National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for deep geologic repository

  1. Canada's Deep Geological Repository for Used Nuclear Fuel - Geo-scientific Site Evaluation Process - 13117

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blyth, Alec; Ben Belfadhel, Mahrez; Hirschorn, Sarah; Hamilton, Duncan; McKelvie, Jennifer

    2013-07-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is responsible for implementing Adaptive Phased Management (APM), the approach selected by the Government of Canada for long-term management of used nuclear fuel generated by Canadian nuclear reactors. The ultimate objective of APM is the centralized containment and isolation of Canada's used nuclear fuel in a Deep Geological Repository in a suitable rock formation at a depth of approximately 500 meters (m) (1,640 feet [ft]). In May 2010, the NWMO published a nine-step site selection process that serves as the road map to decision-making on the location for the deep geological repository. The safety and appropriateness of any potential site will be assessed against a number of factors, both technical and social in nature. The selected site will be one that can be demonstrated to be able to safely contain and isolate used nuclear fuel, protecting humans and the environment over the very long term. The geo-scientific suitability of potential candidate sites will be assessed in a stepwise manner following a progressive and thorough site evaluation process that addresses a series of geo-scientific factors revolving around five safety functions. The geo-scientific site evaluation process includes: Initial Screenings; Preliminary Assessments; and Detailed Site Evaluations. As of November 2012, 22 communities have entered the site selection process (three in northern Saskatchewan and 18 in northwestern and southwestern Ontario). (authors)

  2. Development of an Integrated Natural Barrier Database System for Site Evaluation of a Deep Geologic Repository in Korea - 13527

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Haeryong; Lee, Eunyong; Jeong, YiYeong; Lee, Jeong-Hwan

    2013-07-01

    Korea Radioactive-waste Management Corporation (KRMC) established in 2009 has started a new project to collect information on long-term stability of deep geological environments on the Korean Peninsula. The information has been built up in the integrated natural barrier database system available on web (www.deepgeodisposal.kr). The database system also includes socially and economically important information, such as land use, mining area, natural conservation area, population density, and industrial complex, because some of this information is used as exclusionary criteria during the site selection process for a deep geological repository for safe and secure containment and isolation of spent nuclear fuel and other long-lived radioactive waste in Korea. Although the official site selection process has not been started yet in Korea, current integrated natural barrier database system and socio-economic database is believed that the database system will be effectively utilized to narrow down the number of sites where future investigation is most promising in the site selection process for a deep geological repository and to enhance public acceptance by providing readily-available relevant scientific information on deep geological environments in Korea. (authors)

  3. Use of groundwater lifetime expectancy for the performance assessment of a deep geologic waste repository: 1. Theory, illustrations, and implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornaton, F J; Normani, S D; Sudicky, E A; Sykes, J F

    2011-01-01

    Long-term solutions for the disposal of toxic wastes usually involve isolation of the wastes in a deep subsurface geologic environment. In the case of spent nuclear fuel, if radionuclide leakage occurs from the engineered barrier, the geological medium represents the ultimate barrier that is relied upon to ensure safety. Consequently, an evaluation of radionuclide travel times from a repository to the biosphere is critically important in a performance assessment analysis. In this study, we develop a travel time framework based on the concept of groundwater lifetime expectancy as a safety indicator. Lifetime expectancy characterizes the time that radionuclides will spend in the subsurface after their release from the repository and prior to discharging into the biosphere. The probability density function of lifetime expectancy is computed throughout the host rock by solving the backward-in-time solute transport adjoint equation subject to a properly posed set of boundary conditions. It can then be used to defi...

  4. Vitrification treatment options for disposal of greater-than-Class-C low-level waste in a deep geologic repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullmer, K.S.; Fish, L.W.; Fischer, D.K.

    1994-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), in keeping with their responsibility under Public Law 99-240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, is investigating several disposal options for greater-than-Class C low-level waste (GTCC LLW), including emplacement in a deep geologic repository. At the present time vitrification, namely borosilicate glass, is the standard waste form assumed for high-level waste accepted into the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System. This report supports DOE`s investigation of the deep geologic disposal option by comparing the vitrification treatments that are able to convert those GTCC LLWs that are inherently migratory into stable waste forms acceptable for disposal in a deep geologic repository. Eight vitrification treatments that utilize glass, glass ceramic, or basalt waste form matrices are identified. Six of these are discussed in detail, stating the advantages and limitations of each relative to their ability to immobilize GTCC LLW. The report concludes that the waste form most likely to provide the best composite of performance characteristics for GTCC process waste is Iron Enriched Basalt 4 (IEB4).

  5. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Deep Geological Repository: A Domestic and Global Blueprint for Safe Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Waste - 12081

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eriksson, Leif G. [Nuclear Waste Dispositions, Winter Park, Florida 32789 (United States); Dials, George E. [B and W Conversion Services, LLC, Lexington, Kentucky 40513 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    At the end of 2011, the world's first used/spent nuclear fuel and other long-lived high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository is projected to open in 2020, followed by two more in 2025. The related pre-opening periods will be at least 40 years, as it also would be if USA's candidate HLW-repository is resurrected by 2013. If abandoned, a new HLW-repository site would be needed. On 26 March 1999, USA began disposing long-lived radioactive waste in a deep geological repository in salt at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site. The related pre-opening period was less than 30 years. WIPP has since been re-certified twice. It thus stands to reason the WIPP repository is the global proof of principle for safe deep geological disposal of long-lived radioactive waste. It also stands to reason that the lessons learned since 1971 at the WIPP site provide a unique, continually-updated, blueprint for how the pre-opening period for a new HLW repository could be shortened both in the USA and abroad. (authors)

  6. Use of groundwater lifetime expectancy for the performance assessment of a deep geologic radioactive waste repository:2. Application to a Canadian Shield environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Y -J; Normani, S D; Sykes, J F; Sudicky, E A

    2011-01-01

    Cornaton et al. [2007] introduced the concept of lifetime expectancy as a performance measure of the safety of subsurface repositories, based upon the travel time for contaminants released at a certain point in the subsurface to reach the biosphere or compliance area. The methodologies are applied to a hypothetical but realistic Canadian Shield crystalline rock environment, which is considered to be one of the most geologically stable areas on Earth. In an approximately 10\\times10\\times1.5 km3 hypothetical study area, up to 1000 major and intermediate fracture zones are generated from surface lineament analyses and subsurface surveys. In the study area, mean and probability density of lifetime expectancy are analyzed with realistic geologic and hydrologic shield settings in order to demonstrate the applicability of the theory and the numerical model for optimally locating a deep subsurface repository for the safe storage of spent nuclear fuel. The results demonstrate that, in general, groundwater lifetime exp...

  7. Salt Disposal Investigations to Study Thermally Hot Radioactive Waste In A Deep Geologic Repository in Bedded Rock Salt - 12488

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Roger A. [DOE, Carlsbad Field Office, Carlsbad NM (United States); Buschman, Nancy [DOE, Office of Environmental Management, Washington DC (United States)

    2012-07-01

    A research program is proposed to investigate the behavior of salt when subjected to thermal loads like those that would be present in a high-level waste repository. This research would build upon results of decades of previous salt repository program efforts in the US and Germany and the successful licensing and operation of a repository in salt for disposal of defense transuranic waste. The proposal includes a combination of laboratory-scale investigations, numerical simulations conducted to develop validated models that could be used for future repository design and safety case development, and a thermal field test in an underground salt formation with a configuration that replicates a small portion of a conceptual repository design. Laboratory tests are proposed to measure salt and brine properties across and beyond the range of possible repository conditions. Coupled numerical models will seek to describe phenomenology (thermal, mechanical, and hydrological) observed in the laboratory tests. Finally, the field test will investigate many phenomena that have been variously cited as potential issues for disposal of thermally hot waste in salt, including buoyancy effects and migration of pre-existing trapped brine up the thermal gradient (including vapor phase migration). These studies are proposed to be coordinated and managed by the Carlsbad Field Office of DOE, which is also responsible for the operation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) within the Office of Environmental Management. The field test portion of the proposed research would be conducted in experimental areas of the WIPP underground, far from disposal operations. It is believed that such tests may be accomplished using the existing infrastructure of the WIPP repository at a lower cost than if such research were conducted at a commercial salt mine at another location. The phased field test is proposed to be performed over almost a decade, including instrumentation development, several years of measurements during heating and then subsequent cooling periods, and the eventual forensic mining back of the test bed to determine the multi-year behavior of the simulated waste/rock environment. Funding possibilities are described, and prospects for near term start-up are discussed. Mining of the access drifts required to create the test area in the WIPP underground began in November 2011. Because this mining uses existing WIPP infrastructure and labor, it is estimated to take about two years to complete the access drifts. WIPP disposal operations and facility maintenance activities will take priority over the SDI field test area mining. Funding of the SDI proposal was still being considered by DOE's Offices of Environmental Management and Nuclear Energy at the time this paper was written, so no specific estimates of the progress in 2012 have been included. (authors)

  8. Response to West Cumbria MRWS consultation: Why a deep nuclear waste repository should not be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Response to West Cumbria MRWS consultation: Why a deep nuclear waste repository should not be sited geological nuclear waste repository. There a suspicion of predetermination because the only district that has. National and international guidance on how best to select potential sites for deep geological nuclear waste

  9. Cigeo, the French Geological Repository Project - 13022

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Labalette, Thibaud; Harman, Alain; Dupuis, Marie-Claude; Ouzounian, Gerald [ANDRA, 1-7, rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France)] [ANDRA, 1-7, rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France)

    2013-07-01

    The Cigeo industrial-scale geological disposal centre is designed for the disposal of the most highly-radioactive French waste. It will be built in an argillite formation of the Callovo-Oxfordian dating back 160 million years. The Cigeo project is located near the Bure village in the Paris Basin. The argillite formation was studied since 1974, and from the Meuse/Haute-Marne underground research laboratory since end of 1999. Most of the waste to be disposed of in the Cigeo repository comes from nuclear power plants and from reprocessing of their spent fuel. (authors)

  10. The French Geological Repository Project Cigeo - 12023

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harman, Alain; Labalette, Thibaud; Dupuis, Marie-Claude; Ouzounian, Gerald [ANDRA, Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    2012-07-01

    The French Agency for Radioactive Waste Management, ANDRA, was launched by law in 1991 to perform and develop the research programme for managing high level and intermediate level long-lived radioactive waste generated by the French nuclear fleet. After a 15-year intensive research programme, including the study of alternative solutions, an overall review and assessment of the results was organized, including a national public debate. As a result, the Parliament passed a Planning Act on radioactive waste management in 2006. Commissioning of a geological repository by 2025 was one of the most important decisions taken at that time. To reach this goal, a license application must be submitted and reviewed by the competent authorities by 2015. A detailed review and consultation process is, as well, defined in the Planning Act. Beside the legal framework the project needs to progress on two fronts. The first one is on siting. A significant milestone was reached in 2009 with the definition of a defined area to locate the underground repository facilities. This area was approved in March 2010 by the Government, after having collected the opinions and positions of all the interested parties, at both National and local levels. A new phase of dialogue with local players began to refine the implementation scenarios of surface facilities. The final site selection will be approved after a public debate planned for 2013. The second one is the industrial organization, planning and costing. The industrial project of this geological repository was called Cigeo (Centre Industriel de Stockage Geologique). Given the amount of work to be done to comply with the given time framework, a detailed organization with well-defined milestones must be set-up. Cigeo will be a specific nuclear facility, built and operated underground for over a hundred years. The consequence of this long duration is that the development of the repository facilities will take place in successive operational phases. The characteristics of the first waste packages received will determine the work and the corresponding investments by 2025 on the repository site. One of the main challenges will be to accommodate both activities of mining and nuclear operations at the same time and at the same location. From the technical standpoint, ventilation and fire risk cannot be managed through a simple transposition from current nuclear industry practices. The reversibility demand also leads to concrete proposals with regard to repository management flexibility and waste package retrievability. These proposals contribute to the dialogue with stakeholders to prepare for the public debate and a future law which will determine the reversibility conditions. New design developments are expected to be introduced in the application from the current studies conducted until 2014. The possibility of optimization beyond 2015 will be kept open taking into account the one hundred years operating time as well as the capability to integrate feedback gained from the first construction and operation works. The industrial committed work aims to reach the application stage by 2015. The license application procedure was defined by the 2006 Act. Subject to authorization, the construction might begin in 2017. (authors)

  11. A Prototype Performance Assessment Model for Generic Deep Borehole Repository for High-Level Nuclear Waste - 12132

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Joon H.; Arnold, Bill W.; Swift, Peter N.; Hadgu, Teklu; Freeze, Geoff; Wang, Yifeng

    2012-07-01

    A deep borehole repository is one of the four geologic disposal system options currently under study by the U.S. DOE to support the development of a long-term strategy for geologic disposal of commercial used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The immediate goal of the generic deep borehole repository study is to develop the necessary modeling tools to evaluate and improve the understanding of the repository system response and processes relevant to long-term disposal of UNF and HLW in a deep borehole. A prototype performance assessment model for a generic deep borehole repository has been developed using the approach for a mined geological repository. The preliminary results from the simplified deep borehole generic repository performance assessment indicate that soluble, non-sorbing (or weakly sorbing) fission product radionuclides, such as I-129, Se-79 and Cl-36, are the likely major dose contributors, and that the annual radiation doses to hypothetical future humans associated with those releases may be extremely small. While much work needs to be done to validate the model assumptions and parameters, these preliminary results highlight the importance of a robust seal design in assuring long-term isolation, and suggest that deep boreholes may be a viable alternative to mined repositories for disposal of both HLW and UNF. (authors)

  12. Multiple-code simulation study of the long-term EDZ evolution of geological nuclear waste repositories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2008-01-01

    Associated with Nuclear Waste Repositories, Academic Press,C (eds) Rock Mechanics of Nuclear Waste Repositories, Veil,EDZ Evolution of Geological Nuclear Waste Repositories Jonny

  13. Constructing Hydraulic Barriers in Deep Geologic Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E. [Technologies Co, Texas (United States); Cooper, D.C. [Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Many construction methods have been developed to create hydraulic barriers to depths of 30 to 50 meters, but few have been proposed for depths on the order of 500 meters. For these deep hydraulic barriers, most methods are potentially feasible for soil but not for hard rock. In the course of researching methods of isolating large subterranean blocks of oil shale, the authors have developed a wax thermal permeation method for constructing hydraulic barriers in rock to depths of over 500 meters in competent or even fractured rock as well as soil. The technology is similar to freeze wall methods, but produces a permanent barrier; and is potentially applicable in both dry and water saturated formations. Like freeze wall barriers, the wax thermal permeation method utilizes a large number of vertical or horizontal boreholes around the perimeter to be contained. However, instead of cooling the boreholes, they are heated. After heating these boreholes, a specially formulated molten wax based grout is pumped into the boreholes where it seals fractures and also permeates radially outward to form a series of columns of wax-impregnated rock. Rows of overlapping columns can then form a durable hydraulic barrier. These barriers can also be angled above a geologic repository to help prevent influx of water due to atypical rainfall events. Applications of the technique to constructing containment structures around existing shallow waste burial sites and water shutoff for mining are also described. (authors)

  14. Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Geological Data Evaluation Alternativ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Geological Data Evaluation Alternative Waste Forms and Borehole Seals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Deep Borehole Disposal Research:...

  15. Multiple-code benchmark simulation study of coupled THMC processes in the excavation disturbed zone associated with geological nuclear waste repositories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    filled and open-drift nuclear waste repositories in Task DASSOCIATED WITH GEOLOGICAL NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORIES J.emplacement drifts of a nuclear waste repository. This BMT

  16. Adapting Dry Cask Storage for Aging at a Geologic Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Sanders; D. Kimball

    2005-08-02

    A Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Aging System is a crucial part of operations at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository in the United States. Incoming commercial SNF that does not meet thermal limits for emplacement will be aged on outdoor pads. U.S. Department of Energy SNF will also be managed using the Aging System. Proposed site-specific designs for the Aging System are closely based upon designs for existing dry cask storage (DCS) systems. This paper evaluates the applicability of existing DCS systems for use in the SNF Aging System at Yucca Mountain. The most important difference between existing DCS facilities and the Yucca Mountain facility is the required capacity. Existing DCS facilities typically have less than 50 casks. The current design for the aging pad at Yucca Mountain calls for a capacity of over 2,000 casks (20,000 MTHM) [1]. This unprecedented number of casks poses some unique problems. The response of DCS systems to off-normal and accident conditions needs to be re-evaluated for multiple storage casks. Dose calculations become more complicated, since doses from multiple or very long arrays of casks can dramatically increase the total boundary dose. For occupational doses, the geometry of the cask arrays and the order of loading casks must be carefully considered in order to meet ALARA goals during cask retrieval. Due to the large area of the aging pad, skyshine must also be included when calculating public and worker doses. The expected length of aging will also necessitate some design adjustments. Under 10 CFR 72.236, DCS systems are initially certified for a period of 20 years [2]. Although the Yucca Mountain facility is not intended to be a storage facility under 10 CFR 72, the operational life of the SNF Aging System is 50 years [1]. Any cask system selected for use in aging will have to be qualified to this design lifetime. These considerations are examined, and a summary is provided of the adaptations that must be made in order to use DCS technologies successfully at a geologic repository.

  17. Considerations of human inturison in U.S. programs for deep geologic disposal of radioactive waste.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, Peter N.

    2013-01-01

    Regulations in the United States that govern the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in deep geologic repositories require the explicit consideration of hypothetical future human intrusions that disrupt the waste. Specific regulatory requirements regarding the consideration of human intrusion differ in the two sets of regulations currently in effect in the United States; one defined by the Environmental Protection Agency's 40 Code of Federal Regulations part 197, applied only to the formerly proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and the other defined by the Environmental Protection Agency's 40 Code of Federal Regulations part 191, applied to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico and potentially applicable to any repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the United States other than the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. This report reviews the regulatory requirements relevant to human intrusion and the approaches taken by the Department of Energy to demonstrating compliance with those requirements.

  18. Minor actinide waste disposal in deep geological boreholes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sizer, Calvin Gregory

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate a waste canister design suitable for the disposal of vitrified minor actinide waste in deep geological boreholes using conventional oil/gas/geothermal drilling technology. ...

  19. Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croff, A.G.; Lomenick, T.F.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stow, S.H.

    2003-11-15

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

  20. Reducing the likelihood of future human activities that could affect geologic high-level waste repositories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-05-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes in deep geologic formations provides a means of isolating the waste from people until the radioactivity has decayed to safe levels. However, isolating people from the wastes is a different problem, since we do not know what the future condition of society will be. The Human Interference Task Force was convened by the US Department of Energy to determine whether reasonable means exist (or could be developed) to reduce the likelihood of future human unintentionally intruding on radioactive waste isolation systems. The task force concluded that significant reductions in the likelihood of human interference could be achieved, for perhaps thousands of years into the future, if appropriate steps are taken to communicate the existence of the repository. Consequently, for two years the task force directed most of its study toward the area of long-term communication. Methods are discussed for achieving long-term communication by using permanent markers and widely disseminated records, with various steps taken to provide multiple levels of protection against loss, destruction, and major language/societal changes. Also developed is the concept of a universal symbol to denote Caution - Biohazardous Waste Buried Here. If used for the thousands of non-radioactive biohazardous waste sites in this country alone, a symbol could transcend generations and language changes, thereby vastly improving the likelihood of successful isolation of all buried biohazardous wastes.

  1. Deep Geologic Nuclear Waste Disposal - No New Taxes - 12469

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conca, James [RJLee Group, Inc., Pasco WA 509.205.7541 (United States); Wright, Judith [UFA Ventures, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    To some, the perceived inability of the United States to dispose of high-level nuclear waste justifies a moratorium on expansion of nuclear power in this country. Instead, it is more an example of how science yields to social pressure, even on a subject as technical as nuclear waste. Most of the problems, however, stem from confusion on the part of the public and their elected officials, not from a lack of scientific knowledge. We know where to put nuclear waste, how to put it there, how much it will cost, and how well it will work. And it's all about the geology. The President's Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future has drafted a number of recommendations addressing nuclear energy and waste issues (BRC 2011) and three recommendations, in particular, have set the stage for a new strategy to dispose of high-level nuclear waste and to manage spent nuclear fuel in the United States: 1) interim storage for spent nuclear fuel, 2) resumption of the site selection process for a second repository, and 3) a quasi-government entity to execute the program and take control of the Nuclear Waste Fund in order to do so. The first two recommendations allow removal and storage of spent fuel from reactor sites to be used in the future, and allows permanent disposal of actual waste, while the third controls cost and administration. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NPWA 1982) provides the second repository different waste criteria, retrievability, and schedule, so massive salt returns as the candidate formation of choice. The cost (in 2007 dollars) of disposing of 83,000 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM) high-level waste (HLW) is about $ 83 billion (b) in volcanic tuff, $ 29 b in massive salt, and $ 77 b in crystalline rock. Only in salt is the annual revenue stream from the Nuclear Waste Fund more than sufficient to accomplish this program without additional taxes or rate hikes. The cost is determined primarily by the suitability of the geologic formation, i.e., how well it performs on its own for millions of years with little engineering assistance from humans. It is critical that the states most affected by this issue (WA, SC, ID, TN, NM and perhaps others) develop an independent multi-state agreement in order for a successful program to move forward. Federal approval would follow. Unknown to most, the United States has a successful operating deep permanent geologic nuclear repository for high and low activity waste, called the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Its success results from several factors, including an optimal geologic and physio-graphic setting, a strong scientific basis, early regional community support, frequent interactions among stakeholders at all stages of the process, long-term commitment from the upper management of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) over several administrations, strong New Mexico State involvement and oversight, and constant environmental monitoring from before nuclear waste was first emplaced in the WIPP underground (in 1999) to the present. WIPP is located in the massive bedded salts of the Salado Formation, whose geological, physical, chemical, redox, thermal, and creep-closure properties make it an ideal formation for long-term disposal, long-term in this case being greater than 200 million years. These properties also mean minimal engineering requirements as the rock does most of the work of isolating the waste. WIPP has been operating for twelve years, and as of this writing, has disposed of over 80,000 m{sup 3} of nuclear weapons waste, called transuranic or TRU waste (>100 nCurie/g but <23 Curie/1000 cm{sup 3}) including some high activity waste from reprocessing of spent fuel from old weapons reactors. All nuclear waste of any type from any source can be disposed in this formation better, safer and cheaper than in any other geologic formation. At the same time, it is critical that we complete the Yucca Mountain license application review so as not to undermine the credibility of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the scientific commun

  2. Biogeochemical Changes at Early Stage After the Closure of Radioactive Waste Geological Repository in South Korea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choung, Sungwook; Um, Wooyong; Choi, Seho; Francis, Arokiasamy J.; Kim, Sungpyo; Park, Jin beak; Kim, Suk-Hoon

    2014-09-01

    Permanent disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes in the subterranean environment has been the preferred method of many countries, including Korea. A safety issue after the closure of a geological repository is that biodegradation of organic materials due to microbial activities generates gases that lead to overpressure of the waste containers in the repository and its disintegration with the release of radionuclides. As part of an ongoing large-scale in situ experiment using organic wastes and groundwater to simulate geological radioactive waste repository conditions, we investigated the geochemical alteration and microbial activities at an early stage (~63 days) intended to be representative of the initial period after repository closure. The increased numbers of both aerobes and facultative anaerobes in waste effluents indicate that oxygen content could be the most significant parameter to control biogeochemical conditions at very early periods of reaction (<35 days). Accordingly, the values of dissolved oxygen and redox potential were decreased. The activation of anaerobes after 35 days was supported by the increased concentration to ~50 mg L-1 of ethanol. These results suggest that the biogeochemical conditions were rapidly altered to more reducing and anaerobic conditions within the initial 2 months after repository closure. Although no gases were detected during the study, activated anaerobic microbes will play more important role in gas generation over the long term.

  3. Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    three alternative geologic host rocks for mined repositories (granitic crystalline, salt, and clay shale) and crystalline basement rock for deep borehole disposal. This...

  4. Evaluation of Options for Permanent Geologic Disposal of Spent...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    disposal concepts are addressed: mined repositories in three geologic media-salt, clayshale rocks, and crystalline (e.g., granitic) rocks-and deep borehole disposal in...

  5. Standard guide for characterization of spent nuclear fuel in support of geologic repository disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This guide provides guidance for the types and extent of testing that would be involved in characterizing the physical and chemical nature of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in support of its interim storage, transport, and disposal in a geologic repository. This guide applies primarily to commercial light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel and spent fuel from weapons production, although the individual tests/analyses may be used as applicable to other spent fuels such as those from research and test reactors. The testing is designed to provide information that supports the design, safety analysis, and performance assessment of a geologic repository for the ultimate disposal of the SNF. 1.2 The testing described includes characterization of such physical attributes as physical appearance, weight, density, shape/geometry, degree, and type of SNF cladding damage. The testing described also includes the measurement/examination of such chemical attributes as radionuclide content, microstructure, and corrosion product c...

  6. Limits on the thermal energy release from radioactive wastes in a mined geologic repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, J.A.

    1983-03-01

    The theraml energy release of nuclear wastes is a major factor in the design of geologic repositories. Thermal limits need to be placed on various aspets of the geologic waste disposal system to avoid or retard the degradation of repository performance because of increased temperatures. The thermal limits in current use today are summarized in this report. These limits are placed in a hierarchial structure of thermal criteria consistent with the failure mechanism they are trying to prevent. The thermal criteria hierarchy is used to evaluate the thermal performance of a sample repository design. The design consists of disassembled BWR spent fuel, aged 10 years, close packed in a carbon steel canister with 15 cm of crushed salt backfill. The medium is bedded salt. The most-restrictive temperature for this design is the spent-fuel centerline temperature limit of 300/sup 0/C. A sensitivity study on the effects of additional cooling prior to disposal on repository thermal limits and design is performed.

  7. NWTS program criteria for mined geologic disposal of nuclear waste: repository performance and development criteria. Public draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-07-01

    This document, DOE/NWTS-33(3) is one of a series of documents to establish the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program criteria for mined geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. For both repository performance and repository development it delineates the criteria for design performance, radiological safety, mining safety, long-term containment and isolation, operations, and decommissioning. The US Department of Energy will use these criteria to guide the development of repositories to assist in achieving performance and will reevaluate their use when the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issues radioactive waste repository rules.

  8. Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems: REFERENCE SITE INITIAL ASSESSMENT FOR A SALT DOME REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harwell,, M. A.; Brandstetter,, A.; Benson,, G. L.; Bradley,, D. J.; Serne,, R. J.; Soldat, J. K; Cole,, C. R.; Deutsch,, W. J.; Gupta,, S. K.; Harwell,, C. C.; Napier,, B. A.; Reisenauer,, A. E.; Prater,, L. S.; Simmons,, C. S.; Strenge,, D. L.; Washburn,, J. F.; Zellmer,, J. T.

    1982-06-01

    As a methodology demonstration for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program conducted an initial reference site analysis of the long-term effectiveness of a salt dome repository. The Hainesville Salt Dome in Texas was chosen to be representative of the Gulf Coast interior salt domes; however, the Hainesville Site has been eliminated as a possible nuclear waste repository site. The data used for this exercise are not adequate for an actual assessment, nor have all the parametric analyses been made that would adequately characterize the response of the geosystem surrounding the repository. Additionally, because this was the first exercise of the complete AEGIS and WASTE Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) methodology, this report provides the initial opportunity for the methodology, specifically applied to a site, to be reviewed by the community outside the AEGIS. The scenario evaluation, as a part of the methodology demonstration, involved consideration of a large variety of potentially disruptive phenomena, which alone or in concert could lead to a breach in a salt dome repository and to a subsequent transport of the radionuclides to the environment. Without waste- and repository-induced effects, no plausible natural geologic events or processes which would compromise the repository integrity could be envisioned over the one-million-year time frame after closure. Near-field (waste- and repository-induced) effects were excluded from consideration in this analysis, but they can be added in future analyses when that methodology development is more complete. The potential for consequential human intrusion into salt domes within a million-year time frame led to the consideration of a solution mining intrusion scenario. The AEGIS staff developed a specific human intrusion scenario at 100 years and 1000 years post-closure, which is one of a whole suite of possible scenarios. This scenario resulted in the delivery of radionuclidecontaminated brine to the surface, where a portion was diverted to culinary salt for direct ingestion by the existing population. Consequence analyses indicated calculated human doses that would be highly deleterious. Additional analyses indicated that doses well above background would occur from such a scenario t even if it occurred a million years into the future. The way to preclude such an intrusion is for continued control over the repository sitet either through direct institutional control or through the effective passive transfer of information. A secondary aspect of the specific human intrusion scenario involved a breach through the side of the salt dome t through which radionuclides migrated via the ground-water system to the accessible environment. This provided a demonstration of the geotransport methodology that AEGIS can use in actual site evaluations, as well as the WRIT program's capabilities with respect to defining the source term and retardation rates of the radionuclides in the repository. This reference site analysis was initially published as a Working Document in December 1979. That version was distributed for a formal peer review by individuals and organizations not involved in its development. The present report represents a revisiont based in part on the responses received from the external reviewers. Summaries of the comments from the reviewers and responses to these comments by the AEGIS staff are presented. The exercise of the AEGIS methodology was successful in demonstrating the methodologyt and thus t in providing a basis for substantive peer review, in terms of further development of the AEGIS site-applications capability and in terms of providing insight into the potential for consequential human intrusion into a salt dome repository.

  9. Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems: REFERENCE SITE INITIAL ASSESSMENT FOR A SALT DOME REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harwell,, M. A.; Brandstetter,, A.; Benson,, G. L.; Raymond,, J. R.; Brandley,, D. J.; Serne,, R. J.; Soldat,, J. K.; Cole,, C. R.; Deutsch,, W. J.; Gupta,, S. K.; Harwell,, C. C.; Napier,, B. A.; Reisenauer,, A. E.; Prater,, L. S.; Simmons,, C. S.; Strenge,, D. L.; Washburn,, J. F.; Zellmer,, J. T.

    1982-06-01

    As a methodology demonstration for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program conducted an initial reference site analysis of the long-term effectiveness of a salt dome repository. The Hainesville Salt Dome in Texas was chosen to be representative of the Gulf Coast interior salt domes; however, the Hainesville Site has been eliminated as a possible nuclear waste repository site. The data used for this exercise are not adequate for an actual assessment, nor have all the parametric analyses been made that would adequately characterize the response of the geosystem surrounding the repository. Additionally, because this was the first exercise of the complete AEGIS and WASTE Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) methodology, this report provides the initial opportunity for the methodology, specifically applied to a site, to be reviewed by the community outside the AEGIS. The scenario evaluation, as a part of the methodology demonstration, involved consideration of a large variety of potentially disruptive phenomena, which alone or in concert could lead to a breach in a salt dome repository and to a subsequent transport of the radionuclides to the environment. Without waste- and repository-induced effects, no plausible natural geologic events or processes which would compromise the repository integrity could be envisioned over the one-million-year time frame after closure. Near-field (waste- and repository-induced) effects were excluded from consideration in this analysis, but they can be added in future analyses when that methodology development is more complete. The potential for consequential human intrusion into salt domes within a million-year time frame led to the consideration of a solution mining intrusion scenario. The AEGIS staff developed a specific human intrusion scenario at 100 years and 1000 years post-closure, which is one of a whole suite of possible scenarios. This scenario resulted in the delivery of radionuclidecontaminated brine to the surface, where a portion was diverted to culinary salt for direct ingestion by the existing population. Consequence analyses indicated calculated human doses that would be highly deleterious. Additional analyses indicated that doses well above background would occur from such a scenario t even if it occurred a million years into the future. The way to preclude such an intrusion is for continued control over the repository sitet either through direct institutional control or through the effective passive transfer of information. A secondary aspect of the specific human intrusion scenario involved a breach through the side of the salt dome t through which radionuclides migrated via the ground-water system to the accessible environment. This provided a demonstration of the geotransport methodology that AEGIS can use in actual site evaluations, as well as the WRIT program's capabilities with respect to defining the source term and retardation rates of the radionuclides in the repository. This reference site analysis was initially published as a Working Document in December 1979. That version was distributed for a formal peer review by individuals and organizations not involved in its development. The present report represents a revisiont based in part on the responses received from the external reviewers. Summaries of the comments from the reviewers and responses to these comments by the AEGIS staff are presented. The exercise of the AEGIS methodology was sUGcessful in demonstrating the methodologyt and thus t in providing a basis for substantive peer review, in terms of further development of the AEGIS site-applications capability and in terms of providing insight into the potential for consequential human intrusion into a salt dome repository.

  10. Performance assessment for the geological disposal of Deep Burn spent fuel using TTBX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van den Akker, B.P.; Ahn, J. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The behavior of Deep Burn Modular High Temperature Reactor Spent Fuel (DBSF) is investigated in the Yucca Mountain geological repository (YMR) with respect to the annual dose (Sv/yr) delivered to the Reasonably Maximally Exposed Individual (RMEI) from the transport of radionuclides released from the graphite waste matrix. Transport calculations are performed with a novel computer code, TTBX which is capable of modeling transport pathways that pass through heterogeneous geological formations. TTBX is a multi-region extension of the existing single region TTB transport code. Overall the peak annual dose received by the RMEI is seen to be four orders of magnitude lower than the regulatory threshold for exposure, even under pessimistic scenarios. A number of factors contribute to the favorable performance of DBSF. A reduction of one order of magnitude in the peak annual dose received by the RMEI is observed for every order of magnitude increase in the waste matrix lifetime, highlighting the importance of the waste matrix durability and suggesting graphite's utility as a potential waste matrix for the disposal of high-level waste. Furthermore, we see that by incorporating a higher fidelity far-field model the peak annual dose calculated to be received by the RMEI is reduced by two orders of magnitude. By accounting for the heterogeneities of the far field we have simultaneously removed unnecessary conservatisms and improved the fidelity of the transport model. (authors)

  11. Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain describes the nuclear waste problem and explains why the United States and other nations are considering deep geologic disposal as the solution.

  12. GEOLOGY, August 2007 683Geology, August 2007; v. 35; no. 8; p. 683686; doi: 10.1130/G23675A.1; 4 figures; Data Repository item 2007176. 2007 The Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Permissions, GSA, or editing@geosoci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    GEOLOGY, August 2007 683Geology, August 2007; v. 35; no. 8; p. 683­686; doi: 10.1130/G23675A.1; 4 figures; Data Repository item 2007176. © 2007 The Geological Society of America. For permission to copy

  13. Evaluating variable switching and flash methods in modeling carbon sequestration in deep geologic formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Richard

    Evaluating variable switching and flash methods in modeling carbon sequestration in deep geologic performance computing to assess the risks involved in carbon sequestration in deep geologic formations-thermal- chemical processes in variably saturated, non-isothermal porous media is applied to sequestration

  14. Geotechnical support and topical studies for nuclear waste geologic repositories: Annual report, fiscal year 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This multidisciplinary project was initiated in fiscal year 1986. It comprises 11 reports in two major interrelated tasks: The technical assistance part of the project includes reviewing the progress of the major projects in the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive waste Management (OCRWM) Program and advising the Engineering and Geotechnology Division on significant technical issues facing each project; analyzing geotechnical data, reports, tests, surveys and plans for the different projects; reviewing and commenting on major technical reports and other program documents such as Site Characterization Plans (SCP) and Study Plans; and providing scientific and technical input at technical meetings. The topical studies activity comprises studies on scientific and technical ions and issues of significance to in-situ testing, test analysis methods, and site characterization of nuclear waste geologic repositories. The subjects of study were selected based on discussions with DOE staff. One minor topic is a preliminary consideration and planning exercise for postclosure monitoring studies. The major task, with subtasks involving various geoscience disciplines, is a study of the mechanical, hydraulic, geophysical and geochemical properties of fractures in geologic rock masses.

  15. Merguerian, Charles, 1986a, Tunnel vision -A deep view of the bedrock geology of New York City (NYC).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    Merguerian, Charles, 1986a, Tunnel vision - A deep view of the bedrock geology of New York City This Abstract: Merguerian, Charles, 1986a, Tunnel vision - A deep view of the bedrock geology of New York City

  16. Summary of key directives governing permanent disposal in a geologic repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sands, S.C. III

    1993-11-01

    This document was developed in support of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program (SF&WMTDP). It is largely comprised of flow diagrams summarizing the key regulatory requirements which govern permanent disposal in a geologic repository. The key purposes are (1) to provide an easy and effective tool for referencing or cross referencing federal directives (i.e., regulations and orders), (2) to provide a method for examining the requirements in one directive category against the requirements in another, and (3) to list actions that must be taken to ensure directive compliance. The document is categorically broken down into a Transportation section and a Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) section to ensure that the interrelationship of the entire disposal system is considered. The Transportation section describes the transportation packaging requirements, testing methods, and safety requirements imposed on fissile material shipments. The MGDS section encompasses technical aspects involved in siting, licensing, waste interaction with the container, container design features, physical characteristics of the surrounding environment, facility design features, barrier systems, safety features, criticality considerations, migration restrictions, implementation guidelines, and so forth. For purposes of illustration, the worst case scenario is outlined. It is important that the approaches and considerations contained in this document be integrated into the efforts of the SF&WMTDP so that every applicable aspect of the regulatory requirements can be evaluated to avoid investing large sums of money into projects that do not take into account all of the aspects of permanent waste disposal. Not until an overall picture and clear understanding of these regulations is established can a basis be developed to govern the direction of future activities of the SF&WMTDP.

  17. Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Geological Data Evaluation Alternativ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    much of the enhanced geothermal focus on stimulating fracture development (e.g., fracking) at depth is not directly relevant to deep borehole disposal. For deep borehole...

  18. EIS-0250: Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's proposed action to construct, operate, monitor, and eventually close a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain  for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level...

  19. Geology of the Yucca Mountain Region, Chapter in Stuckless, J.S., ED., Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.S. Stuckless; D. O'Leary

    2006-09-25

    Yucca Mountain has been proposed as the site for the Nation's first geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. This chapter provides the geologic framework for the Yucca Mountain region. The regional geologic units range in age from late Precambrian through Holocene, and these are described briefly. Yucca Mountain is composed dominantly of pyroclastic units that range in age from 11.4 to 15.2 Ma. The proposed repository would be constructed within the Topopah Spring Tuff, which is the lower of two major zoned and welded ash-flow tuffs within the Paintbrush Group. The two welded tuffs are separated by the partly to nonwelded Pah Canyon Tuff and Yucca Mountain Tuff, which together figure prominently in the hydrology of the unsaturated zone. The Quaternary deposits are primarily alluvial sediments with minor basaltic cinder cones and flows. Both have been studied extensively because of their importance in predicting the long-term performance of the proposed repository. Basaltic volcanism began about 10 Ma and continued as recently as about 80 ka with the eruption of cones and flows at Lathrop Wells, approximately 10 km south-southwest of Yucca Mountain. Geologic structure in the Yucca Mountain region is complex. During the latest Paleozoic and Mesozoic, strong compressional forces caused tight folding and thrust faulting. The present regional setting is one of extension, and normal faulting has been active from the Miocene through to the present. There are three major local tectonic domains: (1) Basin and Range, (2) Walker Lane, and (3) Inyo-Mono. Each domain has an effect on the stability of Yucca Mountain.

  20. Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Geological Data Evaluation Alternativ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Research: Geological Data Evaluation Alternative Waste Forms and Borehole Seals Arnold, Bill W.; Brady, Patrick; Sutton, Mark; Travis, Karl; MacKinnon, Robert; Gibb, Fergus;...

  1. GEOLOGY, July 2007 623Geology, July 2007; v. 35; no. 7; p. 623626; doi: 10.1130/G23531A.1; 3 figures; Data Repository item 2007165. 2007 The Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Permissions, GSA, or editing@geosociety.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    GEOLOGY, July 2007 623Geology, July 2007; v. 35; no. 7; p. 623­626; doi: 10.1130/G23531A.1; 3 figures; Data Repository item 2007165. © 2007 The Geological Society of America. For permission to copy and Hole 1275D in conjunction with geophysical and geological mapping data. Although the mechanisms

  2. Cost Comparison for the Transfer of Select Calcined Waste Canisters to the Monitored Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, NV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael B. Heiser; Clark B. Millet

    2005-10-01

    This report performs a life-cycle cost comparison of three proposed canister designs for the shipment and disposition of Idaho National Laboratory high-level calcined waste currently in storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center to the proposed national monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Concept A (2 × 10-ft) and Concept B (2 × 15-ft) canisters are comparable in design, but they differ in size and waste loading options and vary proportionally in weight. The Concept C (5.5 × 17.5-ft) canister (also called the “super canister”), while similar in design to the other canisters, is considerably larger and heavier than Concept A and B canisters and has a greater wall thickness. This report includes estimating the unique life-cycle costs for the three canister designs. Unique life-cycle costs include elements such as canister purchase and filling at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, cask preparation and roundtrip consignment costs, final disposition in the monitored geologic repository (including canister off-loading and placement in the final waste disposal package for disposition), and cask purchase. Packaging of the calcine "as-is" would save $2.9 to $3.9 billion over direct vitrification disposal in the proposed national monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Using the larger Concept C canisters would use 0.75 mi less of tunnel space, cost $1.3 billion less than 10-ft canisters of Concept A, and would be complete in 6.2 years.

  3. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. Test case release consequence analysis for a spent fuel repository in bedded salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond, J.R.; Bond, F.W.; Cole, C.R.; Nelson, R.W.; Reisenauer, A.E.; Washburn, J.F.; Norman, N.A.; Mote, P.A.; Segol, G.

    1980-01-01

    Geologic and geohydrologic data for the Paradox Basin have been used to simulate movement of ground water and radioacrtive contaminants from a hypothetical nuclear reactor spent fuel repository after an assumed accidental release. The pathlines, travel times and velocity of the ground water from the repository to the discharge locale (river) were determined after the disruptive event by use of a two-dimensional finite difference hydrologic model. The concentration of radioactive contaminants in the ground water was calculated along a series of flow tubes by use of a one-dimensional mass transport model which takes into account convection, dispersion, contaminant/media interactions and radioactive decay. For the hypothetical site location and specific parameters used in this demonstration, it is found that Iodine-129 (I-129) is tthe only isotope reaching the Colorado River in significant concentration. This concentration occurs about 8.0 x 10/sup 5/ years after the repository has been breached. This I-129 ground-water concentration is about 0.3 of the drinking water standard for uncontrolled use. The groundwater concentration would then be diluted by the Colorado River. None of the actinide elements reach more than half the distance from the repository to the Colorado River in the two-million year model run time. This exercise demonstrates that the WISAP model system is applicable for analysis of contaminant transport. The results presented in this report, however, are valid only for one particular set of parameters. A complete sensitivity analysis must be performed to evaluate the range of effects from the release of contaminants from a breached repository.

  4. Thermodynamic stability of actinide pyrochlore minerals in deep geologic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaon and Pion decays CitationConnectrepository environments

  5. Thermodynamic stability of actinide pyrochlore minerals in deep geologic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaon and Pion decays CitationConnectrepository

  6. Results from an International Simulation Study on Coupled Thermal, Hydrological, and Mechanical (THM) Processes near Geological Nuclear Waste Repositories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2008-01-01

    safety of a hypothetical nuclear waste repository – BMT1 ofAssociated with Nuclear Waste Repositories, Academic Press,safety of a hypothetical nuclear waste repository – BMT1 of

  7. Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste (Volume 1) Introduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.A. Levich; J.S. Stuckless

    2006-09-25

    Yucca Mountain in Nevada represents the proposed solution to what has been a lengthy national effort to dispose of high-level radioactive waste, waste which must be isolated from the biosphere for tens of thousands of years. This chapter reviews the background of that national effort and includes some discussion of international work in order to provide a more complete framework for the problem of waste disposal. Other chapters provide the regional geologic setting, the geology of the Yucca Mountain site, the tectonics, and climate (past, present, and future). These last two chapters are integral to prediction of long-term waste isolation.

  8. Status of Proposed Repository for Latin-American Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrada, J.J.

    2004-10-04

    This report compiles preliminary information that supports the premise that a repository is needed in Latin America and analyzes the nuclear situation (mainly in Argentina and Brazil) in terms of nuclear capabilities, inventories, and regional spent-fuel repositories. The report is based on several sources and summarizes (1) the nuclear capabilities in Latin America and establishes the framework for the need of a permanent repository, (2) the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) approach for a regional spent-fuel repository and describes the support that international institutions are lending to this issue, (3) the current situation in Argentina in order to analyze the Argentinean willingness to find a location for a deep geological repository, and (4) the issues involved in selecting a location for the repository and identifies a potential location. This report then draws conclusions based on an analysis of this information. The focus of this report is mainly on spent fuel and does not elaborate on other radiological waste sources.

  9. Spent Fuel Reprocessing: More Value for Money Spent in a Geological Repository?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, P.; Vinoche, R.; Devezeaux, J-G.; Bailly, F.

    2003-02-25

    Today, each utility or country operating nuclear power plants can select between two long-term spent fuel management policies: either, spent fuel is considered as waste to dispose of through direct disposal or, spent fuel is considered a resource of valuable material through reprocessing-recycling. Reading and listening to what is said in the nuclear community, we understand that most people consider that the choice of policy is, actually, a choice among two technical paths to handle spent fuel: direct disposal versus reprocessing. This very simple situation has been recently challenged by analysis coming from countries where both policies are on survey. For example, ONDRAF of Belgium published an interesting study showing that, economically speaking for final disposal, it is worth treating spent fuel rather than dispose of it as a whole, even if there is no possibility to recycle the valuable part of it. So, the question is raised: is there such a one-to-one link between long term spent fuel management political option and industrial option? The purpose of the presentation is to discuss the potential advantages and drawbacks of spent fuel treatment as an implementation of the policy that considers spent fuel as waste to dispose of. Based on technical considerations and industrial experience, we will study qualitatively, and quantitatively when possible, the different answers proposed by treatment to the main concerns of spent-fuel-as-a-whole geological disposal.

  10. Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation: Second Worldwide Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    W PROGRAMME Geological characterization prior to repositoryShort-term Characterization Program Geological Formations toexisting geological information, site characterization and

  11. Systems study of the feasibility of high-level nuclear-waste fractionation for thermal stress control in a geologic repository: main report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKee, R.W.; Elder, H.K.; McCallum, R.F.; Silviera, D.J.; Swanson, J.L.; Wiles, L.E.

    1983-06-01

    This study assesses the benefits and costs of fractionating the cesium and strontium (Cs/Sr) components in commercial high-level waste (HLW) to a separate waste stream for the purpose of reducing geologic-repository thermal stresses in the region of the HLW. System costs are developed for a broad range of conditions comparing the Cs/Sr fractionation concept with disposal of 10-year-old vitrified HLW and vitrified HLW aged to achieve (through decay) the same heat output as the fractionated high-level waste (FHLW). All comparisons are based on a 50,000 metric ton equivalent (MTE) system. The FHLW and the Cs/Sr waste are both disposed of as vitrified waste but emplaced in separate areas of a basalt repository. The FHLW is emplaced in high-integrity packages at relatively high waste loading but low heat loading, while the Cs/Sr waste is emplaced in minimum-integrity packages at relatively high heat loading in a separate region of the repository. System cost comparisons are based on minimum cost combinations of canister diameter, waste concentration, and canister spacing in a basalt repository. The effects on both long- and near-term safety considerations are also addressed. The major conclusion is that the Cs/Sr fractionation concept offers the prospect of a substantial total system cost advantage for HLW disposal if reduced HLW package temperatures in a basalt repository are desired. However, there is no cost advantage if currently designated maximum design temperatures are acceptable. Aging the HLW for 50 to 100 years can accomplish similar results at equivalent or lower costs. 37 figures, 58 tables.

  12. Conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements for disposal of borosilicate glass defense high-level waste forms in salt geologic repositories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-06-01

    The conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements presented are applicable specifically to the normal borosilicate glass product of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). They provide preliminary numerical values for the defense high-level waste form parameters and properties identified in the waste form performance specification for geologic isolation in salt repositories. Subject areas treated include containment and isolation, operational period safety, criticality control, waste form/production canister identification, and waste package performance testing requirements. This document was generated for use in the development of conceptual waste package designs in salt. It will be revised as additional data, analyses, and regulatory requirements become available.

  13. The impact of geologic variability on capacity and cost estimates for storing CO2 in deep-saline aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    The impact of geologic variability on capacity and cost estimates for storing CO2 in deep States could store many de- cades worth of the nation's current annual CO2 emissions, the likely cost estimates for storage span three orders of magnitude and average>$100/tonne CO2. However, when the cost

  14. Using geologic conditions and multiattribute decision analysis to determine the relative favorability of selected areas for siting a high-level radioactive waste repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, W.; Edgar, D.E.; Baker, C.H.; Buehring, W.A.; Whitfield, R.G.; Van Luik, A.E.J.; Sood, M.K.; Flower, M.F.J.; Warren, M.F.; Jusko, M.J.; Peerenboom, J.P.; Bogner, J.E.

    1988-05-01

    A method is presented for determining the relative favorability of geologically complex areas for isolating high-level radioactive wastes. In applying the method to the northeastern region of the United States, seismicity and tectonic activity were the screening criteria used to divide the region into three areas of increasing seismotectonic risk. Criteria were then used to subdivide the area of lowest seismotectonic risk into six geologically distinct subareas including characteristics, surface-water and groundwater hydrology, potential human intrusion, site geometry, surface characteristics, and tectonic environment. Decision analysis was then used to identify the subareas most favorable from a geologic standpoint for further investigation, with a view to selecting a site for a repository. Three subareas (parts of northeastern Vermont, northern New Hampshire, and western Maine) were found to be the most favorable, using this method and existing data. However, because this study assessed relative geologic favorability, no conclusions should be drawn concerning the absolute suitability of individual subareas for high-level radioactive waste isolation. 34 refs., 7 figs., 20 tabs.

  15. Source/Sink Matching for U.S. Ethanol Plants and Candidate Deep Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahowski, Robert T.; Dooley, James J.

    2008-09-18

    This report presents data on the 140 existing and 74 planned ethanol production facilities and their proximity to candidate deep geologic storage formations. Half of the existing ethanol plants and 64% of the planned units sit directly atop a candidate geologic storage reservoir. While 70% of the existing and 97% of the planned units are within 100 miles of at least one candidate deep geologic storage reservoir. As a percent of the total CO2 emissions from these facilities, 92% of the exiting units CO2 and 97% of the planned units CO2 emissions are accounted for by facilities that are within 100 miles of at least one potential CO2 storage reservoir.

  16. The Radiological and Thermal Characteristics of Fission Waste from a Deep-Burn Fusion-Fission Hybrid (LIFE) and Implications for Repository Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, H F; Blink, J; Farmer, J; Latkowski, J; Kramer, K

    2009-09-08

    We are studying the use of a Laser Inertial-confinement Fusion Engine (LIFE) to drive a hybrid fusion-fission system that can generate electrical power and/or burn nuclear waste. The system uses the neutrons from laser driven ICF to produce tritium and to drive nuclear reactions in a subcritical fission blanket. The fusion neutron source obviates the need for a self-sustaining chain reaction in the fission blanket. Either fissile or fertile could be used as fission fuel, thus eliminating the need for isotopic enrichment. The 'driven' system potentially allows very high levels of burnup to be reached, extracting a large fraction of the available energy in the fission fuel without the need for reprocessing. In this note, we discuss the radionuclide inventory of a depleted uranium (DU) fuel burned to greater than 95% FIMA (Fissions per Initial heavy Metal Atom), the implications for thermal management of the resulting waste, and the implications of this waste for meeting the dose standards for releases from a geological repository for high-level waste. The fission waste discussed here would be that produced by a LIFE hybrid with a 500-MW fusion source. The fusion neutrons are multiplied and moderated by a sequence of concentric shells of materials before encountering the fission fuel, and fission in this region is largely due to thermal neutrons. The fission blanket consists of 40 metric tons (MT) of DU, assumed to be in the form of TRISO-like UOC fuel particles embedded in 2-cm-diameter graphite pebbles. (It is recognized that TRISO-based fuel may not reach the high burnup of the fertile fuel considered here, and other fuel options are being investigated. We postulate the existence of a fuel that can reach >95% FIMA so that the waste disposal implications of high burnup can be assessed.) The engine and plant design considered here would receive one load of fission fuel and produce {approx}2 GWt of power (fusion + fission) over its 50- to 70-year lifetime. Neutron and photon transport calculations were performed using MCNP5. Burnup calculations were performed using a modified version of Monteburns 2.0. The nuclear data used were from ENDF/B-VII. Additional details of the burn calculations can be found in. For comparison to spent fuel from light water reactors (LWRs), we use the projected initial inventory of PWR and BWR fuels (current average age of 23 years since discharge) used for the Yucca Mountain Project Final Environmental Impact Statement. The decay of this initial inventory to 1 million years was calculated using ORIGEN2. The hybrid system considered here would have generated {approx}44 GWe-yr of energy at 99% FIMA. The energy generated per MT is therefore about 1100 MWe-yr/MT. In contrast, using average burnups of 41.2 GWt-day/MT and 33.6 GWt-day/MT for the PWR and BWR fuel slated for disposal at Yucca Mtn., and assuming a thermal electric conversion efficiency of {approx}33%, the total energy generated by the 68,000 MT 'Yucca Mtn. inventory' is {approx}2500 GWe-yr, or {approx}37 MWe-yr/MT, which is {approx}30 times less energy per MT than the waste from the hybrid. Clearly, relative to the current once-through fuel cycle, the use of a deep-burn hybrid to generate electricity would significantly reduce the need for repository capacity.

  17. Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation: Second Worldwide Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    radioac- tive waste repository construction and operation,and Construction of Underground Repositories for Radioactive Wastes,suitable for the construction of deep waste repositories and

  18. Report on Intact and Degraded Criticality for Selected Plutonium Waste Forms in a Geologic Repository, Volume I: MOX SNF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.A. McClure

    1998-09-21

    As part of the plutonium waste form development and down-select process, repository analyses have been conducted to evaluate the long-term performance of these forms for repository acceptance. Intact and degraded mode criticality analysis of the mixed oxide (MOX) spent fuel is presented in Volume I, while Volume II presents the evaluations of the waste form containing plutonium immobilized in a ceramic matrix. Although the ceramic immobilization development program is ongoing, and refinements are still being developed and evaluated, this analysis provides value through quick feed-back to this development process, and as preparation for the analysis that will be conducted starting in fiscal year (FY) 1999 in support of the License Application. While no MOX fuel has been generated in the United States using weapons-usable plutonium, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted calculations on Westinghouse-type reactors to determine the expected characteristics of such a fuel. These spent nuclear fuel (SNF) characteristics have been used to determine the long-term potential for criticality in a repository environment. In all instances the methodology and scenarios used in these analyses are compatible with those developed and used for Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel (CSNF) and Defense High Level Waste (DHLW), as tailored for the particular characteristics of the waste forms. This provides a common basis for comparison of the results. This analysis utilizes dissolution, solubility, and thermodynamic data that are currently available. Additional data on long-term behavior is being developed, and later analyses (FY 99) to support the License Application will use the very latest information that has been generated. Ranges of parameter values are considered to reflect sensitivity to uncertainty. Most of the analysis is focused on those parameter values that produce the worst case results, so that potential licensing issues can be identified.

  19. Information needs for characterization of high-level waste repository sites in six geologic media. Volume 1. Main report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1985-05-01

    Evaluation of the geologic isolation of radioactive materials from the biosphere requires an intimate knowledge of site geologic conditions, which is gained through precharacterization and site characterization studies. This report presents the results of an intensive literature review, analysis and compilation to delineate the information needs, applicable techniques and evaluation criteria for programs to adequately characterize a site in six geologic media. These media, in order of presentation, are: granite, shale, basalt, tuff, bedded salt and dome salt. Guidelines are presented to assess the efficacy (application, effectiveness, and resolution) of currently used exploratory and testing techniques for precharacterization or characterization of a site. These guidelines include the reliability, accuracy and resolution of techniques deemed acceptable, as well as cost estimates of various field and laboratory techniques used to obtain the necessary information. Guidelines presented do not assess the relative suitability of media. 351 refs., 10 figs., 31 tabs.

  20. Why West Cumbria is unsuitable for a deep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Why West Cumbria is unsuitable for a deep geological nuclear waste facility: Allerdale Hubris of nuclear engineers David Smythe 22 November 2012 #12;Some progress made during/since MRWS 50 400 ~500 Quaternary: Aquifer 200 Repository Zone 100 Currently active water wells penetrate

  1. 2001 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Clearance Center at www.copyright.com or (978) 750-8400. Geology; May 2001; v. 29; no. 5; p. 447450; 1 figure; 1 table; Data Repository item 2001047. 447

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchner, James W.

    ; Data Repository item 2001047. 447 Minimal climatic control on erosion rates in the Sierra Nevada for geochemical modeling of long-term climatic change (Raymo et al., 1988; Molnar and England, 1990). Climate has2001 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Clearance Center

  2. EIS-0250-S2: Supplemental EIS for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This SEIS is to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of constructing and operating a railroad for shipments of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from an existing rail line in Nevada to a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The purpose of the evaluation is to assist the Department in deciding whether to construct and operate a railroad in Nevada, and if so, in which corridor and along which specific alignment within the selected corridor.

  3. Development of Earthquake Ground Motion Input for Preclosure Seismic Design and Postclosure Performance Assessment of a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, NV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    I. Wong

    2004-11-05

    This report describes a site-response model and its implementation for developing earthquake ground motion input for preclosure seismic design and postclosure assessment of the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The model implements a random-vibration theory (RVT), one-dimensional (1D) equivalent-linear approach to calculate site response effects on ground motions. The model provides results in terms of spectral acceleration including peak ground acceleration, peak ground velocity, and dynamically-induced strains as a function of depth. In addition to documenting and validating this model for use in the Yucca Mountain Project, this report also describes the development of model inputs, implementation of the model, its results, and the development of earthquake time history inputs based on the model results. The purpose of the site-response ground motion model is to incorporate the effects on earthquake ground motions of (1) the approximately 300 m of rock above the emplacement levels beneath Yucca Mountain and (2) soil and rock beneath the site of the Surface Facilities Area. A previously performed probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) (CRWMS M&O 1998a [DIRS 103731]) estimated ground motions at a reference rock outcrop for the Yucca Mountain site (Point A), but those results do not include these site response effects. Thus, the additional step of applying the site-response ground motion model is required to develop ground motion inputs that are used for preclosure and postclosure purposes.

  4. Regional Examples of Geological Settings for Nuclear Waste Disposal in Deep Boreholes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapiie, B.

    This report develops and exercises broad-area site selection criteria for deep boreholes suitable for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and/or its separated constituents. Three candidates are examined: a regional site in the ...

  5. Estimating the supply and demand for deep geologic CO2 storage capacity over the course of the 21st Century: A meta-analysis of the literature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.

    2013-08-05

    Whether there is sufficient geologic CO2 storage capacity to allow CCS to play a significant role in mitigating climate change has been the subject of debate since the 1990s. This paper presents a meta- analysis of a large body of recently published literature to derive updated estimates of the global deep geologic storage resource as well as the potential demand for this geologic CO2 storage resource over the course of this century. This analysis reveals that, for greenhouse gas emissions mitigation scenarios that have end-of-century atmospheric CO2 concentrations of between 350 ppmv and 725 ppmv, the average demand for deep geologic CO2 storage over the course of this century is between 410 GtCO2 and 1,670 GtCO2. The literature summarized here suggests that -- depending on the stringency of criteria applied to calculate storage capacity – global geologic CO2 storage capacity could be: 35,300 GtCO2 of “theoretical” capacity; 13,500 GtCO2 of “effective” capacity; 3,900 GtCO2, of “practical” capacity; and 290 GtCO2 of “matched” capacity for the few regions where this narrow definition of capacity has been calculated. The cumulative demand for geologic CO2 storage is likely quite small compared to global estimates of the deep geologic CO2 storage capacity, and therefore, a “lack” of deep geologic CO2 storage capacity is unlikely to be an impediment for the commercial adoption of CCS technologies in this century.

  6. Modelling and Numerical Simulation of Gas Migration in a Nuclear Waste Repository

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourgeat, Alain; Smai, Farid

    2010-01-01

    We present a compositional compressible two-phase, liquid and gas, flow model for numerical simulations of hydrogen migration in deep geological radioactive waste repository. This model includes capillary effects and the gas diffusivity. The choice of the main variables in this model, Total or Dissolved Hydrogen Mass Concentration and Liquid Pressure, leads to a unique and consistent formulation of the gas phase appearance and disappearance. After introducing this model, we show computational evidences of its adequacy to simulate gas phase appearance and disappearance in different situations typical of underground radioactive waste repository.

  7. Development of an object-oriented simulation code for repository performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsujimoto, Keiichi; Ahn, J.

    1999-07-01

    As understanding for mechanisms of radioactivity confinement by a deep geologic repository improves at the individual process level, it has become imperative to evaluate consequences of individual processes to the performance of the whole repository system. For this goal, the authors have developed a model for radionuclide transport in, and release from, the repository region by incorporating multiple-member decay chains and multiple waste canisters. A computer code has been developed with C++, an object-oriented language. By utilizing the feature that a geologic repository consists of thousands of objects of the same kind, such as the waste canister, the repository region is divided into multiple compartments and objects for simulation of radionuclide transport. Massive computational tasks are distributed over, and executed by, multiple networked workstations, with the help of parallel virtual machine (PVM) technology. Temporal change of the mass distribution of 28 radionuclides in the repository region for the time period of 100 million yr has been successfully obtained by the code.

  8. Repository Performance Confirmation - 12119

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, F.D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Repository performance confirmation links the technical bases of repository science and societal acceptance. Among the countless aspects of monitoring, performance confirmation holds a special place, involving distinct activities combining technical and social significance in radioactive waste management. Discussion is divided into four themes: 1. A distinction is drawn between performance confirmation monitoring and other testing and monitoring objectives, 2. A case study illustrates confirmation activities integrated within a long-term testing and monitoring strategy for Yucca Mountain, 3. A case study reviews compliance monitoring developed and implemented for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, and 4. An approach for developing, evaluating and implementing the next generation of performance confirmation monitoring is presented. International interest in repository monitoring is exhibited by the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme 'Monitoring Developments for Safe Repository Operation and Staged Closure' (MoDeRn) Project. The MoDeRn partners are considering the role of monitoring in a phased approach to the geological disposal of radioactive waste. As repository plans advance in different countries, the need to consider monitoring strategies within a controlled framework has become more apparent. The MoDeRn project pulls together technical and societal experts to assimilate a common understanding of a process that could be followed to develop a monitoring program. Experience from two repository programs in the United States sheds light on how performance confirmation has been executed. Lessons learned can help the next generation of performance confirmation. (author)

  9. Leveraging Regional Exploration to Develop Geologic Framework for CO2 Storage in Deep Formations in Midwestern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeraj Gupta

    2009-09-30

    Obtaining subsurface data for developing a regional framework for geologic storage of CO{sub 2} can require drilling and characterization in a large number of deep wells, especially in areas with limited pre-existing data. One approach for achieving this objective, without the prohibitive costs of drilling costly standalone test wells, is to collaborate with the oil and gas drilling efforts in a piggyback approach that can provide substantial cost savings and help fill data gaps in areas that may not otherwise get characterized. This leveraging with oil/gas drilling also mitigates some of the risk involved in standalone wells. This collaborative approach has been used for characterizing in a number of locations in the midwestern USA between 2005 and 2009 with funding from U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE award: DE-FC26-05NT42434) and in-kind contributions from a number of oil and gas operators. The results are presented in this final technical report. In addition to data collected under current award, selected data from related projects such as the Midwestern Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} storage project at and near the Mountaineer Plant, and the drilling of the Ohio Stratigraphic well in Eastern Ohio are discussed and used in the report. Data from this effort are also being incorporated into the MRCSP geologic mapping. The project activities were organized into tracking and evaluation of characterization opportunities; participation in the incremental drilling, basic and advanced logging in selected wells; and data analysis and reporting. Although a large number of opportunities were identified and evaluated, only a small subset was carried into the field stage. Typical selection factors included reaching an acceptable agreement with the operator, drilling and logging risks, and extent of pre-existing data near the candidate wells. The region of study is primarily along the Ohio River Valley corridor in the Appalachian Basin, which underlies large concentrations of CO{sub 2} emission sources. In addition, some wells in the Michigan basin are included. Assessment of the geologic and petrophysical properties of zones of interest has been conducted. Although a large number of formations have been evaluated across the geologic column, the primary focus has been on evaluating the Cambrian sandstones (Mt. Simon, Rose Run, Kerbel) and carbonates layers (Knox Dolomite) as well as on the Silurian-Devonian carbonates (Bass Island, Salina) and sandstones (Clinton, Oriskany, Berea). Factors controlling the development of porosity and permeability, such as the depositional setting have been explored. In northern Michigan the Bass Islands Dolomite appears to have favorable reservoir development. In west central Michigan the St. Peter sandstone exhibits excellent porosity in the Hart and Feuring well and looks promising. In Southeastern Kentucky in the Appalachian Basin, the Batten and Baird well provided valuable data on sequestration potential in organic shales through adsorption. In central and eastern Ohio and western West Virginia, the majority of the wells provided an insight to the complex geologic framework of the relatively little known Precambrian through Silurian potential injection targets. Although valuable data was acquired and a number of critical data gaps were filled through this effort, there are still many challenges ahead and questions that need answered. The lateral extent to which favorable potential injection conditions exist in most reservoirs is still generally uncertain. The prolongation of the characterization of regional geologic framework through partnership would continue to build confidence and greatly benefit the overall CO{sub 2} sequestration effort.

  10. Two phase partially miscible flow and transport modeling in porous media: application to gas migration in a nuclear waste repository

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourgeat, Alain; Smaï, Farid

    2008-01-01

    We derive a compositional compressible two-phase, liquid and gas, flow model for numerical simulations of hydrogen migration in deep geological repository for radioactive waste. This model includes capillary effects and the gas high diffusivity. Moreover, it is written in variables (total hydrogen mass density and liquid pressure) chosen in order to be consistent with gas appearance or disappearance. We discuss the well possedness of this model and give some computational evidences of its adequacy to simulate gas generation in a water saturated repository.

  11. Two phase partially miscible flow and transport modeling in porous media: application to gas migration in a nuclear waste repository

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alain Bourgeat; Mladen Jurak; Farid Smaï

    2008-02-29

    We derive a compositional compressible two-phase, liquid and gas, flow model for numerical simulations of hydrogen migration in deep geological repository for radioactive waste. This model includes capillary effects and the gas high diffusivity. Moreover, it is written in variables (total hydrogen mass density and liquid pressure) chosen in order to be consistent with gas appearance or disappearance. We discuss the well possedness of this model and give some computational evidences of its adequacy to simulate gas generation in a water saturated repository.

  12. Analysis Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE

    2012-03-16

    The Analysis Repository is a compilation of analyses and analytical models relevant to assessing hydrogen fuel and fuel cell issues. Projects in the repository relate to: hydrogen production, delivery, storage, fuel cells, and hydrogen vehicle technology; hydrogen production feedstock cost and availability; electricity production, central and distributed; energy resource estimation and forecasting.

  13. Geological Engineering Geological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehlau, David

    1 Geological Engineering l 1 Geological Engineering www.geol.ca Queen's Geological Engineering Vicki Remenda, PEng ­ GEOENG Head Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering Miller Hall Welcome to... Orientation CLASS OF 2018 What is Geological Engineering ? Geological Engineering

  14. Generic Repository Concepts and Thermal Analysis for Advanced Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)] [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Blink, James [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Carter, Joe [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)] [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Massimiliano, Fratoni [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Greenberg, Harris [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Howard, Rob L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The current posture of the used nuclear fuel management program in the U.S. following termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, is to pursue research and development (R&D) of generic (i.e., non-site specific) technologies for storage, transportation and disposal. Disposal R&D is directed toward understanding and demonstrating the performance of reference geologic disposal concepts selected to represent the current state-of-the-art in geologic disposal. One of the principal constraints on waste packaging and emplacement in a geologic repository is management of the waste-generated heat. This paper describes the selection of reference disposal concepts, and thermal management strategies for waste from advanced fuel cycles. A geologic disposal concept for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or high-level waste (HLW) consists of three components: waste inventory, geologic setting, and concept of operations. A set of reference geologic disposal concepts has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Used Fuel Disposition Campaign, for crystalline rock, clay/shale, bedded salt, and deep borehole (crystalline basement) geologic settings. We performed thermal analysis of these concepts using waste inventory cases representing a range of advanced fuel cycles. Concepts of operation consisting of emplacement mode, repository layout, and engineered barrier descriptions, were selected based on international progress and previous experience in the U.S. repository program. All of the disposal concepts selected for this study use enclosed emplacement modes, whereby waste packages are in direct contact with encapsulating engineered or natural materials. The encapsulating materials (typically clay-based or rock salt) have low intrinsic permeability and plastic rheology that closes voids so that low permeability is maintained. Uniformly low permeability also contributes to chemically reducing conditions common in soft clay, shale, and salt formations. Enclosed modes are associated with temperature constraints that limit changes to the encapsulating materials, and they generally have less capacity to dissipate heat from the waste package and its immediate surroundings than open modes such as that proposed for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Open emplacement modes can be ventilated for many years prior to permanent closure of the repository, limiting peak temperatures both before and after closure, and combining storage and disposal functions in the same facility. Open emplacement modes may be practically limited to unsaturated host formations, unless emplacement tunnels are effectively sealed everywhere prior to repository closure. Thermal analysis of disposal concepts and waste inventory cases has identified important relationships between waste package size and capacity, and the duration of surface decay storage needed to meet temperature constraints. For example, the choice of salt as the host medium expedites the schedule for geologic disposal by approximately 50 yr (other factors held constant) thereby reducing future reliance on surface decay storage. Rock salt has greater thermal conductivity and stability at higher temperatures than other media considered. Alternatively, the choice of salt permits the use of significantly larger waste packages for SNF. The following sections describe the selection of reference waste inventories, geologic settings, and concepts of operation, and summarize the results from the thermal analysis.

  15. Geological aspects of the nuclear waste disposal problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laverov, N.P.; Omelianenko, B.L.; Velichkin, V.I.

    1994-06-01

    For the successful solution of the high-level waste (HLW) problem in Russia one must take into account such factors as the existence of the great volume of accumulated HLW, the large size and variety of geological conditions in the country, and the difficult economic conditions. The most efficient method of HLW disposal consists in the maximum use of protective capacities of the geological environment and in using inexpensive natural minerals for engineered barrier construction. In this paper, the principal trends of geological investigation directed toward the solution of HLW disposal are considered. One urgent practical aim is the selection of sites in deep wells in regions where the HLW is now held in temporary storage. The aim of long-term investigations into HLW disposal is to evaluate geological prerequisites for regional HLW repositories.

  16. 2002 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Permissions, GSA, or editing@geosociety.org. Geology; July 2002; v. 30; no. 7; p. 639642; 3 figures; Data Repository item 2002067. 639

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garneau, Michelle

    and flux directions ranging from vertical (upward and downward) to horizontal. Averaged over the entire@essic.umd.edu. geological environments, such as mid-ocean ridges, contact aureoles, geothermal fields, and sedimentary

  17. 2003 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Permissions, GSA, or editing@geosociety.org. Geology; July 2003; v. 31; no. 7; p. 581584; 3 figures; Data Repository item 2003084. 581

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svensen, Henrik

    2003 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Permissions, GSA for understanding peat fires and coal-seam fires--related phenomena with substantial CO2 emissions (e.g., Voigt et

  18. 2003 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Permissions, GSA, or editing@geosociety.org. Geology; October 2003; v. 31; no. 10; p. 849852; 3 figures; Data Repository item 2003129. 849

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Bradley R.

    of the Tajik Academy of Science, 734063, Dushanbe, Tajikistan Bradley Hacker Department of Geological Sciences are rare in such environments (e.g., Hacker et al., 2000). In this study we present new petrographic

  19. State-of-the-art for evaluating the potential impact of flooding on a radioactive waste repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-07-16

    This report is a review of the state-of-the-art for evaluating the potential impact of flooding on a deep radioactive-waste repository, namely, for predicting the future occurrence of catastrophic flooding and for estimating the effect of such flooding on waste containment characteristics. Several detrimental effects are identified: flooding can increase groundwater seepage velocities through a repository within the framework of the existing hydrologic system and thus increase the rate of radioactive-waste leakage to the biosphere; flooding may alter repository hydrology by reversing flow gradients, relocating sources of groundwater recharge and discharge, or shortening seepage paths, thereby producing unpredictable leakage; saturation of a vadose-zone repository during flooding can increase groundwater seepage velocities by several orders of magnitude; and flooding can damage repository-media containment properties by inducing seismic or chemical instability or increasing fracture permeability in relatively shallow repository rock as a result of redistributing in-situ stresses. Short-term flooding frequency and magnitude can be predicted statistically by analyzing historical records of flooding. However, long-term flooding events that could damage a permanent repository cannot be predicted with confidence because the geologic record is neither unique nor sufficienly complete for statistical analysis. It is more important to identify parameters characterizing containment properties (such as permeability, groundwater gradient, and shortest seepage path length to the biosphere) that could be affected by future flooding, estimate the maximum magnitude of flooding that could occur within the life of the repository by examining the geologic record, and determine the impact such flooding could have on the parameter values.

  20. Panel Organization 1. Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix A Panel Organization 1. Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering Chair: Dr. Clarence R Technical Exchange (open) Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering Denver, Colorado Topic: DOE & Performance Analysis and the Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering Denver, Colorado Topic: Repository

  1. Panel Organization 1. Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix A Panel Organization 1. Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering Chair: Dr. Clarence R) Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering Denver, Colorado Topic: DOE presentation on the exploratory and the Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering Denver, Colorado Topic: Repository system design

  2. 2003 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Permissions, GSA, or editing@geosociety.org. Geology; December 2003; v. 31; no. 12; p. 10971100; 4 figures; Data Repository item 2003163. 1097

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Licciardi, Joseph M.

    : Evidence from the Ghazij Formation, Balochistan, Pakistan William C. Clyde Department of Earth Sciences, and Geological Survey of Pakistan, Sariab Road, Box 15, Quetta, Pakistan Philip D. Gingerich Department of western Pakistan records continental sedimentation and mammalian dispersal associated with initial India

  3. 2002 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Permissions, GSA, or editing@geosociety.org. Geology; September 2002; v. 30; no. 9; p. 827830; 4 figures; Data Repository item 2002096. 827

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rees, Allister

    2002 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Permissions, GSA existed in both hemispheres, but equatorial coals and tropical rainforests were only well developed conditions changed gradually during the Early Permian such that the main coal- forming plants were replaced

  4. Generic repository design concepts and thermal analysis (FY11).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, Robert; Dupont, Mark; Blink, James A.; Fratoni, Massimiliano; Greenberg, Harris; Carter, Joe; Hardin, Ernest L.; Sutton, Mark A.

    2011-08-01

    Reference concepts for geologic disposal of used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the U.S. are developed, including geologic settings and engineered barriers. Repository thermal analysis is demonstrated for a range of waste types from projected future, advanced nuclear fuel cycles. The results show significant differences among geologic media considered (clay/shale, crystalline rock, salt), and also that waste package size and waste loading must be limited to meet targeted maximum temperature values. In this study, the UFD R&D Campaign has developed a set of reference geologic disposal concepts for a range of waste types that could potentially be generated in advanced nuclear FCs. A disposal concept consists of three components: waste inventory, geologic setting, and concept of operations. Mature repository concepts have been developed in other countries for disposal of spent LWR fuel and HLW from reprocessing UNF, and these serve as starting points for developing this set. Additional design details and EBS concepts will be considered as the reference disposal concepts evolve. The waste inventory considered in this study includes: (1) direct disposal of SNF from the LWR fleet, including Gen III+ advanced LWRs being developed through the Nuclear Power 2010 Program, operating in a once-through cycle; (2) waste generated from reprocessing of LWR UOX UNF to recover U and Pu, and subsequent direct disposal of used Pu-MOX fuel (also used in LWRs) in a modified-open cycle; and (3) waste generated by continuous recycling of metal fuel from fast reactors operating in a TRU burner configuration, with additional TRU material input supplied from reprocessing of LWR UOX fuel. The geologic setting provides the natural barriers, and establishes the boundary conditions for performance of engineered barriers. The composition and physical properties of the host medium dictate design and construction approaches, and determine hydrologic and thermal responses of the disposal system. Clay/shale, salt, and crystalline rock media are selected as the basis for reference mined geologic disposal concepts in this study, consistent with advanced international repository programs, and previous investigations in the U.S. The U.S. pursued deep geologic disposal programs in crystalline rock, shale, salt, and volcanic rock in the years leading up to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, or NWPA (Rechard et al. 2011). The 1987 NWPA amendment act focused the U.S. program on unsaturated, volcanic rock at the Yucca Mountain site, culminating in the 2008 license application. Additional work on unsaturated, crystalline rock settings (e.g., volcanic tuff) is not required to support this generic study. Reference disposal concepts are selected for the media listed above and for deep borehole disposal, drawing from recent work in the U.S. and internationally. The main features of the repository concepts are discussed in Section 4.5 and summarized in Table ES-1. Temperature histories at the waste package surface and a specified distance into the host rock are calculated for combinations of waste types and reference disposal concepts, specifying waste package emplacement modes. Target maximum waste package surface temperatures are identified, enabling a sensitivity study to inform the tradeoff between the quantity of waste per disposal package, and decay storage duration, with respect to peak temperature at the waste package surface. For surface storage duration on the order of 100 years or less, waste package sizes for direct disposal of SNF are effectively limited to 4-PWR configurations (or equivalent size and output). Thermal results are summarized, along with recommendations for follow-on work including adding additional reference concepts, verification and uncertainty analysis for thermal calculations, developing descriptions of surface facilities and other system details, and cost estimation to support system-level evaluations.

  5. Geologic Maps Geology 200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammer, Thomas

    Geologic Maps Geology 200 Geology for Environmental Scientists #12;Geologic Map of the US #12;Symbols found on geologic maps #12;Horizontal Strata #12;Geologic map of part of the Grand Canyon. Each color represents a different formation. #12;Inclined Strata #12;Dome #12;Geologic map of the Black Hills

  6. Repository operational criteria comparative analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hageman, J.P.; Chowdhury, A.H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

    1994-06-01

    The objective of the ``Repository Operational Criteria (ROC) Feasibility Studies`` (or ROC task) was to conduct comprehensive and integrated analyses of repository design, construction, and operations criteria in 10 CFR Part 60 regulations considering the interfaces among the components of the regulations and impacts of any potential changes to those regulations. The ROC task addresses regulatory criteria and uncertainties related to the preclosure aspects of the geologic repository. Those parts of 10 CFR Part 60 that require routine guidance or minor changes to the rule were addressed in Hageman and Chowdhury, 1992. The ROC task shows a possible need for further regulatory clarity, by major changes to the rule, related to the design bases and siting of a geologic repository operations area and radiological emergency planning in order to assure defense-in-depth. The analyses, presented in this report, resulted in the development and refinement of regulatory concepts and their supporting rationale for recommendations for potential major changes to 10 CFR Pan 0 regulations.

  7. Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    radioactive waste forms, along with research and development for mined repositories in salt, granite, and clay, as part of the used fuel disposition (UFD) campaign. The deep...

  8. Repository performance confirmation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Francis D.

    2011-09-01

    Repository performance confirmation links the technical bases of repository science and societal acceptance. This paper explores the myriad aspects of what has been labeled performance confirmation in U.S. programs, which involves monitoring as a collection of distinct activities combining technical and social significance in radioactive waste management. This paper is divided into four parts: (1) A distinction is drawn between performance confirmation monitoring and other testing and monitoring objectives; (2) A case study illustrates confirmation activities integrated within a long-term testing and monitoring strategy for Yucca Mountain; (3) A case study reviews compliance monitoring developed and implemented for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant; and (4) An approach for developing, evaluating and implementing the next generation of performance confirmation monitoring is presented. International interest in repository monitoring is exhibited by the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme 'Monitoring Developments for Safe Repository Operation and Staged Closure' (MoDeRn) Project. The MoDeRn partners are considering the role of monitoring in a phased approach to the geological disposal of radioactive waste. As repository plans advance in different countries, the need to consider monitoring strategies within a controlled framework has become more apparent. The MoDeRn project pulls together technical and societal experts to assimilate a common understanding of a process that could be followed to develop a monitoring program. A fundamental consideration is the differentiation of confirmation monitoring from the many other testing and monitoring activities. Recently, the license application for Yucca Mountain provided a case study including a technical process for meeting regulatory requirements to confirm repository performance as well as considerations related to the preservation of retrievability. The performance confirmation plan developed as part of the Yucca Mountain license application identified a broad suite of monitoring activities. A revision of the plan was expected to winnow the number of activities down to a manageable size. As a result, an objective process for the next stage of performance confirmation planning was developed as an integral part of an overarching long-term testing and monitoring strategy. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant compliance monitoring program at once reflects its importance to stakeholders while demonstrating adequate understanding of relevant monitoring parameters. The compliance criteria were stated by regulation and are currently monitored as part of the regulatory rule for disposal. At the outset, the screening practice and parameter selection were not predicated on a direct or indirect correlation to system performance metrics, as was the case for Yucca Mountain. Later on, correlation to performance was established, and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant continues to monitor ten parameters originally identified in the compliance certification documentation. The monitoring program has proven to be effective for the technical intentions and societal or public assurance. The experience with performance confirmation in the license application process for Yucca Mountain helped identify an objective, quantitative methodology for this purpose. Revision of the existing plan would be based on findings of the total system performance assessment. Identification and prioritization of confirmation activities would then derive from performance metrics associated with performance assessment. Given the understanding of repository performance confirmation, as reviewed in this paper, it is evident that the performance confirmation program for the Yucca Mountain project could be readily re-engaged if licensing activities resumed.

  9. On mobilization of lead and arsenic in groundwater in response to CO2 leakage from deep geological storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, L.; Apps, J.A.; Zhang, Y.; Xu, T.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2009-07-01

    If carbon dioxide stored in deep saline aquifers were to leak into an overlying aquifer containing potable groundwater, the intruding CO{sub 2} would change the geochemical conditions and cause secondary effects mainly induced by changes in pH In particular, hazardous trace elements such as lead and arsenic, which are present in the aquifer host rock, could be mobilized. In an effort to evaluate the potential risks to potable water quality, reactive transport simulations were conducted to evaluate to what extent and mechanisms through which lead and arsenic might be mobilized by intrusion of CO{sub 2}. An earlier geochemical evaluation of more than 38,000 groundwater quality analyses from aquifers throughout the United States and an associated literature review provided the basis for setting up a reactive transport model and examining its sensitivity to model variation. The evaluation included identification of potential mineral hosts containing hazardous trace elements, characterization of the modal bulk mineralogy for an arenaceous aquifer, and augmentation of the required thermodynamic data. The reactive transport simulations suggest that CO{sub 2} ingress into a shallow aquifer can mobilize significant lead and arsenic, contaminating the groundwater near the location of intrusion and further downstream. Although substantial increases in aqueous concentrations are predicted compared to the background values, the maximum permitted concentration for arsenic in drinking water was exceeded in only a few cases, whereas that for lead was never exceeded.

  10. Geologic Sequestration of CO2 in Deep, Unmineable Coalbeds: An Integrated Researdh and Commercial-Scale Field Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Reeves; George Koperna

    2008-09-30

    The Coal-Seq consortium is a government-industry collaborative consortium with the objective of advancing industry's understanding of complex coalbed methane and gas shale reservoir behavior in the presence of multi-component gases via laboratory experiments, theoretical model development and field validation studies. This will allow primary recovery, enhanced recovery and CO{sub 2} sequestration operations to be commercially enhanced and/or economically deployed. The project was initially launched in 2000 as a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored investigation into CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep, unmineable coalseams. The initial project accomplished a number of important objectives, which mainly revolved around performing baseline experimental studies, documenting and analyzing existing field projects, and establishing a global network for technology exchange. The results from that Phase have been documented in a series of reports which are publicly available. An important outcome of the initial phase was that serious limitations were uncovered in our knowledge of reservoir behavior when CO{sub 2} is injected into coal. To address these limitations, the project was extended in 2005 as a government-industry collaborative consortium. Selected accomplishments from this phase have included the identification and/or development of new models for multi-component sorption and diffusion, laboratory studies of coal geomechanical and permeability behavior with CO{sub 2} injection, additional field validation studies, and continued global technology exchange. Further continuation of the consortium is currently being considered. Some of the topics that have been identified for investigation include further model development/refinement related to multicomponent equations-of-state, sorption and diffusion behavior, geomechanical and permeability studies, technical and economic feasibility studies for major international coal basins, the extension of the work to gas shale reservoirs, and continued global technology exchange.

  11. International Collaboration Activities in Different Geologic Disposal Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birkholzer, Jens

    2015-09-01

    This report describes the current status of international collaboration regarding geologic disposal research in the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign. Since 2012, in an effort coordinated by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, UFD has advanced active collaboration with several international geologic disposal programs in Europe and Asia. Such collaboration allows the UFD Campaign to benefit from a deep knowledge base with regards to alternative repository environments developed over decades, and to utilize international investments in research facilities (such as underground research laboratories), saving millions of R&D dollars that have been and are being provided by other countries. To date, UFD’s International Disposal R&D Program has established formal collaboration agreements with five international initiatives and several international partners, and national lab scientists associated with UFD have conducted specific collaborative R&D activities that align well with its R&D priorities.

  12. Preliminary total-system analysis of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslinger, P.W.; Doremus, L.A.; Engel, D.W.; Miley, T.B.; Murphy, M.T.; Nichols, W.E.; White, M.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Langford, D.W.; Ouderkirk, S.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The placement of high-level radioactive wastes in mined repositories deep underground is considered a disposal method that would effectively isolate these wastes from the environment for long periods of time. This report describes modeling performed at PNL for Yucca Mountain between May and November 1991 addressing the performance of the entire repository system related to regulatory criteria established by the EPA in 40 CFR Part 191. The geologic stratigraphy and material properties used in this study were chosen in cooperation with performance assessment modelers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Sandia modeled a similar problem using different computer codes and a different modeling philosophy. Pacific Northwest Laboratory performed a few model runs with very complex models, and SNL performed many runs with much simpler (abstracted) models.

  13. Selection of Corrosion Resistant Materials for Nuclear Waste Repositories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.B. Rebak

    2006-08-28

    Several countries are considering geological repositories to dispose of nuclear waste. The environment of most of the currently considered repositories will be reducing in nature, except for the repository in the US, which is going to be oxidizing. For the reducing repositories, alloys such as carbon steel, stainless steels and titanium are being evaluated. For the repository in the US, some of the most corrosion resistant commercially available alloys are being investigated. This paper presents a summary of the behavior of the different materials under consideration for the repositories and the current understanding of the degradation modes of the proposed alloys in ground water environments from the point of view of general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking.

  14. Midland Core Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, Noel

    2000-08-14

    This report summarizes activities for the repository during this quarter. The repository holds drill cores and cuttings samples from oil wells that can be viewed or checked out by users.

  15. Repositories Unleashing Data: Ideas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Pauline Nathalie

    2015-08-13

    Participants at Repositories Fringe (RepoFringe) 2015 were invited to discuss how new audiences (particularly beyond the academic community) and new uses for data from institutional repositories could be identified and reached. A number of questions...

  16. New Design for an HLW Repository (for Spent Fuel and Waste from Reprocessing) in a Salt Formation in Germany - 12213

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollingerfehr, Wilhelm; Filbert, Wolfgang; Lerch, Christian; Mueller-Hoeppe, Nina; Charlier, Frank

    2012-07-01

    In autumn 2010, after a 10-year moratorium, exploration was resumed in Gorleben, the potential site for a German HLW repository. At the same time, the Federal Government launched a two-year preliminary safety analysis to assess whether the salt dome at Gorleben is suitable to host all heat-generating radioactive waste generated by German NPPs based on the waste amounts expected at that time. The revised Atomic Energy Act of June 2011 now stipulates a gradual phase-out of nuclear energy production by 2022, which is 13 years earlier than expected in 2010. A repository design was developed which took into account an updated set of data on the amounts and types of expected heat-generating waste, the documented results of the exploration of the Gorleben salt dome, and the new 'Safety Requirements Governing the Final Disposal of Heat-Generating Radioactive Waste' of 30 September, 2010. The latter has a strong influence on the conceptual designs as it requires that retrievability of all waste containers is possible within the repository lifetime. One design considered that all waste containers will be disposed of in horizontal drifts of a geologic repository, while the other design considered that all waste containers will be disposed of in deep vertical boreholes. For both options (emplacement in drifts/emplacement in vertical boreholes), the respective design includes a selection of waste containers, the layout of drifts, respectively lined boreholes, a description of emplacement fields, and backfilling and sealing measures. The design results were described and displayed and the differences between the two main concepts were elaborated and discussed. For the first time in both repository designs the requirement was implemented to retrieve waste canisters during the operational phase. The measures to fulfill this requirement and eventually the consequences were highlighted. It was pointed out that there arises the need to keep transport- and storage casks in adequate numbers and interim storage facilities available until the repository is closed. (authors)

  17. National Geoscience Data Repository System. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiffries, C.M.; Milling, M.E.

    1994-03-01

    The American Geological Institute (AGI) has completed the first phase of a study to assess the feasibility of establishing a National Geoscience Data Repository System to capture and preserve valuable geoscientific data. The study was initiated in response to the fact that billions of dollars worth of domestic geological and geophysical data are in jeopardy of being irrevocably lost or destroyed as a consequence of the ongoing downsizing of the US energy and minerals industry. This report focuses on two major issues. First, it documents the types and quantity of data available for contribution to a National Geoscience Data Repository System. Second, it documents the data needs and priorities of potential users of the system. A National Geoscience Data Repository System would serve as an important and valuable source of information for the entire geoscience community for a variety of applications, including environmental protection, water resource management, global change studies, and basic and applied research. The repository system would also contain critical data that would enable domestic energy and minerals companies to expand their exploration and production programs in the United States for improved recovery of domestic oil, gas, and mineral resources.

  18. 2004 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Permissions, GSA, or editing@geosociety.org. Geology; July 2004; v. 32; no. 7; p. 601604; doi: 10.1130/G20367.1; 4 figures; Data Repository item 2004096. 601

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    . Solon--ExxonMobil Exploration Company, Houston, Texas 77060, USA. Bock: Deceased 6 November 2002. Nelson; Data Repository item 2004096. 601 Precise temperature estimation in the Tibetan crust from seismic

  19. Electromagnetic images of the Earth from near-surface to deep within the mantle Alan G. Jones (Geological Survey of Canada)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    @cg.nrcan.gc.ca The natural-source magnetotelluric (MT) technique has one major advantage over all other electrical (Geological Survey of Canada) 615 Booth St., Room 218, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0E9, ajones

  20. Long-Term Planning for Nuclear Energy Systems Under Deep Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Lance Kyungwoo

    2011-01-01

    a Geologic Repository. Nuclear Technology, 154:95–106, Mayfor the promise of nuclear technology inspired my ownof the ever-changing nuclear technology landscape. Making

  1. Generic Repository Concepts and Thermal Analysis for Advanced Fuel Cycles - 12477

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800 MS 0736, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Blink, James [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551-0808 (United States); Carter, Joe [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Fratoni, Massimiliano; Greenberg, Harris; Sutton, Mark [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States); Howard, Robert [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    A geologic disposal concept for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or high-level waste (HLW) consists of three components: waste inventory, geologic setting, and concept of operations. A set of reference geologic disposal concepts has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Used Fuel Disposition campaign. Reference concepts are identified for crystalline rock, clay/shale, bedded salt, and deep borehole (crystalline basement) geologic settings. These were analyzed for waste inventory cases representing a range of waste types that could be produced by advanced nuclear fuel cycles. Concepts of operation consisting of emplacement mode, repository layout, and engineered barrier descriptions, were selected based on international progress. All of these disposal concepts are enclosed emplacement modes, whereby waste packages are in direct contact with encapsulating engineered or natural materials. Enclosed modes have less capacity to dissipate heat than open modes such as that proposed for a repository at Yucca Mountain. Thermal analysis has identified important relationships between waste package size and capacity, and the duration of surface decay storage needed to meet temperature limits for different disposal concepts. For the crystalline rock and clay/shale repository concepts, a waste package surface temperature limit of 100 deg. C was assumed to prevent changes in clay-based buffer material or clay-rich host rock. Surface decay storage of 50 to 100 years is needed for disposal of high-burnup LWR SNF in 4-PWR packages, or disposal of HLW glass from reprocessing LWR uranium oxide (UOX) fuel. High-level waste (HLW) from reprocessing of metal fuel used in a fast reactor could be disposed after decay storage of 50 years or less. For disposal in salt the rock thermal conductivity is significantly greater, and higher temperatures (200 deg. C) can be tolerated at the waste package surface. Decay storage of 10 years or less is needed for high-burnup LWR SNF in 4-PWR packages, while 12-PWR packages could be emplaced after 40 years or less. HLW from reprocessing LWR UOX fuel or metal fuel from fast reactors, could be disposed of in salt after 10 to 50 years of decay storage depending on the specific composition and other factors. For the deep borehole disposal concept no near-field temperature limits are recognized because no performance credit is taken for waste form or waste package integrity, or containment by the near-field host rock. These results show the key differences in thermal management strategies available to the U.S. repository program, given the range of disposal concepts. A host medium such as salt with greater thermal conductivity and peak temperature tolerance could shorten decay storage by 50 years, or facilitate the use of larger waste packages. The LWR UOX SNF evaluated in this study represents that which could be produced in the coming decades. The existing, lower burnup used fuel that is presently in storage at many LWR locations across the U.S. is significantly cooler, and analyses of this type could be used to show that disposal is possible with less decay storage or larger waste packages. We note that while the temperature limits and waste package capacities used in this study are similar to those used internationally and in past U.S. studies, they might be increased as the result of ongoing research and development activities. This study selected enclosed emplacement modes to conform with disposal concepts developed internationally and previously in the U.S. Open modes (such as that proposed for a repository at Yucca Mountain) afford additional flexibility in waste management and the necessary investment, because the same facility serves both storage and disposal functions. Use of open modes, and combined analysis of storage, transportation, and disposal functions, are appropriate to consider in future studies of this type. (authors)

  2. A compound power-law model for volcanic eruptions: Implications for risk assessment of volcanism at the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, Chih-Hsiang

    1994-10-17

    Much of the ongoing debate on the use of nuclear power plants in U.S.A. centers on the safe disposal of the radioactive waste. Congress, aware of the importance of the waste issue, passed the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, requiring the federal government to develop a geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high level radioactive wastes from civilian nuclear power plants. The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) in 1983 to identify potential sites. When OCRWM had selected three potential sites to study, Congress enacted the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, which directed the DOE to characterize only one of those sites, Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada. For a site to be acceptable, theses studies must demonstrate that the site could comply with regulations and guidelines established by the federal agencies that will be responsible for licensing, regulating, and managing the waste facility. Advocates and critics disagree on the significance and interpretation of critical geological features which bear on the safety and suitability of Yucca Mountain as a site for the construction of a high-level radioactive waste repository. Recent volcanism in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain is readily recognized as an important factor in determining future public and environmental safety because of the possibility of direct disruption of a repository site by volcanism. In particular, basaltic volcanism is regarded as direct and unequivocal evidence of deep-seated geologic instability. In this paper, statistical analysis of volcanic hazard assessment at the Yucca Mountain site is discussed, taking into account some significant geological factors raised by experts. Three types of models are considered in the data analysis. The first model assumes that both past and future volcanic activities follow a homogeneous Poisson process (HPP).

  3. Investigations on Repository Near-Field Thermal Modeling - Repository Science/Thermal Load Management & Design Concepts (M41UF033302)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, M; Blink, J A; Fratoni, M; Greenberg, H R; Ross, A D

    2011-07-15

    The various layers of material from the waste package (such as components of the engineered barrier system and the host rock surface) to a given distance within the rock wall at a given distance can be described as concentric circles with varying thermal properties (see Figure 5.1-1). The selected model approach examines the contributions of the waste package, axial waste package neighbors and lateral neighboring emplacement drifts (see Section 5.2.1 and Appendix H, Section 2). In clay and deep borehole media, the peak temperature is driven by the central waste package whereas, in granite and salt, the contribution to the temperature rise by adjacent (lateral) waste packages in drift or emplacement borehole lines is dominant at the time of the peak temperature. Mathematical models generated using Mathcad software provide insight into the effects of changing waste package spacing for six waste forms, namely UOX, MOX, co-extraction, new extraction, E-Chem ceramic and E-Chem metal in four different geologic media (granite, clay, salt and deep borehole). Each scenario includes thermal conductivity and diffusivity for each layer between the waste package and the host rock, dimensions of representative repository designs (such as waste package spacing, drift or emplacement borehole spacing, waste package dimensions and layer thickness), and decay heat curves generated from knowledge of the contents of a given waste form after 10, 50, 100 and 200 years of surface storage. Key results generated for each scenario include rock temperature at a given time calculated at a given radius from the central waste package (Section 5.2.1 and Appendix H, Section 3), the corresponding temperature at the interface of the waste package and EBS material, and at each EBS layer in between (Section 5.2.2 and Appendix H, Section 4). This information is vital to understand the implications of repository design (waste package capacity, surface storage time, waste package spacing, and emplacement drift or borehole spacing) by comparing the peak temperature to the thermal limits of the concentric layers surrounding the waste package; specifically 100 C for the bentonite buffer in granite and clay repositories, 100 C for rock wall in a clay repository and 200 C at the rock wall for a salt repository. These thermal limits are both preliminary and approximate, and serve as a means to evaluate design options rather than determining compliance for licensing situations. The thermal behavior of a salt repository is more difficult to model because it is not a concentric geometry and because the crushed salt backfill initially has a much higher thermal resistance than intact salt. Three models were investigated, namely a waste package in complete contact with crushed salt, secondly a waste package in contact with intact salt, and thirdly a waste package in contact with 75% intact and 25% crushed salt. The latter model best depicts emplacement of a waste package in the corner of an intact salt alcove and subsequently covered with crushed salt backfill to the angle of repose. The most conservative model (crushed salt) had temperatures much higher than the other models and although bounding, is too conservative to use. The most realistic model (75/25) had only a small temperature difference from the simplest (non-conservative, intact salt) model, and is the one chosen in this report (see Section 5.2.3). A trade-study investigating three key variables (surface storage time, waste package capacity and waste package spacing) is important to understand and design a repository. Waste package heat can be reduced by storing for longer periods prior to emplacement, or by reducing the number of assemblies or canisters within that waste package. Waste package spacing can be altered to optimize the thermal load without exceeding the thermal limits of the host rock or EBS components. By examining each of these variables, repository footprint (and therefore cost) can be optimized. For this report, the layout was fixed for each geologic medium based on prior published designs in

  4. National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase III: Implementation and operation of the repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    American Geological Institute

    2000-03-13

    The American Geological Institute's (AGI) National Geoscience Data Repository System (NGDRS) was initiated in response to the fact that billions of dollars worth of domestic geoscience data are in jeopardy of being irrevocably lost or destroyed as a consequence of the ongoing downsizing of the U.S. energy and minerals industry. Preservation and access to domestic geological and geophysical data are critical to the energy security and economic prosperity of the nation. There is a narrow window of opportunity to act before valuable data are destroyed. The data truly represent a national treasure and immediate steps must be taken to assure their preservation.

  5. Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California, as a near-field natural analog of a radioactive waste repository in salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elders, W.A.; Cohen, L.H.

    1983-11-01

    Since high concentrations of radionuclides and high temperatures are not normally encountered in salt domes or beds, finding an exact geologic analog of expected near-field conditions in a mined nuclear waste repository in salt will be difficult. The Salton Sea Geothermal Field, however, provides an opportunity to investigate the migration and retardation of naturally occurring U, Th, Ra, Cs, Sr and other elements in hot brines which have been moving through clay-rich sedimentary rocks for up to 100,000 years. The more than thirty deep wells drilled in this field to produce steam for electrical generation penetrate sedimentary rocks containing concentrated brines where temperatures reach 365/sup 0/C at only 2 km depth. The brines are primarily Na, K, Ca chlorides with up to 25% of total dissolved solids; they also contain high concentrations of metals such as Fe, Mn, Li, Zn, and Pb. This report describes the geology, geophysics and geochemistry of this system as a prelude to a study of the mobility of naturally occurring radionuclides and radionuclide analogs within it. The aim of this study is to provide data to assist in validating quantitative models of repository behavior and to use in designing and evaluating waste packages and engineered barriers. 128 references, 33 figures, 13 tables.

  6. Salt repository project closeout status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1988-06-01

    This report provides an overview of the scope and status of the US Department of Energy (DOE`s) Salt Repository Project (SRP) at the time when the project was terminated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987. The report reviews the 10-year program of siting a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste in rock salt formations. Its purpose is to aid persons interested in the information developed during the course of this effort. Each area is briefly described and the major items of information are noted. This report, the three salt Environmental Assessments, and the Site Characterization Plan are the suggested starting points for any search of the literature and information developed by the program participants. Prior to termination, DOE was preparing to characterize three candidate sites for the first mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The sites were in Nevada, a site in volcanic tuff; Texas, a site in bedded salt (halite); and Washington, a site in basalt. These sites, identified by the screening process described in Chapter 3, were selected from the nine potentially acceptable sites shown on Figure I-1. These sites were identified in accordance with provisions of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. 196 refs., 21 figs., 11 tabs.

  7. 1 Geological Sciences GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    1 Geological Sciences GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES Geological sciences' faculty members are engaged in research on the geology and paleontology of the Appalachian and Rocky mountains, Asia and elsewhere. They collaborate with scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey and other international organizations. Research

  8. IRB RESEARCH REPOSITORY COMPLIANCE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    to destroy the materials when the specific research project that generates the materials ends. #12;What is not considered a repository. Refer to materials located on our website for additional details on the Repository with the Repository Policy within eIRB: Create a ,,Repository Only submission Create a ,,New Study submission

  9. 2004 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Permissions, GSA, or editing@geosociety.org. Geology; July 2004; v. 32; no. 7; p. 637640; doi: 10.1130/G20407.1; 4 figures; 1 insert; Data Repository item 2004102. 637

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horton, Brian K.

    in sequence progradation. Keywords: sequence stratigraphy, foreland basins, fold and thrust belts of foreland-basin sequence stratigraphy and the relationship between tec- tonics and coarse-grained sediment insert; Data Repository item 2004102. 637 Tectonic control on coarse-grained foreland-basin sequences

  10. 2006 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Permissions, GSA, or editing@geosociety.org. Geology; July 2006; v. 34; no. 7; p. 597600; doi: 10.1130/G22533.1; 3 figures; 1 table; Data Repository item 2006112. 597

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    table; Data Repository item 2006112. 597 Laacher See revisited: High-spatial-resolution zircon dating, University of California­Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095-1567, USA ABSTRACT High of the phonolite crystallization sequence. Based on their similarity to zircons in sub- volcanic nodules

  11. 2006 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Permissions, GSA, or editing@geosociety.org. Geology; June 2006; v. 34; no. 6; p. 441444; doi: 10.1130/G22545.1; 3 figures; Data Repository item 2006087. 441

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Debbie

    and Miller, 1996; Davies et al., 2001). *Current address: ExxonMobil Exploration, 233 Benmar, Houston, Texas; Data Repository item 2006087. 441 Evolution of Atlantic thermohaline circulation: Early Oligocene onset of this transition requires a better understanding of the timing of the transition. New Nd isotope data from

  12. 2006 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Permissions, GSA, or editing@geosociety.org. Geology; January 2006; v. 34; no. 1; p. 6163; doi: 10.1130/G21722.1; 5 figures; 1 table; Data Repository item 2006010. 61

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    , New York 10964, USA, and Corporate Strategic Research, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering, 1545 Route, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering, 1545 Route 22E, Annandale, New Jersey 08801, USA C.H. Scholz Lamont table; Data Repository item 2006010. 61 Stability of a sodium chloride indenter contact undergoing

  13. 2006 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Permissions, GSA, or editing@geosociety.org. Geology; March 2006; v. 34; no. 3; p. 181184; doi: 10.1130/G22106.1; 3 figures; Data Repository item 2006034. 181

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avouac, Jean-Philippe

    ; Data Repository item 2006034. 181 Magnetostratigraphy of the Yaha section, Tarim Basin (China): 11 Ma Laboratoire de Pale´omagne´tisme, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex-23, Pasadena, California 91125, USA Sevket Sen Museum of Natural History, 43 rue Buffon, 75005 Paris Cedex 5

  14. Salt Repository Research,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on Salt Repository Research, Design, and Operation La Fonda Hotel Santa Fe, New Mexico September 7 - 11, 2014 Please join us Sunday September 7, 2014 for a welcome and reception at...

  15. Salt Repository Research,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 th USGerman Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design, and Operation Hotel Pullmann Dresden Newa Dresden September 7 - 9, 2015 September 7- Monday 08:00-08:30 Registration...

  16. The Potential for Increased Atmospheric CO2 Emissions and Accelerated Consumption of Deep Geologic CO2 Storage Resources Resulting from the Large-Scale Deployment of a CCS-Enabled Unconventional Fossil Fuels Industry in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.; Davidson, Casie L.

    2009-11-02

    Desires to enhance the energy security of the United States have spurred significant interest in the development of abundant domestic heavy hydrocarbon resources including oil shale and coal to produce unconventional liquid fuels to supplement conventional oil supplies. However, the production processes for these unconventional fossil fuels create large quantities of carbon dioxide (CO2) and this remains one of the key arguments against such development. Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies could reduce these emissions and preliminary analysis of regional CO2 storage capacity in locations where such facilities might be sited within the U.S. indicates that there appears to be sufficient storage capacity, primarily in deep saline formations, to accommodate the CO2 from these industries. Nevertheless, even assuming wide-scale availability of cost-effective CO2 capture and geologic storage resources, the emergence of a domestic U.S. oil shale or coal-to-liquids (CTL) industry would be responsible for significant increases in CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. The authors present modeling results of two future hypothetical climate policy scenarios that indicate that the oil shale production facilities required to produce 3MMB/d from the Eocene Green River Formation of the western U.S. using an in situ retorting process would result in net emissions to the atmosphere of between 3000-7000 MtCO2, in addition to storing potentially 900-5000 MtCO2 in regional deep geologic formations via CCS in the period up to 2050. A similarly sized, but geographically more dispersed domestic CTL industry could result in 4000-5000 MtCO2 emitted to the atmosphere in addition to potentially 21,000-22,000 MtCO2 stored in regional deep geologic formations over the same period. While this analysis shows that there is likely adequate CO2 storage capacity in the regions where these technologies are likely to deploy, the reliance by these industries on large-scale CCS could result in an accelerated rate of utilization of the nation’s CO2 storage resource, leaving less high-quality storage capacity for other carbon-producing industries including electric power generation.

  17. Assessment of spent-fuel waste-form/stabilizer alternatives for geologic disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einziger, R.E.; Himes, D.A.

    1982-06-01

    The Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) is studying the possibility of burying canisterized unreprocessed spent fuel in a deep geologic repository. One aspect of this study is an assessment of the possible spent fuel waste forms. The fuel performance portion of the Waste Form Assessment was to evaluate five candidate spent fuel waste forms for postemplacement performance with emphasis on their ability to retard the release of radionuclides to the repository geology. Spent fuel waste forms under general consideration were: (1) unaltered fuel assembly; (2) fuel assembly with end fittings removed to shorten the length; (3 rods vented to remove gases and resealed; (4) disassembled fuel bundles to close-pack the rods; and (5) rods chopped and fragments immobilized in a matrix material. Thirteen spent fuel waste forms, classified by generic stabilizer type, were analyzed for relative in-repository performance based on: (1) waste form/stabilizer support against lithostatic pressure; (2) long-term stability for radionuclide retention; (3) minimization of cladding degradation; (4) prevention of canister/repository breach due to pressurization; (5) stabilizer heat transfer; (6) the stabilizer as an independent barrier to radionuclide migration; and (7) prevention of criticality. The waste form candidates were ranked as follows: (1) the best waste form/stabilizer combination is the intact assembly, with or without end bells, vented (and resealed) or unvented, with a solid stabilizer; (2) a suitable alternative is the combination of bundled close-packed rods with a solid stabilizer around the outside of the bundle to resist lithostatic pressure; and (3) the other possible waste forms are of lower ranking with the worst waste form/stabilizer combination being the intact assembly with a gas stabilizer or the chopped fuel.

  18. The application of high-resolution 3D seismic data to model the distribution of mechanical and hydrogeological properties of a potential host rock for the deep storage of radioactive waste in France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mari, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    In the context of a deep geological repository of high-level radioactive wastes, the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra) has conducted an extensive characterization of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillaceous rock and surrounding formations in the Eastern Paris Basin. As part of this project, an accurate 3D seismic derived geological model is needed. The paper shows the procedure used for building the 3D seismic constrained geological model in depth by combining time-to-depth conversion of seismic horizons, consistent seismic velocity model and elastic impedance in time. It also shows how the 3D model is used for mechanical and hydrogeological studies. The 3D seismic field data example illustrates the potential of the proposed depth conversion procedure for estimating density and velocity distributions, which are consistent with the depth conversion of seismic horizons using the Bayesian Kriging method. The geological model shows good agreement with well log data obtained from a reference we...

  19. 2006 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Permissions, GSA, or editing@geosociety.org. Geology; November 2006; v. 34; no. 11; p. 925928; doi: 10.1130/G22670A.1; 1 figure; Data Repository item 2006207. 925

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiners, Peter W.

    for terrestrial rocks. Zircon dates from 1.73 to 1.58 Ga are consistent with independent geological diffusion kinetics and considering the proposed effect of radiation damage on apatite He retentivity. Our

  20. YOUNG GEOLOGY GEOLOGY OF THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    YOUNG GEOLOGY UNIVERSITY May, 1962 GEOLOGY OF THE SOUTHERN WASATCH MOUNTAINS AND VICIN~IM,UTAH C O ....................J. Keith Rigby 80 Economic Geology of North-Central Utah ...,............... Kcnneth C.Bdodc 85 Rod Log ........................Lehi F. Hintze, J. Ka# Ri&, & ClydeT. Hardy 95 Geologic Map of Southern

  1. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. CIRMIS data system. Volume 3. Generator routines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedrichs, D.R.; Argo, R.S.

    1980-01-01

    The Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program is developing and applying the methodology for assessing the far-field, long-term post-closure safety of deep geologic nuclear waste repositories. AEGIS is being performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract with the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) for the Department of Energy (DOE). One task within AEGIS is the development of methodology for analysis of the consequences (water pathway) from loss of repository containment as defined by various release scenarios. The various input parameters required in the analysis are compiled in data systems. The data are organized and prepared by various input subroutines for utilization by the hydraulic and transport codes. The hydrologic models simulate the groundwater flow systems and provide water flow directions, rates, and velocities as inputs to the transport models. Outputs from the transport models are basically graphs of radionuclide concentration in the groundwater plotted against time. After dilution in the receiving surface-water body (e.g., lake, river, bay), these data are the input source terms for the dose models, if dose assessments are required. The dose models calculate radiation dose to individuals and populations. CIRMIS (Comprehensive Information Retrieval and Model Input Sequence) Data System, a storage and retrieval system for model input and output data, including graphical interpretation and display is described. This is the third of four volumes of the description of the CIRMIS Data System.

  2. Illustration of sampling-based approaches to the calculation of expected dose in performance assessments for the proposed high level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helton, Jon Craig (Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ); Sallaberry, Cedric J. PhD. (.; .)

    2007-04-01

    A deep geologic repository for high level radioactive waste is under development by the U.S. Department of Energy at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. As mandated in the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has promulgated public health and safety standards (i.e., 40 CFR Part 197) for the YM repository, and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has promulgated licensing standards (i.e., 10 CFR Parts 2, 19, 20, etc.) consistent with 40 CFR Part 197 that the DOE must establish are met in order for the YM repository to be licensed for operation. Important requirements in 40 CFR Part 197 and 10 CFR Parts 2, 19, 20, etc. relate to the determination of expected (i.e., mean) dose to a reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) and the incorporation of uncertainty into this determination. This presentation describes and illustrates how general and typically nonquantitive statements in 40 CFR Part 197 and 10 CFR Parts 2, 19, 20, etc. can be given a formal mathematical structure that facilitates both the calculation of expected dose to the RMEI and the appropriate separation in this calculation of aleatory uncertainty (i.e., randomness in the properties of future occurrences such as igneous and seismic events) and epistemic uncertainty (i.e., lack of knowledge about quantities that are poorly known but assumed to have constant values in the calculation of expected dose to the RMEI).

  3. Development of Science-Based Permitting Guidance for Geological Sequestration of CO2 in Deep Saline Aquifers Based on Modeling and Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jean-Philippe Nicot; Renaud Bouroullec; Hugo Castellanos; Susan Hovorka; Srivatsan Lakshminarasimhan; Jeffrey Paine

    2006-06-30

    Underground carbon storage may become one of the solutions to address global warming. However, to have an impact, carbon storage must be done at a much larger scale than current CO{sub 2} injection operations for enhanced oil recovery. It must also include injection into saline aquifers. An important characteristic of CO{sub 2} is its strong buoyancy--storage must be guaranteed to be sufficiently permanent to satisfy the very reason that CO{sub 2} is injected. This long-term aspect (hundreds to thousands of years) is not currently captured in legislation, even if the U.S. has a relatively well-developed regulatory framework to handle carbon storage, especially in the operational short term. This report proposes a hierarchical approach to permitting in which the State/Federal Government is responsible for developing regional assessments, ranking potential sites (''General Permit'') and lessening the applicant's burden if the general area of the chosen site has been ranked more favorably. The general permit would involve determining in the regional sense structural (closed structures), stratigraphic (heterogeneity), and petrophysical (flow parameters such as residual saturation) controls on the long-term fate of geologically sequestered CO{sub 2}. The state-sponsored regional studies and the subsequent local study performed by the applicant will address the long-term risk of the particular site. It is felt that a performance-based approach rather than a prescriptive approach is the most appropriate framework in which to address public concerns. However, operational issues for each well (equivalent to the current underground injection control-UIC-program) could follow regulations currently in place. Area ranking will include an understanding of trapping modes. Capillary (due to residual saturation) and structural (due to local geological configuration) trappings are two of the four mechanisms (the other two are solubility and mineral trappings), which are the most relevant to the time scale of interest. The most likely pathways for leakage, if any, are wells and faults. We favor a defense-in-depth approach, in which storage permanence does not rely upon a primary seal only but assumes that any leak can be contained by geologic processes before impacting mineral resources, fresh ground water, or ground surface. We examined the Texas Gulf Coast as an example of an attractive target for carbon storage. Stacked sand-shale layers provide large potential storage volumes and defense-in-depth leakage protection. In the Texas Gulf Coast, the best way to achieve this goal is to establish the primary injection level below the total depth of most wells (>2,400 m-8,000 ft). In addition, most faults, particularly growth faults, present at the primary injection level do not reach the surface. A potential methodology, which includes an integrated approach comprising the whole chain of potential events from leakage from the primary site to atmospheric impacts, is also presented. It could be followed by the State/Federal Government, as well as by the operators.

  4. Preliminary analyses of scenarios for potential human interference for repositories in three salt formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-10-01

    Preliminary analyses of scenarios for human interference with the performance of a radioactive waste repository in a deep salt formation are presented. The following scenarios are analyzed: (1) the U-Tube Connection Scenario involving multiple connections between the repository and the overlying aquifer system; (2) the Single Borehole Intrusion Scenario involving penetration of the repository by an exploratory borehole that simultaneously connects the repository with overlying and underlying aquifers; and (3) the Pressure Release Scenario involving inflow of water to saturate any void space in the repository prior to creep closure with subsequent release under near lithostatic pressures following creep closure. The methodology to evaluate repository performance in these scenarios is described and this methodology is applied to reference systems in three candidate formations: bedded salt in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas; bedded salt in the Paradox Basin, Utah; and the Richton Salt Dome, Mississippi, of the Gulf Coast Salt Dome Basin.

  5. Progress Towards International Repositories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCombie, C.; Chapman, N.

    2002-02-27

    The nuclear fuel cycle is designed to be very international, with some specialist activities (e.g. fuel fabrication, reprocessing, etc.) being confined to a few countries. Nevertheless, political and public opposition has in the past been faced by proposals to internationalise the back-end of the cycle, in particular waste disposal. Attitudes, however, have been changing recently and there is now more acceptance of the general concept of shared repositories and of specific proposals such as that of Pangea. However, as for national facilities, progress towards implementation of shared repositories will be gradual. Moreover, the best vehicle for promoting the concept may not be a commercial type of organization. Consequently the Pangea project team are currently establishing a widely based Association for this purpose.

  6. Integrating repositories with fuel cycles: The airport authority model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The organization of the fuel cycle is a legacy of World War II and the cold war. Fuel cycle facilities were developed and deployed without consideration of the waste management implications. This led to the fuel cycle model of a geological repository site with a single owner, a single function (disposal), and no other facilities on site. Recent studies indicate large economic, safety, repository performance, nonproliferation, and institutional incentives to collocate and integrate all back-end facilities. Site functions could include geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) with the option for future retrievability, disposal of other wastes, reprocessing with fuel fabrication, radioisotope production, other facilities that generate significant radioactive wastes, SNF inspection (navy and commercial), and related services such as SNF safeguards equipment testing and training. This implies a site with multiple facilities with different owners sharing some facilities and using common facilities - the repository and SNF receiving. This requires a different repository site institutional structure. We propose development of repository site authorities modeled after airport authorities. Airport authorities manage airports with government-owned runways, collocated or shared public and private airline terminals, commercial and federal military facilities, aircraft maintenance bases, and related operations - all enabled and benefiting the high-value runway asset and access to it via taxi ways. With a repository site authority the high value asset is the repository. The SNF and HLW receiving and storage facilities (equivalent to the airport terminal) serve the repository, any future reprocessing plants, and others with needs for access to SNF and other wastes. Non-public special-built roadways and on-site rail lines (equivalent to taxi ways) connect facilities. Airport authorities are typically chartered by state governments and managed by commissions with members appointed by the state governor, county governments, and city governments. This structure (1) enables state and local governments to work together to maximize job and tax benefits to local communities and the state, (2) provides a mechanism to address local concerns such as airport noise, and (3) creates an institutional structure with large incentives to maximize the value of the common asset, the runway. A repository site authority would have a similar structure and be the local interface to any national waste management authority. (authors)

  7. Canister design for deep borehole disposal of nuclear waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoag, Christopher Ian

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to design a canister for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high-level waste in deep borehole repositories using currently available and proven oil, gas, and geothermal drilling ...

  8. A drop-in-concept for deep borehole canister emplacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bates, Ethan Allen

    2011-01-01

    Disposal of high-level nuclear waste in deep boreholes drilled into crystalline bedrock (i.e., "granite") is an interesting repository alternative of long standing. Work at MIT over the past two decades, and more recently ...

  9. Geology Major www.geology.pitt.edu/undergraduate/geology.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Geology Major www.geology.pitt.edu/undergraduate/geology.html Revised: 03/2013 Geology is a scientific discipline that aims to understand every aspect of modern and ancient Earth. A degree in geology the field of geology, environmental and geotechnical jobs exist for people with BS degrees. A master

  10. The geomechanics of CO2 storage in deep sedimentary formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2013-01-01

    The geomechanics of CO 2 storage in deep sedimentaryThis paper provides a review of the geomechanics andmodeling of geomechanics associated with geologic carbon

  11. Geologic factors controlling patterns of small-volume basaltic volcanism: Application to a volcanic hazards assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connor, Charles

    repositories, that must be constructed in areas of low geologic risk [International Atomic Energy Agency, 1997. The proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is located within an active are often required for facilities, such as nuclear power plants and high-level radioactive waste

  12. ACCELERATION PHYSICS CODE WEB REPOSITORY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEI, J.

    2006-06-26

    In the framework of the CARE HHH European Network, we have developed a web-based dynamic accelerator-physics code repository. We describe the design, structure and contents of this repository, illustrate its usage, and discuss our future plans, with emphasis on code benchmarking.

  13. Accelerator Physics Code Web Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmermann, F.; Basset, R.; Bellodi, G.; Benedetto, E.; Dorda, U.; Giovannozzi, M.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Pieloni, T.; Ruggiero, F.; Rumolo, G.; Schmidt, F.; Todesco, E.; Zotter, B.W.; Payet, J.; Bartolini, R.; Farvacque, L.; Sen, T.; Chin, Y.H.; Ohmi, K.; Oide, K.; Furman, M.; /LBL, Berkeley /Oak Ridge /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /SLAC /TRIUMF /Tech-X, Boulder /UC, San Diego /Darmstadt, GSI /Rutherford /Brookhaven

    2006-10-24

    In the framework of the CARE HHH European Network, we have developed a web-based dynamic accelerator-physics code repository. We describe the design, structure and contents of this repository, illustrate its usage, and discuss our future plans, with emphasis on code benchmarking.

  14. The Subsurface Fluid Mechanics of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Subsurface Fluid Mechanics of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage by Michael Lawrence Szulczewski S Mechanics of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage by Michael Lawrence Szulczewski Submitted to the Department capture and storage (CCS), CO2 is captured at power plants and then injected into deep geologic reservoirs

  15. Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14,Energy 9,UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT||Solar and Wind

  16. Sequential Thermo-Hydraulic Modeling of Variably Saturated Flow in High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Sequential Thermo-Hydraulic Modeling of Variably Saturated Flow in High-Level Radioactive Waste-Malabry, France Key words: waste repository, geological disposal, thermo- hydraulic modeling Introduction The most developed a sequential model to predict the coupled thermo-hydraulic processes at a cell-scale radioactive

  17. Geological flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. N. Bratkov

    2008-11-19

    In this paper geology and planetology are considered using new conceptual basis of high-speed flow dynamics. Recent photo technics allow to see all details of a flow, 'cause the flow is static during very short time interval. On the other hand, maps and images of many planets are accessible. Identity of geological flows and high-speed gas dynamics is demonstrated. There is another time scale, and no more. All results, as far as the concept, are new and belong to the author. No formulae, pictures only.

  18. Nuclear waste repository research at the micro- to nanoscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaefer, T.; Denecke, M. A.

    2010-04-06

    Micro- and nano-focused synchrotron radiation techniques to investigate determinant processes in contaminant transport in geological media are becoming especially an increasingly used tool in nuclear waste disposal research. There are a number of reasons for this but primarily they are driven by the need to characterize actinide speciation localized in components of heterogeneous natural systems. We summarize some of the recent research conducted by researchers of the Institute of Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE) at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology using micro- and nano-focused X-ray beams for characterization of colloids and their interaction with minerals and of elemental and phase distributions in potential repository host rocks and actinide speciation in a repository natural analogues sample. Such investigations are prerequisite to ensuring reliable assessment of the long term radiological safety for proposed nuclear waste disposal sites.

  19. Measuring and Comparing Participation Patterns In Digital Repositories, Repositories by the Numbers Part I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Chuck; McDonald, Robert H.

    2007-01-01

    library. (Wash. , D.C: Digital Library Federation). digital repositories certainly will be an important part of future "distributed libraries" (Digital Repositories, Repositories by the Numbers Part I Chuck Thomas, Florida Center for Library

  20. Geologic simulation model for a hypothetical site in the Columbia Plateau. [AEGIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrie, G.M.; Zellmer, J.T.; Lindberg, J.W.; Foley, M.G.

    1981-04-01

    This report describes the structure and operation of the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Geologic Simulation Model, a computer simulation model of the geology and hydrology of an area of the Columbia Plateau, Washington. The model is used to study the long-term suitability of the Columbia Plateau Basalts for the storage of nuclear waste in a mined repository. It is also a starting point for analyses of such repositories in other geologic settings. The Geologic Simulation Model will aid in formulating design disruptive sequences (i.e. those to be used for more detailed hydrologic, transport, and dose analyses) from the spectrum of hypothetical geological and hydrological developments that could result in transport of radionuclides out of a repository. Quantitative and auditable execution of this task, however, is impossible without computer simulation. The computer simulation model aids the geoscientist by generating the wide spectrum of possible future evolutionary paths of the areal geology and hydrology, identifying those that may affect the repository integrity. This allows the geoscientist to focus on potentially disruptive processes, or series of events. Eleven separate submodels are used in the simulation portion of the model: Climate, Continental Glaciation, Deformation, Geomorphic Events, Hydrology, Magmatic Events, Meteorite Impact, Sea-Level Fluctuations, Shaft-Seal Failure, Sub-Basalt Basement Faulting, and Undetected Features. Because of the modular construction of the model, each submodel can easily be replaced with an updated or modified version as new information or developments in the state of the art become available. The model simulates the geologic and hydrologic systems of a hypothetical repository site and region for a million years following repository decommissioning. The Geologic Simulation Model operates in both single-run and Monte Carlo modes.

  1. Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program. Task 4. Third Contractor Information Meeting. [Adsorption-desorption on geological media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The study subject of this meeting was the adsorption and desorption of radionuclides on geologic media under repository conditions. This volume contans eight papers. Separate abstracts were prepared for all eight papers. (DLC)

  2. Protocol for laboratory research on degradation, interaction, and fate of wastes disposed by deep-well injection: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, A.G.; Crocker, M.E.

    1987-12-01

    The objective of this research investigation was to develop a laboratory protocol for use in determining degradation, interaction, and fate of organic wastes disposed in deep subsurface reservoirs via disposal wells. Knowledge of the ultimate fate of deep-well disposed wastes is important because provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) require that by August 1988, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must show that the disposal of specified wastes by deep-well injection is safe to human health and the environment, or the practice must be stopped. The National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) developed this protocol primarily by transferring some of its expertise and knowledge of laboratory protocol relevant to improved recovery of petroleum. Phenol, because it is injected into deep, subsurface reservoirs for disposal, was selected for study by the EPA. Phenol is one waste product that has been injected into the Frio formation; therefore, a decision was made to use phenol and sedimentary rock from the Frio formation for a series of laboratory experiments to demonstrate the protocol. This study investigates the adsorption properties of a specific reservoir rock which is representative of porous sedimentary geologic formations used as repositories for hazardous organic wastes. The developed protocol can be used to evaluate mobility, adsorption, and degradation of an organic hazardous waste under simulated subsurface reservoir conditions. 22 refs., 13 figs., 16 tabs.

  3. GEOLOGY, B.S.G. GEOLOGY OPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburger, Peter

    GEOLOGY, B.S.G. GEOLOGY OPTION (Fall 2015-Summer 2016) IPFW Residency Requirements: ____ 32 credits GEOLOGY BSG CORE COURSES (66 credits) *Note: grades of C- or better required in GEOL courses/2.0 GPA ______ 3 - 5 Credits in Geology or Geography with Laboratory (Select 1 of the following): ___3 GEOL G103

  4. Implementing Geological Disposal of Radioactive Waste Technology Platform From the Strategic Research Agenda to its Deployment - 12015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ouzounian, P. [ANDRA, Chatenay-Malabry (France); Palmu, Marjatta [Posiva Oy, Eurajoki (Finland); Eng, Torsten [SKB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-07-01

    Several European waste management organizations (WMOs) have initiated a technology platform for accelerating the implementation of deep geological disposal of radioactive waste in Europe. The most advanced waste management programmes in Europe (i.e. Finland, Sweden, and France) have already started or are prepared to start the licensing process of deep geological disposal facilities within the next decade. A technology platform called Implementing Geological Disposal of Radioactive Waste Technology Platform (IGD-TP) was launched in November 2009. A shared vision report for the platform was published stating that: 'Our vision is that by 2025, the first geological disposal facilities for spent fuel, high-level waste, and other long-lived radioactive waste will be operating safely in Europe'. In 2011, the IGD-TP had eleven WMO members and about 70 participants from academia, research, and the industry committed to its vision. The IGD-TP has started to become a tool for reducing overlapping work, to produce savings in total costs of research and implementation and to make better use of existing competence and research infrastructures. The main contributor to this is the deployment of the IGD-TP's newly published Strategic Research Agenda (SRA). The work undertaken for the SRA defined the pending research, development and demonstration (RD and D) issues and needs. The SRA document describing the identified issues that could be worked on collaboratively was published in July 2011. It is available on the project's public web site (www.igdtp.eu). The SRA was organized around 7 Key Topics covering the Safety Case, Waste forms and their behaviour, Technical feasibility and long-term performance of repository components, Development strategy of the repository, Safety of construction and operations, Monitoring, and Governance and stakeholder involvement. Individual Topics were prioritized within the Key Topics. Cross-cutting activities like Education and Training or Knowledge Management as well as activities remaining specific for the WMOs were as well identified in the document. For example, each WMO has to develop their own waste acceptance rules, and plan for the economics and the funding of their waste management programmes. The challenge at hand for the IGD-TP is to deploy the SRA. This is carried out by agreeing on a Deployment Plan (DP) that guides organizing the concrete joint activities between the WMOs and the other participants of the IGD-TP. The first DP points out the coordinated RD and D projects and other activities that need to be launched to produce these results over the next four to five years (by the end of 2016). The DP also describes general principles for how the joint work can be organised and funded. (authors)

  5. Repository Services for Research Data Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uribe, Luis Martinez

    2008-07-31

    Repository Services for Research Data Management - findings from interviews and workshop to capture Oxford researchers' requirements for services to help them manage their data...Presentation given at the Edinburgh Repository Fringe 2008 conference...

  6. Summary report of first and foreign high-level waste repository concepts; Technical report, working draft 001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanke, P.M.

    1987-11-04

    Reference repository concepts designs adopted by domestic and foreign waste disposal programs are reviewed. Designs fall into three basic categories: deep borehole from the surface; disposal in boreholes drilled from underground excavations; and disposal in horizontal tunnels or drifts. The repository concepts developed in Sweden, Switzerland, Finland, Canada, France, Japan, United Kingdom, Belgium, Italy, Holland, Denmark, West Germany and the United States are described. 140 refs., 315 figs., 19 tabs.

  7. An evaluation of the feasibility of disposal of nuclear waste in very deep boreholes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Victoria Katherine, 1980-

    2004-01-01

    Deep boreholes, 3 to 5 km into igneous rock, such as granite, are evaluated for next- generation repository use in the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high level waste. The primary focus is on the stability and ...

  8. Statistical approaches to leak detection for geological sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haidari, Arman S

    2011-01-01

    Geological sequestration has been proposed as a way to remove CO? from the atmosphere by injecting it into deep saline aquifers. Detecting leaks to the atmosphere will be important for ensuring safety and effectiveness of ...

  9. US/German Collaboration in Salt Repository Research, Design and Operation - 13243

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steininger, Walter; Hansen, Frank; Biurrun, Enrique; Bollingerfehr, Wilhelm

    2013-07-01

    Recent developments in the US and Germany [1-3] have precipitated renewed efforts in salt repository investigations and related studies. Both the German rock salt repository activities and the US waste management programs currently face challenges that may adversely affect their respective current and future state-of-the-art core capabilities in rock salt repository science and technology. The research agenda being pursued by our respective countries leverages collective efforts for the benefit of both programs. The topics addressed by the US/German salt repository collaborations align well with the findings and recommendations summarized in the January 2012 US Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future (BRC) report [4] and are consistent with the aspirations of the key topics of the Strategic Research Agenda of the Implementing Geological Disposal of Radioactive Waste Technology Platform (IGD-TP) [5]. Against this background, a revival of joint efforts in salt repository investigations after some years of hibernation has been undertaken to leverage collective efforts in salt repository research, design, operations, and related issues for the benefit of respective programs and to form a basis for providing an attractive, cost-effective insurance against the premature loss of virtually irreplaceable scientific expertise and institutional memory. (authors)

  10. A Handbook for Geology Students Why study Geology?.............................................................................................3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    1 A Handbook for Geology Students #12;2 Contents Why study Geology ..................................................................................7 Why Appalachian Geology?................................................................................10 Geology Faculty and Staff

  11. PHYSICAL GEOLOGY LABORATORY MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    PHYSICAL GEOLOGY LABORATORY MANUAL Geology 001 Eleventh Edition by Professors Charles Merguerian and J Bret Bennington Department of Geology Hofstra University © 2010 #12;ii Table of Contents Lab and Find Out More about Geology at Hofstra Email: Geology professors can be contacted via Email: Full

  12. System description of the Repository-Only System for the FY 1990 systems integration program studies. [CONTAINS GLOSSARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKee, R.W.; Young, J.R.; Konzek, G.J.

    1991-07-01

    This document provides both functional and physical descriptions of a conceptual high-level waste management system defined as a Repository-Only System. Its purpose is to provide a basis for required system computer modeling and system studies initiated in FY 1990 under the Systems Integration Program of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The Repository-Only System is designed to accept 3000 MTU per year of spent fuel and 400 equivalent MTU per year of high-level wastes disposal in the geologic repository. This document contains both functional descriptions of the processes in the waste management system and physical descriptions of the equipment and facilities necessary for performance of those processes. These descriptions contain the level of detail needed for the projected systems analysis studies. The Repository-Only System contains all system components, from the waste storage facilities of the waste generators to the underground facilities for final disposal of the wastes. The major facilities in the system are the waste generator waste storage facilities, a repository facility that packages the wastes and than emplaces them in the geologic repository, and the transportation equipment and facilities for transporting the wastes between these major facilities. 18 refs., 39 figs.

  13. Principles of Historical Geology Geology 331

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammer, Thomas

    Unconformity #12;Application of the Principles of Historical Geology. What is present on the seismic cross geologist to understand stratigraphy and make correlations. #12;#12;William Smith's Geologic Map of England

  14. QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES AND GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sedimentology dalrymple@geol.queensu.ca Dr. M. Diederichs (Sabb Jan 15-July 15) Eng Geology; Geomech; Structural) Engineering Geology; Geohazards jhutchin@geol.queensu.ca Dr. N. James Sedimentology james@geol.queensu.ca Dr

  15. Deep Web Web Deep Web Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deep Web 100872 Deep Web Web Deep Web Web Web Deep Web Deep Web TP391 A Uncertain Schema Matching in Deep Web Integration Service JIANG Fang-Jiao MENG Xiao-Feng JIA Lin-Lin (School of Information, Renmin University of China, Beijing, 100872) Abstract: With increasing of Deep Web, providing

  16. Sub-Seabed Repository for Nuclear Waste - a Strategic Alternative - 13102

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAllister, Keith R. [Department of the Navy, 15 Turkey Foot Court, Darnestown, MD 20878 (United States)] [Department of the Navy, 15 Turkey Foot Court, Darnestown, MD 20878 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    It was recognized at the outset of nuclear power generation in the 1950's that the waste products would require isolation away from humans for periods in excess of 10,000 years. After years studying alternatives, the DOE recommended pursuing the development of a SNF/HLW disposal facility within Yucca Mountain in the desert of Nevada. That recommendation became law with passage of the NWPAA, effectively stopping development of other approaches to the waste problem. In the face of political resistance from the state of Nevada, the 2010 decision to withdraw the license application for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain has delayed further the most mature option for safe, long-term disposal of SNF and HLW. It is time to revisit an alternative option, sub-seabed disposal within the US Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), which would permanently sequester waste out of the biosphere, and out of the reach of saboteurs or terrorists. A proposal is made for a full scale pilot project to demonstrate burying radioactive waste in stable, deep ocean sediments. While much of the scientific work on pelagic clays has been done to develop a sub-seabed waste sequestration capability, this proposal introduces technology from non-traditional sources such as riser-less ocean drilling and the Navy's Sound Surveillance System. The political decisions affecting the issue will come down to site selection and a thorough understanding of comparative risks. The sub-seabed sequestration of nuclear waste has the potential to provide a robust solution to a critical problem for this clean and reliable energy source. (authors)

  17. An Overview of Institutional Repositories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singarella, Thomas

    2005-02-04

    services to support ?peer review? activities. 3. Enhance the administrative functionality and interface. 4. Provide interoperability with institutional repository systems. (Ehling, 2004) The development of the open source publishing system at Cornell... that could be lost if not placed into a central IR. Historical Perspective A historical perspective is important regarding the evolution and development of an IR in order to understand where we are today. In the early 1990s, primarily within the high-energy...

  18. Efficacy of backfilling and other engineered barriers in a radioactive waste repository in salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claiborne, H.C.

    1982-09-01

    In the United States, investigation of potential host geologic formations was expanded in 1975 to include hard rocks. Potential groundwater intrusion is leading to very conservative and expensive waste package designs. Recent studies have concluded that incentives for engineered barriers and 1000-year canisters probably do not exist for reasonable breach scenarios. The assumption that multibarriers will significantly increase the safety margin is also questioned. Use of a bentonite backfill for surrounding a canister of exotic materials was developed in Sweden and is being considered in the US. The expectation that bentonite will remain essentially unchanged for hundreds of years for US repository designs may be unrealistic. In addition, thick bentonite backfills will increase the canister surface temperature and add much more water around the canister. The use of desiccant materials, such as CaO or MgO, for backfilling seems to be a better method of protecting the canister. An argument can also be made for not using backfill material in salt repositories since the 30-cm-thick space will provide for hole closure for many years and will promote heat transfer via natural convection. It is concluded that expensive safety systems are being considered for repository designs that do not necessarily increase the safety margin. It is recommended that the safety systems for waste repositories in different geologic media be addressed individually and that cost-benefit analyses be performed.

  19. BioMed Central: Open Repository: Building a hosted repository service on DSpace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cockerill, Matthew

    2005-07-07

    currently have repositories RCUK policy likely to encourage many smaller institutions to consider setting up repositories High Availability Commercial Tier-1 network datacentre 24x7 monitoring, troubleshooting and fault resolution Fully redundant...

  20. Regional Geologic Map

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28

    Shaded relief base with Hot Pot project area, generalized geology, selected mines, and major topographic features

  1. Regional Geologic Map

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Shaded relief base with Hot Pot project area, generalized geology, selected mines, and major topographic features

  2. GEOLOGY (GEOL) Robinson Foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dresden, Gregory

    177Geology GEOLOGY (GEOL) Robinson Foundation PROFESSOR HARBOR ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS KNAPP, CONNORS ASSISTANT PROFESSORS GREER, RAHL MAJORS BACHELOR OF SCIENCE A major in geology leading to a Bachelor of Science degree consists of 50 credits as follows: 1. Geology 160, 185, 211, 311, 330, 350

  3. IMPLEMENTATION AND OPERATION OF THE REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcus Milling

    2003-10-01

    The NGDRS has facilitated 85% of cores, cuttings, and other data identified available for transfer to the public sector. Over 12 million linear feet of cores and cuttings, in addition to large numbers of paleontological samples and are now available for public use. To date, with industry contributions for program operations and data transfers, the NGDRS project has realized a 6.5 to 1 return on investment to Department of Energy funds. Large-scale transfers of seismic data have been evaluated, but based on the recommendation of the NGDRS steering committee, cores have been given priority because of the vast scale of the seismic data problem relative to the available funding. The rapidly changing industry conditions have required that the primary core and cuttings preservation strategy evolve as well. Additionally, the NGDRS clearinghouse is evaluating the viability of transferring seismic data covering the western shelf of the Florida Gulf Coast. AGI remains actively involved in working to realize the vision of the National Research Council's report of geoscience data preservation. GeoTrek has been ported to Linux and MySQL, ensuring a purely open-source version of the software. This effort is key in ensuring long-term viability of the software so that is can continue basic operation regardless of specific funding levels. Work has been on a major revision of GeoTrek, using the open-source MapServer project and its related MapScript language. This effort will address a number of key technology issues that appear to be rising for 2003, including the discontinuation of the use of Java in future Microsoft operating systems. The recent donation of BPAmoco's Houston core facility to the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology has provided substantial short-term relief of the space constraints for public repository space.

  4. Main Features for the Conceptualization of the Post-Closure Evolution Scenario of the Cigeo LIL-HL Waste Repository - 13105

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landais, Patrick; Giffaut, Eric; Pepin, Guillaume; Plas, Frederic; Schumacher, S. [Andra, 1-7 rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Chatenay Malabry (France)] [Andra, 1-7 rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Chatenay Malabry (France)

    2013-07-01

    In France, in order to commission the planned geological repository by 2025, a license application for the industrial project of this geological repository called Cigeo (Centre Industriel de Stockage Geologique) must be submitted and reviewed by the competent authorities by 2015. On the basis of its preliminary design set up in 2009 and on the associated requirements for long-term safety, an overall conceptual model has been developed in order to prepare the performance and safety analysis. The Cigeo repository makes use of the passive safety response characteristics of both the engineered and geological barriers that allow: - resisting water ingress, with repository designs favoring the limitation of the water flows; - limiting the release of radionuclides and chemical toxics; - delaying and mitigating the spread of radionuclides and chemical toxics. In order to evaluate the performance of the various elements, a conceptual model of the thermo-hydro-chemico-mechanical (THMC) evolution of the different components of the repository has been designed. It takes stock of a 20 years research effort which allowed data to be obtained from various surface geological campaigns, in-situ experiments in URLs and wastes characterization, and advances in numerical simulation to be utilised. Based on the best available knowledge to date, this conceptual model constitutes a robust basis for the definition and development of the long-term safety scenarios. It also helps identifying the residual uncertainties, and provides guidelines for additional research and system optimizations. (authors)

  5. Building of multilevel stakeholder consensus in radioactive waste repository siting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreimanis, A. [Radiation Safety Centre, Riga LV (Latvia)

    2007-07-01

    This report considers the problem of multilevel consensus building for siting and construction of shared multinational/regional repositories for radioactive waste (RW) deep disposal. In the siting of a multinational repository there appears an essential innovative component of stakeholder consensus building, namely: to reach consent - political, social, economic, ecological - among international partners, in addition to solving the whole set of intra-national consensus building items. An entire partnering country is considered as a higher-level stakeholder - the national stakeholder, represented by the national government, being faced to simultaneous seeking an upward (international) and a downward (intra-national) consensus in a psychologically stressed environment, possibly being characterized by diverse political, economic and social interests. The following theses as a possible interdisciplinary approach towards building of shared understanding and stakeholder consensus on the international scale of RW disposal are forwarded and developed: a) building of international stakeholder consensus would be promoted by activating and diversifying on the international scale multilateral interactions between intra- and international stakeholders, including web-based networks of the RW disposal site investigations and decision-making, as well as networks for international cooperation among government authorities in nuclear safety, b) gradual progress in intergovernmental consensus and reaching multilateral agreements on shared deep repositories will be the result of democratic dialogue, via observing the whole set of various interests and common resolving of emerged controversies by using advanced synergetic approaches of conflict resolution, c) cross-cultural thinking and world perception, mental flexibility, creativity and knowledge are considered as basic prerogatives for gaining a higher level of mutual understanding and consensus for seeking further consensus, for advancing the preparedness to act together, and ultimately - for achieving desired shared goals. It is proposed that self-organized social learning will make it possible to promote adequate perception of risk and prevent, by diminishing uncertainties and unknown factors, social amplification of an imagined risk, as well as to increase the trust level and facilitate more adequate equity perception. The proposed approach to the multilevel stakeholder consensus building on international scale is extrapolated to the present-day activities of siting of such near-surface RW disposal facilities which supposedly could have non-negligible trans-boundary impact. A multilevel stakeholder interaction process is considered for the case of resolving of emerged problems in site selection for the planned near-surface RW repository in vicinity of the Lithuanian-Latvian border foreseen for disposal of short lived low- and intermediate level waste arising from the decommissioning of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant. (authors)

  6. THERMAL ANALYSIS OF GEOLOGIC HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hensel, S.; Lee, S.

    2010-04-20

    The engineering design of disposal of the high level waste (HLW) packages in a geologic repository requires a thermal analysis to provide the temperature history of the packages. Calculated temperatures are used to demonstrate compliance with criteria for waste acceptance into the geologic disposal gallery system and as input to assess the transient thermal characteristics of the vitrified HLW Package. The objective of the work was to evaluate the thermal performance of the supercontainer containing the vitrified HLW in a non-backfilled and unventilated underground disposal gallery. In order to achieve the objective, transient computational models for a geologic vitrified HLW package were developed by using a computational fluid dynamics method, and calculations for the HLW disposal gallery of the current Belgian geological repository reference design were performed. An initial two-dimensional model was used to conduct some parametric sensitivity studies to better understand the geologic system's thermal response. The effect of heat decay, number of co-disposed supercontainers, domain size, humidity, thermal conductivity and thermal emissivity were studied. Later, a more accurate three-dimensional model was developed by considering the conduction-convection cooling mechanism coupled with radiation, and the effect of the number of supercontainers (3, 4 and 8) was studied in more detail, as well as a bounding case with zero heat flux at both ends. The modeling methodology and results of the sensitivity studies will be presented.

  7. Handling Change Management using Temporal Active Repositories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gal, Avigdor

    Handling Change Management using Temporal Active Repositories Avigdor Gal and Opher Etzion and their management. In this paper we introduce an architecture of change man- agement using active temporal repositories. Flexible change management allows the support of information about past or future versions

  8. National Geothermal Data System - DOE Geothermal Data Repository...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - DOE Geothermal Data Repository Presentation National Geothermal Data System - DOE Geothermal Data Repository Presentation Overview of the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS)...

  9. Immersion studies on candidate container alloys for the Tuff Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beavers, J.A.; Durr, C.L.

    1991-05-01

    Cortest Columbus Technologies (CC Technologies) is investigating the long-term performance of container materials used for high-level radioactive waste packages. This information is being developed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to aid in their assessment of the Department of Energy`s application to construct a geologic repository for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. This report summarizes the results of exposure studies performed on two copper-base and two Fe-Cr-Ni alloys in simulated Tuff Repository conditions. Testing was performed at 90{degrees}C in three environments; simulated J-13 well water, and two environments that simulated the chemical effects resulting from boiling and irradiation of the groundwater. Creviced specimens and U-bends were exposed to liquid, to vapor above the condensed phase, and to alternate immersion. A rod specimen was used to monitor corrosion at the vapor-liquid interface. The specimens were evaluated by electrochemical, gravimetric, and metallographic techniques following approximately 2000 hours of exposure. Results of the exposure tests indicated that all four alloys exhibited acceptable general corrosion rates in simulated J-13 well water. These rates decreased with time. Incipient pitting was observed under deposits on Alloy 825 and pitting was observed on both Alloy CDA 102 and Alloy CDA 715 in the simulated J-13 well water. No SCC was observed in U-bend specimens of any of the alloys in simulated J-13 well water. 33 refs., 48 figs., 23 tabs.

  10. NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

    2002-02-05

    From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory pyrolysis methods have provided much information on the origins of deep gas. Technologic problems are one of the greatest challenges to deep drilling. Problems associated with overcoming hostile drilling environments (e.g. high temperatures and pressures, and acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) for successful well completion, present the greatest obstacles to drilling, evaluating, and developing deep gas fields. Even though the overall success ratio for deep wells is about 50 percent, a lack of geological and geophysical information such as reservoir quality, trap development, and gas composition continues to be a major barrier to deep gas exploration. Results of recent finding-cost studies by depth interval for the onshore U.S. indicate that, on average, deep wells cost nearly 10 times more to drill than shallow wells, but well costs and gas recoveries vary widely among different gas plays in different basins. Based on an analysis of natural gas assessments, many topical areas hold significant promise for future exploration and development. One such area involves re-evaluating and assessing hypothetical unconventional basin-center gas plays. Poorly-understood basin-center gas plays could contain significant deep undiscovered technically-recoverable gas resources.

  11. Focused Crawling of the Deep Web Using Service Class Descriptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocco, D; Liu, L; Critchlow, T

    2004-06-21

    Dynamic Web data sources--sometimes known collectively as the Deep Web--increase the utility of the Web by providing intuitive access to data repositories anywhere that Web access is available. Deep Web services provide access to real-time information, like entertainment event listings, or present a Web interface to large databases or other data repositories. Recent studies suggest that the size and growth rate of the dynamic Web greatly exceed that of the static Web, yet dynamic content is often ignored by existing search engine indexers owing to the technical challenges that arise when attempting to search the Deep Web. To address these challenges, we present DynaBot, a service-centric crawler for discovering and clustering Deep Web sources offering dynamic content. DynaBot has three unique characteristics. First, DynaBot utilizes a service class model of the Web implemented through the construction of service class descriptions (SCDs). Second, DynaBot employs a modular, self-tuning system architecture for focused crawling of the DeepWeb using service class descriptions. Third, DynaBot incorporates methods and algorithms for efficient probing of the Deep Web and for discovering and clustering Deep Web sources and services through SCD-based service matching analysis. Our experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the service class discovery, probing, and matching algorithms and suggest techniques for efficiently managing service discovery in the face of the immense scale of the Deep Web.

  12. Deep Lysimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2004-06-01

    A deep lysimeter including a hollow vessel having a chamber, a fill conduit extending into the chamber through apertures, a semi-permeable member mounted on the vessel and in fluid communication with the fill conduit, and a line connection for retrieving the lysimeter.

  13. GEOLOGY 619 ADVANCED PETROLEUM GEOLOGY Wayne M. Ahr, Professor, CPG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOLOGY 619 ­ ADVANCED PETROLEUM GEOLOGY Wayne M. Ahr, Professor, CPG Draft v.1 ­ October, 2008 Advanced Petroleum Geology is designed for graduate students in geology, geophysics, and engineering. This course differs from Geology 404 ­ Petroleum Geology ­ by its more rigorous treatment of subject matter

  14. Geologic Maps and Structures Name ______________________________ Geology 100 Harbor section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harbor, David

    Geologic Maps and Structures Name ______________________________ Geology 100 ­ Harbor section The objectives of this lab are for you to learn the basic geologic structures in 3-D and to develop some facility in interpreting the nature of geologic structures from geologic maps and geologic cross sections. A big part

  15. BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 33, Part 1 CONTENTS Tertiary Geologic History Geology of the Deadman Canyon 7112-Minute Quadrangle, Carbon County, Utah, Utah. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .James Douglas Smith 135 Geology

  16. Region-to-area screening methodology for the Crystalline Repository Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1985-04-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the Crystalline Repository Project's (CRP) process for region-to-area screening of exposed and near-surface crystalline rock bodies in the three regions of the conterminous United States where crystalline rock is being evaluated as a potential host for the second nuclear waste repository (i.e., in the North Central, Northeastern, and Southeastern Regions). This document indicates how the US Department of Energy's (DOE) General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories (10 CFR 960) were used to select and apply factors and variables for the region-to-area screening, explains how these factors and variable are to be applied in the region-to-area screening, and indicates how this methodology relates to the decision process leading to the selection of candidate areas. A brief general discussion of the screening process from the national survey through area screening and site recommendation is presented. This discussion sets the scene for detailed discussions which follow concerning the region-to-area screening process, the guidance provided by the DOE Siting Guidelines for establishing disqualifying factors and variables for screening, and application of the disqualifying factors and variables in the screening process. This document is complementary to the regional geologic and environmental characterization reports to be issued in the summer of 1985 as final documents. These reports will contain the geologic and environmental data base that will be used in conjunction with the methodology to conduct region-to-area screening.

  17. Temperature-package power correlations for open-mode geologic disposal concepts.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardin, Ernest L.

    2013-02-01

    Logistical simulation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) management in the U.S. combines storage, transportation and disposal elements to evaluate schedule, cost and other resources needed for all major operations leading to final geologic disposal. Geologic repository reference options are associated with limits on waste package thermal power output at emplacement, in order to meet limits on peak temperature for certain key engineered and natural barriers. These package power limits are used in logistical simulation software such as CALVIN, as threshold requirements that must be met by means of decay storage or SNF blending in waste packages, before emplacement in a repository. Geologic repository reference options include enclosed modes developed for crystalline rock, clay or shale, and salt. In addition, a further need has been addressed for open modes in which SNF can be emplaced in a repository, then ventilated for decades or longer to remove heat, prior to permanent repository closure. For each open mode disposal concept there are specified durations for surface decay storage (prior to emplacement), repository ventilation, and repository closure operations. This study simulates those steps for several timing cases, and for SNF with three fuel-burnup characteristics, to develop package power limits at which waste packages can be emplaced without exceeding specified temperature limits many years later after permanent closure. The results are presented in the form of correlations that span a range of package power and peak postclosure temperature, for each open-mode disposal concept, and for each timing case. Given a particular temperature limit value, the corresponding package power limit for each case can be selected for use in CALVIN and similar tools.

  18. Some Materials Degradation Issues in the U.S. High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository Study (The Yucca Mountain Project)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Hua; P. Pasupathi; N. Brown; K. Mon

    2005-09-19

    The safe disposal of radioactive waste requires that the waste be isolated from the environment until radioactive decay has reduced its toxicity to innocuous levels for plants, animals, and humans. All of the countries currently studying the options for disposing of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) have selected deep geologic formations to be the primary barrier for accomplishing this isolation. In U.S.A., the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987) designated Yucca Mountain in Nevada as the potential site to be characterized for high-level nuclear waste (HLW) disposal. Long-term containment of waste and subsequent slow release of radionuclides into the geosphere will rely on a system of natural and engineered barriers including a robust waste containment design. The waste package design consists of a highly corrosion resistant Ni-based Alloy 22 cylindrical barrier surrounding a Type 316 stainless steel inner structural vessel. The waste package is covered by a mailbox-shaped drip shield composed primarily of Ti Grade 7 with Ti Grade 24 structural support members. The U.S. Yucca Mountain Project has been studying and modeling the degradation issues of the relevant materials for some 20 years. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art understanding of the degradation processes based on the past 20 years studies on Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) materials degradation issues with focus on interaction between the in-drift environmental conditions and long-term materials degradation of waste packages and drip shields within the repository system during the 10,000 years regulatory period. This paper provides an overview of the current understanding of the likely degradation behavior of the waste package and drip shield in the repository after the permanent closure of the facility. The degradation scenario discussed in this paper include aging and phase instability, dry oxidation, general and localized corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen induced cracking of Alloy 22 and titanium alloys. The effects of microbial activity and radiation on degradation of Alloy 22 and titanium alloys are also discussed. Further, for titanium alloys, the effects of fluorides, bromides, calcium ions, and galvanic coupling to less noble metals are further considered. It is concluded that, as far as materials degradation is concerned, the materials and design adopted in the U.S. Yucca Mountain Project will provide sufficient safety margins within the 10,000-years regulatory period.

  19. The institutional repository in the digital library 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacColl, John; Jones, Richard D; Andrew, Theo

    We begin by looking at the concept of institutional repositories within the broader context of digital libraries. ‘Digital libraries’ can mean many things, but we consider them to be libraries first and foremost, and ...

  20. Velocities of deep water reservoir sands De-hua Han, University of Houston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velocities of deep water reservoir sands De-hua Han, University of Houston M. Batzle, Colorado the application for DHI techniques. Summary In deep-water sedimentary processes, compaction is a major force of weakly cemented deep-water sands. Geological compaction and possible weak cementation can reduce porosity

  1. Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of isolating radioactive wastes from the biosphere presents specialists in the fields of earth sciences with some of the most complicated problems they have ever encountered. This is especially true for high level waste (HLW) which must be isolated in the underground and away from the biosphere for thousands of years. Essentially every country that is generating electricity in nuclear power plants is faced with the problem of isolating the radioactive wastes that are produced. The general consensus is that this can be accomplished by selecting an appropriate geologic setting and carefully designing the rock repository. Much new technology is being developed to solve the problems that have been raised and there is a continuing need to publish the results of new developments for the benefit of all concerned. The 28th International Geologic Congress that was held July 9--19, 1989 in Washington, DC provided an opportunity for earth scientists to gather for detailed discussions on these problems. Workshop W3B on the subject, Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation -- A World Wide Review'' was organized by Paul A Witherspoon and Ghislain de Marsily and convened July 15--16, 1989 Reports from 19 countries have been gathered for this publication. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  2. THE DECISION TO RECOMMEND YUCCA MOUNTAIN AND THE NEXT STEPS TOWARD LICENSED REPOSITORY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, L. H.

    2002-02-25

    After more than 20 years of carefully planned and reviewed scientific field work by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Geological Survey, and numerous other organizations, Secretary of Energy Abraham concluded in January that the Yucca Mountain site is suitable, within the meaning of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, for development as a permanent nuclear waste and spent fuel repository. In February, the Secretary recommended to the President that the site be developed for licensed disposal of these wastes, and the President transmitted this recommendation to Congress. This paper summarizes key technical and national interest considerations that provided the basis for the recommendation. It also discusses the program's near-term plans for repository development if Congress designates the site.

  3. YUCCA MOUNTAIN PROJECT RECOMMENDATION BY THE SECRETARY OF ENERGY REGARDING THE SUITABILITY OF THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE FOR A REPOSITORY UNDER THE NUCLEAR WASTE POLICY ACT OF 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NA

    2002-03-26

    For more than half a century, since nuclear science helped us win World War II and ring in the Atomic Age, scientists have known that !he Nation would need a secure, permanent facility in which to dispose of radioactive wastes. Twenty years ago, when Congress adopted the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA or ''the Act''), it recognized the overwhelming consensus in the scientific community that the best option for such a facility would be a deep underground repository. Fifteen years ago, Congress directed the Secretary of Energy to investigate and recommend to the President whether such a repository could be located safely at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Since then, our country has spent billions of dollars and millions of hours of research endeavoring to answer this question. I have carefully reviewed the product of this study. In my judgment, it constitutes sound science and shows that a safe repository can be sited there. I also believe that compelling national interests counsel in favor of proceeding with this project. Accordingly, consistent with my responsibilities under the NWPA, today I am recommending that Yucca Mountain be developed as the site for an underground repository for spent fuel and other radioactive wastes. The first consideration in my decision was whether the Yucca Mountain site will safeguard the health and safety of the people, in Nevada and across the country, and will be effective in containing at minimum risk the material it is designed to hold. Substantial evidence shows that it will. Yucca Mountain is far and away the most thoroughly researched site of its kind in the world. It is a geologically stable site, in a closed groundwater basin, isolated on thousands of acres of Federal land, and farther from any metropolitan area than the great majority of less secure, temporary nuclear waste storage sites that exist in the country today. This point bears emphasis. We are not confronting a hypothetical problem. We have a staggering amount of radioactive waste in this country--nearly 100,000,000 gallons of high-level nuclear waste and more than 40,000 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel with more created every day. Our choice is not between, on the one hand, a disposal site with costs and risks held to a minimum, and, on the other, a magic disposal system with no costs or risks at all. Instead, the real choice is between a single secure site, deep under the ground at Yucca Mountain, or making do with what we have now or some variant of it--131 aging surface sites, scattered across 39 states. Every one of those sites was built on the assumption that it would be temporary. As time goes by. every one is closer to the limit of its safe life span. And every one is at least a potential security risk--safe for today, but a question mark in decades to come.

  4. Preliminary Geologic Characterization of West Coast States for Geologic Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Myer

    2005-09-29

    Characterization of geological sinks for sequestration of CO{sub 2} in California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington was carried out as part of Phase I of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) project. Results show that there are geologic storage opportunities in the region within each of the following major technology areas: saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and coal beds. The work focused on sedimentary basins as the initial most-promising targets for geologic sequestration. Geographical Information System (GIS) layers showing sedimentary basins and oil, gas, and coal fields in those basins were developed. The GIS layers were attributed with information on the subsurface, including sediment thickness, presence and depth of porous and permeable sandstones, and, where available, reservoir properties. California offers outstanding sequestration opportunities because of its large capacity and the potential of value-added benefits from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and enhanced gas recovery (EGR). The estimate for storage capacity of saline formations in the ten largest basins in California ranges from about 150 to about 500 Gt of CO{sub 2}, depending on assumptions about the fraction of the formations used and the fraction of the pore volume filled with separate-phase CO{sub 2}. Potential CO{sub 2}-EOR storage was estimated to be 3.4 Gt, based on a screening of reservoirs using depth, an API gravity cutoff, and cumulative oil produced. The cumulative production from gas reservoirs (screened by depth) suggests a CO{sub 2} storage capacity of 1.7 Gt. In Oregon and Washington, sedimentary basins along the coast also offer sequestration opportunities. Of particular interest is the Puget Trough Basin, which contains up to 1,130 m (3,700 ft) of unconsolidated sediments overlying up to 3,050 m (10,000 ft) of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The Puget Trough Basin also contains deep coal formations, which are sequestration targets and may have potential for enhanced coal bed methane recovery (ECBM).

  5. Integrating rock mechanics issues with repository design through design process principles and methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1996-04-01

    A good designer needs not only knowledge for designing (technical know-how that is used to generate alternative design solutions) but also must have knowledge about designing (appropriate principles and systematic methodology to follow). Concepts such as {open_quotes}design for manufacture{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}concurrent engineering{close_quotes} are widely used in the industry. In the field of rock engineering, only limited attention has been paid to the design process because design of structures in rock masses presents unique challenges to the designers as a result of the uncertainties inherent in characterization of geologic media. However, a stage has now been reached where we are be able to sufficiently characterize rock masses for engineering purposes and identify the rock mechanics issues involved but are still lacking engineering design principles and methodology to maximize our design performance. This paper discusses the principles and methodology of the engineering design process directed to integrating site characterization activities with design, construction and performance of an underground repository. Using the latest information from the Yucca Mountain Project on geology, rock mechanics and starter tunnel design, the current lack of integration is pointed out and it is shown how rock mechanics issues can be effectively interwoven with repository design through a systematic design process methodology leading to improved repository performance. In essence, the design process is seen as the use of design principles within an integrating design methodology, leading to innovative problem solving. In particular, a new concept of {open_quotes}Design for Constructibility and Performance{close_quotes} is introduced. This is discussed with respect to ten rock mechanics issues identified for repository design and performance.

  6. Environmental Geology Major www.geology.pitt.edu/uprogs.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Environmental Geology Major www.geology.pitt.edu/uprogs.html Revised: 04/2004 Environmental geology in environmental geology provides the diverse skills required to work in many different employment settings issues. Within the field of geology, environmental and geotechnical jobs exist for people with BS degrees

  7. Department of Geology and Geological Engineering University of Mississippi Announces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsherbeni, Atef Z.

    Department of Geology and Geological Engineering University of Mississippi Announces Krista Pursuing a degree within the Geology & Geological Engineering department Record of financial need the University of Mississippi with a Bachelor of Science degree in geological engineering in 1982. After earning

  8. Geologic Maps and Structures Name ______________________________ Geology 100 Harbor section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harbor, David

    Geologic Maps and Structures Name ______________________________ Geology 100 ­ Harbor section Read Ch. 7 before you begin. The objectives of this lab are for you to learn the basic geologic structures in 3-D and to develop some facility in interpreting the nature of geologic structures from geologic

  9. Coupling fuel cycles with repositories: how repository institutional choices may impact fuel cycle design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, C.; Miller, W.F.

    2013-07-01

    The historical repository siting strategy in the United States has been a top-down approach driven by federal government decision making but it has been a failure. This policy has led to dispatching fuel cycle facilities in different states. The U.S. government is now considering an alternative repository siting strategy based on voluntary agreements with state governments. If that occurs, state governments become key decision makers. They have different priorities. Those priorities may change the characteristics of the repository and the fuel cycle. State government priorities, when considering hosting a repository, are safety, financial incentives and jobs. It follows that states will demand that a repository be the center of the back end of the fuel cycle as a condition of hosting it. For example, states will push for collocation of transportation services, safeguards training, and navy/private SNF (Spent Nuclear Fuel) inspection at the repository site. Such activities would more than double local employment relative to what was planned for the Yucca Mountain-type repository. States may demand (1) the right to take future title of the SNF so if recycle became economic the reprocessing plant would be built at the repository site and (2) the right of a certain fraction of the repository capacity for foreign SNF. That would open the future option of leasing of fuel to foreign utilities with disposal of the SNF in the repository but with the state-government condition that the front-end fuel-cycle enrichment and fuel fabrication facilities be located in that state.

  10. Directions in the study of ocean chemistry over the Phanerozoic and its links to geologic processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paytan, Adina

    processes To study the changes over geologic time in the salts of seawater is to study not just marine chemistry, but the intertwined tales of geologic processes: tectonics, climate, biomineralization of the concentration and isotopic composition of these salts is information about rates of deep sea hydrothermal

  11. REMOTE SENSING GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sensing data used in CPRM geologic projects Future perspective: the Spectral Library of Geological Survey Pesquisa de Recursos Minerais (CPRM) is a state-owned company that carries out the functions of Brazil ­ CPRM #12;Examples of use of LANDSAT imagery in CPRM projects Field works planning ­ Enhancement

  12. The Geological Society of America Special Paper 430

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Geological Society of America Special Paper 430 2007 Global kinematics in deep versus shallow below the asthenosphere, and one fed by the asthenos- phere itself, provide different kinematic results pull as the first-or- der driving mechanism of plate dynamics. Keywords: plate motions, reference

  13. The subsurface fluid mechanics of geologic carbon dioxide storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szulczewski, Michael Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    In carbon capture and storage (CCS), CO? is captured at power plants and then injected into deep geologic reservoirs for long-term storage. While CCS may be critical for the continued use of fossil fuels in a carbon-constrained ...

  14. GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS 2014-2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermúdez, José Luis

    GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS 2014-2015 Graduate Student Handbook - 1 · Geology & Geophysics Core Values - 2 · A Message from the Graduate Advisor - 3 · Department Organizations - 60 · Departmental Executive Committee - 61 · Geology& Geophysics Development Advisory Council

  15. Deep dermatophytosis caused by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warycha, Melanie A; Leger, Marie; Tzu, Julia; Kamino, Hideko; Stein, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    PubMed ] 5. Gong JQ, et al. Deep dermatophytosis caused bymolecular diagnosis of deep localized cutaneous infectionPubMed ] 7. Chastain MA, et al. Deep dermatophytosis: report

  16. Deep Research Submarine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woertz, Jeff

    2002-02-01

    The Deep Sea Research Submarine (Figure 1) is a modified VIRGINIA Class Submarine that incorporates a permanently installed Deep Sea Operations Compartment (Figure 2). Table 1 summarizes the characteristics of the Deep ...

  17. New Yucca Mountain Repository Design to be Simpler, Safer and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    New Yucca Mountain Repository Design to be Simpler, Safer and More Cost-Effective New Yucca Mountain Repository Design to be Simpler, Safer and More Cost-Effective untitled More...

  18. BUOYANCY FLOW IN FRACTURES INTERSECTING A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.S.Y.

    2010-01-01

    11112 "Heat Transfer to Nuclear Waste Disposal", ASME WinterIN FPACTUHES INTERSECTING A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY J.S.Y.Heat released from a nuclear waste repository in a

  19. Chapter 14 Geology and Soils

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in bold and acronyms are defined in Chapter 32, Glossary and Acronyms. Chapter 14 Geology and Soils This chapter describes existing geological and soil conditions in the...

  20. National Geoscience Data Repository System -- Phase III: Implementation and Operation of the Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keane, Christopher M.

    2002-05-28

    The National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase III was an operational project focused on coordinating and facilitating transfers of at-risk geoscience data from the private sector to the public domain.

  1. VISUALIZING ELECTRONIC DOCUMENT REPOSITORIES: DRAWING BOOKS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rauber,Andreas

    ' are not natural selection criteria in their known environment. Even analyzing the provided metadata to #12;nd out ranking criteria, allowing users to quickly identify both the topics covered by the library, the amountVISUALIZING ELECTRONIC DOCUMENT REPOSITORIES: DRAWING BOOKS AND PAPERS IN A DIGITAL LIBRARY Andreas

  2. BS in GEOLOGY (694022) MAP Sheet Department of Geological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    351 Mineralogy Geol 352 Petrology Geol 370 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy Geol 375 Structural Geology

  3. Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Geological Data Evaluation Alternativ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Content: Close Send 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for pages...

  4. Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,Executive Compensation References: FARWashersGenSysContractors | Department

  5. Jobtong Deep Web Web""Surface WebDeep Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jobtong Deep Web Web Web Web""Surface WebDeep Web Surface WebDeep Web Web[1] 20007BrightPlanet.comDeep Web[2] Web43,000-96,000Web7,500TB(Surface Web500) UIUC5Deep Web[3]2004Deep Web 307,000366,000-535,000"" Deep Web""Google Yahoo32%Deep Web WAMDMWebDeep WebJobtong Deep Web (Jobtong) Jobtong(, http

  6. 460:410--Field Geology COURSE INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sedimentology, stratigraphy, and structural geology. Students gain skills in geologic mapping on air: Structural Geology AND Stratigraphy or Sedimentary Geology; OR permission of instructors IV. Instructors 21 Aug Museum: Quiz; lectures and exercises on Fundy basin geology; stratigraphy & depositional

  7. Learning Deep Generative Ruslan Salakhutdinov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Learning Deep Generative Models Ruslan Salakhutdinov Departments of Computer Science reserved Keywords deep learning, deep belief networks, deep Boltzmann machines, graphical models Abstract suggest that building such systems requires models with deep architectures that involve many layers

  8. An assessment of the effect on Olkiluoto repository capacity achievable with advanced fuel cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juutilainen, P.; Viitanen, T.

    2013-07-01

    Previously a few scenarios have been simulated for transition from thermal to fast reactor fleet in Finland in order to determine how much the transuranic inventory could be reduced with the partitioning and transmutation (P-T) technologies. Those calculations, performed with COSI6 code developed by CEA, are extended in the present study, in which the effect of P-T on the capacity of the planned final disposal repository at Olkiluoto (Finland) is evaluated by taking into account the created fission products and transuranic residuals from the reprocessing operations. The decay heat is assumed to be the most restrictive factor in defining the waste disposal packing density. The repository capacity evaluation of this study is based on the comparison of the decay heats produced by the deposited waste in various scenarios. The reference scenario of this article involves only Light Water Reactors (LWR) in an open fuel cycle. The capacity requirement of the geological repository is estimated in a few closed fuel cycle scenarios, all including actinide transmutation with Fast Reactors (FR). The comparison between the P-T scenarios and reference is based on the decay heat production of the deposited waste. The COSI6 code is used for simulations to provide the repository decay heat curves. Applying the closed fuel cycle would change the disposal concept and schedule, because of which it is not quite straightforward to assess the impact of P-T on the capacity. However, it can be concluded that recycling the transuranic nuclides probably decreases the required volume for the disposal, but thermal dimensioning analysis is needed for more specific conclusions.

  9. BS in GEOLOGY: Environmental Geology Emphasis (694029) MAP Sheet Department of Geological Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    Mineralogy Geol 352 Petrology Geol 370 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy Geol 375 Structural Geology Geol 410

  10. Semi-analytical Solution for Multiphase Fluid Flow Applied to CO2 Sequestration in Geologic Porous Media 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed, Ahmed Mohamed Anwar Sayed

    2013-08-01

    The increasing concentration of CO_(2) has been linked to global warming and changes in climate. Geologic sequestration of CO_(2) in deep saline aquifers is a proposed greenhouse gas mitigation technology with potential to significantly reduce...

  11. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    state multi layered cylindrical solution to simulate the temperature response of a deep geologic radioactive waste repository with multi layered natural and engineered...

  12. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    multi-layered cylindrical solution to simulate the temperature response of a deep geologic radioactive waste repository with multi-layered natural and engineered...

  13. Application of Analytical Heat Transfer Models of Multi-layered...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    multi-layered cylindrical solution to simulate the temperature response of a deep geologic radioactive waste repository with multi-layered natural and engineered...

  14. Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    will withstand intense scrutiny 3116 Requirements 1. Does not require disposal in deep geological repository 2. Highly radioactive radionuclides removed to the maximum extent...

  15. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helton, Jon Craig; Sallaberry, Cedric M.; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2010-05-01

    Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. As part of this development, an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the YM repository was completed in 2008 [1] and supported a license application by the DOE to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the construction of the YM repository [2]. This presentation provides an overview of the conceptual and computational structure of the indicated PA (hereafter referred to as the 2008 YM PA) and the roles that uncertainty analysis and sensitivity analysis play in this structure.

  16. Fukushima Daiichi Information Repository FY13 Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; Cherie Phelan; Dave Schwieder

    2013-09-01

    The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station in Japan is one of the most serious in commercial nuclear power plant operating history. Much will be learned that may be applicable to the U.S. reactor fleet, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and supporting systems, and the international reactor fleet. For example, lessons from Fukushima Daiichi may be applied to emergency response planning, reactor operator training, accident scenario modeling, human factors engineering, radiation protection, and accident mitigation; as well as influence U.S. policies towards the nuclear fuel cycle including power generation, and spent fuel storage, reprocessing, and disposal. This document describes the database used to establish a centralized information repository to store and manage the Fukushima data that has been gathered. The data is stored in a secured (password protected and encrypted) repository that is searchable and available to researchers at diverse locations.

  17. UT Repository 1928 3 12 12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goda, Keisuke

    Repository 770 3,66121,945663939 25 2 1 http://imglib.ioc.u-tokyo.ac.jp/ Web http://www.lib.m.u-tokyo.ac.jp/digital/index.html http://rarebook.dl.itc.u-tokyo.ac.jp/ogai/index.html URL http://www.lib.u-tokyo.ac.jp/koho/guide/coll/index.html 201110281120 2012710 2011710 20107 10 ...12502009710 9 http://www.lib.u-tokyo.ac.jp/ http://www.lib.u-tokyo.ac.jp/tenjikai/index.html

  18. Measured response to a drainage adit in a deep creeping L. BONZANIGO1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhardt, Erik

    notable characteristics of the Campo Vallemaggia slide is the presence of deep artesian water pressuresMeasured response to a drainage adit in a deep creeping slide mass L. BONZANIGO1 , E. EBERHARDT2 and S. LOEW2 1 Bonzanigo Geologo Consulente, Bellinzona, Switzerland 2 Engineering Geology, Swiss

  19. SUBSURFACE REPOSITORY INTEGRATED CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.J. Fernado

    1998-09-17

    The purpose of this document is to develop preliminary high-level functional and physical control system architectures for the proposed subsurface repository at Yucca Mountain. This document outlines overall control system concepts that encompass and integrate the many diverse systems being considered for use within the subsurface repository. This document presents integrated design concepts for monitoring and controlling the diverse set of subsurface operations. The subsurface repository design will be composed of a series of diverse systems that will be integrated to accomplish a set of overall functions and objectives. The subsurface repository contains several Instrumentation and Control (I&C) related systems including: waste emplacement systems, ventilation systems, communication systems, radiation monitoring systems, rail transportation systems, ground control monitoring systems, utility monitoring systems (electrical, lighting, water, compressed air, etc.), fire detection and protection systems, retrieval systems, and performance confirmation systems. Each of these systems involve some level of I&C and will typically be integrated over a data communication network. The subsurface I&C systems will also integrate with multiple surface-based site-wide systems such as emergency response, health physics, security and safeguards, communications, utilities and others. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Identify preliminary system level functions and interface needs (Presented in the functional diagrams in Section 7.2). (2) Examine the overall system complexity and determine how and on what levels these control systems will be controlled and integrated (Presented in Section 7.2). (3) Develop a preliminary subsurface facility-wide design for an overall control system architecture, and depict this design by a series of control system functional block diagrams (Presented in Section 7.2). (4) Develop a series of physical architectures that present preliminary concepts for integrating the diverse set of control systems to be used within the subsurface repository facility (Presented in Section 7.3). (5) Develop initial concepts for an overall subsurface data communication system that can be used to integrate critical and data-intensive control systems (Presented in Section 7.4). (6) Discuss technology trends and control system design issues (Presented in Section 7.5).

  20. Death Valley Lower Carbonate Aquifer Monitoring Program Wells Down gradient of the Proposed Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inyo County

    2006-07-26

    Inyo County has participated in oversight activities associated with the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository since 1987. The overall goal of these studies are the evaluation of far-field issues related to potential transport, by ground water, or radionuclides into Inyo County, including Death Valley, and the evaluation of a connection between the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) and the biosphere. Our oversight and completed Cooperative Agreement research, and a number of other investigators research indicate that there is groundwater flow between the alluvial and carbonate aquifers both at Yucca Mountain and in Inyo County. In addition to the potential of radionuclide transport through the LCA, Czarnecki (1997), with the US Geological Survey, research indicate potential radionuclide transport through the shallower Tertiary-age aquifer materials with ultimate discharge into the Franklin Lake Playa in Inyo County. The specific purpose of this Cooperative Agreement drilling program was to acquire geological, subsurface geology, and hydrologic data to: (1) establish the existence of inter-basin flow between the Amargosa Basin and Death Valley Basin; (2) characterize groundwater flow paths in the LCA through Southern Funeral Mountain Range, and (3) Evaluation the hydraulic connection between the Yucca Mountain repository and the major springs in Death Valley through the LCA.

  1. A Fundamental Study of Convective Mixing of CO2 in Heterogeneous Geologic Media using Surrogate Fluids and Numerical Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , H. A., and Huppert H. E., 2010, Convective dissolution of carbon dioxide in saline aquifers, GeophysA Fundamental Study of Convective Mixing of CO2 in Heterogeneous Geologic Media using Surrogate mechanisms contributing to storage of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) in deep saline geologic formations. When

  2. The geomechanics of CO{sub 2} storage in deep sedimentary formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, J.

    2011-11-01

    This paper provides a review of the geomechanics and modeling of geomechanics associated with geologic carbon storage (GCS), focusing on storage in deep sedimentary formations, in particular saline aquifers. The paper first introduces the concept of storage in deep sedimentary formations, the geomechanical processes and issues related with such an operation, and the relevant geomechanical modeling tools. This is followed by a more detailed review of geomechanical aspects, including reservoir stress-strain and microseismicity, well integrity, caprock sealing performance, and the potential for fault reactivation and notable (felt) seismic events. Geomechanical observations at current GCS field deployments, mainly at the In Salah CO2 storage project in Algeria, are also integrated into the review. The In Salah project, with its injection into a relatively thin, low-permeability sandstone is an excellent analogue to the saline aquifers that might be used for large scale GCS in parts of Northwest Europe, the U.S. Midwest, and China. Some of the lessons learned at In Salah related to geomechanics are discussed, including how monitoring of geomechanical responses is used for detecting subsurface geomechanical changes and tracking fluid movements, and how such monitoring and geomechanical analyses have led to preventative changes in the injection parameters. Recently, the importance of geomechanics has become more widely recognized among GCS stakeholders, especially with respect to the potential for triggering notable (felt) seismic events and how such events could impact the long-term integrity of a CO{sub 2} repository (as well as how it could impact the public perception of GCS). As described in the paper, to date, no notable seismic event has been reported from any of the current CO{sub 2} storage projects, although some unfelt microseismic activities have been detected by geophones. However, potential future commercial GCS operations from large power plants will require injection at a much larger scale. For such largescale injections, a staged, learn-as-you-go approach is recommended, involving a gradual increase of injection rates combined with continuous monitoring of geomechanical changes, as well as siting beneath a multiple layered overburden for multiple flow barrier protection, should an unexpected deep fault reactivation occur.

  3. A comparative simulation study of coupled THM processes and their effect on fractured rock permeability around nuclear waste repositories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, Jonny

    2008-01-01

    hydrothermomechanical design of nuclear waste repositories.Associated with Nuclear Waste Repositories, Academic Press,safety of a hypothetical nuclear waste repository – BMT1 of

  4. Critical Issues Geologic mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    , and productive cooperation with many other organizations all combine to enhance the IGS-bed methane, and geothermal energy. The IGS's important sources of information--geologic maps, rock and core technologies of energy production, such as integrated gasification combined cycle systems and underground coal

  5. The consequences of failure should be considered in siting geologic carbon sequestration projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, P.N.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2009-02-23

    Geologic carbon sequestration is the injection of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} into deep geologic formations where the CO{sub 2} is intended to remain indefinitely. If successfully implemented, geologic carbon sequestration will have little or no impact on terrestrial ecosystems aside from the mitigation of climate change. However, failure of a geologic carbon sequestration site, such as large-scale leakage of CO{sub 2} into a potable groundwater aquifer, could cause impacts that would require costly remediation measures. Governments are attempting to develop regulations for permitting geologic carbon sequestration sites to ensure their safety and effectiveness. At present, these regulations focus largely on decreasing the probability of failure. In this paper we propose that regulations for the siting of early geologic carbon sequestration projects should emphasize limiting the consequences of failure because consequences are easier to quantify than failure probability.

  6. Deep Lambertian Networks Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Deep Lambertian Networks Introduction Learns distributions over 3D object shapes from sets of 2D-shot recognition possible Uses multiplicative interactions to approximate the Lambertian reflectance model Deep 30 50 Experiments Deep Lambertian Networks Inference Samples from albedo DBN Face Relighting Simple

  7. Deep Web video

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None Available

    2012-03-28

    To make the web work better for science, OSTI has developed state-of-the-art technologies and services including a deep web search capability. The deep web includes content in searchable databases available to web users but not accessible by popular search engines, such as Google. This video provides an introduction to the deep web search engine.

  8. Deep Web video

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None Available

    2009-06-01

    To make the web work better for science, OSTI has developed state-of-the-art technologies and services including a deep web search capability. The deep web includes content in searchable databases available to web users but not accessible by popular search engines, such as Google. This video provides an introduction to the deep web search engine.

  9. DOE Geothermal Data Repository: Getting More Mileage Out of Your...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (b) Keywords: GDR, NGDS, geothermal, data, repository, information, node, DOE, OSTI, Data.gov, metadata, license, submissions ABSTRACT All data submitted to the U.S....

  10. Deep-Burn Modular Helium Reactor Fuel Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McEachern, D

    2002-12-02

    This document contains the workscope, schedule and cost for the technology development tasks needed to satisfy the fuel and fission product transport Design Data Needs (DDNs) for the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR), operating in its role of transmuting transuranic (TRU) nuclides in spent fuel discharged from commercial light-water reactors (LWRs). In its application for transmutation, the GT-MHR is referred to as the Deep-Burn MHR (DB-MHR). This Fuel Development Plan (FDP) describes part of the overall program being undertaken by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), utilities, and industry to evaluate the use of the GT-MHR to transmute transuranic nuclides from spent nuclear fuel. The Fuel Development Plan (FDP) includes the work on fuel necessary to support the design and licensing of the DB-MHR. The FDP is organized into ten sections. Section 1 provides a summary of the most important features of the plan, including cost and schedule information. Section 2 describes the DB-MHR concept, the features of its fuel and the plan to develop coated particle fuel for transmutation. Section 3 describes the knowledge base for fabrication of coated particles, the experience with irradiation performance of coated particle fuels, the database for fission product transport in HTGR cores, and describes test data and calculations for the performance of coated particle fuel while in a repository. Section 4 presents the fuel performance requirements in terms of as-manufactured quality and performance of the fuel coatings under irradiation and accident conditions. These requirements are provisional because the design of the DB-MHR is in an early stage. However, the requirements are presented in this preliminary form to guide the initial work on the fuel development. Section 4 also presents limits on the irradiation conditions to which the coated particle fuel can be subjected for the core design. These limits are based on past irradiation experience. Section 5 describes the Design Data Needs to: (1) fabricate the coated particle fuel, (2) predict its performance in the reactor core, (3) predict the radionuclide release rates from the reactor core, and (4) predict the performance of spent fuel in a geological repository. The heart of this fuel development plan is Section 6, which describes the development activities proposed to satisfy the DDNs presented in Section 5. The development scope is divided into Fuel Process Development, Fuel Materials Development, Fission Product Transport, and Spent Fuel Disposal. Section 7 describes the facilities to be used. Generally, this program will utilize existing facilities. While some facilities will need to be modified, there is no requirement for major new facilities. Section 8 states the Quality Assurance requirements that will be applied to the development activities. Section 9 presents detailed costs organized by WBS and spread over time. Section 10 presents a list of the types of deliverables that will be prepared in each of the WBS elements. Four Appendices contain supplementary information on: (a) design data needs, (b) the interface with the separations plant, (c) the detailed development schedule, and (d) the detailed cost estimate.

  11. Deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Brady, Patrick Vane; Swift, Peter N.; Rechard, Robert Paul; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2009-07-01

    Preliminary evaluation of deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel indicates the potential for excellent long-term safety performance at costs competitive with mined repositories. Significant fluid flow through basement rock is prevented, in part, by low permeabilities, poorly connected transport pathways, and overburden self-sealing. Deep fluids also resist vertical movement because they are density stratified. Thermal hydrologic calculations estimate the thermal pulse from emplaced waste to be small (less than 20 C at 10 meters from the borehole, for less than a few hundred years), and to result in maximum total vertical fluid movement of {approx}100 m. Reducing conditions will sharply limit solubilities of most dose-critical radionuclides at depth, and high ionic strengths of deep fluids will prevent colloidal transport. For the bounding analysis of this report, waste is envisioned to be emplaced as fuel assemblies stacked inside drill casing that are lowered, and emplaced using off-the-shelf oilfield and geothermal drilling techniques, into the lower 1-2 km portion of a vertical borehole {approx}45 cm in diameter and 3-5 km deep, followed by borehole sealing. Deep borehole disposal of radioactive waste in the United States would require modifications to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act and to applicable regulatory standards for long-term performance set by the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR part 191) and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (10 CFR part 60). The performance analysis described here is based on the assumption that long-term standards for deep borehole disposal would be identical in the key regards to those prescribed for existing repositories (40 CFR part 197 and 10 CFR part 63).

  12. Geology and geohydrology of the Palo Duro Basin, Texas Panhandle. Report on the progress of nuclear waste isolation feasibility studies, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavson, T.C.; Presley, M.W.; Handford, C.R.; Finley, R.J.; Dutton, S.P.; Baumgardner, R.W. Jr.; McGillis, K.A.; Simpkins, W.W.

    1980-01-01

    Since early 1977, the Bureau of Economic Geology has been evaluating several salt-bearing basins within the State of Texas as part of the national nuclear repository program. The Bureau, a research unit of The University of Texas at Austin and the State of Texas, is carrying out a long-term program to gather and interpret all geologic and hydrologic information necessary for description, delineation, and evaluation of salt-bearing strata in the Palo Duro and Dalhart Basins of the Texas Panhandle. The program in FY 79 has been subdivided into four broad research tasks, which are addressed by a basin analysis group, a surface studies group, a geohydrology group, and a host-rock analysis group. The basin analysis group has delineated the structural and stratigraphic framework of the basins, initiated natural resource assessment, and integrated data from 8000 ft (2400 m) of core material into salt-stratigraphy models. Salt depth and thickness have been delineated for seven salt-bearing stratigraphic units. Concurrently, the surface studies group has collected ground and remotely sensed data to describe surficial processes, including salt solution, slope retreat/erosion mechanisms, geomorphic evolution, and fracture system development. The basin geohydrology group has begun evaluating both shallow and deep fluid circulation within the basins. The newly formed host-rock analysis group has initiated study of cores from two drilling sites for analysis of salt and the various lithologies overlying and interbedded with salt units. This paper, a summary report of progress in FY 79, presents principal conclusions and reviews methods used and types of data and maps generated.

  13. Strategic Basis for License Application Planning for a Potential Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newberry, C. M.; Brocoum, S. J.; Gamble, R. P.; Murray, R. C.; Cline, M.

    2002-02-26

    If Yucca Mountain, Nevada is designated as the site for development of a geologic repository for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, the Department of Energy (DOE) must obtain Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval first for repository construction, then for an operating license, and, eventually, for repository closure and decommissioning. The licensing criteria defined in Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 63 (10 CFR Part 63) establish the basis for these NRC decisions. Submittal of a license application (LA) to the NRC for authorization to construct a repository at the Yucca Mountain site is, at this point, only a potential future action by the DOE. The policy process defined in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), as amended, for recommendation and designation of Yucca Mountain as a repository site makes it difficult to predict whether or when the site might be designated. The DOE may only submit a LA to the NRC if the site designation takes effect. In spite of this uncertainty, the DOE must take prudent and appropriate action now, and over the next several years, to prepare for development and timely submittal of a LA. This is particularly true given the need for the DOE to develop, load, and certify the operation of its electronic information system to provide access to its relevant records as part of the licensing support network (LSN) in compliance with NRC requirements six months prior to LA submittal. The DOE must also develop a LA, which is a substantially different document from those developed to support a Site Recommendation (SR) decision. The LA must satisfy NRC licensing criteria and content requirements, and address the acceptance criteria defined by the NRC in its forthcoming Yucca Mountain Review Plan (YMRP). The content of the LA must be adequate to facilitate NRC acceptance and docketing for review, and the LA and its supporting documents must provide the documented basis for the NR C findings required for a construction authorization. The LA must also support a licensing proceeding before an Atomic Safety and Licensing Board panel prior to NRC action on any decision to authorize construction. The DOE has established a strategic basis for planning that is intended to provide the framework for development of an integrated plan for activities leading to preparation and submittal of a LA.

  14. Geology and Geophysics 454: Engineering Geology Spring Semester, 2015, 3.0 Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Geology and Geophysics 454: Engineering Geology Spring Semester, 2015: "Engineering Geology" by Perry Rahn, or "Practical Engineering Geology" by Steve Hencher Class Themes This class emphasizes a modern approach to engineering geology

  15. The Lapworth Museum of Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    The Lapworth Museum of Geology www.lapworth.bham.ac.uk www.bham.ac.uk Events The Lapworth Lectures take place on evenings during University term time. These lectures are on a wide range of geological geological topics, usually based around collections in the museum. These provide an opportunity to see

  16. DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS UNDERGRADUATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS UNDERGRADUATE SURVIVAL MANUAL 2014-2015 SCHOOL OF OCEAN & EARTH SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI`I AT MNOA Updated January 2015 #12;INTRODUCTION 1 Geology OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS _ 2 Who We Are _ 2 Where To Get Help _ 2 POLICIES, PROCEDURES & REQUIREMENTS 3

  17. GEOLOGY, September 2010 823 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    GEOLOGY, September 2010 823 INTRODUCTION Deformations around transpressive plate boundaries numerical models constrained by global positioning system (GPS) observations and Geology, September 2010; v. 38; no. 9; p. 823­826; doi: 10.1130/G30963.1; 3 figures; 1 table. © 2010 Geological Society

  18. Denys Poshyvanyk CSci 780: Mining Software Repositories CSci 780: Mining Software Repositories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poshyvanyk, Denys

    Denys Poshyvanyk CSci 780: Mining Software Repositories 1 CSci 780: Mining:50pm Location: McGlothlin-Street Hall 002 Instructor: Denys Poshyvanyk Office Hours: MW, 11:30am-1pm Office: McGlothlin-Street Hall, 006 Email: denys [at-sign] cs

  19. September 2012 BASIN RESEARCH AND ENERGY GEOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    September 2012 BASIN RESEARCH AND ENERGY GEOLOGY STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK at BINGHAMTON research programs in geochemistry, sedimentary geology, or Earth surface processes with the potential the position, visit the Geological Sciences and Environmental Studies website (www.geology

  20. TextureCam: A Smart Camera for Microscale, Mesoscale, and Deep Space Applications. David R. Thomp-, William Abbey2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    TextureCam: A Smart Camera for Microscale, Mesoscale, and Deep Space Applications. David R. Thomp variable illumination. #12;Mesoscale Geologic Surface Classification: Re- cent tests on images collected

  1. A Repository of Codes of Ethics and Technical Standards in Health Informatics A Repository of Codes of Ethics and Technical Standards in Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaiane, Osmar R.

    A Repository of Codes of Ethics and Technical Standards in Health Informatics 1 A Repository of Codes of Ethics and Technical Standards in Health Informatics Hamman W. Samuel1 , Osmar R. Zaïane1 1 ethics repository. Keywords: health informatics ethics, repository, codes of ethics, technical standards

  2. Environmental Responses to Carbon Mitigation through Geological Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, Alfred; Bromenshenk, Jerry

    2013-08-30

    In summary, this DOE EPSCoR project is contributing to the study of carbon mitigation through geological storage. Both deep and shallow subsurface research needs are being addressed through research directed at improved understanding of environmental responses associated with large scale injection of CO{sub 2} into geologic formations. The research plan has two interrelated research objectives. ? Objective 1: Determine the influence of CO{sub 2}-related injection of fluids on pore structure, material properties, and microbial activity in rock cores from potential geological carbon sequestration sites. ? Objective 2: Determine the Effects of CO{sub 2} leakage on shallow subsurface ecosystems (microbial and plant) using field experiments from an outdoor field testing facility.

  3. Establishing MICHCARB, a geological carbon sequestration research...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Western Michigan University 58 GEOSCIENCES Geological carbon sequestration Enhanced oil recovery Characterization of oil, gas and saline reservoirs Geological carbon...

  4. Evaluating Simple Repository Deposit for Open Educational Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giles, C. Lee

    Evaluating Simple Repository Deposit for Open Educational Resources Morwan Mohamed Nour, Kyle software tools have been identified as drivers for the Open Educational Resources (OER) move- ment. However resources, repository, deposit, desktop 1 Introduction Open Educational Resources (OER) are digital objects

  5. A Change Impact Analysis Approach for Workflow Repository Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Change Impact Analysis Approach for Workflow Repository Management Gustavo A. Oliva* , Marco A dependency-centric change impact analysis approach for workflow repository management. The approach relies that ranged from 11 (+10%) to 35 (+250%). Keywords--change impact analysis; dependency management; workflow

  6. Genre Taxonomy: A Knowledge Repository of Communicative Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genre Taxonomy: A Knowledge Repository of Communicative Actions Takeshi Yoshioka1 Center taxonomy as a knowledge repository of communicative structures or "typified actions" enacted by organizational members. The Genre taxonomy aims at helping people to make sense of diverse types of communicative

  7. A Framework for Describing Web Repositories Frank McCown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Michael L.

    , dark and grey web repos- itories; and states of recoverability (vulnerable, replicated, endangeredA Framework for Describing Web Repositories Frank McCown Department of Computer Science Harding to "lazily preserve" websites and re- construct them when they are lost. We use the term "web repositories

  8. National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase II. Final report, January 30, 1995--January 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-04-01

    The American Geological Institute (AGI) has completed Phase II of a project to establish a National Geoscience Data Repository System (NGDRS). The project`s primary objectives are to preserve geoscience data in jeopardy of being destroyed and to make that data available to those who have a need to use it in future investigations. These data are available for donation to the public as a result of the downsizing that has occurred in the major petroleum and mining companies in the United States for the past decade. In recent years, these companies have consolidated domestic operations, sold many of their domestic properties and relinquished many of their leases. The scientific data associated with those properties are no longer considered to be useful assets and are consequently in danger of being lost forever. The national repository project will make many of these data available to the geoscience community for the first time. To address this opportunity, AGI sought support from the Department of Energy (DOE) in 1994 to initiate the NGDRS Phase I feasibility study to determine the types and quantity of data that companies would be willing to donate. The petroleum and mining companies surveyed indicated that they were willing to donate approximately five million well logs, one hundred million miles of seismic reflection data, millions of linear feet of core and cuttings, and a variety of other types of scientific data. Based on the positive results of the Phase I study, AGI undertook Phase II of the program in 1995. Funded jointly by DOE and industry, Phase II encompasses the establishment of standards for indexing and cataloging of geoscience data and determination of the costs of transferring data from the private sector to public-sector data repositories. Pilot projects evaluated the feasibility of the project for transfer of different data types and creation of a Web-based metadata supercatalog and browser.

  9. Room at the Mountain: Estimated Maximum Amounts of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel Capable of Disposal in a Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessler, John H. [Electric Power Research Institute - EPRI, 3420 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Kemeny, John [University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721 (United States); King, Fraser [Integrity Corrosion Consulting, Ltd., 6732 Silverview Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Ross, Alan M. [Alan M. Ross and Associates, 1061 Gray Fox Circle Pleasanton, CA 94566 (Canada); Ross, Benjamen [Disposal Safety, Inc., Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an initial analysis of the maximum amount of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) that could be emplaced into a geological repository at Yucca Mountain. This analysis identifies and uses programmatic, material, and geological constraints and factors that affect this estimation of maximum amount of CSNF for disposal. The conclusion of this initial analysis is that the current legislative limit on Yucca Mountain disposal capacity, 63,000 MTHM of CSNF, is a small fraction of the available physical capacity of the Yucca Mountain system assuming the current high-temperature operating mode (HTOM) design. EPRI is confident that at least four times the legislative limit for CSNF ({approx}260,000 MTHM) can be emplaced in the Yucca Mountain system. It is possible that with additional site characterization, upwards of nine times the legislative limit ({approx}570,000 MTHM) could be emplaced. (authors)

  10. Proceedings of 3rd US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Proceedings of 3rd USGerman Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design, and Operation Proceedings of 3rd USGerman Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design, and Operation...

  11. Corrosion-induced gas generation in a nuclear waste repository: Reactive geochemistry and multiphase flow effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.

    2009-01-01

    Lying Repositories for Nuclear Waste, NAGRA Technical Reporthost rock formation for nuclear waste storage. EngineeringGas Generation in a Nuclear Waste Repository: Reactive

  12. Water-Steel Canister Interaction and H2 Gas Pressure Buildup in a Nuclear Waste Repository

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tianfu; Senger, Rainer; Finstele, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear Waste Repository T. Xu & S. Finsteiie Earth Sciencesdeep lying repositories for nuclear waste. Nagra Techni­ calthe system state in a nuclear waste re­ pository. 2 PROCESS

  13. Carbon-14 in waste packages for spent fuel in a tuff repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Smith, C.F.; Culham, H.W.; Smith, H.D.

    1986-10-14

    Carbon-14 is produced naturally by cosmic ray neutrons in the upper atmosphere. It is also produced in nuclear reactors, in amounts much smaller than the global inventory. About one-third of this is released directly to the atmosphere, and the other two-thirds remains in the spent fuel. Both the Environmental Protection Agency and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission have established limits on release of the {sup 14}C in spent fuel. This is of particular concern for the proposed repository in tuff, because of the unsaturated conditions and the consequent possibility of gaseous transport of {sup 14}C as CO{sub 2}. Existing measurements and calculations of the {sup 14}C inventory in spent fuel are reviewed. The physical distribution and chemical forms of the {sup 14}C are discussed. Available data on the release of {sup 14}C from spent fuel in aqueous solutions and in gaseous environments of air, nitrogen, and helium are reviewed. Projected {sup 14}C behavior in a tuff repository is described. It is concluded that {sup 14}C release measurements from spent fuel into moist air at temperatures both above and below the in situ boiling point of water as well as detailed transport calculations for the tuff geological environment will be needed to determine whether the 10CFR60 and 40CFR191 requirements can be met. 56 refs., 1 tab.

  14. The Economic, repository and proliferation implications of advanced nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deinert, Mark; Cady, K B

    2011-09-04

    The goal of this project was to compare the effects of recycling actinides using fast burner reactors, with recycle that would be done using inert matrix fuel burned in conventional light water reactors. In the fast reactor option, actinides from both spent light water and fast reactor fuel would be recycled. In the inert matrix fuel option, actinides from spent light water fuel would be recycled, but the spent inert matrix fuel would not be reprocessed. The comparison was done over a limited 100-year time horizon. The economic, repository and proliferation implications of these options all hinge on the composition of isotopic byproducts of power production. We took the perspective that back-end economics would be affected by the cost of spent fuel reprocessing (whether conventional uranium dioxide fuel, or fast reactor fuel), fuel manufacture, and ultimate disposal of high level waste in a Yucca Mountain like geological repository. Central to understanding these costs was determining the overall amount of reprocessing needed to implement a fast burner, or inert matrix fuel, recycle program. The total quantity of high level waste requiring geological disposal (along with its thermal output), and the cost of reprocessing were also analyzed. A major advantage of the inert matrix fuel option is that it could in principle be implemented using the existing fleet of commercial power reactors. A central finding of this project was that recycling actinides using an inert matrix fuel could achieve reductions in overall actinide production that are nearly very close to those that could be achieved by recycling the actinides using a fast burner reactor.

  15. International Journal of Rock Mechanics & Mining Sciences 45 (2008) 11951210 Consolidation settlements above deep tunnels in fractured crystalline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhardt, Erik

    2008-01-01

    settlements above deep tunnels in fractured crystalline rock: Part 1--Investigations above the Gotthard highway tunnel C. Zangerla,b,Ã, K.F. Evansa , E. Eberhardta,c , S. Loewa a Engineering Geology, Swiss Management, Grabenweg 3, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria c Geological Engineering/Earth and Ocean Sciences

  16. International Journal of Rock Mechanics & Mining Sciences 45 (2008) 12111225 Consolidation settlements above deep tunnels in fractured

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhardt, Erik

    2008-01-01

    settlements above deep tunnels in fractured crystalline rock: Part 2--Numerical analysis of the Gotthard highway tunnel case study C. Zangerla,b,Ã, E. Eberhardta,c , K.F. Evansa , S. Loewa a Engineering Geology Hazard Management, Innsbruck, Austria c Geological Engineering/Earth and Ocean Sciences, University

  17. Geological Hazards Labs Spring 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Po

    Geological Hazards Labs Spring 2010 TA: En-Jui Lee (http://www.gg.uwyo.edu/ggstudent/elee8/site - An Indispensible Tool in Hazard Planning 3 26/1; 27/1 Lab 2: Geologic Maps - Mapping the Hazards 4 2/2; 3/2 Lab 3: Population - People at Risk 5 9/2; 10/2 Lab 4: Plate Tectonics - Locating Geologic Hazards 6 16/2; 17/2 Lab 5

  18. Report of early site suitability evaluation of the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younker, J.L.; Andrews, W.B.; Fasano, G.A.; Herrington, C.C.; Mattson, S.R.; Murray, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Ballou, L.B.; Revelli, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Ducharme, A.R.; Shephard, L.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dudley, W.W.; Hoxie, D.T. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Herbst, R.J.; Patera, E.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Judd, B.R. [Decision Analysis Co., Portola Valley, CA (United States); Docka, J.A.; Rickertsen, L.D. [Weston Technical Associates, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This study evaluated the technical suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential site for a mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of radioactive waste. The evaluation was conducted primarily to determine early in the site characterization program if there are any features or conditions at the site that indicate it is unsuitable for repository development. A secondary purpose was to determine the status of knowledge in the major technical areas that affect the suitability of the site. This early site suitability evaluation (ESSE) was conducted by a team of technical personnel at the request of the Associate Director of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Geologic Disposal, a unit within the DOE`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The Yucca Mountain site has been the subject of such evaluations for over a decade. In 1983, the site was evaluated as part of a screening process to identify potentially acceptable sites. The site was evaluated in greater detail and found suitable for site characterization as part of the Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE, 1986) required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA). Additional site data were compiled during the preparation of the Site Characterization Plan (SCP) (DOE, 1988a). This early site suitability evaluation has considered information that was used in preparing both-documents, along with recent information obtained since the EA and SCP were published. This body of information is referred to in this report as ``current information`` or ``available evidence.``

  19. Thermal impact of waste emplacement and surface cooling associated with geologic disposal of nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J.S.Y.; Mangold, D.C.; Spencer, R.K.; Tsang, C.F.

    1982-08-01

    The thermal effects associated with the emplacement of aged radioactive wastes in a geologic repository were studied, with emphasis on the following subjects: the waste characteristics, repository structure, and rock properties controlling the thermally induced effects; the current knowledge of the thermal, thermomechanical, and thermohydrologic impacts, determined mainly on the basis of previous studies that assume 10-year-old wastes; the thermal criteria used to determine the repository waste loading densities; and the technical advantages and disadvantages of surface cooling of the wastes prior to disposal as a means of mitigating the thermal impacts. The waste loading densities determined by repository designs for 10-year-old wastes are extended to older wastes using the near-field thermomechanical criteria based on room stability considerations. Also discussed are the effects of long surface cooling periods determined on the basis of far-field thermomechanical and thermohydrologic considerations. The extension of the surface cooling period from 10 years to longer periods can lower the near-field thermal impact but have only modest long-term effects for spent fuel. More significant long-term effects can be achieved by surface cooling of reprocessed high-level waste.

  20. Impact of porous medium desiccation during anhydrous CO2 injection in deep saline aquifers: up scaling from experimental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    flow rate and capillary properties on the desiccation mechanisms. Keywords: supercritical CO2, dryingImpact of porous medium desiccation during anhydrous CO2 injection in deep saline aquifers: up - France Abstract Injection of CO2 in geological reservoirs or deep aquifers is nowadays studied

  1. Deep in Data. Empirical Data Based Software Accuracy Testing Using the Building America Field Data Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neymark, J.; Roberts, D.

    2013-06-01

    This paper describes progress toward developing a usable, standardized, empirical data-based software accuracy test suite using home energy consumption and building description data. Empirical data collected from around the United States have been translated into a uniform Home Performance Extensible Markup Language format that may enable software developers to create translators to their input schemes for efficient access to the data. This could allow for modeling many homes expediently, and thus implementing software accuracy test cases by applying the translated data.

  2. Montana State University 1 Geology Option

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Montana State University 1 Geology Option The Geology Option is a degree program designed and private sectors in fields such as petroleum geology, mining geology, seismology (including earthquake and volcanic risk assessment), hydrology (surface and ground water) natural-hazard geology, environmental clean

  3. WSU B.S. Geology Curriculum (structural)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    WSU B.S. Geology Curriculum Geology GEL 3300 (structural) GEL 3400 (sed/strat) Geology Elective 1 Geology Elective 2 Yr 1 Yr 2 Yr 3 Yr 4 PHY 2130/31 MAT 2010 PHY 2140/41 CHEM 1220/30 MAT 1800 Cognates GEL 5593 (writing intensive) GEL 3160 (petrology) GEL 3650 (field camp) Geology Elective 3 GEL 2130

  4. GEOLOGY, December 2009 1115 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Törnqvist, Torbjörn E.

    for land movements is to use geological data. Salt- marsh sedimentary sequences enable the recon- struction-based approaches, because subtle tectonic effects are incorporated into both the geological and 20th century rates., 2005; Church et al., 2008). It is widely accepted that the tectonic component along the passive marg

  5. Coring in deep hardrock formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-08-01

    The United States Department of Energy is involved in a variety of scientific and engineering feasibility studies requiring extensive drilling in hard crystalline rock. In many cases well depths extend from 6000 to 20,000 feet in high-temperature, granitic formations. Examples of such projects are the Hot Dry Rock well system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico and the planned exploratory magma well near Mammoth Lakes, California. In addition to these programs, there is also continuing interest in supporting programs to reduce drilling costs associated with the production of geothermal energy from underground sources such as the Geysers area near San Francisco, California. The overall progression in these efforts is to drill deeper holes in higher temperature, harder formations. In conjunction with this trend is a desire to improve the capability to recover geological information. Spot coring and continuous coring are important elements in this effort. It is the purpose of this report to examine the current methods used to obtain core from deep wells and to suggest projects which will improve existing capabilities. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Energy Systems Laboratory: Building a Model Repository Collection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koenig, Jay; Haberl, Jeff S.; Gilman, Don; Hughes, Sherrie

    2008-06-05

    • Metadata • Upload to Repository • Train replacements • Batch Loading • File structure created • Passed to Digital Initiatives The Model Collection • Well Organized • Self-Sufficient • Diverse • Large • Rapidly Growing Video Interview with Jeff Haberl, PhD ...

  7. Automated Validation of Trusted Digital Repository Assessment Criteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, MacKenzie

    The RLG/NARA trusted digital repository (TDR) certification checklist defines a set of assessment criteria for preservation environments. The criteria can be mapped into data management policies that define how a digital ...

  8. Drift Natural Convection and Seepage at the Yucca Mountain Repository

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halecky, Nicholaus Eugene

    2010-01-01

    2 A Simulation Code for Yucca Mountain Transport Processes:List of Figures Yucca Mountain location, southwest1 Introduction 1.1 Yucca Mountain Repository . . . . 1.1.1

  9. The National Repository at Yucca Mountain, Russ Dyer

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy submitted an application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for a license to construct a repository at Yucca Mountain 3 SBBB-GeneralBriefing070808Rev1.ppt...

  10. EM Gains Insight from Germany on Salt-Based Repositories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    KARLSRUHE and PEINE, Germany – EM officials recently took part in workshops in Germany to benefit from the exchange of research and experience operating salt-based repositories for radioactive waste.

  11. sea level, understanding the linkages between ice sheet processes and subglacial geology is key. Bell,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lance, Veronica P.

    in the world. Geological Carbon Capture and Storage: How Does It work? Peter B. Kelemen, Arthur D. Storke Kelemen investigates ways to harness the carbon storage potential in rocks that originate deep within an important part of the solution to the global rise of carbon dioxide. Deadzones and Ghosts of Oil Plumes Ajit

  12. Geology and geodynamics of Iceland R.G. Trnnes, Nordic volcanological Institute, University of Iceland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingólfsson, Ólafur

    Geology and geodynamics of Iceland R.G. Trønnes, Nordic volcanological Institute, University of Iceland Iceland is located where the asthenosperic flow under the the NE Atlantic plate boundary interacts and mixes with a deep-seated mantle plume. The buoyancy of the Iceland plume leads to dynamic uplift

  13. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    younger than ground water in the deep aquifer (Rupert and Plummer, 2004). Water first seeps downU.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet 2004­3051 July 2004 Ground-Water generally is the same as the rate of sand transport southwestward by water; together, the two mechanisms

  14. Geology and Geophysics 303: Structural Geology Fall Semester, 2015, 3.0 Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geology and Geophysics 303: Structural Geology Fall Semester, 2015, 3.0 Units Lectures: MW 10 Geology: An Introduction, by Pollard and Martel (PM) Basic Methods of Structural Geology, by Marshak geologic structures depends largely on how we perceive them. Few geologic structures form by trivially

  15. Evolution: Geology and climate drive diversification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillespie, RG; Roderick, GK

    2014-01-01

    on 7 May 2014. EVO LU TI O N Geology and climate driveIslands exemplify how geology and climate can interact toevents, the dynamics of geology and climate can be powerful

  16. GEOLOGY AND FRACTURE SYSTEM AT STRIPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olkiewicz, O.

    2010-01-01

    of underground test site •• 1.5 Regional bedrock geology.Stripa mine, sub-till geology in the immediate mine area.Fig. 2.1 Stripa mine, sub-till geology in the immediate mine

  17. Geology, Environmental Science, Geography, Environmental Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, James R.

    2011 Geology, Environmental Science, Geography, Environmental Management Postgraduate Handbook #12 Environmental Management 14 Environmental Science 18 Geography 22 Geographic Information Science 26 Geology, Applied Geology and Geoscience 30 Course descriptions 36 Masters and PhD programmes 52 The Masters

  18. Deep drilling phase of the Pen Brand Fault Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stieve, A.

    1991-05-15

    This deep drilling activity is one element of the Pen Branch Fault Program at Savannah River Site (SRS). The effort will consist of three tasks: the extension of wells PBF-7 and PBF-8 into crystalline basement, geologic and drilling oversight during drilling operations, and the lithologic description and analysis of the recovered core. The drilling program addresses the association of the Pen Branch fault with order fault systems such as the fault that formed the Bunbarton basin in the Triassic.

  19. Optimization of Deep Borehole Systems for HLW Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driscoll, Michael; Baglietto, Emilio; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Lester, Richard; Brady, Patrick; Arnold, B. W.

    2015-09-09

    This is the final report on a project to update and improve the conceptual design of deep boreholes for high level nuclear waste disposal. The effort was concentrated on application to intact US legacy LWR fuel assemblies, but conducted in a way in which straightforward extension to other waste forms, host rock types and countries was preserved. The reference fuel design version consists of a vertical borehole drilled into granitic bedrock, with the uppermost kilometer serving as a caprock zone containing a diverse and redundant series of plugs. There follows a one to two kilometer waste canister emplacement zone having a hole diameter of approximately 40-50 cm. Individual holes are spaced 200-300 m apart to form a repository field. The choice of verticality and the use of a graphite based mud as filler between the waste canisters and the borehole wall liner was strongly influenced by the expectation that retrievability would continue to be emphasized in US and worldwide repository regulatory criteria. An advanced version was scoped out using zinc alloy cast in place to fill void space inside a disposal canister and its encapsulated fuel assembly. This excludes water and greatly improves both crush resistance and thermal conductivity. However the simpler option of using a sand fill was found adequate and is recommended for near-term use. Thermal-hydraulic modeling of the low permeability and porosity host rock and its small (? 1%) saline water content showed that vertical convection induced by the waste’s decay heat should not transport nuclides from the emplacement zone up to the biosphere atop the caprock. First order economic analysis indicated that borehole repositories should be cost-competitive with shallower mined repositories. It is concluded that proceeding with plans to drill a demonstration borehole to confirm expectations, and to carry out priority experiments, such as retention and replenishment of in-hole water is in order.

  20. Deep East Texas HTC 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    To better understand how the evolution of Cenozoic deep-water circulation related to changes in global climate and ocean basin configuration, we generated Nd isotope records from Ocean Drilling Program sites in the southeastern Atlantic to track...

  1. Characteristics of potential repository wastes. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The LWR spent fuels discussed in Volume 1 of this report comprise about 99% of all domestic non-reprocessed spent fuel. In this report we discuss other types of spent fuels which, although small in relative quantity, consist of a number of diverse types, sizes, and compositions. Many of these fuels are candidates for repository disposal. Some non-LWR spent fuels are currently reprocessed or are scheduled for reprocessing in DOE facilities at the Savannah River Site, Hanford Site, and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It appears likely that the reprocessing of fuels that have been reprocessed in the past will continue and that the resulting high-level wastes will become part of defense HLW. However, it is not entirely clear in some cases whether a given fuel will be reprocessed, especially in cases where pretreatment may be needed before reprocessing, or where the enrichment is not high enough to make reprocessing attractive. Some fuels may be canistered, while others may require special means of disposal. The major categories covered in this chapter include HTGR spent fuel from the Fort St. Vrain and Peach Bottom-1 reactors, research and test reactor fuels, and miscellaneous fuels, and wastes generated from the decommissioning of facilities.

  2. Exploration for deep coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2008-12-15

    The most important factor in safe mining is the quality of the roof. The article explains how the Rosebud Mining Co. conducts drilling and exploration in 11 deep coal mine throughout Pennsylvania and Ohio. Rosebud uses two Atlas Copco CS10 core drilling rigs mounted on 4-wheel drive trucks. The article first appeared in Atlas Copco's in-house magazine, Deep Hole Driller. 3 photos.

  3. Proposal for a Planetary Geology and Geophysics Initiative on Lunar Drilling Shaopeng Huang, Dept. Geol. Sciences., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Shaopeng

    Proposal for a Planetary Geology and Geophysics Initiative on Lunar Drilling Shaopeng Huang, Dept and technology. As the Moon is the cornerstone for deep space exploration, lunar drilling will become technologies for lunar drilling is lagging behind deep space exploration strategy and planning. Compelling

  4. West Virginia University Geology 404, Geology Field Camp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammer, Thomas

    , Stratigraphy-Sedimentation. Grades: Grades are based on field exercises. The final grade is based on the maps to describe and log stratigraphic sequences of sedimentary rocks. 2. To learn how to construct geologic maps

  5. LIFE Materials: Fuel Cycle and Repository Volume 11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, H; Blink, J A

    2008-12-12

    The fusion-fission LIFE engine concept provides a path to a sustainable energy future based on safe, carbon-free nuclear power with minimal nuclear waste. The LIFE design ultimately offers many advantages over current and proposed nuclear energy technologies, and could well lead to a true worldwide nuclear energy renaissance. When compared with existing and other proposed future nuclear reactor designs, the LIFE engine exceeds alternatives in the most important measures of proliferation resistance and waste minimization. The engine needs no refueling during its lifetime. It requires no removal of fuel or fissile material generated in the LIFE engine. It leaves no weapons-attractive material at the end of life. Although there is certainly a need for additional work, all indications are that the 'back end' of the fuel cycle does not to raise any 'showstopper' issues for LIFE. Indeed, the LIFE concept has numerous benefits: (1) Per unit of electricity generated, LIFE engines would generate 20-30 times less waste (in terms of mass of heavy metal) requiring disposal in a HLW repository than does the current once-through fuel cycle. (2) Although there may be advanced fuel cycles that can compete with LIFE's low mass flow of heavy metal, all such systems require reprocessing, with attendant proliferation concerns; LIFE engines can do this without enrichment or reprocessing. Moreover, none of the advanced fuel cycles can match the low transuranic content of LIFE waste. (3) The specific thermal power of LIFE waste is initially higher than that of spent LWR fuel. Nevertheless, this higher thermal load can be managed using appropriate engineering features during an interim storage period, and could be accommodated in a Yucca-Mountain-like repository by appropriate 'staging' of the emplacement of waste packages during the operational period of the repository. The planned ventilation rates for Yucca Mountain would be sufficient for LIFE waste to meet the thermal constraints of the repository design. (4) A simple, but arguably conservative, estimate for the dose from a repository containing 63,000 MT of spent LIFE fuel would have similar performance to the currently planned Yucca Mountain Repository. This indicates that a properly designed 'LIFE Repository' would almost certainly meet the proposed Nuclear Regulatory Commission standards for dose to individuals, even though the waste in such a repository would have produced 20-30 times more generated electricity than the reference case for Yucca Mountain. The societal risk/benefit ratio for a LIFE repository would therefore be significantly better than for currently planned repositories for LWR fuel.

  6. Geologic mapping for groundwater resource protection and assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, J.M. (Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Earth Sciences and Resources Inst.); Berg, R.C. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Groundwater is a vital natural resource in the US and around the world. In order to manage and protect this often threatened resource one must better understand its occurrence, extent, and susceptibility to contamination. Geologic mapping is a fundamental approach to developing more detailed and accurate assessments of groundwater resources. The stratigraphy and lithology of earth materials provide the framework for groundwater systems, whether they are deep confined aquifers or shallow, water table environments. These same earth materials control, in large part, the rates of migration of water and contaminants into and through groundwater systems thus establishing the potential yields of the systems and their vulnerability to contamination. Geologic mapping is used to delineate and display the vertical sequencing of earth materials either in cross-section or over lateral areas as in the stack-unit geologic map. These geologic maps, along with supportive hydrogeologic information, are used to identify the three-dimensional positioning and continuity of aquifer and non-aquifer earth materials. For example, detailed stack-unit mapping to a depth of 30 meters has been completed for a portion of a northern Illinois county. Groundwater contamination potentials were assigned to various vertical sequences of materials. Where aquifers are unconfined, groundwater contamination potentials are greatest. Conversely, other considerations being equal, the thicker the confining unit, the lower the contamination potential. This information is invaluable for land use decision-making; water supply assessment, development, and management; and environmental protection planning.

  7. Remote sensing data exploiration for geologic characterization of difficult targets : Laboratory Directed Research and Development project 38703 final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costin, Laurence S.; Walker, Charles A.; Lappin, Allen R.; Hayat, Majeed M. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Ford, Bridget K.; Paskaleva, Biliana (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Moya, Mary M.; Mercier, Jeffrey Alan (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Stormont, John C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Jody Lynn

    2003-09-01

    Characterizing the geology, geotechnical aspects, and rock properties of deep underground facility sites can enhance targeting strategies for both nuclear and conventional weapons. This report describes the results of a study to investigate the utility of remote spectral sensing for augmenting the geological and geotechnical information provided by traditional methods. The project primarily considered novel exploitation methods for space-based sensors, which allow clandestine collection of data from denied sites. The investigation focused on developing and applying novel data analysis methods to estimate geologic and geotechnical characteristics in the vicinity of deep underground facilities. Two such methods, one for measuring thermal rock properties and one for classifying rock types, were explored in detail. Several other data exploitation techniques, developed under other projects, were also examined for their potential utility in geologic characterization.

  8. Mined Geologic Disposal System Requirements Document. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This Mined Geologic Disposal System Requirements Document (MGDS-RD) describes the functions to be performed by, and the requirements for, a Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) (including SNF loaded in multi-purpose canisters (MPCs)) and commercial and defense high-level radioactive waste (HLW) in support of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). The purpose of the MGDS-RD is to define the program-level requirements for the design of the Repository, the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), and Surface Based Testing Facilities (SBTF). These requirements include design, operation, and decommissioning requirements to the extent they impact on the physical development of the MGDS. The document also presents an overall description of the MGDS, its functions (derived using the functional analysis documented by the Physical System Requirements (PSR) documents as a starting point), its segments as described in Section 3.1.3, and the requirements allocated to the segments. In addition, the program-level interfaces of the MGDS are identified. As such, the MGDS-RD provides the technical baseline for the design of the MGDS.

  9. Central American geologic map project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dengo, G.

    1986-07-01

    During the Northeast Quadrant Panel meeting of the Circum-Pacific Map Project held in Mexico City, February 1985, Central American panel members proposed and adopted plans for compiling a geologic map of Central America, probably at a scale of 1:500,000. A local group with participants from each country was organized and coordinated by Rolando Castillo, director, Central American School of Geology, University of Costa Rica, for the geologic aspects, and Fernando Rudin, director, Geographic Institute of Costa Rica, for the topographic base. In 1956, the US Geological Survey published a geologic map of the region at a scale of 1:1 million. Subsequent topographic and geologic mapping projects have provided a large amount of new data. The entire area is now covered by topographic maps at a scale of 1:50,000, and these maps have been used in several countries as a base for geologic mapping. Another regional map, the Metallogenic Map of Central America (scale = 1:2 million), was published in 1969 by the Central American Research Institute for Industry (ICAITI) with a generalized but updated geologic base map. Between 1969 and 1980, maps for each country were published by local institutions: Guatemala-Belize at 1:500,000, Honduras at 1:500,000, El Salvador at 1:100,000, Nicaragua at 1:1 million, Costa Rica at 1:200,000, and Panama at 1:1 million. This information, in addition to that of newly mapped areas, served as the base for the Central American part of the Geologic-Tectonic Map of the Caribbean Region (scale = 1:2.5 million), published by the US Geological Survey in 1980, and also fro the Northeast Quadrant Maps of the Circum-Pacific Region. The new project also involves bathymetric and geologic mapping of the Pacific and Caribbean margins of the Central American Isthmus. A substantial amount of new information of the Middle America Trench has been acquired through DSDP Legs 67 and 84.

  10. Deep Maps”: A Brief for Digital Palimpsest Mapping Projects (DPMPs, or “Deep Maps”)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fishkin, Shelley Fisher

    2011-01-01

    DEEP  MAPS”:  A  Brief  for   Digital  Projects   (DPMPs,  or  “Deep  Maps”)   SHELLEY  FISHER  acronym   DPMPs   as   “Deep   Maps. ”   They   would  

  11. Dr Eugenio Carminati Associate Professor (Structural Geology)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dr Eugenio Carminati Associate Professor (Structural Geology) room 216 ph: +39 0649914950 fax a degree in Geological Sciences at the University of Milano with a thesis in Structural Geology. I achieved. I'm fellow of the Geological Society of Italy and of the American Geophysical union. Between 2004

  12. 242 Department of Geology Undergraduate Catalogue 201415

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    242 Department of Geology Undergraduate Catalogue 2014­15 Department of Geology Chairperson: Abdel. Assistant Instructor: P Hajj-Chehadeh, Abdel-Halim The Department of Geology offers programs leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Geology, and Master of Science degrees in certain areas of the vast

  13. Geology of the Shenandoah National Park Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eaton, L. Scott

    1 Geology of the Shenandoah National Park Region 39th Annual Virginia Geological Field Conference October 2nd - 3rd, 2009 Scott Southworth U. S. Geological Survey L. Scott Eaton James Madison University Meghan H. Lamoreaux College of William & Mary William C. Burton U. S. Geological Survey Christopher M

  14. Assessment Report, Department of Geology August, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogaerts, Steven

    Assessment Report, Department of Geology August, 2012 1. Learning Goals ALL students in geology, classification schemes, geologic history and processes, and the structure of the Earth. 3. demonstrate an understanding of the variability, complexity, and interdependency of processes within geologic systems. 4. use

  15. Reprinted February 2003 4-H Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    4-H 340 Reprinted February 2003 4-H Geology Member Guide OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION SERVICE #12;Contents 4-H Geology Project 3 Project Recommendations 3 Books on Geology 4 Trip Planning 4 Contests 7 Identification of Rocks and Minerals 7 Physical Properties of Minerals 8 Generalized Geologic

  16. Proceedings of the scientific visit on crystalline rock repository development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mariner, Paul E.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Miksova, Jitka

    2013-02-01

    A scientific visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development was held in the Czech Republic on September 24-27, 2012. The visit was hosted by the Czech Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA), co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of the visit was to promote technical information exchange between participants from countries engaged in the investigation and exploration of crystalline rock for the eventual construction of nuclear waste repositories. The visit was designed especially for participants of countries that have recently commenced (or recommenced) national repository programmes in crystalline host rock formations. Discussion topics included repository programme development, site screening and selection, site characterization, disposal concepts in crystalline host rock, regulatory frameworks, and safety assessment methodology. Interest was surveyed in establishing a %E2%80%9Cclub,%E2%80%9D the mission of which would be to identify and address the various technical challenges that confront the disposal of radioactive waste in crystalline rock environments. The idea of a second scientific visit to be held one year later in another host country received popular support. The visit concluded with a trip to the countryside south of Prague where participants were treated to a tour of the laboratory and underground facilities of the Josef Regional Underground Research Centre.

  17. Code requirements for concrete repository and processing facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hookham, C.J. [Black & Veatch, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Palaniswamy, R. [Bechtel Savannah River, Inc., North Augusta, SC (United States)

    1993-04-01

    The design and construction of facilities and structures for the processing and safe long-term storage of low- and high-level radioactive wastes will likely employ structural concrete. This concrete will be used for many purposes including structural support, shielding, and environmental protection. At the present time, there are no design costs, standards or guidelines for repositories, waste containers, or processing facilities. Recently, the design and construction guidelines contained in American Concrete Institute (ACI), Code Requirements for Nuclear Safety Related Concrete Structures (ACI 349), have been cited for low-level waste (LLW) repositories. Conceptual design of various high-level (HLW) repository surface structures have also cited the ACI 349 Code. However, the present Code was developed for nuclear power generating facilities and its application to radioactive waste repositories was not intended. For low and medium level radioactive wastes, concrete has a greater role and use in processing facilities, engineered barriers, and repository structures. Because of varied uses and performance/safety requirements this review of the current ACI 349 Code document was required to accommodate these special classes of structures.

  18. Geological Visualization Tools and Structural Geology Geologists use several visualization tools to understand rock outcrop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    Geological Visualization Tools and Structural Geology Geologists use several visualization tools to understand rock outcrop relationships, regional patterns and subsurface geology in 3D and 4D. Geological maps to studying geologic maps. Cross sections are vertical "slices" into the earth that are used to interpret

  19. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND PLANETARY SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND PLANETARY SCIENCE WWW.GEOLOGY" for a complete range of advising information plus the latest Environmental Geology requirements. CORE COURSES (check each as completed): (30 credits) ____Choose one of the following introductory geology classes

  20. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2Geological Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-02-23

    Several technological options have been proposed to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2}. One proposed remedy is to separate and capture CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel power plants and other stationary industrial sources and to inject the CO{sub 2} into deep subsurface formations for long-term storage and sequestration. Characterization of geologic formations for sequestration of large quantities of CO{sub 2} needs to be carefully considered to ensure that sites are suitable for long-term storage and that there will be no adverse impacts to human health or the environment. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (Final Draft, October 2005) states that ''Site characterization, selection and performance prediction are crucial for successful geological storage. Before selecting a site, the geological setting must be characterized to determine if the overlying cap rock will provide an effective seal, if there is a sufficiently voluminous and permeable storage formation, and whether any abandoned or active wells will compromise the integrity of the seal. Moreover, the availability of good site characterization data is critical for the reliability of models''. This International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO{sub 2} Geological Storage (CO2SC) addresses the particular issue of site characterization and site selection related to the geologic storage of carbon dioxide. Presentations and discussions cover the various aspects associated with characterization and selection of potential CO{sub 2} storage sites, with emphasis on advances in process understanding, development of measurement methods, identification of key site features and parameters, site characterization strategies, and case studies.

  1. Implementation of the Brazilian National Repository - RBMN Project - 13008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassia Oliveira de Tello, Cledola [CDTN - Center for Development of Nuclear Technology, Av. Presidente Antonio Carlos, 6.627 - Campus UFMG - Pampulha, CEP 31270-901 - Belo Horizonte - MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Ionizing radiation in Brazil is used in electricity generation, medicine, industry, agriculture and for research and development purposes. All these activities can generate radioactive waste. At this point, in Brazil, the use of nuclear energy and radioisotopes justifies the construction of a national repository for radioactive wastes of low and intermediate-level. According to Federal Law No. 10308, Brazilian National Commission for Nuclear Energy (CNEN) is responsible for designing and constructing the intermediate and final storages for radioactive wastes. Additionally, a restriction on the construction of Angra 3 is that the repository is under construction until its operation start, attaining some requirements of the Brazilian Environmental Regulator (IBAMA). Besides this NPP, in the National Energy Program is previewed the installation of four more plants, by 2030. In November 2008, CNEN launched the Project RBMN (Repository for Low and Intermediate-Level Radioactive Wastes), which aims at the implantation of a National Repository for disposal of low and intermediate-level of radiation wastes. This Project has some aspects that are unique in the Brazilian context, especially referring to the time between its construction and the end of its institutional period. This time is about 360 years, when the area will be released for unrestricted uses. It means that the Repository must be safe and secure for more than three hundred years, which is longer than half of the whole of Brazilian history. This aspect is very new for the Brazilian people, bringing a new dimension to public acceptance. Another point is this will be the first repository in South America, bringing a real challenge for the continent. The current status of the Project is summarized. (authors)

  2. The Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository From A Corrosion Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.H. Payer

    2005-03-10

    Corrosion is a primary determinant of waste package performance at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository and will control the delay time for radionuclide transport from the waste package. Corrosion is the most probable and most likely degradation process that will determine when packages will be penetrated and the shape size and distribution of those penetrations. The general issues in corrosion science, materials science and electrochemistry are well defined, and the knowledge base is substantial for understanding corrosion processes. In this paper, the Yucca Mountain Repository is viewed from a corrosion perspective.

  3. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 55, NO. 6 (JUNE 1990); P. 67Ck.681, 11 FIGS., 1 TABLE. Physical properties of deep crustal reflectors in southern California from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the deep crust. To simplify this analysis, recorded ampli- tudes are assumed to be reflections from weak in the Mojave Desert recorded deep reflections that show amplitude changes with offset. Both the 1985 Calcrust reflection which they believe can be traced to surface exposures, the geologic interpretation of middle

  4. DSpace : An Institutional Repository from the MIT Libraries and Hewlett Packard Laboratories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, MacKenzie

    2002-01-01

    The DSpaceâ?¢ project of the MIT Libraries and the Hewlett Packard Laboratories has built an institutional repository system for digital research material. This paper will describe the rationale for institutional repositories, ...

  5. ANU Library | anulib.anu.edu.au October 2013 ANU Print Repository request service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Journals, books and pamphlets held in the ANU Print Repository are available for loan in accordance and pamphlets held in the ANU Print Repository may be requested. The copyright declaration must be completed

  6. Powering Triton's recent geological activity by obliquity tides: Implications for Pluto geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nimmo, F.; Spencer, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Strom, R. G. , 1995. The geology of Triton. In: Cruikshank,layering and instability. Geology 21, 299–302. Schenk, P.generating the surface geology and heat flow on Enceladus.

  7. GEOLOGY, January 2008 51 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shervais, John W.

    track, while Sr and Nd isotope ratios are intermediate between depleted mantle and continental crust to Proterozoic in the west (Leeman et al., 1985; Wolf et al., 2005). Basalts from deep drill cores in the eastern

  8. Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    parts: waste inventory (7 waste types examined), geologic setting (e.g., clayshale, salt, crystalline, other sedimentary), and the engineering concept of operations (range of...

  9. Deep Deference, Autonomy, and The Deferential Wife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silverstein, Elizabeth Rachel

    2013-01-01

    OF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Deep Deference, Autonomy, and thev ABSTRACT OF THE DISSERTATION Deep Deference, Autonomy, andby DW and AF, which I call deep deference. Next, I identify

  10. Federal Control of Geological Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reitze, Arnold

    2011-04-11

    The United States has economically recoverable coal reserves of about 261 billion tons, which is in excess of a 250-­?year supply based on 2009 consumption rates. However, in the near future the use of coal may be legally restricted because of concerns over the effects of its combustion on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy is making significant efforts to help develop and implement a commercial scale program of geologic carbon sequestration that involves capturing and storing carbon dioxide emitted from coal-­?burning electric power plants in deep underground formations. This article explores the technical and legal problems that must be resolved in order to have a viable carbon sequestration program. It covers the responsibilities of the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the Departments of Energy, Transportation and Interior. It discusses the use of the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Air Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, and other applicable federal laws. Finally, it discusses the provisions related to carbon sequestration that have been included in the major bills dealing with climate change that Congress has been considering in 2009 and 2010. The article concludes that the many legal issues that exist can be resolved, but whether carbon sequestration becomes a commercial reality will depend on reducing its costs or by imposing legal requirements on fossil-­?fired power plants that result in the costs of carbon emissions increasing to the point that carbon sequestration becomes a feasible option.

  11. pre or co-requisite Geology Course Prerequisite Chart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    pre or co-requisite Geology Course Prerequisite Chart 1101, 1102, 1103,1104, 1105 2250 3160 2500 hours geology junior standing; six hours geology depends on course senior standing, permission hours geology six hours geology Evolution of the Earth Geophysics Physical Geology , Historical Geology

  12. Designing a Secure Storage Repository for Sharing Scientific Datasets using Public Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Kai

    Designing a Secure Storage Repository for Sharing Scientific Datasets using Public Clouds Alok present an architecture for a secure data repository service designed on top of a public Cloud and Protection General Terms Public Clouds, Secure Cloud Storage, Access Control, Data Repository, eEngineering 1

  13. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. A conceptual simulation model for release scenario analysis of a hypothetical site in Columbia Plateau Basalts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stottlemyre, J.A.; Petrie, G.M.; Benson, G.L.; Zellmer, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    This report is a status report for an evolving methodology for release scenario development for underground nuclear waste repositories. As such, it is intended for use as a reference point and a preliminary description of an evolving geoscience methodology. When completed this methodology will be used as a tool in developing disruptive release scenarios for analyzing the long-term safety of geological nuclear waste repositories. While a basalt environment is used as an example, this report is not intended to reflect an actual site safety assessment for a repository in a media. It is rather intended to present a methodology system framework and to provide discussions of the geological phenomena and parameters that must be addressed in order to develop a methodology for potential release scenarios. It is also important to note that the phenomena, their interrelationships, and their relative importance along with the overall current structure of the model will change as new geological information is gathered through additional peer review, geotechnical input, site specific field work, and related research efforts.

  14. West Virginia University Geology 404, Geology Field Camp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammer, Thomas

    .geo.wvu.edu/~kammer/geol404.htm Format: Five weeks of geologic field work in the Northern Rocky Mountains. Field areas, Wyoming, Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park, Grand Teton National Park, and Southwest will include the Black Hills, Big Horn Mountains, Yellowstone National Park, Grand Teton National Park

  15. CSMRI DOCUMENT REPOSITORY INDEX Revised June 15, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 CSMRI DOCUMENT REPOSITORY INDEX Revised June 15, 2007 HARD COPY DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE 2002 - March 2003 3 New Horizons Project Records Capital Construction CSM 2002-2004 4 New Horizons - CSMRI Site Contaminated Material The S.M. Stoller Corporation April 1, 2005 7 Technical and Cost

  16. Impact of Pyrophoric Events on Long-Term Repository Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Gregg

    2005-09-01

    This paper provides an overview of a feature, event, and process (FEP) screening argument developed for the issue of pyrophoricity as it pertains to the post-closure interment of Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (DSNF) at the Yucca Mountain Repository.

  17. Identifying Cross-Cutting Concerns Using Software Repository Mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaidman, Andy

    Identifying Cross-Cutting Concerns Using Software Repository Mining Frank Mulder Software and/or a fee. IWPSE-EVOL'10 September 20-21, 2010 Antwerp, Belgium Copyright 2010 ACM 978 Framework #12;3.2 Tool-chain Structure 3.3 Data Acquisition 3.4 Frequent Itemset Mining 3.4.1 Definition #12

  18. Building a Repository for Workflow Systems Chengfei Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Chengfei

    . The repository technology is introduced in CASE/CAD environments to provide unified access and management of Technology, Sydney NSW 2009, Australia liu@socs.uts.edu.au Xuemin Lin School of Computer Science maria@csee.uq.edu.au Abstract Workflow technology is becoming the key technology for business process

  19. QUT Digital Repository: http://eprints.qut.edu.au/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Huizhi "Elly"

    by the Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. (ACM). #12;Design from the Everyday: Continuously evolving, embeddedQUT Digital Repository: http://eprints.qut.edu.au/ Heyer, Clint & Brereton, Margot (2010) Design Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, 16-20 August, 2010, Aarhus, Denmark. © Copyright 2010

  20. www.geology.pdx.edu Undergraduate Degrees Offered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , geomorphology, geomechanics, engineering geology, and teaching and learning. e PSU program serves geology majors Glaciology Geomechanics Environmental and engineering geology K-12 education In addition to their work

  1. Why Geology Matters: Decoding the Past, Anticipating the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Byron P.

    2011-01-01

    Review: Why Geology Matters: Decoding the Past, AnticipatingUSA Macdougall, Doug. Why Geology Matters: Decoding theE-book available. Why Geology Matters pursues two goals: to

  2. Risk assessment framework for geologic carbon sequestration sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.

    2010-01-01

    Framework for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment,for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment, Energyfor Geologic Carbon Sequestration, Int. J. of Greenhouse Gas

  3. Certification Framework Based on Effective Trapping for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2009-01-01

    workshop on geologic carbon sequestration, 2002. Benson,verification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.CO 2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites, Vadose Zone

  4. Nevada potential repository preliminary transportation strategy Study 2. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to build on the findings of the Nevada Potential Repository Preliminary Transportation Strategy Study 1 (CRWMS M&O 1995b), and to provide additional information for input to the repository environmental impact statement (EIS) process. In addition, this study supported the future selection of a preferred rail corridor and/or heavy haul route based on defensible data, methods, and analyses. Study research did not consider proposed legislation. Planning was conducted according to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Plan (DOE 1994a). The specific objectives of Study 2 were to: eliminate or reduce data gaps, inconsistencies, and uncertainties, and strengthen the analysis performed in Study 1; develop a preliminary list of rail route evaluation criteria that could be used to solicit input from stakeholders during scoping meetings. The evaluation criteria will be revised based on comments received during scoping; restrict and refine the width of the four rail corridors identified in Study 1 to five miles or less, based on land use constraints and engineering criteria identified and established in Study 2; evaluate national-level effects of routing spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste to the four identified branch lines, including the effects of routing through or avoiding Las Vegas; continue to gather published land use information and environmental data to support the repository EIS; continue to evaluate heavy haul truck transport over three existing routes as an alternative to rail and provide sufficient information to support the repository EIS process; and evaluate secondary uses for rail (passenger use, repository construction, shared use).

  5. GEOLOGY, February 2009 155 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybers, Peter

    GEOLOGY, February 2009 155 INTRODUCTION Polar layered deposits (PLD)--stratigraphic sequences revealed a more complex stratigraphy, which has also been hypothesized to contain orbital features (Laskar signal, we construct a model of the north PLD (NPLD) stratigraphy from space- craft images, measure

  6. GEOLOGY, April 2011 315 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Robert J.

    GEOLOGY, April 2011 315 INTRODUCTION The Gulf of Mexico opened as the western- most arm of). In spite of this general understanding about when and how it opened, the Gulf of Mexico is a rare example transitional crust thought to have formed during Gulf of Mexico opening (Dobson and Buffler, 1997; Harry

  7. Geological Characterization of California's Offshore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the various data generated by the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership. The project's goals are to: · Perform a preliminary geologic characterization of the carbon dioxide sequestration of carbon sequestration potential. · For select formations previously studied in the Southern Sacramento

  8. Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, George V.; Mackley, Rob D.; Saripalli, Ratna R.

    2005-09-26

    This is a user's guide for viewing and downloading borehold geologic data through a web-based interface.

  9. Geological carbon sequestration: critical legal issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    Geological carbon sequestration: critical legal issues Ray Purdy and Richard Macrory January 2004 Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research Working Paper 45 #12;1 Geological carbon sequestration an integrated assessment of geological carbon sequestration (Project ID code T2.21). #12;2 1 Introduction

  10. PRECAMBRIAN GEOLOGY OF THE OJO CALIENTE QUADRANGLE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treiman, Allan H.

    PRECAMBRIAN GEOLOGY OF THE OJO CALIENTE QUADRANGLE, RIO ARRIBA AND TAOS COUNTIES, NEW MEXICO A THESIS SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND THE COMMITTEE ON GRADUATE STUDIES OF STANFORD Treiman June 1977 PRECAMBRIAN GEOLOGY OF THE OJO CALIENTE QUADRANGLE, RIO ARRIBA AND TAOS COUNTIES, NEW

  11. Inner model theoretic geology Gunter Fuchs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindler, Ralf

    Inner model theoretic geology Gunter Fuchs Ralf Schindler November 18, 2014 Abstract One of the basic concepts of set theoretic geology is the mantle of a model of set theory V: it is the intersection in what was dubbed Set Theoretic Geology in that paper. One of the main results of [FHR] was that any

  12. Geological Society of America 3300 Penrose Place

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Clark R.

    Geological Society of America 3300 Penrose Place P.O. Box 9140 Boulder, CO 80301 (303) 447 and restrictions: Copyright © 2002, The Geological Society of America, Inc. (GSA). All rights reserved. Copyright. Opinions presented in this publication do not reflect official positions of the Society. #12;Geological

  13. INTERAGENCY REPORT APOLLO 17 LANDING SITE GEOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    INTERAGENCY REPORT APOLLO 17 LANDING SITE GEOLOGY UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GEOLOGICAL SURVEY ASTROGEOLOGY #73 JUNE 1975 Prepared under NASA Contract T-5874A and W13,130 NATIONAL STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GEOLOGICAL SURVEY INTERAGENCY REPORT: ASTROGEOLOGY 73 Part I

  14. Bob Campbell Geology Museum Mission Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    Bob Campbell Geology Museum Mission Statement: To foster a greater awareness, understanding, and appreciation of the complex and dynamic nature of geology. The Museum's collection focuses on rocks, minerals and fossils of Southeastern US, but includes specimens from around the world. Bob Campbell Geology Museum

  15. GEOLOGY, B.S.G. ENVIRONMENTAL OPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburger, Peter

    GEOLOGY, B.S.G. ENVIRONMENTAL OPTION (Fall 2015-Summer 2016) IPFW Residency Requirements: ____ 32/Gen Ed GEOLOGY BSG CORE COURSES (66 credits) *Note: grades of C- or better required in GEOL courses/2.0 GPA ______ 3 - 5 Credits in Geology or Geography with Laboratory (Select 1 of the following): ___3

  16. Geological Carbon Storage: The Roles of Government

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geological Carbon Storage: The Roles of Government and Industry in Risk Management ROSE MURPHY version of this publication, please send an email to Mark Jaccard (jaccard@sfu.ca). #12;8 Geological to a location suitable for long-term storage. CO2 can be stored in onshore or offshore geological formations

  17. FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY FIELD CAMP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY FIELD CAMP IN NORTHERN NEW MEXICO May 9, through June 15, 2015 The Department of Earth, Ocean & Atmospheric Science, Geological Science at FSU offers a 6 semester-hour course in Field Geology (GLY4790). We have been teaching this highly successful course from a facility north

  18. GeoloGy (Geol) Robinson Foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dresden, Gregory

    182 GeoloGy (Geol) Robinson Foundation PROFESSOR HARBoR ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS KNAPP, CONNORS ASSISTANT PROFESSORS GREER, RAHL MAJORS BACHELOR OF SCIENCE Amajor in geology leading to a Bachelor of Science degree consists of 50 credits as follows: 1. Geology160,185,211,311,330,350,andacom- prehensive

  19. A publication of the Department of Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;A publication of the Department of Geology Brigharn Young University Provo, Utah 84602 Editors W. Kenneth Hamblin Cynthia M. Gardner Brigham Young University Geology Studies is published semiannually by the department. Geology Studies consists of graduate-student and staff research

  20. , UNIVERSITY Brigham Young University Geology Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    , UNIVERSITY #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 1 5 - 1968 Part 2 Studies for Students No. 1 Guide to the Geology of the Wasatch Mountain Front, Between Provo Canyon and Y Mountain, Northeast of Provo, Utah by J. Keith Rigby and Lehi F. Hintze #12;A publication of the Department of Geology

  1. Courses: Geology (GEOL) Page 321Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog Geology (GEOL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    Courses: Geology (GEOL) Page 321Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog Geology (GEOL) GEOL 102 Our Dynamic Earth: intrODuctiOn tO GEOLOGy (3) Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. A study. Emphasis on local geology, including earthquakes and other environmental aspects. Laboratory study

  2. Roadmap: Geology Environmental Geology -Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-GEOL-EGEO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Geology ­ Environmental Geology - Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-GEOL-EGEO] College of Arts This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major. However, courses on page 2 General Elective 8 #12;Roadmap: Geology ­ Environmental Geology - Bachelor of Science [AS

  3. ABOUT THE JOURNAL One of the oldest journals in geology, The Journal of Geology has

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Jill M.

    ABOUT THE JOURNAL One of the oldest journals in geology, The Journal of Geology has promoted the systematic philosophical and fundamental study of geology since 1893. The Journal publishes original research are available for rental. For more information contact: J-advertising@press.uchicago.edu Journal of Geology

  4. Formal Concept Analysis in Geology 1 7 Formal Concept Analysis in Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belohlavek, Radim

    Formal Concept Analysis in Geology 1 7 Formal Concept Analysis in Geology: Attribute Tables-attribute knowledge is vague (fuzzy), which is typical of sciences like geology, biology etc. Basically, formal of fuzzy data and its possible applications in geological and related sciences. The presen- #12;Formal

  5. Courses: Geology (GEOL) Page 319Sonoma State University 2015-2016 Catalog Geology (GEOL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    Courses: Geology (GEOL) Page 319Sonoma State University 2015-2016 Catalog Geology (GEOL) geoL 102 our dynAMiC eArtH: introduCtion to geoLogy (3) Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. A study. Emphasis on local geology, including earthquakes and other environmental as- pects. Laboratory study

  6. Mathematical Geology, Vol. 34, No. 1, January 2002 ( C 2002) On Modelling Discrete Geological Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baran, Sándor

    Mathematical Geology, Vol. 34, No. 1, January 2002 ( C 2002) On Modelling Discrete Geological there is a large amount of missing observations, which often is the case in geological applications. We make,predictions,MarkovchainMonteCarlo,simulatedannealing,incomplete observations. INTRODUCTION In many geological applications, there is an interest in predicting properties

  7. ABOUT THE JOURNAL One of the oldest journals in geology, The Journal of Geology has

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Jill M.

    ABOUT THE JOURNAL One of the oldest journals in geology, The Journal of Geology has promoted the systematic philosophical and fundamental study of geology since 1893. The Journal publishes original research across a broad range of subfields in geology, including geophysics, geochemistry, sedimentology

  8. Courses: Geology (GEOL) Page 325Sonoma State University 2014-2015 Catalog Geology (GEOL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    Courses: Geology (GEOL) Page 325Sonoma State University 2014-2015 Catalog Geology (GEOL) geoL 102 our dynAMiC eArtH: introduCtion to geoLogy (3) Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 3 hours. A study. Empha- sis on local geology, including earthquakes and other environmental aspects. Labo- ratory study

  9. Radioactive waste isolation in salt: Peer review of the Fluor Technology, Inc. , report and position paper concerning waste emplacement mode and its effect on repository conceptual design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hambley, D.F.; Russell, J.E.; Whitfield, R.G.; McGinnis, L.D.; Harrison, W.; Jacoby, C.H.; Bump, T.R.; Mraz, D.Z.; Busch, J.S.; Fischer, L.E.

    1987-02-01

    Recommendations for revising the Fluor Technology, Inc., draft position paper entitled Evaluation of Waste Emplacement Mode and the final report entitled Waste Package/Repository Impact Study include: reevaluate the relative rankings for the various emplacement modes; delete the following want objectives: maximize ability to locate the package horizon because sufficient flexibility exists to locate rooms in the relatively clean San Andres Unit 4 Salt and maximize far-field geologic integrity during retrieval because by definition the far field will be unaffected by thermal and stress perturbations caused by remining; give greater emphasis to want objectives regarding cost and use of present technology; delete the following statements from pages 1-1 and 1-2 of the draft position paper: ''No thought or study was given to the impacts of this configuration (vertical emplacement) on repository construction or short and long-term performance of the site'' and ''Subsequent salt repository designs adopted the vertical emplacement configuration as the accepted method without further evaluation.''; delete App. E and lines 8-17 of page 1-4 of the draft position paper because they are inappropriate; adopt a formal decision-analysis procedure for the 17 identified emplacement modes; revise App. F of the impact study to more accurately reflect current technology; consider designing the underground layout to take advantage of stress-relief techniques; consider eliminating reference to fuel assemblies <10 yr ''out-of-reactor''; model the temperature distribution, assuming that the repository is constructed in an infinitely large salt body; state that the results of creep analyses must be considered tentative until they can be validated by in situ measurements; and reevaluate the peak radial stresses on the waste package so that the calculated stress conditions more closely approximate expected in situ conditions.

  10. Physical Geology Laboratory Manual Charles Merguerian and J Bret Bennington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    Physical Geology Laboratory Manual Charles Merguerian and J Bret Bennington Geology Department Hofstra University © 2006 #12;i PHYSICAL GEOLOGY LABORATORY MANUAL Ninth Edition Professors Charles Merguerian and J Bret Bennington Geology Department Hofstra University #12;ii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS We thank

  11. GEOLOGY, April 2010 311 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Vicki

    , and crater flux models indicate a global average model surface age (AMSA) of ca. 750 +350/­ 400 Ma (Mc resurfacing hypothesis: that ca. 500 Ma, ~80% of Venus's surface was completely renewed in a period of 10­100 m.y. Postulated surface renewal could have occurred either through (1) extensive deep volcanic

  12. Boullier The fault zone geology 1 Fault zone geology: lessons from drilling through the Nojima and 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Boullier The fault zone geology 1 Fault zone geology: lessons from active faults with the aim of 11 learning about the geology of the fault all 18 their objectives, have still contributed to a better geological

  13. MSc STUDY PROGRAMME IN THE FACULTY OF GEOLOGY AND GEOENVIRONMENT, UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS 201314 Geology and Geoenvironment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kouroupetroglou, Georgios

    MSc STUDY PROGRAMME IN THE FACULTY OF GEOLOGY AND GEOENVIRONMENT, UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS 201314 1 Geology and Geoenvironment MSc Programme STUDENT HANDBOOK Applied Environmental Geology, Stratigraphy Paleontology, Geography and Environment, Dynamic Geology and Tectonics/ Hydrogeology, Geophysics

  14. Expected brine movement at potential nuclear waste repository salt sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCauley, V.S.; Raines, G.E.

    1987-08-01

    The BRINEMIG brine migration code predicts rates and quantities of brine migration to a waste package emplaced in a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt. The BRINEMIG code is an explicit time-marching finite-difference code that solves a mass balance equation and uses the Jenks equation to predict velocities of brine migration. Predictions were made for the seven potentially acceptable salt sites under consideration as locations for the first US high-level nuclear waste repository. Predicted total quantities of accumulated brine were on the order of 1 m/sup 3/ brine per waste package or less. Less brine accumulation is expected at domal salt sites because of the lower initial moisture contents relative to bedded salt sites. Less total accumulation of brine is predicted for spent fuel than for commercial high-level waste because of the lower temperatures generated by spent fuel. 11 refs., 36 figs., 29 tabs.

  15. Lithophysal Rock Mass Mechanical Properties of the Repository Host Horizon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Rigby

    2004-11-10

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop estimates of key mechanical properties for the lithophysal rock masses of the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) within the repository host horizon, including their uncertainties and spatial variability. The mechanical properties to be characterized include an elastic parameter, Young's modulus, and a strength parameter, uniaxial compressive strength. Since lithophysal porosity is used as a surrogate property to develop the distributions of the mechanical properties, an estimate of the distribution of lithophysal porosity is also developed. The resulting characterizations of rock parameters are important for supporting the subsurface design, developing the preclosure safety analysis, and assessing the postclosure performance of the repository (e.g., drift degradation and modeling of rockfall impacts on engineered barrier system components).

  16. World Wide WebWWWDeep Web Web Deep Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deep Web Web World Wide WebWWWDeep Web Web Deep Web Deep Web Deep Web Deep Web Deep Web 1 World Wide Web [1] Web 200,000TB Web Web Web Internet Web Web Web "" Surface Web Deep Web Surface Web 21.3% Surface Web Deep Web [2] Deep Web Web Crawler Deep Web 1 Web

  17. Thermal Conductivity of the Potential Repository Horizon Model Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Ramsey

    2002-08-29

    The purpose of this report is to assess the spatial variability and uncertainty of thermal conductivity in the host horizon for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. More specifically, the lithostratigraphic units studied are located within the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) and consist of the upper lithophysal zone (Tptpul), the middle nonlithophysal zone (Tptpmn), the lower lithophysal zone (Tptpll), and the lower nonlithophysal zone (Tptpln). The Tptpul is the layer directly above the repository host layers, which consist of the Tptpmn, Tptpll, and the Tptpln. Current design plans indicate that the largest portion of the repository will be excavated in the Tptpll (Board et al. 2002 [157756]). The main distinguishing characteristic among the lithophysal and nonlithophysal units is the percentage of large scale (cm-m) voids within the rock. The Tptpul and Tptpll, as their names suggest, have a higher percentage of lithophysae than the Tptpmn and the Tptpln. Understanding the influence of the lithophysae is of great importance to understanding bulk thermal conductivity and perhaps repository system performance as well. To assess the spatial variability and uncertainty of thermal conductivity, a model is proposed that is functionally dependent on the volume fraction of lithophysae and the thermal conductivity of the matrix portion of the rock. In this model, void space characterized as lithophysae is assumed to be air-saturated under all conditions, while void space characterized as matrix may be either water- or air-saturated. Lithophysae are assumed to be air-saturated under all conditions since the units being studied are all located above the water table in the region of interest, and the relatively strong capillary forces of the matrix will, under most conditions, preferentially retain any moisture present in the rock.

  18. A deep earthquake goes supershear

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, R. Mark

    2014-09-01

    Seismic analysis of an aftershock off Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula offers evidence that deep earthquakes are more complicated than geoscientists realized.

  19. BACKFILL BARRIERS: THE USE OF ENGINEERED BARRIERS BASED ON GEOLOGIC MATERIALS TO ASSURE ISOLATION OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A REPOSITORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apps, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management, Boston, MA,Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management, Volume 3. New

  20. Multiple-code simulation study of the long-term EDZ evolution of geological nuclear waste repositories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2008-01-01

    Programme on Nuclear Waste Management (KYT) and Posiva, the09. Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co, Stockholm,boring. Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB)

  1. Information needs for characterization of high-level waste repository sites in six geologic media. Volume 2. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1985-05-01

    Volume II contains appendices for the following: (1) remote sensing and surface mapping techniques; (2) subsurface mapping methods for site characterization; (3) gravity technique; (4) audio-frequency magnetotelluric technique; (5) seismic refraction technique; (6) direct-current electrical resistivity method; (7) magnetic technique; (8) seismic reflection technique; (9) seismic crosshole method; (10) mechanical downhole seismic velocity survey method; (11) borehole geophysical logging techniques; (12) drilling and coring methods for precharacterization studies; (13) subsurface drilling methods for site characterization; (14) geomechanical/thermomechanical techniques for precharacterization studies; (15)geomechanical/thermal techniques for site characterization studies; (16) exploratory geochemical techniques for precharacterization studies; (17) geochemical techniques for site characterization; (18) hydrologic techniques for precharacterization studies; (19) hydrologic techniques for site characterization; and (20) seismological techniques.

  2. B.S. GEOLOGY (Geology Subplan) CHECKLIST of required courses for major Geology Core Courses: 9-10 courses, 33-34 credits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    B.S. GEOLOGY (Geology Subplan) CHECKLIST of required courses for major Geology Core Courses: 9 - Experiencing Geology Lab and either GEOSCI 103 - Intro to Oceanography or GEOSCI 105 - Dynamic Earth 4 (1) (4 semester GEOSCI 201 ­ History of the Earth 4 1st or 2nd year, spring semester GEOSCI 231 ­ Geological Field

  3. Deep Inelastic Neutrino Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Kretzer; M. H. Reno

    2003-06-30

    Understanding neutrino interactions is an important task in searches for neutrino oscillations; e.g. the nu_{mu} -> nu_{tau} oscillation hypothesis will be tested through nu_{tau} production of tau in long-baseline experiments as well as underground neutrino telescopes. An anomaly in the deep inelastic interaction of neutrinos has recently been observed by the NuTeV collaboration -- resulting in a measured weak mixing angle sin^2 Theta_{W} that differs by ~ 3 sigma from the standard model expectation. In this contribution to the proceedings of NUINT02, we summarize results on the NLO neutrino structure functions and cross sections in which charm quark mass and target mass effects in the collinear approximation are included.

  4. Method of deep drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colgate, Stirling A. (4616 Ridgeway, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

    1984-01-01

    Deep drilling is facilitated by the following steps practiced separately or in any combination: (1) Periodically and sequentially fracturing zones adjacent the bottom of the bore hole with a thixotropic fastsetting fluid that is accepted into the fracture to overstress the zone, such fracturing and injection being periodic as a function of the progression of the drill. (2) Casing the bore hole with ductile, pre-annealed casing sections, each of which is run down through the previously set casing and swaged in situ to a diameter large enough to allow the next section to run down through it. (3) Drilling the bore hole using a drill string of a low density alloy and a high density drilling mud so that the drill string is partially floated.

  5. Numerical study of the THM effects on the near-field safety of a hypothetical nuclear waste repository - BMT1 of the DECOVALEX III project. Part 3: Effects of THM coupling in sparsely fractured rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01

    Safety of a Hypothetical Nuclear Waste Repository – BMT1 ofsafety of a hypothetical nuclear waste repository – BMT1 ofsafety of a hypothetical nuclear waste repository – BMT1 of

  6. INVESTIGATION OF DEEP-WATER CIRCULATION MODES IN THE EARLY CENOZOIC USING NEODYMIUM ISOTOPES FROM FOSSIL FISH DEBRIS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Landon 1989-

    2011-05-10

    , this mode did not operate in the geologic past. A growing body of Nd isotope data from fossil fish debris is being used to reconstruct the ancient mode of deep-water circulation throughout the early Cenozoic greenhouse interval. Recent data from previous...

  7. Sandia Energy - 2014 US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2014 USGerman Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design, and Operation Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle Nuclear Energy Workshops 2014 USGerman Workshop on Salt...

  8. Sandia Energy - 2016 US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2016 USGerman Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design, and Operation Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle Nuclear Energy Workshops 2016 USGerman Workshop on Salt...

  9. Sandia Energy - 2015 US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 USGerman Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design, and Operation Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle Nuclear Energy Workshops 2015 USGerman Workshop on Salt...

  10. EA-1404: Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science Laboratory, Carlsbad, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to construct and operate an Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science Laboratory to support chemical research activities related to the...

  11. 6th US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LIST of Participants (August 25, 2015) 6th USGerman Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design and Operations LAST NAME FIRST NAME COMPANY EMAIL lizowski Jarosaw AGH...

  12. Request Access to the PARSIIe Project Management Lessons Learned (PMLL) Repository

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The page identifies the process by which PARSIIe username/password is issued to Users who only require access to the PARSIIe Project Management Lessons Learned (PMLL) Repository.

  13. Deep water gives up another secret

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, CE

    2013-01-01

    COMMENTARY Deep water gives up another secret Craig E.important properties at deep-earth conditions: its dielec-magmas carry water from the deep interior. Water in?u- ences

  14. GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA to extend our thanks to the authors of various West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

  15. Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    adjoining regions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources of the...

  16. Carbonic Acid Shows Promise in Geology, Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Surprising Secrets of Carbonic Acid Probing the Surprising Secrets of Carbonic Acid Berkeley Lab Study Holds Implications for Geological and Biological Processes October 23,...

  17. Geology and Geophysics at The University of Kansas Geology's High-Tech Revolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GHAWKER Geology and Geophysics at The University of Kansas Fall 2009 Geology's High-Tech Revolution Associates Program of the Kansas University Endowment Association. The High-Tech Revolution A geologist

  18. Flemish fieldstone: unravelling lithological differences and diagenesis Research Unit: Sedimentary Geology and Engineering Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    Flemish fieldstone: unravelling lithological differences and diagenesis Research Unit: Sedimentary Geology and Engineering Geology Topic: Fieldstone, natural stone, diagenesis, microscopy with a great interest in sedimentation processes and diagenesis, in petrology and Flemish stratigraphy

  19. WIPP Celebrates 14th Anniversary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CARLSBAD, N.M. – The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) recently marked its 14th year as America’s only operational deep geologic repository for the disposal of radioactive waste.

  20. RECOVERY.GOV U.S. Depar

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and prepare legacy TRU waste for shipment from SRS to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), DOE's deep geologic repository for the permanent disposal of defense-generated TRU...

  1. Adding OAI-ORE Support to Repository Platforms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maslov, Alexey; Mikeal, Adam; Phillips, Scott; Leggett, John; McFarland, Mark

    2009-05-17

    ?OAI?ORE?Support?to? Repository?Pla8orms? Alexey?Maslov,?Adam?Mikeal,?Sco3?Phillips,?? John?Legge3,?Mark?McFarland? Texas?Digital?Library? OR?09? Overview? ?? Texas?Digital?Library? Use?Case?for?OAI?ORE? ?? Mapping?ORE?model?to? DSpace?architecture? ?? ImplementaJon?? ?? Results...: A case study of a digital library application?, Adam Mikeal, James Creel, Alexey Maslov, Scott Phillips, John Leggett, Mark McFarland. JCDL 2009 Current?PrioriDes? ?? Live?deployment?at?TDL? ?? Release?to?the?open?source?community? ?? Integra...

  2. GPFA-AB_Phase1GeologicReservoirsContentModel10_26_2015.xls

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Teresa E. Jordan

    2015-09-30

    This dataset conforms to the Tier 3 Content Model for Geologic Reservoirs Version 1.0. It contains the known hydrocarbon reservoirs within the study area of the GPFA-AB Phase 1 Task 2, Natural Reservoirs Quality Analysis (Project DE-EE0006726). The final values for Reservoir Productivity Index (RPI) and uncertainty (in terms of coefficient of variation, CV) are included. RPI is in units of liters per MegaPascal-second (L/MPa-s), quantified using permeability, thickness of formation, and depth. A higher RPI is more optimal. Coefficient of Variation (CV) is the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean RPI for each reservoir. A lower CV is more optimal. Details on these metrics can be found in the Reservoirs_Methodology_Memo.pdf uploaded to the Geothermal Data Repository Node of the NGDS in October of 2015.

  3. Coda-wave interferometry analysis of time-lapse VSP data for monitoring geological carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, R.

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring Geological Carbon Sequestration Authors: RongmaoGeological Carbon Sequestration ABSTRACT Injection andmonitoring geological carbon sequestration. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

  4. Jeffrey A. Karson Structural Geology & Tectonics Born November 3, 1949

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raina, Ramesh

    Jeffrey A. Karson Structural Geology & Tectonics Born November 3, 1949 204 Heroy Geology Laboratory-443-3363 Syracuse, NY 13244-1070 email: jakarson@syr.edu Education B.S. (Geology) Case Institute of Technology (CWRU), 1972 M.S. (Geology) State University of New York at Albany (SUNYA), 1975 Ph.D. (Geology) State

  5. Geologic mapping of tectonic planets Vicki L. Hansen *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Vicki

    Geologic mapping of tectonic planets Vicki L. Hansen * Department of Geological Sciences, Southern 2000; accepted 14 January 2000 Abstract Geological analysis of planets typically begins with the construction of a geologic map of the planets' surfaces using remote data sets. Geologic maps provide the basis

  6. Petroleum Geology Conference series doi: 10.1144/0070921

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Petroleum Geology Conference series doi: 10.1144/0070921 2010; v. 7; p. 921-936Petroleum Geology Collection to subscribe to Geological Society, London, Petroleum Geologyhereclick Notes on January 5, 2011Downloaded by by the Geological Society, London © Petroleum Geology Conferences Ltd. Published #12;An

  7. Wireless Magnetothermal Deep Brain Stimulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ritchie

    Wireless deep brain stimulation of well-defined neuronal populations could facilitate the study of intact brain circuits and the treatment of neurological disorders. Here we demonstrate minimally-invasive and remote neural ...

  8. SRS Geology/Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denham, M.E.

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of the Savannah River Site Geology and Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document (EID) is to provide geologic and hydrogeologic information to serve as a baseline to evaluate potential environmental impacts. This EID is based on a summary of knowledge accumulated from research conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and surrounding areas.

  9. Dessicant materials screening for backfill in a salt repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, D.R.

    1980-10-01

    Maintaining an anhydrous environment around nuclear waste stored in a salt repository is a concern which can be alleviated by using a desiccant material for backfilling. Such a desiccant should desiccate a brine yet be non deliquescent, the hydrated product should have moderate thermal stability, and the desiccant should have a high capacity and be readily available. From a literature search MgO and CaO were identified for detailed study. These oxides, and an intimate mixture of the two obtained by calcining dolomite, were used in experiments to further determine their suitability. They proved to be excellent desiccants with a high water capacity. The hydrates of both have moderate thermal stability and a high water content. Both MgO and CaO react in an alkaline chloride brine forming oxychloride compounds with different waters of crystallization. Some of these compounds are the Sorel Cements. CaO hydrates to Ca(OH)/sub 2/ which carbonates with CO/sub 2/ in air to form CaCO/sub 3/ and release the hydrated water. Thus the intimate mixture of CaO and MgO from calcined dolomite may serve as a desiccant and remove CO/sub 2/ from the repository atmosphere.

  10. Rethinking Preservation Validation with the Preserved Object and Repository Risks Ontology (PORRO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lalmas, Mounia

    supports not only the repository evaluation or risk assessment exercise, but also documentation in a moreRethinking Preservation Validation with the Preserved Object and Repository Risks Ontology (PORRO and evaluation are fundamentally implicit and share similar complexity. Means are required for the identifica

  11. Benchmarking DAML+OIL Repositories Yuanbo Guo, Jeff Heflin, and Zhengxiang Pan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heflin, Jeff

    Benchmarking DAML+OIL Repositories Yuanbo Guo, Jeff Heflin, and Zhengxiang Pan Department, heflin, zhp2}@cse.lehigh.edu Abstract. We present a benchmark that facilitates the evaluation of DAML+OIL repositories in a standard and systematic way. This benchmark is intended to evaluate the performance of DAML+OIL

  12. Copyright 2007, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology) 0883-1351/07/0022-0577/$3.00 PALAIOS, 2007, v. 22, p. 577582

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higgins, Pennilyn

    deep structural basins containing both abundant vertebrate fossils and uranium-ore deposits in the form IMPLICATIONS OF URANIUM ROLL FRONTS PENNILYN HIGGINS* University of Wyoming Department of Geology is essentially identical to that observed in areas affected by ura- nium roll-front deposits in other Tertiary

  13. Model Evaluation of the Thermo-Hydrological Response in Argillaceous Sedimentary Rock Repository for Direct Disposal of Dual-Purpose Canisters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Liange

    2014-01-01

    Alternative Concepts for Direct Disposal of Dual-PurposeRock Repository for Direct Disposal of Dual-PurposeRock Repository for Direct Disposal of Dual-Purpose

  14. Thermally induced mechanical and permeability changes around a nuclear waste repository -- a far-field study based on equivalent properties determined by a discrete approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min, Ki-Bok; Rutqvist, Jonny; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Jing, Lanru

    2004-01-01

    changes around a nuclear waste repository – a far-fieldmass containing a hypothetical nuclear waste repository. Thethe safe isolation of nuclear wastes from the biosphere,

  15. Bridging the Gap in the Chemical Thermodynamic Database for Nuclear Waste Repository: Studies of the Effect of Temperature on Actinide Complexation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Linfeng

    2011-01-01

    Thermodynamic Database for Nuclear Waste Repository: Studiesthermodynamic database for nuclear waste repository wherethe safe management of nuclear wastes is to store the high-

  16. Deep in Data: Empirical Data Based Software Accuracy Testing Using the Building America Field Data Repository: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neymark, J.; Roberts, D.

    2013-06-01

    An opportunity is available for using home energy consumption and building description data to develop a standardized accuracy test for residential energy analysis tools. That is, to test the ability of uncalibrated simulations to match real utility bills. Empirical data collected from around the United States have been translated into a uniform Home Performance Extensible Markup Language format that may enable software developers to create translators to their input schemes for efficient access to the data. This may facilitate the possibility of modeling many homes expediently, and thus implementing software accuracy test cases by applying the translated data. This paper describes progress toward, and issues related to, developing a usable, standardized, empirical data-based software accuracy test suite.

  17. Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship for Undergraduate Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship for Undergraduate Students Application ASU ID#: Date of 5 RESEARCH PROJECT The Ronald Greeley Planetary Geology Scholarship includes an undergraduate research component in planetary geology, which must be conducted in collaboration with a member

  18. BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 27, Part I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 27, Part I Preble Formation, a Cambrian Outer ..........................................................................J. Roger Olsen Geology of the Sterling Quadrangle, Sanpete County, Utah ..............................................................................James Michael Taylor Publications and Maps of the Geology Department Cover: Aertalphorograph rhowing

  19. Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 28, Part 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 28, Part 3 CONTENTS Three Creeks Caldera ................................................................................................................................... Scott Dean Geology of the Antelope Peak Area of the Southern .................................................................................................................. Craig D. Hall Geology of the Longlick and White Mountain Area, Southern San Francisco Mountains

  20. Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation: Second Worldwide Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    for fuel assemblies that arrive in a shipping container (shipping to the repository. Each canister will contain 12 B W R fuel

  1. Report on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay Repository

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, H.-H.

    2014-01-01

    J-C. (2002) Geological and hydraulic characterization of thegeological, hydrogeological, geochemical, and geotechnical characterization

  2. PERSPECTIVES Deep Earthquakes: A Fault Too Big?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, Seth

    PERSPECTIVES Deep Earthquakes: A Fault Too Big? Seth Stein Because deep Earth processes are inacces. Recent results for the mys- terious deep earthquakes that occur to depths greater than 600 km is that large deep earthquakes (1-3) seem to have occurred on faults larger than ex- pected from the competing

  3. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Overview David C. Koo & DEEP2 Team UCO/Lick Observatory. Univ. of California, Santa Cruz AAS Seattle Jan 2003 DEIMOSKECK #12;l What is DEEP2 ? l What are its Scientific Goals? l What is its Current Status? #12;The DEEP2 Collaboration Team Members: M. Davis (PI, UCB), S. Faber

  4. SEQUENTIAL DEEP BELIEF NETWORKS Galen Andrew

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, William Stafford

    SEQUENTIAL DEEP BELIEF NETWORKS Galen Andrew University of Washington Department of Computer bilmes@ee.washington.edu ABSTRACT Previous work applying Deep Belief Networks (DBNs) to problems sequential information in the hidden layers. Index Terms-- deep learning, deep belief network, phone recog

  5. WebDeep Web Surface Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Web WebWeb WebWeb WebHTML Web WebDeep Web Surface Web " " Deep Web21 Dot-ComWebWeb2.0 WebWeb ""Web WebWeb Deep Web WebWeb SNS Web WebWeb 20017BrightPlanet.comDeep Web Web43,000-96,000Web7,500TB(Surface Web500) UIUCDeep Web2004Deep Web 307,000366,000-535,000 WebDeep Web "" Deep Web 1 Web Web #12

  6. Role of Geological and Geophysical Data in Modeling a Southwestern...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a ground-water flow model of the Animas Valley, southwest New Mexico. Complete Bouguer gravity anomaly maps together with seismic-refraction profiles, geologic maps, geologic,...

  7. Geologic interpretation of gravity and magnetic data in the Salida...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geologic interpretation of gravity and magnetic data in the Salida region, Colorado Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geologic...

  8. GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGY...

  9. UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT MANOA DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT MANOA DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS Graduate Admissions 1680 East * Geophysics & Tectonics; Marine & Environmental Geology; Planetary Geosciences; Volcanology, Geochemistry

  10. On leakage and seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Unger, A.J.A.; Hepple, R.P.; Jordan, P.D.

    2002-01-01

    from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Orlando Lawrencefrom Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Farrar, C.D. , M.L.1999. Reichle, D. et al. , Carbon sequestration research and

  11. Report on THMC Modeling of the Near Field Evolution of a Generic Clay Repository: Model Validation and Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, H. H.

    2014-01-01

    C. (2002). Geological and hydraulic characterization of thegeological, hydrogeological, geochemical and geotechnical characterizationcharacterization carried out by Swedish Geological Survey

  12. The Silent Deep: The Discovery, Ecology and Conservation of the Deep Sea.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koehl, Mimi

    The Silent Deep: The Discovery, Ecology and Conservation of the Deep Sea. By Tony Koslow. Chicago and Tyler's excellent textbook, Deep-Sea Biology: A Natural History of Organisms at the Deep- Sea Floor and line drawings of deep-sea organisms and exploration give it broad appeal. The text is deceptive

  13. Evolution of Spheroidal Galaxies at z Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe (DEEP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evolution of Spheroidal Galaxies at z Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe (DEEP) Myungshin Im 1 and DEEP team 2 UCO/Lick Observatory, UCSC, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 Abstract. DEEP is a multi about DEEP, see an article by D.C. Koo in this conference proceedings). So far, our data consist

  14. Lessons Learned from Natural and Industrial Analogues for Storage of Carbon Dioxide in Deep Geological Formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, Sally M.; Hepple, Robert; Apps, John; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Lippmann, Marcelo

    2002-01-01

    1495.5 MMTC/yr Global Annual Crude Oil Production, U.S. DOEConsumption - 1998 Global Annual Crude Oil Production - 1998Consumption - 1998 Global Annual Crude Oil Production - 1998

  15. Lessons Learned from Natural and Industrial Analogues for Storage of Carbon Dioxide in Deep Geological Formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, Sally M.; Hepple, Robert; Apps, John; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Lippmann, Marcelo

    2002-01-01

    Soda Ash Manufacture and Consumption Carbon Dioxide Consumption* Iron and Steel Production** Ammonia

  16. Lessons Learned from Natural and Industrial Analogues for Storage of Carbon Dioxide in Deep Geological Formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, Sally M.; Hepple, Robert; Apps, John; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Lippmann, Marcelo

    2002-01-01

    used to preserve food from insects, microbes, and fungi isFungi Effective Control of Insect Pests in Food Storage Marshemolymph. Food preservation research has shown that insects

  17. Computer Modelling of 3D Geological Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kodge, B G

    2011-01-01

    The geological surveying presently uses methods and tools for the computer modeling of 3D-structures of the geographical subsurface and geotechnical characterization as well as the application of geoinformation systems for management and analysis of spatial data, and their cartographic presentation. The objectives of this paper are to present a 3D geological surface model of Latur district in Maharashtra state of India. This study is undertaken through the several processes which are discussed in this paper to generate and visualize the automated 3D geological surface model of a projected area.

  18. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archer, David

    2008-02-27

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere/ ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial/interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  19. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Archer

    2008-02-27

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere / ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial / interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  20. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    David Archer

    2010-01-08

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere / ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial / interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  1. Page 1 | B.S. in Geology | Academic Plan of Study Updated April 2014 B.S. in Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yongge

    in topics like sedimentology, structural geology and mineralogy. Extracurricular experiences are important in the subjects of geomorphology, sedimentology, and structural geology. In addition, students at UNC Charlotte

  2. CPTAC Assay Portal: a repository of targeted proteomic assays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Halusa, Goran; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Sharma, Vagisha; MacLean, Brendan; Yan, Ping; Wrobel, John; Kennedy, Jacob; Mani, DR; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Meyer, Matthew R.; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Abbateillo, Susan E.; Boja, Emily; Carr, Steven A.; Chan, Daniel W.; Chen, Xian; Chen, Jing; Davies, Sherri; Ellis, Matthew; Fenyo, David; Hiltket, Tara; Ketchum, Karen; Kinsinger, Christopher; Kuhn, Eric; Liebler, Daniel; Lin, De; Liu, Tao; Loss, Michael; MacCoss, Michael; Qian, Weijun; Rivers, Robert; Rodland, Karin D.; Ruggles, Kelly; Scott, Mitchell; Smith, Richard D.; Thomas, Stefani N.; Townsend, Reid; Whiteley, Gordon; Wu, Chaochao; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2014-06-27

    To address these issues, the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched an Assay Portal (http://assays.cancer.gov) to serve as a public repository of well-characterized quantitative, MS-based, targeted proteomic assays. The purpose of the CPTAC Assay Portal is to facilitate widespread adoption of targeted MS assays by disseminating SOPs, reagents, and assay characterization data for highly characterized assays. A primary aim of the NCI-supported portal is to bring together clinicians or biologists and analytical chemists to answer hypothesis-driven questions using targeted, MS-based assays. Assay content is easily accessed through queries and filters, enabling investigators to find assays to proteins relevant to their areas of interest. Detailed characterization data are available for each assay, enabling researchers to evaluate assay performance prior to launching the assay in their own laboratory.

  3. DOE Geothermal Data Repository - Tethering Data to Information: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weers, J.; Anderson, A.

    2014-02-01

    Data are not inherently information. Without context, data are just numbers, figures, names, or points on a line. By assigning context to data, we can validate ideas, form opinions, and generate knowledge. This is an important distinction to information scientists, as we recognize that the context in which we keep our data plays a big part in generating its value. The mechanisms used to assign this context often include their own data, supplemental to the data being described and defining semantic relationships, commonly referred to as metadata. This paper provides the status of the DOE Geothermal Data Repository (DOE GDR), including recent efforts to tether data submissions to information, discusses the important distinction between data and information, outlines a path to generate useful knowledge from raw data, and details the steps taken in order to become a node on the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS).

  4. Reaction Mechanisms in Petroleum: From Experimentation to Upgrading and Geological Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lannuzel, Frédéric; Bounaceur, Roda; Marquaire, Paul-Marie; Michels, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    Among the numerous questions that arise concerning the exploitation of petroleum from unconventional reservoirs, lie the questions of the composition of hydrocarbons present in deep seated HP-HT reservoirs or produced during in-situ upgrading steps of heavy oils and oil shales. Our research shows that experimental hydrocarbon cracking results obtained in the laboratory cannot be extrapolated to geological reservoir conditions in a simple manner. Our demonstration is based on two examples: 1) the role of the hydrocarbon mixture composition on reaction kinetics (the "mixing effect") and the effects of pressure (both in relationship to temperature and time). The extrapolation of experimental data to geological conditions requires investigation of the free-radical reaction mechanisms through a computed kinetic model. We propose a model that takes into account 52 reactants as of today, and which can be continuously improved by addition of new reactants as research proceeds. This model is complete and detailed enou...

  5. GEOL 102 Historical Geology Exam 1 Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

    & Last Appearance Datum; Zone Other Methods of Stratigraphy Magnetostratigraphy (Chron); Sequence Stratigraphy (Sequence) #12;Geologic Column Chronostratigraphy (Rock) Geochronology (Time) Eonthem Eon Erathem Facies concept Transgressions (onlap sequences) & Regressions (offlap sequences) Sources of coastline

  6. GEOLOGIC NOTE Fault linkage and graben

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fossen, Haakon

    . Schultz $ Geomechanics-Rock Fracture Group, Department of Geological Sciences and Engineering/172 (1982), and his Ph.D. in geomechanics from Purdue University (1987). He worked at the Lunar

  7. Department of Geology & Geophysics University of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Geology & Geophysics University of Hawaii THE APPLICATION CHECKLIST SEND THESE ITEMS TO : University of Hawaii Graduate Division Admissions Office 2540 Maile Way, Spalding Hall 354 Honolulu, HI 96822 Original application and fees. http://www.hawaii

  8. 149Department of Geology Graduate Catalogue 201516

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , hydro, wind, solar, and geothermal methods, with practical applications. P part time #12;150 Department of planimetric geological maps, profiles and mosaics from vertical photographs using pocket and mirror

  9. 149Department of Geology Graduate Catalogue 201415

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , hydro, wind, solar, and geothermal methods, with practical applications. P Part time #12;150 Department of planimetric geological maps, profiles and mosaics from vertical photographs using pocket and mirror

  10. Department of Geological Sciences Postgraduate Handbook 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Field Work and Equipment Costs 18 Careers in Geology 19 Postgraduate Programme 20 Teaching Staff 21 Design your Degree 22 Contact Information Cover Image Drilling Machine called `Sissi', NEAT Gotthard Base

  11. JUDSON MEAD GEOLOGIC FIELD STATION OF INDIANA UNIVERSITY 2013 APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    Geology G Structural Geology G Sedimentology/Stratigraphy G Sedimentology/Stratigraphy G Sophomore G

  12. Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 28, Part 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 28, Part 2 Lower and Middle Ordovician at Section G, Ibex, Utah. #12;A publication of the Department of Geology Brigham Young University Provo, Utah o ~ l z gUfziversity Geology Studies is published by the Department of Geology. This publication

  13. CRISM: Exploring the Geology of Mars Tech Splash Open Music

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CRISM: Exploring the Geology of Mars Tech Splash Open Music Exploring the geology of Mars Marineris simply pulled apart, we would expect the geology on the North and South side of the canyon that make up the rocks. Using the CRISM data we can put together a very simplistic geologic profile

  14. November 47 Geological Society of America 2012 Annual Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    , Jason F., Illinois State Geological Survey, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, 615 E. Peabody Dr, Champaign, IL 61820, jthomaso@illinois.edu and KEEFER, Donald A., Illinois State Geological Survey, Prairie, Quaternary and Engineering Geology Section, Illinois State Geological Survey, 615 E. Peabody Drive, Champaign

  15. Title: Alberta Geological Survey GIS Downloads Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Alberta Geological Survey GIS Downloads Data Creator / Copyright Owner: Alberta Geological Survey Publisher: Alberta Geological Survey Edition: N/A Versions: N/A Publication Date: N/A Coverage Date(s): N/A Updates: N/A Abstract: Dataset contains geological information for the province of Alberta

  16. BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 25,Part 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    #12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 25,Part 1 Papers reviewing geology of field trip areas, 31st annual meeting, Rocky Mountain Section, Geological Society of America, April 28 ....................................................................................................................................................... Geology of Volcanic Rocks and Mineral Deposits in the Southern Thomas Range, Utah: A Brief Summary

  17. Missouri University of Science and Technology 1 Geology and Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Missouri-Rolla, University of

    Missouri University of Science and Technology 1 Geology and Geophysics Graduate work in Geology are designed to provide you with an understanding of the fundamentals and principles of geology, geochemistry and Environmental Geochemistry · Mineralogy/Petrology/Economic Geology · Geophysics/Tectonics/Remote Sensing

  18. Going Deep vs. Going Wide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Going Deep vs. Going Wide, from the Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions Conference 2012. Provides an overview on the progress of four energy efficiency programs: Clean Energy Works Oregon, Efficiency Maine, Energy Upgrade California Flex Path, and EcoHouse Loan Program.

  19. Milestones for Selection, Characterization, and Analysis of the Performance of a Repository for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rechard, Robert P.

    2014-02-01

    This report presents a concise history in tabular form of events leading up to site identification in 1978, site selection in 1987, subsequent characterization, and ongoing analysis through 2008 of the performance of a repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada. The tabulated events generally occurred in five periods: (1) commitment to mined geologic disposal and identification of sites; (2) site selection and analysis, based on regional geologic characterization through literature and analogous data; (3) feasibility analysis demonstrating calculation procedures and importance of system components, based on rough measures of performance using surface exploration, waste process knowledge, and general laboratory experiments; (4) suitability analysis demonstrating viability of disposal system, based on environment-specific laboratory experiments, in-situ experiments, and underground disposal system characterization; and (5) compliance analysis, based on completed site-specific characterization. Because the relationship is important to understanding the evolution of the Yucca Mountain Project, the tabulation also shows the interaction between four broad categories of political bodies and government agencies/institutions: (a) technical milestones of the implementing institutions, (b) development of the regulatory requirements and related federal policy in laws and court decisions, (c) Presidential and agency directives and decisions, and (d) critiques of the Yucca Mountain Project and pertinent national and world events related to nuclear energy and radioactive waste.

  20. First evidence of a distal early Holocene ash layer in Eastern Mediterranean deep-sea sediments derived from the Anatolian volcanic province

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    First evidence of a distal early Holocene ash layer in Eastern Mediterranean deep-sea sediments-4445, USA c Hacettepe University, Department of Geological Engineering, 06532 Beytepe-Ankara, Turkey d volcanic eruptions and distributed by tropospheric and stratospheric wind regimes and water currents can

  1. Well injectivity during CO2 storage operations in deep saline aquifers6 1: Experimental investigation of drying effects, salt precipitation and7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is a technique than can potentially limit the accumulation29-17Jan2014 #12;3 1. Introduction51 52 Geological sequestration of CO2 into deep saline aquifers studied54 much less than mature oil & gas reservoirs. Injection of carbon dioxide into saline aquifers55

  2. Large-scale impact of CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers: A sensitivity study on pressure response in stratified systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Quanlin

    Large-scale impact of CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers: A sensitivity study on pressure response storage potential of all the geological CO2 storage options and are widely distributed throughout the globe in all sedimentary basins.ForCO2 storage tohaveasignificantimpact on atmospheric levels

  3. Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Students (2014-15 academic year)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Students (2014-15 academic year): General Academic Advising for Geology & Geophysics Majors ­ Ms. Judy for Geology Emphasis, Geoscience Major ­ Prof. Brenda Bowen (email: brenda.bowen@ utah.edu, office: 341 FASB

  4. Attitudes and aspirations in a diverse world: the Project StORe perspective on scientific repositories 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryor, Graham

    2006-01-01

    When preparing a team of recent postgraduates who were about to embark on a survey of repository users, it became necessary to equip them with a glossary of terms for use when explaining their mission. Whilst our project’s ...

  5. Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical Coupled Analysis in Low Permeability Media Under Nuclear Repository Conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aponte Rivera, Fernando Luis

    2013-12-06

    The design of underground repositories to storage high level radioactive waste is based on the multi barrier concept that consists of placing natural and artificial barriers around the radioactive material for isolation. ...

  6. Where does it go from here? The place of software in digital repositories 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chue Hong, Neil

    The open repositories community has made great strides in recent years in addressing interoperability, policy and providing the arguments for open access and sharing. One aspect of open research which has come to prominence ...

  7. Modelling Geospatial Application Databases using UML-based Repositories Aligned with International Standards in Geomatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modelling Geospatial Application Databases using UML-based Repositories Aligned with International, geospatial database modelling, interoperability, metadata, UML, Perceptory, ISO/TC 211, OGC 1. Introduction the conceptual content of object oriented application database schemas and dictionaries aligned

  8. Risk-informing decisions about high-level nuclear waste repositories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Suchandra Tina, 1973-

    2004-01-01

    Performance assessments (PAs) are important sources of information for societal decisions in high-level radioactive waste (HLW) management, particularly in evaluating safety cases for proposed HLW repository development. ...

  9. REGIONAL THERMOHYDROLOGICAL EFFECTS OF AN UNDERGROUND REPOSITORY FOR NUCLEAR WASTES IN HARD ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.S.Y.

    2014-01-01

    underground repository for nuclear waste in hard rock, LBL-and Vath, J.E. , Nuclear waste projections and source-termthe Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management, Material

  10. Design of a high-level waste repository system for the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Driscoll, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents a conceptual design for a High Level Waste disposal system for fuel discharged by U.S. commercial power reactors, using the Yucca Mountain repository site recently designated by federal legislation. ...

  11. The Five Great Space Repository Bodhisattvas: Lineage, Protection and Celestial Authority in Ninth-Century Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Hillary

    2010-12-31

    This dissertation explores the protective role of the Five Great Space Repository Bodhisattva (Godai Kokuzo Bosastu) sculptural pentads in Japan during the mid-ninth-century. While existing art historical scholarship ...

  12. Deep-web search engine ranking algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Brian Wai Fung

    2010-01-01

    The deep web refers to content that is hidden behind HTML forms. The deep web contains a large collection of data that are unreachable by link-based search engines. A study conducted at University of California, Berkeley ...

  13. The Phoenix Deep Survey: A Deep Microjansky Radio Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Afonso; B. Mobasher; A. Hopkins; L. Cram

    1999-09-05

    The study of the nature of faint radio sources is of great importance since a significant fraction of these objects is thought to be composed of actively star-forming galaxies. Due to the increased sensitivity of radio telescopes, we are now not only able to catalogue large numbers of these sources in the sub-millijansky regime, but also to start the study of the nature of increasingly fainter microjansky sources. This paper presents a new very deep 1.4 GHz radio survey made as a part of the Phoenix Deep Survey, a project aimed to study the nature of the faintest radio sources. With a limiting sensitivity of 45 microJy, this new survey has allowed us to assemble a large number of sources with 1.4 GHz flux densities below 100 microJy. The resulting source counts and the analysis of the optical properties of the faintest radio sources are presented.

  14. Geology and Geohazards in Taiwan Geologic Field Course and Study Abroad Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Geology and Geohazards in Taiwan Geologic Field Course and Study Abroad Experience Winter Break the tropics over winter break? Sunday, March 2, 14 #12;Contents: The Course Why Taiwan Logistics The Instructors The Cost Comments from 2013 Fact Sheet & Links GEOLOGYANDGEOHAZARDS TAIWAN2013 Sunday, March 2, 14

  15. An Assessment of Geological Carbon Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Finley

    2005-09-30

    The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) has investigated the options for geological carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in the 155,400-km{sup 2} (60,000-mi{sup 2}) Illinois Basin. Within the Basin, underlying most of Illinois, western Indiana, and western Kentucky, are relatively deeper and/or thinner coal resources, numerous mature oil fields, and deep salt-water-bearing reservoirs that are potentially capable of storing CO{sub 2}. The objective of this Assessment was to determine the technical and economic feasibility of using these geological sinks for long-term storage to avoid atmospheric release of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel combustion and thereby avoid the potential for adverse climate change. The MGSC is a consortium of the geological surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky joined by six private corporations, five professional business associations, one interstate compact, two university researchers, two Illinois state agencies, and two consultants. The purpose of the Consortium is to assess carbon capture, transportation, and storage processes and their costs and viability in the three-state Illinois Basin region. The Illinois State Geological Survey serves as Lead Technical Contractor for the Consortium. The Illinois Basin region has annual emissions from stationary anthropogenic sources exceeding 276 million metric tonnes (304 million tons) of CO{sub 2} (>70 million tonnes (77 million tons) carbon equivalent), primarily from coal-fired electric generation facilities, some of which burn almost 4.5 million tonnes (5 million tons) of coal per year. Assessing the options for capture, transportation, and storage of the CO{sub 2} emissions within the region has been a 12-task, 2-year process that has assessed 3,600 million tonnes (3,968 million tons) of storage capacity in coal seams, 140 to 440 million tonnes (154 to 485 million tons) of capacity in mature oil reservoirs, 7,800 million tonnes (8,598 million tons) of capacity in saline reservoirs deep beneath geological structures, and 30,000 to 35,000 million tonnes (33,069 to 38,580 million tons) of capacity in saline reservoirs on a regional dip >1,219 m (4,000 ft) deep. The major part of this effort assessed each of the three geological sinks: coals, oil reservoirs, and saline reservoirs. We linked and integrated options for capture, transportation, and geological storage with the environmental and regulatory framework to define sequestration scenarios and potential outcomes for the region. Extensive use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and visualization technology was made to convey results to project sponsors, other researchers, the business community, and the general public. An action plan for possible technology validation field tests involving CO{sub 2} injection was included in a Phase II proposal (successfully funded) to the U.S. Department of Energy with cost sharing from Illinois Clean Coal Institute.

  16. Reference design and operations for deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrick, Courtney Grant; Brady, Patrick Vane; Pye, Steven; Arnold, Bill Walter; Finger, John Travis; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2011-10-01

    A reference design and operational procedures for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste in deep boreholes have been developed and documented. The design and operations are feasible with currently available technology and meet existing safety and anticipated regulatory requirements. Objectives of the reference design include providing a baseline for more detailed technical analyses of system performance and serving as a basis for comparing design alternatives. Numerous factors suggest that deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste is inherently safe. Several lines of evidence indicate that groundwater at depths of several kilometers in continental crystalline basement rocks has long residence times and low velocity. High salinity fluids have limited potential for vertical flow because of density stratification and prevent colloidal transport of radionuclides. Geochemically reducing conditions in the deep subsurface limit the solubility and enhance the retardation of key radionuclides. A non-technical advantage that the deep borehole concept may offer over a repository concept is that of facilitating incremental construction and loading at multiple perhaps regional locations. The disposal borehole would be drilled to a depth of 5,000 m using a telescoping design and would be logged and tested prior to waste emplacement. Waste canisters would be constructed of carbon steel, sealed by welds, and connected into canister strings with high-strength connections. Waste canister strings of about 200 m length would be emplaced in the lower 2,000 m of the fully cased borehole and be separated by bridge and cement plugs. Sealing of the upper part of the borehole would be done with a series of compacted bentonite seals, cement plugs, cement seals, cement plus crushed rock backfill, and bridge plugs. Elements of the reference design meet technical requirements defined in the study. Testing and operational safety assurance requirements are also defined. Overall, the results of the reference design development and the cost analysis support the technical feasibility of the deep borehole disposal concept for high-level radioactive waste.

  17. EPA Air Docket A-98-49, Item II-B1-34; September 2014 Summary of EPA's Response and Findings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's Ambient Air Monitoring System....................... 5 On-site Inspection at the WIPP operations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. The WIPP is a deep geologic repository where waste was being placed within the WIPP repository. The air exhaust switched to a filtered mode

  18. Exceptional Service in the National Interest WIPP:1.4.1.2:PA:QA-L:543261

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exceptional Service in the National Interest WIPP:1.4.1.2:PA:QA-L:543261 Operated for the U for Mixing Processes in the WIPP Repository to Reflect the CRA-2004 PABC Technical Baseline and the Impact (WIPP) was built by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as a deep geologic repository for transuranic

  19. Isoform discovery by targeted cloning,`deep-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, Frederick

    Isoform discovery by targeted cloning,`deep- well' pooling and parallel sequencing Kourosh Salehi transcriptase (RT)- PCR recombinational cloning,`deep-well' pooling and a next- generation sequencing platform and demonstrate the ORFeome primer pairs ORFeome minipool arrays Single colony isolates `Deep wells' of pooled

  20. THE DEEP PROJECT DAVID C. KOO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE DEEP PROJECT DAVID C. KOO UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA Abstract. DEEP is a multi­institutional program designed to undertake a ma­ jor new spectroscopic goal of securing large numbers of redshifts (10,000 + ) to very faint limits of I ¸ 23, DEEP intends

  1. Deep Web Entity Monitoring Mohammadreza Khelghati

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiemstra, Djoerd

    Deep Web Entity Monitoring Mohammadreza Khelghati Database Group University of Twente, Netherlands. This data is defined as hidden web or deep web which is not accessible through search engines. It is estimated that deep web contains data in a scale several times bigger than the data accessible through

  2. Deep Mixtures of Factor Analysers Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Deep Mixtures of Factor Analysers Introduction Experiments - High dimensional data (avg. log An efficient way to learn deep density models is to greedily learn one layer at a time using one layer latent Graphical Model of Deep MFA Illustration with 2D data Each ellipse is a Gaussian Component Aggregated

  3. Deep-Space Optical Communications: Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djordjevic, Ivan B.

    INVITED P A P E R Deep-Space Optical Communications: Future Perspectives and Applications Current technologies available for deep-space optical data transmission and networking are discussed in this paper IEEE, Abhijit Biswas, and Ivan B. Djordjevic, Senior Member IEEE ABSTRACT | The concept of deep

  4. Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deep Vadose Zone­ Applied Field Research Initiative Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Report #12;Prepared Tasks 25 References 25 Appendix: FY2012 Products for the Deep Vadose Zone­ Applied Field Research Initiative Contents #12;Message from the Deep Vadose Zone- Applied Field Research Initiative Project Manager

  5. Boston Harbor -Deep Draft Navigation Improvement Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    of Massachusetts Bay and is the New England region's largest port. The main deep water harbor is comprised for the Chelsea River which has an authorized depth of 38 feet MLLW. Deep water access to the harbor is providedBoston Harbor - Deep Draft Navigation Improvement Massachusetts 21 August 2008 and 18 September

  6. Sampling the National Deep Web Denis Shestakov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammerton, James

    Sampling the National Deep Web Denis Shestakov Department of Media Technology, Aalto University pages filled with information from myriads of online databases. This part of the Web, known as the deep a problem of deep Web characterization: how to estimate the total number of online databases on the Web? We

  7. New Horizons for Deep Subsurface Microbiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onstott, Tullis

    life cannot exist. · Experiments being designed for the Deep Un- derground Science and EngineeringNew Horizons for Deep Subsurface Microbiology Subsurface microorganisms may grow slowly 200-m-deep wells along with procedures to monitor for drilling-related contaminants, uncovered

  8. Repository site data report for unsaturated tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tien, P.L.; Updegraff, C.D.; Siegel, M.D.; Wahi, K.K.; Guzowski, R.V.

    1985-11-01

    The US Department of Energy is currently considering the thick sequences of unsaturated, fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain, on the southwestern boundary of the Nevada Test Site, as a possible candidate host rock for a nuclear-waste repository. Yucca Mountain is in one of the most arid areas in the United States. The site is within the south-central part of the Great Basin section of the Basin and Range physiographic province and is located near a number of silicic calderas of Tertiary age. Although localized zones of seismic activity are common throughout the province, and faults are present at Yucca Mountain, the site itself is basically aseismic. No data are available on the composition of ground water in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. It has been suggested that the composition is bounded by the compositions of water from wells USW-H3, UE25p-1, J-13, and snow or rain. There are relatively few data available from Yucca Mountain on the moisture content and saturation, hydraulic conductivity, and characteristic curves of the unsaturated zone. The available literature on thermomechanical properties of tuff does not always distinguish between data from the saturated zone and data from the unsaturated zone. Geochemical, hydrologic, and thermomechanical data available on the unsaturated tuffs of Yucca Mountain are tabulated in this report. Where the data are very sparse, they have been supplemented by data from the saturated zone or from areas other than Yucca Mountain. 316 refs., 58 figs., 37 tabs.

  9. Deep-Sea Research I 49 (2002) 681705 Modification and pathways of Southern Ocean Deep Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    2002-01-01

    Deep-Sea Research I 49 (2002) 681­705 Modification and pathways of Southern Ocean Deep Waters of the deep water masses flowing through the region, and to quantify changes in their properties as they cross and pathways of deep water masses in the Scotia Sea had remained poorly documented despite their global

  10. Brine flow in heated geologic salt.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya

    2013-03-01

    This report is a summary of the physical processes, primary governing equations, solution approaches, and historic testing related to brine migration in geologic salt. Although most information presented in this report is not new, we synthesize a large amount of material scattered across dozens of laboratory reports, journal papers, conference proceedings, and textbooks. We present a mathematical description of the governing brine flow mechanisms in geologic salt. We outline the general coupled thermal, multi-phase hydrologic, and mechanical processes. We derive these processes' governing equations, which can be used to predict brine flow. These equations are valid under a wide variety of conditions applicable to radioactive waste disposal in rooms and boreholes excavated into geologic salt.

  11. Method of fracturing a geological formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

    1990-01-01

    An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

  12. ADVANCED NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE EFFECTS ON THE TREATMENT OF UNCERTAINTY IN THE LONG-TERM ASSESSMENT OF GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL SYSTEMS - EBS INPUT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, M; Blink, J A; Greenberg, H R; Sharma, M

    2012-04-25

    The Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign within the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Technology (FCT) program has been tasked with investigating the disposal of the nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level nuclear waste (HLW) for a range of potential waste forms and geologic environments. The planning, construction, and operation of a nuclear disposal facility is a long-term process that involves engineered barriers that are tailored to both the geologic environment and the waste forms being emplaced. The UFD Campaign is considering a range of fuel cycles that in turn produce a range of waste forms. The UFD Campaign is also considering a range of geologic media. These ranges could be thought of as adding uncertainty to what the disposal facility design will ultimately be; however, it may be preferable to thinking about the ranges as adding flexibility to design of a disposal facility. For example, as the overall DOE-NE program and industrial actions result in the fuel cycles that will produce waste to be disposed, and the characteristics of those wastes become clear, the disposal program retains flexibility in both the choice of geologic environment and the specific repository design. Of course, other factors also play a major role, including local and State-level acceptance of the specific site that provides the geologic environment. In contrast, the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) repository license application (LA) is based on waste forms from an open fuel cycle (PWR and BWR assemblies from an open fuel cycle). These waste forms were about 90% of the total waste, and they were the determining waste form in developing the engineered barrier system (EBS) design for the Yucca Mountain Repository design. About 10% of the repository capacity was reserved for waste from a full recycle fuel cycle in which some actinides were extracted for weapons use, and the remaining fission products and some minor actinides were encapsulated in borosilicate glass. Because the heat load of the glass was much less than the PWR and BWR assemblies, the glass waste form was able to be co-disposed with the open cycle waste, by interspersing glass waste packages among the spent fuel assembly waste packages. In addition, the Yucca Mountain repository was designed to include some research reactor spent fuel and naval reactor spent fuel, within the envelope that was set using the commercial reactor assemblies as the design basis waste form. This milestone report supports Sandia National Laboratory milestone M2FT-12SN0814052, and is intended to be a chapter in that milestone report. The independent technical review of this LLNL milestone was performed at LLNL and is documented in the electronic Information Management (IM) system at LLNL. The objective of this work is to investigate what aspects of quantifying, characterizing, and representing the uncertainty associated with the engineered barrier are affected by implementing different advanced nuclear fuel cycles (e.g., partitioning and transmutation scenarios) together with corresponding designs and thermal constraints.

  13. Impacts of a high-burnup spent fuel on a geological disposal system design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, D.K.; Lee, Y.; Lee, J.Y.; Choi, H.J.; Choi, J.W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon-city (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The influence of a burnup increase of a spent nuclear fuel on a deep geological disposal system was evaluated in this study. First, the impact of a burnup increase on each aspect related to thermal and nuclear safety concerns was quantified. And then, the tunnel length, excavation volume, and the raw materials for a cast insert, copper, bentonite, and backfill needed to constitute a disposal system were comprehensively analyzed based on the spent fuel inventory to generate 1 Terawatt-year (TWa), to establish the overall effects and consequences on a geological disposal. As a result, impact of a burnup increase on the criticality safety and radiation shielding was shown to be negligible. The disposal area, however, is considerably affected because of a higher thermal load. And, it is reasonable to use a canister such as the Korean Reference Disposal Canister (KDC-1) containing 4 spent fuels up to 50 GWD/MtU, and to use a canister containing 3 spent fuels beyond 50 GWD/MtU. Although a considerable increased, 33 % in the tunnel length and 30 % in the excavation volume, was observed as the burnup increases from 50 to 60 GWD/MtU, because a decrease in the canister needs can offset an increase in the excavation volume, it can be concluded that a burnup increase of a spent fuel is not a critical concern for a geological disposal of a spent fuel. (authors)

  14. Expected near-field thermal environments in a sequentially loaded spent-fuel or high-level waste repository in salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rickertsen, L.D.; Arbital, J.G.; Claiborne, H.C.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes the effect of realistic waste emplacement schedules on repository thermal environments. Virtually all estimates to date have been based on instantaneous loading of wastes having uniform properties throughout the repository. However, more realistic scenarios involving sequential emplacement of wastes reflect the gradual filling of the repository over its lifetime. These cases provide temperatures that can be less extreme than with the simple approximation. At isolated locations in the repository, the temperatures approach the instantaneous-loading limit. However, for most of the repository, temperature rises in the near-field are 10 to 40 years behind the conservative estimates depending on the waste type and the location in the repository. Results are presented for both spent-fuel and high-level reprocessing waste repositories in salt, for a regional repository concept, and for a single national repository concept. The national repository is filled sooner and therefore more closely approximates the instantaneously loaded repository. However, temperatures in the near-field are still 20/sup 0/C or more below the values in the simple model for 40 years after startup of repository emplacement operations. The results suggest that current repository design concepts based on the instantaneous-loading predictions are very conservative. Therefore, experiments to monitor temperatures in a test and evaluation facility, for example, will need to take into account the reduced temperatures in order to provide data used in predicting repository performance.

  15. Geologic control of natural marine hydrocarbon seep emissions, Coal Oil Point seep field, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leifer, Ira; Kamerling, Marc J.; Luyendyk, Bruce P.; Wilson, Douglas S.

    2010-01-01

    offshore oil production. Geology 27:1047–1050 Shindell DT,between the subsurface geology and gas-phase (methane)emission distribution. Geology and seeps Vertical migration

  16. Kinetics of the Dissolution of Scheelite in Groundwater: Implications for Environmental and Economic Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, Stephanie Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Tungsten, Its History, Geology, Ore-dressing, Metallurgy,5.1 Implications for Environmental Geology…………………………..26 5.2Implications for Economic Geology………………………………..27 6. Future

  17. 1. Study programme for the Master of Science in Geology, 120 Higher Education Credits, at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    geology, paleoecology and paleontology, sedimentology and glacial geology, stratigraphy, geochronology sedimentology ­ processes, sediments and landform systems 2. Quaternary Geology: Paleoecological methods

  18. Model Components of the Certification Framework for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2009-01-01

    to two geologic carbon sequestration sites, Energy Procedia,for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Based on Effectivefor geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment, Energy

  19. Case studies of the application of the Certification Framework to two geologic carbon sequestration sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2009-01-01

    from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zoneverification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.to two geologic carbon sequestration sites Curtis M.

  20. Geologic carbon sequestration as a global strategy to mitigate CO2 emissions: Sustainability and environmental risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2012-01-01

    from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zone2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites: CO 2 migrationGeologic Carbon Sequestration as a Global Strategy to

  1. A comparative simulation study of coupled THM processes and their effect on fractured rock permeability around nuclear waste repositories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, Jonny

    2008-01-01

    emplacement drift at Yucca Mountain. Journal of Contaminantniches in tuff units at Yucca Mountain. Proceedings of thetunnels, similar to the Yucca Mountain repository concept in

  2. Modeling thermal-hydrological response of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to thermal load at a potential repository

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haukwa, C.B.; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2002-01-01

    Repository at Yucca Mountain. In Materials Research Societystudies using the Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone model.Unsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Water Resources

  3. Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    construct and operate a railroad to transport spent nuclear fuel, high-level radioactive waste, and other materials from an existing railroad in Nevada to a repository at Yucca...

  4. GEOLOGIC NOTE A simple model of gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    GEOLOGIC NOTE A simple model of gas production from hydrofractured horizontal wells in shales Tad Patzek, Frank Male, and Michael Marder ABSTRACT Assessing the production potential of shale gas can a nonlinear initial boundary value problem for transient flow of real gas that may sorb on the rock and solve

  5. Geological and geotechnical databases and developments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    in NL - Hack & Tegtmeier 17 Tower of Pisa (trial and error....) Tower of Pisa (photo Pisa, 2006) #12 was adjusted, result: Pisa a leaning curved tower, Delft a leaning bended tower Oude Kerk, Delft, The Netherlands (photo Oude Kerk (Delft), 2006) Tower of Pisa (photo Pisa, 2006) #12;9 October 2007 Geological

  6. GEOL 102: Historical Geology Final Exam Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

    collides with western North America Triassic Climates: Redbeds; Coal Gap; Megamonsoons Tr marine life: Rise patterns of: The Geologic History of major sections of North America (East, Gulf Coast, Midwest plate underneath western North America; standard Andean-style orogeny. Fransiscan mélange; molasse

  7. Geological Society of America 3300 Penrose Place

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    runoff at Volcán Santiaguito, Guatemala Andrew J.L. Harris* Hawaii Institute of Geophysics-57, Zona 13, Guatemala City, Guatemala Elly Bunzendahl Department of Geological Engineering and Sciences at the Santiaguito dome complex (Guatemala) results in continuous lahar activity and river bed aggradation downstream

  8. 145Department of Geology Graduate Catalogue 201314

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    . An introduction to seismic, gravity, and magnetic methods and their interpretation procedures and applications and their methods of interpretation. Pre- or corequisites: GEOL 221 and GEOL 222. GEOL 306 Economic Minerals Geology.2; 3 cr. A course on the principles of air photo interpretation and remote sensing; the construction

  9. Geological Society of America Special Paper 255

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Bradley R.

    Mesozoichigh-pressurerocks in theKlamath Mountains and SierraNevada Bradley R. Hacker* Departmentof Earth and Space, 1990) and tains and easternSierra Nevada attest to convergencebetween B. R. Hacker (unpublished data:Departmentof Geology,StanfordUniversity,Stanford, Nevada. California 94305-2115. Hacker,B.R.,andGoodge,J. W., 1990

  10. Geological Society of America Special Paper 255

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Bradley R.

    and Trinity terrane of theKlamath Mountains with theFeatherRiver terrane of theSierraNevada Bradley R. Hacker. The California94305-2115. descriptionsof the Central Metamorphic Belt, the Trinity terrane, Hacker, B. R:Boulder, Colorado, Geological Society of America Special Paper255. 75 - #12;76 Hacker and Peacock I and the Feather

  11. Geological Modeling of Dahomey and Liberian Basins 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gbadamosi, Hakeem B.

    2010-01-16

    in the last 10 years or so. We proposed geological descriptions of these two Basins. The key characteristics of the two models are the presence of channels and pinch-outs for depths of between 1 km and 2 km (these values are rescaled for our numerical purposes...

  12. NOVEL CONCEPTS RESEARCH IN GEOLOGIC STORAGE OF CO2 PHASE III THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY CO2 STORAGE PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeraj Gupta

    2005-05-26

    As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) initiation on developing new technologies for storage of carbon dioxide in geologic reservoir, Battelle has been awarded a project to investigate the feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in the deep saline reservoirs in the Ohio River Valley region. This project is the Phase III of Battelle's work under the Novel Concepts in Greenhouse Gas Management grant. The main objective of the project is to demonstrate that CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep formations is feasible from engineering and economic perspectives, as well as being an inherently safe practice and one that will be acceptable to the public. In addition, the project is designed to evaluate the geology of deep formations in the Ohio River Valley region in general and in the vicinity of AEP's Mountaineer Power Plant in particular, in order to determine their potential use for conducting a long-term test of CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline formations and potentially in nearby deep coal seams. The current technical progress report summarizes activities completed for the January through March 2005 period of the project. As discussed in the report, the technical activities focused on development of injection well design, preparing a Class V Underground Injection Control permit, assessment of monitoring technologies, analysis of coal samples for testing the capture system by Mitsubishi Heavy Industry, and presentation of project progress at several venues. In addition, related work has progressed on a collaborative risk assessment project with Japan research institute CREIPI and technical application for the Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership.

  13. Spent fuel disassembly hardware and other non-fuel bearing components: characterization, disposal cost estimates, and proposed repository acceptance requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luksic, A.T.; McKee, R.W.; Daling, P.M.; Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Purcell, W.L.

    1986-10-01

    There are two categories of waste considered in this report. The first is the spent fuel disassembly (SFD) hardware. This consists of the hardware remaining after the fuel pins have been removed from the fuel assembly. This includes end fittings, spacer grids, water rods (BWR) or guide tubes (PWR) as appropriate, and assorted springs, fasteners, etc. The second category is other non-fuel-bearing (NFB) components the DOE has agreed to accept for disposal, such as control rods, fuel channels, etc., under Appendix E of the standard utiltiy contract (10 CFR 961). It is estimated that there will be approximately 150 kg of SFD and NFB waste per average metric ton of uranium (MTU) of spent uranium. PWR fuel accounts for approximately two-thirds of the average spent-fuel mass but only 50 kg of the SFD and NFB waste, with most of that being spent fuel disassembly hardware. BWR fuel accounts for one-third of the average spent-fuel mass and the remaining 100 kg of the waste. The relatively large contribution of waste hardware in BWR fuel, will be non-fuel-bearing components, primarily consisting of the fuel channels. Chapters are devoted to a description of spent fuel disassembly hardware and non-fuel assembly components, characterization of activated components, disposal considerations (regulatory requirements, economic analysis, and projected annual waste quantities), and proposed acceptance requirements for spent fuel disassembly hardware and other non-fuel assembly components at a geologic repository. The economic analysis indicates that there is a large incentive for volume reduction.

  14. Paleontology and Geology of Indiana Department of Geological Sciences | P. David Polly 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    . Iowa Tracheophyta (vascular plants) Spores, New Albany Shale Sporing bodies, Dugger Fm. #12;Department (conifers) Walchia, Abo Fm. New Mexico (Permian) #12;Department of Geological Sciences | P. David Polly 5

  15. Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB Packet HanfordDOEDanielDe novo Design of Debugging6DecodingDeep Sky

  16. Deep Vadose Zone - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB Packet HanfordDOEDanielDe novo Design of Debugging6DecodingDeep

  17. Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation: Second Worldwide Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    GEOLOGICAL FORMATIONS IN UKRAINE D.P. Khrushchov , and V.M.25.1. Subdivision of the Ukraine on conditions of R A Win geological formations. UKRAINE CH. Figure 25.2. Concept

  18. Internal Geology and Evolution of the Redondo Dome, Valles Caldera...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Internal Geology and Evolution of the Redondo Dome, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Internal Geology...

  19. UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT MANOA DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT MANOA DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS Graduate Admissions 1680 East's admissibility into the Graduate Program in Geology and Geophysics at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Strongly

  20. Geology and Geothermal Potential of the Roosevelt Hot Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geology and Geothermal Potential of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Area, Beaver County, Utah Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Thesis: Geology and...