Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geologic repository" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

License for the Konrad Deep Geological Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deep geological disposal of long-lived radioactive waste is currently considered a major challenge. Until present, only three deep geological disposal facilities have worldwide been operated: the Asse experimental repository (1967-1978) and the Morsleben repository (1971-1998) in Germany as well as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the USA (1999 to present). Recently, the licensing procedure for the fourth such facility, the German Konrad repository, ended with a positive ''Planfeststellung'' (plan approval). With its plan approval decision, the licensing authority, the Ministry of the Environment of the state of Lower Saxony, approved the single license needed pursuant to German law to construct, operate, and later close down this facility.

Biurrun, E.; Hartje, B.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

2

Current Status of The Romanian National Deep Geological Repository Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Construction of a deep geological repository is a very demanding and costly task. By now, countries that have Candu reactors, have not processed the spent fuel passing to the interim storage as a preliminary step of final disposal within the nuclear fuel cycle back-end. Romania, in comparison to other nations, represents a rather small territory, with high population density, wherein the geological formation areas with radioactive waste storage potential are limited and restricted not only from the point of view of the selection criteria due to the rocks natural characteristics, but also from the point of view of their involvement in social and economical activities. In the framework of the national R and D Programs, series of 'Map investigations' have been made regarding the selection and preliminary characterization of the host geological formation for the nation's spent fuel deep geological repository. The fact that Romania has many deposits of natural gas, oil, ore and geothermal water, and intensively utilizes soil and also is very forested, cause some of the apparent acceptable sites to be rejected in the subsequent analysis. Currently, according to the Law on the spent fuel and radioactive waste management, including disposal, The National Agency of Radioactive Waste is responsible and coordinates the national strategy in the field and, subsequently, further actions will be decided. The Romanian National Strategy, approved in 2004, projects the operation of a deep geological repository to begin in 2055. (authors)

Radu, M.; Nicolae, R.; Nicolae, D. [Center of Technology and Engineering for Nuclear Objectives (CITON), ILFOV County (Romania)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Development of an Integrated Natural Barrier Database System for Site Evaluation of a Deep Geologic Repository in Korea - 13527  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Korea Radioactive-waste Management Corporation (KRMC) established in 2009 has started a new project to collect information on long-term stability of deep geological environments on the Korean Peninsula. The information has been built up in the integrated natural barrier database system available on web (www.deepgeodisposal.kr). The database system also includes socially and economically important information, such as land use, mining area, natural conservation area, population density, and industrial complex, because some of this information is used as exclusionary criteria during the site selection process for a deep geological repository for safe and secure containment and isolation of spent nuclear fuel and other long-lived radioactive waste in Korea. Although the official site selection process has not been started yet in Korea, current integrated natural barrier database system and socio-economic database is believed that the database system will be effectively utilized to narrow down the number of sites where future investigation is most promising in the site selection process for a deep geological repository and to enhance public acceptance by providing readily-available relevant scientific information on deep geological environments in Korea. (authors)

Jung, Haeryong; Lee, Eunyong; Jeong, YiYeong; Lee, Jeong-Hwan [Korea Radioactive-waste Management Corportation - KRMC, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Radioactive-waste Management Corportation - KRMC, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Long-Term Environmental Monitoring of an Operating Deep Geologic Nuclear Waste Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present energy dilemma in which we find ourselves, the magnitude of humanity's energy needs requires that we embrace a multitude of various energy sources and applications. Nuclear energy must be a major portion of the distribution. One often-cited strategic hurdle to the commercial production of nuclear energy is the apparent lack of an acceptable nuclear waste repository. This issue has been quietly addressed at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP; see http://www.wipp.energy.gov), the closest population center of significant size being Carlsbad, New Mexico. WIPP has been operating for about nine years, disposing of over 250,000 drum-equivalents of nuclear waste. From the standpoint of addressing operational and environmental risk, as well as public fear, WIPP has had extensive human health and environmental monitoring. The Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center is in the Institute for Energy and the Environment, in the College of Engineering at New Mexico State University. Located in Carlsbad, NM, CEMRC has been the independent monitoring facility for the area around WIPP from 1993 to the present, i.e., from six years before disposal operations began to nine years of waste disposal operations (www.cemcr.org). Based on the radiological analyses of monitoring samples completed to date for area residents and site workers, and for selected aerosols, soils, sediments, drinking water and surface waters, there is no evidence of increases in radiological contaminants in the region of WIPP that could be attributed to releases from WIPP. Levels of radiological and non-radiological analytes measured since operations began in 1999 have been within the range of baseline levels measured previously, and are within the ranges measured by other entities at the State and local levels since well before disposal phase operations began in 1999. (authors)

Conca, J.; Kirchner, Th.; Monk, J.; Sage, S. [Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center, IEE NMSU, 1400 University Drive, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Use of groundwater lifetime expectancy for the performance assessment of a deep geologic radioactive waste repository:2. Application to a Canadian Shield environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cornaton et al. [2007] introduced the concept of lifetime expectancy as a performance measure of the safety of subsurface repositories, based upon the travel time for contaminants released at a certain point in the subsurface to reach the biosphere or compliance area. The methodologies are applied to a hypothetical but realistic Canadian Shield crystalline rock environment, which is considered to be one of the most geologically stable areas on Earth. In an approximately 10\\times10\\times1.5 km3 hypothetical study area, up to 1000 major and intermediate fracture zones are generated from surface lineament analyses and subsurface surveys. In the study area, mean and probability density of lifetime expectancy are analyzed with realistic geologic and hydrologic shield settings in order to demonstrate the applicability of the theory and the numerical model for optimally locating a deep subsurface repository for the safe storage of spent nuclear fuel. The results demonstrate that, in general, groundwater lifetime exp...

Park, Y -J; Normani, S D; Sykes, J F; Sudicky, E A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Seismic Response of a Deep Underground Geologic Repository for Nuclear Waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a deep underground nuclear waste repository certified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ,(EPA) to store transuranic defense-related waste contaminated by small amounts of radioactive materials. Located at a depth of about 655 meters below the surface, the facility is sited in southeastern New Mexico, about 40 Department of Energy underground facilities, waste disposal. kilometers east of the city of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The U.S. (DOE) managed the design and construction of the surface and and remains responsible for operation and closure following The managing and operating contractor for the DOE at the WIPP, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, maintains two rechmiant seismic monitoring systems located at the surface and in the underground. This report discusses two earthquakes detected by the seismic monitoring system, one a duratior magnitude 5.0 (Md) event located approximately 60 km east-southeast of the facility, and another a body-wave magnitude 5.6 (rob) event that occurred approximately 260 kilometers to the south-southeast.

Sanchez, P.E.

1998-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

7

Overview of Ontario Power Generation's Proposed Deep Geologic Repository for Low and Intermediate Level Waste at the Bruce Site, Ontario, Canada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) for the long-term management of Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste is being proposed by Ontario Power Generation at the Bruce site near Kincardine, Ontario. The DGR would be located at a depth of approximately 680 m within a 200 m thick layer of low-permeability Ordovician argillaceous limestone, which is below a 200 m layer of low permeability Ordovician shale. The repository would have the capacity for approximately 200,000 m{sup 3} of as-disposed waste, sufficient for the current fleet of 20 OPG-owned nuclear reactors. The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary of the project. In summary: Site-specific studies to confirm the suitability of the site to host the DGR were initiated in 2006. These studies include site characterization, environmental assessment, facility engineering and safety assessment. The preliminary results of this work, which is ongoing, continue to confirm our expectations that the site is suitable. (authors)

Gierszewski, P. [Ontario Power Generation, Toronto (Canada)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Response to West Cumbria MRWS consultation: Why a deep nuclear waste repository should not be  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response to West Cumbria MRWS consultation: Why a deep nuclear waste repository should not be sited geological nuclear waste repository. There a suspicion of predetermination because the only district that has. National and international guidance on how best to select potential sites for deep geological nuclear waste

9

Salt Disposal Investigations to Study Thermally Hot Radioactive Waste In A Deep Geologic Repository in Bedded Rock Salt - 12488  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A research program is proposed to investigate the behavior of salt when subjected to thermal loads like those that would be present in a high-level waste repository. This research would build upon results of decades of previous salt repository program efforts in the US and Germany and the successful licensing and operation of a repository in salt for disposal of defense transuranic waste. The proposal includes a combination of laboratory-scale investigations, numerical simulations conducted to develop validated models that could be used for future repository design and safety case development, and a thermal field test in an underground salt formation with a configuration that replicates a small portion of a conceptual repository design. Laboratory tests are proposed to measure salt and brine properties across and beyond the range of possible repository conditions. Coupled numerical models will seek to describe phenomenology (thermal, mechanical, and hydrological) observed in the laboratory tests. Finally, the field test will investigate many phenomena that have been variously cited as potential issues for disposal of thermally hot waste in salt, including buoyancy effects and migration of pre-existing trapped brine up the thermal gradient (including vapor phase migration). These studies are proposed to be coordinated and managed by the Carlsbad Field Office of DOE, which is also responsible for the operation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) within the Office of Environmental Management. The field test portion of the proposed research would be conducted in experimental areas of the WIPP underground, far from disposal operations. It is believed that such tests may be accomplished using the existing infrastructure of the WIPP repository at a lower cost than if such research were conducted at a commercial salt mine at another location. The phased field test is proposed to be performed over almost a decade, including instrumentation development, several years of measurements during heating and then subsequent cooling periods, and the eventual forensic mining back of the test bed to determine the multi-year behavior of the simulated waste/rock environment. Funding possibilities are described, and prospects for near term start-up are discussed. Mining of the access drifts required to create the test area in the WIPP underground began in November 2011. Because this mining uses existing WIPP infrastructure and labor, it is estimated to take about two years to complete the access drifts. WIPP disposal operations and facility maintenance activities will take priority over the SDI field test area mining. Funding of the SDI proposal was still being considered by DOE's Offices of Environmental Management and Nuclear Energy at the time this paper was written, so no specific estimates of the progress in 2012 have been included. (authors)

Nelson, Roger A. [DOE, Carlsbad Field Office, Carlsbad NM (United States); Buschman, Nancy [DOE, Office of Environmental Management, Washington DC (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Monitored Geologic Repository Test Evaluation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Monitored Geologic Repository test & evaluation program will specify tests, demonstrations, examinations, and analyses, and describe procedures to conduct and document testing necessary to verify meeting Monitored Geologic Repository requirements for a safe and effective geologic repository for radioactive waste. This test program will provide assurance that the repository is performing as designed, and that the barriers perform as expected; it will also develop supporting documentation to support the licensing process and to demonstrate compliance with codes, standards, and regulations. This comprehensive program addresses all aspects of verification from the development of test requirements to the performance of tests and reporting of the test results. The ''Monitored Geologic Repository Test & Evaluation Plan'' provides a detailed description of the test program approach necessary to achieve the above test program objectives. This test plan incorporates a set of test phases focused on ensuring repository safety and operational readiness and implements a project-wide integrated product management team approach to facilitate test program planning, analysis, and implementation. The following sections provide a description of the individual test phases, the methodology for test program planning and analyses, and the management approach for implementing these activities.

M.B. Skorska

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

11

MONITORED GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY SYSTEMS REQUIREMENTS DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the Monitored Geologic Repository system requirements for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). These requirements are based on the ''Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document'' (CRD) (DOE 2004a). The ''Monitored Geologic Repository Systems Requirements Document'' (MGR-RD) is developed in accordance with LP-3.3 SQ-OCRWM, ''Preparation, Review, and Approval of Office of Repository Development Requirements Document''. As illustrated in Figure 1, the MGR-RD forms part of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Technical Requirements Baseline. Revision 0 of this document identifies requirements for the current phase of repository design that is focused on developing a preliminary design for the repository and will be included in the license application submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for a repository at Yucca Mountain in support of receiving a construction authorization and subsequent operating license. As additional information becomes available, more detailed requirements will be identified in subsequent revisions to this document.

V. Trebules

2006-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

12

Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (PDD) is to allocate the functions, requirements, and assumptions to the systems at Level 5 of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) architecture identified in Section 4. It provides traceability of the requirements to those contained in Section 3 of the ''Monitored Geologic Repository Requirements Document'' (MGR RD) (CRWMS M&O 2000b) and other higher-level requirements documents. In addition, the PDD allocates design related assumptions to work products of non-design organizations. The document provides Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) engineering design basis in support of design and performance assessment in preparing for the Site Recommendation (SR) and License Application (LA) milestones. The engineering design basis documented in the PDD is to be captured in the System Description Documents (SDDs) which address each of the systems at Level 5 of the CRWMS architecture. The design engineers obtain the engineering design basis from the SDDs and by reference from the SDDs to the PDD. The design organizations and other organizations will obtain design related assumptions directly from the PDD. These organizations may establish additional assumptions for their individual activities, but such assumptions are not to conflict with the assumptions in the PDD. The PDD will serve as the primary link between the engineering design basis captured in the SDDs and the design requirements captured in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) documents. The approved PDD is placed under Level 3 baseline control by the CRWMS Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) and the following portions of the PDD constitute the Technical Design Baseline for the MGR: the design characteristics listed in Table 2-1, the MGR Architecture (Section 4.1),the Engineering Design Bases (Section 5), and the Controlled Project Assumptions (Section 6).

P. Curry

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (PDD) is to allocate the functions, requirements, and assumptions to the systems at Level 5 of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) architecture identified in Section 4. It provides traceability of the requirements to those contained in Section 3 of the ''Monitored Geologic Repository Requirements Document'' (MGR RD) (YMP 2000a) and other higher-level requirements documents. In addition, the PDD allocates design related assumptions to work products of non-design organizations. The document provides Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) technical requirements in support of design and performance assessment in preparing for the Site Recommendation (SR) and License Application (LA) milestones. The technical requirements documented in the PDD are to be captured in the System Description Documents (SDDs) which address each of the systems at Level 5 of the CRWMS architecture. The design engineers obtain the technical requirements from the SDDs and by reference from the SDDs to the PDD. The design organizations and other organizations will obtain design related assumptions directly from the PDD. These organizations may establish additional assumptions for their individual activities, but such assumptions are not to conflict with the assumptions in the PDD. The PDD will serve as the primary link between the technical requirements captured in the SDDs and the design requirements captured in US Department of Energy (DOE) documents. The approved PDD is placed under Level 3 baseline control by the CRWMS Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) and the following portions of the PDD constitute the Technical Design Baseline for the MGR: the design characteristics listed in Table 1-1, the MGR Architecture (Section 4.1), the Technical Requirements (Section 5), and the Controlled Project Assumptions (Section 6).

P. M. Curry

2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

14

Cigeo, the French Geological Repository Project - 13022  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cigeo industrial-scale geological disposal centre is designed for the disposal of the most highly-radioactive French waste. It will be built in an argillite formation of the Callovo-Oxfordian dating back 160 million years. The Cigeo project is located near the Bure village in the Paris Basin. The argillite formation was studied since 1974, and from the Meuse/Haute-Marne underground research laboratory since end of 1999. Most of the waste to be disposed of in the Cigeo repository comes from nuclear power plants and from reprocessing of their spent fuel. (authors)

Labalette, Thibaud; Harman, Alain; Dupuis, Marie-Claude; Ouzounian, Gerald [ANDRA, 1-7, rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France)] [ANDRA, 1-7, rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Reference Design Description for a Geologic Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the current major national environmental problems is the safe disposal of large quantities of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste materials, which are rapidly accumulating throughout the country. These radioactive byproducts are generated as the result of national defense activities and from the generation of electricity by commercial nuclear power plants. At present, spent nuclear fuel is accumulating at over 70 power plant sites distributed throughout 33 states. The safe disposal of these high-level radioactive materials at a central disposal facility is a high national priority. This Reference Design Description explains the current design for a potential geologic repository that may be located at Yucca Mountain in Nevada for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste materials. This document describes a possible design for the three fundamental parts of a repository: a surface facility, subsurface repository, and waste packaging. It also presents the current conceptual design of the key engineering systems for the final four phases of repository processes: operations, monitoring, closure, and postclosure. In accordance with current law, this design does not include an interim storage option. In addition, this Reference Design Description reviews the expected long-term performance of the potential repository. It describes the natural barrier system which, together with the engineered systems, achieves the repository objectives. This design will protect the public and the environment by allowing the safe disposal of radioactive waste received from government-owned custodial spent fuel sites, high-level radioactive waste sites, and commercial power reactor sites. All design elements meet or exceed applicable regulations governing the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The design will provide safe disposal of waste materials for at least a 10,000 year period. During this time interval, natural radioactive decay of the waste materials will result in fission products that pose a minimal radiological hazard to the public afterward. For example, after 100 years, the relative hazard from the waste fission products will have diminished approximately 90 percent. After 1,000 years, the hazard will have diminished 99 percent, and after 10,000 years it will have diminished 99.9 percent. The resulting radiological hazard after 10,000 years is minimal, being of the same order of magnitude as that posed by 0.2 percent uranium ore, which is equivalent to that which was used to originally produce the nuclear fuel. Because developing such a repository is extremely complex, the design will move forward in three stages: Site Recommendation, License Application, and Construction. This document presents the design as it will be submitted in the Site Recommendation Consideration Report; the design will be updated as the design process moves forward. As more cost-effective solutions, technical advancements, or changes to requirements occur, the design may evolve. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management is developing a system that includes this potential repository. This waste management system integrates acceptance, transportation, storage, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Acceptance and transportation will be handled by regional servicing contractors under contract to the DOE. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission will conduct an in-depth and thorough licensing review to determine the acceptability of the proposed waste management system. Eight sections of this document follow. Section 2 discusses the design requirements for the proposed repository. Section 3 describes the physical layout of the proposed repository. Section 4 describes the evolutionary phases of the development of the proposed repository. Section 5 describes the receipt of waste. Section 6 details the various systems that will package the waste and move it below ground, as well as safety monitoring and closure. Section 7 describes the syst

NA

2000-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

16

Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (PDD) is to allocate the functions, requirements, and assumptions to the systems at Level 5 of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) architecture identified in Section 4. It provides traceability of the requirements to those contained in Section 3 of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Requirements Document (YMP RD) (YMP 2001a) and other higher-level requirements documents. In addition, the PDD allocates design related assumptions to work products of non-design organizations. The document provides Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) technical requirements in support of design and performance assessment in preparing for the Site Recommendation (SR) and License Application (LA) milestones. The technical requirements documented in the PDD are to be captured in the System Description Documents (SDDs) which address each of the systems at Level 5 of the CRWMS architecture. The design engineers obtain the technical requirements from the SDDs and by reference from the SDDs to the PDD. The design organizations and other organizations will obtain design related assumptions directly from the PDD. These organizations may establish additional assumptions for their individual activities, but such assumptions are not to conflict with the assumptions in the PDD. The PDD will serve as the primary link between the technical requirements captured in the SDDs and the design requirements captured in US Department of Energy (DOE) documents. The approved PDD is placed under Level 3 baseline control by the CRWMS Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) and the following portions of the PDD constitute the Technical Design Baseline for the MGR: the design characteristics listed in Table 1-1, the MGR Architecture (Section 4.1), the Technical Requirements (Section 5), and the Controlled Project Assumptions (Section 6).

P. Curry

2001-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

17

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada - Nevada Rail Transportation CorridorDOE/EIS-0250F-S2andFinal Envir Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada - Nevada Rail Transportation CorridorDOE/EIS-0250F-S2andFinal Envir This part of the Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada -- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor (DOE/EIS-0250F-S2) (Nevada Rail Corridor SEIS)

18

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Nevada Rail - Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and Final Env Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada -- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and Final Env The Summary of the Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada -- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Rail Alignment for the Construction and Operation of a Railroad in Nevada to a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County,

19

Constructing Hydraulic Barriers in Deep Geologic Formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many construction methods have been developed to create hydraulic barriers to depths of 30 to 50 meters, but few have been proposed for depths on the order of 500 meters. For these deep hydraulic barriers, most methods are potentially feasible for soil but not for hard rock. In the course of researching methods of isolating large subterranean blocks of oil shale, the authors have developed a wax thermal permeation method for constructing hydraulic barriers in rock to depths of over 500 meters in competent or even fractured rock as well as soil. The technology is similar to freeze wall methods, but produces a permanent barrier; and is potentially applicable in both dry and water saturated formations. Like freeze wall barriers, the wax thermal permeation method utilizes a large number of vertical or horizontal boreholes around the perimeter to be contained. However, instead of cooling the boreholes, they are heated. After heating these boreholes, a specially formulated molten wax based grout is pumped into the boreholes where it seals fractures and also permeates radially outward to form a series of columns of wax-impregnated rock. Rows of overlapping columns can then form a durable hydraulic barrier. These barriers can also be angled above a geologic repository to help prevent influx of water due to atypical rainfall events. Applications of the technique to constructing containment structures around existing shallow waste burial sites and water shutoff for mining are also described. (authors)

Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E. [Technologies Co, Texas (United States); Cooper, D.C. [Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Performance assessment implementation plan for the geologic repository program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance assessment is a major constituent of the program being conducted in the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a geologic repository. Performance assessment is the set of activities needed for quantitative evaluations of repository-system performance to access compliance with regulations and to support the development of the geologic repository. To define the strategy for these evaluations, the DOE has developed this performance assessment strategy plan. This document discusses the need for such a strategy, the objectives and scope of the strategy plan, the relationship of the plan to other program plans. Additionally, it defines performance assessment and describes the roles of performance assessment in this program, discusses concepts and general strategies needed for performance assessment, outlines the content of the Safety Analysis Report, summarizes the requirements for the repository Environmental Impact Statement, discusses the requirements that apply to the site-suitability analyses and describes the site characterization. 10 figs., 7 tabs.

NONE

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geologic repository" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Siting America's geologic repository for high-level Nuclear Waste: Implications for environmental Policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Siting a geologic repository for isolating highlevel nuclear waste up to 10,000 years is ... before attempted in the United States. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 exempted repository siting from ... require...

John Lemons; Charles Malone

22

Licensing A Geologic Repository At Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After completing more than twenty years of intensive scientific and engineering investigations at the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that the site is suitable for development of a geologic repository for disposal of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Following this determination, the site was recommended to the President for repository development. The President approved the recommendation and forwarded it to the U.S. Congress for site designation. The Governor of Nevada vetoed the recommendation with a notice of disapproval to the U.S. Congress. Congress subsequently over-rode the Governor's veto with a joint resolution which the President signed into law. With site designation in effect, DOE is now focusing its work on the development of a license application for repository construction. This paper will summarize the work that had been done to support site recommendation, work that is currently being done for license application, and the necessary next steps that may be required to allow repository operations to begin in 2010.

Dyer, R. J.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

23

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nevada Rail Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and Final En Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada - Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and Final En Proposed Action: To determine a rail alignment within a rail corridor in which to construct and operate a railroad to transport spent nuclear fuel, high-level radioactive waste, and other materials from an existing railroad in Nevada to a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. The Proposed Action includes the construction of railroad construction and operations support facilities. This Rail Alignment EIS analyzes two alternatives that would implement the Proposed Action: the Caliente rail

24

MONITORED GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY LIFE CYCLE COST ESTIMATE ASSUMPTIONS DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this assumptions document is to provide general scope, strategy, technical basis, schedule and cost assumptions for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) life cycle cost (LCC) estimate and schedule update incorporating information from the Viability Assessment (VA) , License Application Design Selection (LADS), 1999 Update to the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) estimate and from other related and updated information. This document is intended to generally follow the assumptions outlined in the previous MGR cost estimates and as further prescribed by DOE guidance.

R.E. Sweeney

2001-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

25

Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System Description Document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System provides supervisory control, monitoring, and selected remote control of primary and secondary repository operations. Primary repository operations consist of both surface and subsurface activities relating to high-level waste receipt, preparation, and emplacement. Secondary repository operations consist of support operations for waste handling and treatment, utilities, subsurface construction, and other selected ancillary activities. Remote control of the subsurface emplacement operations, as well as, repository performance confirmation operations are the direct responsibility of the system. In addition, the system monitors parameters such as radiological data, air quality data, fire detection status, meteorological conditions, unauthorized access, and abnormal operating conditions, to ensure a safe workplace for personnel. Parameters are displayed in a real-time manner to human operators regarding surface and subsurface conditions. The system performs supervisory monitoring and control for both important to safety and non-safety systems. The system provides repository operational information, alarm capability, and human operator response messages during emergency response situations. The system also includes logic control to place equipment, systems, and utilities in a safe operational mode or complete shutdown during emergency response situations. The system initiates alarms and provides operational data to enable appropriate actions at the local level in support of emergency response, radiological protection response, evacuation, and underground rescue. The system provides data communications, data processing, managerial reports, data storage, and data analysis. This system's primary surface and subsurface operator consoles, for both supervisory and remote control activities, will be located in a Central Control Center (CCC) inside one of the surface facility buildings. The system consists of instrument and control equipment and components necessary to provide human operators with sufficient information to monitor and control the operation of the repository in an efficient and safe manner. The system consists of operator consoles and workstations, multiple video display terminals, communications and interfacing equipment, and instrument and control software with customized configuration to meet the needs of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Process and logic controllers and the associated input/output units of each system interfaced with this system will be configured into Remote Terminal Units (RTU) and located close to the systems to be monitored and controlled. The RTUs are configured to remain operational should communication with CCC operations be lost. The system provides closed circuit television to selectively view systems, operations, and equipment areas and to aid in the operation of mechanical systems. Control and monitoring of site utility systems will be located in the CCC. Site utilities include heating, ventilation, and air conditioning equipment; plant compressed air; plant water; firewater; electrical systems; and inert gases, such as nitrogen, if required. This system interfaces with surface and subsurface systems that either generate output data or require remote control input. The system interfaces with the Site Communications System for bulk storage of operational data, on-site and off-site communication, and a plant-wide public announcement system. The system interfaces with the Safeguards and Security System to provide operational status and emergency alarm indications. The system interfaces with the Site Operation System to provide site wide acquisition of data for analysis and reports, historical information for trends, utility information for plant operation, and to receive operating plans and procedures.

E.F. Loros

2000-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

26

EIS-0250: Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EIS-0250: Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear EIS-0250: Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada EIS-0250: Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada Summary This EIS analyzes DOE's proposed action to construct, operate, monitor, and eventually close a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The EIS evaluates not only impacts from constructing, operating, monitoring, and closing a repository, but also from transporting the materials from 72 commercial and 4 DOE sites to the Yucca Mountain repository site in Nye County, Nevada. Public Comment Opportunities

27

Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case The Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case presents generic information that is of use in understanding potential deep geologic disposal options in the U.S. for used nuclear fuel (UNF) from reactors and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). Potential disposal options include mined disposal in a variety of geologic media (e.g., salt, shale, granite), and deep borehole disposal in basement rock. The Generic Safety Case is intended to be a source of information to provide answers to questions that may arise as the U.S. works to develop strategies to dispose of current and future inventories of UNF and HLW. DOE is examining combinations of generic geologic media and facility designs that could potentially support

28

French Geological Repository Project for High Level and Long-Lived Waste: Scientific Programme  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility study presented in the Dossier 2005 Argile set out to evaluate the conditions for building, operating and managing a reversible disposal facility. The research was directed at demonstrating a potential for confining long-lived radioactive waste in a deep clay formation by establishing the feasibility of the disposal principle. Results have been enough convincing and a Planning Act was passed on 28 June, 2006. Decision in principle has been taken to dispose of intermediate and high level long-lived radioactive waste in a geological repository. An application file for a license to construct a disposal facility is requested by end of 2014 and its commissioning is planned for 2025. Based on previous results as well as on recommendations made by various Dossier 2005 evaluators, a new scientific programme for 2006-2015 has been defined. It gives details of what will be covered over the 2006-2015 period. Particular emphasis is placed on consolidating scientific data, increasing understanding of certain mechanisms and using a scientific and technical integration approach. It aims at integrating scientific developments and engineering advances. The scientific work envisaged beyond 2006 has the benefit of a unique context, which is direct access to the geological medium over long timescales. It naturally extends the research carried out to date, and incorporates additional investigations of the geological medium, and the preparation of demonstration work especially through full-scale tests. Results will aim at improving the representation of repository evolutions over time, extract the relevant parameters for monitoring during the reversibility phases, reduce the parametric uncertainties and enhance the robustness of models for performance calculations and safety analyses. Structure and main orientation of the ongoing scientific programme are presented. (author)

Landais, P.; Lebon, P.; Ouzounian, G. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs (ANDRA), 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Evaluation of radionuclide migration in the homogeneous system of a geological repository  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to study radionuclide migration and release from a deep underground repository situated in a clay formation. An insight into the processes influencing the radionuclide transport in the near field and far field will be presented. For the calculation, a set of radionuclides has been chosen, considering the half-life, decay chains, capacity of the sorption, solubility limits and diffusion coefficients. The migration of radionuclides is dependent on transport properties of the particular nuclide. Due to the low hydraulic conductivity of the backfill material and clay geological formation, the transport in the repository occurs mainly by diffusion. The migration rate will be influenced by the water chemistry, solubility, retardation and diffusive properties of the nuclides, and the water flow rate in the clay. The release rates of radionuclides from the geosphere to the biosphere will be converted into the indicative dose rates using dose conversion factors for ingestion. The impact of the critical group is considered via consumption of meat, root vegetables and drinking water from wells.

S. Prvakova; J. Duran; V. Necas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Adapting Dry Cask Storage for Aging at a Geologic Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Aging System is a crucial part of operations at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository in the United States. Incoming commercial SNF that does not meet thermal limits for emplacement will be aged on outdoor pads. U.S. Department of Energy SNF will also be managed using the Aging System. Proposed site-specific designs for the Aging System are closely based upon designs for existing dry cask storage (DCS) systems. This paper evaluates the applicability of existing DCS systems for use in the SNF Aging System at Yucca Mountain. The most important difference between existing DCS facilities and the Yucca Mountain facility is the required capacity. Existing DCS facilities typically have less than 50 casks. The current design for the aging pad at Yucca Mountain calls for a capacity of over 2,000 casks (20,000 MTHM) [1]. This unprecedented number of casks poses some unique problems. The response of DCS systems to off-normal and accident conditions needs to be re-evaluated for multiple storage casks. Dose calculations become more complicated, since doses from multiple or very long arrays of casks can dramatically increase the total boundary dose. For occupational doses, the geometry of the cask arrays and the order of loading casks must be carefully considered in order to meet ALARA goals during cask retrieval. Due to the large area of the aging pad, skyshine must also be included when calculating public and worker doses. The expected length of aging will also necessitate some design adjustments. Under 10 CFR 72.236, DCS systems are initially certified for a period of 20 years [2]. Although the Yucca Mountain facility is not intended to be a storage facility under 10 CFR 72, the operational life of the SNF Aging System is 50 years [1]. Any cask system selected for use in aging will have to be qualified to this design lifetime. These considerations are examined, and a summary is provided of the adaptations that must be made in order to use DCS technologies successfully at a geologic repository.

C. Sanders; D. Kimball

2005-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

31

Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

Croff, A.G.; Lomenick, T.F.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stow, S.H.

2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Deep Geologic Nuclear Waste Disposal - No New Taxes - 12469  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To some, the perceived inability of the United States to dispose of high-level nuclear waste justifies a moratorium on expansion of nuclear power in this country. Instead, it is more an example of how science yields to social pressure, even on a subject as technical as nuclear waste. Most of the problems, however, stem from confusion on the part of the public and their elected officials, not from a lack of scientific knowledge. We know where to put nuclear waste, how to put it there, how much it will cost, and how well it will work. And it's all about the geology. The President's Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future has drafted a number of recommendations addressing nuclear energy and waste issues (BRC 2011) and three recommendations, in particular, have set the stage for a new strategy to dispose of high-level nuclear waste and to manage spent nuclear fuel in the United States: 1) interim storage for spent nuclear fuel, 2) resumption of the site selection process for a second repository, and 3) a quasi-government entity to execute the program and take control of the Nuclear Waste Fund in order to do so. The first two recommendations allow removal and storage of spent fuel from reactor sites to be used in the future, and allows permanent disposal of actual waste, while the third controls cost and administration. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NPWA 1982) provides the second repository different waste criteria, retrievability, and schedule, so massive salt returns as the candidate formation of choice. The cost (in 2007 dollars) of disposing of 83,000 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM) high-level waste (HLW) is about $ 83 billion (b) in volcanic tuff, $ 29 b in massive salt, and $ 77 b in crystalline rock. Only in salt is the annual revenue stream from the Nuclear Waste Fund more than sufficient to accomplish this program without additional taxes or rate hikes. The cost is determined primarily by the suitability of the geologic formation, i.e., how well it performs on its own for millions of years with little engineering assistance from humans. It is critical that the states most affected by this issue (WA, SC, ID, TN, NM and perhaps others) develop an independent multi-state agreement in order for a successful program to move forward. Federal approval would follow. Unknown to most, the United States has a successful operating deep permanent geologic nuclear repository for high and low activity waste, called the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Its success results from several factors, including an optimal geologic and physio-graphic setting, a strong scientific basis, early regional community support, frequent interactions among stakeholders at all stages of the process, long-term commitment from the upper management of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) over several administrations, strong New Mexico State involvement and oversight, and constant environmental monitoring from before nuclear waste was first emplaced in the WIPP underground (in 1999) to the present. WIPP is located in the massive bedded salts of the Salado Formation, whose geological, physical, chemical, redox, thermal, and creep-closure properties make it an ideal formation for long-term disposal, long-term in this case being greater than 200 million years. These properties also mean minimal engineering requirements as the rock does most of the work of isolating the waste. WIPP has been operating for twelve years, and as of this writing, has disposed of over 80,000 m{sup 3} of nuclear weapons waste, called transuranic or TRU waste (>100 nCurie/g but <23 Curie/1000 cm{sup 3}) including some high activity waste from reprocessing of spent fuel from old weapons reactors. All nuclear waste of any type from any source can be disposed in this formation better, safer and cheaper than in any other geologic formation. At the same time, it is critical that we complete the Yucca Mountain license application review so as not to undermine the credibility of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the scientific commun

Conca, James [RJLee Group, Inc., Pasco WA 509.205.7541 (United States); Wright, Judith [UFA Ventures, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Deep Repositories: Out of Sight, Out of Terrorists' Reach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...civilian nuclear power plants will be loaded...heat of the nuclear material...relentless attack by moisture...terrorist attacks have highlighted...The risks we face from terrorism and nuclear proliferation are...abandon nuclear power, the repositories...and Global Security. If the fire...built this plant, we thought...

Richard Stone

2004-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

34

Limits on the thermal energy release from radioactive wastes in a mined geologic repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theraml energy release of nuclear wastes is a major factor in the design of geologic repositories. Thermal limits need to be placed on various aspets of the geologic waste disposal system to avoid or retard the degradation of repository performance because of increased temperatures. The thermal limits in current use today are summarized in this report. These limits are placed in a hierarchial structure of thermal criteria consistent with the failure mechanism they are trying to prevent. The thermal criteria hierarchy is used to evaluate the thermal performance of a sample repository design. The design consists of disassembled BWR spent fuel, aged 10 years, close packed in a carbon steel canister with 15 cm of crushed salt backfill. The medium is bedded salt. The most-restrictive temperature for this design is the spent-fuel centerline temperature limit of 300/sup 0/C. A sensitivity study on the effects of additional cooling prior to disposal on repository thermal limits and design is performed.

Scott, J.A.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Modeling the Sequestration of CO2 in Deep Geological Formations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Sequestration of CO the Sequestration of CO 2 in Deep Geological Formations K. Prasad Saripalli, B. Peter McGrail, and Mark D. White Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 corresponding author Prasad Saripalli Senior Research Scientist Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 1313 Sigma V Complex (K6-81) Richland, WA 99352 ph: (509) 376-1667 fax: (509) 376-5368 prasad.saripalli@pnl.gov 2 Modeling the Sequestration of CO 2 in Deep Geological Formations K. Prasad Saripalli, B. Peter McGrail, and Mark D. White Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 Modeling the injection of CO 2 and its sequestration will require simulations of a multi- well injection system in a large reservoir field. However, modeling at the injection well

36

Staff Technical Position on geological repository operations area underground facility design: Thermal loads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Staff Technical Position (STP) is to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) with a methodology acceptable to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff for demonstrating compliance with 10 CFR 60.133(i). The NRC staff`s position is that DOE should develop and use a defensible methodology to demonstrate the acceptability of a geologic repository operations area (GROA) underground facility design. The staff anticipates that this methodology will include evaluation and development of appropriately coupled models, to account for the thermal, mechanical, hydrological, and chemical processes that are induced by repository-generated thermal loads. With respect to 10 CFR 60.133(i), the GROA underground facility design: (1) should satisfy design goals/criteria initially selected, by considering the performance objectives; and (2) must satisfy the performance objectives 10 CFR 60.111, 60.112, and 60.113. The methodology in this STP suggests an iterative approach suitable for the underground facility design.

Nataraja, M.S. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of High-Level Waste Management; Brandshaug, T. [Itasca Consulting Group, Inc., Minneapolis, MN (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Staff Technical Position on geological repository operations area underground facility design: Thermal loads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Staff Technical Position (STP) is to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) with a methodology acceptable to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff for demonstrating compliance with 10 CFR 60.133(i). The NRC staff's position is that DOE should develop and use a defensible methodology to demonstrate the acceptability of a geologic repository operations area (GROA) underground facility design. The staff anticipates that this methodology will include evaluation and development of appropriately coupled models, to account for the thermal, mechanical, hydrological, and chemical processes that are induced by repository-generated thermal loads. With respect to 10 CFR 60.133(i), the GROA underground facility design: (1) should satisfy design goals/criteria initially selected, by considering the performance objectives; and (2) must satisfy the performance objectives 10 CFR 60.111, 60.112, and 60.113. The methodology in this STP suggests an iterative approach suitable for the underground facility design.

Nataraja, M.S. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of High-Level Waste Management); Brandshaug, T. (Itasca Consulting Group, Inc., Minneapolis, MN (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems: REFERENCE SITE INITIAL ASSESSMENT FOR A SALT DOME REPOSITORY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a methodology demonstration for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program conducted an initial reference site analysis of the long-term effectiveness of a salt dome repository. The Hainesville Salt Dome in Texas was chosen to be representative of the Gulf Coast interior salt domes; however, the Hainesville Site has been eliminated as a possible nuclear waste repository site. The data used for this exercise are not adequate for an actual assessment, nor have all the parametric analyses been made that would adequately characterize the response of the geosystem surrounding the repository. Additionally, because this was the first exercise of the complete AEGIS and WASTE Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) methodology, this report provides the initial opportunity for the methodology, specifically applied to a site, to be reviewed by the community outside the AEGIS. The scenario evaluation, as a part of the methodology demonstration, involved consideration of a large variety of potentially disruptive phenomena, which alone or in concert could lead to a breach in a salt dome repository and to a subsequent transport of the radionuclides to the environment. Without waste- and repository-induced effects, no plausible natural geologic events or processes which would compromise the repository integrity could be envisioned over the one-million-year time frame after closure. Near-field (waste- and repository-induced) effects were excluded from consideration in this analysis, but they can be added in future analyses when that methodology development is more complete. The potential for consequential human intrusion into salt domes within a million-year time frame led to the consideration of a solution mining intrusion scenario. The AEGIS staff developed a specific human intrusion scenario at 100 years and 1000 years post-closure, which is one of a whole suite of possible scenarios. This scenario resulted in the delivery of radionuclidecontaminated brine to the surface, where a portion was diverted to culinary salt for direct ingestion by the existing population. Consequence analyses indicated calculated human doses that would be highly deleterious. Additional analyses indicated that doses well above background would occur from such a scenario t even if it occurred a million years into the future. The way to preclude such an intrusion is for continued control over the repository sitet either through direct institutional control or through the effective passive transfer of information. A secondary aspect of the specific human intrusion scenario involved a breach through the side of the salt dome t through which radionuclides migrated via the ground-water system to the accessible environment. This provided a demonstration of the geotransport methodology that AEGIS can use in actual site evaluations, as well as the WRIT program's capabilities with respect to defining the source term and retardation rates of the radionuclides in the repository. This reference site analysis was initially published as a Working Document in December 1979. That version was distributed for a formal peer review by individuals and organizations not involved in its development. The present report represents a revisiont based in part on the responses received from the external reviewers. Summaries of the comments from the reviewers and responses to these comments by the AEGIS staff are presented. The exercise of the AEGIS methodology was successful in demonstrating the methodologyt and thus t in providing a basis for substantive peer review, in terms of further development of the AEGIS site-applications capability and in terms of providing insight into the potential for consequential human intrusion into a salt dome repository.

Harwell,, M. A.; Brandstetter,, A.; Benson,, G. L.; Bradley,, D. J.; Serne,, R. J.; Soldat, J. K; Cole,, C. R.; Deutsch,, W. J.; Gupta,, S. K.; Harwell,, C. C.; Napier,, B. A.; Reisenauer,, A. E.; Prater,, L. S.; Simmons,, C. S.; Strenge,, D. L.; Washburn,, J. F.; Zellmer,, J. T.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems: REFERENCE SITE INITIAL ASSESSMENT FOR A SALT DOME REPOSITORY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a methodology demonstration for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program conducted an initial reference site analysis of the long-term effectiveness of a salt dome repository. The Hainesville Salt Dome in Texas was chosen to be representative of the Gulf Coast interior salt domes; however, the Hainesville Site has been eliminated as a possible nuclear waste repository site. The data used for this exercise are not adequate for an actual assessment, nor have all the parametric analyses been made that would adequately characterize the response of the geosystem surrounding the repository. Additionally, because this was the first exercise of the complete AEGIS and WASTE Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) methodology, this report provides the initial opportunity for the methodology, specifically applied to a site, to be reviewed by the community outside the AEGIS. The scenario evaluation, as a part of the methodology demonstration, involved consideration of a large variety of potentially disruptive phenomena, which alone or in concert could lead to a breach in a salt dome repository and to a subsequent transport of the radionuclides to the environment. Without waste- and repository-induced effects, no plausible natural geologic events or processes which would compromise the repository integrity could be envisioned over the one-million-year time frame after closure. Near-field (waste- and repository-induced) effects were excluded from consideration in this analysis, but they can be added in future analyses when that methodology development is more complete. The potential for consequential human intrusion into salt domes within a million-year time frame led to the consideration of a solution mining intrusion scenario. The AEGIS staff developed a specific human intrusion scenario at 100 years and 1000 years post-closure, which is one of a whole suite of possible scenarios. This scenario resulted in the delivery of radionuclidecontaminated brine to the surface, where a portion was diverted to culinary salt for direct ingestion by the existing population. Consequence analyses indicated calculated human doses that would be highly deleterious. Additional analyses indicated that doses well above background would occur from such a scenario t even if it occurred a million years into the future. The way to preclude such an intrusion is for continued control over the repository sitet either through direct institutional control or through the effective passive transfer of information. A secondary aspect of the specific human intrusion scenario involved a breach through the side of the salt dome t through which radionuclides migrated via the ground-water system to the accessible environment. This provided a demonstration of the geotransport methodology that AEGIS can use in actual site evaluations, as well as the WRIT program's capabilities with respect to defining the source term and retardation rates of the radionuclides in the repository. This reference site analysis was initially published as a Working Document in December 1979. That version was distributed for a formal peer review by individuals and organizations not involved in its development. The present report represents a revisiont based in part on the responses received from the external reviewers. Summaries of the comments from the reviewers and responses to these comments by the AEGIS staff are presented. The exercise of the AEGIS methodology was sUGcessful in demonstrating the methodologyt and thus t in providing a basis for substantive peer review, in terms of further development of the AEGIS site-applications capability and in terms of providing insight into the potential for consequential human intrusion into a salt dome repository.

Harwell,, M. A.; Brandstetter,, A.; Benson,, G. L.; Raymond,, J. R.; Brandley,, D. J.; Serne,, R. J.; Soldat,, J. K.; Cole,, C. R.; Deutsch,, W. J.; Gupta,, S. K.; Harwell,, C. C.; Napier,, B. A.; Reisenauer,, A. E.; Prater,, L. S.; Simmons,, C. S.; Strenge,, D. L.; Washburn,, J. F.; Zellmer,, J. T.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Performance assessment for the geological disposal of Deep Burn spent fuel using TTBX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of Deep Burn Modular High Temperature Reactor Spent Fuel (DBSF) is investigated in the Yucca Mountain geological repository (YMR) with respect to the annual dose (Sv/yr) delivered to the Reasonably Maximally Exposed Individual (RMEI) from the transport of radionuclides released from the graphite waste matrix. Transport calculations are performed with a novel computer code, TTBX which is capable of modeling transport pathways that pass through heterogeneous geological formations. TTBX is a multi-region extension of the existing single region TTB transport code. Overall the peak annual dose received by the RMEI is seen to be four orders of magnitude lower than the regulatory threshold for exposure, even under pessimistic scenarios. A number of factors contribute to the favorable performance of DBSF. A reduction of one order of magnitude in the peak annual dose received by the RMEI is observed for every order of magnitude increase in the waste matrix lifetime, highlighting the importance of the waste matrix durability and suggesting graphite's utility as a potential waste matrix for the disposal of high-level waste. Furthermore, we see that by incorporating a higher fidelity far-field model the peak annual dose calculated to be received by the RMEI is reduced by two orders of magnitude. By accounting for the heterogeneities of the far field we have simultaneously removed unnecessary conservatisms and improved the fidelity of the transport model. (authors)

Van den Akker, B.P.; Ahn, J. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geologic repository" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Evaluating variable switching and flash methods in modeling carbon sequestration in deep geologic formations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating variable switching and flash methods in modeling carbon sequestration in deep geologic performance computing to assess the risks involved in carbon sequestration in deep geologic formations-thermal- chemical processes in variably saturated, non-isothermal porous media is applied to sequestration

Mills, Richard

42

Sequential evaluation of the potential geologic repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the changes that are planned for the characterization program at Yucca Mountain due to budget changes. Yucca Mountain is the only site being studied in the US for a geologic repository. Funding for the site characterization program at Yucca Mountain program was cut by roughly one half from the 1994 projected budget to complete three major milestones. These project milestones included: (1) a time-phased determination of site suitability, and if a positive finding, (2) completion of an Environmental Impact Statement, and (3) preparation of a License Application to the US NRC to authorize repository construction. In reaction, Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project has shifted from parallel development of these milestones to a sequenced approach with the site suitability evaluation being replaced with a management assessment. Changes to the regulatory structure for the disposal program are under consideration by DOE and the NRC. The possibility for NRC and Doe to develop a site-specific regulatory structure follows from the National Energy Policy Act of 1992 that authorized the US EPA to develop a site specific environmental standard for Yucca Mountain.

Bjerstedt, T.W.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

Analysis on the use of engineered barriers for geologic isolation of spent fuel in a reference salt site repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A perspective on the potential durability and effectiveness requirements for the waste form, container and other engineered barriers for geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel has been developed. This perspective is based on calculated potential doses to individuals who may be exposed to radioactivity released from a repository via a groundwater transport pathway. These potential dose commitments were calculated with an integrated geosphere transport and bioshpere transport model. A sensitivity analysis was accomplished by varying four important system parameters, namely the waste radionuclide release rate from the repository, the delay prior to groundwater contact with the waste (leach initiation), aquifer flow velocity and flow path length. The nuclide retarding capacity of the geologic media, a major determinant of the isolation effectiveness, was not varied as a parameter but was held constant for a particular reference site. This analysis is limited to looking only at engineered barriers whose net effect is either to delay groundwater contact with the waste form or to limit the rate of release of radionuclides into the groundwater once contact has occurred. The analysis considers only leach incident scenarios, including a water well intrusion into the groundwater near a repository, but does not consider other human intrusion events or catastrophic events. The analysis has so far been applied to a reference salt site repository system and conclusions are presented.Basically, in nearly all cases, the regional geology is the most effective barrier to release of radionuclides to the biosphere; however, for long-lived isotopes of carbon, technetium and iodine, which were poorly sorbed on the geologic media, the geology is not very effective once a leach incident is initiated.

Cloninger, M.O.; Cole, C.R.; Washburn, J.F.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Continuous Improvement and the Safety Case for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Geologic Repository - 13467  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a geologic repository 2150 feet (650 m) below the surface of the Chihuahuan desert near Carlsbad, New Mexico. WIPP permanently disposes of transuranic waste from national defense programs. Every five years, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) submits an application to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to request regulatory-compliance re-certification of the facility for another five years. Every ten years, DOE submits an application to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) for the renewal of its hazardous waste disposal permit. The content of the applications made by DOE to the EPA for re-certification, and to the NMED for permit-renewal, reflect any optimization changes made to the facility, with regulatory concurrence if warranted by the nature of the change. DOE points to such changes as evidence for its having taken seriously its 'continuous improvement' operations and management philosophy. Another opportunity for continuous improvement is to look at any delta that may exist between the re-certification and re-permitting cases for system safety and the consensus advice on the nature and content of a safety case as being developed and published by the Nuclear Energy Agency's Integration Group for the Safety Case (IGSC) expert group. DOE at WIPP, with the aid of its Science Advisor and teammate, Sandia National Laboratories, is in the process of discerning what can be done, in a reasonably paced and cost-conscious manner, to continually improve the case for repository safety that is being made to the two primary regulators on a recurring basis. This paper will discuss some aspects of that delta and potential paths forward to addressing them. (authors)

Van Luik, Abraham; Patterson, Russell; Nelson, Roger [US Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office, 4021 S. National parks Highway, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)] [US Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office, 4021 S. National parks Highway, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States); Leigh, Christi [Sandia National Laboratories Carlsbad Operations, 4100 S. National parks Highway, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories Carlsbad Operations, 4100 S. National parks Highway, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Thermal Performance of Deep-Burn Fusion-Fission Hybrid Waste in a Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) Engine [1] combines a neutron-rich but energy-poor inertial fusion system with an energy-rich but neutron-poor subcritical fission blanket. Because approximately 80% of the LIFE Engine energy is produced from fission, the requirements for laser efficiency and fusion target performance are relaxed, compared to a pure-fusion system, and hence a LIFE Engine prototype can be based on target performance in the first few years of operation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Similarly, because of the copious fusion neutrons, the fission blanket can be run in a subcritical, driven, mode, without the need for control rods or other sophisticated reactivity control systems. Further, because the fission blanket is inherently subcritical, fission fuels that can be used in LIFE Engine designs include thorium, depleted uranium, natural uranium, spent light water reactor fuel, highly enriched uranium, and plutonium. Neither enrichment nor reprocessing is required for the LIFE Engine fuel cycle, and burnups to 99% fraction of initial metal atoms (FIMA) being fissioned are envisioned. This paper discusses initial calculations of the thermal behavior of spent LIFE fuel following completion of operation in the LIFE Engine [2]. The three time periods of interest for thermal calculations are during interim storage (probably at the LIFE Engine site), during the preclosure operational period of a geologic repository, and after closure of the repository.

Blink, J A; Chipman, V; Farmer, J; Shaw, H; Zhao, P

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

46

Geology of the Yucca Mountain Region, Chapter in Stuckless, J.S., ED., Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain has been proposed as the site for the Nation's first geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. This chapter provides the geologic framework for the Yucca Mountain region. The regional geologic units range in age from late Precambrian through Holocene, and these are described briefly. Yucca Mountain is composed dominantly of pyroclastic units that range in age from 11.4 to 15.2 Ma. The proposed repository would be constructed within the Topopah Spring Tuff, which is the lower of two major zoned and welded ash-flow tuffs within the Paintbrush Group. The two welded tuffs are separated by the partly to nonwelded Pah Canyon Tuff and Yucca Mountain Tuff, which together figure prominently in the hydrology of the unsaturated zone. The Quaternary deposits are primarily alluvial sediments with minor basaltic cinder cones and flows. Both have been studied extensively because of their importance in predicting the long-term performance of the proposed repository. Basaltic volcanism began about 10 Ma and continued as recently as about 80 ka with the eruption of cones and flows at Lathrop Wells, approximately 10 km south-southwest of Yucca Mountain. Geologic structure in the Yucca Mountain region is complex. During the latest Paleozoic and Mesozoic, strong compressional forces caused tight folding and thrust faulting. The present regional setting is one of extension, and normal faulting has been active from the Miocene through to the present. There are three major local tectonic domains: (1) Basin and Range, (2) Walker Lane, and (3) Inyo-Mono. Each domain has an effect on the stability of Yucca Mountain.

J.S. Stuckless; D. O'Leary

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

47

Leveraging Regional Exploration to Develop Geologic Framework for CO2 Storage in Deep Formations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Leveraging regionaL expLoration Leveraging regionaL expLoration to DeveLop geoLogic Framework For co 2 Storage in Deep FormationS Background The Midwestern region encompasses numerous coal-fired power plants that could be adversely impacted by carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emission control restrictions. Geologic sequestration could be a viable option to mitigate the CO 2 emissions within this region. Unfortunately, the understanding of rock properties within deep forma- tions in the region is poorly understood due to lack of deep well data. Under this project, regional geologic characterization is being refined with new rock property data being collected in collaboration with regional oil and gas drilling companies. Description The project is designed to develop an improved understanding of the geologic frame-

48

Development of experimental methods for intermediate scale testing of deep geologic CO2 sequestration trapping processes at ambient laboratory conditions.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is a potential strategy to reduce CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. Deep geological formations provide a viable storage site for… (more)

Vargas-Johnson, Javier

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spend Nuclear Fuel and High-Leval Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Draft Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management DOE/EIS-0250F-S1D October 2007 Table of Contents Summary Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada Summary U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management DOE/EIS-0250F-S1D October 2007 Printed on recycled paper with soy ink. COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal

50

Geophysical Exploration Linking Deep Earth and Backyard Geology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the cryptically elevated Colorado Plateau, or any number of...drip" helping unloose the Colorado Plateau, these deep features...Batholith and the Columbia River flood basalt, suggesting a connection...drips off the bottom of the Colorado Plateau have helped let it...

Richard A. Kerr

2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

51

Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain Summary The Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain describes the nuclear waste problem and explains why the United States and other nations are considering deep geologic disposal as the solution. The overview describes why the Unites States is considering Yucca Mountain and how a monitored geologic repository would work in the mountain. It presents a repository design, an assessment of its expected performance, and an evaluation of the possible effects on people living near Yucca Mountain. Also presented is the work remaining to be completed prior to a license application, along with the estimated cost of building and operating a

52

Numerical methods for the simulation of a corrosion model in a nuclear waste deep repository $  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

framework of the study The concept for long term storage of high-level radioactive waste in France under this repository concept with the aim to ensure its long-term safety and its reversibility. In particular, the repository concept requires a minimum containment time of 1000 years. The long-term safety assessment

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

53

Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spend Nuclear Fuel and High-Leval Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada Volume I Impact Analyses Chapters 1 through 13 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management DOE/EIS-0250F-S1D October 2007 Printed on recycled paper with soy ink. COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada (DOE/EIS-0250F-S1D) (Repository SEIS). CONTACTS: For more information about this document, For general information on the DOE NEPA process, write

54

Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste (Volume 1) Introduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain in Nevada represents the proposed solution to what has been a lengthy national effort to dispose of high-level radioactive waste, waste which must be isolated from the biosphere for tens of thousands of years. This chapter reviews the background of that national effort and includes some discussion of international work in order to provide a more complete framework for the problem of waste disposal. Other chapters provide the regional geologic setting, the geology of the Yucca Mountain site, the tectonics, and climate (past, present, and future). These last two chapters are integral to prediction of long-term waste isolation.

R.A. Levich; J.S. Stuckless

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

55

Radiological Aspects of Deep-Burn Fusion-Fission Hybrid Waste in a Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quantity, radioactivity, and isotopic characteristics of the spent fission fuel from a hybrid fusion-fission system capable of extremely high burnups are described. The waste generally has higher activity per unit mass of heavy metal, but much lower activity per unit energy generated. The very long-term radioactivity is dominated by fission products. Simple scaling calculations suggest that the dose from a repository containing such waste would be dominated by {sup 129}I, {sup 135}Cs, and {sup 242}Pu. Use of such a system for generating energy would greatly reduce the need for repository capacity.

Shaw, H F; Blink, J A; Farmer, J C; Karmer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Zhao, P

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

56

OPERATION OF A PUBLIC GEOLOGIC CORE AND SAMPLE REPOSITORY IN HOUSTON, TEXAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG), building on an initial gift from BP, and with the continuing support of the Department of Energy (DOE), has established the first regional core and sample research center in Houston, Texas. The Houston Research Center (HRC) provides a state-of-the-art core layout facility, two fully equipped meeting rooms, and a comprehensive technical library, all available for public use. This document summarizes the activities, upkeep, increase in staff, and public impact on industry and the community that were accomplished at the Houston Research Center during its first two years of operation.

Scott W. Tinker; Laura C. Zahm; Beverly Blakeney DeJarnett

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

EIS-0250-S1: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Proposed Action defined in the Yucca Mountain FEIS is to construct, operate, monitor, and eventually close a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain to dispose of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The Proposed Action includes transportation of these materials from commercial and DOE sites to the repository.

58

Potential role of ABC-assisted repositories in U.S. plutonium and high-level waste disposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper characterizes the issues involving deep geologic disposal of LWR spent fuel rods, then presents results of an investigation to quantify the potential role of Accelerator-Based Conversion (ABC) in an integrated national nuclear materials and high level waste disposition strategy. The investigation used the deep geological repository envisioned for Yucca Mt., Nevada as a baseline and considered complementary roles for integrated ABC transmutation systems. The results indicate that although a U.S. geologic waste repository will continue to be required, waste partitioning and accelerator transmutation of plutonium, the minor actinides, and selected long-lived fission products can result in the following substantial benefits: plutonium burndown to near zero levels, a dramatic reduction of the long term hazard associated with geologic repositories, an ability to place several-fold more high level nuclear waste in a single repository, electricity sales to compensate for capital and operating costs.

Berwald, David; Favale, Anthony; Myers, Timothy; McDaniel, Jerry [Grumman Aerospace Corporation, Bethpage New York 11714 (United States); Bechtel Corporation, 50 Beal St., San Francisco, California 94105 (United States)

1995-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel in an Underground Geologic Repository - Volume 3: Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management's (DOE/EM's) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), through a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), is conducting a systematic Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) of the disposal of SNFs in an underground geologic repository sited in unsaturated tuff. This analysis is intended to provide interim guidance to the DOE for the management of the SNF while they prepare for final compliance evaluation. This report presents results from a Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) that examined the potential consequences and risks of criticality during the long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel owned by DOE-EM. This analysis investigated the potential of post-closure criticality, the consequences of a criticality excursion, and the probability frequency for post-closure criticality. The results of the NDCA are intended to provide the DOE-EM with a technical basis for measuring risk which can be used for screening arguments to eliminate post-closure criticality FEPs (features, events and processes) from consideration in the compliance assessment because of either low probability or low consequences. This report is composed of an executive summary (Volume 1), the methodology and results of the NDCA (Volume 2), and the applicable appendices (Volume 3).

Taylor, L.L.; Wilson, J.R. (INEEL); Sanchez, L.C.; Aguilar, R.; Trellue, H.R.; Cochrane, K. (SNL); Rath, J.S. (New Mexico Engineering Research Institute)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

OPERATION OF A PUBLIC GEOLOGIC CORE AND SAMPLE REPOSITORY IN HOUSTON, TEXAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bureau of Economic Geology's Houston Research Center (HRC) is well established as a premier regional research center for geologic research serving not only Houston, but geoscientists from around Texas, the U. S., and even the world. As reported in the 2003-2004 technical progress report to the DOE, the HRC provides a state-of-the-art core viewing facility, two fully equipped conference rooms, and a comprehensive technical library, all available for public use. In addition, the HRC currently houses over 500,000 boxes of rock material, and has space to hold approximately 400,000 more boxes. Use of the facility has continued to increase during this third year of operation; over the past twelve months the HRC has averaged approximately 200 patrons per month. This usage is a combination of individuals describing core, groups of geoscientists holding seminars and workshops, and various industry and government-funded groups holding short courses, workshops, and seminars. The BEG/HRC secured several substantial donations of rock materials and/or cash during this operating period. All of these funds went directly into the endowment. Outreach during 2004 and 2005 included many technical presentations and several publications on the HRC. Several field trips to the facility were held for geoscience professionals and grade school students alike. Goals for the upcoming year involve securing more donations of rock material and cash in order to fully fund the HRC endowment. BEG will also continue to increase the number of patrons using the facility, and we will strive to raise awareness of the HRC's 100,000-volume geoscience technical library.

Scott W. Tinker; Beverly Blakeney DeJarnett; Laura C. Zahm

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geologic repository" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

OPERATION OF A PUBLIC GEOLOGIC CORE AND SAMPLE REPOSITORY IN HOUSTON TEXAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the spring of 2002, the Department of Energy provided an initial 1-year grant to the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) at The University of Texas at Austin (UT). The grant covered the one-year operational expenses of a worldclass core and cuttings facility located in Houston, Texas, that BP America donated to the BEG. The DOE investment of $300,000, matched by a $75,000 UT contribution, provided critical first-year funds that were heavily leveraged by the BP gift of $7.0 million in facilities and cash. DOE also provided a one-month extension and grant of $30,000 for the month of May 2003. A 5-year plan to grow a permanent endowment in order to manage the facility in perpetuity is well under way and on schedule. The facility, named the Houston Research Center, represents an ideal model for a strong Federal, university, and private partnership to accomplish a national good. This report summarizes the activities supported by the initial DOE grant during the first 13 months of operation and provides insight into the activities and needs of the facility in the second year of operation.

Scott W. Tinker

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

OPERATION OF A PUBLIC GEOLOGIC CORE AND SAMPLE REPOSITORY IN HOUSTION, TEXAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bureau of Economic Geology's Houston Research Center (HRC) is well established as a premier regional research center for geologic research serving not only Houston, but geoscientists from around Texas, the US, and even the world. As reported in the 2004-2005 technical progress report to the DOE, the HRC provides a state-of-the-art core viewing facility, two fully equipped conference rooms, and a comprehensive technical library, all available for public use. In addition, the HRC currently now houses over 600,000 boxes of rock material, and has space to hold approximately 300,000 more boxes. Use of the facility has remained strong during this fourth year of operation; the number of patrons averaged nearly 150 per month from June 1, to 2005 May 31, 2006. This usage is a combination of individuals describing core, groups of geoscientists holding seminars and workshops, and various industry and government-funded groups holding short courses, workshops, and seminars. These numbers are in addition to the numerous daily requests from patrons desiring to have rock material shipped offsite to their own offices. The BEG/HRC secured several substantial donations of rock materials and cash totaling approximately $2.2 million during the 2005-2006 operating period. All of these funds went directly into an endowment that will, when complete, endow the HRC in perpetuity. Specific details regarding the funds in the endowment are addressed in a table later in this report. Outreach during 2005 and 2006 included many technical presentations and several publications on the HRC. Several field trips to the facility were held for geoscience professionals and grade school students alike. Goals for the upcoming year include securing donations of rock material and cash to approach full funding of the HRC endowment. Thanks to donations totaling $2.2 million from Shea Homes (heritage Unocal rock material), Chevron and others this operating year, the HRC endowment now totals $8,015,621. A major project underway for the HRC in FY2007 is improvement of the existing online core/log database into a Geoinformatics-compatible, GIS-driven online system. Usage of the HRC has gone up every year and is now very respectable. This year we will strive to raise awareness of the HRC's 100,000-volume geoscience technical library. Our original business model targeted $10 million in endowment; after several years of operation we realize we require an $11 million endowment. We are ''on plan'' and need only $3 million to fully fund the endowment. To meet these goals in the 2006-2007 operating year will require DOE support for the fifth and final year. DOE support will allow for {approx}$600k in endowment growth and save using the fund for operation; lack of support will result in a net negative spread of up to $1 million, and set the plan way back. We recognize that DOE budgets for oil and gas research, against best efforts, have been cut substantially this year. Any support available for HRC operation, during continuing resolution or otherwise, would have a very positive impact on this critical final year of the original business plan.

Scott W. Tinker; Beverly Blakeney DeJarnett

2006-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

63

Operation of a Public Geologic Core and Sample Repository in Houstion, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bureau of Economic Geology's Houston Research Center (HRC) is well established as a premier regional research center for geologic research serving not only Houston, but geoscientists from around Texas, the U. S., and even the world. As reported in the FY05 and FY06 technical progress reports to the DOE, the HRC provides a state-of-the-art core viewing facility, two fully equipped conference rooms, and a comprehensive technical library, all available for public use. In addition, the HRC currently now houses over 725,000 boxes of rock material (as of January 2008), and has space to hold approximately 300,000 more boxes. Use of the facility has remained strong; the number of patrons averaged over 100 per month from June 1, 2006 to October 2007, and 90,000 boxes of core were donated to, and received by, the HRC during this time. Usage is a combination of individuals describing core, groups of geoscientists holding seminars and workshops, and various industry and government-funded groups holding short courses, workshops, and seminars. These numbers are in addition to the numerous daily requests from patrons desiring to have rock material shipped offsite to their own offices. The BEG/HRC secured several substantial donations of rock materials and cash totaling approximately $2.2 million during the 2005-2006 operating period. All of these funds went directly into an endowment that UT is building in order to operate the HRC primarily off a portion of the interest generated by the fund. Specific details regarding the funds in the endowment are addressed in a table later in this report. Outreach during 2005 and 2006 included many technical presentations and several publications on the HRC. Several field trips to the facility were held for geoscience professionals and grade school students alike. Goals for the upcoming year involve securing a major donation of rock material and cash in order to approach full funding of the HRC endowment. Thanks to donations totaling $2.2 million from Shea Homes (heritage Unocal rock material),Chevron and others this operating year, the HRC endowment now totals $8,015,621. A major project underway for the HRC in FY2007 is improvement of the existing online core/log database into a geoinformatics-compatible, GIS-driven online system. Usage of the HRC has gone up every year and is now very respectable. This year we will strive to raise awareness of the HRC's 100,000-volume geoscience technical library. Our original business model targeted $10 million in endowment; after several years of operation we realize we require an $11 million endowment. We are 'on plan' and need only $3 million to fully fund the endowment. To meet these goals in the 2007 operating year will require DOE support for the fifth and final year. DOW support will allow for {approx}$600K in endowment growth and save using the fund for operation; lack of support will result in a net negative spread of up to $1 million, and set the plan way back. We recognize that DOE budgets for oil and gas research, against best efforts, have been cut substantially this year. Any support available for HRC operation, during continuing resolution or otherwise, would have a very positive impact on this critical final year of the original business plan.

Scott Tinker; Beverly DeJarnett

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

Report to Congress on the potential use of lead in the waste packages for a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the Report of the Senate Committee on Appropriations accompanying the Energy and Water Appropriation Act for 1989, the Committee directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the use of lead in the waste packages to be used in geologic repositories for spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. The evaluation that was performed in response to this directive is presented in this report. This evaluation was based largely on a review of the technical literature on the behavior of lead, reports of work conducted in other countries, and work performed for the waste-management program being conducted by the DOE. The initial evaluation was limited to the potential use of lead in the packages to be used in the repository. Also, the focus of this report is post closure performance and not on retrievability and handling aspects of the waste package. 100 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs.

NONE

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Geological overview of the Angola-Congo Margin, the Congo deep-sea fan and its submarine valleys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Congo deep-sea fan is one of the largest fans in the world still affected by presently active turbidity currents. The present activity of deep-sea sedimentary processes is linked to the existence of a direct connection between the Congo River estuary and the Congo canyon head that allows relatively continuous sediment feeding of the deep-sea environment, in spite of a wide continental shelf (150 km). Because of this important activity in terms of sedimentary processes, the deep-sea environment of the Congo-Angola margin presents major interests concerning physical, chemical and biological studies near the sea floor. The main aim of this paper is to present the initial geological context of the BioZaire Program, showing a synthesis of the major results of the ZaïAngo Project including (1) the brief geological setting of the Congo-Angola margin, (2) the structure of the modern Congo deep-sea fan, (3) the sedimentary architecture of the recent Congo turbidite system (from the canyon to the distal lobes), and (4) the recent and present turbidite sedimentation. In order to provide useful information and advice relevant to biological and geochemical studies across the Congo sedimentary system, this article focuses on the present sedimentary processes and the present activity of turbidity current along the Congo canyon and channel.

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada DOE/EIS-0250 Errata Sheet Since release of the Final EIS for Yucca Mountain on February 14, 2002 as part of the Site Recommendation documentation required under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended, the Department of Energy (DOE) has identified a variety of errors in the document. These errors were found to include: editing errors - errors in editorial style, rounding, and unit conversions data entry errors, errors in typing a number transcription errors - errors in transcribing information from one part of the document to another, failures to update the text from the most current analyses at the time of the

67

Information needs for characterization of high-level waste repository sites in six geologic media. Volume 1. Main report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluation of the geologic isolation of radioactive materials from the biosphere requires an intimate knowledge of site geologic conditions, which is gained through precharacterization and site characterization studies. This report presents the results of an intensive literature review, analysis and compilation to delineate the information needs, applicable techniques and evaluation criteria for programs to adequately characterize a site in six geologic media. These media, in order of presentation, are: granite, shale, basalt, tuff, bedded salt and dome salt. Guidelines are presented to assess the efficacy (application, effectiveness, and resolution) of currently used exploratory and testing techniques for precharacterization or characterization of a site. These guidelines include the reliability, accuracy and resolution of techniques deemed acceptable, as well as cost estimates of various field and laboratory techniques used to obtain the necessary information. Guidelines presented do not assess the relative suitability of media. 351 refs., 10 figs., 31 tabs.

NONE

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

EIS-0250-S2: Supplemental EIS for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This SEIS is to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of constructing and operating a railroad for shipments of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from an existing rail line in Nevada to a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The purpose of the evaluation is to assist the Department in deciding whether to construct and operate a railroad in Nevada, and if so, in which corridor and along which specific alignment within the selected corridor.

69

Evaluation of Incident Risks in a Repository for Radioactive Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A probabilistic safety assessment of the operation phase of a repository for radioactive waste requires the knowledge of incident risks. These are evaluated from generic observations. The present method accounts for the uncertainty (1) of whether an incident occurs, (2) of the incident rate, (3) of the duration of generic observation, and (4) of the duration of operation phase of the repository. It yields a mean risk and its standard deviation from a minimum of generic data, comprising only the number of observed incidents and the duration of the observation, as more comprehensive generic data are seldom available. It was shown that incidents sharing a common generic observation must be either merged together to a total incident or the generic observation must be split up in sub-observations, one for each such incident. The method was tested on the example of the German Konrad repository for low-level waste in a deep geological formation. (authors)

Grundler, D.; Mariae, D.; Muller, W.; Boetsch, W. [Institut fur Sicherheitstechnologie (ISTec), Koln (Germany); Thiel, J. [Bundesamt fur Strahlenschutz (BfS), Salzgitter (Germany)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page 7. Repository Design, Performance, and Affected Environment .......................................................CR7-1 7.1 Repository Design ...........................................................................................................CR7-18 7.1.1 Draft EIS Repository Design ....................................................................................CR7-39 7.1.2 Supplement to the Draft EIS Flexible Design...........................................................CR7-62 7.1.2.1 Higher- and Lower-Temperature Operating Modes .................................................CR7-73 7.1.2.2 Ventilation.......................................................................................................CR7-74

71

Modelling and Numerical Simulation of Gas Migration in a Nuclear Waste Repository  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a compositional compressible two-phase, liquid and gas, flow model for numerical simulations of hydrogen migration in deep geological radioactive waste repository. This model includes capillary effects and the gas diffusivity. The choice of the main variables in this model, Total or Dissolved Hydrogen Mass Concentration and Liquid Pressure, leads to a unique and consistent formulation of the gas phase appearance and disappearance. After introducing this model, we show computational evidences of its adequacy to simulate gas phase appearance and disappearance in different situations typical of underground radioactive waste repository.

Bourgeat, Alain; Smai, Farid

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Summary of four release consequence analyses for hypothetical nuclear waste repositories in salt and granite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Release consequence methology developed under the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) program has now been applied to four hypothetical repository sites. This paper summarizes the results of these four studies in order to demonstrate that the far-field methodology developed under the AEGIS program offers a practical approach to the post-closure safety assessment of nuclear waste repositories sited in deep continental geologic formations. The four studies are briefly described and compared according to the following general categories: physical description of the repository (size, inventory, emplacement depth); geologic and hydrologic description of the site and the conceptual hydrologic model for the site; description of release scenario; hydrologic model implementation and results; engineered barriers and leach rate modeling; transport model implementation and results; and dose model implementation and results. These studies indicate the following: numerical modeling is a practical approach to post-closure safety assessment analysis for nuclear waste repositories; near-field modeling capability needs improvement to permit assessment of the consequences of human intrusion and pumping well scenarios; engineered barrier systems can be useful in mitigating consequences for postulated release scenarios that short-circuit the geohydrologic system; geohydrologic systems separating a repository from the natural biosphere discharge sites act to mitigate the consequences of postulated breaches in containment; and engineered barriers of types other than the containment or absorptive type may be useful.

Cole, C.R.; Bond, F.W.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Drift Natural Convection and Seepage at the Yucca Mountain Repository.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The decay heat from radioactive waste that is to be disposed in the once proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM) will significantly influence the… (more)

Halecky, Nicholaus Eugene

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Two phase partially miscible flow and transport modeling in porous media: application to gas migration in a nuclear waste repository  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive a compositional compressible two-phase, liquid and gas, flow model for numerical simulations of hydrogen migration in deep geological repository for radioactive waste. This model includes capillary effects and the gas high diffusivity. Moreover, it is written in variables (total hydrogen mass density and liquid pressure) chosen in order to be consistent with gas appearance or disappearance. We discuss the well possedness of this model and give some computational evidences of its adequacy to simulate gas generation in a water saturated repository.

Alain Bourgeat; Mladen Jurak; Farid Smaï

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

75

Two phase partially miscible flow and transport modeling in porous media: application to gas migration in a nuclear waste repository  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive a compositional compressible two-phase, liquid and gas, flow model for numerical simulations of hydrogen migration in deep geological repository for radioactive waste. This model includes capillary effects and the gas high diffusivity. Moreover, it is written in variables (total hydrogen mass density and liquid pressure) chosen in order to be consistent with gas appearance or disappearance. We discuss the well possedness of this model and give some computational evidences of its adequacy to simulate gas generation in a water saturated repository.

Bourgeat, Alain; Smaï, Farid

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

2001 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Clearance Center at www.copyright.com or (978) 750-8400. Geology; September 2001; v. 29; no. 9; p. 803806; 4 figures; Data Repository item 2001091. 803  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Radiogenic hydrothermal carbonate can form from these solutions and later weather, releasing silicate Sr; Data Repository item 2001091. 803 Hydrothermal source of radiogenic Sr to Himalayan rivers Matthew J of hydrothermal water ( 1% of total river discharge) have a significant impact on the solute chemistry

Derry, Louis A.

77

DOE/EIS-0250D; Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada CONTACT: For more information on this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), write or call: Wendy R. Dixon, EIS Project Manager Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Office Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 30307, Mail Stop 010 North Las Vegas, Nevada 89036-0307 Telephone: (800) 967-3477 The EIS is also available on the Internet at the Yucca Mountain Project website at http://www.ymp.gov and on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) website at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/nepa/. For general information on the DOE NEPA process, write or call:

78

Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Options to Elements of the Proposed Action Options to Elements of the Proposed Action TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page A. Options to Elements of the Proposed Action .....................................................................................A-1 A.1 Wastewater Treatment at the Repository Option.........................................................................A-1 A.1.1 Potential Benefits of the Premanufactured Wastewater Treatment Facility..........................A-2 A.1.2 Potential Environmental Impacts of the Premanufactured Wastewater Treatment Facility .................................................................................................................A-2 A.2 Reduced Transportation, Aging, and Disposal Canister Use Option...........................................A-2

79

Generic Repository Concepts and Thermal Analysis for Advanced Fuel Cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current posture of the used nuclear fuel management program in the U.S. following termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, is to pursue research and development (R&D) of generic (i.e., non-site specific) technologies for storage, transportation and disposal. Disposal R&D is directed toward understanding and demonstrating the performance of reference geologic disposal concepts selected to represent the current state-of-the-art in geologic disposal. One of the principal constraints on waste packaging and emplacement in a geologic repository is management of the waste-generated heat. This paper describes the selection of reference disposal concepts, and thermal management strategies for waste from advanced fuel cycles. A geologic disposal concept for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or high-level waste (HLW) consists of three components: waste inventory, geologic setting, and concept of operations. A set of reference geologic disposal concepts has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Used Fuel Disposition Campaign, for crystalline rock, clay/shale, bedded salt, and deep borehole (crystalline basement) geologic settings. We performed thermal analysis of these concepts using waste inventory cases representing a range of advanced fuel cycles. Concepts of operation consisting of emplacement mode, repository layout, and engineered barrier descriptions, were selected based on international progress and previous experience in the U.S. repository program. All of the disposal concepts selected for this study use enclosed emplacement modes, whereby waste packages are in direct contact with encapsulating engineered or natural materials. The encapsulating materials (typically clay-based or rock salt) have low intrinsic permeability and plastic rheology that closes voids so that low permeability is maintained. Uniformly low permeability also contributes to chemically reducing conditions common in soft clay, shale, and salt formations. Enclosed modes are associated with temperature constraints that limit changes to the encapsulating materials, and they generally have less capacity to dissipate heat from the waste package and its immediate surroundings than open modes such as that proposed for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Open emplacement modes can be ventilated for many years prior to permanent closure of the repository, limiting peak temperatures both before and after closure, and combining storage and disposal functions in the same facility. Open emplacement modes may be practically limited to unsaturated host formations, unless emplacement tunnels are effectively sealed everywhere prior to repository closure. Thermal analysis of disposal concepts and waste inventory cases has identified important relationships between waste package size and capacity, and the duration of surface decay storage needed to meet temperature constraints. For example, the choice of salt as the host medium expedites the schedule for geologic disposal by approximately 50 yr (other factors held constant) thereby reducing future reliance on surface decay storage. Rock salt has greater thermal conductivity and stability at higher temperatures than other media considered. Alternatively, the choice of salt permits the use of significantly larger waste packages for SNF. The following sections describe the selection of reference waste inventories, geologic settings, and concepts of operation, and summarize the results from the thermal analysis.

Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)] [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Blink, James [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Carter, Joe [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)] [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Massimiliano, Fratoni [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Greenberg, Harris [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Howard, Rob L [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Generic repository design concepts and thermal analysis (FY11).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reference concepts for geologic disposal of used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the U.S. are developed, including geologic settings and engineered barriers. Repository thermal analysis is demonstrated for a range of waste types from projected future, advanced nuclear fuel cycles. The results show significant differences among geologic media considered (clay/shale, crystalline rock, salt), and also that waste package size and waste loading must be limited to meet targeted maximum temperature values. In this study, the UFD R&D Campaign has developed a set of reference geologic disposal concepts for a range of waste types that could potentially be generated in advanced nuclear FCs. A disposal concept consists of three components: waste inventory, geologic setting, and concept of operations. Mature repository concepts have been developed in other countries for disposal of spent LWR fuel and HLW from reprocessing UNF, and these serve as starting points for developing this set. Additional design details and EBS concepts will be considered as the reference disposal concepts evolve. The waste inventory considered in this study includes: (1) direct disposal of SNF from the LWR fleet, including Gen III+ advanced LWRs being developed through the Nuclear Power 2010 Program, operating in a once-through cycle; (2) waste generated from reprocessing of LWR UOX UNF to recover U and Pu, and subsequent direct disposal of used Pu-MOX fuel (also used in LWRs) in a modified-open cycle; and (3) waste generated by continuous recycling of metal fuel from fast reactors operating in a TRU burner configuration, with additional TRU material input supplied from reprocessing of LWR UOX fuel. The geologic setting provides the natural barriers, and establishes the boundary conditions for performance of engineered barriers. The composition and physical properties of the host medium dictate design and construction approaches, and determine hydrologic and thermal responses of the disposal system. Clay/shale, salt, and crystalline rock media are selected as the basis for reference mined geologic disposal concepts in this study, consistent with advanced international repository programs, and previous investigations in the U.S. The U.S. pursued deep geologic disposal programs in crystalline rock, shale, salt, and volcanic rock in the years leading up to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, or NWPA (Rechard et al. 2011). The 1987 NWPA amendment act focused the U.S. program on unsaturated, volcanic rock at the Yucca Mountain site, culminating in the 2008 license application. Additional work on unsaturated, crystalline rock settings (e.g., volcanic tuff) is not required to support this generic study. Reference disposal concepts are selected for the media listed above and for deep borehole disposal, drawing from recent work in the U.S. and internationally. The main features of the repository concepts are discussed in Section 4.5 and summarized in Table ES-1. Temperature histories at the waste package surface and a specified distance into the host rock are calculated for combinations of waste types and reference disposal concepts, specifying waste package emplacement modes. Target maximum waste package surface temperatures are identified, enabling a sensitivity study to inform the tradeoff between the quantity of waste per disposal package, and decay storage duration, with respect to peak temperature at the waste package surface. For surface storage duration on the order of 100 years or less, waste package sizes for direct disposal of SNF are effectively limited to 4-PWR configurations (or equivalent size and output). Thermal results are summarized, along with recommendations for follow-on work including adding additional reference concepts, verification and uncertainty analysis for thermal calculations, developing descriptions of surface facilities and other system details, and cost estimation to support system-level evaluations.

Howard, Robert (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Dupont, Mark (Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC); Blink, James A. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Fratoni, Massimiliano (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Greenberg, Harris (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Carter, Joe (Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC); Hardin, Ernest L.; Sutton, Mark A. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geologic repository" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Repository Applications: Potential Benefits of Using Depleted Uranium (DU)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Repository Applications Repository Applications Repository Applications: Potential Benefits of Using Depleted Uranium (DU) in a Geological Repository The United States is investigating the Yucca Mountain (YM) site in Nevada for the disposal of radioactive spent nuclear fuel (SNF)—the primary waste from nuclear power plants. The SNF would be packaged and then emplaced 200 to 300 m underground in parallel disposal tunnels. The repository isolates the SNF from the biosphere until the radionuclides decay to safe levels. DU may improve the performance of geological repositories for disposal of SNF via three mechanisms: Radiation shielding for waste packages to protect workers Lowering the potential for long-term nuclear criticality in the repository Reducing the potential for releases of radionuclides from the SNF

82

Information Repository  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Information Repository Documents 3 Information Repository Documents WIPP Annual Waste Minimization Report Transmittal of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Waste Minimization Report, dated November 14, 2013 Class 1 Permit Modifications and NMED Responses Class 1 Modification, August 29, 2013 WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit EPA I.D. Number NM4890139088. (1. revise a course outline; 2. revise table and panel figures to include Panel 7; 3. update description related to Type B Packages; and 4. update TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT figures) JE Kieling, NMED dated October 13, 2013 Fee Assessment Class 1 Permit Modification WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit EPA I.D. Number NM4890139088-TSDF (Revise a Course Outline; Revise Table and Panel Figures to Include Panel 7; Update Descriptions Related to Type B Packages; and Update TRUPACT-ll and HalfPACT Figures) JM Kieling, NMED dated September 23, 2013

83

TheU-Tube: A Novel System for Acquiring Borehole Fluid Samplesfrom a Deep Geologic CO2 Sequestration Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel system has been deployed to obtain geochemical samples of water and gas, at in situ pressure, during a geologic CO2 sequestration experiment conducted in the Frio brine aquifer in Liberty County, Texas. Project goals required high-frequency recovery of representative and uncontaminated aliquots of a rapidly changing two-phase (supercritical CO2-brine) fluid from 1.5 km depth. The datasets collected, using both the liquid and gas portions of the downhole samples, provide insights into the coupled hydro-geochemical issues affecting CO2 sequestration in brine-filled formations. While the basic premise underlying the U-Tube sampler is not new, the system is unique because careful consideration was given to the processing of the recovered two-phase fluids. In particular, strain gauges mounted beneath the high-pressure surface sample cylinders measured the ratio of recovered brine to supercritical CO2. A quadrupole mass spectrometer provided real-time gas analysis for perfluorocarbon and noble gas tracers that were injected along with the CO2. The U-Tube successfully acquired frequent samples, facilitating accurate delineation of the arrival of the CO2 plume, and on-site analysis revealed rapid changes in geochemical conditions.

Freifeld, Barry M.; Trautz, Robert C.; Kharaka, Yousif K.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Myer, Larry R.; Hovorka, Susan D.; Collins, Daniel J.

2005-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

84

Repository performance confirmation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Repository performance confirmation links the technical bases of repository science and societal acceptance. This paper explores the myriad aspects of what has been labeled performance confirmation in U.S. programs, which involves monitoring as a collection of distinct activities combining technical and social significance in radioactive waste management. This paper is divided into four parts: (1) A distinction is drawn between performance confirmation monitoring and other testing and monitoring objectives; (2) A case study illustrates confirmation activities integrated within a long-term testing and monitoring strategy for Yucca Mountain; (3) A case study reviews compliance monitoring developed and implemented for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant; and (4) An approach for developing, evaluating and implementing the next generation of performance confirmation monitoring is presented. International interest in repository monitoring is exhibited by the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme 'Monitoring Developments for Safe Repository Operation and Staged Closure' (MoDeRn) Project. The MoDeRn partners are considering the role of monitoring in a phased approach to the geological disposal of radioactive waste. As repository plans advance in different countries, the need to consider monitoring strategies within a controlled framework has become more apparent. The MoDeRn project pulls together technical and societal experts to assimilate a common understanding of a process that could be followed to develop a monitoring program. A fundamental consideration is the differentiation of confirmation monitoring from the many other testing and monitoring activities. Recently, the license application for Yucca Mountain provided a case study including a technical process for meeting regulatory requirements to confirm repository performance as well as considerations related to the preservation of retrievability. The performance confirmation plan developed as part of the Yucca Mountain license application identified a broad suite of monitoring activities. A revision of the plan was expected to winnow the number of activities down to a manageable size. As a result, an objective process for the next stage of performance confirmation planning was developed as an integral part of an overarching long-term testing and monitoring strategy. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant compliance monitoring program at once reflects its importance to stakeholders while demonstrating adequate understanding of relevant monitoring parameters. The compliance criteria were stated by regulation and are currently monitored as part of the regulatory rule for disposal. At the outset, the screening practice and parameter selection were not predicated on a direct or indirect correlation to system performance metrics, as was the case for Yucca Mountain. Later on, correlation to performance was established, and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant continues to monitor ten parameters originally identified in the compliance certification documentation. The monitoring program has proven to be effective for the technical intentions and societal or public assurance. The experience with performance confirmation in the license application process for Yucca Mountain helped identify an objective, quantitative methodology for this purpose. Revision of the existing plan would be based on findings of the total system performance assessment. Identification and prioritization of confirmation activities would then derive from performance metrics associated with performance assessment. Given the understanding of repository performance confirmation, as reviewed in this paper, it is evident that the performance confirmation program for the Yucca Mountain project could be readily re-engaged if licensing activities resumed.

Hansen, Francis D.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Geologic Sequestration of CO2 in Deep, Unmineable Coalbeds: An Integrated Researdh and Commercial-Scale Field Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Coal-Seq consortium is a government-industry collaborative consortium with the objective of advancing industry's understanding of complex coalbed methane and gas shale reservoir behavior in the presence of multi-component gases via laboratory experiments, theoretical model development and field validation studies. This will allow primary recovery, enhanced recovery and CO{sub 2} sequestration operations to be commercially enhanced and/or economically deployed. The project was initially launched in 2000 as a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored investigation into CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep, unmineable coalseams. The initial project accomplished a number of important objectives, which mainly revolved around performing baseline experimental studies, documenting and analyzing existing field projects, and establishing a global network for technology exchange. The results from that Phase have been documented in a series of reports which are publicly available. An important outcome of the initial phase was that serious limitations were uncovered in our knowledge of reservoir behavior when CO{sub 2} is injected into coal. To address these limitations, the project was extended in 2005 as a government-industry collaborative consortium. Selected accomplishments from this phase have included the identification and/or development of new models for multi-component sorption and diffusion, laboratory studies of coal geomechanical and permeability behavior with CO{sub 2} injection, additional field validation studies, and continued global technology exchange. Further continuation of the consortium is currently being considered. Some of the topics that have been identified for investigation include further model development/refinement related to multicomponent equations-of-state, sorption and diffusion behavior, geomechanical and permeability studies, technical and economic feasibility studies for major international coal basins, the extension of the work to gas shale reservoirs, and continued global technology exchange.

Scott Reeves; George Koperna

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

86

Accelerated Dissolution Process of the Spent Fuel (UO{sub 2}) under Repository Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nowadays, nuclear energy is one of the options for developed countries in order to maintain the demand of electric energy. One of the key problems associated with kind of energy generation is the residual waste formed after a fuel cycle (spent nuclear fuel). The thermal treatment received in the reactor and there composition renders these materials very difficult to characterize and thus exhaustive studies are required to obtain knowledge that will help to build a complete, reliable and very safety underground facility. In this way, the option known as the Deep Geological Repository (DGR) is under development by each country taking part in the nuclear energy industry. The unique pathway for the migration to the biosphere of the radionuclide, actinide and lanthanides content in the spent fuel pellet (UO{sub 2}) after the closing of the deep geological repository is by a water transport phenomena. It is a fundamental question to know how much time they will spend on their trip and the first step is the rate of liberation of these radionuclides from the spent fuel pellet. In this way the matrix dissolution rate of the spent fuel pellet, which is not dependent on the specific surface area after normalization by the initial value is a key parameter to begin the performance assessment for any deep geological repository. The specific surface value is, following the Matrix Alteration Model (MAM) sensitivity analysis, one of the most important parameters controlling the radionuclides liberation. In this way, several measurements were carried out to obtain values in different conditions for different sieves of UO{sub 2} powder treated as fresh fuel. First of all, the specific surface area was measured with a multi-point isothermal procedure with N{sub 2} and Kr for both. The values obtained are presented in order to obtain a general law for the rate of evolution with the particle size. These data are part of a bigger project about the complete description of the spent fuel analogues, which are very useful for obtaining new dissolution rates for spent nuclear fuel under repository simulated conditions. (authors)

Iglesias, Eduardo; Quinones, Javier; Rodriguez, Nieves [Energy, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid, 28040 (Spain)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

REPOSITORY ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM DESIGN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Viability Assessment (VA) for the Yucca Mountain Project is being completed for delivery in September of 1998. A major element of the VA is the design of a high level waste repository on the Nevada Test Site. The repository is made up of surface and subsurface facilities. The engineered barrier includes the man-made elements of the system that act to retard the migration of radionuclides from a geologic repository. They act in conjunction with the geologic barriers present at Yucca Mountain. The engineered barrier system (EBS) consists of the Waste Package and the underground facility. The focus of this paper is the status of the design of the underground facility portion of the EBS. In addition to a robust waste package, the EBS components in the reference design include a number of features that impede naturally occurring infiltration from reaching and corroding the waste packages. In addition, and as a defense-in-depth strategy, a number of other optional features are being considered. They include drip shields above the waste packages to intercept dripping water and granular backfill around the waste packages to form a diffusion barrier. Plans are being made to test a number of the EBS materials and structures. The Viability Assessment document will discuss the various EBS options and alternative designs and lay out a plan for determining those to be included in the License Application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) scheduled for completion in 2002.

DANIEL G. MCKENZIE III PE, DR. KALYAN K. BHATTACHARYYA AND PAUL G. HARRINGTON

1998-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

88

Two Approaches to the Geologic Disposal of Long-Lived Nuclear Waste: Yucca Mountain, Nevada and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key component of the US energy program is to provide for the safe and permanent isolation of spent nuclear fuel and long-lived radioactive waste produced through programs related to national defense and the generation of electric power by nuclear utilities. To meet this challenge, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a multi-faceted approach to the geologic disposal of long-lived nuclear wastes. Two sites are being developed or studied as current or potential deep geologic repositories for long lived radioactive wastes, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico and Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

Levich, R. A.; Patterson, R. L.; Linden, R. M.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

89

Hydrocarbon Potential of Deep Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Hydrocarbon Potential of Deep Water H. R. Warman In...the geology and hydrocarbon potential of the Earth's deeper water areas, an attempt...United Kingdom 1981 Hydrocarbon potential of deep water Warman H. R. Author...

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Geological SciencesGeological Sciences Geological EngineeringGeological Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological SciencesGeological Sciences Geological EngineeringGeological Engineering Geosciences Careers in the ik ou ve n ver see t b f rel e y ' e n i e o ! Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering Queen's University See the World Geological Sciences Arts and Science Faculty

Ellis, Randy

91

Canister design for deep borehole disposal of nuclear waste .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objective of this thesis was to design a canister for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high-level waste in deep borehole repositories… (more)

Hoag, Christopher Ian.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Environmental Impacts of Repository  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

~~"'"""""""""'l.. _ _ 4 Environmental Impacts of Repository Construction, Operation and Monitoring, and Closure 4-iii Environmental Impacts of Repository Construction, Operations, Monitoring, and Closure TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page 4. Environmental Impacts of Repository Construction, Operations, Monitoring, and Closure ..............4-1 4.1 Preclosure Environmental Impacts of Construction, Operations, Monitoring, and Closure of a Repository ...............................................................................................................................4-3 4.1.1 Impacts to Land Use and Ownership .......................................................................................4-4

93

Seismic interpretation and regional geologic correlation established for offshore Togo, West Africa: a preliminary evaluation of hydrocarbon potential in deep water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3-D seismic data acquired by Petroleum Geo-Services Inc. (PGS), Houston, Texas. The study area ranges from approximately 180 m - 2500 m water depth. Research included regional geologic correlation, seismic interpretation, and structural modeling...

Gray, Max Daniel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

94

A case study on the influence of THM coupling on the near field safety of a spent fuel repository in sparsely fractured granite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geological disposal of spent CANDU fuel in Canada, a safetyhypothetical repository for spent CANDU fuel in the Canadianbuffer. The waste form: CANDU reactors in Canada are fuelled

Nguyen, T.S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

The National Repository at Yucca Mountain, Russ Dyer  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Repository at Repository at Yucca Mountain Presented to: EM High Level Waste Corporate Board Presented by: Russ Dyer Chief Scientist Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management July 24, 2008 Idaho National Laboratory 2 SBBB-GeneralBriefing_070808Rev1.ppt Solving a national problem now * On June 3, 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy submitted an application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for a license to construct a repository at Yucca Mountain 3 SBBB-GeneralBriefing_070808Rev1.ppt Repository license application * The LA seeks authorization to construct the nation's first geologic repository * It is a culmination of more than 25 years of scientific research and engineering * The LA describes DOE's plan to safely isolate spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive

96

Performance Assessment Modeling for Savannah River Glass HLW Disposal in a Potential Repository at Yucca Mountain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Performance assessment (PA) simulates the long-term performance of a conceptual geological repository for nuclear waste or the performance of a subsystem such as the engineered barrier system (drifts, waste pa...

W. J. O’Connell; W. L. Bourcier; J. Gansemer…

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Prepared in cooperation with the Inyo County, California, Yucca Mountain Repository Assessment Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prepared in cooperation with the Inyo County, California, Yucca Mountain Repository Assessment County, California, Yucca Mountain Repository Assessment Office #12;U.S. Department of the Interior KEN Office Geologic Map of the southern Funeral Mountains including nearby Groundwater Discharge Sites

Fleskes, Joe

98

The Potential for Increased Atmospheric CO2 Emissions and Accelerated Consumption of Deep Geologic CO2 Storage Resources Resulting from the Large-Scale Deployment of a CCS-Enabled Unconventional Fossil Fuels Industry in the U.S.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Desires to enhance the energy security of the United States have spurred significant interest in the development of abundant domestic heavy hydrocarbon resources including oil shale and coal to produce unconventional liquid fuels to supplement conventional oil supplies. However, the production processes for these unconventional fossil fuels create large quantities of carbon dioxide (CO2) and this remains one of the key arguments against such development. Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies could reduce these emissions and preliminary analysis of regional CO2 storage capacity in locations where such facilities might be sited within the U.S. indicates that there appears to be sufficient storage capacity, primarily in deep saline formations, to accommodate the CO2 from these industries. Nevertheless, even assuming wide-scale availability of cost-effective CO2 capture and geologic storage resources, the emergence of a domestic U.S. oil shale or coal-to-liquids (CTL) industry would be responsible for significant increases in CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. The authors present modeling results of two future hypothetical climate policy scenarios that indicate that the oil shale production facilities required to produce 3MMB/d from the Eocene Green River Formation of the western U.S. using an in situ retorting process would result in net emissions to the atmosphere of between 3000-7000 MtCO2, in addition to storing potentially 900-5000 MtCO2 in regional deep geologic formations via CCS in the period up to 2050. A similarly sized, but geographically more dispersed domestic CTL industry could result in 4000-5000 MtCO2 emitted to the atmosphere in addition to potentially 21,000-22,000 MtCO2 stored in regional deep geologic formations over the same period. While this analysis shows that there is likely adequate CO2 storage capacity in the regions where these technologies are likely to deploy, the reliance by these industries on large-scale CCS could result in an accelerated rate of utilization of the nation’s CO2 storage resource, leaving less high-quality storage capacity for other carbon-producing industries including electric power generation.

Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.; Davidson, Casie L.

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

99

Geologic Framework Model (GFM2000)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the geologic framework model, version GFM2000 with regard to input data, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations, and validation of the model results, and the differences between GFM2000 and previous versions. The version number of this model reflects the year during which the model was constructed. This model supersedes the previous model version, documented in Geologic Framework Model (GFM 3.1) (CRWMS M&O 2000 [DIRS 138860]). The geologic framework model represents a three-dimensional interpretation of the geology surrounding the location of the monitored geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain. The geologic framework model encompasses and is limited to an area of 65 square miles (168 square kilometers) and a volume of 185 cubic miles (771 cubic kilometers). The boundaries of the geologic framework model (shown in Figure 1-1) were chosen to encompass the exploratory boreholes and to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the unsaturated zone (UZ). The upper surface of the model is made up of the surface topography and the depth of the model is constrained by the inferred depth of the Tertiary-Paleozoic unconformity. The geologic framework model was constructed from geologic map and borehole data. Additional information from measured stratigraphic sections, gravity profiles, and seismic profiles was also considered. The intended use of the geologic framework model is to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest consistent with the level of detailed needed for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the UZ and for repository design. The model is limited by the availability of data and relative amount of geologic complexity found in an area. The geologic framework model is inherently limited by scale and content. The grid spacing used in the geologic framework model (200 feet [61 meters]), discussed in Section 6.4.2, limits the size of features that can be resolved by the model but is appropriate for the distribution of data available and its intended use. Uncertainty and limitations are discussed in Section 6.6 and model validation is discussed in Section 7.

T. Vogt

2004-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

100

Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California, as a near-field natural analog of a radioactive waste repository in salt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since high concentrations of radionuclides and high temperatures are not normally encountered in salt domes or beds, finding an exact geologic analog of expected near-field conditions in a mined nuclear waste repository in salt will be difficult. The Salton Sea Geothermal Field, however, provides an opportunity to investigate the migration and retardation of naturally occurring U, Th, Ra, Cs, Sr and other elements in hot brines which have been moving through clay-rich sedimentary rocks for up to 100,000 years. The more than thirty deep wells drilled in this field to produce steam for electrical generation penetrate sedimentary rocks containing concentrated brines where temperatures reach 365/sup 0/C at only 2 km depth. The brines are primarily Na, K, Ca chlorides with up to 25% of total dissolved solids; they also contain high concentrations of metals such as Fe, Mn, Li, Zn, and Pb. This report describes the geology, geophysics and geochemistry of this system as a prelude to a study of the mobility of naturally occurring radionuclides and radionuclide analogs within it. The aim of this study is to provide data to assist in validating quantitative models of repository behavior and to use in designing and evaluating waste packages and engineered barriers. 128 references, 33 figures, 13 tables.

Elders, W.A.; Cohen, L.H.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geologic repository" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Use of a United States mid-Pacific Island territory for a Pacific Island Repository System (PIRS): Extended summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of using a mid-ocean island for a geologic high-level waste repository was investigated. The technical advantages include geographical isolation and near-infinite ocean dilution as a backup to repository geological waste isolation. The institutional advantages are reduced siting problems and the potential of creating an international waste repository. Establishment of international waste repository would allow cost sharing, aid US nonproliferation goals, and assure proper disposal of spent fuel from developing countries. The major uncertainties in this concept are rock conditions at waste disposal depths and costs. 13 refs., 2 tabs.

Forsberg, C.W.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

An analysis of repository waste-handling operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to document the operational analysis of waste-handling facilities at a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. The site currently under investigation for the geologic repository is located at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. The repository waste-handling operations have been identified and analyzed for the year 2011, a steady-state year during which the repository receives spent nuclear fuel containing the equivalent of 3000 metric tons of uranium (MTU) and defense high-level waste containing the equivalent of 400 MTU. As a result of this analysis, it has been determined that the waste-handling facilities are adequate to receive, prepare, store, and emplace the projected quantity of waste on an annual basis. In addition, several areas have been identified where additional work is required. The recommendations for future work have been divided into three categories: items that affect the total waste management system, operations within the repository boundary, and the methodology used to perform operational analyses for repository designs. 7 refs., 48 figs., 11 tabs.

Dennis, A.W.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

2004 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Permissions, GSA, or editing@geosociety.org. Geology; January 2004; v. 32; no. 1; p. 58; DOI 10.1130/G19957.1; 2 figures; Data Repository item 2004001. 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2004 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Permissions, GSA, or editing@geosociety.org. Geology; January 2004; v. 32; no. 1; p. 5­8; DOI 10.1130/G19957.1; 2 figures; Data a speleothem-based ab- solutely dated record (using uranium-series data) of climate change for the southwestern

Asmerom, Yemane

104

Salt repository project closeout status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the scope and status of the US Department of Energy (DOE`s) Salt Repository Project (SRP) at the time when the project was terminated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987. The report reviews the 10-year program of siting a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste in rock salt formations. Its purpose is to aid persons interested in the information developed during the course of this effort. Each area is briefly described and the major items of information are noted. This report, the three salt Environmental Assessments, and the Site Characterization Plan are the suggested starting points for any search of the literature and information developed by the program participants. Prior to termination, DOE was preparing to characterize three candidate sites for the first mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The sites were in Nevada, a site in volcanic tuff; Texas, a site in bedded salt (halite); and Washington, a site in basalt. These sites, identified by the screening process described in Chapter 3, were selected from the nine potentially acceptable sites shown on Figure I-1. These sites were identified in accordance with provisions of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. 196 refs., 21 figs., 11 tabs.

NONE

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Supplement to the Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, NV (DOE/EIS-0250F) (10/13/06)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

90 Federal Register 90 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 198 / Friday, October 13, 2006 / Notices 1 Coincident with this Notice of Intent, DOE is publishing an Amended Notice of Intent to prepare a Supplemental Yucca Mountain Rail Corridor and Rail Alignment EIS (DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and DOE/ EIS-0369). That EIS will review the rail corridor analyses of the Yucca Mountain Final EIS, and update, as appropriate, and will analyze the proposed Mina corridor; it also will include detailed analyses of alternative alignments for the construction and operation of a rail line within the Mina corridor, as well as the Caliente corridor. 2 Section 114(f)(4) of the NWPA provides that any environmental impact statement ''prepared in connection with a repository * * * shall, to the extent practicable, be adopted by the Commission

106

Geologic and hydrologic investigations of a potential nuclear waste disposal site at Yucca Mountain, southern Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain in southern Nye County, Nevada, has been selected by the United States Department of Energy as one of three potential sites for the nation`s first high-level nuclear waste repository. Its deep water table, closed-basin ground-water flow, potentially favorable host rock, and sparse population have made the Yucca Mountain area a viable candidate during the search for a nuclear waste disposal site. Yucca Mountain, however, lies within the southern Great Basin, a region of known contemporary tectonism and young volcanic activity, and the characterization of tectonism and volcanism remains as a fundamental problem for the Yucca Mountain site. The United States Geological Survey has been conducting extensive studies to evaluate the geologic setting of Yucca Mountain, as well as the timing and rates of tectonic and volcanic activity in the region. A workshop was convened by the Geologic Survey in Denver, Colorado, on August 19, 20, and 21, 1985, to review the scientific progress and direction of these studies. Considerable debate resulted. This collection of papers represents the results of some of the studies presented at the workshop, but by no means covers all of the scientific results and viewpoints presented. Rather, the volume is meant to serve as a progress report on some of the studies within the Geological Survey`s continuing research program toward characterizing the tectonic framework of Yucca Mountain. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base.

Carr, M.D.; Yount, J.C. (eds.)

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. CIRMIS data system. Volume 3. Generator routines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program is developing and applying the methodology for assessing the far-field, long-term post-closure safety of deep geologic nuclear waste repositories. AEGIS is being performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract with the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) for the Department of Energy (DOE). One task within AEGIS is the development of methodology for analysis of the consequences (water pathway) from loss of repository containment as defined by various release scenarios. The various input parameters required in the analysis are compiled in data systems. The data are organized and prepared by various input subroutines for utilization by the hydraulic and transport codes. The hydrologic models simulate the groundwater flow systems and provide water flow directions, rates, and velocities as inputs to the transport models. Outputs from the transport models are basically graphs of radionuclide concentration in the groundwater plotted against time. After dilution in the receiving surface-water body (e.g., lake, river, bay), these data are the input source terms for the dose models, if dose assessments are required. The dose models calculate radiation dose to individuals and populations. CIRMIS (Comprehensive Information Retrieval and Model Input Sequence) Data System, a storage and retrieval system for model input and output data, including graphical interpretation and display is described. This is the third of four volumes of the description of the CIRMIS Data System.

Friedrichs, D.R.; Argo, R.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Regulation of geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has been actively developing needed regulations over the last two years for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Technical criteria are about to be published in the form of a proposed regulation. The waste packages, underground facility, and geologic setting form the major elements of any geologic repository and the basis of a multibarrier system. Performance objectives and supporting technical criteria have been developed for each of these repository elements to provide benchmarks for scientists and engineers working in each of these major areas. 9 refs.

White, L.A.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Development of Science-Based Permitting Guidance for Geological Sequestration of CO2 in Deep Saline Aquifers Based on Modeling and Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground carbon storage may become one of the solutions to address global warming. However, to have an impact, carbon storage must be done at a much larger scale than current CO{sub 2} injection operations for enhanced oil recovery. It must also include injection into saline aquifers. An important characteristic of CO{sub 2} is its strong buoyancy--storage must be guaranteed to be sufficiently permanent to satisfy the very reason that CO{sub 2} is injected. This long-term aspect (hundreds to thousands of years) is not currently captured in legislation, even if the U.S. has a relatively well-developed regulatory framework to handle carbon storage, especially in the operational short term. This report proposes a hierarchical approach to permitting in which the State/Federal Government is responsible for developing regional assessments, ranking potential sites (''General Permit'') and lessening the applicant's burden if the general area of the chosen site has been ranked more favorably. The general permit would involve determining in the regional sense structural (closed structures), stratigraphic (heterogeneity), and petrophysical (flow parameters such as residual saturation) controls on the long-term fate of geologically sequestered CO{sub 2}. The state-sponsored regional studies and the subsequent local study performed by the applicant will address the long-term risk of the particular site. It is felt that a performance-based approach rather than a prescriptive approach is the most appropriate framework in which to address public concerns. However, operational issues for each well (equivalent to the current underground injection control-UIC-program) could follow regulations currently in place. Area ranking will include an understanding of trapping modes. Capillary (due to residual saturation) and structural (due to local geological configuration) trappings are two of the four mechanisms (the other two are solubility and mineral trappings), which are the most relevant to the time scale of interest. The most likely pathways for leakage, if any, are wells and faults. We favor a defense-in-depth approach, in which storage permanence does not rely upon a primary seal only but assumes that any leak can be contained by geologic processes before impacting mineral resources, fresh ground water, or ground surface. We examined the Texas Gulf Coast as an example of an attractive target for carbon storage. Stacked sand-shale layers provide large potential storage volumes and defense-in-depth leakage protection. In the Texas Gulf Coast, the best way to achieve this goal is to establish the primary injection level below the total depth of most wells (>2,400 m-8,000 ft). In addition, most faults, particularly growth faults, present at the primary injection level do not reach the surface. A potential methodology, which includes an integrated approach comprising the whole chain of potential events from leakage from the primary site to atmospheric impacts, is also presented. It could be followed by the State/Federal Government, as well as by the operators.

Jean-Philippe Nicot; Renaud Bouroullec; Hugo Castellanos; Susan Hovorka; Srivatsan Lakshminarasimhan; Jeffrey Paine

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

110

Open OntologyOpen Ontology Repository:Repository  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonfunctional requirements Use case descriptionsUse case descriptions Wiki page:Wiki page: http://ontolog.cim3.net/cgihttp://ontolog.cim11 Open OntologyOpen Ontology Repository:Repository: Architecture andArchitecture and Interfaces3.net/cgi-- bin/wiki.pl?OpenOntologyRepository_Requirementbin/wiki.pl?OpenOntology

Baclawski, Kenneth B.

111

Canister design for deep borehole disposal of nuclear waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this thesis was to design a canister for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high-level waste in deep borehole repositories using currently available and proven oil, gas, and geothermal drilling ...

Hoag, Christopher Ian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

A drop-in-concept for deep borehole canister emplacement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disposal of high-level nuclear waste in deep boreholes drilled into crystalline bedrock (i.e., "granite") is an interesting repository alternative of long standing. Work at MIT over the past two decades, and more recently ...

Bates, Ethan Allen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis A disposal concept consists of three parts: waste inventory (7 waste types examined), geologic setting (e.g., clay/shale, salt, crystalline, other sedimentary), and the engineering concept of operations (range of generic operational concepts examined). Two major categories for waste package emplacement modes are identified: 1) "open" where extended ventilation can remove heat for many years following waste emplacement underground; and 2) "enclosed" modes for clay/shale and salt media where waste packages are emplaced in direct or close contact with natural or engineered materials which may have temperature limits that constrain thermal

114

Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis A disposal concept consists of three parts: waste inventory (7 waste types examined), geologic setting (e.g., clay/shale, salt, crystalline, other sedimentary), and the engineering concept of operations (range of generic operational concepts examined). Two major categories for waste package emplacement modes are identified: 1) "open" where extended ventilation can remove heat for many years following waste emplacement underground; and 2) "enclosed" modes for clay/shale and salt media where waste packages are emplaced in direct or close contact with natural or engineered materials which may have temperature limits that constrain thermal

115

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

process for the Nation's proposed geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain ountains Yucca Mountain Pahute Mesa Yucca Flat Valley Penoyer Valley Penoyer Valley Nevada Test Site

116

Repository seals requirement study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, managed by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) is conducting investigations to support the Viability Assessment and the License Application for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The sealing subsystem is part of the Yucca Mountain Waste Isolation System. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is currently evaluating the role of the sealing subsystem (shaft, ramp and exploratory borehole seals) in achieving the overall performance objectives for the Waste Isolation System. This report documents the results of those evaluations. The objective of the study is to provide water or air flow performance based requirements for shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes located near the repository. Recommendations, as appropriate, are provided for developing plans, seals component testing, and other studies relating to sealing.

NONE

1997-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

117

Stratified Communities of Active Archaea in Deep Marine Subsurface Sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of microbes in methane hydrate-bearing deep marine...Kvenvolden, K. A. 1993. Gas hydrates-geological perspective...and J. Corbeil. 2005. Sand DNA-a genetic library...communities from methane hydrate-bearing deep marine...

Ketil B. Sørensen; Andreas Teske

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Interaction of Plutonium with Bacteria in the Repository Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microorganisms in the nuclear waste repository environment may interact with plutonium through (1) sorption, (2) intracellular accumulation, and (3) transformation speciation. These interactions may retard or enhance the mobility of Pu by precipitation reactions, biocolloid formation, or production of more soluble species. Current and planned radioactive waste repository environments, such as deep subsurface halite and granite formations, are considered extreme relative to life processes in the near-surface terrestrial environment. There is a paucity of information on the biotransformation of radionuclides by microorganisms present in such extreme environments. In order to gain a better understanding of the interaction of plutonium with microorganisms present in the waste repository sites we investigated a pure culture (Halomonas sp.) and a mixed culture of bacteria (Haloarcula sinaiiensis, Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus, Altermonas sp., and a {gamma}-proteobacterium) isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site and an Acetobacterium sp. from alkaline groundwater at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland.

Gillow, J. B.; Francis, A. J.; Lucero, D. A.; Papenguth, H. W.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Carbon Storage Geologic Storage Focus Area Geologiccarbon dioxide (CO2) storage involves the injection of supercritical CO2 into deep geologic formations (injection zones) overlain by competent sealing formations and geologic traps that will prevent the CO2 from escaping. Current research and field studies are focused on developing better understanding 11 major types of geologic storage reservoir classes, each having their own unique opportunities and challenges. Understanding these different storage classes provides insight into how the systems influence fluids flow within these systems today, and how CO2 in geologic storage would be anticipated to flow in the future. The different storage formation classes include: deltaic, coal/shale, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Basaltic interflow zones are also being considered as potential reservoirs. These storage reservoirs contain fluids that may include natural gas, oil, or saline water; any of which may impact CO2 storage differently. The following summarizes the potential for storage and the challenges related to CO2 storage capability for fluids that may be present in more conventional clastic and carbonate reservoirs (saline water, and oil and gas), as well as unconventional reservoirs (unmineable coal seams, organic-rich shales, and basalts):

120

GEOLOGY, January 2007 1 GSA Data Repository item 2007010, Figures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, contact Copyright Permissions, GSA, or editing@geosociety.org. Solar forcing of Holocene climate: New Department of Geosciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003, USA Jessica Rassmussen between solar forcing and Holocene climate, such as the Asian monsoon, has been shown for some regions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geologic repository" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Hydrologic Nuclide Transport Models in Cyder, A Geologic Disposal Software Library - 13328  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Component level and system level abstraction of detailed computational geologic repository models have resulted in four rapid computational models of hydrologic radionuclide transport at varying levels of detail. Those models are described, as is their implementation in Cyder, a software library of interchangeable radionuclide transport models appropriate for representing natural and engineered barrier components of generic geology repository concepts. A proof of principle demonstration was also conducted in which these models were used to represent the natural and engineered barrier components of a repository concept in a reducing, homogenous, generic geology. This base case demonstrates integration of the Cyder open source library with the Cyclus computational fuel cycle systems analysis platform to facilitate calculation of repository performance metrics with respect to fuel cycle choices. (authors)

Huff, Kathryn D. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, IL (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, IL (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

WIPP site and vicinity geological field trip. A report of a field trip to the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant project in Southeastern New Mexico, June 16 to 18, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Evaluation Group is conducting an assessment of the radiological health risks to people from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. As a part of this work, EEG is making an effort to improve the understanding of those geological issues concerning the WIPP site which may affect the radiological consequences of the proposed repository. One of the important geological issues to be resolved is the timing and the nature of the dissolution processes which may have affected the WIPP site. EEG organized a two-day conference of geological scientists, on January 17-18, 1980. On the basis of the January conference and the June field trip, EEG has formed the following conclusions: (1) it has not been clearly established that the site or the surrounding area has been attacked by deep dissolution to render it unsuitable for the nuclear waste pilot repository; (2) the existence of an isolated breccia pipe at the site unaccompanied by a deep dissolution wedge, is a very remote possibility; (3) more specific information about the origin and the nature of the brine reservoirs is needed. An important question that should be resolved is whether each encounter with artesian brine represents a separate pocket or whether these occurrences are interconnected; (4) Anderson has postulated a major tectonic fault or a fracture system at the Basin margin along the San Simon Swale; (5) the area in the northern part of the WIPP site, identified from geophysical and bore hole data as the disturbed zone, should be further investigated to cleary understand the nature and significance of this structural anomaly; and (6) a major drawback encountered during the discussions of geological issues related to the WIPP site is the absence of published material that brings together all the known information related to a particular issue.

Chaturvedi, L.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Examining Repository Loading Options to Expand Yucca Mountain Repository Capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Siting a high level nuclear waste repository entails high economic, social, and political costs. Given the difficulty in siting the Yucca Mountain repository and the already identified need for additional capacity, the concept of expanding the capacity of the Yucca Mountain repository is of significant interest to the nuclear industry and the Department of Energy (DOE). As the capacity of the repository is limited by the decay heat inventory of the spent nuclear fuel in relation to the thermal design limits, expanding the capacity requires appropriate schemes for decay heat and spent fuel loading management. The current Yucca Mountain repository is based on a single level, fixed drift spacing design for a fixed area or footprint. Studies performed to date investigating the capacity of Yucca Mountain often assume that the loading of spent fuel is uniform throughout the repository and use the concept of a linear loading or areal power density (APD). However, use of linear loading or APD can be problematic with the various cooling times involved. The temperature within the repository at any point in time is controlled by the integral of the heat deposited in the repository. The integral of the decay heat varies as a function of pre-loading cooling periods even for a fixed linear loading. A meaningful repository capacity analysis requires the use of a computer model that describes the time-dependent temperature distributions of the rock from the dissipation of the heat through the repository system. If variations from the current Yucca Mountain repository design were to be considered, expanding the capacity of the repository would be pursued in several ways including: (1) increase the footprint size; (2) implement multiple-levels in the repository for the given footprint; (3) allow the drift distance to vary within thermal limits; and, (4) allow non-uniform loading of wastes into the drifts within thermal limits. Options (1) and (2) have been investigated by other researchers. This paper investigates options (3) and (4) for possible expansion of the Yucca Mountain repository capacity. To support the work, a thermal analysis model was needed to describe the temperature changes in the rock around the waste packages against the thermal design limits as a function of spent fuel characteristics and composition. Under the high temperature operating mode (HTOM), the relevant thermal design limits are: (1) the rock temperature midway between adjacent drifts must remain below the local boiling point (96 deg. C); and (2) the rock temperature at drift walls must remain below 200 deg. C. As the work involves a large number of calculations, examining the compliance within thermal design limits, the capability to perform efficient mountain-scale heat-transfer analyses was necessary. A related topic of importance in this investigation was also the effect of uncertainty. As the modeling exercise relies on the use of computational models, uncertainties are unavoidable and understanding the uncertainty in the interpretation of the results is important. The concept of variable drift spacing and variable drift thermal loading was investigated with respect to possible capacity expansion of the Yucca Mountain repository. Also, a computer model was developed for efficient repository heat transfer calculations and sensitivity and uncertainty analyses were performed to identify key parameters and to estimate the uncertainty in the results and understand how the repository capacity estimation would be affected by the uncertainty. (authors)

Li, Jun; Nicholson, Mark; Proctor, W. Cyrus; Yim, Man-Sung; McNelis, David [Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Environmental review and regulation for siting a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed that the first geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste in the United States be sited at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Repository sitting was exempted by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act from the requirements for an environmental impact statement under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and, additionally, the DOE was prohibited by law from acquiring new empirical information for environmental assessment. Thus, no systematic, interdisciplinary evaluation of impacts based on site-specific data will occur before the Yucca Mountain environment is irreparably altered by site characterization. Exemption of siting activities for the nation's first geologic repository for high-level nuclear wastes from NEPA review is further evidence of the eclipse of NEPA in decision making, a trend that may foretell how controversial, technologically complex projects will be carried out in the future.

Charles R. Malone

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Thermal impact of waste emplacement and surface cooling associated with geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article is a study of the thermal effects associated with the emplacement of aged radioactive high-level wastes in a geologic repository, with emphasis on the following subjects: waste characteristics, re...

J. S. Y. Wang; D. C. Mangold; C. F. Tsang

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Advanced fuel cycles and impacts On The Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the goals identified for advanced fuel cycles, such as that proposed by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership, is to reduce the volume of wastes that would ultimately have to be disposed in a geologic repository. Besides reducing volume, techniques that recycle the vast majority of actinides along with the removal of key fission products also reduce the inventory of radionuclides that must ultimately be disposed and the thermal output of the wastes. Advanced recycling techniques may also generate waste forms having different characteristics than those that have been considered for disposal in a repository at Yucca Mountain to-date. These all have a potential impact on several aspects of a repository, such as the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, including surface and subsurface facility design, pre-closure and post-closure safety analyses, and ultimately licensing. These changes would all have to be performed in accordance with the requirements at 10 CFR 63 and approved by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in a license amendment prior to the disposal of any wastes from an advanced fuel cycle. (authors)

Nutt, W.M.; Peters, M.T. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Swift, P.N. [Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Environmental effects on corrosion in the Tuff repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cortest Columbus is investigating the long-term performance of container materials used for high-level waste packages as part of the information needed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to assess the Department of Energy`s application to construct a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. The scope of work consists of employing short-term techniques, to examine a wide range of possible failure modes. Long-term tests are being used to verify and further examine specific failure modes identified as important by the short-term studies. The original focus of the program was on the salt repository but the emphasis was shifted to the Tuff repository. This report summarizes the results of a literature survey performed under Task 1 of the program. The survey focuses on the influence of environmental variables on the corrosion behavior of candidate container materials for the Tuff repository. Environmental variables considered include: radiation, thermal and microbial effects. 80 refs., 44 figs., 44 tabs.

Beavers, J.A.; Thompson, N.G. [Cortest Columbus, Inc., OH (USA)

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

YOUNG GEOLOGY GEOLOGY OF THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the 1962 meetings of the Rocky Mountain Section of the Geological Society of America held on the Brigham University Provo, Utah Part I partially supported by the Rocky Mountaln Section. Officers of the Rocky ....................................................................Blackhawk Formation 56 Castlegate Sandstone and South Flat Formation ............................ 56

Seamons, Kent E.

129

Schematic designs for penetration seals for a reference repository in bedded salt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The isolation of radioactive wastes in geologic repositories requires that man-made penetrations such as shafts, tunnels, or boreholes are adequately sealed. This report describes schematic seal designs for a repository in bedded salt referenced to the straitigraphy of southeastern New Mexico. The designs are presented for extensive peer review and will be updated as site-specific conceptual designs when a site for a repository in salt has been selected. The principal material used in the seal system is crushed salt obtained from excavating the repository. It is anticipated that crushed salt will consolidate as the repository rooms creep close to the degree that mechanical and hydrologic properties will eventually match those of undisturbed, intact salt. For southeastern New Mexico salt, analyses indicate that this process will require approximately 1000 years for a seal located at the base of one of the repository shafts (where there is little increase in temperature due to waste emplacement) and approximately 400 years for a seal located in an access tunnel within the repository. Bulkheads composed of contrete or salt bricks are also included in the seal system as components which will have low permeability during the period required for salt consolidation.

Kelsall, P.C.; Case, J.B.; Meyer, D.; Coons, W.E.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Implementing Geological Disposal of Radioactive Waste Technology Platform From the Strategic Research Agenda to its Deployment - 12015  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several European waste management organizations (WMOs) have initiated a technology platform for accelerating the implementation of deep geological disposal of radioactive waste in Europe. The most advanced waste management programmes in Europe (i.e. Finland, Sweden, and France) have already started or are prepared to start the licensing process of deep geological disposal facilities within the next decade. A technology platform called Implementing Geological Disposal of Radioactive Waste Technology Platform (IGD-TP) was launched in November 2009. A shared vision report for the platform was published stating that: 'Our vision is that by 2025, the first geological disposal facilities for spent fuel, high-level waste, and other long-lived radioactive waste will be operating safely in Europe'. In 2011, the IGD-TP had eleven WMO members and about 70 participants from academia, research, and the industry committed to its vision. The IGD-TP has started to become a tool for reducing overlapping work, to produce savings in total costs of research and implementation and to make better use of existing competence and research infrastructures. The main contributor to this is the deployment of the IGD-TP's newly published Strategic Research Agenda (SRA). The work undertaken for the SRA defined the pending research, development and demonstration (RD and D) issues and needs. The SRA document describing the identified issues that could be worked on collaboratively was published in July 2011. It is available on the project's public web site (www.igdtp.eu). The SRA was organized around 7 Key Topics covering the Safety Case, Waste forms and their behaviour, Technical feasibility and long-term performance of repository components, Development strategy of the repository, Safety of construction and operations, Monitoring, and Governance and stakeholder involvement. Individual Topics were prioritized within the Key Topics. Cross-cutting activities like Education and Training or Knowledge Management as well as activities remaining specific for the WMOs were as well identified in the document. For example, each WMO has to develop their own waste acceptance rules, and plan for the economics and the funding of their waste management programmes. The challenge at hand for the IGD-TP is to deploy the SRA. This is carried out by agreeing on a Deployment Plan (DP) that guides organizing the concrete joint activities between the WMOs and the other participants of the IGD-TP. The first DP points out the coordinated RD and D projects and other activities that need to be launched to produce these results over the next four to five years (by the end of 2016). The DP also describes general principles for how the joint work can be organised and funded. (authors)

Ouzounian, P. [ANDRA, Chatenay-Malabry (France); Palmu, Marjatta [Posiva Oy, Eurajoki (Finland); Eng, Torsten [SKB, Stockholm (Sweden)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

HYDROMECHANICAL RESPONSE TO A MINE BY TEST EXPERIMENT IN DEEP CLAYSTONE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radioactifs, France ABSTRACT In order to demonstrate the feasibility of radioactive waste repository in deep radioactive waste management agency) in eastern France, in a Callovo-Oxfordian claystone. 15 boreholes were the feasibility of a radioactive waste repository in the claystone formation, the French national radioactive

Boyer, Edmond

132

Geologic Framework Model Analysis Model Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the Geologic Framework Model (GFM), Version 3.1 (GFM3.1) with regard to data input, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations, and validation of the model results, qualification status of the model, and the differences between Version 3.1 and previous versions. The GFM represents a three-dimensional interpretation of the stratigraphy and structural features of the location of the potential Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository. The GFM encompasses an area of 65 square miles (170 square kilometers) and a volume of 185 cubic miles (771 cubic kilometers). The boundaries of the GFM were chosen to encompass the most widely distributed set of exploratory boreholes (the Water Table or WT series) and to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the unsaturated zone (UZ). The depth of the model is constrained by the inferred depth of the Tertiary-Paleozoic unconformity. The GFM was constructed from geologic map and borehole data. Additional information from measured stratigraphy sections, gravity profiles, and seismic profiles was also considered. This interim change notice (ICN) was prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model Process Model Report Revision 01 (CRWMS M&O 2000). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The GFM is one component of the Integrated Site Model (ISM) (Figure l), which has been developed to provide a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site. The ISM consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) Rock Properties Model (RPM); and (3) Mineralogic Model (MM). The ISM merges the detailed project stratigraphy into model stratigraphic units that are most useful for the primary downstream models and the repository design. These downstream models include the hydrologic flow models and the radionuclide transport models. All the models and the repository design, in turn, will be incorporated into the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of the potential radioactive waste repository block and vicinity to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a host for the repository. The interrelationship of the three components of the ISM and their interface with downstream uses are illustrated in Figure 2.

R. Clayton

2000-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

133

Deep Repositories: Out of Sight, Out of Terrorists' Reach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...civilian nuclear power plants will be loaded...heat of the nuclear material...relentless attack by moisture...The risks we face from terrorism and nuclear...civilian nuclear power plants will be...heat of the nuclear material...relentless attack by moisture...radionuclides. The risks we face from terrorism and nuclear...

Richard Stone

2004-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

134

Review of research on geological disposal of radioactive waste March 2011 s.haszeldine@ed.ac.uk Page 1 of 13 Review of research on geological disposal of radioactive waste proposed by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review of research on geological disposal of radioactive waste March 2011 s.haszeldine@ed.ac.uk Page 1 of 13 Review of research on geological disposal of radioactive waste proposed by the UK Nuclear, and future research work needed, on the pathway towards choosing sites for a radioactive waste Repository

135

Summary discussion of the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste was proposed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This paper summarizes the historical development of the 2008 YM performance assessment (PA), and explains how the methods and results of the 2008 PA address regulatory requirements specified by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Topics covered include (i) screening of features, events and processes, (ii) development of scenario classes, (iii) descriptions of barrier capability, and (iv) compliance with applicable quantitative standards for individual protection, individual protection following human intrusion, and ground water protection. This article is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA and provides a brief summary of information presented in detail in multiple articles in this issue and interprets the results in the context of applicable EPA and NRC regulations.

Peter N. Swift; Clifford W. Hansen; Jon C. Helton; Robert L. Howard; M. Kathryn Knowles; Robert J. MacKinnon; Jerry A. McNeish; S. David Sevougian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Regional Geologic Map  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shaded relief base with Hot Pot project area, generalized geology, selected mines, and major topographic features

Lane, Michael

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

137

Regional Geologic Map  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Shaded relief base with Hot Pot project area, generalized geology, selected mines, and major topographic features

Lane, Michael

138

Report on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay Repository  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay Repository Report on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay Repository Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world. Coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical, and chemical (THMC) processes have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. This report documents results from three R&D activities: (1) implementation and validation of constitutive relationships, (2) development of a discrete fracture network (DFN) model for investigating coupled processes in the excavation damaged zone, and (3) development of a THM model for the Full-Scale Emplacement Experiment tests at Mont Terri, Switzerland, for the

139

Conceptual model for regional radionuclide transport from a salt dome repository: a technical memorandum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal of high-level radioactive wastes is a major environmental problem influencing further development of nuclear energy in this country. Salt domes in the Gulf Coast Basin are being investigated as repository sites. A major concern is geologic and hydrologic stability of candidate domes and potential transport of radionuclides by groundwater to the biosphere prior to their degradation to harmless levels of activity. This report conceptualizes a regional geohydrologic model for transport of radionuclides from a salt dome repository. The model considers transport pathways and the physical and chemical changes that would occur through time prior to the radionuclides reaching the biosphere. Necessary, but unknown inputs to the regional model involve entry and movement of fluids through the repository dome and across the dome-country rock interface and the effect on the dome and surrounding strata of heat generated by the radioactive wastes.

Kier, R.S.; Showalter, P.A.; Dettinger, M.D.

1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

140

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. As part of this development, a detailed performance assessment (PA) for the YM repository was completed in 2008 and supported a license application by the DOE to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the construction of the YM repository. The following aspects of the 2008 YM PA are described in this presentation: (i) conceptual structure and computational organization, (ii) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques in use, (iii) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for physical processes, and (iv) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for expected dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) specified the NRC’s regulations for the YM repository.

Jon C. Helton; Clifford W. Hansen; Cédric J. Sallaberry

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geologic repository" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Clay and granitic geologic rock units are potential host media for future repositories for used nuclear fuel and high level waste. This report addresses the representation of flow in these two media within numerical process models. Discrete fracture network (DFNs) models are an approach to representing flow in fractured granite that explicitly represents the geometry and flow properties of individual fractures. New DFN generation and computational grid generation methods have been developed and tested. Mesh generation and the generation of flow streamlines within the DFN are also included. Traditional form of Darcy's law is not adequate

142

The Application of Performance Assessment to Make Regulatory and Operational Changes in an Operating Nuclear Waste Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes how performance assessment (PA) is used to support changes to the regulatory basis of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The WIPP, located near Carlsbad, New Mexico is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as the nation's only deep geologic repository for the disposal of transuranic nuclear waste. In 1998, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified that the WIPP met the performance requirements of 40 CFR Part 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes. A PA analysis of long term (10,000 year) repository performance successfully demonstrated that the probability and consequences of potential long-term releases of radionuclides to the accessible environment would be well below the established limits. These results were key in obtaining WIPP's initial certification, allowing the first shipment and disposal of nuclear waste in March of 1999. As disposal operations have taken place over the last eight years, changes have been identified in the regulatory and operational realms of the facility that would enhance waste disposal efficiency. Such changes, however, cannot be made without prior consent of the EPA. Therefore, changes planned by the DOE must be thoroughly described and supported by varying degrees of the same type of analyses that were conducted to demonstrate the WIPP's containment capabilities as presented in the initial compliance application submitted to EPA in 1996. Such analyses are used to identify the impacts or benefits of implementing the planned change. The DOE has successfully used performance assessment analyses for the approval of changes such as: 1) the disposal of super-compacted waste forms, and; 2) the adoption of new parameters and modeling assumptions In some cases the planned changes are simpler in nature than those listed above, and therefore only require targeted or simplified PA analyses to demonstrate the effect on performance. Targeted analyses have been used to successfully gain approval of the following: 1) a reduction in the amount of magnesium oxide (MgO) chemical buffer backfill that must be emplaced in the repository 2) a change in the repository mining/disposal horizon In addition to these approved changes, the DOE has used PA analyses to support the following planned change requests that await EPA's approval: 1) panel closure redesign 2) further reduction in the MgO-to-waste ratio Finally, this paper will discuss some of the changes that the DOE is currently preparing and plans to submit to the EPA for approval in the near future. This paper will describe how a set of analytical tools initially used to open the WIPP continues to have a role in making the repository more efficient and adaptable as variations in waste streams, operational demands, and other dynamic forces change the operating environment over time. (authors)

Patterson, R. [Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Kirkes, R. [John Hart and Associates, P.A., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Conceptual model for regional radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site. Final draft, technical memorandum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical memorandum was prepared to: (1) describe a typical basalt radionuclide repository site, (2) describe geologic and hydrologic processes associated with regional radionuclide transport in basalts, (3) define the parameters required to model regional radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site, and (4) develop a ''conceptual model'' of radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site. In a general hydrological sense, basalts may be described as layered sequences of aquifers and aquitards. The Columbia River Basalt, centered near the semi-arid Pasco Basin, is considered by many to be typical basalt repository host rock. Detailed description of the flow system including flow velocities with high-low hydraulic conductivity sequences are not possible with existing data. However, according to theory, waste-transport routes are ultimately towards the Columbia River and the lengths of flow paths from the repository to the biosphere may be relatively short. There are many physical, chemical, thermal, and nuclear processes with associated parameters that together determine the possible pattern of radionuclide migration in basalts and surrounding formations. Brief process descriptions and associated parameter lists are provided. Emphasis has been placed on the use of the distribution coefficient in simulating ion exchange. The use of the distribution coefficient approach is limited because it takes into account only relatively fast mass transfer processes. In general, knowledge of hydrogeochemical processes is primitive.

Walton, W.C.; Voorhees, M.L.; Prickett, T.A.

1980-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

144

Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage In September 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced the award of 11 projects with a total project value of $75.5 million* to conduct site characterization of promising geologic formations for CO2 storage. These Recovery Act projects will increase our understanding of the potential for these formations to safely and permanently store CO2. The information gained from these projects (detailed below) will further DOE's efforts to develop a national assessment of CO2 storage capacity in deep geologic formations. Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage * Subsequently, the Board of Public Works project in Holland, MI has been

145

NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory pyrolysis methods have provided much information on the origins of deep gas. Technologic problems are one of the greatest challenges to deep drilling. Problems associated with overcoming hostile drilling environments (e.g. high temperatures and pressures, and acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) for successful well completion, present the greatest obstacles to drilling, evaluating, and developing deep gas fields. Even though the overall success ratio for deep wells is about 50 percent, a lack of geological and geophysical information such as reservoir quality, trap development, and gas composition continues to be a major barrier to deep gas exploration. Results of recent finding-cost studies by depth interval for the onshore U.S. indicate that, on average, deep wells cost nearly 10 times more to drill than shallow wells, but well costs and gas recoveries vary widely among different gas plays in different basins. Based on an analysis of natural gas assessments, many topical areas hold significant promise for future exploration and development. One such area involves re-evaluating and assessing hypothetical unconventional basin-center gas plays. Poorly-understood basin-center gas plays could contain significant deep undiscovered technically-recoverable gas resources.

Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

146

Geologic spatial analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development of geologic spatial analysis research which focuses on conducting comprehensive three-dimensional analysis of regions using geologic data sets that can be referenced by latitude, longitude, and elevation/depth. (CBS)

Thiessen, R.L.; Eliason, J.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Focused Crawling of the Deep Web Using Service Class Descriptions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dynamic Web data sources--sometimes known collectively as the Deep Web--increase the utility of the Web by providing intuitive access to data repositories anywhere that Web access is available. Deep Web services provide access to real-time information, like entertainment event listings, or present a Web interface to large databases or other data repositories. Recent studies suggest that the size and growth rate of the dynamic Web greatly exceed that of the static Web, yet dynamic content is often ignored by existing search engine indexers owing to the technical challenges that arise when attempting to search the Deep Web. To address these challenges, we present DynaBot, a service-centric crawler for discovering and clustering Deep Web sources offering dynamic content. DynaBot has three unique characteristics. First, DynaBot utilizes a service class model of the Web implemented through the construction of service class descriptions (SCDs). Second, DynaBot employs a modular, self-tuning system architecture for focused crawling of the DeepWeb using service class descriptions. Third, DynaBot incorporates methods and algorithms for efficient probing of the Deep Web and for discovering and clustering Deep Web sources and services through SCD-based service matching analysis. Our experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the service class discovery, probing, and matching algorithms and suggest techniques for efficiently managing service discovery in the face of the immense scale of the Deep Web.

Rocco, D; Liu, L; Critchlow, T

2004-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

148

The Geological Research in France - The Dossier 2005 Argile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the end of fifteen years of research defined by the French act of December 30, 1991 on radwaste management, ANDRA gave a report, 'Dossier Argile 2005', which concluded with the feasibility of a reversible disposal in the argillaceous Callovo-Oxfordian formation studied by means of an underground research laboratory at the Meuse/Haute-Marne site. Starting from source data like the characteristics of the geological medium and the waste inventory, the process followed by ANDRA to achieve this conclusion is of a sequential type, and iterative between concept design, scientific knowledge, in particular that of the phenomenological evolution of the repository and its geological environment from operating period to long term, and safety assessment. The 'Dossier Argile 2005' covers a broad radwaste inventory, ILLW, HLW and Spent Fuel, so that it makes it possible to cover the whole of the technological, scientific and safety topics. This article will give an overview of the geological disposal studies in France and draw the main conclusion of the Dossier 2005 Argile. It will be focused on the near field (engineering components and near field host rock), while considering, if necessary, its integration within the whole system. After a short description of the concepts (including waste inventory and the characteristics of the Meuse/Haute the Marne site) and the functions of the components of repository and geological medium, one will describe, successively, the broad outline of the phenomenological evolution of repository and the geological medium in near field, in particular, by releasing the time scales of processes and uncertainties of knowledge. On this basis, one will indicate the safety scenarios that were considered and the broad outline of performance and dose calculations. Lessons learn from the Dossier 2005 Argile will be discussed and perspectives and priorities for future will be indicated. (authors)

Plas, Frederic; Wendling, Jacques [DS/IT, Andra, Parc de la Croix Blanche, 1-7 rue Jean Monnet, Chatenay-Malabry, 92298 (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Geology of Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... to an accepted plan have produced a most comprehensive geological account of the occurrence of natural ...naturalgas ...

E. F. A.

1936-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

150

AASG State Geological Survey  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.Contributions to the NGDSAASG State Geological Survey

151

Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection Guidelines,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection Guidelines, Borehole Seals Design, and RD&D Needs Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection Guidelines, Borehole Seals Design, and RD&D Needs The U.S. Department of Energy has been investigating deep borehole disposal as one alternative for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive waste forms, along with research and development for mined repositories in salt, granite, and clay, as part of the used fuel disposition (UFD) campaign. The deep borehole disposal concept consists of drilling a borehole on the order of 5,000 m deep, emplacing waste canisters in the lower part of the borehole, and sealing the upper part of the borehole with bentonite and concrete seals. A reference design of the

152

Microsoft Word - CCS Geologic Storage-Intro_2011l.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Geologic carbon sequestration involves the storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in deep underground geologic formations. The majority of geologic formations considered for CO 2 storage, deep saline or depleted oil and gas reservoirs, are layers of subsurface porous rock that are overlain by a layer or multiple layers of low-permeability rock. Under high pressures, CO 2 is a supercritical fluid, with the high- density characteristics of a liquid but behaves like a gas by filling all available volume. Coal seams are also a viable option for geologic storage. When CO 2 is injected into a coal formation it is adsorbed onto the coal surfaces and methane gas is released and produced in adjacent wells. NETL's Core R&D research is focused on developing the ability to characterize a geologic formation

153

Building of multilevel stakeholder consensus in radioactive waste repository siting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report considers the problem of multilevel consensus building for siting and construction of shared multinational/regional repositories for radioactive waste (RW) deep disposal. In the siting of a multinational repository there appears an essential innovative component of stakeholder consensus building, namely: to reach consent - political, social, economic, ecological - among international partners, in addition to solving the whole set of intra-national consensus building items. An entire partnering country is considered as a higher-level stakeholder - the national stakeholder, represented by the national government, being faced to simultaneous seeking an upward (international) and a downward (intra-national) consensus in a psychologically stressed environment, possibly being characterized by diverse political, economic and social interests. The following theses as a possible interdisciplinary approach towards building of shared understanding and stakeholder consensus on the international scale of RW disposal are forwarded and developed: a) building of international stakeholder consensus would be promoted by activating and diversifying on the international scale multilateral interactions between intra- and international stakeholders, including web-based networks of the RW disposal site investigations and decision-making, as well as networks for international cooperation among government authorities in nuclear safety, b) gradual progress in intergovernmental consensus and reaching multilateral agreements on shared deep repositories will be the result of democratic dialogue, via observing the whole set of various interests and common resolving of emerged controversies by using advanced synergetic approaches of conflict resolution, c) cross-cultural thinking and world perception, mental flexibility, creativity and knowledge are considered as basic prerogatives for gaining a higher level of mutual understanding and consensus for seeking further consensus, for advancing the preparedness to act together, and ultimately - for achieving desired shared goals. It is proposed that self-organized social learning will make it possible to promote adequate perception of risk and prevent, by diminishing uncertainties and unknown factors, social amplification of an imagined risk, as well as to increase the trust level and facilitate more adequate equity perception. The proposed approach to the multilevel stakeholder consensus building on international scale is extrapolated to the present-day activities of siting of such near-surface RW disposal facilities which supposedly could have non-negligible trans-boundary impact. A multilevel stakeholder interaction process is considered for the case of resolving of emerged problems in site selection for the planned near-surface RW repository in vicinity of the Lithuanian-Latvian border foreseen for disposal of short lived low- and intermediate level waste arising from the decommissioning of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant. (authors)

Dreimanis, A. [Radiation Safety Centre, Riga LV (Latvia)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Coupling geothermal energy capture with carbon dioxide sequestration in naturally permeable, porous geologic formations  – a novel approach for expanding geothermal energy utilization.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis research presents a new method to harness geothermal energy by combining it with geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration. CO2 is injected into deep,… (more)

Randolph, Jimmy Bryan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You August 11, 2010 - 2:45pm Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Develops and tests technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts Here's a riddle for you: What do spelunkers, mineralogists and the latest Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) awardees have in common? They're all experts in tapping into projects of geological proportions! Today, Secretary Chu announced the selection of 15 projects aimed at developing and testing technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts (just to name a few). Funded with $21.3

156

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You August 11, 2010 - 2:45pm Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Develops and tests technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts Here's a riddle for you: What do spelunkers, mineralogists and the latest Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) awardees have in common? They're all experts in tapping into projects of geological proportions! Today, Secretary Chu announced the selection of 15 projects aimed at developing and testing technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts (just to name a few). Funded with $21.3

157

Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations During And After The Volcanic Crisis Of Spring 1990, And Monitoring Prior To The May 2003 Eruption Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations During And After The Volcanic Crisis Of Spring 1990, And Monitoring Prior To The May 2003 Eruption Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Anatahan island is 9.5 km east-west by 3.5 km north-south and truncated by an elongate caldera 5 km east-west by 2.5 km north-south. A steep-walled pit crater ~1 km across and ~200 m deep occupies the eastern part of the caldera. The island is the summit region of a mostly submarine stratovolcano. The oldest subaerial rocks (stage 1) are exposed low on the

158

Salt Repository Project waste emplacement mode decision paper: Revison 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides a recommendation as to the mode of waste emplacement to be used as the current basis for site characterization activity for the Deaf Smith County, Texas, high level nuclear waste repository site. It also presents a plan for implementing the recommendation so as to provide a high level of confidence in the project's success. Since evaluations of high-level waste disposal in geologic repositories began in the 1950s, most studies emplacement in salt formations employed the vertical orientation for emplacing waste packages in boreholes in the floor of the underground facility. This orientation was used in trials at Project Salt Vault in the 1960s. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has recently settled on a combination of vertical and horizontal modes for various waste types. This paper analyzes the information available and develops a project position upon which to base current site characterization activities. The position recommended is that the SRP should continue to use the vertical waste emplacement mode as the reference design and to carry the horizontal mode as a ''passive'' alternative. This position was developed based upon the conclusions of a decision analysis, risk assessment, and cost/schedule impact assessment. 52 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Immersion studies on candidate container alloys for the Tuff Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cortest Columbus Technologies (CC Technologies) is investigating the long-term performance of container materials used for high-level radioactive waste packages. This information is being developed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to aid in their assessment of the Department of Energy`s application to construct a geologic repository for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. This report summarizes the results of exposure studies performed on two copper-base and two Fe-Cr-Ni alloys in simulated Tuff Repository conditions. Testing was performed at 90{degrees}C in three environments; simulated J-13 well water, and two environments that simulated the chemical effects resulting from boiling and irradiation of the groundwater. Creviced specimens and U-bends were exposed to liquid, to vapor above the condensed phase, and to alternate immersion. A rod specimen was used to monitor corrosion at the vapor-liquid interface. The specimens were evaluated by electrochemical, gravimetric, and metallographic techniques following approximately 2000 hours of exposure. Results of the exposure tests indicated that all four alloys exhibited acceptable general corrosion rates in simulated J-13 well water. These rates decreased with time. Incipient pitting was observed under deposits on Alloy 825 and pitting was observed on both Alloy CDA 102 and Alloy CDA 715 in the simulated J-13 well water. No SCC was observed in U-bend specimens of any of the alloys in simulated J-13 well water. 33 refs., 48 figs., 23 tabs.

Beavers, J.A.; Durr, C.L. [Cortest Columbus Technologies, OH (USA)

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Temperature-package power correlations for open-mode geologic disposal concepts.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Logistical simulation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) management in the U.S. combines storage, transportation and disposal elements to evaluate schedule, cost and other resources needed for all major operations leading to final geologic disposal. Geologic repository reference options are associated with limits on waste package thermal power output at emplacement, in order to meet limits on peak temperature for certain key engineered and natural barriers. These package power limits are used in logistical simulation software such as CALVIN, as threshold requirements that must be met by means of decay storage or SNF blending in waste packages, before emplacement in a repository. Geologic repository reference options include enclosed modes developed for crystalline rock, clay or shale, and salt. In addition, a further need has been addressed for open modes in which SNF can be emplaced in a repository, then ventilated for decades or longer to remove heat, prior to permanent repository closure. For each open mode disposal concept there are specified durations for surface decay storage (prior to emplacement), repository ventilation, and repository closure operations. This study simulates those steps for several timing cases, and for SNF with three fuel-burnup characteristics, to develop package power limits at which waste packages can be emplaced without exceeding specified temperature limits many years later after permanent closure. The results are presented in the form of correlations that span a range of package power and peak postclosure temperature, for each open-mode disposal concept, and for each timing case. Given a particular temperature limit value, the corresponding package power limit for each case can be selected for use in CALVIN and similar tools.

Hardin, Ernest L.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geologic repository" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Konrad Repository Facing its Construction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to the German Atomic Energy Act the Federation is responsible for the construction and operation of installations for the safekeeping and disposal of radioactive waste. This duty was assigned to the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz - BfS). In 1982, the Federal Institute of Physics and Metrology (Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt - PTB) as the precursor of BfS applied for a license for the disposal of radioactive waste with negligible heat generation in the Konrad iron ore mine near Salzgitter at the Ministry for Environment of Lower Saxony. After 25 years of plan approval procedure and subsequent lawsuits the license is now valid and Konrad is waiting for construction. Facing this challenge BfS has established a project team to supervise the in-house and external activities to be done. It is intended to construct the Konrad repository within a preparation period of two years and a subsequent erection phase of four years. Thus, Konrad is planned to come into operation in 2013. In this paper the development of the plan approval procedure, the technical design of the planned repository, especially with regard to safety-related aspects, and the planning for the construction will be discussed. (authors)

Kunze, V. [Bundesamt fur Strahlenschutz (BfS), Salzgitter (Germany)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem of isolating radioactive wastes from the biosphere presents specialists in the fields of earth sciences with some of the most complicated problems they have ever encountered. This is especially true for high level waste (HLW) which must be isolated in the underground and away from the biosphere for thousands of years. Essentially every country that is generating electricity in nuclear power plants is faced with the problem of isolating the radioactive wastes that are produced. The general consensus is that this can be accomplished by selecting an appropriate geologic setting and carefully designing the rock repository. Much new technology is being developed to solve the problems that have been raised and there is a continuing need to publish the results of new developments for the benefit of all concerned. The 28th International Geologic Congress that was held July 9--19, 1989 in Washington, DC provided an opportunity for earth scientists to gather for detailed discussions on these problems. Workshop W3B on the subject, Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation -- A World Wide Review'' was organized by Paul A Witherspoon and Ghislain de Marsily and convened July 15--16, 1989 Reports from 19 countries have been gathered for this publication. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Witherspoon, P.A. (ed.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Region-to-area screening methodology for the Crystalline Repository Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to describe the Crystalline Repository Project's (CRP) process for region-to-area screening of exposed and near-surface crystalline rock bodies in the three regions of the conterminous United States where crystalline rock is being evaluated as a potential host for the second nuclear waste repository (i.e., in the North Central, Northeastern, and Southeastern Regions). This document indicates how the US Department of Energy's (DOE) General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories (10 CFR 960) were used to select and apply factors and variables for the region-to-area screening, explains how these factors and variable are to be applied in the region-to-area screening, and indicates how this methodology relates to the decision process leading to the selection of candidate areas. A brief general discussion of the screening process from the national survey through area screening and site recommendation is presented. This discussion sets the scene for detailed discussions which follow concerning the region-to-area screening process, the guidance provided by the DOE Siting Guidelines for establishing disqualifying factors and variables for screening, and application of the disqualifying factors and variables in the screening process. This document is complementary to the regional geologic and environmental characterization reports to be issued in the summer of 1985 as final documents. These reports will contain the geologic and environmental data base that will be used in conjunction with the methodology to conduct region-to-area screening.

none,

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Preliminary Geologic Characterization of West Coast States for Geologic Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterization of geological sinks for sequestration of CO{sub 2} in California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington was carried out as part of Phase I of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) project. Results show that there are geologic storage opportunities in the region within each of the following major technology areas: saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and coal beds. The work focused on sedimentary basins as the initial most-promising targets for geologic sequestration. Geographical Information System (GIS) layers showing sedimentary basins and oil, gas, and coal fields in those basins were developed. The GIS layers were attributed with information on the subsurface, including sediment thickness, presence and depth of porous and permeable sandstones, and, where available, reservoir properties. California offers outstanding sequestration opportunities because of its large capacity and the potential of value-added benefits from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and enhanced gas recovery (EGR). The estimate for storage capacity of saline formations in the ten largest basins in California ranges from about 150 to about 500 Gt of CO{sub 2}, depending on assumptions about the fraction of the formations used and the fraction of the pore volume filled with separate-phase CO{sub 2}. Potential CO{sub 2}-EOR storage was estimated to be 3.4 Gt, based on a screening of reservoirs using depth, an API gravity cutoff, and cumulative oil produced. The cumulative production from gas reservoirs (screened by depth) suggests a CO{sub 2} storage capacity of 1.7 Gt. In Oregon and Washington, sedimentary basins along the coast also offer sequestration opportunities. Of particular interest is the Puget Trough Basin, which contains up to 1,130 m (3,700 ft) of unconsolidated sediments overlying up to 3,050 m (10,000 ft) of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The Puget Trough Basin also contains deep coal formations, which are sequestration targets and may have potential for enhanced coal bed methane recovery (ECBM).

Larry Myer

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

165

Assessment of the geothermal resources of Indiana based on existing geologic data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The general geology of Indiana is presented including the following: physiography, stratigraphy, and structural features. The following indicators of geothermal energy are discussed: heat flow and thermal gradient, geothermal occurrences, seismic activity, geochemistry, and deep sedimentary basins. (MHR)

Vaught, T.L.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and conserve and protect fish and wildlife. · · TheNationalCooperativeGeologicMapping · · · · The of the conterminous United States. Santa Barbara N Deep seismic tremor M6.5 San Simeon mainshock 2003 Central

Torgersen, Christian

167

Geologic CO2 Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geologic CO2 Sequestration Geologic CO2 Sequestration Geologic reservoirs offer promising option for long- term storage of captured CO 2 Accumulations of gases (including CO 2 ) in geologic reservoirs, by natural processes or through enhanced oil recovery operations, demonstrate that gas can be stored for long periods of time and provide insights to the efficacy and impacts of geological gas storage. Los Alamos scientists in the Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES) Division have been involved in geologic CO 2 storage research for over a decade. Research Highlights * Led first-ever US field test on CO 2 sequestration in depleted oil reservoirs * Participant in two Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (Southwest Regional and Big Sky) * Part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) for CO

168

Fundamental properties of monolithic bentonite buffer material formed by cold isostatic pressing for high-level radioactive waste repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methods of fabrication, handling, and emplacement of engineered barriers used in a deep geological repository for high level radioactive waste should be planned as simply as possible from the engineering and economic viewpoints. Therefore, a new concept of a monolithic buffer material around a waste package have been proposed instead of the conventional concept with the use of small blocks, which would decrease the cost for buffer material. The monolithic buffer material is composed of two parts of highly compacted bentonite, a cup type body and a cover. As the forming method of the monolithic buffer material, compaction by the cold isostatic pressing process (CIP) has been employed. In this study, monolithic bentonite bodies with the diameter of about 333 mm and the height of about 455 mm (corresponding to the approx. 1/5 scale for the Japanese reference concept) were made by the CIP of bentonite powder. The dry densities: {rho}d of the bodies as a whole were measured and the small samples were cut from several locations to investigate the density distribution. The swelling pressure and hydraulic conductivity as function of the monolithic body density for CIP-formed specimens were also measured. High density ({rho}d: 1.4--2.0 Mg/m{sup 3}) and homogeneous monolithic bodies were formed by the CIP. The measured results of the swelling pressure (3--15 MPa) and hydraulic conductivity (0.5--1.4 x 10{sup {minus}13} m/s) of the specimens were almost the same as those for the uniaxial compacted bentonite in the literature. It is shown that the vacuum hoist system is an applicable handling method for emplacement of the monolithic bentonite.

Kawakami, S.; Yamanaka, Y.; Kato, K.; Asano, H.; Ueda, H.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

YUCCA MOUNTAIN PROJECT RECOMMENDATION BY THE SECRETARY OF ENERGY REGARDING THE SUITABILITY OF THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE FOR A REPOSITORY UNDER THE NUCLEAR WASTE POLICY ACT OF 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For more than half a century, since nuclear science helped us win World War II and ring in the Atomic Age, scientists have known that !he Nation would need a secure, permanent facility in which to dispose of radioactive wastes. Twenty years ago, when Congress adopted the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA or ''the Act''), it recognized the overwhelming consensus in the scientific community that the best option for such a facility would be a deep underground repository. Fifteen years ago, Congress directed the Secretary of Energy to investigate and recommend to the President whether such a repository could be located safely at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Since then, our country has spent billions of dollars and millions of hours of research endeavoring to answer this question. I have carefully reviewed the product of this study. In my judgment, it constitutes sound science and shows that a safe repository can be sited there. I also believe that compelling national interests counsel in favor of proceeding with this project. Accordingly, consistent with my responsibilities under the NWPA, today I am recommending that Yucca Mountain be developed as the site for an underground repository for spent fuel and other radioactive wastes. The first consideration in my decision was whether the Yucca Mountain site will safeguard the health and safety of the people, in Nevada and across the country, and will be effective in containing at minimum risk the material it is designed to hold. Substantial evidence shows that it will. Yucca Mountain is far and away the most thoroughly researched site of its kind in the world. It is a geologically stable site, in a closed groundwater basin, isolated on thousands of acres of Federal land, and farther from any metropolitan area than the great majority of less secure, temporary nuclear waste storage sites that exist in the country today. This point bears emphasis. We are not confronting a hypothetical problem. We have a staggering amount of radioactive waste in this country--nearly 100,000,000 gallons of high-level nuclear waste and more than 40,000 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel with more created every day. Our choice is not between, on the one hand, a disposal site with costs and risks held to a minimum, and, on the other, a magic disposal system with no costs or risks at all. Instead, the real choice is between a single secure site, deep under the ground at Yucca Mountain, or making do with what we have now or some variant of it--131 aging surface sites, scattered across 39 states. Every one of those sites was built on the assumption that it would be temporary. As time goes by. every one is closer to the limit of its safe life span. And every one is at least a potential security risk--safe for today, but a question mark in decades to come.

NA

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

170

MRS system study for the repository: Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project; Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), has initiated a waste management system study to identify the impacts of the presence or absence of a monitored retrievable storage facility (hereinafter referred to as ``MRS``) on system costs and program schedules. To support this study, life-cycle cost estimates and construction schedules have been prepared for the surface and underground facilities and operations geologic nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Nine different operating scenarios (cases) have been identified by OCRWM for inclusion in this study. For each case, the following items are determined: the repository design and construction costs, operating costs, closure and decommissioning costs, required staffing, construction schedules, uncertainties associated with the costs and schedules, and shipping cask and disposal container throughputs. This document contains A-D.

Sinagra, T.A. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA); Harig, R. [Parsons, Brinckerhoff, Quade and Douglas, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA)

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

THE DECISION TO RECOMMEND YUCCA MOUNTAIN AND THE NEXT STEPS TOWARD LICENSED REPOSITORY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After more than 20 years of carefully planned and reviewed scientific field work by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Geological Survey, and numerous other organizations, Secretary of Energy Abraham concluded in January that the Yucca Mountain site is suitable, within the meaning of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, for development as a permanent nuclear waste and spent fuel repository. In February, the Secretary recommended to the President that the site be developed for licensed disposal of these wastes, and the President transmitted this recommendation to Congress. This paper summarizes key technical and national interest considerations that provided the basis for the recommendation. It also discusses the program's near-term plans for repository development if Congress designates the site.

Barrett, L. H.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

172

DSpace: An Open Source Dynamic Digital Repository  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For the past two years the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Libraries and Hewlett-Packard Labs have been collaborating on the development of an open source system called DSpaceâ?¢ that functions as a repository ...

Smith, MacKenzie

173

Principles of Historical Geology Geology 331  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in West Virginia. #12;Original Lateral Continuity #12;Geology Field Camp in the Badlands of South Dakota surface of igneous or metamorphic rocks. #12;Crystalline Rocks #12;James Hutton, 18th Century founder Smith, the first 19th Century geologist to understand stratigraphy and make correlations. #12

Kammer, Thomas

174

Coupling fuel cycles with repositories: how repository institutional choices may impact fuel cycle design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The historical repository siting strategy in the United States has been a top-down approach driven by federal government decision making but it has been a failure. This policy has led to dispatching fuel cycle facilities in different states. The U.S. government is now considering an alternative repository siting strategy based on voluntary agreements with state governments. If that occurs, state governments become key decision makers. They have different priorities. Those priorities may change the characteristics of the repository and the fuel cycle. State government priorities, when considering hosting a repository, are safety, financial incentives and jobs. It follows that states will demand that a repository be the center of the back end of the fuel cycle as a condition of hosting it. For example, states will push for collocation of transportation services, safeguards training, and navy/private SNF (Spent Nuclear Fuel) inspection at the repository site. Such activities would more than double local employment relative to what was planned for the Yucca Mountain-type repository. States may demand (1) the right to take future title of the SNF so if recycle became economic the reprocessing plant would be built at the repository site and (2) the right of a certain fraction of the repository capacity for foreign SNF. That would open the future option of leasing of fuel to foreign utilities with disposal of the SNF in the repository but with the state-government condition that the front-end fuel-cycle enrichment and fuel fabrication facilities be located in that state.

Forsberg, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Room 24-207A Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Miller, W.F. [Texas A.M. University System, MS 3133 College Station, TX 77843-3133 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Geological Development of Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Panama that geologists see today is a young ... /early Tertiary time. The geological development of Panama is a consequence of the relative motions ... igneous rocks that comprise much of present-day Panama f...

Russell S.Harmon

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Geologic mapping of the air intake shaft at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The air intake shaft (AS) was geologically mapped from the surface to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility horizon. The entire shaft section including the Mescalero Caliche, Gatuna Formation, Santa Rosa Formation, Dewey Lake Redbeds, Rustler Formation, and Salado Formation was geologically described. The air intake shaft (AS) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site was constructed to provide a pathway for fresh air into the underground repository and maintain the desired pressure balances for proper underground ventilation. It was up-reamed to minimize construction-related damage to the wall rock. The upper portion of the shaft was lined with slip-formed concrete, while the lower part of the shaft, from approximately 903 ft below top of concrete at the surface, was unlined. As part of WIPP site characterization activities, the AS was geologically mapped. The shaft construction method, up-reaming, created a nearly ideal surface for geologic description. Small-scale textures usually best seen on slabbed core were easily distinguished on the shaft wall, while larger scale textures not generally revealed in core were well displayed. During the mapping, newly recognized textures were interpreted in order to refine depositional and post-depositional models of the units mapped. The objectives of the geologic mapping were to: (1) provide confirmation and documentation of strata overlying the WIPP facility horizon; (2) provide detailed information of the geologic conditions in strata critical to repository sealing and operations; (3) provide technical basis for field adjustments and modification of key and aquifer seal design, based upon the observed geology; (4) provide geological data for the selection of instrument borehole locations; (5) and characterize the geology at geomechanical instrument locations to assist in data interpretation. 40 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

Holt, R.M.; Powers, D.W. (IT Corporation (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Discovery, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Discovery, Humboldt County, Nevada Abstract Triassic argillite and sandstone of the Grass Valley Formation and phyllitic mudstone of the overlying Raspberry Formation, also of Triassic age, host a blind geothermal system under exploration by Blue Mountain Power Company Inc. with assistance from the Energy & Geoscience Institute. Geologically young, steeply dipping, open fault sets, striking N50-60°E,N50-60°W, and N-S intersect in the geothermal zone providing deep permeability over a wide area. Extensive silicification andhydro

178

Geologic flow characterization using tracer techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new tracer flow-test system has been developed for in situ characterization of geologic formations. This report describes two sets of test equipment: one portable and one for testing in deep formations. Equations are derived for in situ detector calibration, raw data reduction, and flow logging. Data analysis techniques are presented for computing porosity and permeability in unconfined isotropic media, and porosity, permeability and fracture characteristics in media with confined or unconfined two-dimensional flow. The effects of tracer pulse spreading due to divergence, dispersion, and porous formations are also included.

Klett, R. D.; Tyner, C. E.; Hertel, Jr., E. S.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

EIDR :: Experimental Information and Data Repository  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EIDR :: Experimental Information and Data Repository EIDR :: Experimental Information and Data Repository QUICK LINKS: About EIDR | EIDR FAQS | VIEW gene expression data | VIEW phenotype microarray data > Browse data by ... mouse over the below to display the menus experimental condition organism organism, experimental condition organism, type of laboratory analyses type of laboratory analyses Status of data import 2007-02-10 EIDR Overview EIDR is an information database for the ESPP project. It contains information about data generated by project participants, as well as links to data stored either in Biofiles or in the Experimental Data Repository. EIDR references data files that have been uploaded to LBNL using Biofiles, custom Web interfaces, or ftp. Information about the data includes design information about biomass production experiments, information about the lab analyses that generated the data, and links to more detailed information, displays, or analyses. You can browse for data using the menus in the Browse data by ... table to the left.

180

New Yucca Mountain Repository Design to be Simpler, Safer and...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

New Yucca Mountain Repository Design to be Simpler, Safer and More Cost-Effective New Yucca Mountain Repository Design to be Simpler, Safer and More Cost-Effective untitled More...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geologic repository" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Semi-analytical Solution for Multiphase Fluid Flow Applied to CO 2 Sequestration in Geologic Porous Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The increasing concentration of CO_(2) has been linked to global warming and changes in climate. Geologic sequestration of CO_(2) in deep saline aquifers is a proposed greenhouse gas mitigation technology with potential to significantly reduce...

Mohamed, Ahmed Mohamed Anwar Sayed

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Stress-corrosion-cracking studies on candidate container alloys for the Tuff Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cortest Columbus Technologies, Inc. (CC Technologies) investigated the long-term performance of container materials used for high-level waste package as part of the information needed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assess the Department of Energy`s application to construct to geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. At the direction of the NRC, the program focused on the Tuff Repository. This report summarizes the results of Stress-Corrosion-Cracking (SCC) studies performed in Tasks 3, 5, and 7 of the program. Two test techniques were used; U-bend exposures and Slow-Strain-Rate (SSR) tests. The testing was performed on two copper-base alloys (Alloy CDA 102 and Alloy CDA 175) and two Fe-Cr-Ni alloys (Alloy 304L and Alloy 825) in simulated J-13 groundwater and other simulated solutions for the Tuff Repository. These solutions were designed to simulate the effects of concentration and irradiation on the groundwater composition. All SCC testing on the Fe-Cr-Ni Alloys was performed on solution-annealed specimens and thus issues such as the effect of sensitization on SCC were not addressed.

Beavers, J.A.; Durr, C.L. [Cortest Columbus Technologies, Inc., OH (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

The Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain is being characterized for the development of a high-level nuclear waste repository. The repository is planned to be located in the unsaturated zone in fractured, welded tuff. Sealing of the repository is one element of the Yucca Mountain Project. This paper presents a description of the current sealing design options, design requirements, and the design constraints. Design options for the shafts include anchor-to-bedrock seals, shaft fill, and settlement plugs; in the underground facility, they include drift seals, drainage channels, sumps, and bulkheads. Design requirements are those quantitative requirements imposed on the sealing design options to achieve a desired level of performance. For example, a design requirement could be a restriction on the hydraulic conductivity of a design option. Constraints are restrictions placed on the repository design by the sealing design. An example of a constraint could be establishing the drainage pattern to direct flow from emplacement drifts to nonemplacement drifts. As (1) additional hydrogeologic data are obtained through site characterization, (2) approaches to allocating performance to various subsystems within the Yucca Mountain Project are refined, and (3) the exploratory shafts and the associated testing results are developed, the design requirements and constraints may be modified and used in developing the License Application Design.

Fernandez, J.A.; Hinkebein, T.E

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Nuclear Waste Repository Plan Approved by Senate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bill calls for selection of permanent repository site by 1989, building of a retrievable waste facility, cash payments states with storage sites ... After considerable debate, the Senate has approved a plan aimed at getting the federal government's effort to find a long-term storage site for spent nuclear fuel and highlevel nuclear wastes off dead center and out of the political crossfire. ...

JANICE LONG

1987-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

185

Nuclear fuel corrosion over millennia interpreted using geologic data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrosion of nuclear fuel over the 10,000 year regulatory period in a geologic repository will be a function of physical characteristics (e.g., crystallinity, crystal sizes, crystal forms) and chemical characteristics (e.g., crystal composition, compositional variability, accessory phases). Natural uraninite (nominally UO{sub 2+x}) which has undergone long-term corrosion can be studied to infer the long-term behavior of nuclear fuel. Previously, uraninite from the Nopal I deposit, Pena Blanca district, Chihuahua, Mexico, has been shown to constitute an outstanding analog material for comparison with nuclear fuel. Similarities between Nopal I uraninite and nuclear fuel have been shown to include bulk composition, general crystal structure, and total trace element content. Data presented here suggest that, as a bulk material, Nopal I uraninite compares favorably with irradiated nuclear fuel. Nevertheless, some fine-scale differences are noted between Nopal I uraninite and irradiated nuclear fuel with respect to both internal structures and compositions. These observations suggest that whereas the long-term responses of the two materials to oxidative alteration in a geologic repository may be similar, the detailed mechanisms of initial oxidant penetration and the short-term oxidative alternation of Nopal I uraninite and irradiated nuclear fuel are likely to be different.

Pearcy, E.C.; Manaktala, H.K. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Application Of Electrical Resistivity And Gravimetry In Deep Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resistivity And Gravimetry In Deep Geothermal Resistivity And Gravimetry In Deep Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Application Of Electrical Resistivity And Gravimetry In Deep Geothermal Exploration Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The electrical resistivity method has been proven applicable to geothermal exploration because of the direct relationship between fluid and rock temperatures on the one hand electrical conductivity on the other. The problem of exploitation of a surface technique, such as resistivity, to the determination of geothermal gradients or 'hot spots' is complicated by the other geological parameters which affect resistivity: porosity, fluid salinity, cementation factor and clay content. However, by rational

187

The Challenge of Producing Oil and Gas in Deep Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...institutions (Joides). The oil industry has drilled controlled...major unexplored frontier for oil and gas. The paper emphasizes...engineering geology natural gas offshore petroleum production 1977 06...1981 The challenge of producing oil and gas in deep water van Eek...

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Making the Postclosure Safety Case for the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), in its advisory standard for geological repositories promulgated jointly with the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, explicitly distinguishes between the concepts of a safety case and a safety assessment. As defined in the advisory standard, the safety case is a broader set of arguments that provide confidence and substantiate the formal analyses of system safety made through the process of safety assessment. Although the IAEAYs definitions include both preclosure (i.e., operational) safety and post-closure performance in the overall safety assessment and safety case, the emphasis in here is on long-term performance after waste has been emplaced and the repository has been closed. This distinction between pre- and postclosure aspects of the repository is consistent with the U.S. regulatory framework defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (Chapter 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 197, or 40 CFR 197) [2] and implemented by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (Chapter 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 63, or 10 CFR 63) [3]. The separation of the pre- and postclosure safety cases is also consistent with the way in which the U.S. Department of Energy has assigned responsibilities for developing the safety case. Bechtel SAIC Company is the Management and Operating contractor responsible for the design and operation of the Yucca Mountain facility and is therefore responsible for the preparation of the preclosure aspects of the safety case. Sandia National Laboratories has lead responsibility for scientific work evaluating post-closure performance, and therefore is responsible for developing the post-closure aspects of the safety case. In the context of the IAEA definitions, both preclosure and postclosure safety, including safety assessment and the safety case, will be documented in the license application being prepared for the proposed Yucca Mountain repository, and in the documents that support that license application.

P. Swift; A.V. Luik

2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

189

Potentiodynamic polarization studies on candidate container alloys for the Tuff Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cortest Columbus Technologies, Inc. (CC Technologies) is investigating the long-term performance of container materials used for high-level radioactive waste packages. This information is being developed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to aid in their assessment of the Department of Energy`s application to construct a geologic repository for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. This report summarizes the results of cyclic-potentiodynamic-polarization (CCP) studies performed on candidate container materials for the Tuff Repository. The CPP technique was used to provide an understanding of how specific variables such as environmental composition, temperature, alloy composition, and welding affect both the general- and localized-corrosion behavior of two copper-base and two Fe-Cr-Ni alloys in simulated repository environments. A statistically-designed test solution matrix was formulated, based on an extensive search of the literature, to evaluate the possible range of environmental species that may occur in the repository over the life of the canister. Forty-two CPP curves were performed with each alloy and the results indicated that several different types of corrosion were possible. The copper-base alloys exhibited unusual CCP behavior in that hysteresis was not always associated with pitting. The effects of temperature on the corrosions behavior were evaluated in two types of tests; isothermal tests at temperatures from 50{degrees}C to 90{degrees}C and heat-transfer tests where the solution was maintained at 50{degrees}C and the specimen was internally heated to 90{degrees}C. In the isothermal test, CPP curves were obtained with each alloy in simulated environments at 50{degrees}C, 75{degrees}C, and 90{degrees}C. The results of these CCP experiments indicated that no systematic trends were evident for the environments tested. Lastly, the effects of welding on the corrosion behavior of the alloys in simulated environments were examined.

Thompson, N.G.; Beavers, J.A.; Durr, C.L. [Cortest Columbus Technologies, OH (United States)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. As part of this development, an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the YM repository was completed in 2008 [1] and supported a license application by the DOE to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the construction of the YM repository [2]. This presentation provides an overview of the conceptual and computational structure of the indicated PA (hereafter referred to as the 2008 YM PA) and the roles that uncertainty analysis and sensitivity analysis play in this structure.

Helton, Jon Craig; Sallaberry, Cedric M.; Hansen, Clifford W.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

GEOLOGY, November 2008 871 INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOLOGY, November 2008 871 INTRODUCTION A number of geodetic and morphotectonic techniques. 2). Geology, November 2008; v. 36; no. 11; p. 871­874; doi: 10.1130/G25073A.1; 3 figures; Data

Avouac, Jean-Philippe

192

Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologice Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mounta  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

v v COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada - Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor (DOE/EIS-0250F-S2D; the Nevada Rail Corridor SEIS), and Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a Rail Alignment for the Construction and Operation of a Railroad in Nevada to a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada (DOE/EIS-0369D; the Rail Alignment EIS) CONTACTS: For more information about this document, write or call: For general information on the DOE NEPA process, write or call: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management

193

Deep Web video  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

To make the web work better for science, OSTI has developed state-of-the-art technologies and services including a deep web search capability. The deep web includes content in searchable databases available to web users but not accessible by popular search engines, such as Google. This video provides an introduction to the deep web search engine.

None Available

2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

194

Deep Web video  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To make the web work better for science, OSTI has developed state-of-the-art technologies and services including a deep web search capability. The deep web includes content in searchable databases available to web users but not accessible by popular search engines, such as Google. This video provides an introduction to the deep web search engine.

None Available

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Geology and geohydrology of the Palo Duro Basin, Texas Panhandle. Report on the progress of nuclear waste isolation feasibility studies, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since early 1977, the Bureau of Economic Geology has been evaluating several salt-bearing basins within the State of Texas as part of the national nuclear repository program. The Bureau, a research unit of The University of Texas at Austin and the State of Texas, is carrying out a long-term program to gather and interpret all geologic and hydrologic information necessary for description, delineation, and evaluation of salt-bearing strata in the Palo Duro and Dalhart Basins of the Texas Panhandle. The program in FY 79 has been subdivided into four broad research tasks, which are addressed by a basin analysis group, a surface studies group, a geohydrology group, and a host-rock analysis group. The basin analysis group has delineated the structural and stratigraphic framework of the basins, initiated natural resource assessment, and integrated data from 8000 ft (2400 m) of core material into salt-stratigraphy models. Salt depth and thickness have been delineated for seven salt-bearing stratigraphic units. Concurrently, the surface studies group has collected ground and remotely sensed data to describe surficial processes, including salt solution, slope retreat/erosion mechanisms, geomorphic evolution, and fracture system development. The basin geohydrology group has begun evaluating both shallow and deep fluid circulation within the basins. The newly formed host-rock analysis group has initiated study of cores from two drilling sites for analysis of salt and the various lithologies overlying and interbedded with salt units. This paper, a summary report of progress in FY 79, presents principal conclusions and reviews methods used and types of data and maps generated.

Gustavson, T.C.; Presley, M.W.; Handford, C.R.; Finley, R.J.; Dutton, S.P.; Baumgardner, R.W. Jr.; McGillis, K.A.; Simpkins, W.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Death Valley Lower Carbonate Aquifer Monitoring Program Wells Down gradient of the Proposed Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inyo County has participated in oversight activities associated with the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository since 1987. The overall goal of these studies are the evaluation of far-field issues related to potential transport, by ground water, or radionuclides into Inyo County, including Death Valley, and the evaluation of a connection between the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) and the biosphere. Our oversight and completed Cooperative Agreement research, and a number of other investigators research indicate that there is groundwater flow between the alluvial and carbonate aquifers both at Yucca Mountain and in Inyo County. In addition to the potential of radionuclide transport through the LCA, Czarnecki (1997), with the US Geological Survey, research indicate potential radionuclide transport through the shallower Tertiary-age aquifer materials with ultimate discharge into the Franklin Lake Playa in Inyo County. The specific purpose of this Cooperative Agreement drilling program was to acquire geological, subsurface geology, and hydrologic data to: (1) establish the existence of inter-basin flow between the Amargosa Basin and Death Valley Basin; (2) characterize groundwater flow paths in the LCA through Southern Funeral Mountain Range, and (3) Evaluation the hydraulic connection between the Yucca Mountain repository and the major springs in Death Valley through the LCA.

Inyo County

2006-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

197

Deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary evaluation of deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel indicates the potential for excellent long-term safety performance at costs competitive with mined repositories. Significant fluid flow through basement rock is prevented, in part, by low permeabilities, poorly connected transport pathways, and overburden self-sealing. Deep fluids also resist vertical movement because they are density stratified. Thermal hydrologic calculations estimate the thermal pulse from emplaced waste to be small (less than 20 C at 10 meters from the borehole, for less than a few hundred years), and to result in maximum total vertical fluid movement of {approx}100 m. Reducing conditions will sharply limit solubilities of most dose-critical radionuclides at depth, and high ionic strengths of deep fluids will prevent colloidal transport. For the bounding analysis of this report, waste is envisioned to be emplaced as fuel assemblies stacked inside drill casing that are lowered, and emplaced using off-the-shelf oilfield and geothermal drilling techniques, into the lower 1-2 km portion of a vertical borehole {approx}45 cm in diameter and 3-5 km deep, followed by borehole sealing. Deep borehole disposal of radioactive waste in the United States would require modifications to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act and to applicable regulatory standards for long-term performance set by the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR part 191) and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (10 CFR part 60). The performance analysis described here is based on the assumption that long-term standards for deep borehole disposal would be identical in the key regards to those prescribed for existing repositories (40 CFR part 197 and 10 CFR part 63).

Stein, Joshua S.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Brady, Patrick Vane; Swift, Peter N.; Rechard, Robert Paul; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; Bauer, Stephen J.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Enhanced CO2 Storage and Sequestration in Deep Saline Aquifers by Nanoparticles: Commingled Disposal of Depleted Uranium and CO2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Geological storage of anthropogenic CO2 emissions in deep saline aquifers has recently received tremendous attention in the scientific literature. Injected buoyant CO2 accumulates at the top part of the aquifer u...

Farzam Javadpour; Jean-Philippe Nicot

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Might underground waste repositories blow up?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some writers have presented possible scenarios in which a subcritical underground deposit of plutonium or other fissile material might be changed into a critical configuration. The underground criticalities that occurred in Gabon some 1.7 billion years ago in deposits of natural uranium is cited. Other scientists assert that it is virtually impossible that such a configuration could develop in an underground repository. The author presents the pros and cons of these views. 5 refs.

Hippel, F. von [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Benchmark problems for repository siting models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes benchmark problems to test computer codes used in siting nuclear waste repositories. Analytical solutions, field problems, and hypothetical problems are included. Problems are included for the following types of codes: ground-water flow in saturated porous media, heat transport in saturated media, ground-water flow in saturated fractured media, heat and solute transport in saturated porous media, solute transport in saturated porous media, solute transport in saturated fractured media, and solute transport in unsaturated porous media.

Ross, B.; Mercer, J.W.; Thomas, S.D.; Lester, B.H.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geologic repository" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Hydrological/Geological Studies  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.\ .8.2 .\ .8.2 Hydrological/Geological Studies Book 1. Radiochemical Analyses of Water Samples from SelectedT" Streams Wells, Springs and Precipitation Collected During Re-Entry Drilling, Project Rulison-7, 197 1 HGS 8 This page intentionally left blank . . . ... . . . . . . . . , : . . . . . . . . . ' . r - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . ..... . - x ..:; . , ' , . . ' . . . . . . !' r:.::. _. . : _ . . : . . . . \ . . ' - \ , : , . . . . . . . . . . . . . il.'; , . . y,.:.: . . . . . . . . ., ' . . ' . , . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . ... . . . . . : . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .,. . . . . . . . .. 2 . . . . . . . . . . . ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . , .- , . : , . , . . . . ......... ... ) . . i - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prepared. Under . . . ~ ~ r e e m e n t - No. AT(29-2) -474 for the ~ e v a d a - - Operations Office U. S .. Atomic. ,Energy Commi~ssion

202

The shallow geologic features of the upper continental slope, northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

System. Navigation. Seismic Data Interpretation. Bathymetry. Identification of Geological Features. . Drilling and Coring Surveys. Isopach Maps anci Sedil. lent Velociiy OBSERVATIONS. Hath metrv 10 13 13 13 15 20 20 Physiograohic...). The geologic structures seen in the upper 300 m (1000 ft) of sediment are mainly a result of the large influx of terrigenous sediments and deep seated salt tectonism. Drilling and seismic stratigraphy have confirmed that numerous topographic highs...

Buck, Arvo Viktor

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

203

Containment of uranium in the proposed Egyptian geologic repository for radioactive waste using hydroxyapatite.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, the Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority is designing a shallow-land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste. To insure containment and prevent migration of radionuclides from the site, the use of a reactive backfill material is being considered. One material under consideration is hydroxyapatite, Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}, which has a high affinity for the sorption of many radionuclides. Hydroxyapatite has many properties that make it an ideal material for use as a backfill including low water solubility (K{sub sp}>10{sup -40}), high stability under reducing and oxidizing conditions over a wide temperature range, availability, and low cost. However, there is often considerable variation in the properties of apatites depending on source and method of preparation. In this work, we characterized and compared a synthetic hydroxyapatite with hydroxyapatites prepared from cattle bone calcined at 500 C, 700 C, 900 C and 1100 C. The analysis indicated the synthetic hydroxyapatite was similar in morphology to 500 C prepared cattle hydroxyapatite. With increasing calcination temperature the crystallinity and crystal size of the hydroxyapatites increased and the BET surface area and carbonate concentration decreased. Batch sorption experiments were performed to determine the effectiveness of each material to sorb uranium. Sorption of U was strong regardless of apatite type indicating all apatite materials evaluated. Sixty day desorption experiments indicated desorption of uranium for each hydroxyapatite was negligible.

Moore, Robert Charles; Hasan, Ahmed Ali Mohamed; Headley, Thomas Jeffrey; Sanchez, Charles Anthony (University of Arizona, Yuma, AZ); Zhao, Hongting; Salas, Fred Manuel; Hasan, Mahmoud A. (Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, Egypt); Holt, Kathleen Caroline

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Strategic Basis for License Application Planning for a Potential Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If Yucca Mountain, Nevada is designated as the site for development of a geologic repository for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, the Department of Energy (DOE) must obtain Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval first for repository construction, then for an operating license, and, eventually, for repository closure and decommissioning. The licensing criteria defined in Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 63 (10 CFR Part 63) establish the basis for these NRC decisions. Submittal of a license application (LA) to the NRC for authorization to construct a repository at the Yucca Mountain site is, at this point, only a potential future action by the DOE. The policy process defined in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), as amended, for recommendation and designation of Yucca Mountain as a repository site makes it difficult to predict whether or when the site might be designated. The DOE may only submit a LA to the NRC if the site designation takes effect. In spite of this uncertainty, the DOE must take prudent and appropriate action now, and over the next several years, to prepare for development and timely submittal of a LA. This is particularly true given the need for the DOE to develop, load, and certify the operation of its electronic information system to provide access to its relevant records as part of the licensing support network (LSN) in compliance with NRC requirements six months prior to LA submittal. The DOE must also develop a LA, which is a substantially different document from those developed to support a Site Recommendation (SR) decision. The LA must satisfy NRC licensing criteria and content requirements, and address the acceptance criteria defined by the NRC in its forthcoming Yucca Mountain Review Plan (YMRP). The content of the LA must be adequate to facilitate NRC acceptance and docketing for review, and the LA and its supporting documents must provide the documented basis for the NR C findings required for a construction authorization. The LA must also support a licensing proceeding before an Atomic Safety and Licensing Board panel prior to NRC action on any decision to authorize construction. The DOE has established a strategic basis for planning that is intended to provide the framework for development of an integrated plan for activities leading to preparation and submittal of a LA.

Newberry, C. M.; Brocoum, S. J.; Gamble, R. P.; Murray, R. C.; Cline, M.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

205

DOE Releases Report on Techniques to Ensure Safe, Effective Geologic Carbon  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Releases Report on Techniques to Ensure Safe, Effective Releases Report on Techniques to Ensure Safe, Effective Geologic Carbon Sequestration DOE Releases Report on Techniques to Ensure Safe, Effective Geologic Carbon Sequestration March 17, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has created a comprehensive new document that examines existing and emerging techniques to monitor, verify, and account for carbon dioxide (CO2) stored in geologic formations. The report, titled Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting of CO2 Stored in Deep Geologic Formations, should prove to be an invaluable tool in reducing greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere through geologic sequestration. The report was prepared by NETL with input from the seven Regional Carbon

206

Area recommendation report for the crystalline repository project: An evaluation. [Crystalline Repository Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation is given of DOE's recommendation of the Elk River complex in North Carolina for siting the second repository. Twelve recommendations are made including a strong suggestion that the Cherokee Tribe appeal both through political and legal avenues for inclusion as an affected area primarily due to projected impacts upon economy and public health as a consequence of the potential for reduced tourism.

Beck, J E; Lowe, H; Yurkovich, S P

1986-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

207

Room at the Mountain: Estimated Maximum Amounts of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel Capable of Disposal in a Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to present an initial analysis of the maximum amount of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) that could be emplaced into a geological repository at Yucca Mountain. This analysis identifies and uses programmatic, material, and geological constraints and factors that affect this estimation of maximum amount of CSNF for disposal. The conclusion of this initial analysis is that the current legislative limit on Yucca Mountain disposal capacity, 63,000 MTHM of CSNF, is a small fraction of the available physical capacity of the Yucca Mountain system assuming the current high-temperature operating mode (HTOM) design. EPRI is confident that at least four times the legislative limit for CSNF ({approx}260,000 MTHM) can be emplaced in the Yucca Mountain system. It is possible that with additional site characterization, upwards of nine times the legislative limit ({approx}570,000 MTHM) could be emplaced. (authors)

Kessler, John H. [Electric Power Research Institute - EPRI, 3420 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Kemeny, John [University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721 (United States); King, Fraser [Integrity Corrosion Consulting, Ltd., 6732 Silverview Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Ross, Alan M. [Alan M. Ross and Associates, 1061 Gray Fox Circle Pleasanton, CA 94566 (Canada); Ross, Benjamen [Disposal Safety, Inc., Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Zircaloy cladding rupture during repository storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper creep, a potential degradation mechanism of Zircaloy cladding after repository disposal of spent nuclear fuel, is investigated. The deformation and fracture map methodology is used to predict maximum allowable initial storage temperatures to achieve a 1000-yr life without rupture as a function of spent-fuel history. Maximum allowable temperatures are 340{degrees}C (613 K) for typically stresses rods (70 to 100 MPa) and 300{degrees}C (573 K) for highly stressed rods (140 to 160 MPa).

Santanam, L.; Raghavan, S.; Chin, B.A. (Auburn Univ., Materials Engineering Dept., Auburn, AL (US))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Selection of candidate canister materials for high-level nuclear waste containment in a tuff repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A repository located at Yucca Mountain at the Nevada Test Site is a potential site for permanent geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The repository can be located in a horizon in welded tuff, a volcanic rock, which is above the static water level at this site. The environmental conditions in this unsaturated zone are expected to be air and water vapor dominated for much of the containment period. Type 304L stainless steel is the reference material for fabricating canisters to contain the solid high-level wastes. Alternative stainless alloys are considered because of possible susceptibility of 304L to localized and stress forms of corrosion. For the reprocessed glass wastes, the canisters serve as the recipient for pouring the glass with the result that a sensitized microstructure may develop because of the times at elevated temperatures. Corrosion testing of the reference and alternative materials has begun in tuff-conditioned water and steam environments. 21 references, 8 figures, 8 tables.

McCright, R.D.; Weiss, H.; Juhas, M.C.; Logan, R.W.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

U.S. Department of Energy Awards a Contract to USA Repository...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

to USA Repository Services for Management and Operating Contractor Support for the Yucca Mountain Project U.S. Department of Energy Awards a Contract to USA Repository...

211

The Economic, repository and proliferation implications of advanced nuclear fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to compare the effects of recycling actinides using fast burner reactors, with recycle that would be done using inert matrix fuel burned in conventional light water reactors. In the fast reactor option, actinides from both spent light water and fast reactor fuel would be recycled. In the inert matrix fuel option, actinides from spent light water fuel would be recycled, but the spent inert matrix fuel would not be reprocessed. The comparison was done over a limited 100-year time horizon. The economic, repository and proliferation implications of these options all hinge on the composition of isotopic byproducts of power production. We took the perspective that back-end economics would be affected by the cost of spent fuel reprocessing (whether conventional uranium dioxide fuel, or fast reactor fuel), fuel manufacture, and ultimate disposal of high level waste in a Yucca Mountain like geological repository. Central to understanding these costs was determining the overall amount of reprocessing needed to implement a fast burner, or inert matrix fuel, recycle program. The total quantity of high level waste requiring geological disposal (along with its thermal output), and the cost of reprocessing were also analyzed. A major advantage of the inert matrix fuel option is that it could in principle be implemented using the existing fleet of commercial power reactors. A central finding of this project was that recycling actinides using an inert matrix fuel could achieve reductions in overall actinide production that are nearly very close to those that could be achieved by recycling the actinides using a fast burner reactor.

Mark Deinert; K.B. Cady

2011-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

212

A Framework for Describing Web Repositories Frank McCown  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, dark and grey web repos- itories; and states of recoverability (vulnerable, replicated, endangeredA Framework for Describing Web Repositories Frank McCown Department of Computer Science Harding to "lazily preserve" websites and re- construct them when they are lost. We use the term "web repositories

Nelson, Michael L.

213

Copyright 2007, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology) 0883-1351/07/0022-0577/$3.00 PALAIOS, 2007, v. 22, p. 577582  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPLICATIONS OF URANIUM ROLL FRONTS PENNILYN HIGGINS* University of Wyoming Department of GeologyCopyright 2007, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology) 0883-1351/07/0022-0577/$3.00 PALAIOS, 2007 deep structural basins containing both abundant vertebrate fossils and uranium-ore deposits in the form

Higgins, Pennilyn

214

Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear Waste Oil Shale Research in the United States Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal...

215

THE INFLUENCE OF REPOSITORY THERMAL LOAD ON MULTIPHASE FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER IN THE UNSATURATED ZONE OF YUCCA MOUNTAIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the impact of proposed repository thermal-loading on mountain-scale flow and heat transfer in the unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In this context, a model has been developed to study the coupled thermal-hydrological (TH) processes at the scale of the entire Yucca Mountain. This mountain-scale TH model implements the current geological framework and hydrogeological conceptual models, and incorporates the latest rock thermal and hydrological properties. The TH model consists of a two-dimensional north-south vertical cross section across the entire unsaturated zone model domain and uses refined meshes near and around the proposed repository block, based on the current repository design, drift layout, thermal loading scenario, and estimated current and future climatic conditions. The model simulations provide insights into thermally affected liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and elevated water and rock temperature, which in turn allow modelers to predict the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes, and drainage between drifts.

Yu-Shu Wu, Sumit Mukhopadhyay, Keni Zhang, and G. S. Bodvarsson

2006-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

216

Probabilistic risk assessment for salt repository conceptual design of subsurface facilities: A techical basis for Q-list determination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subpart G ''Quality Assurance'' of 10 CFR Part 60 requires that the US Department of Energy (DOE) apply a quality assurance program to ''all systems, structures, and components important to safety'' and to ''design and characterization of barriers important to waste isolation.'' In April 1986, DOE's Office of Geologic Repositories (OGR) issued general guidance for formulating a list of such systems, structures, and components---the Q-list. This guidance called for the use of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) techniques to identify Q-list items. In this report, PRA techniques are applied to the underground facilities and systems described in the conceptual design report for the Salt Repository Project (SRP) in Deaf Smith County, Texas. Based on probability and dose consequence calculations, no specific items were identified for the Q-list. However, evaluation of the analyses indicated that two functions are important in precluding off-site releases of radioactivity: disposal container integrity; and isolation of the underground facility by the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Items related to these functions are recommended for further evaluation as the repository design progresses. 13 refs., 20 figs.

Chen, C.P.; Mayberry, J.J.; Shepherd, J.; Koza, H.; Rahmani, H.; Sinsky, J.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

GEOLOGY, November 2008 879 INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

precipitation has been inferred in continental and marine settings under oxic conditions (Casanova et al., 1999 relation- ships between microbial cells and carbonate minerals in natural environments indicate Repository) and incubated at 25 and 35 °C. In order to detect the presence of precipitates, the plates were

Gilli, Adrian

218

Z .Chemical Geology 152 1998 227256 The thermal and cementation histories of a sandstone petroleum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Z .Chemical Geology 152 1998 227­256 The thermal and cementation histories of a sandstone petroleum-feldspars recovered at various depths from a deep well drilled through a carbonate-cemented sandstone petroleum of a sandstone petroleum xreservoir, Elk Hills, California. Part 2: In situ oxygen and carbon isotopic results

219

Continental Scientific Drilling Program thermal regimes: comparative site assessment geology of five magma-hydrothermal systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The geology and salient aspects of geophysics and hydrogeochemistry of five high-grade geothermal systems in the USA are reviewed. On the basis of this information, a target location is suggested for a deep (5- to 8-km) borehole that will maximize the amount of scientific information to be learned at each of the five geothermal areas.

Goff, F.; Waters, A.C. (eds.)

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Deep Vadose Zone Field Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD, RAP March 6, 2013 Presented by: John Morse DEEP VADOSE ZONE ACTIVITIES Page 2 Deep Vadose Zone Areas Page 3 Deep Vadose Zone Field Activities FY 2014...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geologic repository" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Chinese Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological Survey Place: China Sector: Geothermal energy Product: Chinese body which is involved in surveys of geothermal sites. References: Chinese Geological Survey1 This...

222

Repository Subsurface Preliminary Fire Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fire hazard analysis identifies preliminary design and operations features, fire, and explosion hazards, and provides a reasonable basis to establish the design requirements of fire protection systems during development and emplacement phases of the subsurface repository. This document follows the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2001c) which was prepared in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''; Attachment 4 of AP-ESH-008, ''Hazards Analysis System''; and AP-3.11Q, ''Technical Reports''. The objective of this report is to establish the requirements that provide for facility nuclear safety and a proper level of personnel safety and property protection from the effects of fire and the adverse effects of fire-extinguishing agents.

Richard C. Logan

2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

223

Repository surface design site layout analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to establish the arrangement of the Yucca Mountain Repository surface facilities and features near the North Portal. The analysis updates and expands the North Portal area site layout concept presented in the ACD, including changes to reflect the resizing of the Waste Handling Building (WHB), Waste Treatment Building (WTB), Carrier Preparation Building (CPB), and site parking areas; the addition of the Carrier Washdown Buildings (CWBs); the elimination of the Cask Maintenance Facility (CMF); and the development of a concept for site grading and flood control. The analysis also establishes the layout of the surface features (e.g., roads and utilities) that connect all the repository surface areas (North Portal Operations Area, South Portal Development Operations Area, Emplacement Shaft Surface Operations Area, and Development Shaft Surface Operations Area) and locates an area for a potential lag storage facility. Details of South Portal and shaft layouts will be covered in separate design analyses. The objective of this analysis is to provide a suitable level of design for the Viability Assessment (VA). The analysis was revised to incorporate additional material developed since the issuance of Revision 01. This material includes safeguards and security input, utility system input (size and location of fire water tanks and pump houses, potable water and sanitary sewage rates, size of wastewater evaporation pond, size and location of the utility building, size of the bulk fuel storage tank, and size and location of other exterior process equipment), main electrical substation information, redundancy of water supply and storage for the fire support system, and additional information on the storm water retention pond.

Montalvo, H.R.

1998-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

224

Deep Vadose Zone  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Mission of the Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative is to protect water resources across the DOE complex over the long-term by developing effective solutions to solve DOE’s most...

225

Remote sensing data exploiration for geologic characterization of difficult targets : Laboratory Directed Research and Development project 38703 final report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterizing the geology, geotechnical aspects, and rock properties of deep underground facility sites can enhance targeting strategies for both nuclear and conventional weapons. This report describes the results of a study to investigate the utility of remote spectral sensing for augmenting the geological and geotechnical information provided by traditional methods. The project primarily considered novel exploitation methods for space-based sensors, which allow clandestine collection of data from denied sites. The investigation focused on developing and applying novel data analysis methods to estimate geologic and geotechnical characteristics in the vicinity of deep underground facilities. Two such methods, one for measuring thermal rock properties and one for classifying rock types, were explored in detail. Several other data exploitation techniques, developed under other projects, were also examined for their potential utility in geologic characterization.

Costin, Laurence S.; Walker, Charles A.; Lappin, Allen R.; Hayat, Majeed M. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Ford, Bridget K.; Paskaleva, Biliana (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Moya, Mary M.; Mercier, Jeffrey Alan (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Stormont, John C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Jody Lynn

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Recent characterization activities of Midway Valley as a potential repository surface facility site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Midway Valley, located at the eastern base of Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada, has been identified as a possible location for the surface facilities of a potential high-level nuclear-waste repository. This structural and topographic valley is bounded by two north- trending, down-to-the-west normal faults: the Paintbrush Canyon fault on the east and the Bow Ridge fault on the west. Surface and near-surface geological data have been acquired from Midway Valley during the past three years with particular emphasis on evaluating the existence of Quaternary faults. A detailed (1:6000) surficial geological map has been prepared based on interpretation of new and existing aerial photographs, field mapping, soil pits, and trenches. No evidence was found that would indicate displacement of these surficial deposits along previously unrecognized faults. However, given the low rates of Quaternary faulting and the extensive areas that are covered by late Pleistocene to Holocene deposits south of Sever Wash, Quaternary faulting between known faults cannot be precluded based on surface evidence alone. Middle to late Pleistocene alluvial fan deposits (Unit Q3) exist at or near the surface throughout Midway Valley. Confidence is increased that the potential for surface fault rupture in Midway Valley can be assessed by excavations that expose the deposits and soils associated with Unit Q3 or older units (middle Pleistocene or earlier).

Gibson, J.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wesling, J.R.; Swan, F.H.; Bullard, T.F. [Geomatrix Consultants, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1992-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

NERSC Visualization and Analysis for Nanoscale Control of Geologic Carbon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanocontrol of CO2 Nanocontrol of CO2 Visualization and Analysis for Nanoscale Control of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Goals * Collect experimental 2D-3D imaging data in order to investigate fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interactions; * Provide algorithms for better understanding of processes governing fluid-fluid and fluid-rock systems, related to geologic sequestration of CO2; * Develop image processing methods for analyzing experimental data and comparing it to simulations; * Detect/reconstruct material interfaces, quantify contact angles, derive contact angle distribution, etc. Impact * Unveil knowledge required for developing technology to store CO2 safely in deep surface rock formations, thus reducing amount of CO2 in atmosphere; More Personnel * CRD: Wes Bethel, Dani Ushizima, Gunther Weber (SciDAC-e award)

228

Provenance and diagenesis of the Cherokee sandstones, deep Anadarko basin, Western Oklahoma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROVENANCE AND DIAGENESIS OF THE CHEROKEE SANDSTONES, DEEP ANADARKO BASIN, WESTERN OKLAHOMA A Thesis by STEPHEN DOUGLAS LEVINE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May l984 Major Subject: Geology PROVENANCE AND DIAGENESIS OF THE CHEROKEE SANDSTONES, t DEEP ANADARKO BASIN, WESTERN OKLAHOMA A Thesis by STEPHEN DOUGLAS LEVINE Approved as to style and content by: Thomas T. Tieh (Chairman...

Levine, Stephen Douglas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

229

Preliminary geology of eastern Umtanum Ridge, South-Central Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basalt stratigraphy and geologic structures of eastern Umtanum Ridge have been mapped and studied in detail to help assess the feasibility of nuclear waste terminal storage on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Eastern Umtanum Ridge is an asymmetric east-west-trending anticline of Columbia River basalt that plunges 5 degrees eastward into the Pasco Basin. Geologic mapping and determination of natural remanent magnetic polarity and chemical composition reveal that flows of the Pomona and Umatilla Members (Saddle Mountains Basalt), Priest Rapids and Frenchman Springs Members (Wanapum Basalt), and Grande Ronde Basalt were erupted as fairly uniform sheets. The Wahluke and Huntzinger flows (Saddle Mountains Basalt) fill a paleovalley cut into Wanapum Basalt. No evidence was found to indicate Quaternary-age movement on any structures in the map area. The basalt strata on the south limb of the Umtanum anticline display relatively little tectonic deformation since Miocene-Pliocene time. Thus, the buried south flank of Umtanum Ridge may provide an excellent location for a nuclear waste repository beneath the Hanford Site.

Goff, F.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Geological Characterization of California's Offshore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological Characterization of California's Offshore Carbon Dioxide Storage Capacity ENVIRONMENTAL offshore onto the continental shelf, and these offshore sections constitute additional storage capacity potential of Californias offshore subsurface environment. California offshore sedimentary basins (in green

231

NETL: Geological and Environmental Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geological & Environmental Systems Geological & Environmental Systems Onsite Research Geological and Environmental Sciences Geological and Environmental Sciences (GES) is a focus area of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's Office of Research and Development (ORD). ORD's other focus areas are Energy System Dynamics, Computational and Basic Sciences, and Materials Science and Engineering. Scientists and engineers in ORD conduct research at NETL's advanced research facilities in Morgantown, WV; Pittsburgh, PA; and Albany, OR, and at various offsite locations. GES tackles the challenge of clean energy production from fossil energy sources by focusing on the behavior of natural systems at both the earth's surface and subsurface, including prediction, control, and monitoring of fluid flow in porous and fractured media. Efforts include

232

Central American geologic map project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the Northeast Quadrant Panel meeting of the Circum-Pacific Map Project held in Mexico City, February 1985, Central American panel members proposed and adopted plans for compiling a geologic map of Central America, probably at a scale of 1:500,000. A local group with participants from each country was organized and coordinated by Rolando Castillo, director, Central American School of Geology, University of Costa Rica, for the geologic aspects, and Fernando Rudin, director, Geographic Institute of Costa Rica, for the topographic base. In 1956, the US Geological Survey published a geologic map of the region at a scale of 1:1 million. Subsequent topographic and geologic mapping projects have provided a large amount of new data. The entire area is now covered by topographic maps at a scale of 1:50,000, and these maps have been used in several countries as a base for geologic mapping. Another regional map, the Metallogenic Map of Central America (scale = 1:2 million), was published in 1969 by the Central American Research Institute for Industry (ICAITI) with a generalized but updated geologic base map. Between 1969 and 1980, maps for each country were published by local institutions: Guatemala-Belize at 1:500,000, Honduras at 1:500,000, El Salvador at 1:100,000, Nicaragua at 1:1 million, Costa Rica at 1:200,000, and Panama at 1:1 million. This information, in addition to that of newly mapped areas, served as the base for the Central American part of the Geologic-Tectonic Map of the Caribbean Region (scale = 1:2.5 million), published by the US Geological Survey in 1980, and also fro the Northeast Quadrant Maps of the Circum-Pacific Region. The new project also involves bathymetric and geologic mapping of the Pacific and Caribbean margins of the Central American Isthmus. A substantial amount of new information of the Middle America Trench has been acquired through DSDP Legs 67 and 84.

Dengo, G.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Assessment of compliance with ground water protection standards in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In support of this development and an associated license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the DOE completed an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository in 2008. This presentation describes the assessment of compliance with ground water protection standards in the 2008 YM PA. The following topics are addressed: (i) regulatory background, (ii) analysis structure including characterization of uncertainty, and (iii) analysis results for each of the ground water protection standards. The present article is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA; additional articles in the issue describe other aspects of the 2008 YM PA.

C.W. Hansen; G.A. Behie; K.M. Brooks; Y. Chen; J.C. Helton; S.P. Hommel; K.P. Lee; B. Lester; P.D. Mattie; S. Mehta; S.P. Miller; C.J. Sallaberry; S.D. Sevougian; M. Wasiolek

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Adding OAI-ORE Support to Repository Platforms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to DSpace considerably simplifies the task of maintaining TDL?s federated ETD colection. However, the aplications of this project extend beyond its initial use case. The ability to easily harvest content from one repository to another provides...

Maslov, Alexey; Mikeal, Adam; Phillips, Scott; Leggett, John; McFarland, Mark

2009-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

235

A Repository for Beyond-the-Standard-Model Tools  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To aid phenomenological studies of Beyond-the-Standard-Model (BSM) physics scenarios, a web repository for BSM calculational tools has been created. We here present brief overviews of the relevant codes, ordered by topic as well as by alphabet.

Skands, P.; /Fermilab; Richardson, P.; Allanach, B.C.; Baer, H.; Belanger, G.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellwanger, U.; Freitas, A.; Ghodbane, N.; Goujdami, D.; Hahn, T.; Heinemeyer,; Kneur, J.-L.; Landsberg, G.; Lee, J.S.; Muhlleitner, M.; Ohl, T.; Perez, E.; Peskin, M.; Pilaftsis, A.; Plehn, T.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Drift Natural Convection and Seepage at the Yucca Mountain Repository  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 A Simulation Code for Yucca Mountain Transport Processes:List of Figures Yucca Mountain location, southwest1 Introduction 1.1 Yucca Mountain Repository . . . . 1.1.1

Halecky, Nicholaus Eugene

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Waste package/repository impact study: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Package/Repository Impact Study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using the current reference salt waste package in the salt repository conceptual design. All elements of the repository that may impact waste package parameters, i.e., (size, weight, heat load) were evaluated. The repository elements considered included waste hoist feasibility, transporter and emplacement machine feasibility, subsurface entry dimensions, feasibility of emplacement configuration, and temperature limits. The evaluations are discussed in detail with supplemental technical data included in Appendices to this report, as appropriate. Results and conclusions of the evaluations are discussed in light of the acceptability of the current reference waste package as the basis for salt conceptual design. Finally, recommendations are made relative to the salt project position on the application of the reference waste package as a basis for future design activities. 31 refs., 11 figs., 11 tabs.

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Automated Validation of Trusted Digital Repository Assessment Criteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The RLG/NARA trusted digital repository (TDR) certification checklist defines a set of assessment criteria for preservation environments. The criteria can be mapped into data management policies that define how a digital ...

Smith, MacKenzie

239

Fracture characteristics and their relationships to producing zones in deep  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Fracture characteristics and their relationships to producing zones in deep wells, Raft River geothermal area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Fracture characteristics and their relationships to producing zones in deep wells, Raft River geothermal area Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fracture characteristics in the sedimentary and metamorphic rocks in the Raft River KGRA of Idaho are analyzed using geological, hydrological and borehole geophysical data from five deep geothermal production wells. Particular emphasis is placed on fracture identification using borehole

240

Decision analysis methodology applied to deep base communications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deep underground basing of an ICBM facility improves its survivability. The deep basing concept relies on the thick rock overburden to provide it with an ''earth shield'' to absorb any Soviet nuclear attack. However, this basing scheme complicates the problem of how communication is maintained between the deep base facility and higher authority in a post-attack environment. This report addresses the identification of what communication links between the underground facility and the surface will be operational in a post-attack environment and will meet the communication requirements of the ICBM deep base. This problem is difficult and complex because of the inability of conventional communications systems to survive and the lack of information about newer systems designed for survival. In addition, there are significant uncertainties concerning nuclear weapons effects, shock propagation, and the influence of geological parameters. There are numerous communication options for the deep base. In general, these options can be characterized by three general types: proliferated, hardened surface antennas; through-the-earth communications; and reconstituted communications, of which the rapid bore-out option is a specific case. Many of the potential options are costly and incorporate many new and untested technologies. The identification of the preferred option or combination of options is an important step in the deep basing communication system design and could affect overall facility design in terms of basing location, geometry, support systems, and cost. 35 refs., 21 figs., 7 tabs.

Latorre, V.R.; Harben, P.E.; Strait, R.S.; Didwall, E.M.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geologic repository" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Improving Repository Performance by Using a Fill  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a Fill a Fill Improving Repository Performance by Using a Fill The use of fills, semi-independent of the specific fill material, can improve package performance. The first barrier to prevent releases from the spent nuclear fuel is the waste package itself. The longer the waste package remains intact, the lower the ultimate releases from the spent nuclear fuel. In a typical waste package over half of the interior space is empty space. There are coolant channels in the spent fuel and square fuel assemblies can not fully fill a round waste package. After the package is buried, it will begin to corrode and the walls will thin. Rock falls may cause early failure of the waste package. However, if the package is full, it is more difficult to crush a full package and fail the exterior wall. The behavior of a waste package over time is similar to a soda can. Empty cans are easy to crush. Full, sealed cans are difficult to crush because the fluid inside supports the can.

242

REPOSITORY SURFACE FACILITIES PRIMARY SYSTEM CRANE DATA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this calculation is to compile crane design data for the mechanical primary structures, systems, and components (SSCs) required for the repository Waste Handling Building (WHB) and Carrier Preparation Building (CPB). The work presented in this document has been prepared in accordance with Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management approved program document AP-3.12Q, Calculations. This calculation has been developed to supplement information previously prepared using the development plan for ''WHB/WTB Space Program Analysis for Site Recommendation'' (Reference 5), which concentrates on the primary, primary support, facility support, and miscellaneous building support areas located in the WHB and Waste Treatment Building (WTB). The development plan was completed in accordance with AP-2.13Q, ''Technical Product Development Planning''. The work in this calculation is a continuance of the work described in the previous development plan; therefore, in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities'', a new Technical Work Plan is not required.

K. Schwartztrauber

2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

243

A Short History of Engineering Geology and Geophysics at the British Geological Survey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Engineering geology in the British Geological Survey (BGS) began, in a formal sense, with the creation of the Engineering Geology Unit in 1967. Virtually since its inception, despite changing research prioriti...

M. G. Culshaw; K. J. Northmore; D. M. McCann

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Federal Control of Geological Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States has economically recoverable coal reserves of about 261 billion tons, which is in excess of a 250-­?year supply based on 2009 consumption rates. However, in the near future the use of coal may be legally restricted because of concerns over the effects of its combustion on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy is making significant efforts to help develop and implement a commercial scale program of geologic carbon sequestration that involves capturing and storing carbon dioxide emitted from coal-­?burning electric power plants in deep underground formations. This article explores the technical and legal problems that must be resolved in order to have a viable carbon sequestration program. It covers the responsibilities of the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the Departments of Energy, Transportation and Interior. It discusses the use of the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Air Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, and other applicable federal laws. Finally, it discusses the provisions related to carbon sequestration that have been included in the major bills dealing with climate change that Congress has been considering in 2009 and 2010. The article concludes that the many legal issues that exist can be resolved, but whether carbon sequestration becomes a commercial reality will depend on reducing its costs or by imposing legal requirements on fossil-­?fired power plants that result in the costs of carbon emissions increasing to the point that carbon sequestration becomes a feasible option.

Reitze, Arnold

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

245

Characteristics of potential repository wastes. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document, and its associated appendices and microcomputer (PC) data bases, constitutes the reference OCRWM data base of physical and radiological characteristics data of radioactive wastes. This Characteristics Data Base (CDB) system includes data on spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste (HLW), which clearly require geologic disposal, and other wastes which may require long-term isolation, such as sealed radioisotope sources. The data base system was developed for OCRWM by the CDB Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Various principal or official sources of these data provided primary information to the CDB Project which then used the ORIGEN2 computer code to calculate radiological properties. The data have been qualified by an OCRWM-sponsored peer review as suitable for quality-affecting work meeting the requirements of OCRWM`s Quality Assurance Program. The wastes characterized in this report include: light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel and immobilized HLW.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

The Geologic and Hydrogeologic Setting of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a mined repository constructed by the US Department of Energy for the permanent disposal of transuranic wastes generated since 1970 by activities related to national defense. The WIPP is located 42 km east of Carlsbad, New Mexico, in bedded salt (primarily halite) of the Late Permian (approximately 255 million years old) Salado Formation 655 m below the land surface. Characterization of the site began in the mid-1970s. Construction of the underground disposal facilities began in the early 1980s, and the facility received final certification from the US Environmental Protection Agency in May 1998. Disposal operations are planned to begin following receipt of a final permit from the State of New Mexico and resolution of legal issues. Like other proposed geologic repositories for radioactive waste, the WIPP relies on a combination of engineered and natural barriers to isolate the waste from the biosphere. Engineered barriers at the WIPP, including the seals that will be emplaced in the access shafts when the facility is decommissioned, are discussed in the context of facility design elsewhere in this volume. Physical properties of the natural barriers that contribute to the isolation of radionuclides are discussed here in the context of the physiographic, geologic, and hydrogeologic setting of the site.

Swift, P.N.; Corbet, T.F.

1999-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

247

Supplemental Performance Analyses for the Potential High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering the possible recommendation of a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the potential development of a geologic repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. To facilitate public review and comment, in May 2001 the DOE released the Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report (S&ER) (1), which presents technical information supporting the consideration of the possible site recommendation. The report summarizes the results of more than 20 years of scientific and engineering studies. Based on internal reviews of the S&ER and its key supporting references, the Total System Performance Assessment for the Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) (2) and the Analysis Model Reports and Process Model Reports cited therein, the DOE has recently identified and performed several types of analyses to supplement the treatment of uncertainty in support of the consideration of a possible site recommendation. The results of these new analyses are summarized in the two-volume report entitled FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analysis (SSPA) (3,4). The information in this report is intended to supplement, not supplant, the information contained in the S&ER. The DOE recognizes that important uncertainties will always remain in any assessment of the performance of a potential repository over thousands of years (1). One part of the DOE approach to recognizing and managing these uncertainties is a commitment to continued testing and analysis and to the continued evaluation of the technical basis supporting the possible recommendation of the site, such as the analysis contained in the SSPA. The goals of the work described here are to provide insights into the implications of newly quantified uncertainties, updated science, and evaluations of lower operating temperatures on the performance of a potential Yucca Mountain repository and to increase confidence in the results of the TSPA described in the S&ER (1). The primary tool used to evaluate the implications of the three types of supplemental information described in the SSPA (3,4) is the Yucca Mountain integrated TSPA model.

Sevougian, S. D.; McNeish, J. A.; Coppersmith, K.; Jenni, K. E.; Rickertsen, L. D.; Swift, P. N.; Wilson, M. L.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

248

Proceedings of the scientific visit on crystalline rock repository development.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A scientific visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development was held in the Czech Republic on September 24-27, 2012. The visit was hosted by the Czech Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA), co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of the visit was to promote technical information exchange between participants from countries engaged in the investigation and exploration of crystalline rock for the eventual construction of nuclear waste repositories. The visit was designed especially for participants of countries that have recently commenced (or recommenced) national repository programmes in crystalline host rock formations. Discussion topics included repository programme development, site screening and selection, site characterization, disposal concepts in crystalline host rock, regulatory frameworks, and safety assessment methodology. Interest was surveyed in establishing a %E2%80%9Cclub,%E2%80%9D the mission of which would be to identify and address the various technical challenges that confront the disposal of radioactive waste in crystalline rock environments. The idea of a second scientific visit to be held one year later in another host country received popular support. The visit concluded with a trip to the countryside south of Prague where participants were treated to a tour of the laboratory and underground facilities of the Josef Regional Underground Research Centre.

Mariner, Paul E.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Miksova, Jitka [RAWRA, Czech Republic

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Transportation analysis for the concept of regional repositories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past several years, planning associated with the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program assumed the use of one or two large, centrally located repository facilities. Recently, an alternative approach has been proposed which consists of the use of multiple, smaller regional repositories. In this report, several regional concepts were studied and the transportation requirements for the shipment of spent fuel to the regional repositories were estimated. In general, the transportation requirements decrease as the number of repositories increase. However, as far as transportation is concerned, the point of diminishing returns is reached at approximately one repository in each of three to four regions. Additional savings beyond this point are small. A series of sensitivity studies is also included to demonstrate the impact on the total transportation requirements of varying cask capacity, rail speed, or truck speed. Since most of the projected fuel shipments are to be made by rail, varying the capacity of the rail cask or varying average rail transport speed will have a major effect on overall transportation requirements.

Joy, D.S.; Hudson, B.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Deep Energy Retrofits & State Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), provides information on Deep Energy Retrofits & State Applications

251

Carbon dioxide capture and geological storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Blundell and Fraser Armstrong Carbon dioxide capture and geological storage Sam...Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK Carbon dioxide capture and geological storage is a...80-90%. It involves the capture of carbon dioxide at a large industrial...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Hawaii geologic map data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geologic map data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii geologic map data Published USGS, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for...

253

Environmental Assessment for Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

questions on the Environmental Assessment for Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science Laboratory, email Harold.Johnson@wipp.ws or call (505) 234-7349. questions on the Environmental Assessment for Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science Laboratory, email Harold.Johnson@wipp.ws or call (505) 234-7349. Environmental Assessment for Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science Laboratory Final - January, 2006 This document has been provided to you in PDF format. Please install Adobe Acrobat Reader before accessing these documents. Some of the Chapters containing complex graphics have been split into multiple parts to allow for more detail in the graphics and ease in downloading. Cover Sheet, Table of Contents, List of Tables, List of Figures, and Acronyms and Abbreviations Chapter 1 - Introduction and Statement of Purpose and Need Chapter 2 - Proposed Action and Alternatives Chapter 3 - Existing Environment

254

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Experiments were used to examine water content in Permian salt samples (Salado Formation) collected from the WIPP site. The profile of water release and movement is recognized as a function of temperature from 30 to 275 oC using classical gravimetric methods to measure weight loss as a result of heating. The amount of water released from heating the salt was found to be correlated with the salts accessory mineral content (clay, other secondary minerals lost up to 3 wt % while pure halite salt lost less than 0.5 wt % water). Water released from salt at lower temperature was reversible and is attributed to clay hydration and dehydration processes. The analysis

255

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Experiments were used to examine water content in Permian salt samples (Salado Formation) collected from the WIPP site. The profile of water release and movement is recognized as a function of temperature from 30 to 275 oC using classical gravimetric methods to measure weight loss as a result of heating. The amount of water released from heating the salt was found to be correlated with the salts accessory mineral content (clay, other secondary minerals lost up to 3 wt % while pure halite salt lost less than 0.5 wt % water). Water released from salt at lower temperature was reversible and is attributed to clay hydration and dehydration processes. The analysis

256

Long-term Repository Benefits of Using Cermet Waste Packages  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Long-Term Benefits Long-Term Benefits Long-term Repository Benefits of Using Cermet Waste Packages A cermet waste package may improve the long-term performance of the YM repository by two mechanisms: reducing (1) the potential for nuclear criticality in the repository and (2) the long-term release rate of radionuclides from the waste package. In the natural environment, the centers of uranium ore deposits have remained intact for very long time periods while the outer edges of the ore deposit have degraded. A cermet waste package may operate in the same way. The sacrificial, slow degradation of the waste package and the DU oxide protects the SNF uranium dioxide in the interior of the package long after the package has failed. Page 2 of 4 Follow the link below to learn more about Cermets:

257

Improving Repository Performance by Using DU Dioxide Fill  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DU Dioxide Fill DU Dioxide Fill Improving Repository Performance by Using DU Dioxide Fill Fills may improve repository performance by acting as sacrificial materials, which delay the degradation of SNF uranium dioxide. Because fill and SNF have the same chemical form of uranium (uranium dioxide), the DU dioxide in a repository is the only fill which has the same behavior as that of the SNF. In the natural environment, some uranium ore deposits have remained intact for very long periods of time. The outer parts of the ore deposit degrade while the inner parts of the deposit are protected. The same approach is proposed herein for protecting SNF. The application could use half or more of the DU inventory in the United States. Behavior of Uranium and Potential Behavior of a Waste Package with SNF and Fill

258

The usage of open educational resources in MAOR repository  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, an innovative view of open online learning materials repositories will be presented through the example of MAOR, Israel's national repository that is linked to MERLOT. Web-usage mining techniques are utilised to explore three aspects: (a) distribution level of learning object (LO) that was contributed; (b) tools available to the community and its contribution to object quality; (c) transfer from public to personal workspaces. The use of MAOR repository has become substantial and continues to rise every year to both local and global audience. MAOR members contributed more than 3,300 LO and may access to approximately 30,000 in MERLOT. Furthermore, as part of the learning community they share knowledge by adding comments regarding the object and their experiences and benefit from additional information contributed by users in MERLOT. In addition, the potential of the personal workspaces was identified even though it is a new feature in MAOR.

Eli Shmueli; Anat Cohen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Diffractive deep inelastic scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new approach to the analysis of diffractive deep inelastic data is presented. We show that the collinear factorisation theorem, which holds for diffractive DIS, has important modifications in the sub-asymptotic HERA regime, which can be quantified by using perturbative QCD. In fact the diffractive parton densities are shown to satisfy an inhomogeneous evolution equation. Moreover it is necessary to include both the gluonic and sea-quark t-channel components of the perturbative Pomeron.

Martin, A.D.; Ryskin, M.G. [IPPP, Physics Department, University of Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Watt, G. [DESY, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

260

Implementation of the Brazilian National Repository - RBMN Project - 13008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ionizing radiation in Brazil is used in electricity generation, medicine, industry, agriculture and for research and development purposes. All these activities can generate radioactive waste. At this point, in Brazil, the use of nuclear energy and radioisotopes justifies the construction of a national repository for radioactive wastes of low and intermediate-level. According to Federal Law No. 10308, Brazilian National Commission for Nuclear Energy (CNEN) is responsible for designing and constructing the intermediate and final storages for radioactive wastes. Additionally, a restriction on the construction of Angra 3 is that the repository is under construction until its operation start, attaining some requirements of the Brazilian Environmental Regulator (IBAMA). Besides this NPP, in the National Energy Program is previewed the installation of four more plants, by 2030. In November 2008, CNEN launched the Project RBMN (Repository for Low and Intermediate-Level Radioactive Wastes), which aims at the implantation of a National Repository for disposal of low and intermediate-level of radiation wastes. This Project has some aspects that are unique in the Brazilian context, especially referring to the time between its construction and the end of its institutional period. This time is about 360 years, when the area will be released for unrestricted uses. It means that the Repository must be safe and secure for more than three hundred years, which is longer than half of the whole of Brazilian history. This aspect is very new for the Brazilian people, bringing a new dimension to public acceptance. Another point is this will be the first repository in South America, bringing a real challenge for the continent. The current status of the Project is summarized. (authors)

Cassia Oliveira de Tello, Cledola [CDTN - Center for Development of Nuclear Technology, Av. Presidente Antonio Carlos, 6.627 - Campus UFMG - Pampulha, CEP 31270-901 - Belo Horizonte - MG (Brazil)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geologic repository" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a user's guide for viewing and downloading borehold geologic data through a web-based interface.

Last, George V.; Mackley, Rob D.; Saripalli, Ratna R.

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

262

Design and implementation of the Web-enabled NIST design repository  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article describes the design and development of a design repository software system. This system is a prototype implementation intended to demonstrate the role of design repositories as part of a vision for the next generation of product development ...

Simon Szykman; Ram D. Sriram

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

DSpace : An Institutional Repository from the MIT Libraries and Hewlett Packard Laboratories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The DSpaceâ?¢ project of the MIT Libraries and the Hewlett Packard Laboratories has built an institutional repository system for digital research material. This paper will describe the rationale for institutional repositories, ...

Smith, MacKenzie

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

The Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository From A Corrosion Perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrosion is a primary determinant of waste package performance at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository and will control the delay time for radionuclide transport from the waste package. Corrosion is the most probable and most likely degradation process that will determine when packages will be penetrated and the shape size and distribution of those penetrations. The general issues in corrosion science, materials science and electrochemistry are well defined, and the knowledge base is substantial for understanding corrosion processes. In this paper, the Yucca Mountain Repository is viewed from a corrosion perspective.

J.H. Payer

2005-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

265

Parameters and variables appearing in repository-siting models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Included in this report is a summary of data characterizing the parameters and variables appearing in repository siting models. These data cover the processes of saturates flow, unsaturated flow, surface water flow, geochemistry, heat transport, solute transport, and geomechanical response. Definitions and ranges of values are provided for equation parameters, source terms, dependent variables, boundary conditions, and initial conditions for the equations that are solved in the repository siting models. The data were compiled to help guide the selection of values of parameters and variables to be used in benchmark problems.

Mercer, J.W.; Thomas, S.D.; Ross, B.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Geological carbon sequestration: critical legal issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological carbon sequestration: critical legal issues Ray Purdy and Richard Macrory January 2004 Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research Working Paper 45 #12;1 Geological carbon sequestration an integrated assessment of geological carbon sequestration (Project ID code T2.21). #12;2 1 Introduction

Watson, Andrew

267

Geological and geotechnical databases and developments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological and geotechnical databases and developments in the Netherlands Robert Hack & Wiebke Tegtmeier Namur, Belgium, 9 October 2007 #12;9 October 2007 Geological and geotech databases in NL - Hack 2007 Geological and geotech databases in NL - Hack & Tegtmeier 3 Surface data: · Climate · Vegetation

Hack, Robert

268

11 Years Engineering Geology Fieldwork in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;14 dec 2001 11 years engineering geology in Falset - science from fieldwork - hack 2 What did we Produce ? Why did we ? #12;14 dec 2001 11 years engineering geology in Falset - science from fieldwork - hack 3 happy #12;14 dec 2001 11 years engineering geology in Falset - science from fieldwork - hack 4 Why keep

Hack, Robert

269

Conceptual structure and computational organization of the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. This presentation describes the overall conceptual structure and computational organization of the 2008 performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository carried out by the DOE in support of a licensing application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The following topics are addressed: (i) regulatory background, (ii) the three basic entities underlying a PA, (iii) determination of expected, mean and median dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) specified in the NRC regulations for the YM repository, (iv) the relationship between probability, sets and scenario classes, (v) scenario classes and the characterization of aleatory uncertainty, (vi) scenario classes and the determination of expected dose to the RMEI, (vii) analysis decomposition, (viii) disjoint and nondisjoint scenario classes, (ix) scenario classes and the NRC’s YM review plan, (x) characterization of epistemic uncertainty, and (xi) adequacy of Latin hypercube sample size used in the propagation of epistemic uncertainty. This article is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA and is intended as an introduction to following articles in the issue that provide additional analysis details and specific analysis results.

J.C. Helton; C.W. Hansen; C.J. Sallaberry

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for the seismic scenario classes in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extensive work has been carried out by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In support of this development and an associated license application to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the DOE completed an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository in 2008. This presentation describes uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results for the seismic ground motion scenario class and the seismic fault displacement scenario class obtained in the 2008 YM PA. The following topics are addressed for the seismic ground motion scenario class: (i) engineered barrier system conditions; (ii) release results for the engineered barrier system, unsaturated zone, and saturated zone; (iii) dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) specified in the NRC regulations for the YM repository; and (iv) expected dose to the RMEI. In addition, expected dose to the RMEI for the seismic fault displacement scenario class is also considered. The present article is the part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA; additional articles in the issue describe other aspects of the 2008 YM PA.

C.W. Hansen; G.A. Behie; A. Bier; K.M. Brooks; Y. Chen; J.C. Helton; S.P. Hommel; K.P. Lee; B. Lester; P.D. Mattie; S. Mehta; S.P. Miller; C.J. Sallaberry; S.D. Sevougian; P. Vo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Expected dose for the early failure scenario classes in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In support of this development and an associated license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the DOE completed an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository in 2008. This presentation describes the determination of expected dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) specified in the NRC regulations for the YM repository for the early waste package (WP) failure scenario class and the early drip shield (DS) failure scenario class in the 2008 YM PA. The following topics are addressed: (i) properties of the early failure scenario classes and the determination of dose and expected dose the RMEI, (ii) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI from the early WP failure scenario class, (iii) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI from the early DS failure scenario class, (iv) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI from the combined early WP and early DS failure scenario class with and without the inclusion of failures resulting from nominal processes, and (v) uncertainty in the occurrence of early failure scenario classes. The present article is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA; additional articles in the issue describe other aspects of the 2008 YM PA.

J.C. Helton; C.W. Hansen; C.J. Sallaberry

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for the igneous scenario classes in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In support of this development and an associated license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the DOE completed an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository in 2008. This presentation describes uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results for the igneous intrusive scenario class and the igneous eruptive scenario class obtained in the 2008 YM PA. The following topics are addressed for the igneous intrusive scenario class: (i) engineered barrier system conditions, (ii) release results for the engineered barrier system, unsaturated zone, and saturated zone, (iii) dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) specified in the NRC regulations for the YM repository, and (iv) expected dose to the RMEI. In addition, expected dose to the RMEI for the igneous eruptive scenario class is also considered. The present article is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA; additional articles in the issue describe other aspects of the 2008 YM PA.

C.J. Sallaberry; G.A. Behie; A. Bier; K.M. Brooks; Y. Chen; C.W. Hansen; J.C. Helton; S.P. Hommel; K.P. Lee; B. Lester; P.D. Mattie; S. Mehta; S.P. Miller; S.D. Sevougian; P. Vo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Expected dose for the nominal scenario class in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In support of this development and an associated license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the DOE completed an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository in 2008. This presentation describes the determination of expected (mean) dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) specified in the NRC regulations for the YM repository for the nominal scenario class (i.e., under nominal or undisturbed conditions) in the 2008 YM PA. The following topics are addressed: (i) properties of the nominal scenario class and the determination of dose and expected (mean) dose to the RMEI, (ii) uncertainty in dose and resultant expected (mean) dose to the RMEI, (iii) expected (mean) dose to the RMEI from individual radionuclides, and (iv) numerical stability of the sampling-based procedure used to estimate the expected (mean) dose to the RMEI. The present paper is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA; additional papers in the issue describe other aspects of the 2008 YM PA.

J.C. Helton; C.W. Hansen; C.J. Sallaberry

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Expected dose for the igneous scenario classes in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In support of this development and an associated license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the DOE completed an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository in 2008. This presentation describes the determination of expected dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) specified in the NRC regulations for the YM repository for the igneous intrusive scenario class and the igneous eruptive scenario class in the 2008 YM PA. The following topics are addressed: (i) properties of the igneous scenario classes and the determination of dose and expected dose to the RMEI, (ii) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI from the igneous intrusive scenario class, (iii) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI from the igneous eruptive scenario class, (iv) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI from the combined igneous intrusive and igneous eruptive scenario class, and (v) uncertainty in the occurrence of igneous scenario classes. The present article is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA; additional articles in the issue describe other aspects of the 2008 YM PA.

C.J. Sallaberry; C.W. Hansen; J.C. Helton

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for the nominal scenario class in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In support of this development and an associated license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the DOE completed an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository in 2008. This presentation describes uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results for the nominal scenario class (i.e., for undisturbed conditions) obtained in the 2008 YM PA. The following topics are addressed: (i) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis procedures, (ii) drip shield and waste package failure, (iii) engineered barrier system conditions, (iv) radionuclide release results for the engineered barrier system, unsaturated zone, and saturated zone, and (v) dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual specified in the NRC regulations for the YM repository. The present article is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA; additional articles in the issue describe other aspects of the 2008 YM PA.

C.W. Hansen; G.A. Behie; A. Bier; K.M. Brooks; Y. Chen; J.C. Helton; S.P. Hommel; K.P. Lee; B. Lester; P.D. Mattie; S. Mehta; S.P. Miller; C.J. Sallaberry; S.D. Sevougian; P. Vo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for the early failure scenario classes in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In support of this development and an associated license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the DOE completed an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository in 2008. This presentation describes uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results for the early waste package failure scenario class and the early drip shield failure scenario class obtained in the 2008 YM PA. The following topics are addressed: (i) engineered barrier system conditions, (ii) release results for the engineered barrier system, unsaturated zone, and saturated zone, (iii) dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) specified in the NRC regulations for the YM repository, and (iv) expected dose to the RMEI. The present article is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA; additional articles in the issue describe other aspects of the 2008 YM PA.

C.W. Hansen; G.A. Behie; A. Bier; K.M. Brooks; Y. Chen; J.C. Helton; S.P. Hommel; K.P. Lee; B. Lester; P.D. Mattie; S. Mehta; S.P. Miller; C.J. Sallaberry; S.D. Sevougian; P. Vo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Geology and alteration of the Coso Geothermal Area, Inyo County, California  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geology and alteration of the Coso Geothermal Area, Inyo County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geology and alteration of the Coso Geothermal Area, Inyo County, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Geology and alteration of the Coso geothermal area were mapped in conjunction with geophysical surveys and a deep drill test (CGEH-1) to facilitate selection of a follow-up drill site. The oldest rocks exposed at Coso are intermediate to mafic metamorphic rocks of uncertain age intruded by dikes and pods of quartz latite porphyry and felsite, and by a small

278

MSc STUDY PROGRAMME IN THE FACULTY OF GEOLOGY AND GEOENVIRONMENT, UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS 201314 Geology and Geoenvironment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Geology and Geoenvironment MSc Programme STUDENT HANDBOOK Applied Environmental Geology Environmental Geology 3 3. Specialization in Stratigraphy and Palaeontology 5 4. Specialization programme leading to MSc degree in the following specializations (majors): · Applied Environmental Geology

Kouroupetroglou, Georgios

279

Geological/geophysical study progresses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Robertson Research (U.S.) Inc. of Houston is working on the second of a planned three-phase regional geological and geochemical study of Paleozoic rocks in the Williston Basin. The studies cover the entire Williston Basin in North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Each report is based largely on original petrographic, well log, and geochemical data that were developed by Robertson.

Savage, D.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Early Restoration Plan Repositories STATE LIBRARY ADDRESS CITY ZIP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calcasieu Parish Public Library Central Branch 301 W. Claude St. Lake Charles 70605 #12;STATE LIBRARYEarly Restoration Plan Repositories STATE LIBRARY ADDRESS CITY ZIP AL Dauphin Island Sea Laboratory. Walton 32548 FL Panama City Beach Public Library 125000 Hutchison Blvd Panama City Beach 32407 FL

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geologic repository" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Effect of repository underground ventilation on emplacement drift temperature control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The repository advanced conceptual design (ACD) is being conducted by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System, Management & Operating Contractor. Underground ventilation analyses during ACD have resulted in preliminary ventilation concepts and design methodologies. This paper discusses one of the recent evaluations -- effects of ventilation on emplacement drift temperature management.

Yang, H.; Sun, Y.; McKenzie, D.G.; Bhattacharyya, K.K. [Morrison Knudson Corporation, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Grey/Gray Matter: The Role of Institutional Repositories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the Academy 3:2 (2003), pp. 327-336. 7. Crow, Raym. "The Case for Institutional Repositories: A SPARC Position Paper." ARL Bimonthly Report 223 (August 2002). 8. google.com 9. DSpace@MIT http://dspace.mit.edu 12. IDEALS http...

Mercer, Holly

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Impact of Pyrophoric Events on Long-Term Repository Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of a feature, event, and process (FEP) screening argument developed for the issue of pyrophoricity as it pertains to the post-closure interment of Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (DSNF) at the Yucca Mountain Repository.

Richard Gregg

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

SHERPA Document SHERPA Document -Institutional Repositories: Staff and Skills Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SHERPA Document SHERPA Document - Institutional Repositories: Staff and Skills Requirements Mary This document began in response to requests received by the core SHERPA team for examples of job descriptions and UKCORR members. This document will be revised annually (July/August) to reflect changing needs

Southampton, University of

285

Cancer Usurps Skeletal Muscle as an Energy Repository  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Biology Cancer Usurps Skeletal Muscle as an Energy Repository Yi Luo 1 Junya Yoneda 2 Hitoshi...supply glutamine to cancer cells as an energy source through the release of HMGB1...muscle physiology. Cancer cells produce energy through aerobic glycolysis, but contributions...

Yi Luo; Junya Yoneda; Hitoshi Ohmori; Takamitsu Sasaki; Kazutaka Shimbo; Sachise Eto; Yumiko Kato; Hiroshi Miyano; Tsuyoshi Kobayashi; Tomonori Sasahira; Yoshitomo Chihara; Hiroki Kuniyasu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Step-Wise Repository Licensing-Implementing the Scientific and Legislative Vision for the Next Phase of the Yucca Mountain Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

International scientific consensus backing geologic disposal as the preferred method of long term management of used nuclear fuel and defense high level radioactive waste has existed since the 1950s. Furthermore, many believe that geologic disposal programs should be implemented in a staged or 'step-wise' approach. These principles have also been at the root of US waste management policy for which a regulatory framework for site selection, and the licensing of a site once selected, is set forth in a series of legislation. The US program has now matured to the point where these regulatory components are now in place. Sufficient data has also been gathered and evaluated to support a site recommendation decision. This decision--on whether or not to proceed with a repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada - is about to be put before the US President and Congress. If made in the affirmative, the decision would initiate the next phase in the US disposal process as originally envisioned by Congress--a three-step repository licensing process (Construction, Operation, & Closure). This paper explores the many facets of the licensing process that may lie ahead. Approaches that could be deployed to effectively implement this process are discussed and opportunities to optimize the process, by capitalizing on its evolutionary nature to assure that the best available science is always applied to the protection of public health and safety, are identified. Focus is also placed on a key prerequisite to the accomplishment of this goal--the definition of the level to which post closure repository performance must be addressed at each stage of the licensing process.

McCullum, R.; Kessler, J. H.; Eyre, M. L.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

287

On leakage and seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geologic carbon sequestration is one strategy for reducing the rate of increase of global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2} ) concentrations (IEA, 1997; Reichle, 2000). As used here, the term geologic carbon sequestration refers to the direct injection of supercritical CO{sub 2} deep into subsurface target formations. These target formations will typically be either depleted oil and gas reservoirs, or brine-filled permeable formations referred to here as brine formations. Injected CO{sub 2} will tend to be trapped by one or more of the following mechanisms: (1) permeability trapping, for example when buoyant supercritical CO{sub 2} rises until trapped by a confining caprock; (2) solubility trapping, for example when CO{sub 2} dissolves into the aqueous phase in water-saturated formations, or (3) mineralogic trapping, such as occurs when CO{sub 2} reacts to produce stable carbonate minerals. When CO{sub 2} is trapped in the subsurface by any of these mechanisms, it is effectively sequestered away from the atmosphere where it would otherwise act as a greenhouse gas. The purpose of this report is to summarize our work aimed at quantifying potential CO{sub 2} seepage due to leakage from geologic carbon sequestration sites. The approach we take is to present first the relevant properties of CO{sub 2} over the range of conditions from the deep subsurface to the vadose zone (Section 2), and then discuss conceptual models for how leakage might occur (Section 3). The discussion includes consideration of gas reservoir and natural gas storage analogs, along with some simple estimates of seepage based on assumed leakage rates. The conceptual model discussion provides the background for the modeling approach wherein we focus on simulating transport in the vadose zone, the last potential barrier to CO{sub 2} seepage (Section 4). Because of the potentially wide range of possible properties of actual future geologic sequestration sites, we carry out sensitivity analyses by means of numerical simulation and derive the trends in seepage flux and near-surface CO{sub 2} concentrations that will arise from variations in fundamental hydrogeological properties.

Oldenburg, C.M.; Unger, A.J.A.; Hepple, R.P.; Jordan, P.D.

2002-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

288

A Summary of Properties Used to Evaluate INEEL Calcine Disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To support evaluations of the direct disposal of Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory calcines to the repository at Yucca Mountain, an evaluation of the performance of the calcine in the repository environment must be performed. This type of evaluation demonstrates, through computer modeling and analysis, the impact the calcine would have on the ability of the repository to perform its function of containment of materials during the repository lifetime. This report discusses parameters that were used in the scoping evaluation conducted in FY 2003. It provides nominal values for the parameters, with explanation of the source of the values, and how the values were modified for use in repository analysis activities.

Dahl, C.A.

2003-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

289

Nevada potential repository preliminary transportation strategy Study 2. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this study were to build on the findings of the Nevada Potential Repository Preliminary Transportation Strategy Study 1 (CRWMS M&O 1995b), and to provide additional information for input to the repository environmental impact statement (EIS) process. In addition, this study supported the future selection of a preferred rail corridor and/or heavy haul route based on defensible data, methods, and analyses. Study research did not consider proposed legislation. Planning was conducted according to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Plan (DOE 1994a). The specific objectives of Study 2 were to: eliminate or reduce data gaps, inconsistencies, and uncertainties, and strengthen the analysis performed in Study 1; develop a preliminary list of rail route evaluation criteria that could be used to solicit input from stakeholders during scoping meetings. The evaluation criteria will be revised based on comments received during scoping; restrict and refine the width of the four rail corridors identified in Study 1 to five miles or less, based on land use constraints and engineering criteria identified and established in Study 2; evaluate national-level effects of routing spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste to the four identified branch lines, including the effects of routing through or avoiding Las Vegas; continue to gather published land use information and environmental data to support the repository EIS; continue to evaluate heavy haul truck transport over three existing routes as an alternative to rail and provide sufficient information to support the repository EIS process; and evaluate secondary uses for rail (passenger use, repository construction, shared use).

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Radioactive waste isolation in salt: Peer review of the Fluor Technology, Inc. , report and position paper concerning waste emplacement mode and its effect on repository conceptual design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recommendations for revising the Fluor Technology, Inc., draft position paper entitled Evaluation of Waste Emplacement Mode and the final report entitled Waste Package/Repository Impact Study include: reevaluate the relative rankings for the various emplacement modes; delete the following want objectives: maximize ability to locate the package horizon because sufficient flexibility exists to locate rooms in the relatively clean San Andres Unit 4 Salt and maximize far-field geologic integrity during retrieval because by definition the far field will be unaffected by thermal and stress perturbations caused by remining; give greater emphasis to want objectives regarding cost and use of present technology; delete the following statements from pages 1-1 and 1-2 of the draft position paper: ''No thought or study was given to the impacts of this configuration (vertical emplacement) on repository construction or short and long-term performance of the site'' and ''Subsequent salt repository designs adopted the vertical emplacement configuration as the accepted method without further evaluation.''; delete App. E and lines 8-17 of page 1-4 of the draft position paper because they are inappropriate; adopt a formal decision-analysis procedure for the 17 identified emplacement modes; revise App. F of the impact study to more accurately reflect current technology; consider designing the underground layout to take advantage of stress-relief techniques; consider eliminating reference to fuel assemblies <10 yr ''out-of-reactor''; model the temperature distribution, assuming that the repository is constructed in an infinitely large salt body; state that the results of creep analyses must be considered tentative until they can be validated by in situ measurements; and reevaluate the peak radial stresses on the waste package so that the calculated stress conditions more closely approximate expected in situ conditions.

Hambley, D.F.; Russell, J.E.; Whitfield, R.G.; McGinnis, L.D.; Harrison, W.; Jacoby, C.H.; Bump, T.R.; Mraz, D.Z.; Busch, J.S.; Fischer, L.E.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Expected dose and associated uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results for the human intrusion scenario in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In support of this development and an associated license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the DOE completed an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository in 2008. This presentation describes the determination of expected (mean) dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) specified in the NRC regulations for the YM repository resulting from an inadvertent drilling intrusion into the repository. The following topics are addressed: (i) assumed properties of an inadvertent drilling intrusion and the determination of the associated dose and expected (mean) dose to the RMEI, (ii) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results for expected dose to the RMEI, and (iii) the numerical stability of the sampling-based procedure used to estimate expected (mean) dose to the RMEI. The present article is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA; additional articles in the issue describe other aspects of the 2008 YM PA.

C.W. Hansen; G.A. Behie; K.M. Brooks; Y. Chen; J.C. Helton; S.P. Hommel; K.P. Lee; B. Lester; P.D. Mattie; S. Mehta; S.P. Miller; C.J. Sallaberry; S.D. Sevougian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Research On Fiber Optic Sensing Systems And Their Application As Final Repository Monitoring Tools  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For several years, fiber-optic sensing devices had been used for straightforward on/off monitoring functions such as presence and position detection. Recently, they gained interest as they offer a novel, exciting technology for a multitude of sensing applications. In the deep geological environment most physical properties, and thus most parameters important to safety, can be measured with fiber-optic technology. Typical examples are displacements, strains, radiation dose and dose rate, presence of some gases, temperature, pressure, etc. Their robustness, immunity to electromagnetic interference, as well as their large bandwidths and data rates ensure high reliability and superior performance. Moreover, the networking capabilities of meanwhile available fiber-optic sensors allow for efficient management of large sensor systems. Distributed sensing with multiple sensing locations on a single fiber reduces significantly the number of cables and connecting points. Reliable, cost effective, and maintenance-free solutions can thus be implemented.

Jobmann, M.; Biurrun, E.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

293

Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Cassia County Idaho; data; geophysical surveys; Idaho; Raft River geothermal area; surveys; United States; USGS; Well No. 3; well-logging Author(s): Covington, H.R. Published: Open-File Report - U. S. Geological Survey, 1/1/1978 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Raft River Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Deep_drilling_data,_Raft_River_geothermal_area,_Idaho-Raft_River_geothermal_exploration_well_sidetrack-C&oldid=473365"

294

Spent nuclear fuel as a waste form for geologic disposal: Assessment and recommendations on data and modeling needs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study assesses the status of knowledge pertinent to evaluating the behavior of spent nuclear fuel as a waste form in geologic disposal systems and provides background information that can be used by the DOE to address the information needs that pertain to compliance with applicable standards and regulations. To achieve this objective, applicable federal regulations were reviewed, expected disposal environments were described, the status of spent-fuel modeling was summarized, and information regarding the characteristics and behavior of spent fuel was compiled. This compiled information was then evaluated from a performance modeling perspective to identify further information needs. A number of recommendations were made concerning information still needed to enhance understanding of spent-fuel behavior as a waste form in geologic repositories. 335 refs., 22 figs., 44 tabs.

Van Luik, A.E.; Apted, M.J.; Bailey, W.J.; Haberman, J.H.; Shade, J.S.; Guenther, R.E.; Serne, R.J.; Gilbert, E.R.; Peters, R.; Williford, R.E.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Method of deep drilling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Deep drilling is facilitated by the following steps practiced separately or in any combination: (1) Periodically and sequentially fracturing zones adjacent the bottom of the bore hole with a thixotropic fastsetting fluid that is accepted into the fracture to overstress the zone, such fracturing and injection being periodic as a function of the progression of the drill. (2) Casing the bore hole with ductile, pre-annealed casing sections, each of which is run down through the previously set casing and swaged in situ to a diameter large enough to allow the next section to run down through it. (3) Drilling the bore hole using a drill string of a low density alloy and a high density drilling mud so that the drill string is partially floated.

Colgate, Stirling A. (4616 Ridgeway, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

MINNESOTA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Harvey Thorleifson, Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy (DOE) role . . . . 25 Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) role . . . . 28 US . . . . 76 Previous stratigraphic investigations . . . . 76 Oil and gas potential . . . . 79 Iowa deep drilling . . . . 81 Wisconsin deep drilling . . . . 83 SEDIMENTARY ROCKS AND GROUNDWATER

297

Brine and Gas Flow Patterns Between Excavated Areas and Disturbed Rock Zone in the 1996 Performance Assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for a Single Drilling Intrusion that Penetrates Repository and Castile Brine Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is located in southeastern New Mexico, is being developed for the geologic disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Waste disposal will take place in panels excavated in a bedded salt formation approximately 2000 ft (610 m) below the land surface. The BRAGFLO computer program which solves a system of nonlinear partial differential equations for two-phase flow, was used to investigate brine and gas flow patterns in the vicinity of the repository for the 1996 WIPP performance assessment (PA). The present study examines the implications of modeling assumptions used in conjunction with BRAGFLO in the 1996 WIPP PA that affect brine and gas flow patterns involving two waste regions in the repository (i.e., a single waste panel and the remaining nine waste panels), a disturbed rock zone (DRZ) that lies just above and below these two regions, and a borehole that penetrates the single waste panel and a brine pocket below this panel. The two waste regions are separated by a panel closure. The following insights were obtained from this study. First, the impediment to flow between the two waste regions provided by the panel closure model is reduced due to the permeable and areally extensive nature of the DRZ adopted in the 1996 WIPP PA, which results in the DRZ becoming an effective pathway for gas and brine movement around the panel closures and thus between the two waste regions. Brine and gas flow between the two waste regions via the DRZ causes pressures between the two to equilibrate rapidly, with the result that processes in the intruded waste panel are not isolated from the rest of the repository. Second, the connection between intruded and unintruded waste panels provided by the DRZ increases the time required for repository pressures to equilibrate with the overlying and/or underlying units subsequent to a drilling intrusion. Third, the large and areally extensive DRZ void volumes is a significant source of brine to the repository, which is consumed in the corrosion of iron and thus contributes to increased repository pressures. Fourth, the DRZ itself lowers repository pressures by providing storage for gas and access to additional gas storage in areas of the repository. Fifth, given the pathway that the DRZ provides for gas and brine to flow around the panel closures, isolation of the waste panels by the panel closures was not essential to compliance with the U.S. Environment Protection Agency's regulations in the 1996 WIPP PA.

ECONOMY,KATHLEEN M.; HELTON,JON CRAIG; VAUGHN,PALMER

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One way to reduce the effects of anthropogenic greenhousegases on climate is to inject carbon dioxide (CO2) from industrialsources into deep geological formations such as brine formations ordepleted oil or gas reservoirs. Research has and is being conducted toimprove understanding of factors affecting particular aspects ofgeological CO2 storage, such as performance, capacity, and health, safetyand environmental (HSE) issues, as well as to lower the cost of CO2capture and related processes. However, there has been less emphasis todate on system-level analyses of geological CO2 storage that considergeological, economic, and environmental issues by linking detailedrepresentations of engineering components and associated economic models.The objective of this study is to develop a system-level model forgeological CO2 storage, including CO2 capture and separation,compression, pipeline transportation to the storage site, and CO2injection. Within our system model we are incorporating detailedreservoir simulations of CO2 injection and potential leakage withassociated HSE effects. The platform of the system-level modelingisGoldSim [GoldSim, 2006]. The application of the system model is focusedon evaluating the feasibility of carbon sequestration with enhanced gasrecovery (CSEGR) in the Rio Vista region of California. The reservoirsimulations are performed using a special module of the TOUGH2 simulator,EOS7C, for multicomponent gas mixtures of methane and CO2 or methane andnitrogen. Using this approach, the economic benefits of enhanced gasrecovery can be directly weighed against the costs, risks, and benefitsof CO2 injection.

Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

299

Geological Aspects of the Port Hacking Estuary  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The geology of Port Hacking, a small estuary on Australia’s east ... construction sand that could be dredged from Port Hacking.

Alberto D. Albani; Peter C. Rickwood…

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA to extend our thanks to the authors of various West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geologic repository" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

geologic-sequestration | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geological Sequestration Training and Research Program in Capture and Transport: Development of the Most Economical Separation Method for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0001953 NETL...

302

Handbook of the Geology of Ireland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE work is based on the late Prof. Cole's contributions to the "Handbook of Regional Geology," published some years ago in Heidelberg, and revised and brought ...

1925-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

303

Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and adjoining regions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources of...

304

3D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 3D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological Survey Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Many Geological Survey Organisations (GSOs) are using 3D modelling software technology for a vast variety of applications. Initially many 3D tools were designed for the exploitation of digital seismic mass data existing in hydrocarbon exploration industry. Accordingly, GSOs have to adapt available software and to modify it to their special requirements, defining their own best practice. The Geological Survey of the Bavarian Environment Agency has developed procedures and workflows for a variety of

305

Multiple-code simulation study of the long-term EDZ evolution of geological nuclear waste repositories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This simulation study shows how widely different model approaches can be adapted to model the evolution of the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) around a heated nuclear waste emplacement drift in fractured rock. The study includes modeling of coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes, with simplified consideration of chemical coupling in terms of time-dependent strength degradation or subcritical crack growth. The different model approaches applied in this study include boundary element, finite element, finite difference, particle mechanics, and elastoplastic cellular automata methods. The simulation results indicate that thermally induced differential stresses near the top of the emplacement drift may cause progressive failure and permeability changes during the first 100 years (i.e., after emplacement and drift closure). Moreover, the results indicate that time-dependent mechanical changes may play only a small role during the first 100 years of increasing temperature and thermal stress, whereas such time-dependency is insignificant after peak temperature, because decreasing thermal stress.

Rutqvist, J.; Backstrom, A.; Chijimatsu, M.; Feng, X.-T.; Pan, P.-Z.; Hudson, J.; Jing, L.; Kobayashi, A.; Koyama, T.; Lee, H.-S.; Huang, X.-H.; Rinne, M.; Shen, B.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

306

Multiple-code simulation study of the long-term EDZ evolution of geological nuclear waste repositories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

subcritical crack growth were determined from laboratory experiments under water-subcritical crack growth with time- dependent parameters determined from laboratory experiments under water

Rutqvist, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Basic research for assessment of geologic nuclear waste repositories: What solubility and speciation studies of transuranium elements can tell us  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solubility and speciation data are important in understanding aqueous radionuclide transport through the geosphere. They define the source term for transport retardation processes such as sorption and colloid formation. Solubility and speciation data are useful in verifying the validity of geochemical codes that are part of predictive transport models. Results from solubility and speciation experiments of {sup 237}NpO{sub 2} {sup +}, {sup 239}Pu{sup 4+}, and {sup 241}Am{sup 3+}/Nd{sup 3+} in J-13 groundwater (from the Yucca Mountain region, Nevada, which is being investigated as a candidate high-level nuclear waste disposal site) at three different temperatures (25{degrees}, 60{degrees}, and 90{degrees}C) and pH values (6, 7, and 8.5) are presented and compared with published modeling calculations. The comparison results indicate that there is a great need for experimental data on the solubility and speciation of transuranium elements under a wide range of conditions, for example, pH, Eh, temperature, and composition of groundwaters. Additionally, the influence of alpha radiation and the radiolysis of the secondary transuranium solids on solubility and speciation should be studies. Solubility studies and model calculations should be extended to other important long-lived nuclear waste radionuclides such as nickel, zirconium, cadmium, radium, and thorium. 14 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

Nitsche, H.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Information needs for characterization of high-level waste repository sites in six geologic media. Volume 2. Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II contains appendices for the following: (1) remote sensing and surface mapping techniques; (2) subsurface mapping methods for site characterization; (3) gravity technique; (4) audio-frequency magnetotelluric technique; (5) seismic refraction technique; (6) direct-current electrical resistivity method; (7) magnetic technique; (8) seismic reflection technique; (9) seismic crosshole method; (10) mechanical downhole seismic velocity survey method; (11) borehole geophysical logging techniques; (12) drilling and coring methods for precharacterization studies; (13) subsurface drilling methods for site characterization; (14) geomechanical/thermomechanical techniques for precharacterization studies; (15)geomechanical/thermal techniques for site characterization studies; (16) exploratory geochemical techniques for precharacterization studies; (17) geochemical techniques for site characterization; (18) hydrologic techniques for precharacterization studies; (19) hydrologic techniques for site characterization; and (20) seismological techniques.

NONE

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

The use of numerical models in support of site characterization and performance assessment studies for geological repositories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Contracts (work programme linked to limited funding) to the following countries and institutions: Brazil (BRA); Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (

Neerdael, B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Multiple-code simulation study of the long-term EDZ evolution of geological nuclear waste repositories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

degradation or subcritical crack growth. The different modelby considering subcritical crack growth in their BEMthe time-dependent subcritical crack growth were determined

Rutqvist, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Sorption of 237Np by UO2 under Repository Conditions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

237 Np by UO 2 under Repository Conditions M. Jonathan Haire E. V. Zakharova T. V. Kazakovskaya Oak Ridge National Laboratory Institute of Physical Chemistry Institute of Experimental Physics Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6166 Moscow, Russia, 117915 Sarov, Russia, 607190 Phone: (865) 574-7141 Phone: 7 095 335 1742 Phone: 7 42796 73369 e-mail: hairemj@ornl.gov e-mail: zakharova@ipc.rssi.ru e-mail: kaz@astra.vniief.ru Abstract - The primary radioisotope contributor to the calculated long-term radiation dose to the public at the Yucca Mountain spent nuclear fuel (SNF) repository site boundary is neptunium-237 ( 237 Np). Russian experiments have shown that Np(V) and Np(IV) are sorbed onto UO 2 . If Np were sorbed by UO 2 in spent fuel rather than being transported to the site

312

and could possibly serve as a repository for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and could possibly serve as a repository for and could possibly serve as a repository for captured CO 2 emissions. The formation is covered by layers of low permeability rock and possesses several properties that are conducive to CO 2 storage, such as the appropriate depth, thickness, porosity, and permeability. Prior to drilling the test well, MRCSP conducted a seismic survey at the site and obtained necessary permits for the injection test from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Kentucky Division of Oil and Gas. Following the permitting process, the researchers injected clean brine in order to determine formation properties like the maximum injection rate and then injected approximately 1,000 metric tons of CO 2 in two, 500-meter-ton steps. The injection rate, pressure, temperature,

313

Asse salt mine nuclear waste repository simulation experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The field tests underway in Asse, Federal Republic of Germany are dicected toward the development of test plans, techniques and equipment to be used in Exploratory Shafts or At Depth Test Facilities confirmation tests. These simulated repository tests will also provide information which address the following issues: brine migration (liquid and vapor); radiation effects of gamma rays; gas generation caused by radiation and corrosion; accelerated corrosion and leaching; altered properties of salt (the effects of heat, radiation and brine); and the effects of heat and radiation on test assemblies, instruments, and various materials exposed to repository conditions. This paper is a status of the first 82 days of operation of the Asse Brine Migration Tests, which were initiated on May 25, 1983. 6 references.

Coyle, A.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Deep Maps”: A Brief for Digital Palimpsest Mapping Projects (DPMPs, or “Deep Maps”)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEEP  MAPS”:  A  Brief  for   Digital  Palimpsest  DPMPs,  or  “Deep  Maps”)   SHELLEY  FISHER  FISHKIN  paintings,   drawings,   maps,   photos,   books,  

Fishkin, Shelley Fisher

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

HYDRIDE-RELATED DEGRADATION OF SNF CLADDING UNDER REPOSITORY CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose and scope of this analysis/model report is to analyze the degradation of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) cladding under repository conditions by the hydride-related metallurgical processes, such as delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride reorientation and hydrogen embrittlement, thereby providing a better understanding of the degradation process and clarifying which aspects of the process are known and which need further evaluation and investigation. The intended use is as an input to a more general analysis of cladding degradation.

K. McCoy

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

316

doi: 10.1130/focus012012.1 2012;40;95-96Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological Society of America on December 26, 2011geology.gsapubs.orgDownloaded from #12;GEOLOGY, January

317

Title 40 CFR Part 191 Subparts B and C  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carlsbad Field Office Carlsbad, New Mexico #12;Compliance Recertification Application 2014 Executive Pilot Plant (WIPP), located near Carlsbad, New Mexico, is a deep geologic3 repository for the disposal

318

Title 40 CFR Part 191 Subparts B and C  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carlsbad Field Office Carlsbad, New Mexico #12;Executive Summary #12;Title 40 CFR Part 191 Subparts B and C Carlsbad, New Mexico, is a deep geologic repository for the disposal of transuranic (TRU) wastes generated

319

Nuclear Waste: Knowledge Waste?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...4). Although disposal of HLW remains...for long-term disposal is through deep...successful waste-disposal program has eluded...geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Authorized...Administration withdrew funding for Yucca Mountain...

Eugene A. Rosa; Seth P. Tuler; Baruch Fischhoff; Thomas Webler; Sharon M. Friedman; Richard E. Sclove; Kristin Shrader-Frechette; Mary R. English; Roger E. Kasperson; Robert L. Goble; Thomas M. Leschine; William Freudenburg; Caron Chess; Charles Perrow; Kai Erikson; James F. Short

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

320

Petroleum Geology Conference series doi: 10.1144/0070921  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Petroleum Geology Conference series doi: 10.1144/0070921 2010; v. 7; p. 921-936Petroleum Geology Collection to subscribe to Geological Society, London, Petroleum Geologyhereclick Notes on January 5, 2011Downloaded by by the Geological Society, London © Petroleum Geology Conferences Ltd. Published #12;An

Demouchy, Sylvie

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geologic repository" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Effects of some common geological features on two-dimensional variably saturated flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents results of unsaturated flow simulations undertaken as an auxiliary analysis for the Iterative Performance Assessment (IPA) project, one of the approaches adopted by the U.S. NRC to develop repository license application review capabilities. The effects on flow of common geological features, such as nonhorizontal stratification and vertical or near-vertical fault zones intersecting the strata, in a two-dimensional (2D) domain are studied. Results indicate that the presence of layers and crosscutting fault zones tend to induce three-dimensional (3D) unstable flows in the unsaturated zone. The instability is manifested in our simulations by an oscillatory behavior of steady state. This numerical instability imposes extremely stringent criteria on the time step used in the simulation. Finally, once stable steady-state solutions are attained, the effect of the crossing point in the matrix-fault unsaturated hydraulic conductivity curve on groundwater flux vectors and moisture content distributions is studied.

Bagtzoglou, A.C.; Ababou, R.; Sagar, B.; Islam, M.R. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

322

Repository Safety Strategy: Strategy for Protecting Public Health and Safety after Closure of a Yucca Mountain Repository, Rev. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The updated Strategy to Protect Public Health and Safety explains the roles that the natural and engineered systems are expected to play in achieving the objectives of a potential repository system at Yucca Mountain. These objectives are to contain the radionuclides within the waste packages for thousands of years, and to ensure that annual doses to a person living near the site will be acceptably low. This strategy maintains the key assumption of the Site Characterization Plan (DOE 1988) strategy that the potential repository level (horizon) will remain unsaturated. Thus, the strategy continues to rely on the natural attributes of the unsaturated zone for primary protection by providing a setting where waste packages assisted by other engineered barriers are expected to contain wastes for thousands of years. As in the Site Characterization Plan (DOE 1988) strategy, the natural system from the walls of the underground openings (drifts) to the human environment is expected to provide additional defense by reducing the concentrations of any radionuclides released from the waste packages. The updated Strategy to Protect Public Health and Safety is the framework for the integration of site information, repository design and assessment of postclosure performance to develop a safety case for the viability assessment and a subsequent license application. Current site information and a reference design are used to develop a quantitative assessment of performance to be compared with a performance measure. Four key attributes of an unsaturated repository system that are critical to meeting the objectives: (1) Limited water contacting the waste packages; (2) Long waste package lifetime; (3) Slow rate of release of radionuclides from the waste form; and (4) Concentration reduction during transport through engineered and natural barriers.

DOE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Geology, Society and the Environmental health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management Environmental analysis Sustainability Learning Objectives #12; As members of the biological The water we drink The air we breathe Geologic factors in environmental health #12; Health can be definedChapter 19 Geology, Society and the Future #12; Environmental health Air pollution Waste

Pan, Feifei

324

Careers in Geology Department of Geosciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, coal, and water. Environmental geology ­ study of problems associated with pollution, waste disposal ­ study of earth materials of economic interest, including metals, minerals, building stone, petroleum Army Corps of Engineers, state geological surveys Industry Oil companies, environmental firms, mining

Logan, David

325

Sandhills Geology Response by Professor James Goeke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. As it turns out, a good portion of the pipeline is not in the Sandhills and doesn't overlie the Ogallala1 Sandhills Geology Response by Professor James Goeke Providing a short, succinct description of the sandhills geology is a difficult and nebulous request. The sandhills themselves are primarily eolian

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

326

GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA OPEN FILE 7462  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the McArthur River uranium deposit, Athabasca Basin; Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 7462, 35 pGEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA OPEN FILE 7462 Alteration within the basement rocks associated with the P2 fault and the McArthur River uranium deposit, Athabasca Basin E.E. Adlakha, K. Hattori, G

327

Proceedings of 3rd US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Proceedings of 3rd US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Proceedings of 3rd US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design, and Operation Proceedings of 3rd US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design, and Operation The 3rd U.S./German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design and Operation was held in Albuquerque and Carlsbad, New Mexico on October 8-11, 2012. Approximately 60 salt research scientists from Germany and the United States met to discuss repository science state of the art. Workshop topics included: 1) Safety case for heat-generating waste disposal in salt; 2) Benchmark modeling in preparation for thermomechanical field-scale tests; and 3) Reconsolidation of granular salt. Collaboration being pursued by U.S. and German salt repository researchers is presented in the report.

328

Preliminary evaluation of the subsurface area available for a potential nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project, managed by the Nevada Operations Office of the US Department of Energy, is examining the feasibility of siting a repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site. The Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff has been recommended as the target geologic formation. One purpose of this study was to determine whether adequate area for the underground facility exists within the portion of the devitrified, densely welded Topopah Spring Member that contains less than 15 to 20% lithophysae. Areas were considered where the underground facility would be above the water table and at least 200 m below the surface. The thickness required for the repository zone was assumed to be 45 m. An area significantly larger than the area estimated to be required to accommodate the underground facility appears to be potentially useable from this study. However, because the primary area of exploration has been the central portion of north Yucca Mountain, adjacent areas are less well characterized. Portions of the areas identified in this study may not meet all of the above criteria. Additional exploration is required to determine tha acreage of the useable area. Another purpose of this study was to identify a preliminary location within the primary area of exploration, where conditions are favorable for the proposed underground facility. Using available information, this study has identified a slab that meets the above criteria. The slab dips 5{sup 0}6`NE from a strike direction of N11{sup 0}18`W. The area of the slab is about 1850 acres (7.49 km{sup 2}).

Mansure, A.J.; Ortiz, T.S.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Repository Integration Program: RIP performance assessment and strategy evaluation model theory manual and user`s guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the theory and capabilities of RIP (Repository Integration Program). RIP is a powerful and flexible computational tool for carrying out probabilistic integrated total system performance assessments for geologic repositories. The primary purpose of RIP is to provide a management tool for guiding system design and site characterization. In addition, the performance assessment model (and the process of eliciting model input) can act as a mechanism for integrating the large amount of available information into a meaningful whole (in a sense, allowing one to keep the ``big picture`` and the ultimate aims of the project clearly in focus). Such an integration is useful both for project managers and project scientists. RIP is based on a `` top down`` approach to performance assessment that concentrates on the integration of the entire system, and utilizes relatively high-level descriptive models and parameters. The key point in the application of such a ``top down`` approach is that the simplified models and associated high-level parameters must incorporate an accurate representation of their uncertainty. RIP is designed in a very flexible manner such that details can be readily added to various components of the model without modifying the computer code. Uncertainty is also handled in a very flexible manner, and both parameter and model (process) uncertainty can be explicitly considered. Uncertainty is propagated through the integrated PA model using an enhanced Monte Carlo method. RIP must rely heavily on subjective assessment (expert opinion) for much of its input. The process of eliciting the high-level input parameters required for RIP is critical to its successful application. As a result, in order for any project to successfully apply a tool such as RIP, an enormous amount of communication and cooperation must exist between the data collectors, the process modelers, and the performance. assessment modelers.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Request Access to the PARSIIe Project Management Lessons Learned (PMLL) Repository  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The page identifies the process by which PARSIIe username/password is issued to Users who only require access to the PARSIIe Project Management Lessons Learned (PMLL) Repository.

331

Anticipated Degradation Modes of Metallic Engineered Barriers for High-Level Nuclear Waste Repositories  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Unsaturated repositories: They are located above the water table (such as the initially designed Yucca Mountain, United States). The EBS does not...5

Martín A. Rodríguez

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

E-Print Network 3.0 - analyze repository capacity Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

features of Yucca Moun- tain led to its selection as a potential repository site: Yucca Mountain now Source: U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Collection: Fission...

333

1 INTRODUCTION In order to demonstrate the feasibility of a radioactive waste repository in claystone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 INTRODUCTION In order to demonstrate the feasibility of a radioactive waste repository in claystone formations, the French national radioactive waste management agency (ANDRA) started in 2000

Boyer, Edmond

334

EA-1404: Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science Laboratory, Carlsbad, New Mexico  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to construct and operate an Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science Laboratory to support chemical research activities related to the...

335

Summary of geology of Colorado related to geothermal potential...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Journal Article: Summary of geology of Colorado related to geothermal potential Author L.T. Grose Published Journal Colorado Geological Survey Bulletin, 1974 DOI Not Provided...

336

Geothermal Well Logging: Geological Wireline Logs and Fracture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Logging: Geological Wireline Logs and Fracture Imaging Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geothermal Well Logging: Geological...

337

Idaho Geological Survey and University of Idaho Explore for Geothermal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Idaho Geological Survey and University of Idaho Explore for Geothermal Energy Idaho Geological Survey and University of Idaho Explore for Geothermal Energy January 11, 2013 -...

338

Radiometric Ages- Compilation 'B', U.S. Geological Survey | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Radiometric Ages- Compilation 'B', U.S. Geological Survey Abstract Abstract...

339

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada - Nevada Rail Transportation CorridorDOE...

340

The Cost of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in Geologic Formations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CosT of Carbon DioxiDe CapTure CosT of Carbon DioxiDe CapTure anD sTorage in geologiC formaTions The sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in geologic formations is a viable option for achieving deep reductions in greenhouse gas emissions without hindering economic prosperity. Due to the abundance of fossil fuels in the United States and around the globe as compared to other energy sources, there is strong interest in geologic sequestration, but cost is a key issue. The volume of CO 2 emitted from power plants and other energy systems is enormous compared to other emissions of concern. For example, a pulverized coal (PC) boiler operating on Illinois #6 coal (2.5 percent sulfur) may generate 0.03 pounds of sulfur dioxide per kilowatt hour (kWh) and emit CO 2 at a rate of 1.7 pounds per kWh.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geologic repository" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Geology of the USW SD-12 drill hole Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Drill hole USW SD-12 is one of several holes drilled under Site Characterization Plan Study 8.3.1.4.3.1, also known as the {open_quotes}Systematic Drilling Program,{close_quotes} as part of the U.S. Department of Energy characterization program at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, which has been proposed as the potential location of a repository for high-level nuclear waste. The SD-12 drill hole is located in the central part of the potential repository area, immediately to the west of the Main Test Level drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility and slightly south of midway between the North Ramp and planned South Ramp declines. Drill hole USW SD-12 is 2166.3 ft (660.26 m) deep, and the core recovered essentially complete sections of ash-flow tuffs belonging to the lower half of the Tiva Canyon Tuff, the Pah Canyon Tuff, and the Topopah Spring Tuff, all of which are part of the Miocene Paintbrush Group. A virtually complete section of the Calico Hills Formation was also recovered, as was core from the entire Prow Pass Tuff formation of the Crater Flat Group.

Rautman, C.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Engstrom, D.A. [Spectra Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Geologic And Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geologic And Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At Dixie Valley, Nevada Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 'nested graben' structural model, in which multiple faults successively displace rocks downward to the deepest part of the basin, is supported by recent field geologic analysis and correlation of results to geophysical data for Dixie Valley. Aerial photographic analysis and detailed field mapping provide strong evidence for a deep graben separated from the ranges to the east and west by multiple normal faults that affect the Tertiary/Quaternary basin-fill sediments. Correlation with seismic

343

Geology Of The Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Site | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geology Of The Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Site Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geology Of The Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Site Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Phase I prototype hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal system was developed in Precambrian basement rocks at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. Core and cuttings samples from the four deep wells indicate that the reservoir of this Phase I HDR system lies within a homogeneous biotite granodiorite body of very low permeability. Natural fractures, although present, are

344

Reaction Mechanisms in Petroleum: From Experimentation to Upgrading and Geological Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Among the numerous questions that arise concerning the exploitation of petroleum from unconventional reservoirs, lie the questions of the composition of hydrocarbons present in deep seated HP-HT reservoirs or produced during in-situ upgrading steps of heavy oils and oil shales. Our research shows that experimental hydrocarbon cracking results obtained in the laboratory cannot be extrapolated to geological reservoir conditions in a simple manner. Our demonstration is based on two examples: 1) the role of the hydrocarbon mixture composition on reaction kinetics (the "mixing effect") and the effects of pressure (both in relationship to temperature and time). The extrapolation of experimental data to geological conditions requires investigation of the free-radical reaction mechanisms through a computed kinetic model. We propose a model that takes into account 52 reactants as of today, and which can be continuously improved by addition of new reactants as research proceeds. This model is complete and detailed enou...

Lannuzel, Frédéric; Bounaceur, Roda; Marquaire, Paul-Marie; Michels, Raymond

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Measurement and Accounting of CO2 Stored in Deep Geologic Formations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage Program Storage Program John Litynski, PE Carbon Storage Technology Manager Carbon Storage Program Infrastructure Annual Review Meeting Nov 15-17, 2011 2 Sources: U.S. data from EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011; World data from IEA, World Energy Outlook 2010, Current Policies Scenario 716 QBtu / Year 79% Fossil Energy 114 QBtu / Year 78% Fossil Energy + 14% Energy Demand 2008 100 QBtu / Year 84% Fossil Energy 487 QBtu / Year 81% Fossil Energy 29,259 mmt CO 2 42,589 mmt CO 2 5,838 mmt CO 2 6,311 mmt CO 2 Energy Demand 2035 United States World + 47% * Primarily traditional biomass, wood, and waste. 3 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY CARBON STORAGE PROGRAM with ARRA Projects 2012 Structure Benefits

346

Expected dose for the seismic scenario classes in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In support of this development and an associated license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the DOE completed an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository in 2008. This presentation describes the determination of expected dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) specified in the NRC regulations for the YM repository for the seismic ground motion scenario class and the seismic fault displacement scenario class in the 2008 YM PA. The following topics are addressed: (i) definition of the seismic scenario classes and the determination of dose and expected dose to the RMEI, (ii) properties of the seismic ground motion scenario class, (iii) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI for the seismic ground motion scenario class from 0 to 20,000 yr, (iv) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI for the seismic ground motion scenario class from 0 to 106 yr, (v) properties of the seismic fault displacement scenario class including expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI from 0 to 20,000 yr and 0 to 106 yr, (vi) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI for the combined ground motion and seismic fault displacement scenario class, and (vii) probabilities associated with seismic scenario classes. The present article is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA; additional articles in the issue describe other aspects of the 2008 YM PA.

J.C. Helton; M.G. Gross; C.W. Hansen; C.J. Sallaberry; S.D. Sevougian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Global Warming in Geologic Time  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere / ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial / interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

David Archer

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

348

Geologic research of conventional and unconventional hydrocarbon resources. Quarterly report, October 1, 1992--March 1, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the period from October 1, 1992 to March 1, 1993. The overall goals of the program task are to provide a final synthesis of six deep seismic reflection profiles and other geological and geophysical data from the southern Washington Cascades region where a probable extensive deep sedimentary basin has been discovered. This deep sedimentary basin is hypothesized from geological, regional magnetotelluric (MT), gravity, magnetic , and seismic reflection data as described in the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) article by Stanley and others (1992). This report analyzed three seismic reflection profiles acquired by the Morgantown Energy Technology Centers in combination with the extensive MT and other data to outline a probable geological model for a thick conductive section of rocks in the southern Washington Cascades (called the Southern Washington Cascades conductor, SWCC). Earlier MT models suggested that the section consisted of an east-dipping package that extended to depths of as much as 20 km but appeared to surface in the Bear Canyon area near Morton, Washington and along the axis of the Carbon River and Morton anticlines. Interpretation of the first three DOE seismic reflection approximately confirmed the MT interpretation and added new information on anticlinal structures and detailed stratigraphy. In this quarterly report, we summarize the progress over the first two quarters of the program for FY93, and project the possible findings during the remainder of the project. A milestone chart for the first two quarters has been submitted separately, along with cost reports, but a copy of these items are attached for completeness.

Not Available

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

349

Factors limiting microbial growth and activity at a proposed high-level nuclear repository, yucca mountain, nevada.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...High-Level Nuclear Repository, Yucca Mountain, Nevada TL Kieft WP Kovacik Jr...part of the characterization of Yucca Mountain, Nev., as a potential repository...from nine sites along a tunnel in Yucca Mountain. Microbial abundance was generally...

T L Kieft; W P Kovacik; D B Ringelberg; D C White; D L Haldeman; P S Amy; L E Hersman

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

A New Approach For Direct Disposal Of Spent Fuel Into Deep Vertical Boreholes In A Salt Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the reference concept for the disposal of heat generating radioactive waste in Germany. It also highlights a new approach to reduce efforts for the transport and handling of waste canisters by introducing a new canister type for spent fuel (BSK 3). The objectives and the scope of a corresponding research and development program performed in the context of the 6. European Framework Program will be presented. The entire emplacement process and the technical components will be described and illustrated. The program for the corresponding 1:1-scale demonstration tests and the location of the test site will be explained. Eventually, an outlook on the planned demonstration test will be given. (authors)

Bollingerfehr, W.; Filbert, W.; Wehrmann, J. [DBE TECHNOLOGY GmbH, Peine (Germany)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Deep in Data: Empirical Data Based Software Accuracy Testing Using the Building America Field Data Repository: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An opportunity is available for using home energy consumption and building description data to develop a standardized accuracy test for residential energy analysis tools. That is, to test the ability of uncalibrated simulations to match real utility bills. Empirical data collected from around the United States have been translated into a uniform Home Performance Extensible Markup Language format that may enable software developers to create translators to their input schemes for efficient access to the data. This may facilitate the possibility of modeling many homes expediently, and thus implementing software accuracy test cases by applying the translated data. This paper describes progress toward, and issues related to, developing a usable, standardized, empirical data-based software accuracy test suite.

Neymark, J.; Roberts, D.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Utah Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utah Geological Survey Utah Geological Survey Name Utah Geological Survey Address 1594 W. North Temple Place Salt Lake City, Utah Zip 84114-6100 Phone number 801.537.3300 Website http://geology.utah.gov/ Coordinates 40.7713859°, -111.9367973° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7713859,"lon":-111.9367973,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

353

Geology of Kilauea Volcano | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology of Kilauea Volcano Geology of Kilauea Volcano Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geology of Kilauea Volcano Abstract This paper summarizes studies of the structure, stratigraphy, petrology, drill holes, eruption frequency, and volcanic and seismic hazards of Kilauea volcano. All the volcano is discussed, bul the focus is on its lower east rift zone (LERZ) because active exploration for geothermal energy is concentrated in that area. Kilauea probably has several separate hydrothermal-convection systems lhat develop in response to the dynamic behavior of the volcano and the influx of abundant meteoric water, of some of these hydrothermal convection systems are known through studies of surface geology,and drill holes. Observations of eruptions during the past

354

Property:AreaGeology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AreaGeology AreaGeology Jump to: navigation, search Property Name AreaGeology Property Type String Description A description of the area geology This is a property of type String. Subproperties This property has the following 22 subproperties: A Amedee Geothermal Area B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area C Chena Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area D cont. Dixie Valley Geothermal Area E East Mesa Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area K Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salton Sea Geothermal Area San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area

355

Geology of the Athabasca Oil Sands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...only when reservoir condi-tions...geological at-rocks, cap rocks, oil migration...subsurface reservoir and supplying...reservoir quality of the sands. Porosity. High-grade...reservoir sandstones (5 to 20...the oil. Permeability. The permeability...

Grant D. Mossop

1980-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

356

Investigations to site a radioactive waste repository in Cumbria: Evidence against proceeding to MRWS Stage 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigations to site a radioactive waste repository in Cumbria: Evidence against proceeding to MRWS Stage 4 Radioactive waste repository in Cumbria: Evidence against proceeding to MRWS Stage 4 s the UK radioactive waste legacy comprises difficult material which is complex, of mixed origin

357

Normalized Access to Ontology Repositories Kim Viljanen, Jouni Tuominen, Eetu Makela and Eero Hyvonen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the best matching concepts for her needs. 1http://bioportal.bioontology.org/ 2http://onki.fi 3http://ontolog.cimNormalized Access to Ontology Repositories Kim Viljanen, Jouni Tuominen, Eetu M¨akel¨a and Eero Hyv http://www.seco.tkk.fi/, firstname.lastname@aalto.fi Abstract--Ontology repositories, such as NCBO

Hyvönen, Eero

358

CVS-Vintage: A Dataset of 14 CVS Repositories of Java Software  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CVS-Vintage: A Dataset of 14 CVS Repositories of Java Software Martin Monperrus and Matias Martinez INRIA Technical Report, 2012. Abstract This paper presents a dataset of 14 CVS repositories of Java applications. This dataset aims at supporting the replication of early papers in the field of software

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

359

Benchmarking DAML+OIL Repositories Yuanbo Guo, Jeff Heflin, and Zhengxiang Pan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Benchmarking DAML+OIL Repositories Yuanbo Guo, Jeff Heflin, and Zhengxiang Pan Department, heflin, zhp2}@cse.lehigh.edu Abstract. We present a benchmark that facilitates the evaluation of DAML+OIL repositories in a standard and systematic way. This benchmark is intended to evaluate the performance of DAML+OIL

Heflin, Jeff

360

Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium--Validation Phase  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geological Sequestration Geological Sequestration Consortium-Validation Phase Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected seven partnerships, through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) initiative, to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), a greenhouse gas (GHG) which can contribute to global climate change. The RCSPs are made up of state and local agencies, coal companies, oil and gas companies, electric utilities,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geologic repository" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Dessicant materials screening for backfill in a salt repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Maintaining an anhydrous environment around nuclear waste stored in a salt repository is a concern which can be alleviated by using a desiccant material for backfilling. Such a desiccant should desiccate a brine yet be non deliquescent, the hydrated product should have moderate thermal stability, and the desiccant should have a high capacity and be readily available. From a literature search MgO and CaO were identified for detailed study. These oxides, and an intimate mixture of the two obtained by calcining dolomite, were used in experiments to further determine their suitability. They proved to be excellent desiccants with a high water capacity. The hydrates of both have moderate thermal stability and a high water content. Both MgO and CaO react in an alkaline chloride brine forming oxychloride compounds with different waters of crystallization. Some of these compounds are the Sorel Cements. CaO hydrates to Ca(OH)/sub 2/ which carbonates with CO/sub 2/ in air to form CaCO/sub 3/ and release the hydrated water. Thus the intimate mixture of CaO and MgO from calcined dolomite may serve as a desiccant and remove CO/sub 2/ from the repository atmosphere.

Simpson, D.R.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

EM Gains Insight from Germany on Salt-Based Repositories | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gains Insight from Germany on Salt-Based Repositories Gains Insight from Germany on Salt-Based Repositories EM Gains Insight from Germany on Salt-Based Repositories December 14, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Participants in the workshops in Germany toured Asse II, one of Germany’s two salt-based repositories, to gain insights into that facility’s technical challenges and proposed solutions. Pictured, left to right, are an Asse II employee, Bernhard Kienzler of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, CBFO Chief Scientist Roger Nelson, CBFO International Programs Manager Dr. Abraham Van Luik, and Andrew Wolfsberg, Acting Deputy Division Leader for Earth and Environmental Sciences at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Participants in the workshops in Germany toured Asse II, one of Germany's two salt-based repositories, to gain insights into that facility's

363

NOVEL CONCEPTS RESEARCH IN GEOLOGIC STORAGE OF CO2 PHASE III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative on developing new technologies for storage of carbon dioxide in geologic reservoirs, Battelle has been investigating the feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in the deep saline reservoirs in the Ohio River Valley region. In addition to the DOE, the project is being sponsored by American Electric Power (AEP), BP, The Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) of the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority, Schlumberger, and Battelle. The main objective of the project is to demonstrate that CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep formations is feasible from engineering and economic perspectives, as well as being an inherently safe practice and one that will be acceptable to the public. In addition, the project is designed to evaluate the geology of deep formations in the Ohio River Valley region in general and in the vicinity of AEP's Mountaineer Power Plant in particular, in order to determine their potential use for conducting a long-term test of CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline formations. The current technical progress report summarizes activities completed for the January-March 2006 period of the project. As discussed in the following report, the main accomplishments were analysis of Copper Ridge ''B-zone'' reservoir test results from the AEP No.1 well and design and feasibility support tasks. Reservoir test results indicate injection potential in the Copper Ridge ''B-zone'' may be significantly higher than anticipated for the Mountaineer site. Work continued on development of injection well design options, engineering assessment of CO{sub 2} capture systems, permitting, and assessment of monitoring technologies as they apply to the project site. In addition, organizational and scheduling issues were addressed to move the project toward an integrated carbon capture and storage system at the Mountaineer site. Overall, the current design feasibility phase project is proceeding according to plans.

Neeraj Gupta

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

364

Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies conducted a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project was to review U.S. deep well drilling and stimulation activity, review rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep, high-pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. This report documents results from this project.

Stephen Wolhart

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

365

Bomb-Pulse Chlorine-36 At The Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository Horizon: An Investigation Of Previous Conflicting Results And Collection Of New Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous studies by scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) found elevated ratios of chlorine-36 to total chloride ({sup 36}Cl/Cl) in samples of rock collected from the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) and the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) at Yucca Mountain as the tunnels were excavated. The data were interpreted as an indication that fluids containing 'bomb-pulse' {sup 36}Cl reached the repository horizon in the {approx}50 years since the peak period of above-ground nuclear testing. Moreover, the data support the concept that so-called fast pathways for infiltration not only exist but are active, possibly through a combination of porous media, faults and/or other geologic features. Due to the significance of {sup 36}Cl data to conceptual models of unsaturated zone flow and transport, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to design and implement a study to validate the LANL findings. The USGS chose to drill new boreholes at select locations across zones where bomb-pulse ratios had previously been identified. The drill cores were analyzed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for {sup 36}Cl/Cl using both active and passive leaches, with the USGS/LLNL concluding that the active leach extracted too much rock-Cl and the passive leach did not show bomb-pulse ratios. Because consensus was not reached between the USGS/LLNL and LANL on several fundamental points, including the conceptual strategy for sampling, interpretation and use of tritium ({sup 3}H) data, and the importance and interpretation of blanks, in addition to the presence or absence of bomb-pulse {sup 36}Cl, an evaluation by an independent entity, the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), using new samples was initiated. This report is the result of that study. The overall objectives of the UNLV study were to investigate the source or sources of the conflicting results from the previous validation study, and to obtain additional data to determine whether or not there are bomb-pulse isotopes at the repository horizon. To that en4 we have engaged in discussions with previous investigators, reviewed reports, and analyzed archived samples. We have also collected new samples of rock from the ESF, soil profiles from the surface of Yucca Mountain, and opportunistic samples of seep water from inside the south ramp of the ESF.

J. Cizdziel

2006-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

366

An Assessment of Geological Carbon Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) has investigated the options for geological carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in the 155,400-km{sup 2} (60,000-mi{sup 2}) Illinois Basin. Within the Basin, underlying most of Illinois, western Indiana, and western Kentucky, are relatively deeper and/or thinner coal resources, numerous mature oil fields, and deep salt-water-bearing reservoirs that are potentially capable of storing CO{sub 2}. The objective of this Assessment was to determine the technical and economic feasibility of using these geological sinks for long-term storage to avoid atmospheric release of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel combustion and thereby avoid the potential for adverse climate change. The MGSC is a consortium of the geological surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky joined by six private corporations, five professional business associations, one interstate compact, two university researchers, two Illinois state agencies, and two consultants. The purpose of the Consortium is to assess carbon capture, transportation, and storage processes and their costs and viability in the three-state Illinois Basin region. The Illinois State Geological Survey serves as Lead Technical Contractor for the Consortium. The Illinois Basin region has annual emissions from stationary anthropogenic sources exceeding 276 million metric tonnes (304 million tons) of CO{sub 2} (>70 million tonnes (77 million tons) carbon equivalent), primarily from coal-fired electric generation facilities, some of which burn almost 4.5 million tonnes (5 million tons) of coal per year. Assessing the options for capture, transportation, and storage of the CO{sub 2} emissions within the region has been a 12-task, 2-year process that has assessed 3,600 million tonnes (3,968 million tons) of storage capacity in coal seams, 140 to 440 million tonnes (154 to 485 million tons) of capacity in mature oil reservoirs, 7,800 million tonnes (8,598 million tons) of capacity in saline reservoirs deep beneath geological structures, and 30,000 to 35,000 million tonnes (33,069 to 38,580 million tons) of capacity in saline reservoirs on a regional dip >1,219 m (4,000 ft) deep. The major part of this effort assessed each of the three geological sinks: coals, oil reservoirs, and saline reservoirs. We linked and integrated options for capture, transportation, and geological storage with the environmental and regulatory framework to define sequestration scenarios and potential outcomes for the region. Extensive use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and visualization technology was made to convey results to project sponsors, other researchers, the business community, and the general public. An action plan for possible technology validation field tests involving CO{sub 2} injection was included in a Phase II proposal (successfully funded) to the U.S. Department of Energy with cost sharing from Illinois Clean Coal Institute.

Robert Finley

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

367

A Summary of INEEL Calcine Properties Used to Evaluate Direct Calcine Disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To support evaluations of the direct disposal of Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory calcines to the repository at Yucca Mountain, an evaluation of the performance of the calcine in the repository environment must be performed. This type of evaluation demonstrates, through computer modeling and analysis, the impact the calcine would have on the ability of the repository to perform its function of containment of materials during the repository lifetime. This report discusses parameters that were used in the scoping evaluation conducted in FY 2003. It provides nominal values for the parameters, with explanation of the source of the values, and how the values were modified for use in repository analysis activities.

C. A. Dahl

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

DOE Geothermal Data Repository - Tethering Data to Information: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data are not inherently information. Without context, data are just numbers, figures, names, or points on a line. By assigning context to data, we can validate ideas, form opinions, and generate knowledge. This is an important distinction to information scientists, as we recognize that the context in which we keep our data plays a big part in generating its value. The mechanisms used to assign this context often include their own data, supplemental to the data being described and defining semantic relationships, commonly referred to as metadata. This paper provides the status of the DOE Geothermal Data Repository (DOE GDR), including recent efforts to tether data submissions to information, discusses the important distinction between data and information, outlines a path to generate useful knowledge from raw data, and details the steps taken in order to become a node on the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS).

Weers, J.; Anderson, A.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Expected dose and associated uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results for all scenario classes in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In support of this development and an associated license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the DOE completed an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository in 2008. The conceptual structure and organization of the 2008 YM PA is based on decomposing the analysis into the following scenario classes: nominal, early waste package failure, early drip shield failure, igneous intrusive, igneous eruptive, seismic ground motion, and seismic fault displacement. This presentation describes how results obtained for the individual scenario classes are brought together in the determination of expected dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) specified by the NRC in the regulatory requirements for the YM repository and presents associated uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results. The following topics are addressed: (i) determination of expected dose to the RMEI from all scenario classes, (ii) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI for 0 to 20,000 yr, (iii) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI from for 0 to 106 yr, (iv) justification for the decomposition procedure used to estimate expected dose to the RMEI from all scenario classes, and (v) effectiveness of individual barrier systems in reducing releases from the repository and thus dose to the RMEI. The present article is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA; additional articles in the issue describe other aspects of the 2008 YM PA.

J.C. Helton; C.W. Hansen; C.J. Sallaberry

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Characterization Efforts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RCSP Geologic Characterization Efforts RCSP Geologic Characterization Efforts The U.S. Department of Energy created a nationwide network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) in 2003 to help determine and implement the technology, infrastructure, and regulations most appropriate to promote carbon storage in different regions of the United States and Canada. The RCSP Initiative is being implemented in three phases: (1) Characterization Phase (2003-2005) to collect data on CO2 stationary sources and geologic formations and develop the human capital to support and enable future carbon storage field tests, (2) Validation Phase (2005-2011) to evaluate promising CO2 storage opportunities through a series of small-scale (<1 million metric tons of CO2) field tests, and (3) Development Phase (2008-2018+) that involves the injection of 1 million metric tons or more of CO2 by each RCSP into regionally significant geologic formations. In addition to working toward developing human capital, encouraging stakeholder networking, and enhancing public outreach and education on carbon capture and storage (CCS), the RCSPs are conducting extensive geologic characterization across all three project phases, as well as CO2 stationary source identification and re-evaluation over time.

371

A New Greenland Deep Ice Core  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...isotopic profile with that from camp Century and with a deep-sea foraminifera...deep-sea cores. The redated Camp Century record suggests a dramatic termination...CENTURIES OF CLIMATIC RECORD FROM CAMP CENTURY ON GREENLAND ICE SHEET, SCIENCE...

W. Dansgaard; H. B. Clausen; N. Gundestrup; C. U. Hammer; S. F. Johnsen; P. M. Kristinsdottir; N. Reeh

1982-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

372

Deep-web search engine ranking algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The deep web refers to content that is hidden behind HTML forms. The deep web contains a large collection of data that are unreachable by link-based search engines. A study conducted at University of California, Berkeley ...

Wong, Brian Wai Fung

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

The Construction of the Konrad Repository - Status and Perspective - 13034  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the Atomic Energy Act of Germany the Federation is responsible for the construction and operation of installations for the safekeeping and disposal of radioactive waste. The Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz - BfS) is assigned with this duty. In 1982 the abandoned iron ore mine Konrad near Salzgitter (Federal State of Lower Saxony) was proposed as a repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste with negligible heat generation. After 20 years of plan approval procedure the license was granted by the Ministry for Environment of Lower Saxony in May 2002. This decision was finally confirmed by the Federal Administrative Court in March 2007. The construction has started, but former assumptions about the beginning of waste emplacement tuned out to be too optimistic. In the course of the preparatory work and the implementation planning it turned out that many changes need to be done. As a matter of fact most of the documents and planning originate from the 1990's and need to be revised because from that time on until now no adaptation was appropriate. The necessity to apply the state-of-the-art technology and other legal implications give rise to further changes and new licensing procedures, especially building licenses. Furthermore, the license from 2002 also includes a lot of collateral clauses that need to be fulfilled before radioactive waste can be emplaced. With this in mind, the time frame for the construction of the Konrad repository was revised in 2010. As a result, the completion of the erection before 2019 does not seem to be realistic. (authors)

Kunze, V. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz - BfS, Postfach 10 01 49, 38201 Salzgitter (Germany)] [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz - BfS, Postfach 10 01 49, 38201 Salzgitter (Germany)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

TECHNICAL ADVANCEMENTS AND ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lessons Learned from Yucca Mountain and Other Programs June 2011 A Report to Congress and the Secretary's efforts to develop a deep geologic repository for high-activity waste1 at Yucca Mountain in Nevada Commission (NRC) to construct a repository at Yucca Mountain. An important part of the Board's mission

375

Reference design and operations for deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reference design and operational procedures for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste in deep boreholes have been developed and documented. The design and operations are feasible with currently available technology and meet existing safety and anticipated regulatory requirements. Objectives of the reference design include providing a baseline for more detailed technical analyses of system performance and serving as a basis for comparing design alternatives. Numerous factors suggest that deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste is inherently safe. Several lines of evidence indicate that groundwater at depths of several kilometers in continental crystalline basement rocks has long residence times and low velocity. High salinity fluids have limited potential for vertical flow because of density stratification and prevent colloidal transport of radionuclides. Geochemically reducing conditions in the deep subsurface limit the solubility and enhance the retardation of key radionuclides. A non-technical advantage that the deep borehole concept may offer over a repository concept is that of facilitating incremental construction and loading at multiple perhaps regional locations. The disposal borehole would be drilled to a depth of 5,000 m using a telescoping design and would be logged and tested prior to waste emplacement. Waste canisters would be constructed of carbon steel, sealed by welds, and connected into canister strings with high-strength connections. Waste canister strings of about 200 m length would be emplaced in the lower 2,000 m of the fully cased borehole and be separated by bridge and cement plugs. Sealing of the upper part of the borehole would be done with a series of compacted bentonite seals, cement plugs, cement seals, cement plus crushed rock backfill, and bridge plugs. Elements of the reference design meet technical requirements defined in the study. Testing and operational safety assurance requirements are also defined. Overall, the results of the reference design development and the cost analysis support the technical feasibility of the deep borehole disposal concept for high-level radioactive waste.

Herrick, Courtney Grant; Brady, Patrick Vane; Pye, Steven; Arnold, Bill Walter; Finger, John Travis; Bauer, Stephen J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Petroleum geology of the Gulf of California, Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gulf of California basin proper is a very young (late Miocene) feature in northwestern Mexico, produced by the tectonic interaction of the Pacific and American plates. Sediments are mostly siliciclastic with thicknesses that may exceed 8,000 m (26,248 ft). Exploratory drilling started in 1979 and since then, ten offshore and seven onshore wells have been spudded. Foremost among the former the Extremeno 1 well tested from a thin deltaic sand 4,115 m deep (13,501 ft) a daily flow of 6.2 million ft{sup 3} of gas and 130 bbl of gas condensate through a 0.25 in. choke with a pressure of 280 kg/cm{sup 2} (3,981 psi). In the southern part of the basin, the offshore Huichol 1 well was also a gas and condensate producer, albeit noncommercial. Geologically, the basin's favorable generation and trapping conditions make up a very attractive scenario for a future petroleum producing province, once exploration priorities are considered timely.

Guzman, A.E. (Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX), San Luis Potosi, Mexico)

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Deep Web Entity Monitoring Mohammadreza Khelghati  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep Web Entity Monitoring Mohammadreza Khelghati Database Group University of Twente, Netherlands. This data is defined as hidden web or deep web which is not accessible through search engines. It is estimated that deep web contains data in a scale several times bigger than the data accessible through

Hiemstra, Djoerd

378

Brine flow in heated geologic salt.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the physical processes, primary governing equations, solution approaches, and historic testing related to brine migration in geologic salt. Although most information presented in this report is not new, we synthesize a large amount of material scattered across dozens of laboratory reports, journal papers, conference proceedings, and textbooks. We present a mathematical description of the governing brine flow mechanisms in geologic salt. We outline the general coupled thermal, multi-phase hydrologic, and mechanical processes. We derive these processes' governing equations, which can be used to predict brine flow. These equations are valid under a wide variety of conditions applicable to radioactive waste disposal in rooms and boreholes excavated into geologic salt.

Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Integrating seismic exploration methods into a geological sciences curriculum at Brigham Young Unversity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The continuing expansion in petroleum and other resource exploration and in geological hazard assessment for infrastructure development have combined to dramatically increase the need for training of university students in seismic imaging methods. This need is being met at Brigham Young University (BYU) by forming alliances or collaborations with private industry and government in order to provide financial support for research using seismic techniques to obtain access to proprietary datasets and to place students in the workplace as part of their university experience. Infrastructure support has been provided by BYU in the form of acquisition of seismic recording equipment procuring of state?of?the?art software for data processing and geologic mapping and building of a dedicated 3D visualization lab. This infrastructure creates an environment that mimics research and exploration programs in private industry. Seismicgeophysical research foci at BYU include (1) seismic characterization of deep reservoirs for carbon sequestration (2) 3D seismic attribute analysis for petroleum prospecting (3) high?resolution seismicexploration applied to landslide and earthquake hazard assessments (4) exploration of deep sedimentary basins that may be prospective for oil or gas and (5) oilfield applications of seismic mapping in order to detect and map shallow faults that may function as leakage pathways.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Geographic information systems (GIS) for geologic mapping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The computer-based Geographic Information System (GIS) is a powerful and versatile tool for preparation of geologic maps. Using GIS different types of geographically oriented information can be displayed on a common base in a flexible format that facilitates examination of relationships between the types of information. In addition, text-based and graphic information (attributes) from separate databases can be attached to points, lines or areas within the different map layers. Although GIS has enormous potential for geologic mapping, it must be used with care. Key considerations when using GIS include realistic representation of the geology, choice of an appropriate scale for the maps, and comparison of the computer-generated maps with field observations to maintain quality control. In building multilayer GIS maps, the data sources must be at a scale appropriate to the intended use. Information derived from diverse sources must be examined carefully to assure that it is valid at the scale of representation required. Examples of GIS products created for one purpose, but potentially misused for a different purpose, include formation contacts (lines) on a regional geologic map scaled up for a facility siting study or well locations on a small-scale location map subsequently contoured for contaminant plume prediction at a very large scale. In using GIS to prepare geologic maps, it is essential to have a clear rationale for the map and use an appropriate scale to depict the various layers of information. The authors of GIS-based geologic maps must be aware that the attractive, polished appearance of their products may tempt some end users to stretch and misinterpret the information displayed.

Schock, S.C. (Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Center for Environmental Research Information)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geologic repository" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Spent fuel test-climax: a test of geologic storage of high-level waste in granite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A test of retrievable geologic storage of spent fuel assemblies from an operating commercial nuclear reactor is underway at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) of the US Department of Energy. This generic test is located 420 m below the surface in the Climax granitic stock. Eleven canisters of spent fuel approximately 2.5 years out of reactor core (about 1.6 kW/canister thermal output) were emplaced in a storage drift along with 6 electrical simulator canisters. Two adjacent drifts contain electrical heaters, which are operated to simulate within the test array the thermal field of a large repository. Fuel was loaded during April to May 1980 and initial results of the test will be presented.

Ramspott, L.D.; Ballou, L.B.; Patrick, W.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Method of fracturing a geological formation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

MIDWEST GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION CONSORTIUM THE UNITED S T A  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MIDWEST GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION CONSORTIUM THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 ATLAS CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) is a consortium of the geologic surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky joined by private corporations, professional business associations, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission, three Illinois state agencies, and university researchers to assess carbon capture, transportation, and geologic storage processes and their costs and viability in the Illinois Basin region. The Illinois State Geological Survey is the Lead Technical Contractor for MGSC, which covers all of Illinois, southwest Indiana, and western Kentucky. To avoid atmospheric release of CO

384

Active Cores in Deep Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep field observations are an essential tool to probe the cosmological evolution of galaxies. In this context, X-ray deep fields provide information about some of the most energetic cosmological objects: active galactic nuclei (AGN). Astronomers are interested in detecting sufficient numbers of AGN to probe the accretion history at high redshift. This talk gives an overview of the knowledge resulting from a highly complete soft X-ray selected sample collected with ROSAT, XMM-Newton and Chandra deep fields. The principal outcome based on X-ray luminosity functions and space density evolution studies is that low-luminosity AGN evolve in a dramatically different way from high-luminosity AGN: The most luminous quasars perform at significantly earlier cosmic times and are most numerous in a unit volume at cosmological redshift z~2. In contrast, low-luminosity AGN evolve later and their space density peaks at z~0.7. This finding is also interpreted as an anti-hierarchical growth of supermassive black holes in the Universe. Comparing this with star formation rate history studies one concludes that supermassive black holes enter the cosmic stage before the bulk of the first stars. Therefore, first solutions of the so-called hen-egg problem are suggested. Finally, status developments and expectations of ongoing and future extended observations such as the XMM-COSMOS project are highlighted.

G. Hasinger; A. Mueller

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

385

U.S. Department of Energy Awards a Contract to USA Repository Services for  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

a Contract to USA Repository a Contract to USA Repository Services for Management and Operating Contractor Support for the Yucca Mountain Project U.S. Department of Energy Awards a Contract to USA Repository Services for Management and Operating Contractor Support for the Yucca Mountain Project October 30, 2008 - 4:14pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a $2.5 billion management and operating (M&O) contract to USA Repository Services (USA-RS), a wholly-owned subsidiary of the URS Corporation. USA-RS will be supported by principal subcontractors: Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure, Inc., and AREVA Federal Services, Inc. "If we are to meet growing energy demand and slow the growth of greenhouse gas emissions, nuclear power must be a larger part of our energy mix; it is

386

U.S. Department of Energy Awards a Contract to USA Repository Services for  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Awards a Contract to USA Repository U.S. Department of Energy Awards a Contract to USA Repository Services for Management and Operating Contractor Support for the Yucca Mountain Project U.S. Department of Energy Awards a Contract to USA Repository Services for Management and Operating Contractor Support for the Yucca Mountain Project October 30, 2008 - 4:14pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a $2.5 billion management and operating (M&O) contract to USA Repository Services (USA-RS), a wholly-owned subsidiary of the URS Corporation. USA-RS will be supported by principal subcontractors: Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure, Inc., and AREVA Federal Services, Inc. "If we are to meet growing energy demand and slow the growth of greenhouse gas emissions, nuclear power must be a larger part of our energy mix; it is

387

This fact sheet describes the repository design activities the U.S. Department o  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

repository design activities the U.S. Department of Energy is conducting at the Monticello repository design activities the U.S. Department of Energy is conducting at the Monticello Mill Tailings Site in Monticello, Utah. These activities are being performed in accordance with Federal and State environ- mental laws. Background The purpose of the Monticello cleanup projects is to minimize the risks to the public and the environment from exposure to mill tailings and the radon gas they produce. The Monticello Mill Tailings Site cleanup remedy was se- lected in the Record of Decision in August 1990 and recon- firmed in December 1994. It includes permanent disposal of mill tailings and contaminated materials in a repository to be constructed on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)- owned land south of the millsite in Monticello, Utah. The repository will hold approximately 2.6 to 3.0 million cubic

388

Proceedings of 3rd US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

New Mexico on October 8-11, 2012. Approximately 60 salt research scientists from Germany and the United States met to discuss repository science state of the art. Workshop...

389

The Five Great Space Repository Bodhisattvas: Lineage, Protection and Celestial Authority in Ninth-Century Japan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation explores the protective role of the Five Great Space Repository Bodhisattva (Godai Kokuzo Bosastu) sculptural pentads in Japan during the mid-ninth-century. While existing art historical scholarship regarding these sculptures...

Pedersen, Hillary

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

Preservation of the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin in the Digital Repository  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

digital repository, through a case study of a project at Texas A&M University Libraries to digitize Texas Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletins. It is hoped that a dispersed network of similar agricultural materials in all the various land grant...

McGeachin, Robert B.

2010-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

391

The Adoption of Advanced Fuel Cycle Technology Under a Single Repository Policy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Develops the tools to investiage the hypothesis that the savings in repository space associated with the implementation of advanced nuclear fuel cycles can result in sufficient cost savings to offset the higher costs of those fuel cycles.

Paul Wilson

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

392

Risk-informing decisions about high-level nuclear waste repositories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance assessments (PAs) are important sources of information for societal decisions in high-level radioactive waste (HLW) management, particularly in evaluating safety cases for proposed HLW repository development. ...

Ghosh, Suchandra Tina, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Design of a high-level waste repository system for the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report presents a conceptual design for a High Level Waste disposal system for fuel discharged by U.S. commercial power reactors, using the Yucca Mountain repository site recently designated by federal legislation. ...

Driscoll, Michael J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Morsleben Nuclear Waste Repository Probabilistic Safety Assessment of the Long-Term Safety  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The probabilistic safety assessment for a radioactive waste repository in a former salt mine is presented. Even with a simplified model, the number of parameters is high. Uncertainties in the parameter values ...

Georg Resele; Matthias Niemeyer…

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Shale Rocks as Nuclear Waste Repositories: Hydrothermal Reactions with Glass, Ceramic and Spent Fuel Waste Forms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objectives of various contributions from this laboratory have been to simulate “worst case” situations, given a proposed choice of waste form, repository rock, and waste loading/waste age. The “worst case”...

W. Phelps Freeborn; Michael Zolensky…

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Planned Emplacement of Magnesium Oxide in the WIPP Repository 1.0 Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Planned Emplacement of Magnesium Oxide in the WIPP Repository 1.0 Overview In December 2002 received approval to dispose of AMWTF's supercompacted waste provided magnesium oxide (MgO), the approved

397

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Final Exam Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Final Exam Review Review Online Exams 1, 2 & 3 In general, know Cretaceous 145.0-- 66.0 Jurassic 201.3 -- 145.0 Triassic 252.2 -- 201.3 Paleozoic Permian 298.9 -- 252 Supergroup: rifting of Pangaea to form Central Atlantic Basin; Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP); Tr

Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

398

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Final Exam Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Final Exam Review Review Exams 1 & 2 In general, know the basic 145.5 -- 65.5 Jurassic 201.5 -- 145.5 Triassic 252.3 -- 201.5 Paleozoic Permian 299 -- 252 to form Central Atlantic Basin; Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP); Tr/J extinction; CO2 peak

Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

399

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Final Exam Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Final Exam Review Review Exams 1 & 2 In general, know the basic 145.5 -- 65.5 Jurassic 199.6 -- 145.5 Triassic 251 -- 199.6 Paleozoic Permian 299 -- 251 Carboniferous Atlantic Basin; Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP); Tr/J extinction; CO2 peak Mesozoic Era: Jurassic

Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

400

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Final Exam Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOL 102: Historical Geology Final Exam Review Review Online Exams 1, 2 & 3 In general, know.0 Triassic 252.2 -- 201.3 Paleozoic Permian 298.9 -- 252.2 Carboniferous/Pennsylvanian 323.2 -- 298 Atlantic Basin; Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP); Tr/J extinction; CO2 peak Mesozoic Era: Jurassic

Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geologic repository" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Sir John Flett and the Geological Survey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... ON October 1 Sir John Flett retired from the directorship of the Geological Survey and Museum. He joined the ... in 1901, in 1903 he was appointed petrographer, and in 1911 he succeeded Dr. John Home as assistant director for Scotland. On the retirement of Sir Aubrey Strahan in ...

1935-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

402

Geology of the Athabasca Oil Sands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...geological at-rocks, cap rocks, oil migration...subsurface reservoir and supplying...the sands. Porosity. High-grade...the oil. Permeability. The permeability...Ath-abasca reservoir is the distribution...ofpri-mary porosity and permeability in the McMurray...

Grant D. Mossop

1980-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

403

Geology of the Athabasca Oil Sands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...flow only when reservoir condi-tions...geological at-rocks, cap rocks, oil migration...the subsurface reservoir and supplying...ex-cellent reservoir quality of the sands. Porosity. High-grade...petroleum reservoir sandstones (5 to 20 0036-8075...

Grant D. Mossop

1980-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

404

, UNIVERSITY Brigham Young University Geology Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, UNIVERSITY #12;Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 1 5 - 1968 Part 2 Studies; and depositing of sedi- ments in an Ice-Age lake called Lake Bonneville which intermittently filled the valley-transported sediment more than a mile in thickness (Text-fig. 2). At the;ery top of this accumulation of valley

Seamons, Kent E.

405

Petroleum reservoir porosity versus depth: Influence of geological age  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in late Carboniferous sandstone reservoirs, Bothamsall oilfield, E. Midlands: Journal of the Geological Society of...carbonate reservoir quality: Examples from Abu Dhabi and the Amu Darya Basin: Marine and Petroleum Geology, v.-15, p...

S. N. Ehrenberg; P. H. Nadeau; Ø. Steen

406

Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology Website Abstract Provides access to digital...

407

Rock mass modification around a nuclear waste repository in welded tuff  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of numerical analyses to estimate the extent of rock mass modification resulting from the presence of a High Level Waste (HLW) repository. Changes in rock mass considered are stresses and joint deformations resulting from disposal room excavation and thermal efffects induced by the heat generated by nuclear waste. rock properties and site conditions are taken from the Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design Report for the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Analyses were conducted using boundary element and distinct element methods. Room-scale models and repository-scale models were investigated for up to 500 years after waste emplacement. Results of room-scale analyses based on the thermoelastic boundary element model indicate that a zone of modified rock develops around the disposal rooms for both vertical and horizontal waste emplacement. This zone is estimated to extend a distance of roughly two room diameters from the room surface. Results from the repository-scale model, which are based on the thermoelastic boundary element model and the distinct element model, indicate a zone with modified rock mass properties starting approximately 100 m above and below the repository, with a thickness of approximately 200 m above and 150 m below the repository. Slip-prone subhorizontal features are shown to have a substantial effect on rock mass response. The estimates of rock mass modification reflect uncertainties and simplifying assumptions in the models. 32 refs., 57 figs., 1 tab.

Mack, M.G.; Brandshaug, T.; Brady, B.H.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Two-stage repository development at Yucca Mountain: an engineering feasibility study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 requires that the first repository for disposal of high-level radioactive waste be ready to receive waste by January 31, 1998. The preliminary designs of candidates for the first repository include a single waste-handling building constructed in one stage. After considering possible approaches to repository construction, the Department of Energy has proposed in its draft Mission Plan to construct the first repository in two steps to increase confidence in meeting the 1998 deadline. Therefore, the Department of Energy has requested the preparation of this engineering study to verify the validity of the two-stage approach to repository construction. This approach involves concurrent construction of two waste-handling buildings. The first would be completed in time to accept the equivalent of 400 MTU/y of waste by January 31, 1998. It would operate for 5 y, during which time construction of a full-capacity, 3000-MTU/y waste-handling building would be completed. The design includes six accesses to the underground facility: four vertical shafts and two ramps. The principal conclusion derived from this study is that two-stage repository construction can allow receipt and disposal of the 400 MTU/y of waste by January 31, 1998. Four alternate concepts have been explored to determine whether savings in costs could be accomplished. All four alternate concepts appear technically feasible and are potentially more cost effective than the reference approach.

MacDougall, H.R. (comp.)

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Paleontology and Geology of Indiana Department of Geological Sciences | P. David Polly 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Iowa Tracheophyta (vascular plants) Spores, New Albany Shale Sporing bodies, Dugger Fm. #12;Department (conifers) Walchia, Abo Fm. New Mexico (Permian) #12;Department of Geological Sciences | P. David Polly 5

Polly, David

410

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada - Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOEEIS-0250F-S2...

411

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada -- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOEEIS-0250F-S2...

412

Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic  Geology Billion  Gallons  per  Year Brine  Use  Sequence Carbon  dioxide  Capture  and  Storage Carbon  Dioxide Coal-­?

Breunig, Hanna M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Map of Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A larger map of FE's Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects awarded as part of the Recovery Act.

414

Geologic Mapping and Database for Portland Area Fault Studies Final  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This collection of digital geologic data derives from geologic and interpretive maps prepared by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) over the last 15 years. Most of the data was collected in the course of preparing digital earthquake hazards maps for all or part of the greater Portland (METRO) urban growth

Ian P. Madin

415

Repository site data report for unsaturated tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is currently considering the thick sequences of unsaturated, fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain, on the southwestern boundary of the Nevada Test Site, as a possible candidate host rock for a nuclear-waste repository. Yucca Mountain is in one of the most arid areas in the United States. The site is within the south-central part of the Great Basin section of the Basin and Range physiographic province and is located near a number of silicic calderas of Tertiary age. Although localized zones of seismic activity are common throughout the province, and faults are present at Yucca Mountain, the site itself is basically aseismic. No data are available on the composition of ground water in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. It has been suggested that the composition is bounded by the compositions of water from wells USW-H3, UE25p-1, J-13, and snow or rain. There are relatively few data available from Yucca Mountain on the moisture content and saturation, hydraulic conductivity, and characteristic curves of the unsaturated zone. The available literature on thermomechanical properties of tuff does not always distinguish between data from the saturated zone and data from the unsaturated zone. Geochemical, hydrologic, and thermomechanical data available on the unsaturated tuffs of Yucca Mountain are tabulated in this report. Where the data are very sparse, they have been supplemented by data from the saturated zone or from areas other than Yucca Mountain. 316 refs., 58 figs., 37 tabs.

Tien, P.L.; Updegraff, C.D.; Siegel, M.D.; Wahi, K.K.; Guzowski, R.V.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Water, Vapor, and Salt Dynamics in a Hot Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to report the results of a new model study examining the high temperature nuclear waste disposal concept at Yucca Mountain using MULTIFLUX, an integrated in-drift- and mountain-scale thermal-hydrologic model. The results show that a large amount of vapor flow into the drift is expected during the period of above-boiling temperatures. This phenomenon makes the emplacement drift a water/moisture attractor during the above-boiling temperature operation. The evaporation of the percolation water into the drift gives rise to salt accumulation in the rock wall, especially in the crown of the drift for about 1500 years in the example. The deposited salts over the drift footprint, almost entirely present in the fractures, may enter the drift either by rock fall or by water drippage. During the high temperature operation mode, the barometric pressure variation creates fluctuating relative humidity in the emplacement drift with a time period of approximately 10 days. Potentially wet and dry conditions and condensation on salt-laden drift wall sections may adversely affect the storage environment. Salt accumulations during the above-boiling temperature operation must be sufficiently addressed to fully understand the waste package environment during the thermal period. Until the questions are resolved, a below-boiling repository design is favored where the Alloy-22 will be less susceptible to localized corrosion. (authors)

Bahrami, Davood; Danko, George [Department of Mining Engineering, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., Reno, NV, 89557 (United States); Walton, John [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University, El Paso, TX, 79968 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Deep Blue No 1- A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery At Blue Mountain, Humboldt  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1- A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery At Blue Mountain, Humboldt 1- A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery At Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Deep Blue No 1- A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery At Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary of the geology, drilling operations, and down-hole measurements obtained during the drilling of Deep Blue No.1. This well was sited on the basis of proximity to numerous gold exploration holes that indicated thermal water, high temperature gradients recorded in the 12 shallow gradient holes, and low resistivity values associated with certain interpreted major faults. The well was targeted to intersect fracture zones associated with the West and

418

Deep Blue No. 1-A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery at Blue Mountain, Humboldt  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

No. 1-A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery at Blue Mountain, Humboldt No. 1-A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery at Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Deep Blue No. 1-A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery at Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada Abstract The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary of the geology, drilling operations, and down-hole measurements obtained during the drilling of Deep Blue No.1. This well was sited on the basis of proximity to numerous gold exploration holes that indicated thermal water, high temperature gradients recorded in the 12 shallow gradient holes, and low resistivity values associated with certain interpreted major faults. The well was targeted to intersect fracture zones associated with the West and Central Faults, two

419

Underground reconnaissance and environmental monitoring related to geologic CO2 sequestration studies at the DUSEL Facility, Homestake Mine, South Dakota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground field reconnaissance was carried out in the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) to identify potential locations for the planned geologic carbon sequestration experimental facility known as DUSEL CO{sub 2}. In addition, instrumentation for continuous environmental monitoring of temperature, pressure, and relative humidity was installed at various locations within the Homestake mine. The motivation for this work is the need to locate and design the DUSEL CO{sub 2} facility currently being planned to host CO{sub 2} and water flow and reaction experiments in long column pressure vessels over large vertical length scales. Review of existing geologic data and reconnaissance underground revealed numerous potential locations for vertical experimental flow columns, with limitations of existing vertical boreholes arising from limited vertical extent, poor continuity between drifts, and small diameter. Results from environmental monitoring over 46 days reveal spatial and temporal variations related to ventilation, weather, and ongoing dewatering of the mine.

Dobson, Patrick F.; Salve, Rohit

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

420

Hanford Site Guidelines for Preparation and Presentation of Geologic Information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A complex geology lies beneath the Hanford Site of southeastern Washington State. Within this geology is a challenging large-scale environmental cleanup project. Geologic and contaminant transport information generated by several U.S. Department of Energy contractors must be documented in geologic graphics clearly, consistently, and accurately. These graphics must then be disseminated in formats readily acceptable by general graphics and document producing software applications. The guidelines presented in this document are intended to facilitate consistent, defensible, geologic graphics and digital data/graphics sharing among the various Hanford Site agencies and contractors.

Lanigan, David C.; Last, George V.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Thorne, Paul D.; Webber, William D.

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep geologic repository" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A Method to Evaluate Additional Waste Forms to Optimize Performance of the HLW Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE high-level waste (HLW) disposal system is based on decisions made in the 1970s. The de facto Yucca Mountain WAC for HLW, contained in the Waste Acceptance System Requirements Document (WASRD), and the DOE-EM Waste Acceptance Product Specification for Vitrified High Level Waste Forms (WAPS) tentatively describes waste forms to be interred in the repository, and limits them to borosilicate glass (BSG). It is known that many developed waste forms are as durable as or better than environmental assessment or “EA”-glass. Among them are the salt-ceramic and metallic waste forms developed at ANL-W. Also, iron phosphate glasses developed at University of Missouri show promise in stabilizing the most refractory materials in Hanford HLW. However, for any of this science to contribute, the current Total System Performance Assessment model must be able to evaluate the additional waste form to determine potential impacts on repository performance. The results can then support the technical bases required in the repository license application. A methodology is proposed to use existing analysis models to evaluate potential additional waste forms for disposal without gathering costly material specific degradation data. The concept is to analyze the potential impacts of waste form chemical makeup on repository performance assuming instantaneous waste matrix dissolution. This assumption obviates the need for material specific degradation models and is based on the relatively modest fractional contribution DOE HLW makes to the repository radionuclide and hazardous metals inventory. The existing analysis models, with appropriate data modifications, are used to evaluate geochemical interactions and material transport through the repository. This methodology would support early screening of proposed waste forms through simplified evaluation of disposal performance, and would provide preliminary guidance for repository license amendment in the future.

D. Gombert; L. Lauerhass

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Performance of Deep Geothermal Energy Systems .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Geothermal energy is an important source of clean and renewable energy. This project deals with the study of deep geothermal power plants for the generation… (more)

Manikonda, Nikhil

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

. . . . . 85 . . . . . International Deep Drawing Research Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . 85 . . . . . International Deep Drawing Research Group IDDRG 2009 International 20899-855 USA e-mail: mark.iadicola@nist.gov, Web page: www

424

United States Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey Survey Jump to: navigation, search Logo: United States Geological Survey Name United States Geological Survey Address USGS National Center 12201 Sunrise Valley Drive Place Reston, VA Zip 20192 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Year founded 1879 Phone number 703-648-5953 Website http://www.usgs.gov/ Coordinates 38.947077°, -77.370315° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.947077,"lon":-77.370315,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

425

North Carolina Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State North Carolina State North Carolina Name North Carolina Geological Survey Address 1612 Mail Service Center City, State Raleigh, North Carolina Zip 27699-1612 Website http://www.geology.enr.state.n Coordinates 35.67°, -78.66° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.67,"lon":-78.66,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

426

Idaho Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Idaho Geological Survey Name Idaho Geological Survey Address 300 North 6th Street Suite 103 City, State Boise, Idaho Zip 83720-0050 Website http://www.idahogeology.org/Dr Coordinates 43.615992°, -116.199217° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.615992,"lon":-116.199217,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

427

Geology of Damon Mound Salt Dome, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geological investigation of the stratigraphy, cap-rock characteristics, deformation and growth history, and growth rate of a shallow coastal diapir. Damon Mound salt dome, located in Brazoria County, has salt less than 600 feet and cap rock less than 100 feet below the surface; a quarry over the dome provides excellent exposures of cap rock as well as overlying Oligocene to Pleistocene strata. These conditions make it ideal as a case study for other coastal diapirs that lack bedrock exposures. Such investigations are important because salt domes are currently being considered by chemical waste disposal companies as possible storage and disposal sites. In this book, the author reviews previous research, presents additional data on the subsurface and surface geology at Damon Mound, and evaluates Oligocene to post-Pleistocene diapir growth.

Collins, E.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Geological well log analysis. Third ed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Until recently, well logs have mainly been used for correlation, structural mapping, and quantitive evaluation of hydrocarbon bearing formations. This third edition of Geologic Well Log Analysis, however, describes how well logs can be used for geological studies and mineral exploration. This is done by analyzing well logs for numerous parameters and indices of significant mineral accumulation, primarily in sediments. Contents are: SP and Eh curves as redoxomorphic logs; sedimentalogical studies by log curve shapes; exploration for stratigraphic traps; continuous dipmeter as a structural tool; continuous dipmeter as a sedimentation tool; Paleo-facies logging and mapping; hydrogeology 1--hydrodynamics of compaction; hydrogeology 2--geostatic equilibrium; and hydrogeology 3--hydrodynamics of infiltration. Appendixes cover: Computer program for calculating the dip magnitude, azimuth, and the degree and orientation of the resistivity anisotrophy; a lithology computer program for calculating the curvature of a structure; and basic log analysis package for HP-41CV programmable calculator.

Pirson, S.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Science @WIPP: Underground Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WIPP WIPP Underground Laboratory Double Beta Decay Dark Matter Biology Repository Science Renewable Energy Underground Laboratory The deep geologic repository at WIPP provides an ideal environment for experiments in many scientific disciplines, including particle astrophysics, waste repository science, mining technology, low radiation dose physics, fissile materials accountability and transparency, and deep geophysics. The designation of the Carlsbad Department of Energy office as a "field" office has allowed WIPP to offer its mine operations infrastructure and space in the underground to researchers requiring a deep underground setting with dry conditions and very low levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials. Please contact Roger Nelson, chief scientist of the Department of

430

NREL's Field Data Repository Supports Accurate Home Energy Analysis (Fact Sheet), Building America: Technical Highlight, Building Technologies Program (BTP)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Field Data Field Data Repository Supports Accurate Home Energy Analysis The Residential Buildings Research Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed a repository of research-level residential building characteristics and historical energy use data to support ongoing efforts to improve the accuracy of residential energy analysis tools and the efficiency of energy assessment processes. The Field Data Repository currently includes data collected from historical programs where residential building characteristics (building geometry, insulation levels, equipment types, etc.), generally collected through energy audits, have been connected to measured energy use. With an emphasis on older homes, the repository contains datasets from Home Energy Rating System

431

Constructing a Risk Controversy: The Case of a Proposed High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository on the Skull Valley Goshute.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This thesis is a qualitative case study of a risk controversy generated by a proposal to construct a high-level nuclear waste repository on the… (more)

Jones, Taunya J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Modeling thermal-hydrological response of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to thermal load at a potential repository  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Repository at Yucca Mountain. In Materials Research Societystudies using the Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone model.Unsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Water Resources

Haukwa, C.B.; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

A comparative simulation study of coupled THM processes and their effect on fractured rock permeability around nuclear waste repositories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emplacement drift at Yucca Mountain. Journal of Contaminantniches in tuff units at Yucca Mountain. Proceedings of thetunnels, similar to the Yucca Mountain repository concept in

Rutqvist, Jonny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

A description and status of the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain is being characterized to determine its suitability as a site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. The repository would be located in the unsaturated zone in fractured, welded tuff. Sealing of the repository is one element of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). This paper presents a description of the repository sealing program including the sealing design options, design requirements, design constraints, and the identification of the proposed sealing materials and field tests. Design options for the shafts include anchor-to-bedrock seals, shaft fill, and settlement plugs; in the underground facility options include drift seals, drainage channels, sumps, and bulkheads. Design requirements are those quantitative requirements imposed on the sealing design options to achieve a desired level of performance. Constraints are restrictions placed on the repository design by the sealing design. As (1) additional hydrogeologic data are obtained through site characterization, (2) approaches to allocating performance to various subsystems within the YMP are refined, and (3) the exploratory shafts and the associated testing results are developed, the design requirements and constraints may be modified and used in developing the License Application Design. 1 ref., 1 fig.

Fernandez, J.A.; Hinkebein, T.E.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Marine biology: Lights in the deep  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the oceans. Moreover, the tools of on-site exploration — remotely operated vehicles and submersibles— generally fall short of being unobtrusive. Ron Douglas, who studies deep-sea vision ... Douglas, who studies deep-sea vision at City University in London, compares exploration by submersible to taking a "Land Rover and going out into the savannah in the middle ...

Mark Schrope

2007-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

436

Leonard and Swap on 'Deep Smarts'  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An interview with Dorothy Leonard and Walter Swap: The first issue that any organization has to face is the identification of the deep smarts. Dorothy Leonard and Walter Swap are co-authors of the new book 'Deep Smarts: How to Cultivate and Transfer ...

Ubiquity staff

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Deep into Pharo ESUG 2013 Edition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep into Pharo ESUG 2013 Edition Alexandre Bergel Damien Cassou Stéphane Ducasse Jannik Laval #12;ii This book is available as a free download from http://rmod.lille.inria.fr/deep of this work. The best way to do this is with a link to this web page: creativecommons.org/licenses/ by-sa/3

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

438

Evaluation of desalination costs with DEEP  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Detailed analysis has shown several discrepancies and pitfalls of coupling an economic evaluation code, such as SEMER to the desalination cost evaluation code DEEP. This paper resumes our findings, which may be of interest to other DEEP users. The paper in particular deals with the following issues: why is it that power costs from nuclear systems are systematically higher in DEEP than those given by the economic evaluations made by individual organisations, (in our case, the SEMER code for example), even when the calculated construction costs are input into DEEP? Why corresponding power costs for fossil energy systems are lower? Why in particular desalination costs from Gas-Turbine Combined Cycle power system, which is now considered to be the cheapest fossil fuel option, are higher than desalination costs by Pulverised Coal system? Why DEEP calculation results with the backup heat source are 40% higher than those without the backup heat source?

S. Nisan; Linda Volpi

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt This report summarizes efforts to simulate coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes occurring within a generic hypothetical high-level waste (HLW) repository in bedded salt; chemical processes of the system allow precipitation and dissolution of salt with elevated temperatures that drive water and water vapor flow around hot waste packages. Characterizing salt backfill processes is an important objective of the exercise. An evidence-based algorithm for mineral dehydration is also applied in the modeling. The Finite Element Heat and Mass transfer code (FEHM) is used to simulate coupled thermal,

440

Evaluating the Long-Term Safety of a Repository at Yucca Mountain   

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regulations require that the repository be evaluated for its health and safety effects for 10,000 years for the Site Recommendation process. Regulations also require potential impacts to be evaluated for up to a million years in an Environmental Impact Statement. The Yucca Mountain Project is in the midst of the Site Recommendation process. The Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) that supports the Site Recommendation evaluated safety for these required periods of time. Results showed it likely that a repository at this site could meet the licensing requirements promulgated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The TSPA is the tool that integrates the results of many years of scientific investigations with design information to allow evaluations of potential far-future impacts of building a Yucca Mountain repository. Knowledge created in several branches of physics is part of the scientific basis of the TSPA that supports the Site Recommendation process.

Abe Van Luik

2009-07-17T23:59:59.000Z