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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep convective clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Effects of aerosols on deep convective cumulus clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work investigates the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on deep convective clouds and the associated radiative forcing in the Houston area. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE) coupled with a spectral-bin microphysics is employed...

Fan, Jiwen

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

Environment and the Lifetime of Tropical Deep Convection in a Cloud-Permitting Regional Model Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By applying a cloud tracking algorithm to tropical convective systems simulated by a regional high resolution model, the study documents environmental conditions before and after convective systems are initiated over ocean and land by following them during their lifetime. The comparative roles of various environmental fields in affecting the lifetime of convection are also quantified. The statistics of lifetime, maximum area, propagation speed and direction of the simulated deep convection agrees well with geostationary satellite observations. Over ocean, convective systems enhance surface fluxes through the associated wind gusts as well as cooling and drying of the boundary layer. A significant relationship is found between the mean surface fluxes during their lifetime and the longevity of the systems which in turn is related to the initial intensity of the moist updraft and to a lesser extent upper level shear. Over land, on the other hand, convective activity suppresses surface fluxes through cloud cover and the lifetime of convection is related to the upper level shear during their lifetime and strength of the heat fluxes several hours before the initiation of convection. For systems of equal lifetime, those over land are significantly more intense than those over ocean especially during early stages of their lifetime.

Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Using Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations of Deep Convection to Inform Cloud Parmaterizations in Large-Scale Models  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Using Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations Using Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations of Deep Convection to Inform Cloud Parameterizations in Large-Scale Models S. A. Klein National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Princeton, New Jersey R. Pincus National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science Climate Diagnostics Center Boulder, Colorado K. -M. Xu National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia Abstract Cloud parameterizations in large-scale models struggle to address the significant non-linear effects of radiation and precipitation that arise from horizontal inhomogeneity in cloud properties at scales smaller than the grid box size of the large-scale models. Statistical cloud schemes provide an attractive

4

Convective Cloud Lifecycles Lunchtime seminar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Convective Cloud Lifecycles Lunchtime seminar 19th May 2009 Bob Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK #12;Introduction Obtain life cycle statistics for clouds in CRM simulations Why Conclusions Convective Cloud Lifecycles ­ p.1/3 #12;Why bother? Convective Cloud Lifecycles ­ p.2/3 #12;Some

Plant, Robert

5

On the Diurnal Cycle of Deep Convection, High-Level Cloud, and Upper Troposphere Water Vapor in the Multiscale Modeling Framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF), also called superparameterization, embeds a cloud-resolving model (CRM) at each grid column of a general circulation model to replace traditional parameterizations of moist convection and large-scale condensation. This study evaluates the diurnal cycle of deep convection, high-level clouds, and upper troposphere water vapor by applying an infrared (IR) brightness temperature (Tb) and a precipitation radar (PR) simulator to the CRM column data. Simulator results are then compared with IR radiances from geostationary satellites and PR reflectivities from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). While the actual surface precipitation rate in the MMF has a reasonable diurnal phase and amplitude when compared with TRMM observations, the IR simulator results indicate an inconsistency in the diurnal anomalies of high-level clouds between the model and the geostationary satellite data. Primarily because of its excessive high-level clouds, the MMF overestimates the simulated precipitation index (PI) and fails to reproduce the observed diurnal cycle phase relationships among PI, high-level clouds, and upper troposphere relative humidity. The PR simulator results show that over the tropical oceans, the occurrence fraction of reflectivity in excess of 20 dBZ is almost 1 order of magnitude larger than the TRMM data especially at altitudes above 6 km. Both results suggest that the MMF oceanic convection is overactive and possible reasons for this bias are discussed. However, the joint distribution of simulated IR Tb and PR reflectivity indicates that the most intense deep convection is found more often over tropical land than ocean, in agreement with previous observational studies.

Zhang, Yunyan; Klein, Stephen A.; Liu, Chuntao; Tian, Baijun; Marchand, Roger T.; Haynes, J. M.; McCoy, Renata; Zhang, Yuying; Ackerman, Thomas P.

2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

6

Limiting Factors for Convective Cloud Top Height in the Tropics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Limiting Factors for Convective Cloud Top Limiting Factors for Convective Cloud Top Height in the Tropics M. P. Jensen and A. D. Del Genio National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies Columbia University New York, New York Introduction Populations of tropical convective clouds are mainly comprised of three types: shallow trade cumulus, mid-level cumulus congestus and deep convective clouds (Johnson et al. 1999). Each of these cloud types has different impacts on the local radiation and water budgets. For climate model applications it is therefore important to understand the factors which determine the type of convective cloud that will occur. In this study, we concentrate on describing the factors that limit the cloud-top heights of mid-

7

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

Jensen, Mike; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

8

Technical Sessions Parameterization of Convective Clouds, Mesoscale...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Convective-Generated Clouds W. R. Cotton Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523 This presentation is a summary of research...

9

The Distribution of Deep Convection over Ocean and Land during the Asian Summer Monsoon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tle highly reflective cloud (HRC) dataset is a daily index of organized deep convection, at one degree resolution, from 17 years of polar-orbiting, satellite imagery. These data are used to analyze and discuss the climatological geographical ...

Robert L. Grossman; Oswaldo Garcia

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Multiscale Variability of Deep Convection In Realation to Large-Scale Circulation in TOGA COARE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Deep convection over the IndoPacific oceanic warm pool in the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled OceanAtmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) occurred in cloud clusters, which grouped together in regions favoring their occurrence. ...

Shuyi S. Chen; Robert A. Houze Jr.; Brian E. Mapes

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Triggering Deep Convection with a Probabilistic Plume Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A model unifying the representation of the planetary boundary layer and dry, shallow, and deep convection, the probabilistic plume model (PPM), is presented. Its capacity to reproduce the triggering of deep convection over land is analyzed in ...

Fabio DAndrea; Pierre Gentine; Alan K. Betts; Benjamin R. Lintner

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

ARM - Field Campaign - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Experiment (MC3E) Experiment (MC3E) Campaign Links Science Plan MC3E Website Related Campaigns Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment: 2DVD Support 2011.04.22, Schwaller, SGP Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Airborne Instruments 2011.04.22, Poellot, AAF Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers 2011.04.22, Williams, SGP Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment: Parsivel Disdrometer Support 2011.04.22, Schwaller, SGP Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Inner Domain Thermodynamic Profiling during MC3E 2011.04.22, Turner, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

13

Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. (2005), 131, pp. 26392663 doi: 10.1256/qj.04.62 Aerosol impact on the dynamics and microphysics of deep convective clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud dynamics Microphysics of cumulus clouds Precipitation efficiency 1. INTRODUCTION High in the concentration of small cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) leads to the formation of a large number of small of the diffusion droplet growth stage, increasing latent heat release by condensation. The additional water

Daniel, Rosenfeld

14

Deep storage of oceanic crust in a vigorously convecting mantle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep storage of oceanic crust in a vigorously convecting mantle J. P. Brandenburg1 and P. E. van: Brandenburg, J. P., and P. E. van Keken (2007), Deep storage of oceanic crust in a vigorously convecting cycle of creation, interaction with seawater and subduction may be responsi- ble for the loss of Pb

van Keken, Peter

15

BNL | Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a

16

North Australian Cloud Lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A satellite classification and climatology of propagating mesoscale cloud fines in northern Australia is presented. These cloud fines range from long, narrow lines of shallow convection to extensive deep convective squall lines with mesoscale ...

W. Drosdowsky; G. J. Holland

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Radiative-Convective Equilibrium Revisited: the Greenhouse Effect of Clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A parameterized spectral radiative-convective equilibrium model is built and the heating rates and temperature profiles for various absorbers are calculated and compared with the results of a classical model. Then using an optical depth that is dependent on both the extinction coefficient and the cloud-water path the validity of the black-cloud assumption is tested. It is determined under what conditions one would need to know the liquid or ice water path of the cloud and when one can simply treat the cloud as a black object. A distribution of both ice and water clouds is inputted into the model and the global average surface temperature is obtained. The sensitivity of the surface temperature to a change in either the ice or liquid water path of the cloud is also evaluated.

R. Davies; C. Radley

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Mechanisms initiating deep convection over complex terrain during COPS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Precipitating convection in a mountain region of moderate topography is investigated, with particular emphasis on its initiation in response to boundary-layer and mid- and upper-tropospheric forcing mechanisms. The data used in the study are from COPS (Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study) that took place in southwestern Germany and eastern France in the summer of 2007. It is found that the initiation of precipitating convection can be roughly classified as being due to either: (i) surface heating and low-level flow convergence; (ii) surface heating and moisture supply overcoming convective inhibition during latent and/or potential instability; or (iii) mid-tropospheric dynamical processes due to mesoscale convergence lines and forced mean vertical motion. These phenomena have to be adequately represented in models in order to improve quantitative precipitation forecast. Selected COPS cases are analyzed and classified into these initiation categories. Although only a subset of COPS data (mainly radiosondes, surface weather stations, radar and satellite data) are used here, it is shown that convective systems are captured in considerable detail by sensor synergy. Convergence lines were observed by Doppler radar in the location where deep convection is triggered several hours later. The results suggest that in many situations, observations of the location and timing of convergence lines will facilitate the nowcasting of convection. Further on, forecasting of the initiation of convection is significantly complicated if advection of potentially convective air masses over changing terrain features plays a major role. The passage of a frontal structure over the Vosges - Rhine valley - Black Forest orography was accompanied by an intermediate suppression of convection over the wide Rhine valley. Further downstream, an intensification of convection was observed over the Black Forest due to differential surface heating, a convergence line, and the flow generated by a gust front.

Kottmeier, C.; Kalthoff, N.; Barthlott, C.; Corsmeier, U.; Van Baelen, J.; Coulter, R.; Environmental Science Division; Inst. for Meteorology and Climate Research; Lab. de Meteorologie Physique; Inst. of Physics and Meteorology

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Convective processes play a critical role in the Earths energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and subsequent impacts on the hydrologic cycle. Global observation and accurate representation of these processes in numerical models is vital to improving our current understanding and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales that are associated with convective and stratiform precipitation processes; therefore, they must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, the physical basis for these parameterization schemes needs to be evaluated for general application under a variety of atmospheric conditions. Analogously, space-based remote sensing algorithms designed to retrieve related cloud and precipitation information for use in hydrological, climate, and numerical weather prediction applications often rely on physical parameterizations that reliably translate indirectly related instrument measurements to the physical quantity of interest (e.g., precipitation rate). Importantly, both spaceborne retrieval algorithms and model convective parameterization schemes traditionally rely on field campaign data sets as a basis for evaluating and improving the physics of their respective approaches. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the AprilMay 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The field campaign leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors, and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation, and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall retrieval algorithms over land that have never before been available. Several different components of convective cloud and precipitation processes tangible to both the convective parameterization and precipitation retrieval algorithm problem are targeted, such as preconvective environment and convective initiation, updraft/downdraft dynamics, condensate transport and detrainment, precipitation and cloud microphysics, spatial and temporal variability of precipitation, influence on the environment and radiation, and a detailed description of the large-scale forcing.

Jensen, MP; Petersen, WA; Del Genio, AD; Giangrande, SE; Heymsfield, A; Heymsfield, G; Hou, AY; Kollias, P; Orr, B; Rutledge, SA; Schwaller, MR; Zipser, E

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

ARM - Field Campaign - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Experiment Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers Related Campaigns Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) 2011.04.22, Jensen, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers 2011.04.22 - 2011.06.06 Lead Scientist : Christopher Williams For data sets, see below. Description The scientific focus was to study the vertical structure of precipitation in a vertical column over the SGP Central Facility. These multi-frequency profiler observations enabled directly measuring the vertical air motion and retrieving the raindrop size distributions from near the surface to just under the freezing level. These profilers were deployed during MC3E

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep convective clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (comstock-hvps)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

Jensen, Mike; Comstock, Jennifer; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

22

Lateral Heat Exchange after the Labrador Sea Deep Convection in 2008  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mechanisms through which convected water restratifies in the Labrador Sea are still under debate. The Labrador Sea restratification after deep convection in the 2007/08 winter is studied with an eddy-resolving numerical model. The modeled ...

Weiwei Zhang; Xiao-Hai Yan

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

A Satellite-Based Parameter to Monitor the Aerosol Impact on Convective Clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method to monitor the aerosol impact on convective clouds using satellite data is presented. The impacts of forest fires and highly polluting megacities on cloud precipitation formation processes are quantified by the vertical extent above ...

Itamar M. Lensky; Ron Drori

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (jensen-sonde)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment.

Jensen, Mike; Comstock, Jennifer; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

25

Deep Convective Transition Characteristics in the Community Climate System Model and Changes under Global Warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tropical deep convective transition characteristics, including precipitation pickup, occurrence probability, and distribution tails related to extreme events, are analyzed using uncoupled and coupled versions of the Community Climate System Model (...

Sandeep Sahany; J. David Neelin; Katrina Hales; Richard B. Neale

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

What Goes Up Must Come Down: The Lifecycle of Convective Clouds (492nd Brookhaven Lecture)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some clouds look like cotton balls and others like anvils. Some bring rain, some snow and sleet, and others, just shade. But, whether big and billowy or dark and stormy, clouds affect far more than the weather each day. Armed with measurements of clouds updrafts and downdraftswhich resemble airflow in a convection ovenand many other atmospheric interactions, scientists from Brookhaven Lab and other institutions around the world are developing models that are crucial for understanding Earths climate and forecasting future climate change. During his lecture, Dr. Jensen provides an overview of the importance of clouds in the Earths climate system before explaining how convective clouds form, grow, and dissipate. His discussion includes findings from the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), a major collaborative experiment between U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA scientists to document precipitation, clouds, winds, and moisture in 3-D for a holistic view of convective clouds and their environment.

Jensen, Michael [BNL Environmental Sciences

2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

27

Influence of Sea Surface Temperature on Humidity and Temperature in the Outflow of Tropical Deep Convection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Service Aircraft (MOZAIC) project are analyzed in the vicinity of deep convective outflow to study the variationsInfluence of Sea Surface Temperature on Humidity and Temperature in the Outflow of Tropical Deep upper-tropospheric temperature and humidity by the Mea- surement of Ozone and Water Vapor by Airbus In

Johnson, Richard H.

28

CLOUD PHYSICS From aerosol-limited to invigoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLOUD PHYSICS From aerosol-limited to invigoration of warm convective clouds Ilan Koren,1 * Guy Dagan,1 Orit Altaratz1 Among all cloud-aerosol interactions, the invigoration effect is the most elusive. Most of the studies that do suggest this effect link it to deep convective clouds with a warm base

Napp, Nils

29

Lightning flash rate and chemistry simulation of tropical island convection using a cloud-resolved model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lightning flash rate and chemistry simulation of tropical island convection using a cloud schemes (FRPSs) and estimating the average NO production per lightning flash in this unique storm type network (LINET) provided lightning flash data for the model and a lightning placement scheme injected

Maryland at College Park, University of

30

Can a Convective Cloud Feedback Help to Eliminate Winter Sea Ice at High CO2 Concentrations?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have remote effects on global climate as well. Accurate forecasting of winter sea ice has significantCan a Convective Cloud Feedback Help to Eliminate Winter Sea Ice at High CO2 Concentrations? DORIAN) ABSTRACT Winter sea ice dramatically cools the Arctic climate during the coldest months of the year and may

Tziperman, Eli

31

The convective structures associated with cloud-to-ground lightning in TOGA COARE Mesoscale Convective Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indicate a pronounced difference between lightning producing and non-lightning producing cells. Lightning producing convective cells have higher radar reflectivity in the 5.0- 8.0 km layer, and a slower decrease with height, both observations indicating...

Restivo, Michael Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

32

Lagrangian investigation of the precipitation efficiency of convective clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The precipitation efficiency of cumulus-congestus clouds is investigated with a new Lagrangian particle framework for large-eddy simulations. The framework is designed to track particles representative of individual water molecules. A Monte-Carlo ...

Wolfgang Langhans; Kyongmin Yeo; David M. Romps

33

Correlation between present-day model simulation of Arctic cloud radiative forcing and sea ice consistent with positive winter convective cloud feedback  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A positive feedback on winter sea-ice loss, based on warming due to radiative forcing caused by the onset of convective clouds in response to sea-ice loss, has recently been proposed. This feedback has thus far been ...

Emanuel, Kerry Andrew

34

Evaluation of convection-permitting model simulations of cloud populations associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation using data collected during the AMIE/DYNAMO field campaign  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regional cloud permitting model simulations of cloud populations observed during the 2011 ARM Madden Julian Oscillation Investigation Experiment/ Dynamics of Madden-Julian Experiment (AMIE/DYNAMO) field campaign are evaluated against radar and ship-based measurements. Sensitivity of model simulated surface rain rate statistics to parameters and parameterization of hydrometeor sizes in five commonly used WRF microphysics schemes are examined. It is shown that at 2 km grid spacing, the model generally overestimates rain rate from large and deep convective cores. Sensitivity runs involving variation of parameters that affect rain drop or ice particle size distribution (more aggressive break-up process etc) generally reduce the bias in rain-rate and boundary layer temperature statistics as the smaller particles become more vulnerable to evaporation. Furthermore significant improvement in the convective rain-rate statistics is observed when the horizontal grid-spacing is reduced to 1 km and 0.5 km, while it is worsened when run at 4 km grid spacing as increased turbulence enhances evaporation. The results suggest modulation of evaporation processes, through parameterization of turbulent mixing and break-up of hydrometeors may provide a potential avenue for correcting cloud statistics and associated boundary layer temperature biases in regional and global cloud permitting model simulations.

Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; Burleyson, Casey D.; Lim, Kyo-Sun; Long, Charles N.; Wu, Di; Thompson, Gregory

2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

35

Posters A One-Dimensional Radiative Convective Model with Detailed Cloud Microphysics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 Posters A One-Dimensional Radiative Convective Model with Detailed Cloud Microphysics J. Simmons, O. Lie-Svendsen, and K. Stamnes Geophysical Institute University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska The Arctic is a key element in determining the radiation budget of the earth. Within the polar regions, the net radiation (incoming solar radiation minus outgoing infrared radiation) is negative. To understand the role this energy deficit plays in the overall radiation budget, one must examine the prevalent atmospheric features of the Arctic. One such feature is a persistent layer of low-altitude, stratiform clouds found over the central Arctic predominantly from April to September (Tsay et al. 1984). These Arctic stratus clouds (ASC) modulate the earth's radiation budget

36

Constructing a Merged Cloud-Precipitation Radar Dataset for Tropical Convective Clouds during the DYNAMO/AMIE Experiment at Addu Atoll  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To improve understanding of the convective processes key to the Madden-Julian-Oscillation (MJO) initiation, the Dynamics of the MJO (DYNAMO) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MJO Investigation Experiment (AMIE) collected four months of observations from three radars, the S-band Polarization Radar (S-Pol), the C-band Shared Mobile Atmospheric Research & Teaching Radar (SMART-R), and Ka-band Zenith Radar (KAZR) on Addu Atoll in the tropical Indian Ocean. This study compares the measurements from the S-Pol and SMART-R to those from the more sensitive KAZR in order to characterize the hydrometeor detection capabilities of the two scanning precipitation radars. Frequency comparisons for precipitating convective clouds and non-precipitating high clouds agree much better than non-precipitating low clouds for both scanning radars due to issues in ground clutter. On average, SMART-R underestimates convective and high cloud tops by 0.3 to 1.1 km, while S-Pol underestimates cloud tops by less than 0.4 km for these cloud types. S-Pol shows excellent dynamic range in detecting various types of clouds and therefore its data are well suited for characterizing the evolution of the 3D cloud structures, complementing the profiling KAZR measurements. For detecting non-precipitating low clouds and thin cirrus clouds, KAZR remains the most reliable instrument. However, KAZR is attenuated in heavy precipitation and underestimates cloud top height due to rainfall attenuation 4.3% of the time during DYNAMO/AMIE. An empirical method to correct the KAZR cloud top heights is described, and a merged radar dataset is produced to provide improved cloud boundary estimates, microphysics and radiative heating retrievals.

Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Schumacher, Courtney; Ellis, Scott; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Bharadwaj, Nitin

2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

37

A transilient matrix for moist convection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is introduced for diagnosing a transilient matrix for moist convection. This transilient matrix quantifies the nonlocal transport of air by convective eddies: for every height z, it gives the distribution of starting heights z{prime} for the eddies that arrive at z. In a cloud-resolving simulation of deep convection, the transilient matrix shows that two-thirds of the subcloud air convecting into the free troposphere originates from within 100 m of the surface. This finding clarifies which initial height to use when calculating convective available potential energy from soundings of the tropical troposphere.

Romps, D.; Kuang, Z.

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Final Technical Report for "Radiative Heating Associated with Tropical Convective Cloud Systems: Its Importance at Meso and Global Scales"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heating associated with tropical cloud systems drive the global circulation. The overall research objectives of this project were to i) further quantify and understand the importance of heating in tropical convective cloud systems with innovative observational techniques, and ii) use global models to determine the large-scale circulation response to variability in tropical heating profiles, including anvil and cirrus cloud radiative forcing. The innovative observational techniques used a diversity of radar systems to create a climatology of vertical velocities associated with the full tropical convective cloud spectrum along with a dissection of the of the total heating profile of tropical cloud systems into separate components (i.e., the latent, radiative, and eddy sensible heating). These properties were used to validate storm-scale and global climate models (GCMs) and were further used to force two different types of GCMs (one with and one without interactive physics). While radiative heating was shown to account for about 20% of the total heating and did not have a strong direct response on the global circulation, the indirect response was important via its impact on convection, esp. in how radiative heating impacts the tilt of heating associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), a phenomenon that accounts for most tropical intraseasonal variability. This work shows strong promise in determining the sensitivity of climate models and climate processes to heating variations associated with cloud systems.

Schumacher, Courtney

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

39

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: The life stage of deep  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The life stage of deep convection defined by the MSG multi-channel data and The life stage of deep convection defined by the MSG multi-channel data and rainfall type observed by PR/TRMM Inoue, Toshiro MRI/JMA The life cycle of deep convection is characterized as the cumulus/cumulonimbus type cloud classified by the method is dominant at the earlier stage and cirrus type cloud (anvil) is dominant at the decaying stage for no-split/no-merge case. We also know that convective rain is dominant at developing and mature stage, and stratiform rain is dominant at decaying stage. We studied the life cycle of deep convection in terms of cloud type using MSG ( Meteosat Second Generation) data taken every 15 minutes. The multi-channel data of MSG are use for cloud type classification. Cloud types are first classified by the split window method

40

Observations and Modeling of Shallow Convective Clouds: Implications for the Indirect Aerosol Effects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Observations Observations and Modeling of Shallow Convective Clouds: Implications for the Indirect Aerosol Effects Sylwester Arabas 1 , Joanna Slawinska 1 , Wojciech Grabowski 2 , Hugh Morrison 2 , Hanna Pawlowska 1 1 : Institute of Geophysics, University of Warsaw, Poland 2 : National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado, USA 348 constants for reference state and lateral boundary conditions 349 ibcx=icyx 350 ibcy=icyy*j3 351 ibcz=icyz 352 irlx=irelx 353 irly=irely*j3 354 irdbc=0 355 fcr0=fcr0*icorio 356 itdl=0 357 tdt=40.*3600. 358 u0tdl=u00 359 360 361 constants for thermodynamics 362 c bv=sqrt(st*g) 363 bv=st 364 st=bv**2/g 365 cp=3.5*rg 366 cap=rg/cp 367 pr00=rg*rh00*tt00

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep convective clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Resonant Response of Deep Convection to Surface Hot Spots F. J. ROBINSON, S. C. SHERWOOD, AND Y. LI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(CAPE)], which determines the amount of potential energy available for conversion to updraft kinetic en are traditionally ascribed to variations in deep moist insta- bility [i.e., convective available potential energy predictors for re- gional forecasters, other important and regionally vari- able factors are clearly at work

Sherwood, Steven

42

8, 42674308, 2008 3-D retrieval of cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 8, 4267­4308, 2008 3-D retrieval of cloud particle profiles T. Zinner et al. Title Page.0 License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Remote sensing of cloud sides of deep convection: towards a three-dimensional retrieval of cloud particle size profiles T. Zinner 1,2 , A. Marshak 1 , S

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

43

Mixed-phase clouds, thin cirrus clouds, and OLR over the tropics: observations, retrievals, and radiative impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of clouds are formed by deep convection and convergence of water vapor. Thus, it is very important to understand the radiative energy balance of the tropics and the effect of clouds on the radiation field. For mixed-phase clouds, error analyses pertaining...

Lee, Joonsuk

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

44

Smoking Rain Clouds over the Amazon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...processes affect the water cycle, the pollution...the dynamics of atmospheric circulation. Several...concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the...transport cloud water in deep convection...concentrations result in recovery of drop size. However...background. Stronger atmospheric instability and a...

M. O. Andreae; D. Rosenfeld; P. Artaxo; A. A. Costa; G. P. Frank; K. M. Longo; M. A. F. Silva-Dias

2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

45

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Microwave Radiometer Profiler (jensen-mwr)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

Jensen, Mike

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer(tomlinson-uhsas)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSASA) A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

Tomlinson, Jason; Jensen, Mike

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

47

Towards a new scheme for parametrisation of deep convection in NAME III  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes an updated scheme for parametrisation of atmospheric convection to be used in the Met Office Atmospheric Dispersion Model (NAME III). In this scheme, the vertical transport of particles due to convection is represented in a 1-dimensional model based on a 'mass-flux' approach. Empirical formulas are used to obtain the mass fluxes and the convective precipitation is used for closure. Results compared with the mass fluxes from the single column version of the Met Office's NWP model show good agreement. Lastly, an alternative method to estimate the mass fluxes by calculating a dilute parcel ascent is also discussed.

Elena Meneguz; David J. Thomson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Geodynamic and seismic constraints on the thermochemical structure and dynamics of convection in the deep mantle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Brodholt and B. J. Wood Geodynamic and seismic constraints on the thermochemical structure...by this viscosity peak. geodynamics|seismic tomography|mantle viscosity|three-dimensional...anomalies|mantle convection| Geodynamic and seismic constraints on the thermochemical structure...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Convective cloud and rainfall processes over the Maritime Continent : simulation and analysis of the diurnal cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Maritime Continent experiences strong moist convection, which produces significant rainfall and drives large fluxes of heat and moisture to the upper troposphere. Despite the importance of these processes to global ...

Gianotti, Rebecca L. (Rebecca Louise)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Cloud Conditions Favoring Secondary Ice Particle Production in Tropical Maritime Convection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Progress in understanding the formation of ice in lower-tropospheric clouds is slowed by the difficulties in characterizing the many complex interactions that lead to ice initiation and to the dynamic, non-steady-state nature of the clouds. The ...

Andrew Heymsfield; Paul Willis

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

A Test of the Simulation of Tropical Convective Cloudiness by a Cloud-Resolving Model MARIO A. LOPEZ, DENNIS L. HARTMANN, PETER N. BLOSSEY, ROBERT WOOD,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

un- certainties in projections of future climates (Bony et al. 2006; Solomon et al. 2007). Clouds solar radiation, although their effect on the net energy balance is often much less than with intense tropical convective systems are known to have long lifetimes and to cover large areas, accounting

Hartmann, Dennis

52

Evaluation of tropical cloud and precipitation statistics of CAM3 using CloudSat and CALIPSO data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The combined CloudSat and CALIPSO satellite observations provide the first simultaneous measurements of cloud and precipitation vertical structure, and are used to examine the representation of tropical clouds and precipitation in the Community Atmosphere Model Version 3 (CAM3). A simulator package utilizing a model-to-satellite approach facilitates comparison of model simulations to observations, and a revised clustering method is used to sort the subgrid-scale patterns of clouds and precipitation into principal cloud regimes. Results from weather forecasts performed with CAM3 suggest that the model underestimates the horizontal extent of low and mid-level clouds in subsidence regions, but overestimates that of high clouds in ascending regions. CAM3 strongly overestimates the frequency of occurrence of the deep convection with heavy precipitation regime, but underestimates the horizontal extent of clouds and precipitation at low and middle levels when this regime occurs. This suggests that the model overestimates convective precipitation and underestimates stratiform precipitation consistent with a previous study that used only precipitation observations. Tropical cloud regimes are also evaluated in a different version of the model, CAM3.5, which uses a highly entraining plume in the parameterization of deep convection. While the frequency of occurrence of the deep convection with heavy precipitation regime from CAM3.5 forecasts decreases, the incidence of the low clouds with precipitation and congestus regimes increases. As a result, the parameterization change does not reduce the frequency of precipitating convection that is far too high relative to observations. For both versions of CAM, clouds and precipitation are overly reflective at the frequency of the CloudSat radar and thin clouds that could be detected by the lidar only are underestimated.

Zhang, Y; Klein, S; Boyle, J; Mace, G G

2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

53

Measurements of Saharan Dust in Convective Clouds over the Tropical Eastern Atlantic Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mineral dust particles have been shown to act as cloud condensation nuclei, and they are known to interact with developing tropical storms over the Atlantic downwind of the Sahara. Once present within liquid droplets, they have the potential to ...

Cynthia H. Twohy

54

Relationships between lightning and properties of convective cloud Joanna M. Futyan1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

August 2007. [1] Satellite observations of convective system properties and lightning flash rate are used with the lightning flash rate. A roughly second order power-law fit to the mean radar echo top height above the 0°C isotherm is shown to capture both regional and land-ocean contrasts in lightning occurrence and flash rate

55

General Macro-and Microphysical Properties of Deep Convective Clouds as Observed by MODIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Ramanathan et al. 1989; Harrison et al. 1990; Hartmann et al. 1992) using satellite data have shown that net radiative forcing for DCC systems on large scale is close to zero with large negative shortwave (SW) forcing canceling out large positive longwave (LW) forcing. Kiehl (1994) used a simple calculation to explain

Li, Zhanqing

56

Microphysical effects determine macrophysical response for aerosol impacts on deep convective clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cycle extremes like droughts and floods (19). The risk of droughts...the risk of both droughts and floods could be higher due...122 . 24 Rosenfeld D ( 2008 ) Flood or drought: How do aerosols...Natl. Cent. for Atmos. Res. Boulder, CO ). 28 Korolev AV Mazin...

Jiwen Fan; L. Ruby Leung; Daniel Rosenfeld; Qian Chen; Zhanqing Li; Jinqiang Zhang; Hongru Yan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Microphysical effects determine macrophysical response for aerosol impacts on deep convective clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Research and Forecasting (WRF) model (27). More...water vapor mixing ratio, wind components U (solid...column are the zonal (U) wind shears calculated as (Maximum...Universal Time (UTC) and Local Standard Time (LST...Fig. 1) and vertical wind shear is relatively...

Jiwen Fan; L. Ruby Leung; Daniel Rosenfeld; Qian Chen; Zhanqing Li; Jinqiang Zhang; Hongru Yan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Ground-based Microwave Cloud Tomography  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Microwave Cloud Tomography Microwave Cloud Tomography Experiment, SGP, May 15-June 15, 2009 Lead Scientist Dong Huang, BNL Co-Investigators Al Gasiewski, UC Boulder Maria Cadeddu, ANL Warren Wiscombe, BNL Radiation Processes Working Group March 30, 2009 multiple radiometers All good cloud radiation modelers should close their airplane window shades so as not to be corrupted by the spectacle of real 3D clouds. - Roger Davies In case you forget to do this, you see 3/30/2009 ARM RPWG 2 Effects of cloud structure on radiation 3/30/2009 ARM RPWG 3 Typical climate model - Cloud fraction & mean water content - Horizontally uniform clouds, no side radiation - Assumption on overlap Courtesy of Bernhard Mayer Cloud structure important to radiation - Cumulus (Benner & Evans 2001, Pincus et al. 2005), deep convection (DiGiuseppe &

59

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Surface Meteorology (williams-surfmet)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams; Mike Jensen

60

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Vertical Air Motion (williams-vertair)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams; Mike Jensen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep convective clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, 449 MHz Profiler(williams-449_prof)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams; Mike Jensen

62

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Parcivel Disdrometer (williams-disdro)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams; Mike Jensen

63

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, 449 MHz Profiler(williams-449_prof)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

64

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Parcivel Disdrometer (williams-disdro)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

65

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Vertical Air Motion (williams-vertair)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

66

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Surface Meteorology (williams-surfmet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

67

Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System Resolving Model Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System Resolving Model Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System Resolving Model PI Name: Venkatramani Balaji PI Email: balaji@princeton.edu Institution: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Allocation Program: ESP Allocation Hours at ALCF: 150 Million Year: 2010 to 2013 Research Domain: Earth Science We expect our understanding of the role of clouds in climate to undergo a qualitative change as the resolutions of global models begin to encompass clouds. At these resolutions, non-hydrostatic dynamics become significant and deep convective processes are resolved. We are poised at the threshold of being able to run global scale simulations that include direct, non-parameterized, simulations of deep convective clouds. The goal of this

68

Evolution of cloud-to-ground lightning characteristics within the convective region of a midlatitude squall line  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

has been examined over a period of 49 minutes. Lightning data from the National Severe Storms Laboratory lightning detection network combined with seven dual-Doppler analyses provided a unique dataset in which to study this Mesoscale Convective System...

Billingsley, David Brian

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

69

Squall Lines and Convectively Coupled Gravity Waves in the Tropics: Why Do Most Cloud Systems Propagate Westward?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coupling between tropical convection and zonally propagating gravity waves is assessed through Fourier analysis of high-resolution (3-hourly, 0.5) satellite rainfall data. Results show the familiar enhancement in power along the dispersion ...

Stefan N. Tulich; George N. Kiladis

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Utilizing CLASIC observations and multiscale models to study the impact of improved Land surface representation on modeling cloud- convection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CLASIC experiment was conducted over the US southern great plains (SGP) in June 2007 with an objective to lead an enhanced understanding of the cumulus convection particularly as it relates to land surface conditions. This project was design to help assist with understanding the overall improvement of land atmosphere convection initiation representation of which is important for global and regional models. The study helped address one of the critical documented deficiency in the models central to the ARM objectives for cumulus convection initiation and particularly under summer time conditions. This project was guided by the scientific question building on the CLASIC theme questions: What is the effect of improved land surface representation on the ability of coupled models to simulate cumulus and convection initiation? The focus was on the US Southern Great Plains region. Since the CLASIC period was anomalously wet the strategy has been to use other periods and domains to develop the comparative assessment for the CLASIC data period, and to understand the mechanisms of the anomalous wet conditions on the tropical systems and convection over land. The data periods include the IHOP 2002 field experiment that was over roughly same domain as the CLASIC in the SGP, and some of the DOE funded Ameriflux datasets.

Niyogi, Devdutta S. [Purdue

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

71

Turbulent effects on the microphysics and initiation of warm rain in deep convective clouds: 2-D simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and theoretical investigations are required to quantify the turbulent effects. Citation: Benmoshe, N., M. Pinsky. Res., 117, D06220, doi:10.1029/2011JD016603. 1. Introduction [2] Several factors affect formation there are specific effects of turbulent mixing on the shape of droplet size distribution [e.g., Jensen and Baker

Mark, Pinsky

72

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, S-band Radar (williams-s_band)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams

73

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, S-band Radar (williams-s_band)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Williams, Christopher

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

74

TC_CLOUD_REGIME.cdr  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tropical cloud properties as a function of regime Regimes? Monsoon versus Break * Different synoptic vertical velocity profiles - Changes convective inhibition, corresponding...

75

BNL | Aerosol, Cloud, Precipitation Interactions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Atmospheric aerosols exert important "indirect effects" on clouds and climate by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei that affect cloud radiative and microphysical properties. For example, an increase in CCN increases the number concentration of droplets enhances cloud albedo, and suppresses precipitation that alters cloud coverage and lifetime. However, in the case of moist and strong convective clouds, increasing aerosols may increase precipitation and enhance storm development. Although aerosol-induced indirect effects on climate are believed to have a significant impact on global climate change, estimating their impact continues to be one of the most uncertain climate forcings.

76

Cloud Services Cloud Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Services Cloud Services In 2012 UCD IT Services launched an exciting new set of cloud solutions called CloudEdu, which includes cloud servers, cloud storage, cloud hosting and cloud network. The CloudEdu package includes a consultancy service in design, deployment, management and utilisation

77

Radiative Heating of the ISCCP Upper Level Cloud Regimes and its Impact on the Large-scale Tropical Circulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiative heating profiles of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud regimes (or weather states) were estimated by matching ISCCP observations with radiative properties derived from cloud radar and lidar measurements from the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites at Manus, Papua New Guinea, and Darwin, Australia. Focus was placed on the ISCCP cloud regimes containing the majority of upper level clouds in the tropics, i.e., mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), deep cumulonimbus with cirrus, mixed shallow and deep convection, and thin cirrus. At upper levels, these regimes have average maximum cloud occurrences ranging from 30% to 55% near 12 km with variations depending on the location and cloud regime. The resulting radiative heating profiles have maxima of approximately 1 K/day near 12 km, with equal heating contributions from the longwave and shortwave components. Upper level minima occur near 15 km, with the MCS regime showing the strongest cooling of 0.2 K/day and the thin cirrus showing no cooling. The gradient of upper level heating ranges from 0.2 to 0.4 K/(day?km), with the most convectively active regimes (i.e., MCSs and deep cumulonimbus with cirrus) having the largest gradient. When the above heating profiles were applied to the 25-year ISCCP data set, the tropics-wide average profile has a radiative heating maximum of 0.45Kday-1 near 250 hPa. Column-integrated radiative heating of upper level cloud accounts for about 20% of the latent heating estimated by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR). The ISCCP radiative heating of tropical upper level cloud only slightly modifies the response of an idealized primitive equation model forced with the tropics-wide TRMM PR latent heating, which suggests that the impact of upper level cloud is more important to large-scale tropical circulation variations because of convective feedbacks rather than direct forcing by the cloud radiative heating profiles. However, the height of the radiative heating maxima and gradient of the heating profiles are important to determine the sign and patterns of the horizontal circulation anomaly driven by radiative heating at upper levels.

Li, Wei; Schumacher, Courtney; McFarlane, Sally A.

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Kinematical relations among radar-observed water concentrations, vertical motions, and liquid-water drop-size spectra in convective clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and liquid- water concentration, a one-dimensional (vertical) continuity equation for water substance is considered. Atmospheric values of parameters which appear in the continuity equation are determined from radar reflectivity measurements. Empirical... viii I INTRODUCTION Cloud Motions in General Equations Governing Cloud Parameters A Kinematical Equation Based on the Continuity of Water Substance Determinati. on of the Values of the Atmospheric Variables Appearing in the Kinematical Equation...

Runnels, Robert Clayton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

79

The kinematic and cloud-to-ground lightning structure of the 9-10, June 1998 Red River Mesoscale Convective System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An investigation of the kinematic and electrical properties of the 9-10 June, 1998 Red River Mesoscale Convective System (MCS), as observed by the NOAA P3 Tail Radar and the National Lightning Detection Network, is presented. This system exhibits...

Santarpia, Joshua

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

80

Modeling convection in the Greenland Sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A detailed examination of the development of a deep convection event observed in the Greenland Sea in 1988-89 is carried out through a combination of modeling, scale estimates, and data analysis. We develop a prognostic ...

Bhushan, Vikas

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep convective clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Evaluation of a Modified Scheme for Shallow Convection: Implementation of CuP and Case Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new treatment for shallow clouds has been introduced into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The new scheme, called the cumulus potential (CuP) scheme, replaces the ad-hoc trigger function used in the Kain-Fritsch cumulus parameterization with a trigger function related to the distribution of temperature and humidity in the convective boundary layer via probability density functions (PDFs). An additional modification to the default version of WRF is the computation of a cumulus cloud fraction based on the time scales relevant for shallow cumuli. Results from three case studies over the U.S. Department of Energys Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in north central Oklahoma are presented. These days were selected because of the presence of shallow cumuli over the ARM site. The modified version of WRF does a much better job predicting the cloud fraction and the downwelling shortwave irradiance thancontrol simulations utilizing the default Kain-Fritsch scheme. The modified scheme includes a number of additional free parameters, including the number and size of bins used to define the PDF, the minimum frequency of a bin within the PDF before that bin is considered for shallow clouds to form, and the critical cumulative frequency of bins required to trigger deep convection. A series of tests were undertaken to evaluate the sensitivity of the simulations to these parameters. Overall, the scheme was found to be relatively insensitive to each of the parameters.

Berg, Larry K.; Gustafson, William I.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Deng, Liping

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Sensitivity of Hadley Circulation to Physical Parameters and Resolution through Changing Upper-Tropospheric Ice Clouds Using a Global Cloud-System Resolving Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relationship between upper-tropospheric ice cloud properties and the Hadley circulation intensity is examined through parameter sensitivity studies of global cloud-system-resolving simulations with explicit cloud convection. Experiments under ...

Shin-ichi Iga; Hirofumi Tomita; Yoko Tsushima; Masaki Satoh

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Tropical and subtropical cloud transitions in weather and climate prediction models: the GCSS/WGNE Pacific Cross-Section Intercomparison (GPCI)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model evaluation approach is proposed where weather and climate prediction models are analyzed along a Pacific Ocean cross-section, from the stratocumulus regions off the coast of California, across the shallow convection dominated trade-winds, to the deep convection regions of the ITCZ: the GCSS/WGNE Pacific Cross-section Intercomparison (GPCI). The main goal of GPCI is to evaluate, and help understand and improve the representation of tropical and sub-tropical cloud processes in weather and climate prediction models. In this paper, a detailed analysis of cloud regime transitions along the cross-section from the sub-tropics to the tropics for the season JJA of 1998 is presented. This GPCI study confirms many of the typical weather and climate prediction model problems in the representation of clouds: underestimation of clouds in the stratocumulus regime by most models with the corresponding consequences in terms of shortwave radiation biases; overestimation of clouds by the ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA40) in the deep tropics (in particular) with the corresponding impact in the outgoing longwave radiation; large spread between the different models in terms of cloud cover, liquid water path and shortwave radiation; significant differences between the models in terms of vertical crosssections of cloud properties (in particular), vertical velocity and relative humidity. An alternative analysis of cloud cover mean statistics is proposed where sharp gradients in cloud cover along the GPCI transect are taken into account. This analysis shows that the negative cloud bias of some models and ERA40 in the stratocumulus regions (as compared to ISCCP) is associated not only with lower values of cloud cover in these regimes, but also with a stratocumulus-to-cumulus transition that occurs too early along the trade-wind Lagrangian trajectory. Histograms of cloud cover along the cross-section differ significantly between models. Some models exhibit a quasi-bimodal structure with cloud cover being either very large (close to 100%) or very small, while other models show a more continuous transition. The ISCCP observations suggest that reality is in-between these two extreme examples. These different patterns reflect the diverse nature of the cloud, boundary layer, and convection parameterizations in the participating weather and climate prediction models.

Teixeira, J.; Cardoso, S.; Bonazzola, M.; Cole, Jason N.; DelGenio, Anthony D.; DeMott, C.; Franklin, A.; Hannay, Cecile; Jakob, Christian; Jiao, Y.; Karlsson, J.; Kitagawa, H.; Koehler, M.; Kuwano-Yoshida, A.; LeDrian, C.; Lock, Adrian; Miller, M.; Marquet, P.; Martins, J.; Mechoso, C. R.; Meijgaard, E. V.; Meinke, I.; Miranda, P.; Mironov, D.; Neggers, Roel; Pan, H. L.; Randall, David A.; Rasch, Philip J.; Rockel, B.; Rossow, William B.; Ritter, B.; Siebesma, A. P.; Soares, P.; Turk, F. J.; Vaillancourt, P.; Von Engeln, A.; Zhao, M.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Statistical representation of clouds in climate models  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

novel approach for representing novel approach for representing ice microphysics in bin and bulk schemes: Application to TWP-ICE deep convection Hugh Morrison and Wojciech Grabowski National Center for Atmospheric Research ARM STM, Monday, April 1, 2009 -1) Uncertainty of ice initiation processes -2) Wide range of ice particle characteristics (e.g., shape, effective density) -3) No clear separation of physical processes for small and large crystals The treatment of ice microphysics has a large impact on model simulations, e.g., precipitation, interactions with dynamics, radiation, etc. However, it is complicated by: Pristine ice crystals, grown by diffusion of water vapor Snowflakes, grown by aggregation Pruppacher and Klett Rimed ice crystals (accretion of supercooled cloud water) Graupel (heavily

85

Parameterizations of Cloud Microphysics and Indirect Aerosol Effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

1. OVERVIEW Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 2001]. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds [NRC, 2001]." The aerosol effect on clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path [Twomey, 1977] and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage [e.g., Ackerman et al., 2000]. Enhanced aerosol concentrations can also suppress warm rain processes by producing a narrow droplet spectrum that inhibits collision and coalescence processes [e.g., Squires and Twomey, 1961; Warner and Twomey, 1967; Warner, 1968; Rosenfeld, 1999]. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect [Albrecht, 1989], is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. Table 1 summarizes the key observational studies identifying the microphysical properties, cloud characteristics, thermodynamics and dynamics associated with cloud systems from high-aerosol continental environments. For example, atmospheric aerosol concentrations can influence cloud droplet size distributions, warm-rain process, cold-rain process, cloud-top height, the depth of the mixed phase region, and occurrence of lightning. In addition, high aerosol concentrations in urban environments could affect precipitation variability by providing an enhanced source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Hypotheses have been developed to explain the effect of urban regions on convection and precipitation [van den Heever and Cotton, 2007 and Shepherd, 2005]. Recently, a detailed spectral-bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and summertime convection over a mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low "clean" concentration and a high "dirty" concentration. The impact of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud and precipitation will be investigated. 2. MODEL DESCRIPTION AND CASE STUDIES 2.1 GCE MODEL The model used in this study is the 2D version of the GCE model. Modeled flow is anelastic. Second- or higher-order advection schemes can produce negative values in the solution. Thus, a Multi-dimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA) has been implemented into the model. All scalar variables (potential temperature, water vapor, turbulent coefficient and all five hydrometeor classes) use forward time differencing and the MPDATA for advection. Dynamic variables, u, v and w, use a second-order accurate advection scheme and a leapfrog time integration (kinetic energy semi-conserving method). Short-wave (solar) and long-wave radiation as well as a subgrid-scale TKE turbulence scheme are also included in the model. Details of the model can be found in Tao and Simpson (1993) and Tao et al. (2003). 2.2 Microphysics (Bin Model) The formulation of the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (cloud droplets and raindrops), and six types of ice particles: pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing 33 categories (bin

Tao, Wei-Kuo [NASA/GSFC] [NASA/GSFC

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

86

Physical Characterization of Tropical Oceanic Convection Observed in KWAJEX  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX) was designed to obtain an empirical physical characterization of precipitating convective clouds over the tropical ocean. Coordinated datasets were collected by three ...

Sandra E. Yuter; Robert A. Houze Jr.; Eric A. Smith; Thomas T. Wilheit; Edward Zipser

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Convection towers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Convection towers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Convection towers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water. 6 figs.

Prueitt, M.L.

1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

90

Convection towers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode.

Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

The Role of Gravity Waves in the Formation and Organization of Clouds during TWPICE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All convective clouds emit gravity waves. While it is certain that convectively-generated waves play important parts in determining the climate, their precise roles remain uncertain and their effects are not (generally) represented in climate models. The work described here focuses mostly on observations and modeling of convectively-generated gravity waves, using the intensive observations from the DoE-sponsored Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), which took place in Darwin, from 17 January to 13 February 2006. Among other things, the research has implications the part played by convectively-generated gravity waves in the formation of cirrus, in the initiation and organization of further convection, and in the subgrid-scale momentum transport and associated large-scale stresses imposed on the troposphere and stratosphere. The analysis shows two groups of inertia-gravity waves are detected: group L in the middle stratosphere during the suppressed monsoon period, and group S in the lower stratosphere during the monsoon break period. Waves belonging to group L propagate to the south-east with a mean intrinsic period of 35 h, and have vertical and horizontal wavelengths of about 5-6 km and 3000-6000 km, respectively. Ray tracing calculations indicate that these waves originate from a deep convective region near Indonesia. Waves belonging to group S propagate to the south-south-east with an intrinsic period, vertical wavelength and horizontal wavelength of about 45 h, 2 km and 2000-4000 km, respectively. These waves are shown to be associated with shallow convection in the oceanic area within about 1000 km of Darwin. The intrinsic periods of high-frequency waves are estimated to be between 20-40 minutes. The high-frequency wave activity in the stratosphere, defined by mass-weighted variance of the vertical motion of the sonde, has a maximum following the afternoon local convection indicating that these waves are generated by local convection. The wave activity is strongest in the lower stratosphere below 22 km and, during the suppressed monsoon period, is modulated with a 3-4-day period. The concentration of the wave activity in the lower stratosphere is consistent with the properties of the environment in which these waves propagate, whereas its 3-4-day modulation is explained by the variation of the convection activity in the TWP-ICE domain. At low rainfall intensity the wave activity increases as rainfall intensity increases. At high values of rainfall intensity, however, the wave activity associated with deep convective clouds is independent of the rainfall intensity. The convection and gravity waves observed during TWP-ICE are simulated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model. These simulations are compared with radiosonde observations described above and are used to determine some of the properties of convectively generated gravity waves. The gravity waves appear to be well simulated by the model. The model is used to explore the relationships between the convection, the gravity waves and cirrus.

Reeder, Michael J. [Monash University; Lane, Todd P. [University of Melbourne; Hankinson, Mai Chi Nguyen [Monash University

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

92

Convection towers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode. 5 figures.

Prueitt, M.L.

1994-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

93

Convective heater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation.

Thorogood, Robert M. (Macungie, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Convective heater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation.

Thorogood, Robert M. (Macungie, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

H I Self Absorption Toward Molecular Clouds: Theoretical Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

information and available data, visit the GRS web page at www.bu.eduwww.bu.edu/G/GRSRS References chemistry deep inside the molecular clouds. We study H I self- absorption toward molecular clouds is dominated by cold atomic hydrogen formed by cosmic ray chemistry deep in the interiors of clouds. If all

96

Properties of tropical convection observed by ARM millimeter-radars  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Properties of tropical convection observed by ARM millimeter-radars Properties of tropical convection observed by ARM millimeter-radars Haynes, John Colorado State University Stephens, Graeme Colorado State University Category: Cloud Properties The results of an analysis of tropical cloud systems observed from a variety of vertically pointing radar systems are described. In particular, observations taken during five years of operation of the ARM millimeter wavelength radar system (MMCR) at Manus Island in the Tropical West Pacific region are characterized into cloud classes according to the radar reflectivity structures of these cloud systems, associated rainfall, and surface radiative properties. These observations of cloud properties are composited with respect to various phases of the Madden Julian Oscillation, which is a dominant mode of variability at Manus Island. A method of better

97

Diurnal Cycle of Convection at the ARM SGP Site: Role of Large-Scale Forcing, Surface Fluxes, and Convective Inhibition  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Diurnal Cycle of Convection at the ARM SGP Site: Diurnal Cycle of Convection at the ARM SGP Site: Role of Large-Scale Forcing, Surface Fluxes, and Convective Inhibition G. J. Zhang Center for Atmospheric Sciences Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla, California Introduction Atmospheric convection undergoes strong diurnal variation over both land and oceans (Gray and Jacobson 1977; Dai 2001; Nesbitt and Zipser 2003). Because of the nature of the diurnal variation of solar radiation, the phasing of convection with solar radiation has a significant impact on the atmospheric radiation budget and cloud radiative forcing. A number of studies have investigated the possible mechanisms of the diurnal variation of convection (Gray and Jacobson 1977; Randall et al. 1991; Dai et al. 1999; Dai 2001). Yet, in regional and global climate models, the diurnal variation of

98

Aircraft Microphysical Documentation from Cloud Base to Anvils of Hailstorm Feeder Clouds in Argentina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aircraft Microphysical Documentation from Cloud Base to Anvils of Hailstorm Feeder Clouds Documentation during January and February 2000 of the structure of severe convective storms in Men- dozaI) rockets, guided by tracking radar, to seed the high-reflectivity cores of in- cipient hailstorms (Makitov

Daniel, Rosenfeld

99

Convective Cells in Altocumulus Observed with a High-Resolution Radar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Very-high-resolution Doppler radar observations are used together with aircraft measurements to document the dynamic and thermodynamic structure of a dissipating altocumulus cloud system associated with a deep virga layer. The cloud layer ...

Jerome M. Schmidt; Piotr J. Flatau; Robert D. Yates

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION DIJKSTRA, SENGUL, WANG INTRODUCTION LINEAR THEORY MAIN THEOREMS CONCLUDING REMARKS DYNAMIC TRANSITIONS OF SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION H.Dijkstra T. Sengul S. Wang #12;SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION DIJKSTRA, SENGUL, WANG INTRODUCTION LINEAR THEORY MAIN THEOREMS

Wang, Shouhong

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep convective clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Stratiform and Convective Precipitation Observed by Multiple Radars during the DYNAMO/AMIE Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, methods of convective/stratiform precipitation classification and surface rain-rate estimation based on the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) cloud radar measurements were developed and evaluated. Simultaneous and ...

Min Deng; Pavlos Kollias; Zhe Feng; Chidong Zhang; Charles N. Long; Heike Kalesse; Arunchandra Chandra; Vickal V. Kumar; Alain Protat

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Characteristics of convective cells over the coastal regions of southeast Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vertical profiles of radar reflectivity and cloud-to-ground lightning characteristics associated with convective cells were analyzed for mesoscate systems occurring over the coastal regions of southeast Texas during the spring and summer months...

Robinson, Michael

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

103

Orogenic Convection in Subtropical South America as Seen by the TRMM Satellite KRISTEN L. RASMUSSEN AND ROBERT A. HOUZE JR.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Orogenic Convection in Subtropical South America as Seen by the TRMM Satellite KRISTEN L. RASMUSSEN storms in southeastern South America are divided into three categories: storms with deep convective cores, the intense storms with wide convective cores over southeastern South America are unlike their Himalayan

Houze Jr., Robert A.

104

Improving Convection Parameterization Using ARM Observations and NCAR Community Atmosphere Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlight of Accomplishments: We made significant contribution to the ASR program in this funding cycle by better representing convective processes in GCMs based on knowledge gained from analysis of ARM/ASR observations. In addition, our work led to a much improved understanding of the interaction among aerosol, convection, clouds and climate in GCMs.

Zhang, Guang J [Scripps Institution of Oceanography

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

105

Impact of Convective Organization on the Response of Tropical Precipitation Extremes to Warming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of Convective Organization on the Response of Tropical Precipitation Extremes to Warming extremes to warming in organized convection is ex- amined using a cloud-resolving model. Vertical shear, the fractional increase of precipitation extremes is similar to that of surface water vapor, which

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

106

The ARAUCARIA project: Deep near-infrared survey of nearby galaxies. I. The distance to the Large Magellanic Cloud from K-band photometry of red clump stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have obtained deep imaging in the near-infrared J and K bands for 2 nearby fields in the bar of the LMC with the ESO NTT telescope, under exquisite seeing conditions. The K, J-K color-magnitude diagrams constructed from these data are of outstanding photometric quality and reveal the presence of several hundreds of red clump stars. Using the calibration of Alves for the K-band absolute magnitude of Hipparcos-observed red clump stars in the solar neigbourhood we derive a distance modulus to our observed LMC fields of 18.487 mag. Applying a correction for the tilt of the LMC bar with respect to the line of sight according to the geometrical model of van der Marel et al., the corresponding LMC barycenter distance is 18.501 mag. If we adopt a K-band population correction of -0.03 mag, as done by Alves et al. 2002, to account for the difference in age and metallicity between the solar neighborhood and LMC red clump star populations, we obtain an LMC barycenter distance modulus of 18.471 mag from our data. This is in excellent agreement with the result of Alves et al., and of another very recent study of Sarajedini et al. (2002) obtained from K-band photometry. However, we emphasize that current model predictions about the uncertainties of population corrections seem to indicate that errors up to about 0.12 mag may be possible, probably in any photometric band. Therefore, work must continue to tighten the constraints on these corrections. We also determine the mean red clump star magnitude in our LMC fields in the J band, which could be a useful alternative to the K band should future work reveal that population effect corrections for red clump stars in the J band are smaller, or more reliably determined than those for the K band.

G. Pietrzynski; W. Gieren

2002-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

107

A numerical study of convection with an ambient wind field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The citations on the following pages follow the style of the Journal of the Atmos heric Sciences. Orville (1968) constructed a convective model based on the same equations as those used by Assi. He concerned himself with the development of cumulus clouds over...

Cottrell, Kit Garfield

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Leading and Trailing Anvil Clouds of West African Squall Lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The anvil clouds of tropical squall-line systems over West Africa have been examined using cloud radar data and divided into those that appear ahead of the leading convective line and those on the trailing side of the system. The leading anvils ...

Jasmine Cetrone; Robert A. Houze Jr.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Title: Radar-observed convective characteristics during TWP-ICE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Title: Radar-observed convective characteristics during TWP-ICE Title: Radar-observed convective characteristics during TWP-ICE Schumacher, Courtney Texas A&M University Houze, Robert University of Washington May, Peter Bureau or Meteorology Research Centre Frederick, Kaycee Cetrone, Jasmine Vallgren, Andreas Category: Field Campaigns This poster will describe the radar dataset obtained in the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), which is to take place 20 January - 14 February 2006 in the vicinity of Darwin, Australia. We will describe the convective systems observed during the project by two scanning C-band Doppler radars, one of which will provide dual-polarization measurements, and ARM's vertically pointing cloud radar and lidar installations. In addition, we will discuss the potential for combining

110

Cloud Computing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chicago Matters: Beyond Burnham (WTTW). Chicago has become a world center of "cloud computing." Argonne experts Pete Beckman and Ian Foster explain what "cloud computing" is and how you probably already use it on a daily basis.

Pete Beckman and Ian Foster

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

111

ARM Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE), Convective Inhibition (CIN) Product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ARM soundings are used to determine Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE), Convective Inhibition (CIN) and associated properties, using the following relationships;

Jensen, Michael

2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

112

ARM Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE), Convective Inhibition (CIN) Product  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

ARM soundings are used to determine Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE), Convective Inhibition (CIN) and associated properties, using the following relationships;

Jensen, Michael

113

Heat Transfer and Convection Currents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...October 1965 research-article Heat Transfer and Convection Currents D. C...convection in a medium with internal heat generation is discussed semi-quantitatively...States English United Kingdom 1966 Heat transfer and convection currents Tozer D...

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

ARM - Field Campaign - COPS - Initiation of Convection and the  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsCOPS - Initiation of Convection and the Microphysical govCampaignsCOPS - Initiation of Convection and the Microphysical Properties of Clouds in Orographic Terrain Campaign Links AMF Black Forest Deployment Related Campaigns COPS - AOS Intercomparison 2007.08.09, Jefferson, AMF COPS - ADMIRARI at Black Forest 2007.07.30, Battaglia, AMF COPS - University of Cologne Micromet Station 2007.07.23, Schween, AMF COPS - Cloud Microwave Validation Experiment in Support of CLOWD 2007.06.22, Vogelmann, AMF COPS - WILI Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar at Black Forest 2007.05.10, Althausen, AMF COPS - Multi Wavelength Raman Lidar (MWL) at Black Forest 2007.05.10, Althausen, AMF COPS - 35.5 GHz Cloud Radar Comparison at Black Forest 2007.05.01, Handwerker, AMF COPS - HATPRO at Black Forest 2007.04.01, Crewell, AMF COPS - Micro-Rain Radar at Black Forest

115

Aircraft Observations of Convective Systems in the Indian Ocean [EVS Event]  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aircraft Observations of Convective Systems in the Indian Ocean Aircraft Observations of Convective Systems in the Indian Ocean August 23, 2013 Speaker: Bradley Nicholas Guy National Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory Date: Friday, August 23, 2013 Time: 11:00 a.m. Location: Argonne National Laboratory TCS Building 240 Room 4301 In the DYNAMO (Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation) field experiment, a large number of measurement platforms were deployed to study environmental and convective cloud system characteristics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) initiation region in the Indian Ocean. A mobile platform, the NOAA P-3 instrumented aircraft, sampled intense convective cloud systems, along with the surrounding environment. This presentation will explore the characteristics of mesoscale convective

116

Dependence of Tropospheric Temperature on the Parameterization of Cumulus Convection in the GLAS Model of the General Circulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analysis of the simulation of seasonal change by the GLAS model of the general circulation reveals deficiencies in the simulation of tropospheric temperature and of convective cloud cover. These interrelated deficiencies are due to a spurious ...

H. Mark Helfand

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Cloud Computing at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home R & D Archive Cloud Computing Cloud Computing Cloud computing is gaining a foothold in the business world, but can clouds meet the specialized needs of scientists?...

118

Month-Long 2D Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Resultant Statistics of Cloud Systems Over the ARM SGP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Month-Long 2D Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation Month-Long 2D Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Resultant Statistics of Cloud Systems Over the ARM SGP X. Wu Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences Iowa State University Ames, Iowa X.-Z. Liang Illinois State Water Survey University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Illinois Introduction The cloud-resolving model (CRM) has recently emerged as a useful tool to develop improved representations of convections, clouds, and cloud-radiation interactions in general circulation models (GCMs). In particular, the fine spatial resolution allows the CRM to more realistically represent the detailed structure of cloud systems, including cloud geometric and radiative properties. The CRM simulations thus provide unique and comprehensive datasets, based on which more realistic GCM

119

Cloud Computing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Cloud computing has been given a great deal of attention during recent years. Almost all the technology market leaders and leading hosting service providers (more)

Siddiqui, Muhammad Anas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Cloud system resolving model simulations of tropical cloud systems observed during the Tropical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The WRF model is configured with a highest-resolving domain convection. The second regime is a monsoon break, which contains intense localized systems that are rep-based observational systems including a polarimetric weather radar, cloud radar, wind profilers, radi- ation

Jakob, Christian

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep convective clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Modeling the Dynamical Coupling of Solar Convection with the Radiative Interior  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The global dynamics of a rotating star like the Sun involves the coupling of a highly turbulent convective envelope overlying a seemingly benign radiative interior. We use the anelastic spherical harmonic code to develop a new class of three-dimensional models that nonlinearly couple the convective envelope to a deep stable radiative interior. The numerical simulation assumes a realistic solar stratification from r = 0.07 up to 0.97R (with R the solar radius), thus encompassing part of the nuclear core up through most of the convection zone. We find that a tachocline naturally establishes itself between the differentially rotating convective envelope and the solid body rotation of the interior, with a slow spreading that is here diffusively controlled. The rapid angular momentum redistribution in the convective envelope leads to a fast equator and slow poles, with a conical differential rotation achieved at mid-latitudes, much as has been deduced by helioseismology. The convective motions are able to overshoot downward about 0.04R into the radiative interior. However, the convective meridional circulation there is confined to a smaller penetration depth and is directed mostly equatorward at the base of the convection zone. Thermal wind balance is established in the lower convection zone and tachocline but departures are evident in the upper convection zone. Internal gravity waves are excited by the convective overshooting, yielding a complex wave field throughout the radiative interior.

Allan Sacha Brun; Mark S. Miesch; Juri Toomre

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Cloud Computing Fundamentals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the introductory chapter we define the concept of cloud computing and cloud services, and we introduce layers and types of cloud computing. We discuss the differences between cloud computing and cloud servi...

Borko Furht

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Isotopic Fractionations in the TTL in cloud-resolving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The results suggest that the sublimation of relatively enriched ice associated with deep convection affects and chemistry of the stratosphere and also of the earth as a whole [e.g., Forster and Shine, 1999; Kirk], hydration by overshooting deep convection through the in- jection and subsequent sublimation of ice [e

Blossey, Peter

124

Intensification of precipitation extremes with warming in a cloud resolving model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A cloud-resolving model is used to investigate the effect of warming on high percentiles of precipitation (precipitation extremes) in the idealized setting of radiative-convective equilibrium. While this idealized setting ...

Muller, Caroline

125

CLOUD MODELING CHALLENGES FOR CLIMATE CHANGE SIMULATION  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OF ENTRAINMENT IN THE OF ENTRAINMENT IN THE DIURNAL TRANSITION FROM SHALLOW TO DEEP CONVECTION Tony Del Genio and Jingbo Wu NASA/GISS ARM Science Team Meeting, 3/31/09 Continental rainfall rates tend to peak in mid-late afternoon or evening Time of peak rainfall, TRMM PR Hirose et al. (2008) But not in GCMs, which like to rain near noon ___ TRMM 3B42 - - - gauge colors = models IPCC AR4 models (Dai, 2006) Some recent studies * Derbyshire et al. (2004): SCMs insensitive to tropospheric humidity * Grabowski et al. (2006): Need entrainment rate to decrease with time of day * Kuang and Bretherton (2006): Weaker entrainment rates for deep than for shallow convection - increasing parcel size as cold pools form? * Khairoutdinov and Randall (2006): Demonstration of downdraft/cold pool role in transition from shallow to deep

126

Dynamic Cloud Infrastructure.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis will explore and investigate the possibility of implementing nested clouds to increase flexibility. A nested cloud is a private cloud running inside another (more)

Gundersen, Espen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Securing Cloud Storage Service.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Cloud computing brought flexibility, scalability, and capital cost savings to the IT industry. As more companies turn to cloud solutions, securing cloud based services (more)

Zapolskas, Vytautas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Thermodynamics Affect Radiative Impact of Deep Convective Cloud Systems Submitter: Jensen, M., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric...

129

Laboratory simulations show diabatic heating drives cumulus-cloud evolution and entrainment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...carried out for a cloud system in radiative-convective...here offer a powerful tool that can complement...Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report, IPCC , ed Solomon SD...the Perturbed Climate System , Laboratory cloud simulation: Capabilities...dome to collect air and steam bubbles, which are released...

Roddam Narasimha; Sourabh Suhas Diwan; Subrahmanyam Duvvuri; K. R. Sreenivas; G. S. Bhat

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Cloud Computing Adam Barker  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Computing 1 Adam Barker #12;Overview · Introduction to Cloud computing · Enabling technologies · Di erent types of cloud: IaaS, PaaS and SaaS · Cloud terminology · Interacting with a cloud: management consoles · Launching an instance · Connecting to an instance · Running your application · Clouds

St Andrews, University of

131

Refinement, Validation and Application of Cloud-Radiation Parameterization in a GCM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research performed under this award was conducted along 3 related fronts: (1) Refinement and assessment of parameterizations of sub-grid scale radiative transport in GCMs. (2) Diagnostic studies that use ARM observations of clouds and convection in an effort to understand the effects of moist convection on its environment, including how convection influences clouds and radiation. This aspect focuses on developing and testing methodologies designed to use ARM data more effectively for use in atmospheric models, both at the cloud resolving model scale and the global climate model scale. (3) Use (1) and (2) in combination with both models and observations of varying complexity to study key radiation feedback Our work toward these objectives thus involved three corresponding efforts. First, novel diagnostic techniques were developed and applied to ARM observations to understand and characterize the effects of moist convection on the dynamical and thermodynamical environment in which it occurs. Second, an in house GCM radiative transfer algorithm (BUGSrad) was employed along with an optimal estimation cloud retrieval algorithm to evaluate the ability to reproduce cloudy-sky radiative flux observations. Assessments using a range of GCMs with various moist convective parameterizations to evaluate the fidelity with which the parameterizations reproduce key observable features of the environment were also started in the final year of this award. The third study area involved the study of cloud radiation feedbacks and we examined these in both cloud resolving and global climate models.

Dr. Graeme L. Stephens

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

132

Understanding and Improving CRM and GCM Simulations of Cloud Systems with ARM Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The works supported by this ASR project lay the solid foundation for improving the parameterization of convection and clouds in the NCAR CCSM and the climate simulations. We have made a significant use of CRM simulations and ARM observations to produce thermodynamically and dynamically consistent multi-year cloud and radiative properties; improve the GCM simulations of convection, clouds and radiative heating rate and fluxes using the ARM observations and CRM simulations; and understand the seasonal and annual variation of cloud systems and their impacts on climate mean state and variability. We conducted multi-year simulations over the ARM SGP site using the CRM with multi-year ARM forcing data. The statistics of cloud and radiative properties from the long-term CRM simulations were compared and validated with the ARM measurements and value added products (VAP). We evaluated the multi-year climate simulations produced by the GCM with the modified convection scheme. We used multi-year ARM observations and CRM simulations to validate and further improve the trigger condition and revised closure assumption in NCAR GCM simulations that demonstrate the improvement of climate mean state and variability. We combined the improved convection scheme with the mosaic treatment of subgrid cloud distributions in the radiation scheme of the GCM. The mosaic treatment of cloud distributions has been implemented in the GCM with the original convection scheme and enables the use of more realistic cloud amounts as well as cloud water contents in producing net radiative fluxes closer to observations. A physics-based latent heat (LH) retrieval algorithm was developed by parameterizing the physical linkages of observed hydrometeor profiles of cloud and precipitation to the major processes related to the phase change of atmospheric water.

Wu, Xiaoqing

2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

133

Long-lived artificial ion clouds in the earth's ionosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report on two observations made over the Caribbean during the summer of 1991 of barium ion cloud releases, ten hours after the clouds were released. One release was made in the morning twilight, and one in the evening twilight, and each was observed again in the following twilight period by a low light level TV imager and a TV spectrograph onboard a Russian research vessel. These observations were very surprising at the time, but the authors present arguments as to why in retrospect they may not be so unusual in practise. Such cloud releases may provide very sensitive tests of ionspheric convection models.

Milinevsky, G.P. (Kiev Univ., Ukraine (Russian Federation)); Kashirin, A.I. (NPO Typhoon, Obninsk (Russian Federation)); Romanovsky, Yu.A. (Institute of Applied Geophysics, Moscow (Russian Federation)); Stenbaek-Nielson, H.C. (Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States)); Kelley, M.C. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States))

1993-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

134

Cloud Controlling Factors --Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Controlling Factors -- Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic) clouds is reviewed, with an emphasis on factors that may be expected to change in a changing climate of low-cloud control- ling processes are offered: these include renewing our focus on theory, model

Stevens, Bjorn

135

Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models RMetS Conference 4th September 2007 Bob Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK #12;Introduction Obtain life cycle statistics for clouds in CRM simulations What is the distribution of cloud lifetimes? What factors determine the lifetime of an individual

Plant, Robert

136

Cloud Controlling Factors --Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Controlling Factors -- Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic conspire to determine the statistics and cli- matology of layers of shallow (boundary layer) clouds of low-cloud control- ling processes are offered: these include renewing our focus on theory, model

Stevens, Bjorn

137

Cloud Computing: Rain-Clouds System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Cloud Computing is the on demand service can be provided to the users at any time. It delivers the software, data access, computing as a service rather than the product. The Cloud application simplifies the computing technology by providing pay-per-use customer relationship. It is the theory that familiar to cheaper devices with low processing power, lower storage capacities, great flexibility and many more things. The security of cloud computing is a major factor as users store sensitive and confidential information with cloud storage providers. The range of these providers may be un trusted and harmful. The purpose of adopting cloud computing in an organization is to decide between a public cloud ? and private cloud ? by means of privacy. Public clouds often known as provider clouds are administrated by third parties and services are offered on pay-per-use basis. Private clouds or internal clouds are owned by the single firm but it has some metrics such as lacking of availability of services (such as memory, server) and network resources which leads it to down. Due to this, technology moves toward the concept of Multi clouds or Rain Clouds. This paper displays the use of multi-clouds or rain clouds due to its ability to handle the huge amount of data traffic that affect the cloud computing user.

Harinder Kaur

138

Radar, satellite, and lightning characteristics of select mesoscale convective systems in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study compares radar data from the League City, Texas WSR-88D and cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning data for a set of eight mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) which occur at various stages of development along the upper Texas Gulf Coast. Vertical...

Toracinta, Ernest Richard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

139

Radar Nowcasting of Cloud-to-Ground Lightning over Houston, Texas RICHARD M. MOSIER,* COURTNEY SCHUMACHER, AND RICHARD E. ORVILLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-to-ground lightning flash from a convective cell. Convective cells were tracked using a modified version of the Storm lightning flashes to find the best lightning forecast criteria. Results show that using 30 dBZ at the 2158. Introduction The forecasting of cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning flashes is of great importance. Curran et al

140

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Estimating Glaciation Temperature of Deep Convective Clouds with Remote Sensing Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Cloud...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep convective clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Tracking tropical cloud systems for the diagnosis of simulations by the weather research and forecasting (WRF) model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To aid in improving model parameterizations of clouds and convection, we examine the capability of models, using explicit convection, to simulate the life cycle of tropical cloud systems in the tropical warm pool. The cloud life cycle is determined using a satellite cloud tracking algorithm (Boer and Ramanathan, J. Geophys. Res., 1997), and the statistics are compared to those of simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model. Using New York Blue, a Blue Gene/L supercomputer that is co-operated by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, simulations are run at a resolution comparable to the observations. Initial results suggest that the organization of the mesoscale convective systems is particularly sensitive to the cloud microphysics parameterization used.

Vogelmann, A.M.; Lin, W.; Cialella, A.; Luke, E. P.; Jensen, M. P.; Zhang, M. H.; Boer, E.

2010-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

142

Cloud Security by Max Garvey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Security Survey by Max Garvey #12;Cloudy Cloud is Cloudy What is the cloud? On Demand Service Network access Resource pooling Elasticity of Resources Measured Service #12;Cloud Types/Variants Iaa Cloud Public Cloud Hybrid Cloud combination. Private cloud with overflow going to public cloud. #12

Tolmach, Andrew

143

Development of Ensemble Neural Network Convection Parameterizations for Climate Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The novel neural network (NN) approach has been formulated and used for development of a NN ensemble stochastic convection parametrization for climate models. This fast parametrization is built based on data from Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) simulations initialized with and forced by TOGA-COARE data. The SAM (System for Atmospheric Modeling), developed by D. Randall, M. Khairoutdinov, and their collaborators, has been used for CRM simulations. The observational data are also used for validation of model simulations. The SAM-simulated data have been averaged and projected onto the GCM space of atmospheric states to implicitly define a stochastic convection parametrization. This parametrization is emulated using an ensemble of NNs. An ensemble of NNs with different NN parameters has been trained and tested. The inherent uncertainty of the stochastic convection parametrization derived in such a way is estimated. Due to these inherent uncertainties, NN ensemble is used to constitute a stochastic NN convection parametrization. The developed NN convection parametrization have been validated in a diagnostic CAM (CAM-NN) run vs. the control CAM run. Actually, CAM inputs have been used, at every time step of the control/original CAM integration, for parallel calculations of the NN convection parametrization (CAM-NN) to produce its outputs as a diagnostic byproduct. Total precipitation (P) and cloudiness (CLD) time series, diurnal cycles, and P and CLD distributions for the large Tropical Pacific Ocean for the parallel CAM-NN and CAM runs show similarity and consistency with the NCEP reanalysis. The P and CLD distributions for the tropical area for the parallel runs have been analyzed first for the TOGA-COARE boreal winter season (November 1992 through February 1993) and then for the winter seasons of the follow-up parallel decadal simulations. The obtained results are encouraging and practically meaningful. They show the validity of the NN approach. This constitutes an important practical conclusion of the study: the obtained results on NN ensembles as a stochastic physics parametrization show a realistic possibility of development of NN convection parametrization for climate (and NWP) models based on learning cloud physics from CRM/SAM simulated data.

Fox-Rabinovitz, M. S.; Krasnopolsky, V. M.

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

144

Cloud Computing For Bioinformatics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Computing For Bioinformatics #12;Cloud Computing: what is it? · Cloud Computing is a distributed infrastructure where resources, software, and data are provided in an on-demand fashion. · Cloud Computing abstracts infrastructure from application. · Cloud Computing should save you time the way software

Ferrara, Katherine W.

145

Contrasting convective regimes over the Amazon: Implications for cloud electrification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

flash rate, lightning yield per unit rainfall) between aerosol-rich October and aerosol-poor November the easterly and westerly wind regimes of the wet season, the lightning yield per unit of rainfall a major continent with minimum aerosol concentration, minimum CAPE, and little if any lightning. INDEX

Daniel, Rosenfeld

146

Impact of aerosols on convective clouds and precipitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue, E19-411 Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA) Location to form and a significant attenuator of solar radiation, aerosols affect climate in several ways. Current

147

The persistence of oceans on Earth-like planets: insights from the deep-water cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we present a series of models for the deep water cycle on super-Earths experiencing plate tectonics. The deep water cycle can be modeled through parameterized convection models coupled with a volatile recycling model. The convection of the silicate mantle is linked to the volatile cycle through the water-dependent viscosity. Important differences in surface water content are found for different parameterizations of convection. Surface oceans are smaller and more persistent for single layer convection, rather than convection by boundary layer instability. Smaller planets have initially larger oceans but also return that water to the mantle more rapidly than larger planets. Super-Earths may therefore be less habitable in their early years than smaller planets, but their habitability (assuming stable surface conditions), will persist much longer.

Schaefer, Laura

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

The Roles of Cloud Drop Effective Radius and LWP in Determining Rain Properties in Marine Stratocumulus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical simulations described in previous studies showed that adding cloud condensation nuclei to marine stratocumulus can prevent their breakup from closed into open cells. Additional analyses of the same simulations show that the suppression of rain is well described in terms of cloud drop effective radius (re). Rain is initiated when re near cloud top is around 12-14 um. Cloud water starts to get depleted when column-maximum rain intensity (Rmax) exceeds 0.1 mm h-1. This happens when cloud-top re reaches 14 um. Rmax is mostly less than 0.1 mm h-1 at re<14 um, regardless of the cloud water path, but increases rapidly when re exceeds 14 um. This is in agreement with recent aircraft observations and theoretical observations in convective clouds so that the mechanism is not limited to describing marine stratocumulus. These results support the hypothesis that the onset of significant precipitation is determined by the number of nucleated cloud drops and the height (H) above cloud base within the cloud that is required for cloud drops to reach re of 14 um. In turn, this can explain the conditions for initiation of significant drizzle and opening of closed cells providing the basis for a simple parameterization for GCMs that unifies the representation of both precipitating and non-precipitating clouds as well as the transition between them. Furthermore, satellite global observations of cloud depth (from base to top), and cloud top re can be used to derive and validate this parameterization.

Rosenfeld, Daniel; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.

2012-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

149

Cloud Computing og availability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Computing og availability Projekt i pålidelighed Henrik Lavdal - 20010210 Søren Bardino Kaa - 20011654 Gruppe 8 19-03-2010 #12;Cloud Computing og availability Side 2 af 28 Indholdsfortegnelse ...........................................................................................5 Cloud computing

Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

150

Federal Cloud Computing: The Definitive Guide for Cloud Service Providers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Federal Cloud Computing: The Definitive Guide for Cloud Service Providers offers an in-depth look at topics surrounding federal cloud computing within the federal government, including the Federal Cloud Computing Strategy, Cloud Computing Standards, ...

Matthew Metheny

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Reconstruction of Early Paleogene North Pacific Deep-Water Circulation using the Neodymium Isotopic Composition of Fossil Fish Debris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the timing of the cessation of major, deep convection in the North Pacific occurred much earlier, ~52 Ma than the timing obtained from shallower Shatsky Rise sites, ~45 Ma. Convection in the North Pacific likely produced a dense water mass that influenced...

Hague, Ashley Melissa

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

152

On Demand Surveillance Service in Vehicular Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Toward Vehicular Service Cloud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.2 Open Mobile Cloud Requirement . . . . .3.1 Mobile Cloud

Weng, Jui-Ting

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Different convection models in ATLAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Convection is an important phenomenon in the atmospheres of A-type and cooler stars. A description of convection in ATLAS models is presented, together with details of how it is specified in model calculations. The effects of changing the treatment of convection on model structures and how this affects observable quantities are discussed. The role of microturbulence is examined, and its link to velocity fields within the atmosphere. Far from being free parameters, mixing-length and microturbulence should be constrained in model calculations.

Barry Smalley

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

154

10.12 CONVECTION INITIATION AND MISOCYCLONE DEVELOMENT: IS THERE A LINK ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kingsmill·, and Carl Young £ · University of Colorado, CIRES, Boulder, Colorado Desert Research Institute to horizontal shear instabilities can produce wave pattern that produce small scale ( 4 km) vertical vortic- ity with the initiation of deep convection along the Florida Peninsula using a net- work of anemometers. Since

155

Isentropic Analysis of Convective Motions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the convective mass transport by sorting air parcels in terms of their equivalent potential temperature to determine an isentropic streamfunction. By averaging the vertical mass flux at a constant value of the equivalent ...

Olivier M. Pauluis; Agnieszka A. Mrowiec

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Cloud Computing For Bioinformatics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Computing For Bioinformatics EC2 and AMIs #12;Quick-starting an EC2 instance (let's get our feet wet!) Cloud Computing #12;Cloud Computing: EC2 instance Quick Start · On EC2 console, we can click on Launch Instance · This will let us get up and going quickly #12;Cloud Computing: EC2 instance

Ferrara, Katherine W.

157

Turbulent Compressible Convection with Rotation - Penetration above a Convection Zone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform Large eddy simulations of turbulent compressible convection in stellar-type convection zones by solving the Navi\\'{e}r-Stokes equations in three dimensions. We estimate the extent of penetration into the stable layer above a stellar-type convection zone by varying the rotation rate ({\\boldmath$\\rm\\Omega$}), the inclination of the rotation vector ($\\theta$) and the relative stability ($S$) of the upper stable layer. The computational domain is a rectangular box in an f-plane configuration and is divided into two regions of unstable and stable stratification with the stable layer placed above the convectively unstable layer. Several models have been computed and the penetration distance into the stable layer above the convection zone is estimated by determining the position where time averaged kinetic energy flux has the first zero in the upper stable layer. The vertical grid spacing in all the model is non-uniform, and is less in the upper region so that the flows are better resolved in the region of interest. We find that the penetration distance increases as the rotation rate increases for the case when the rotation vector is aligned with the vertical axis. However, with the increase in the stability of the upper stable layer, the upward penetration distance decreases. Since we are not able to afford computations with finer resolution for all the models, we compute a number of models to see the effect of increased resolution on the upward penetration. In addition, we estimate the upper limit on the upward convective penetration from stellar convective cores.

Partha S. Pal; Harinder P. Singh; Kwing L. Chan; M. P. Srivastava

2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

158

Convective heat flow probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packet-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.; Striker, R.P.

1984-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

159

ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Satellite Observation CAS Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer CCN Cloud Condensation Nuclei CIP Cloud Imaging Probe CPC Condensation Particle Counter CSPHOT Cimel sunphotometer CVI...

160

SURFACE CLOUD RADIATIVE FORCING, CLOUD FRACTION AND CLOUD ALBEDO: THEIR RELATIONSHIP AND MULTISCALE VARIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SURFACE CLOUD RADIATIVE FORCING, CLOUD FRACTION AND CLOUD ALBEDO: THEIR RELATIONSHIP AND MULTISCALE/Atmospheric Sciences Division Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box, Upton, NY www.bnl.gov ABSTRACT Cloud-induced climate change. Cloud-radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo are three key quantities

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep convective clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Simultaneous detection/separation of mineral dust and cirrus clouds using MODIS thermal infrared window data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and cloud coverage for the Persian Gulf case compares reasonably well to those from the ``Deep Blue-laden scenes, including a daytime dust case over the Persian Gulf and two nighttime dust events over the Cape

Liou, K. N.

162

Microparticles deep in the plasma sheath: Coulomb 'explosion'  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cloud of microparticles was trapped deep in the sheath of a radio-frequency (rf) discharge, very close to the lower (grounded) electrode of the plasma chamber. This was achieved by employing a specifically designed rf-driven segment integrated in the lower electrode, which provided an additional confinement compressing the cloud to a very high density. After switching the rf-driven segment off, the cloud 'exploded' due to mutual interparticle repulsion. By combining a simple theoretical model with different numerical simulation methods, some basic properties of complex plasmas in this highly non-equilibrium regime were determined.

Antonova, T.; Du, C.-R.; Ivlev, A. V.; Hou, L.-J.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Annaratone, B. M. [PIIM, UMR6633 CNRS/Universite de Provence, Campus St. Jerome F-13397, Marseille (France); Kompaneets, R. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

AERIAL MEASUREMENTS OF CONVECTION CELL ELEMENTS IN HEATED LAKES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power plant-heated lakes are characterized by a temperature gradient in the thermal plume originating at the discharge of the power plant and terminating at the water intake. The maximum water temperature discharged by the power plant into the lake depends on the power generated at the facility and environmental regulations on the temperature of the lake. Besides the observed thermal plume, cloud-like thermal cells (convection cell elements) are also observed on the water surface. The size, shape and temperature of the convection cell elements depends on several parameters such as the lake water temperature, wind speed, surfactants and the depth of the thermocline. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Clemson University are collaborating to determine the applicability of laboratory empirical correlations between surface heat flux and thermal convection intensity. Laboratory experiments at Clemson University have demonstrated a simple relationship between the surface heat flux and the standard deviation of temperature fluctuations. Similar results were observed in the aerial thermal imagery SRNL collected at different locations along the thermal plume and at different elevations. SRNL will present evidence that the results at Clemson University are applicable to cooling lakes.

Villa-Aleman, E; Saleem Salaymeh, S; Timothy Brown, T; Alfred Garrett, A; Malcolm Pendergast, M; Linda Nichols, L

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

164

First Observations of Tracking Clouds Using Scanning ARM Cloud Radars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large-drop formation (weather radar first echo). These measurements also complement cloud and precipitation tracking using ...

Paloma Borque; Pavlos Kollias; Scott Giangrande

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Aircraft Observations of Sub-cloud Aerosol and Convective Cloud Physical Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nucleation and Aitken modes. Backtrajectories of Central Mediterranean origin contain a high accumulation mode but low nucleation mode. Eastern Europe backtrajectories have the lowest nucleation mode but exhibit a broad accumulation mode which... are shaped by complex nonlinear processes that are difficult to represent numerically. These processes include nucleation of new particles and evaporation, growth and coagulation of existing particles. Most current models explicitly represent the ASD...

Axisa, Duncan

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

166

Large plasma pressure perturbations and radial convective transport in a tokamak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strongly localized plasma structures with large pressure inhomogeneities (such as plasma blobs in the scrape-off-layer (SOL)/shadow regions, pellet clouds, ELMs) observed in the tokamaks, stellarators and linear plasma devices. Experimental studies of these phenomena reveal striking similarities including more convective rather than diffusive radial plasma transport. We suggest that rather simple models can describe many essentials of blobs, ELMs, and pellet clouds dynamics. The main ingredient of these models is the effective plasma gravity caused by magnetic curvature, centrifugal or friction forces effects. As a result, the equations governing plasma transport in such localized structures appear to be rather similar to that used to describe nonlinear evolution of thermal convection in the Boussinesq approximation (directly related to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability).

Krasheninnikov, S; Ryutov, D; Yu, G

2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

167

Data assimilation for stratified convection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show how the 3DVAR data assimilation methodology can be used in the astrophysical context of a two-dimensional convection flow. We study the way this variational approach finds best estimates of the current state of the flow from a weighted average of model states and observations. We use numerical simulations to generate synthetic observations of a vertical two-dimensional slice of the outer part of the solar convection zone for varying noise levels and implement 3DVAR when the covariance matrices are scalar. Our simulation results demonstrate the capability of 3DVAR to produce error estimates of system states between up to tree orders of magnitude below the original noise level present in the observations. This work exemplifies the importance of applying data assimilation techniques in simulations of the stratified convection.

Svedin, Andreas; Brandenburg, Axel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

On the Features of Radiative and Convective Regimes Under the Cumulus Cloudiness  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

On the Features of Radiative and Convective Regimes On the Features of Radiative and Convective Regimes Under the Cumulus Cloudiness B. M. Koprov, V. M. Koprov, G. S. Golitsyn A.M. Oboukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics Moscow, Russia E. N. Kadygrov, A. V. Koldaev Central Aerological Observatory Dolgoprudny, Russia Introduction The study of instant temperature field transformation, convective and radiative regime perturbation within the layer of 0 to 650 m was fulfilled as caused by cloud modulation of solar radiation flux. It was made within the scope of Zvenigorod Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) experiments in 2001 and 2002. Instrumentation The equipment used: 1. Microwave temperature profiler designed in Central Aerological Observatory (CAO) and manufactured by Russian company ATTEX (Kadygrov and Pick 1998).

169

ARM - Measurement - Cloud fraction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud fraction Fraction of sky covered by clouds, observed directly or derived from SW...

170

ARM - Measurement - Cloud size  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud size Information about the physical dimensions of a cloud, including such measurements...

171

Impact of Resolution on Simulation of Closed Mesoscale Cellular Convection Identified by Dynamically Guided Watershed Segmentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organized mesoscale cellular convection (MCC) is a common feature of marine stratocumulus that forms in response to a balance between mesoscale dynamics and smaller scale processes such as cloud radiative cooling and microphysics. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem) and fully coupled cloud-aerosol interactions to simulate marine low clouds during the VOCALS-REx campaign over the southeast Pacific. A suite of experiments with 3- and 9-km grid spacing indicates resolution-dependent behavior. The simulations with finer grid spacing have smaller liquid water paths and cloud fractions, while cloud tops are higher. The observed diurnal cycle is reasonably well simulated. To isolate organized MCC characteristics we develop a new automated method, which uses a variation of the watershed segmentation technique that combines the detection of cloud boundaries with a test for coincident vertical velocity characteristics. This ensures that the detected cloud fields are dynamically consistent for closed MCC, the most common MCC type over the VOCALS-REx region. We demonstrate that the 3-km simulation is able to reproduce the scaling between horizontal cell size and boundary layer height seen in satellite observations. However, the 9-km simulation is unable to resolve smaller circulations corresponding to shallower boundary layers, instead producing invariant MCC horizontal scale for all simulated boundary layers depths. The results imply that climate models with grid spacing of roughly 3 km or smaller may be needed to properly simulate the MCC structure in the marine stratocumulus regions.

Martini, Matus; Gustafson, William I.; Yang, Qing; Xiao, Heng

2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

172

Representing Cloud Processing of Aerosol in Numerical Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The satellite imagery in Figure 1 provides dramatic examples of how aerosol influences the cloud field. Aerosol from ship exhaust can serve as nucleation centers in otherwise cloud-free regions, forming ship tracks (top image), or can enhance the reflectance/albedo in already cloudy regions. This image is a demonstration of the first indirect effect, in which changes in aerosol modulate cloud droplet radius and concentration, which influences albedo. It is thought that, through the effects it has on precipitation (drizzle), aerosol can also affect the structure and persistence of planetary boundary layer (PBL) clouds. Regions of cellular convection, or open pockets of cloudiness (bottom image) are thought to be remnants of strongly drizzling PBL clouds. Pockets of Open Cloudiness (POCs) (Stevens et al. 2005) or Albrecht's ''rifts'' are low cloud fraction regions characterized by anomalously low aerosol concentrations, implying they result from precipitation. These features may in fact be a demonstration of the second indirect effect. To accurately represent these clouds in numerical models, we have to treat the coupled cloud-aerosol system. We present the following series of mesoscale and large eddy simulation (LES) experiments to evaluate the important aspects of treating the coupled cloud-aerosol problem. 1. Drizzling and nondrizzling simulations demonstrate the effect of drizzle on a mesoscale forecast off the California coast. 2. LES experiments with explicit (bin) microphysics gauge the relative importance of the shape of the aerosol spectrum on the 3D dynamics and cloud structure. 3. Idealized mesoscale model simulations evaluate the relative roles of various processes, sources, and sinks.

Mechem, D.B.; Kogan, Y.L.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

173

Marine cloud brightening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...will not be as effective in marine stratocumulus clouds that are...Engineering steps to implement marine cloud brightening (a) Introduction...brightening by increasing the CCN of marine stratus clouds (by way of...vessel and the optimum means of propulsion. In fact, both these aspects...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

XSEDE Cloud Survey Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

XSEDE Cloud Survey Report David Lifka, Cornell Center for Advanced Computing Ian Foster, ANL, ANL and The University of Chicago A National Science Foundation-sponsored cloud user survey was conducted from September 2012 to April 2013 by the XSEDE Cloud Integration Investigation Team to better

Walter, M.Todd

175

Research Cloud Computing Recommendations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Cloud Computing Recommendations SRCPAC December 3, 2014 #12;Mandate and Membership SRCPAC convened this committee in Sept 2014 to investigate the role that cloud computing should play in our & Academic Affairs (Social Work) #12;Questions discussed · What cloud resources are available? · Which kinds

Qian, Ning

176

Testing the Fixed Anvil Temperature Hypothesis in a Cloud-Resolving Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using cloud-resolving simulations of tropical radiativeconvective equilibrium, it is shown that the anvil temperature changes by less than 0.5 K with a 2-K change in SST, lending support to the fixed anvil temperature (FAT) hypothesis. The ...

Zhiming Kuang; Dennis L. Hartmann

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hybrid cloud combines aspects of public and private clouds: a company may build a compute cloud own its own infrastructure,

Vrable, Michael Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Convective cell development and propagation in a mesoscale convective complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~ , National Fisheries University of Pusan Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr ~ Kennth CD Brundidge A case study was made of the mesoscale convective complex (MCC) which occurred over southern Oklahoma and northern Texas on 27 May 1981. This storm moved... in an east-southeasterly direction and during much of its lifetime was observable by radars at Oklahoma City, OK and Stephenville, TX. It was found that the direction of cell (VIP level 3 or more reflectivity) propagation was somewhat erratic...

Ahn, Yoo-Shin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

179

Collaborative Research: The Influence of Cloud Microphysics and Radiation on the Response of Water Vapor and Clouds to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uncertainties in representing the atmospheric water cycle are major obstacles to an accurate prediction of future climate. This project focused on addressing some of these uncertainties by implementing new physics for convection and radiation into the NCAR climate model. To better understand and eventually better represent these processes, we modified CAM3.5 to use the convection and cloud schemes developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the RRTMG rapid radiation code for global models developed by Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER). The impact of the new physics on the CAM3.5 simulation of convection on diurnal and intra-seasonal scales, intra-seasonal oscillations and the distribution of water vapor has been investigated. The effect of the MIT and AER physics also has been tested in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional forecast model. It has been found that the application of the AER radiation and MIT convection produces significant improvements in the modeled diurnal cycle of convection, especially over land, in the NCAR climate model. However, both the standard CAM3.5 (hereinafter STD) and the modified CAM3.5 with the new physics (hereinafter MOD) are still unable to capture the proper spectrum and propagating characteristics of the intra-seasonal oscillations (ISOs). The new physics methods modify, but do not substantially improve, the distribution of upper tropospheric water vapor relative to satellite measurements.

Dr. Kerry Emanuel; Michael J. Iacono

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

180

Deep Web video  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

To make the web work better for science, OSTI has developed state-of-the-art technologies and services including a deep web search capability. The deep web includes content in searchable databases available to web users but not accessible by popular search engines, such as Google. This video provides an introduction to the deep web search engine.

None Available

2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep convective clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Deep Web video  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To make the web work better for science, OSTI has developed state-of-the-art technologies and services including a deep web search capability. The deep web includes content in searchable databases available to web users but not accessible by popular search engines, such as Google. This video provides an introduction to the deep web search engine.

None Available

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Cloud Properties Working Group Low Clouds Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cloud Properties Working Group Cloud Properties Working Group Low Clouds Update Low Clouds Update Jennifer Comstock Jennifer Comstock Dave Turner Dave Turner Andy Andy Vogelmann Vogelmann Instruments Instruments 90/150 GHz microwave radiometer 90/150 GHz microwave radiometer Deployed during COPS AMF Deployed during COPS AMF Exploring calibration w/ DPR ( Exploring calibration w/ DPR ( Crewell Crewell & & L L ö ö hnert hnert ) ) See COPS Breakout, Wednesday evening See COPS Breakout, Wednesday evening 183 GHz (GVR) deployed at the NSA 183 GHz (GVR) deployed at the NSA Neural network algorithm to retrieve PWV & LWP (Maria Neural network algorithm to retrieve PWV & LWP (Maria Cadeddu Cadeddu ) ) Potential VAP candidate (RPWG) Potential VAP candidate (RPWG)

183

Cloud Occurrence Frequency at the Barrow, Alaska, ARM Climate Research Facility for 2008 Third Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clouds represent a critical component of the Earths atmospheric energy balance as a result of their interactions with solar and terrestrial radiation and a redistribution of heat through convective processes and latent heating. Despite their importance, clouds and the processes that control their development, evolution and lifecycle remain poorly understood. Consequently, the simulation of clouds and their associated feedbacks is a primary source of inter-model differences in equilibrium climate sensitivity. An important step in improving the representation of cloud process simulations is an improved high-resolution observational data set of the cloud systems including their time evolution. The first order quantity needed to understand the important role of clouds is the height of cloud occurrence and how it changes as a function of time. To this end, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facilities (ACRF) suite of instrumentation has been developed to make the observations required to improve the representation of cloud systems in atmospheric models.

M Jensen; K Johnson; JH Mather

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

184

Ship-Track Clouds, Aerosol, and Ship Dynamic Effects; A Climate Perspective from Ship-Based Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ship-track clouds are marine boundary layer clouds that form behind ocean ships and are observed from satellites in the visible and near infrared. Ship-track clouds provide a rare opportunity to connect aerosol cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) emissions and observable changes in marine stratiform clouds. A very small change in the reflectivity of these eastern Pacific and Atlantic clouds (about 4%) provides a climate feedback of similar magnitude to doubling CO{sub 2} (increasing cloud reflectivity corresponds to global cooling). The Department of Energy sponsored research from 1991 to 1995 to study ship-track clouds including two ocean-based experiments in the summers of 1991 and 1994. These experiments showed that ship-track cloud properties were often more complex those related to a reduction of droplet size with an increase in number associated with increasing CCN from the ship's plume. The clouds showed evidence of morphological changes more likely to be associated with cloud dynamic effects either initiated by the increased CCN or directly by the ship's heat output or turbulent air wake. The fact that marine stratiform clouds, that are susceptible to ship track formation, are starved for both CCN and convective turbulence complicates the separation of the two effects.

Porch, W.M.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

185

BNL | Cloud Lifecycle Infrastructure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cloud Life Cycle Infrastructure Cloud Life Cycle Infrastructure An important component of any long-term atmospheric measurement program is the quality control and maintenance of the datastreams from instrument systems. Further, the raw measurements from atmospheric remote sensing instrumentation are not directly useable by the majority of the scientific community. These raw measurements must be interpreted and converted to geophysical quantities that can be more readily used by a greater number of scientists to address important questions regarding the Earth's climate system. The cloud life cycle infrastructure group at BNL is led by Dr. Michael Jensen and is responsible for the development and production of cloud-related value-added products (VAPs). The cloud life cycle infrastructure group also provides mentorships for the millimeter cloud

186

Tracking tropical cloud systems - Observations for the diagnosis of simulations by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To aid in improving model parameterizations of clouds and convection, we examine the capability of models, using explicit convection, to simulate the life cycle of tropical cloud systems in the vicinity of the ARM Tropical Western Pacific sites. The cloud life cycle is determined using a satellite cloud tracking algorithm (Boer and Ramanathan, 1997), and the statistics are compared to those of simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model. Using New York Blue, a Blue Gene/L supercomputer that is co-operated by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, simulations are run at a resolution comparable to the observations. Initial results suggest a computational paradox where, even though the size of the simulated systems are about half of that observed, their longevities are still similar. The explanation for this seeming incongruity will be explored.

Vogelmann, A.M.; Lin, W.; Cialella, A.; Luke, E.; Jensen, M.; Zhang, M.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Cloud episode propagation over the Indonesian Maritime Continent from 10years of infrared brightness temperature observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The cloud-top brightness temperature data from 2001 to 2010 are used to derive a climatology of deep convection duration, span, and propagation speed over the Indonesian Maritime Continent (10S10N, 80E160E). The full domain of study is divided into northern (010N) and southern (010S) regions to investigate the seasonal and latitudinal variabilities of cloud streaks. The ratio of westward- to eastward-propagating cloud streaks is found to be approximately 3:1. Westward-moving streaks generally have longer spans and faster speeds than eastward-moving systems. Coherent episodes of westward- (eastward-) propagating systems have 9.5 (7.5) h durations and 519 (378) km spans on average; most episodes have zonal phase speeds of 630ms?1. Median zonal phase speeds of 14.2 (westward) and 13.5ms?1 (eastward) are found for events with >1000km spans and >20h durations. The recurrence frequency, which is categorized from 1 event per day to 1 event per month, is also discussed. The latitudinal and seasonal dependences of statistical properties are strongly influenced by the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone annual cycle. The number of westward-migrating systems is significant every month, while eastward-migrating systems strongly vary by season and latitude. Eastward migration is less frequent in the southern region during June, July and August (JJA) and in the northern region during December, January and February (DJF). In the northern region, the westward-propagating events' mean span is much longer during JJA, September, October, and November (SON) than the other periods; this effect is partially due to the favorable environmental shear conditions necessary to sustain a long-lived system. Eastward- and westward-propagating events are found during the shortwave heating and dissipation modes of diurnal cycle phase. Thus, thermal forcing, which is associated with the elevated terrain found over the islands and the landsea interface, is dominant on a daily basis. Several possible reasons behind the present results besides the environmental conditions are discussed. It is found that low-level wind may support the precipitation propagation speed, and its support may depend on the MaddenJulian Oscillation (MJO) phase. However, advection by wind alone is likely insufficient to propagate the precipitation as quickly, as our results show. The speed of precipitation migration particularly around Sumatra is similar to the values reported in the framework of propagating gravity waves and moist Kelvin waves.

Marzuki; Hiroyuki Hashiguchi; Masayuki K. Yamamoto; Mamoru Yamamoto; Shuichi Mori; Manabu D. Yamanaka; Richard E. Carbone; John D. Tuttle

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Study of Multi-Scale Cloud Processes Over the Tropical Western Pacific Using Cloud-Resolving Models Constrained by Satellite Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clouds in the tropical western Pacific are an integral part of the large scale environment. An improved understanding of the multi-scale structure of clouds and their interactions with the environment is critical to the ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) program for developing and evaluating cloud parameterizations, understanding the consequences of model biases, and providing a context for interpreting the observational data collected over the ARM Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites. Three-dimensional cloud resolving models (CRMs) are powerful tools for developing and evaluating cloud parameterizations. However, a significant challenge in using CRMs in the TWP is that the region lacks conventional data, so large uncertainty exists in defining the large-scale environment for clouds. This project links several aspects of the ARM program, from measurements to providing improved analyses, and from cloud-resolving modeling to climate-scale modeling and parameterization development, with the overall objective to improve the representations of clouds in climate models and to simulate and quantify resolved cloud effects on the large-scale environment. Our objectives will be achieved through a series of tasks focusing on the use of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and ARM data. Our approach includes: -- Perform assimilation of COSMIC GPS radio occultation and other satellites products using the WRF Ensemble Kalman Filter assimilation system to represent the tropical large-scale environment at 36 km grid resolution. This high-resolution analysis can be used by the community to derive forcing products for single-column models or cloud-resolving models. -- Perform cloud-resolving simulations using WRF and its nesting capabilities, driven by the improved regional analysis and evaluate the simulations against ARM datasets such as from TWP-ICE to optimize the microphysics parameters for this region. A cirrus study (Mace and co-authors) already exists for TWP-ICE using satellite and ground-based observations. -- Perform numerical experiments using WRF to investigate how convection over tropical islands in the Maritime Continent interacts with large-scale circulation and affects convection in nearby regions. -- Evaluate and apply WRF as a testbed for GCM cloud parameterizations, utilizing the ability of WRF to run on multiple scales (from cloud resolving to global) to isolate resolution and physics issues from dynamical and model framework issues. Key products will be disseminated to the ARM and larger community through distribution of data archives, including model outputs from the data assimilation products and cloud resolving simulations, and publications.

Dudhia, Jimy

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

189

ARM - Evaluation Product - Convective Vertical Velocity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ProductsConvective Vertical Velocity ProductsConvective Vertical Velocity Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Convective Vertical Velocity 2011.04.25 - 2011.05.23 Site(s) SGP General Description Convective processes play an important role in Earth's energy balance by distributing heat and moisture throughout the atmosphere. In particular, vertical air motions associated with these processes are inherently linked to the life cycle of these convective systems and are therefore directly tied to their energy budget. However, direct measurements of vertical air motions (e.g., in situ aircraft observations) are sparse, making it difficult to compare them with numerical model output, which relies on convective parameterization schemes that have yet to be extensively

190

The structure of the solar convective overshooting zone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......turbulent kinetic energy fluxes , and super-adiabatic...convection model of the solar convection envelope...the convective energy flux becomes negative...the base of the solar convection zone...that convective energy transfer is very...distance. In the solar atmosphere, the...the National Key Project through grant......

D.R. Xiong; L. Deng

2001-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

191

Dispersion of Cloud Droplet Size Distributions, Cloud Parameterization...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dispersion of Cloud Droplet Size Distributions, Cloud Parameterizations, and Indirect Aerosol Effects P. H. Daum and Y. Liu Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York...

192

ARM - Measurement - Cloud top height  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud top height For a given cloud or cloud layer, the highest level of the atmosphere where...

193

M. Bahrami ENSC 388 (F09) Forced Convection Heat Transfer 1 Forced Convection Heat Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Forced Convection Heat Transfer Convection is the mechanism of heat transfer through a fluid / The convective heat transfer coefficient h strongly depends on the fluid properties and roughness of the solid. As a result, the heat transfer from the solid surface to the fluid layer adjacent to the surface

Bahrami, Majid

194

Slide 1Falk Herwig7 Aug 2006 Convective and non-convective mixing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slide 1Falk Herwig7 Aug 2006 Convective and non-convective mixing in AGB stars Falk Herwig and Bernd Freytag Los Alamos National Laboratory Theoretical Astrophysics Group #12;Slide 2Falk Herwig7 Aug envelope models for sun-like stars #12;Slide 3Falk Herwig7 Aug 2006 3D hydro simulations of AGB convective

Herwig, Falk

195

A Community Atmosphere Model with Superparameterized Clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1999, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) scientists Wojciech Grabowski and Piotr Smolarkiewicz created a "multiscale" atmospheric model in which the physical processes associated with clouds were represented by running a simple high-resolution model within each grid column of a lowresolution global model. In idealized experiments, they found that the multiscale model produced promising simulations of organized tropical convection, which other models had struggled to produce. Inspired by their results, Colorado State University (CSU) scientists Marat Khairoutdinov and David Randall created a multiscale version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). They removed the cloud parameterizations of the CAM, and replaced them with Khairoutdinov's high-resolution cloud model. They dubbed the embedded cloud model a "super-parameterization," and the modified CAM is now called the "SP-CAM." Over the next several years, many scientists, from many institutions, have explored the ability of the SP-CAM to simulate tropical weather systems, the day-night changes of precipitation, the Asian and African monsoons, and a number of other climate processes. Cristiana Stan of the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Interactions found that the SP-CAM gives improved results when coupled to an ocean model, and follow-on studies have explored the SP-CAM's utility when used as the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model. Much of this research has been performed under the auspices of the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes, a National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center for which the lead institution is CSU.

Randall, David; Branson, Mark; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Craig, Cheryl; Gettelman, A.; Edwards, Jim

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

196

Relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo, and new surface-based approach for determining cloud albedo  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper focuses on three interconnected topics: (1) quantitative relationship between surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo; (2) surface-based approach for measuring cloud albedo; (3) multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations of surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. An analytical expression is first derived to quantify the relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. The analytical expression is then used to deduce a new approach for inferring cloud albedo from concurrent surface-based measurements of downwelling surface shortwave radiation and cloud fraction. High-resolution decade-long data on cloud albedos are obtained by use of this surface-based approach over the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiaton Measurement (ARM) Program at the Great Southern Plains (SGP) site. The surface-based cloud albedos are further compared against those derived from the coincident GOES satellite measurements. The three long-term (1997-2009) sets of hourly data on shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo collected over the SGP site are analyzed to explore the multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations. The analytical formulation is useful for diagnosing deficiencies of cloud-radiation parameterizations in climate models.

Liu, Y.; Wu, W.; Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

197

Cloud Computing: An Architectural Perspective .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Cloud Computing is a term heavily used in today's world. Not even a day passes by without hearing the words "Cloud Computing". It has become (more)

Pandya, Hetalben

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Profiling clouds' inner life | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

inner life Subgrid modeling pinpoints cloud transformation to uncover true reflective power An accurate understanding of clouds over the ocean is important for climate change...

199

ARM - Measurement - Cloud extinction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

extinction extinction ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud extinction The removal of radiant energy from an incident beam by the process of cloud absorption and/or scattering. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments NEPHELOMETER : Nephelometer Field Campaign Instruments CEP : Cloud Extinction Probe CLDAEROSMICRO : Cloud and Aerosol Microphysical Properties EC-CONVAIR580-BULK : Environment Canada Convair 580 Bulk Parameters

200

Study of Mechanisms of Aerosol Indirect Effects on Glaciated Clouds: Progress during the Project Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This 3-year project has studied how aerosol pollution influences glaciated clouds. The tool applied has been an 'aerosol-cloud model'. It is a type of Cloud-System Resolving Model (CSRM) modified to include 2-moment bulk microphysics and 7 aerosol species, as described by Phillips et al. (2009, 2013). The study has been done by, first, improving the model and then performing sensitivity studies with validated simulations of a couple of observed cases from ARM. These are namely the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) over the tropical west Pacific and the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) over Oklahoma. During the project, sensitivity tests with the model showed that in continental clouds, extra liquid aerosols (soluble aerosol material) from pollution inhibited warm rain processes for precipitation production. This promoted homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and aerosols. Mass and number concentrations of cloud-ice particles were boosted. The mean sizes of cloud-ice particles were reduced by the pollution. Hence, the lifetime of glaciated clouds, especially ice-only clouds, was augmented due to inhibition of sedimentation and ice-ice aggregation. Latent heat released from extra homogeneous freezing invigorated convective updrafts, and raised their maximum cloud-tops, when aerosol pollution was included. In the particular cases simulated in the project, the aerosol indirect effect of glaciated clouds was twice than of (warm) water clouds. This was because glaciated clouds are higher in the troposphere than water clouds and have the first interaction with incoming solar radiation. Ice-only clouds caused solar cooling by becoming more extensive as a result of aerosol pollution. This 'lifetime indirect effect' of ice-only clouds was due to higher numbers of homogeneously nucleated ice crystals causing a reduction in their mean size, slowing the ice-crystal process of snow production and slowing sedimentation. In addition to the known indirect effects (glaciation, riming and thermodynamic), new indirect effects were discovered and quantified due to responses of sedimentation, aggregation and coalescence in glaciated clouds to changing aerosol conditions. In summary, the change in horizontal extent of the glaciated clouds ('lifetime indirect effects'), especially of ice-only clouds, was seen to be of higher importance in regulating aerosol indirect effects than changes in cloud properties ('cloud albedo indirect effects').

Phillips, Vaughan T. J.

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep convective clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

EFFECTS OF ASYMMETRIC FLOWS IN SOLAR CONVECTION ON OSCILLATION MODES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many helioseismic measurements suffer from substantial systematic errors. A particularly frustrating one is that time-distance measurements suffer from a large center to limb effect which looks very similar to the finite light travel time, except that the magnitude depends on the observable used and can have the opposite sign. This has frustrated attempts to determine the deep meridional flow in the solar convection zone, with Zhao et al. applying an ad hoc correction with little physical basis to correct the data. In this Letter, we propose that part of this effect can be explained by the highly asymmetrical nature of the solar granulation which results in what appears to the oscillation modes as a net radial flow, thereby imparting a phase shift on the modes as a function of observing height and thus heliocentric angle.

Baldner, Charles S.; Schou, Jesper, E-mail: baldner@stanford.edu [W.W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

202

Realistic Solar Convection Simulations Robert F. Stein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Realistic Solar Convection Simulations Robert F. Stein Michigan State University, East Lansing, MIAFG, Juliane Maries Vej 30, Dk­2100 Copenhagen ?, Denmark Abstract. We report on realistic simulations of solar and intensity spectra, the p­mode excitation rate, and the depth of the convection zone. We describe how solar

Stein, Robert

203

ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Support for the Plains Elevated Convection...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

convection, and (d) this lack of understanding greatly hampers the ability of numerical weather and climate models to simulate nocturnal convection well which leads to...

204

Cloud Computing Synopsis and Recommendations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This document reprises the NIST-established definition of cloud computing, describes cloud computing benefits and open issues, presents an overview of major classes of cloud technology, and provides guidelines and recommendations on how organizations ... Keywords: cloud computing, computer security, virtualization

Mark Lee Badger; Timothy Grance; Robert Patt-Corner; Jeffery M, Voas

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Deep Vadose Zone Field Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD, RAP March 6, 2013 Presented by: John Morse DEEP VADOSE ZONE ACTIVITIES Page 2 Deep Vadose Zone Areas Page 3 Deep Vadose Zone Field Activities FY 2014...

206

A Comparison of Simulated Cloud Radar Output from the Multiscale Modeling Framework Global Climate Model with CloudSat Cloud Radar Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last few years a new type of global climate model (GCM) has emerged in which a cloud-resolving model is embedded into each grid cell of a GCM. This new approach is frequently called a multiscale modeling framework (MMF) or superparameterization. In this article we present a comparison of MMF output with radar observations from the NASA CloudSat mission, which uses a near-nadir-pointing millimeter-wavelength radar to probe the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation. We account for radar detection limits by simulating the 94 GHz radar reflectivity that CloudSat would observe from the high-resolution cloud-resolving model output produced by the MMF. Overall, the MMF does a good job of reproducing the broad pattern of tropical convergence zones, subtropical belts, and midlatitude storm tracks, as well as their changes in position with the annual solar cycle. Nonetheless, the comparison also reveals a number of model shortfalls including (1) excessive hydrometeor coverage at all altitudes over many convectively active regions, (2) a lack of low-level hydrometeors over all subtropical oceanic basins, (3) excessive low-level hydrometeor coverage (principally precipitating hydrometeors) in the midlatitude storm tracks of both hemispheres during the summer season (in each hemisphere), and (4) a thin band of low-level hydrometeors in the Southern Hemisphere of the central (and at times eastern and western) Pacific in the MMF, which is not observed by CloudSat. This band resembles a second much weaker ITCZ but is restricted to low levels.

Marchand, Roger T.; Haynes, J. M.; Mace, Gerald G.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Stephens, Graeme L.

2009-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

207

Evaluating regional cloud-permitting simulations of the WRF model for the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE, Darwin 2006)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data from the Tropical Warm Pool I5 nternational Cloud Experiment (TWPICE) were used to evaluate two suites of high-resolution (4-7 km, convection-resolving) simulations of the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with a focus on the performance of different cloud microphysics (MP) schemes. The major difference between these two suites of simulations is with and without the reinitializing process. Whenreinitialized every three days, the four cloud MP schemes evaluated can capture the general profiles of cloud fraction, temperature, water vapor, winds, and cloud liquid and ice water content (LWC and IWC, respectively). However, compared with surface measurements of radiative and moisture fluxes and satellite retrieval of top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) fluxes, disagreements do exist. Large discrepancies with observed LWC and IWC and derived radiative heating profiles can be attributed to both the limitations of the cloud property retrievals and model performance. The simulated precipitation also shows a wide range of uncertainty as compared with observations, which could be caused by the cloud MP schemes, complexity of land-sea configuration, and the high temporal and spatial variability. In general, our result indicates the importance of large-scale initial and lateral boundary conditions in re-producing basic features of cloudiness and its vertical structures. Based on our case study, we find overall the six-hydrometer single-moment MP scheme(WSM6) [Hong and Lim, 2006] in the WRF model si25 mulates the best agree- ment with the TWPICE observational analysis.

Wang, Yi; Long, Charles N.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Dudhia, Jimy; McFarlane, Sally A.; Mather, James H.; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaodong

2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

208

3. New Cloud Climatology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Cloud Climatology New Cloud Climatology Computed for the summers (May-Au- gust) 2000 through 2004 (Berg and Kassianov 2008). Uses ARSCL VAP, Total Sky Imager, and radar wind profiler. * * Initial Evaluation of the Cumulus Potential Scheme at the ACRF SGP Site Larry Berg, William Gustafson, and Evgueni Kassianov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 1. Motivation Shallow clouds are poorly predicted by current global and regional scale models. A new parameterization has been devel- oped that links the boundary-layer turbu- lence and the shallow clouds. 2. The CuP Parameterization The Cumulus Potential (CuP) param- eterization uses Probability Density Functions (PDFs) of temperature and moisture to represent the subgrid scale

209

In Clouds We Trust  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......can bring. Many have realised that giving a third party control of part of the IT infrastructure can help reduce capital expenditure and maximise asset utilisation to provide a quantitative return on investment (ROI). Cloud can also remove resource......

Jim Damoulakis

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Moving into the Cloud.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Cloud computing is the notion of abstracting and outsourcing hardware or software resources over the Internet, often to a third party on a pay-as-you-go basis. (more)

Mikalsen, Christian

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Testing cloud microphysics parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arctic clouds simulated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) are evaluated with observations from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its North Slope of Alaska site in April 2008 and October 2004, respectively. Model forecasts for the Arctic spring and fall seasons performed under the Cloud-Associated Parameterizations Testbed framework generally reproduce the spatial distributions of cloud fraction for single-layer boundary-layer mixed-phase stratocumulus and multilayer or deep frontal clouds. However, for low-level stratocumulus, the model significantly underestimates the observed cloud liquid water content in both seasons. As a result, CAM5 significantly underestimates the surface downward longwave radiative fluxes by 20-40 W m{sup -2}. Introducing a new ice nucleation parameterization slightly improves the model performance for low-level mixed-phase clouds by increasing cloud liquid water content through the reduction of the conversion rate from cloud liquid to ice by the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process. The CAM5 single-column model testing shows that changing the instantaneous freezing temperature of rain to form snow from -5 C to -40 C causes a large increase in modeled cloud liquid water content through the slowing down of cloud liquid and rain-related processes (e.g., autoconversion of cloud liquid to rain). The underestimation of aerosol concentrations in CAM5 in the Arctic also plays an important role in the low bias of cloud liquid water in the single-layer mixed-phase clouds. In addition, numerical issues related to the coupling of model physics and time stepping in CAM5 are responsible for the model biases and will be explored in future studies.

Liu X.; Lin W.; Xie, S.; Boyle, J.; Klein, S. A.; Shi, X.; Wang, Z.; Ghan, S. J.; Earle, M.; Liu, P. S. K.; Zelenyuk, A.

2011-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

212

Testing Cloud Microphysics Parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arctic clouds simulated by the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) are evaluated with observations from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its North Slope of Alaska site in April 2008 and October 2004, respectively. Model forecasts for the Arctic Spring and Fall seasons performed under the Cloud- Associated Parameterizations Testbed (CAPT) framework generally reproduce the spatial distributions of cloud fraction for single-layer boundary layer mixed-phase stratocumulus, and multilayer or deep frontal clouds. However, for low-level clouds, the model significantly underestimates the observed cloud liquid water content in both seasons and cloud fraction in the Spring season. As a result, CAM5 significantly underestimates the surface downward longwave (LW) radiative fluxes by 20-40 W m-2. The model with a new ice nucleation parameterization moderately improves the model simulations by increasing cloud liquid water content in mixed-phase clouds through the reduction of the conversion rate from cloud liquid to ice by the Wegener-Bergeron- Findeisen (WBF) process. The CAM5 single column model testing shows that change in the homogeneous freezing temperature of rain to form snow from -5 C to -40 C has a substantial impact on the modeled liquid water content through the slowing-down of liquid and rain-related processes. In contrast, collections of cloud ice by snow and cloud liquid by rain are of minor importance for single-layer boundary layer mixed-phase clouds in the Arctic.

Liu, Xiaohong; Xie, Shaocheng; Boyle, James; Klein, Stephen A.; Shi, Xiangjun; Wang, Zhien; Lin, Wuyin; Ghan, Steven J.; Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter; Zelenyuk, Alla

2011-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

213

Microphysical characteristics of clouds and precipitation during pre-monsoon and monsoon period over a tropical Indian station  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Characteristics of clouds and precipitation during the pre-monsoon (PM) and monsoon months (MM) have been examined in the present study over the tropical station Kolkata (22.65N, 88.45E), which is located in the eastern part of India. Satellite data of clouds for the years 20052007 and raindrop size distributions (DSD) derived from ground-based Disdrometer for the years 2005 and 2006 for PM and MM has been considered here. Results shows that lower and middle level clouds dominate in the pre-monsoon season and the higher-level clouds are predominant in the monsoon season over the mentioned region. Correspondingly the cloud effective radius value also increases from the pre-monsoon to the monsoon months. The impact of aerosols and moisture plays a vital role in such changes. The characteristics of raindrop size distribution for the two seasons also showed that larger drops are more prevalent during pre-monsoon season whereas the smaller drops are present in larger number in the monsoon months. This is mainly due to the convective nature of rainfall in the pre-monsoon months, where intense convection, accompanied by strong updrafts modifies the raindrops. Thus pre-monsoon (monsoon) season over Kolkata region is characterized by lower/middle level (higher level) clouds, smaller (larger) cloud drop size and larger (smaller) raindrop size at the surface.

Kaustav Chakravarty; P. Ernest Raj; Aniruddha Bhattacharya; Animesh Maitra

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

The Influence of Cloud Microphysics and Radiation on the Response of Water Vapor and Clouds to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uncertainties in representing the atmospheric water cycle are major obstacles to the accurate prediction of future climate. This project focused on addressing some of these uncertainties by implementing new physics for convection and radiation into the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). To better understand and eventually better represent these processes in this major national climate model, we modified CAM3.5 to use the convection and cloud schemes developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the RRTMG rapid radiation code for global climate models developed by Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER). The impact of the new physics on the CAM3.5 simulation of convection on diurnal and intra-seasonal scales, on intra-seasonal oscillations and on the distribution of water vapor has been investigated. In addition, the MIT and AER physics packages have been incorporated and tested in combination within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional forecast model for the purpose of evaluating and improving convective and radiative processes on time scales appropriate to weather simulations. It has been found that the application of the AER radiation and MIT convection produces significant improvements in the modeled diurnal cycle of convection, especially over land, in the NCAR climate model. However, both the standard CAM3.5 and the modified CAM3.5 with the new physics are unable to capture the proper spectrum and propagating characteristics of dynamical intra-seasonal oscillations such as the Madden-Julian Oscillation. In addition, it has been shown that the new physics methods modify, but do not substantially improve, the distribution of upper tropospheric water vapor in CAM as established through the comparison of modeled and observed satellite radiances. This suggests that continuing regional discrepancies in water vapor amounts in the climate model may not be solely related to convective or radiative processes. The major results of this project have been described in more detail in a journal article titled ??The Impacts of AER Radiation and MIT Convection on the Water Cycle Simulated by CAM3.5? that will be submitted for publication during Fall 2010.

Emanuel, Kerry; Iacono, Michael J.

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

215

Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2.1 Cloud Providers . . . . . . . . . . . .2.1.1 Cloud Storage . . . . . . . . .2.1.2 Cloud Computation . . . . . . 2.2 Enterprise Storage

Vrable, Michael Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Magneto-convective models of red dwarfs: constraints imposed by the lithium abundance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic fields impede the onset of convection, thereby altering the thermal structure of a convective envelope in a low mass star: this has an effect on the amount of lithium depletion in a magnetized star. In order to quantify this effect, we have applied a magneto-convective model to two low mass stars for which lithium abundances and precise structural parameters are known: YY Gem and CU Cnc. For both stars, we have obtained models which satisfy empirical constraints on the following parameters: R, L, surface magnetic field strength, and Li abundance. In the case of YY Gem, we have obtained a model which satisfies the empirical constraints with an internal magnetic field of several megagauss: such a field strength is within the range of a dynamo where the field energy is in equipartition with rotational energy deep inside the convection zone. However, in the case of CU Cnc, the Li requires an internal magnetic field which is probably too strong for a dynamo origin: we suggest possible alternatives which m...

MacDonald, J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Convective Cooling and Passive Stack Improvements in Motors (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation discusses current research at NREL in convective cooling and passive stack improvements in motors.

Bennion, K.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Heat Transport by Turbulent Rayleigh-Benard Convection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a research program dedicated to the quantitative laboratory study of turbulent convection.

None

2008-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

219

Deep Vadose Zone  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Mission of the Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative is to protect water resources across the DOE complex over the long-term by developing effective solutions to solve DOEs most...

220

The influence of winter convection on primary production: a parameterisation using a hydrostatic three-dimensional biogeochemical model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the recent past observational and modelling studies have shown that the vertical displacement of water parcels, and therefore, phytoplankton particles in regions of deep-reaching convection plays a key role in late winter/early spring primary production. The underlying mechanism describes how convection cells capture living phytoplankton cells and recurrently expose them to sunlight. This study presents a parameterisation called `phytoconvection' which focuses on the influence of convection on primary production. This parameterisation was implemented into a three-dimensional physical-biogeochemical model and applied to the Northwestern European Continental Shelf and areas of the adjacent Northeast Atlantic. The simulation was compared to a `conventional' parameterisation with respect to its influence on phytoplankton concentrations during the annual cycle and its effect on the carbon cycle. The simulation using the new parameterisation showed good agreement with observation data recorded during winter, whe...

Groe, Fabian; Ptsch, Johannes; Backhaus, Jan O

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep convective clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Thin Cloud Length Scales Using CALIPSO and CloudSat Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thin clouds are the most difficult cloud type to observe. The recent availability of joint cloud products from the active remote sensing instruments aboard CloudSat and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite (CALIPSO) facilitates...

Solbrig, Jeremy E.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

222

Evolution of vertical drafts and cloud-to-ground lightning within the convective region of a mesoscale convective complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to ground in every 10 minute dme interval from 0600-1200 UTC for the 4 June 1985 MCC 43 24 Vertical profile of area-averaged vertical velocity for (a) west lobe froin 0905-1042 UTC, (b) east lobe from 0914-0952 UTC, and (c) east lobe from 1002-1042 UTC.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 25 Vertical profile of variance of the vertical velocity for (a) west lobe from 0905-1042 UTC, (b) east lobe from 0914-0952 UTC, and (c) east lobe froin 1002-1042 UTC...

Saul, Scott Henry

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

223

Steady, three-dimensional, internally heated convection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical calculations have been carried out of steady, symmetric, three-dimensional modes of convection in internally heated, infinite Prandtl number, Boussinesq fluids at a Rayleigh number of 1.4[times]10[sup 4] in a spherical shell with inner/outer radius of 0.55 and in a 3[times]3[times]1 rectangular box. Multiple patterns of convection occur in both geometries. In the Cartesian geometry the patterns are dominated by cylindrical cold downflows and a broad hot upwelling. In the spherical geometry the patterns consist of cylindrical cold downwellings centered either at the vertices of a tetrahedron or the centers of the faces of a cube. The cold downflow cylinders are immersed in a background of upwelling within which there are cylindrical hot concentrations (plumes) and hot halos around the downflows. The forced hot upflow return plumes of internally heated spherical convection are fundamentally different from the buoyancy-driven plumes of heated from below convection.

Schubert, G. (Department of Earth and Space Sciences and Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States)); Glatzmaier, G.A.; Travis, B. (Earth and Environmental Sciences, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Observations on Buoyant Convection in Reverse Osmosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Observations on Buoyant Convection in Reverse Osmosis ... Buoyancy Effects in Dead-End Reverse Osmosis:? Visualization by Holographic Interferometry ... Buoyancy Effects in Dead-End Reverse Osmosis:? Visualization by Holographic Interferometry ...

Terry J. Hendricks; Jean F. Macquin; Forman A. Williams

1972-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Circulation and convection in the Irminger Sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aspects of the circulation and convection in the Irminger Sea are investigated using a variety of in-situ, satellite, and atmospheric reanalysis products. Westerly Greenland tip jet events are intense, small-scale wind ...

Vge, Kjetil

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Observing Warm Clouds in 3D Using ARM Scanning Cloud  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Observing Warm Clouds in 3D Using ARM Scanning Cloud Radars and a Novel Ensemble Method For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.gov...

227

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Convective and Orographically...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of precipitation. These data will be combined with coincident radar, aircraft, and satellite data to improve how clouds and precipitation in low-mountain regions are...

228

Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds In a heated battle, ice crystals win the competition for cloud water vapor The mighty cloud ice crystal appears deceptively...

229

Cloud Based Applications and Platforms (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presentation to the Cloud Computing East 2014 Conference, where we are highlighting our cloud computing strategy, describing the platforms on the cloud (including Smartgrid.gov), and defining our process for implementing cloud based applications.

Brodt-Giles, D.

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Cloud Condensation Nuclei Retrievals at Cloud Base in North Dakota  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Condensation Nuclei Retrievals at Cloud Base in North Dakota · Mariusz Starzec #12;Motivation Compare University of Wyoming (UWyo) and Droplet Measurement Technologies (DMT) cloud condensation nuclei condensation nuclei concentration (CCNC) at any supersaturation (SS) #12;Background Aerosols act as nuclei

Delene, David J.

231

HNCO in molecular clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a survey of 18 molecular clouds, HNCO J/sub K/-1K1..-->..J'/sub K/'-1K'1 = 5/sub 05/..-->..4/sub 05/ and 4/sub 04/..-->..3/sub 03/ emission was etected in seven clouds, and possibly in one other. Emission in these transitions originates in high-density regions (n> or approx. =10/sup 6/ cm/sup -3/). The molecule's excitation requirements allow us to derive limits to excitation temperatures an optical depths. We discuss the possibility of clumping with respect to the beam and compare our results with data from other molecular species. The HNCO emission from Sgr A is an ordder of magnitude larger than the other detected sources as is the ratio ..delta..T +- /sub A/(HNCO 5/sub 05/..-->..4/sub 04/)/..delta..T +- /sub A/(C/sup 18/O 1..-->..0). HNCO is probably a constituent of most molecular clouds.

Jackson, J.M.; Armstrong, J.T.; Barrett, A.H.

1984-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

Attribution Analysis of Cloud Feedback  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uncertainty on cloud feedback is the primary contributor to the large spread of equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) in climate models. In this study, we compare the short-term cloud feedback in climate models with observations, and evaluate...

Zhou, Chen

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Constrained water cloud generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fast generation of large cloudy volumes with imposed cloud cover fractions and ambient vertical profiles is very important for the realistic simulation of atmospheric scenes. The model proposed here is the second step of a two-step model composed on the one hand of a volume generator based on a Fourier filtering method and on the other hand of a physical generator filling the volume with physical parameters. After a description of the general generation scheme, this paper focuses on the simulation of vertical profiles of water content (liquid, vapour) coupled with other state parameters (temperature, pressure, vertical velocity) via thermodynamic and hydrodynamic equations by local forcing of ambient conditions. The method for solving these equations is explained and applied to practical cases. First, by assuming that the actual temperature at the cloud base is equal to the dew temperature and by imposing a moist pseudo-adiabatic temperature gradient between the cloud top and bottom, the temperature profile in the cloud is found. When conditional instability occurs, the initial temperature profile between the ground and the cloud base is iteratively shifted to lower values until absolute stability is reached. Then the liquid water content is calculated by integrating the equation of water conservation, and the water vapour content by assuming that the cloud is everywhere saturated. Eventually, the vertical velocity is estimated by integration of the momentum equation. This method gives results in good agreement with published measurements, analytical and numerical models. Eventually, further developments of the column model, including the effects of phase transitions, turbulence, horizontal motions and mixing with the surrounding medium, are proposed in the concluding section.

Roland P.H. Berton

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Opaque cloud detection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of detecting clouds in a digital image comprising, for an area of the digital image, determining a reflectance value in at least three discrete electromagnetic spectrum bands, computing a first ratio of one reflectance value minus another reflectance value and the same two values added together, computing a second ratio of one reflectance value and another reflectance value, choosing one of the reflectance values, and concluding that an opaque cloud exists in the area if the results of each of the two computing steps and the choosing step fall within three corresponding predetermined ranges.

Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

235

5, 60136039, 2005 FRESCO cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 5, 6013­6039, 2005 FRESCO cloud algorithm N. Fournier et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction cloud information over deserts from SCIAMACHY O2 A-band N. Fournier 1 , P. Stammes 1 , M. de Graaf 1 , R, 6013­6039, 2005 FRESCO cloud algorithm N. Fournier et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

236

3, 33013333, 2003 Cirrus cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 3, 3301­3333, 2003 Cirrus cloud occurrence as function of ambient relative humidity J. Str and Physics Discussions Cirrus cloud occurrence as function of ambient relative humidity: A comparison¨om (johan@itm.su.se) 3301 #12;ACPD 3, 3301­3333, 2003 Cirrus cloud occurrence as function of ambient

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

237

8, 96979729, 2008 FRESCO+ cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 8, 9697­9729, 2008 FRESCO+ cloud retrieval algorithm P. Wang et al. Title Page Abstract Chemistry and Physics Discussions FRESCO+: an improved O2 A-band cloud retrieval algorithm for tropospheric on behalf of the European Geosciences Union. 9697 #12;ACPD 8, 9697­9729, 2008 FRESCO+ cloud retrieval

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

238

Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 4 Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction We now begin to trace the journey towards a star. How long does this take? The answer is surprisingly short: a good many clouds already contain new stars and these stars tend to be young. The typical cloud cannot spend long, if any time at all

Estalella, Robert

239

Convection automated logic oven control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the past few years, there has been a greater push to bring more automation to the cooling process. There have been attempts at automated cooking using a wide range of sensors and procedures, but with limited success. The authors have the answer to the automated cooking process; this patented technology is called Convection AutoLogic (CAL). The beauty of the technology is that it requires no extra hardware for the existing oven system. They use the existing temperature probe, whether it is an RTD, thermocouple, or thermistor. This means that the manufacturer does not have to be burdened with extra costs associated with automated cooking in comparison to standard ovens. The only change to the oven is the program in the central processing unit (CPU) on the board. As for its operation, when the user places the food into the oven, he or she is required to select a category (e.g., beef, poultry, or casseroles) and then simply press the start button. The CAL program then begins its cooking program. It first looks at the ambient oven temperature to see if it is a cold, warm, or hot start. CAL stores this data and then begins to look at the food`s thermal footprint. After CAL has properly detected this thermal footprint, it can calculate the time and temperature at which the food needs to be cooked. CAL then sets up these factors for the cooking stage of the program and, when the food has finished cooking, the oven is turned off automatically. The total time for this entire process is the same as the standard cooking time the user would normally set. The CAL program can also compensate for varying line voltages and detect when the oven door is opened. With all of these varying factors being monitored, CAL can produce a perfectly cooked item with minimal user input.

Boyer, M.A.; Eke, K.I. [Apollo U.S.A. Inc., Orlando, FL (United States)] [Apollo U.S.A. Inc., Orlando, FL (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Who is this cloud?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

WHO IS THIS CLOUD? is a generative artwork in progress. It is a piece of art dedicated to the memory of a loved one and the idea of existence and transformation. The computer "Beings" will be animated according to their inner program, to weather sensors ... Keywords: Turing pattern, artificial life art, cellular automata, generative art, transhumanism

Lola B. Deswarte; Alain Lioret; Barbara Tannery

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep convective clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by deep convection, were observed about 30 percent of the time by the cloud radar. To produce cirrus statistics from the SCM results that are comparable to the cloud radar...

242

letters to nature 440 NATURE |VOL 405 |25 MAY 2000 |www.nature.com  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@physics.utoronto.ca). ................................................................. Deep convective clouds with sustained supercooled liquid water down to -37.5 88C Daniel Rosenfeld measurements in deep convective clouds from an aircraft, showing that most of the condensed water remains Ontario, the Fundacion Ramon Areces, the Spanish CICyT project and the European Community Project. We

Li, Zhanqing

243

EnKF Assimilation of High-Resolution, Mobile Doppler Radar Data of the 4 May 2007 Greensburg, Kansas, Supercell into a Numerical Cloud Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kalman filter (EnKF) technique into a non- hydrostatic, compressible numerical weather prediction model weather prediction (NWP) models to improve under- standing of convective storm dynamics is now a fairly, Kansas, Supercell into a Numerical Cloud Model ROBIN L. TANAMACHI,*,1,# LOUIS J. WICKER,@ DAVID C. DOWELL

Xue, Ming

244

Hot-Jupiter Inflation due to Deep Energy Deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some extrasolar giant planets in close orbits---"hot Jupiters"---exhibit larger radii than that of a passively cooling planet. The extreme irradiation $L_{\\rm eq}$ these hot Jupiters receive from their close in stars creates a thick isothermal layer in their envelopes, which slows down their convective cooling, allowing them to retain their inflated size for longer. This is yet insufficient to explain the observed sizes of the most inflated planets. Some models invoke an additional power source, deposited deep in the planet's envelope. Here we present an analytical model for the cooling of such irradiated, and internally heated gas giants. We show that a power source $L_{\\rm dep}$, deposited at an optical depth $\\tau_{\\rm dep}$, creates an exterior convective region, between optical depths $L_{\\rm eq}/L_{\\rm dep}$ and $\\tau_{\\rm dep}$, beyond which a thicker isothermal layer exists, which in extreme cases may extend to the center of the planet. This convective layer, which occurs only for $L_{\\rm dep}\\tau_{\\r...

Ginzburg, Sivan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Hydrocarbon Potential of Deep Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Hydrocarbon Potential of Deep Water H. R. Warman In...the geology and hydrocarbon potential of the Earth's deeper water areas, an attempt...United Kingdom 1981 Hydrocarbon potential of deep water Warman H. R. Author...

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Deep Energy Retrofits & State Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), provides information on Deep Energy Retrofits & State Applications

247

Origins of convective activity over Panama  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Satellite-derived outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) data. were used to examine convective variability over the Panama region. Time series analysis of the area- averaged daily OLR data, for 1984 and 1985 revealed a, persistent 12-d oscillation... in convective activity during each season. Composite analyses of OLR data, for the area 120'W-40'W and 35'S-35'N for the 1984 dry (1 January ? 9 May) and wet (10 Msy? 4 December) seasons showed this oscillation extends beyond Panama and the Central America...

Strager, Christopher Stephen

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Heat Transfer by Free Convection in a Liquid Metal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

19 December 1961 research-article Heat Transfer by Free Convection in a Liquid Metal F. J. Bayley...an experimental investigation of the free convection heat transfer process under the special conditions associated with...

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Structures and Dynamics of Quasi-2D Mesoscale Convective Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, three distinct archetypes for midlatitude linear mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) have been identified. This article focuses on the fundamentals of two of these archetypes: convective lines with trailing stratiform (TS) precipitation ...

Matthew D. Parker; Richard H. Johnson

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Structure and evolution of a convective band MCS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The structure and evolution of the synoptic, mesoscale, and lightning characteristics of the 5 May 1993 non-squall line Mesoscale Convective System has been described. This storm was a long-lived Mesoscale Convective Complex. Its formation...

Valdes-Manzanilla, Arturo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

251

A Moisture-Stratiform Instability for Convectively Coupled Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple model of two vertical modes is constructed and analyzed to reveal the basic instability mechanisms of convectively coupled waves. The main novelty of this model is a convective parameterization based on the quasi-equilibrium concept and ...

Zhiming Kuang

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

RadiativeConvective Equilibrium over a Land Surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radiativeconvective equilibrium (RCE) describes an idealized state of the atmosphere in which the vertical temperature profile is determined by a balance between radiative and convective fluxes. While RCE has been applied extensively over oceans, ...

Nicolas Rochetin; Benjamin R. Lintner; Kirsten L. Findell; Adam H. Sobel; Pierre Gentine

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Cloud shading retrieval and assimilation in a satellite-model coupled mesoscale analysis system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A retrieval-assimilation method has been developed as a quantitative means to exploit the information in satellite imagery regarding shading of the ground by clouds, as applied to mesoscale weather analysis. Cloud radiative parameters are retrieved from satellite visible image data and used, along with parameters computed by a numerical model, to control the model's computation of downward radiative fluxes at the ground. These fluxes influence the analysis of ground surface temperatures under clouds. The method is part of a satellite-model coupled four-dimensional analysis system that merges information from visible image data in cloudy areas with infrared sounder data in clear areas, where retrievals of surface temperatures and water vapor concentrations are assimilated. The substantial impact of shading on boundary-layer development and mesoscale circulations was demonstrated in simulations, and the value of assimilating shading retrievals was demonstrated with a case study and with a simulated analysis that included the effects of several potential sources of error. The case study was performed in the northwestern Texas area, where convective cloud development was influenced by the shading effects of a persistent region of stratiform cloud cover. Analyses that included shading retrieval assimilation had consistently smaller shelter-height temperature errors than analyses without shading retrievals. When clear-area surface temperature retrievals from sounder data were analyzed along with cloudy-area shading retrievals, the contrast in heating between the shaded and clear parts of the domain led to large variations in analyzed boundary-layer depths and had a modest impact on analyzed wind flow. The analyzed locations of upward vertical motion corresponded roughly to areas of convective cloud development observed in satellite imagery. 29 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

Lipton, A.E. (Phillips Lab., Hanscom AFB, MA (United States))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

The Convective Instability Pathway to Warm Season Drought in Texas. Part II: Free-Tropospheric Modulation of Convective Inhibition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study is concerned with the modulation by convective instability of summertime precipitation in Texas as a mechanism for maintaining or enhancing drought. The important role of convective inhibition (CIN), its dependence on the temperature ...

Boksoon Myoung; John W. Nielsen-Gammon

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Turbulent convection in liquid metal with and without rotation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the efficiency of convective heat transfer (Nu). In general, we find that the convective behavior of liquid metal=ðkT?, where q is total heat flux and k is the fluid's thermal conductivity. Heat flux q is total heat power P by turbulent, rotating convection in liquid metal. Liquid metals are peculiar in that they diffuse heat more

256

Realistic Solar Surface Convection Simulations Robert F. Stein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Realistic Solar Surface Convection Simulations Robert F. Stein Michigan State University, East free simulations with re­ alistic physics of convection near the solar surface. We summarize solar convection is non­local. It is driven from a thin surface thermal boundary layer where radiative

Stein, Robert

257

Low?frequency sound radiation and scattering from bubble clouds.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent experimental evidence has shown that when wave breaking occurs low?frequency (LF?200 Hz) sound is produced and LF scatter has a different characteristic than expected from rough sea surface scattering. These effects have been attributed to the bubbles produced during wave breaking which are convected to depth by the breaking turbulence vorticity and Langmuir circulation as observed by Thorpe [S. Thorpe Oceanic White Caps edited by E. Monahan and G. MacNiocaill (Reidel Boston 1986) pp. 5758]. While the radiation and scatteringcharacteristics at frequencies greater than 1 kHz are explained by incoherent scatter from the observed bubble size and space distributions the lower frequency phenomena are not easily explained. However if bubble plumes and clouds produced in the wave breaking have appreciable volume fractions (?10?5) then LF sound radiation and scattering can be explained by classical theories. This paper reviews the scattering and radiation from bubbleclouds in water as a function of volume fraction. When the cloud is compact coherent and collective scatter are shown to occur. The natural frequency of radiation is shown to be described by a modified Minnaert result while the backscatter target strength is described by the first?order volume mode. These analytical results agree with experimental sound radiation and scatter measurements. Finally the collective radiation of bubble plumes and clouds is discussed as a possible explanation of the observed ocean low?frequency scattering and radiation phenomena. [Work sponsored by ONR 11250A and NUSC IR.

William M. Carey

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Saturation Point Analysis of Moist Convective Overturning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A unified approach to the thermodynamics of cloudy air, cloud-clear air mixing processes, atmospheric thermodynamic equilibrium structure and instability is formulated, using a new concept: the Saturation Point. This permits the representation of ...

Alan K. Betts

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Diffractive deep inelastic scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new approach to the analysis of diffractive deep inelastic data is presented. We show that the collinear factorisation theorem, which holds for diffractive DIS, has important modifications in the sub-asymptotic HERA regime, which can be quantified by using perturbative QCD. In fact the diffractive parton densities are shown to satisfy an inhomogeneous evolution equation. Moreover it is necessary to include both the gluonic and sea-quark t-channel components of the perturbative Pomeron.

Martin, A.D.; Ryskin, M.G. [IPPP, Physics Department, University of Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Watt, G. [DESY, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

260

A Catalog of HI Clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A 21 cm neutral hydrogen interferometric survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) combined with the Parkes multi-beam HI single-dish survey clearly shows that the HI gas is distributed in the form of clumps or clouds. The HI clouds and clumps have been identified using a thresholding method with three separate brightness temperature thresholds ($T_b$). Each catalog of HI cloud candidates shows a power law relationship between the sizes and the velocity dispersions of the clouds roughly following the Larson Law scaling $\\sigma_v \\propto R^{0.5}$, with steeper indices associated with dynamically hot regions. The clouds in each catalog have roughly constant virial parameters as a function mass suggesting that that the clouds are all in roughly the same dynamical state, but the values of the virial parameter are significantly larger than unity showing that turbulent motions dominate gravity in these clouds. The mass distribution of the clouds is a power law with differential indices between -1.6 and -2.0 for the three catalogs. In contrast, the distribution of mean surface densities is a log-normal distribution.

S. Kim; E. Rosolowsky; Y. Lee; Y. Kim; Y. C. Jung; M. A. Dopita; B. G. Elmegreen; K. C. Freeman; R. J. Sault; M. J. Kesteven; D. McConnell; Y. -H. Chu

2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep convective clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Testing turbulent convection theory in solar models I. Structure of the solar convection zone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......outer envelope of the Sun, low-temperature opacities from Alexander...SSM. Fig. 9 shows the distribution of the temperature gradient in the solar...on the structure of the Sun, especially the temperature gradient in the convection......

Y. Li; J. Y. Yang

2007-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

262

Solar MagnetoConvection David J. Bercik  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Magneto­Convection David J. Bercik Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, U.S.A. š Ake Nordlund Theoretical Astrophysics Center, ?ster Voldgade 3, 1350 Copenhagen K, Denmark Robert F. Stein Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan

Stein, Robert

263

Laminar boundary layers in convective heat transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study Rayleigh-Benard convection in the high-Rayleigh-number and high-Prandtl-number regime, i.e., we consider a fluid in a container that is exposed to strong heating of the bottom and cooling of the top plate in the absence of inertia effects. While the dynamics in the bulk are characterized by a chaotic convective heat flow, the boundary layers at the horizontal container plates are essentially conducting and thus the fluid is motionless. Consequently, the average temperature exhibits a linear profile in the boundary layers. In this article, we rigorously investigate the average temperature and oscillations in the boundary layer via local bounds on the temperature field. Moreover, we deduce that the temperature profile is indeed essentially linear close to the horizontal container plates. Our results are uniform in the system parameters (e.g. the Rayleigh number) up to logarithmic correction terms. An important tool in our analysis is a new Hardy-type estimate for the convecting velocity field, which can be used to control the fluid motion in the layer. The bounds on the temperature field are derived with the help of local maximal regularity estimates for convection-diffusion equations.

Christian Seis

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

264

Mantle Convection with Strong Subduction Zones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the oceanic lithosphere within a small region of a nite element grid. By imposing velocity boundary conditions thermal structure. To make the model dynamically consistent, we specify a rate for subduction that balances the energy budget for convection, which includes an expression for the energy needed to bend

Conrad, Clint

265

Size of Cloud from Shadow  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Size of Cloud from Shadow Size of Cloud from Shadow Name: mike Status: other Grade: other Location: N/A Country: USA Date: Summer 2011 Question: I see a cloud and I see its shadow in a field - knowing high sun angles - is there a way of telling how far away the cloud is or how big? - I am thinking if the shadow is 30' wide and the sun is at 2:00 pm- ? Replies: Hi Mike, Try this, draw a small circle representing the Sun. Somewhere below this circle and maybe to the right, draw an oblong, make this oblong bigger than the circle. Now connect the leftmost edge of the circle with the leftmost edge of the oblong with a straight line. Do the same for the rightmost edges. The oblong now represent the shadow of a cloud on the ground, and the lines represent the rays of the sun passing along the edges of the cloud.

266

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

267

ARM - Measurement - Cloud droplet size  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

droplet size droplet size ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud droplet size Linear size (e.g. radius or diameter) of a cloud particle Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. Field Campaign Instruments CPI : Cloud Particle Imager CVI-AIR : Counterflow Virtual Impactor MIRAI : JAMSTEC Research Vessel Mirai PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer UAV-PROTEUS-MICRO : Proteus Cloud Microphysics Instruments SPEC-CPI : Stratton Park Engineering Company - Cloud particle imager

268

Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight from Landsat ETM+ G. Wen and L. Oreopoulos National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center University of Maryland Baltimore County Joint Center of Earth System Technology Greenbelt, Maryland R. F. Cahalan and S. C. Tsay National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction Cumulus clouds attenuate solar radiation casting shows on the ground. Cumulus clouds can also enhance solar radiation in the clear region nearby. The enhancement of down-welling solar radiation has been observed at the ground level in the clear region near cumulus clouds (Mims and Frederick 1994). The additional diffuse radiation source from cumulus clouds makes the clear gaps appear to be

269

Climate zones for maritime clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we use a commercially available lidar ceilometer to investigate how the basic structure of marine boundary-layer clouds varies for four different marine climate regimes. We obtained most of the data used in this analysis from ship-based ceilometer measurements recorded during several different atmospheric and oceanographic field programs conducted in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. For comparison, we show the results obtained at a mid-latitude continental location and at an ice camp on the Arctic ice shelf. For each analyzed case, we use an extended time series to generate meaningful cloud base and cloud fraction statistics. The Vaisala CT 12K ceilometer uses a GaAs diode laser to produce short (150 ns), high-intensity pulses of infrared radiation (904 nm wavelength). The return signals from a large number of consecutive pulses are coherently summed to boost the signal-to-noise ratio. Each resulting 30-s profile of backscattered power (15-m resolution) is analyzed to detect cloud layers using a specified cloud detection limit. In addition to measurements of cloud base, the ceilometer can also provide information on cloud fraction using a time series of the {open_quotes}cloud{close_quotes} or {open_quotes} no cloud{close_quotes} status reported in the 30-s data.

White, A.B.; Ruffieux, D. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States); Fairall, C.W. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Declarative Automated Cloud Resource Orchestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

orchestration · Cloud resource orchestration constraint optimization problems 4 Provider operational] · Orchestration procedures Transactions · Either commit or abort Distributed communication and optimization

Plotkin, Joshua B.

271

Microwave imaging of Saturn's deep atmosphere and rings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analysis of microwave images of Saturn's atmosphere and rings is presented. Interferometer observations at wavelengths of 0.27, 2.01, 6.17, and 20.13 cm, and precise application of synthesis imaging techniques yielded brightness and polarization maps of unsurpassed resolution and sensitivity. Linear polarization is detected from the ring ansea, and brightness variations in the deep atmosphere and the rings are revealed. The disk-integrated spectrum of Saturn is interpreted within the context of a radiative transfer model that requires the NH{sub 3} mixing ratio to take on a value of 0.9 to 1.1 x 10{sup -} directly below the ammonia ice cloud at a pressure of 1.4 bar. The NH{sub 3} mixing ratio increases with depth to a value of 5.0 to 6.5 x 10{sup -} at a pressure of 6 bar. The variation of NH{sub 3} with depth can be entirely accounted for by the presence of 11 to 14 times solar abundance of H{sub 2}S, which reacts with NH{sub 3} to produce a substantial NH{sub 4}SH cloud. Latitudinal variations in brightness temperature indicate that the saturated vapor abundance of ammonia decreases by 50 percent from equator to pole within the cloud deck. At greater depths, the latitudinal variations of ammonia are consistent with alternating zones of concentration and depletion caused by vertical motions. An apparent depletion in northern mid-lattitudes is well-correlated with a decrease in infrared opacity and depressed cloud top levels, indicating deep-seated downwelling. The size, composition, and shape of particles comprising the rings of Saturn are constrained by modeling the emission, scattering, and extinction of radiation by the rings. Azimuthal variations in brightness and linear polarization favor a model in which the particles are irregularly shaped.

Grossman, A.W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Nuclear medium effects in $?(\\bar?)$-nucleus deep inelastic scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the nuclear medium effects in the weak structure functions $F_2(x,Q^2)$ and $F_3(x,Q^2)$ in the deep inelastic neutrino/antineutrino reactions in nuclei. We use a theoretical model for the nuclear spectral functions which incorporates the conventional nuclear effects, such as Fermi motion, binding and nucleon correlations. We also consider the pion and rho meson cloud contributions calculated from a microscopic model for meson-nucleus self-energies. The calculations have been performed using relativistic nuclear spectral functions which include nucleon correlations. Our results are compared with the experimental data of NuTeV and CDHSW.

H. Haider; I. Ruiz Simo; M. Sajjad Athar; M. J. Vicente Vacas

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

273

Cicada: Predictive Guarantees for Cloud Network Bandwidth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In cloud-computing systems, network-bandwidth guarantees have been shown to improve predictability of application performance and cost. Most previous work on cloud-bandwidth guarantees has assumed that cloud tenants know ...

LaCurts, Katrina

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

274

DIRSIG Cloud Modeling Capabilities; A Parametric Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 DIRSIG Cloud Modeling Capabilities; A Parametric Study Kristen Powers powers:................................................................................................................... 13 Calculation of Sensor Reaching Radiance Truth Values for Cloudless & Stratus Cloud Scenes and Atmospheric Database Creation for Stratus Cloud Scene & Calculation of Associated Sensor Reaching Radiance

Salvaggio, Carl

275

Magellan: experiences from a Science Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010. From Clusters To Clouds: xCAT 2 Is Out Of The Bag.Cost of Doing Science on the Cloud: The Montage Example. Incost of doing science on the cloud: the montage example. In

Ramakrishnan, Lavanya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Electron-Cloud Build-Up: Summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Properties In?uencing Electron Cloud Phenomena, Appl. Surf.Dissipation of the Electron Cloud, Proc. PAC03 (Portland,is no signi?cant electron-cloud under nominal operating

Furman, M.A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Convective equilibrium and mixing-length theory for stellarator reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In high ..beta.. stellarator and tokamak reactors, the plasma pressure gradient in some regions of the plasma may exceed the critical pressure gradient set by ballooning instabilities. In these regions, convective cells break out to enhance the transport. As a result, the pressure gradient can rise only slightly above the critical gradient and the plasma is in another state of equilibrium - ''convective equilibrium'' - in these regions. Although the convective transport cannot be calculated precisely, it is shown that the density and temperature profiles in the convective region can still be estimated. A simple mixing-length theory, similar to that used for convection in stellar interiors, is introduced in this paper to provide a qualitative description of the convective cells and to show that the convective transport is highly efficient. A numerical example for obtaining the density and temperature profiles in a stellarator reactor is given.

Ho, D.D.M.; Kulsrud, R.M.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Grain Alignment by Radiation in Dark Clouds and Cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study alignment of grains by radiative torques. We found steep rise of radiative torque efficiency as grain size increases. This allows larger grains that are known to exist within molecular clouds to be aligned by the attenuated and reddened interstellar radiation field. In particular, we found that, even deep inside giant molecular clouds, e.g. at optical depths corresponding to less than Av of 10 large grains can still be aligned by radiative torque. This means that, contrary to earlier claims, far-infrared/submillimeter polarimetry provides a reliable tool to study magnetic fields of pre-stellar cores. Our results show that the grain size distribution is important for determining the relation between the degree of polarization and intensity.

J. Cho; A. Lazarian

2005-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

279

Section 5  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Are Small-Scale Deep Convective Clouds in the Tropical Are Small-Scale Deep Convective Clouds in the Tropical Western Pacific Relevant to Intra-Seasonal Oscillations? S.A. Barr-Kumarakulasinghe Marine Sciences Research Center State University of New York Stony Brook, New York Introduction Deep convection can occur with convective units on the order of a few kilometers or at large-scale units with cloud sizes on the order of over 100 km in diameter (Figure 1). Studies on convection have typically emphasized large-scale convection. However, the interaction of small-scale and large-scale clouds and the atmosphere is not clear. This analysis demonstrates that the bulk of the areal coverage of cold high-level cloud fluctuates between small and large scale and that this size distribution is well correlated to the upper tropospheric

280

The Phenix ultimate natural convection test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The French sodium cooled fast reactor Phenix was shut down in 2009 after 35 years of operation. Before decommissioning, a final set of tests were performed by the CEA during 9 months. Several topics were involved such as thermal hydraulics, core physics and fuel behaviour. Among these ultimate experiments, two thermal hydraulic tests were performed: an asymmetrical test consisting in a trip of one secondary pump and a natural convection test in the primary circuit. Recognizing the unique opportunity offered by these Phenix ultimate tests, IAEA decided in 2007 to launch a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) devoted to benchmarking analyses with system codes on the Phenix natural convection test. One objective of the natural convection test in Phenix reactor is the assessment of the CATHARE system code for safety studies on future and advanced sodium cooled fast reactors. The aim of this paper is to describe this test, which was performed on June 22-23, 2009, and the associated benchmark specifications for the CRP work. The paper reminds briefly the Phenix reactor with the main physical parameters and the instrumentation used during the natural convection test. After that, the test scenario is described: - initial state at a power of 120 MWth, - test beginning resulting from a manual dry out of the two steam generators, - manual scram, - manual trip on the three primary pumps without back-up by pony motors, - setting and development of natural convection in the primary circuit, in a first phase without significant heat sink in the secondary circuits and in a second phase with significant heat sink in the secondary circuits, by opening the casing of steam generators to create an efficient heat sink, by air natural circulation in the steam generators casing. The benchmark case ends after this second phase, which corresponds to the experimental test duration of nearly 7 hours. The paper presents also the benchmark specifications data supplied by the CEA to all participants of this CRP in order to perform calculations (core, primary circuit, primary pumps, IHX, shutdown system, operating parameters, test scenario and real test conditions). Finally, main test results and analyses are presented including the evolution of the core and of the heat exchangers inlet and outlet temperatures, and some local temperature measurements. The natural convection has been easily set up in the pool type reactor Phenix with different boundary conditions at the secondary side, with or without heat sink. The data obtained during this unique test represent some very useful and precious results for the development of SFR in a wide range of thematic such as numerical methods dedicated to thermal-hydraulics safety analyses (system codes, CFD codes and coupling system and CFD codes) and instrumentation. (authors)

Gauthe, P. [CEA, DER, SESI, F-13108, Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Pialla, D.; Tenchine, D. [CEA, DEN, STMF, F-38054, Grenoble (France); Vasile, A. [CEA, DER, SESI, F-13108, Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Rochwerger, D. [CEA, DEN, DEIM, F-30207, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep convective clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A TRUSTED STORAGE SYSTEM FOR THE CLOUD.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Data stored in third party storage systems like the cloud might not be secure since confidentiality and integrity of data are not guaranteed. Though cloud (more)

Karumanchi, Sushama

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Robust Characterization of Model Physics Uncertainty for Simulations of Deep Moist Convection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study explores the functional relationship between model physics parameters and model output variables for the purpose of 1) characterizing the sensitivity of the simulation output to the model formulation and 2) understanding model ...

Derek J. Posselt; Tomislava Vukicevic

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

The QBO's influence on lightning production and deep convection in the tropics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(increase) about the equator and increase (decrease) in off-equator regions. QBO modulation of tropopause height induces a higher/colder (lower/warmer) tropopause near the equator during the east (west) phase. While the expectation was that decreases...

Hernandez, Celina Anne

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

Mesoscale disturbances in the tropical stratosphere excited by convection: Observations and effects on the stratospheric momentum budget  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of the momentum flux of topographically generated mesoscale gravity waves to the extratropical middle atmosphere circulation has been well established for over a decade. Estimates of the zonal forcing due to tropical mesoscale gravity waves, however, are hampered by lack of data on their primarily convective sources. The advent of aircraft measurements over tropical convective systems now makes such estimates possible without the use of ad hoc assumptions about amplitudes and phase speeds. Aircraft measurements from NASA's 1980 Panama and 1987 STEP/Australia Missions show that convectively generated disturbances observed just above the tropopause have horizontal scales comparable to those of the underlying anvils (about 50--100 km) with peak-to-peak isentropic surface variations of about 300--400 m. Satellite imagery of tropical anvil evolution indicates a typical lifetime of about five hours. Assuming that each convective system's impact on the stratosphere can be modeled as a time-dependent [open quotes]mountain[close quotes] with the preceding spatial and time scales, the excited spectrum of gravity waves can be calculated. A suitable quasi-linear wave-mean flow interaction parameterization and satellite-derived cloud area statistics can then be used to evaluate the zonal acceleration as a function of altitude induced by gravity waves from mesoscale convective systems. The results indicate maximum westerly accelerations due to breaking mesoscale gravity waves of almost 0.4 m s[sup [minus]1]/day in the upper stratosphere (in the region of the semiannual oscillation) during September, comparable to but probably smaller than the accelerations induced by planetary-scale Kelvin waves. Calculated easterly accelerations due to breaking mesoscale gravity waves in the QBO region below 35 km are smaller, accounting for about 10% of the required zonal acceleration. 35 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

Pfister, L.; Scott, S.; Loewenstein, M. (NASA/Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)); Bowen, S. (San Jose State Univ., CA (United States)); Legg, M. (Synernet, Fremont, CA (United States))

1993-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Fraunhofer ISST CLOUD COMPUTING APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;© Fraunhofer ISST Fraunhofer Innovation Cluster »Cloud Computing for Logistics« Budget 3 * 3 Mio© Fraunhofer ISST CLOUD COMPUTING APPLICATIONS FOR LOGISTICS Jakob Rehof Professor, Chair of Software Engineering, Technical University of Dortmund Director, Fraunhofer-ISST Dortmund and Berlin First

Rajamani, Sriram K.

286

An enigmatic HI cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The discovery of an HI cloud with peculiar properties at equatorial coordinates (J2000) ra=07h49m, dec=04d30m is presented. The HI object was detected at 21cm using the 300-m NAIC Arecibo telescope. Subsequent follow-up high-resolution observations with the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) telescope at L-Band revealed more details about its morphology. The most intriguing aspect of the object is the clear velocity gradient of 1 km/s, which is present in the data, an indication of either rotation or expansion. The gas appears to be cold, and its morphology is somewhat elliptical with clumpy substructure. Assuming disk rotation, the dynamical mass could be determined as a function of distance.Depending on the exact nature of the velocity gradient in the HI cloud, we can reach some preliminary conclusions about the nature of the object. Expansion would imply association with a circumstellar envelope of an evolved AGB star, while in the case of rotation, a comparison between the visible and the dynamical mass can lead...

Dedes, L; Kalberla, P W M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

An enigmatic HI cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The discovery of an HI cloud with peculiar properties at equatorial coordinates (J2000) ra=07h49m, dec=04d30m is presented. The HI object was detected at 21cm using the 300-m NAIC Arecibo telescope. Subsequent follow-up high-resolution observations with the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) telescope at L-Band revealed more details about its morphology. The most intriguing aspect of the object is the clear velocity gradient of 1 km/s, which is present in the data, an indication of either rotation or expansion. The gas appears to be cold, and its morphology is somewhat elliptical with clumpy substructure. Assuming disk rotation, the dynamical mass could be determined as a function of distance.Depending on the exact nature of the velocity gradient in the HI cloud, we can reach some preliminary conclusions about the nature of the object. Expansion would imply association with a circumstellar envelope of an evolved AGB star, while in the case of rotation, a comparison between the visible and the dynamical mass can lead to some preliminary conclusions. A common feature of those conclusions is the presence of a gravitational potential well, which is required to account for the rotation of the trapped HI gas. This potential well could be associated with a dark galaxy or some other exotic object.

L. Dedes; C. Dedes; P. W. M Kalberla

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

288

ARM - Measurement - Cloud ice particle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ice particle ice particle ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud ice particle Particles made of ice found in clouds. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments MET : Surface Meteorological Instrumentation Field Campaign Instruments REPLICATOR : Balloon-borne Ice Crystal Replicator CPI : Cloud Particle Imager CVI-AIR : Counterflow Virtual Impactor LEARJET : Lear Jet PARTIMG : Particle imager UAV-PROTEUS-MICRO : Proteus Cloud Microphysics Instruments

289

TWP Island Cloud Trail Studies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pacific Island Cloud Trail Studies Pacific Island Cloud Trail Studies W. M. Porch Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico S. Winiecki University of Chicago Chicago, Illinois Introduction Images and surface temperature measurements from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Multi- spectral Thermal Imaging (MTI) satellite are combined with geostationary meteorological satellite (GMS) images during 2000 and 2001 to better understand cloud trail formation characteristics from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site. Figure 1 shows a comparison on two consecutive days in December 2000. The day for which a cloud trail developed was more moist and cooler at the altitude the cloud developed (about 600 m) and there was very little

290

ARM - Measurement - Cloud condensation nuclei  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

condensation nuclei condensation nuclei ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud condensation nuclei Small particles (typically 0.0002 mm, or 1/100 th the size of a cloud droplet) about which cloud droplets coalesce. Categories Aerosols, Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System CCN : Cloud Condensation Nuclei Particle Counter Field Campaign Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System

291

ARM - Measurement - Cloud base height  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

base height base height ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud base height For a given cloud or cloud layer, the lowest level of the atmosphere where cloud properties are detectable. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments BLC : Belfort Laser Ceilometer MPL : Micropulse Lidar MWRP : Microwave Radiometer Profiler RL : Raman Lidar VCEIL : Vaisala Ceilometer External Instruments NOAASURF : NOAA Surface Meteorology Data, collected by NWS and NCDC

292

Inverse Fluid Convection Problems in Enclosures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency, security, and reliability of industrial and domestic processes essentially depend on the deep understanding of their actual processes of fluid flow and heat transfer. Actual processes of fluid flow control and ...

Zhao, Fu-Yun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TOA Radiation Budget of Convective Core/Stratiform Rain/Anvil Clouds from TOA Radiation Budget of Convective Core/Stratiform Rain/Anvil Clouds from Deep Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: Feng, Z., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Dong, X., University of North Dakota Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Feng Z, XQ Dong, BK Xi, C Schumacher, P Minnis, and M Khaiyer. 2011. "Top-of-atmosphere radiation budget of convective core/stratiform rain and anvil clouds from deep convective systems." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D23202, doi:10.1029/2011JD016451. An example of the hybrid classification process. (a) GOES IR temperature, (b) NEXRAD radar reflectivity at 2.5 km MSL, (c) cloud patch segmentation from GOES IR temperature (the color patches are identified as deep

294

Thermocapillary convection induced by laser surface heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermocapillary convection was excited by a laser source in experiments on molten paraffin. The parameters of the resultant flow were determined. The nature of the flow was demonstrated to correspond to shear-driven boundary-layer flow at high Reynolds numbers. Correlation dependences of the flow velocity of the melt and its temperature in the surface region were derived theoretically and were shown to agree with the experimental results. When the size of the laser spot was much less than the characteristic convection scales, three regions of flow of the melt could be distinguished: a viscous surface boundary layer, a stagnation zone under the laser spot, and a large-scale region of flow with a homogeneous temperature distribution. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

Gladush, G G; Drobyazko, S V; Likhanskii, V V; Loboiko, A I; Senatorov, Yu M [State Research Center of Russian Federation 'Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research', Troitsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

1998-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

295

Zenith Radiance Retrieval of Cloud Properties  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

retrievals of cloud properties retrievals of cloud properties from the AMF/COPS campaign Preliminary retrievals of cloud properties from the AMF/COPS campaign Christine Chiu, UMBC/JCET Alexander Marshak, GSFC Yuri Knyazikhin, Boston University Warren Wiscombe, GSFC Christine Chiu, UMBC/JCET Alexander Marshak, GSFC Yuri Knyazikhin, Boston University Warren Wiscombe, GSFC The cloud optical properties of interest are: The cloud optical properties of interest are: * Cloud optical depth τ - the great unknown * Radiative cloud fraction * Cloud effective drop size, r eff * Cloud optical depth τ - the great unknown * Radiative cloud fraction * Cloud effective drop size, r eff τ = 3 2 LWP r eff r eff in μm, LWP in g/m 2 The 2-ch narrow-field-of-view radiometer (2NFOV) The 2-ch narrow-field-of-view radiometer

296

Observed Scaling in Clouds and Precipitation and Scale Incognizance in Regional to Global Atmospheric Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use observations of robust scaling behavior in clouds and precipitation to derive constraints on how partitioning of precipitation should change with model resolution. Our analysis indicates that 90-99% of stratiform precipitation should occur in clouds that are resolvable by contemporary climate models (e.g., with 200 km or finer grid spacing). Furthermore, this resolved fraction of stratiform precipitation should increase sharply with resolution, such that effectively all stratiform precipitation should be resolvable above scales of ~50 km. We show that the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model also exhibit the robust cloud and precipitation scaling behavior that is present in observations, yet the resolved fraction of stratiform precipitation actually decreases with increasing model resolution. A suite of experiments with multiple dynamical cores provides strong evidence that this `scale-incognizant' behavior originates in one of the CAM4 parameterizations. An additional set of sensitivity experiments rules out both convection parameterizations, and by a process of elimination these results implicate the stratiform cloud and precipitation parameterization. Tests with the CAM5 physics package show improvements in the resolution-dependence of resolved cloud fraction and resolved stratiform precipitation fraction.

O'Brien, Travis A.; Li, Fuyu; Collins, William D.; Rauscher, Sara; Ringler, Todd; Taylor, Mark; Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

A study of stability indexes and vertical motion in relation to convective clouds over Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Haltiner and Hartin, 'l957). In this case, Byers (1959) has shown the resultant force, F, positive upward, would be F = H'a = pU'g - p'V'g = (p- p')V'g where a is the acceleration of the air parcel, N' is the mass of the accelerated parcel, p... is the density of the surrounding air, p' is the density of the parcel, V' is the volume of the parcel, and g is the acceleration due to gravity. By use of N' = p'V' and the equation of state, and with the assumption that the parcel is under the same...

Booth, David Michael

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

298

Regional climate model sensitivities to parametrizations of convection and non-precipitating subgrid-scale clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Geesthacht, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany B. Bookhagen Department

Bookhagen, Bodo

299

Convective plumes and the scarcity of Titan's clouds Ralph D. Lorenz,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-to-pole Hadley cell indicated for Titan by GCMs [e.g., Tokano et al., 1999] is in all probability a purely statistical flow, like the Hadley circulation of the Earth. The Hadley circulation is a statistical flow branch of the Hadley circulation, the air is subsiding and only in a few plumes is there upward motion

Lorenz, Ralph D.

300

An Idealized Cloud-Resolving Framework for the Study of Midlatitude Diurnal Convection over Land  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LINDA SCHLEMMER Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland CATHY Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland CHRISTOPHER S. BRETHERTON for Atmospheric and Climate Science, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland (Manuscript received 11 August 2010, in final

Bretherton, Chris

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep convective clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Method of deep drilling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Deep drilling is facilitated by the following steps practiced separately or in any combination: (1) Periodically and sequentially fracturing zones adjacent the bottom of the bore hole with a thixotropic fastsetting fluid that is accepted into the fracture to overstress the zone, such fracturing and injection being periodic as a function of the progression of the drill. (2) Casing the bore hole with ductile, pre-annealed casing sections, each of which is run down through the previously set casing and swaged in situ to a diameter large enough to allow the next section to run down through it. (3) Drilling the bore hole using a drill string of a low density alloy and a high density drilling mud so that the drill string is partially floated.

Colgate, Stirling A. (4616 Ridgeway, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

A Study to Investigate Cloud Feedback Processes and Evaluate GCM Cloud Variations Using Statistical Cloud Property Composites From ARM Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The representation of clouds in Global Climate Models (GCMs) remains a major source of uncertainty in climate change simulations. Cloud climatologies have been widely used to either evaluate climate model cloud fields or examine, in combination with other data sets, climate-scale relationships between cloud properties and dynamical or microphysical parameters. Major cloud climatologies have been based either on satellite observations of cloud properties or on surface observers views of cloud type and amount. Such data sets provide either the top-down view of column-integrated cloud properties (satellites) or the bottom-up view of the cloud field morphology (surface observers). Both satellite-based and surface cloud climatologies have been successfully used to examine cloud properties, to support process studies, and to evaluate climate and weather models. However, they also present certain limitations, since the satellite cloud types are defined using radiative cloud boundaries and surface observations are based on cloud boundaries visible to human observers. As a result, these data sets do not resolve the vertical distribution of cloud layers, an issue that is important in calculating both the radiative and the hydrologic effects of the cloud field. Ground-based cloud radar observations, on the other hand, resolve with good accuracy the vertical distribution of cloud layers and could be used to produce cloud type climatologies with vertical layering information. However, these observations provide point measurements only and it is not immediately clear to what extent they are representative of larger regimes. There are different methods that can be applied to minimize this problem and to produce cloud layering climatologies useful for both cloud process and model evaluation studies. If a radar system is run continuously over a number of years, it eventually samples a large number of dynamical and microphysical regimes. If additional data sets are used to put the cloud layering information into the context of large-scale dynamical regimes, such information can be used to study interactions among cloud vertical distributions and dynamical and microphysical processes and to evaluate the ability of models to simulate those interactions. The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program has established several Climate Research Facilities (ACRF) that provide continuous, long-term observations of clouds and radiation. ARM, with its overall goal of improving the treatment of radiation and clouds in climate models has provided unique observing systems for accelerating progress on the representation of cloud processes. In this project, six and a half years (January 1998 to June 2004) of cloud observations collected at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Oklahoma ACRF were used to produce a cloud-type climatology. The climatology provides cloud amounts for seven different cloud types as well as information on the detailed structure of multi-layer cloud occurrences. Furthermore, the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model output was used to define the dynamic regimes present during the observations of the cloud conditions by the vertically pointing radars at the SGP ACRF. The cloud-type climatology and the ECMWF SGP data set were then analyzed to examine and map dynamical conditions that favor the creation of single-layer versus multi-layer cloud structures as well as dynamical conditions that favor the occurrence of drizzle in continental stratus clouds. In addition, output from the ECMWF weather model forecasts was analyzed with the objective to compare model and radar derived cloud type statistics, in order to identify the major model deficiencies in cloud vertical distribution and map their seasonal variations. The project included two primary goals. The first was to create a cloud type climatology over the Southern Great Planes site that will show how cloud vertical distribution varies with dynamic and thermodynamic regime and how these variations would affect cloud climate fe

George Tselioudis

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

303

ATLAS Cloud R&D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The computing model of the ATLAS experiment was designed around the concept of grid computing and, since the start of data taking, this model has proven very successful. However, new cloud computing technologies bring attractive features to improve the operations and elasticity of scientific distributed computing. ATLAS sees grid and cloud computing as complementary technologies that will coexist at different levels of resource abstraction, and two years ago created an R&D working group to investigate the different integration scenarios. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D has been able to demonstrate the feasibility of offloading work from grid to cloud sites and, as of today, is able to integrate transparently various cloud resources into the PanDA workload management system. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D is operating various PanDA queues on private and public resources and has provided several hundred thousand CPU days to the experiment. As a result, the ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D group has gained...

Panitkin, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Caballero Bejar, J; Benjamin, D; DiGirolamo, A; Gable, I; Hendrix, V; Hover, J; Kucharczuk, K; Medrano LLamas, R; Love, P; Ohman, H; Paterson, M; Sobie, R; Taylor, R; Walker, R; Zaytsev, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Meridional Circulation in Solar and Stellar Convection Zones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a series of 3-D nonlinear simulations of solar-like convection, carried out using the Anelastic Spherical Harmonic (ASH) code, that are designed to isolate those processes that drive and shape meridional circulations within stellar convection zones. These simulations have been constructed so as to span the transition between solar-like differential rotation (fast equator/slow poles) and ``anti-solar' differential rotation (slow equator/fast poles). Solar-like states of differential rotation, arising when convection is rotationally constrained, are characterized by a very different convective Reynolds stress than anti-solar regimes, wherein convection only weakly senses the Coriolis force. We find that the angular momentum transport by convective Reynolds stress plays a central role in establishing the meridional flow profiles in these simulations. We find that the transition from single-celled to multi-celled meridional circulation profiles in strong and weak regimes of rotational constraint is lin...

Featherstone, Nicholas A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

IBM Software Solution Brief Safeguarding the cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IBM Software Solution Brief Safeguarding the cloud with IBM Security solutions Maintain visibility and control with proven security solutions for public, private and hybrid clouds Highlights Address cloud internal and external users, data, applications and workloads as they move to and from the cloud Regain

306

CLOUD COMPUTING INFRASTRUCTURE AND OPERATIONS PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLOUD COMPUTING INFRASTRUCTURE AND OPERATIONS PROGRAM A six-week in-depth program in the architectures, infrastructure, and operations of Cloud Computing DePaul University's Cloud Computing Infrastructure and Operations Program provides specialized knowledge in Cloud infrastructure with emphasis

Schaefer, Marcus

307

Locus Technologies 2014 Lost in the Cloud?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

© Locus Technologies 2014 Lost in the Cloud? There's an App for That David McConaughy Locus Technologies 1997-2014 4 #12;Cloud-based EMIS 2014© Locus Technologies 1997-2014 5 #12; Cloud Synch data back to EIM cloud for analysis 2014© Locus Technologies 1997-2014 9 #12;Mobile Apps for Data

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

308

7, 1711717146, 2007 Dependence of cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 7, 17117­17146, 2007 Dependence of cloud fraction and cloud height on temperature T. Wagner et a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Dependence of cloud fraction and cloud top height on surface temperature derived from spectrally resolved UV/vis satellite observations T

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

309

Cloud Computing An enterprise perspective Raghavan Subramanian  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Computing ­ An enterprise perspective Raghavan Subramanian Infosys Technologies Limited #12;2Infosys Confidential Overview of cloud computing? Cloud computing* Computing in which dynamically scalable of cloud computing 1. On-demand self-service 2. Ubiquitous network access 3. Location independent resource

Rajamani, Sriram K.

310

Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming Alexandru Iosup  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 ­ Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming Alexandru Iosup Pierre (Vrije U.). Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming (Rain for the Thirsty) #12;Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 ­ Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming 2 Intermezzo: Tips on how

Iosup, Alexandru

311

CLOUD, DRIZZLE, AND TURBULENCE OBSERVATIONS IN MARINE STRATOCUMULUS CLOUDS IN THE AZORES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLOUD, DRIZZLE, AND TURBULENCE OBSERVATIONS IN MARINE STRATOCUMULUS CLOUDS IN THE AZORES Jasmine at the Azores provided a unique, long-term record (May 2009 to December 2010) of cloud observations in a regime dominated by low-level stratiform clouds. First, a comprehensive cloud classification scheme that utilizes

312

Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 2. Observations and microphysical modeling of drizzle evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 2. Observations and microphysical I, the influence of cloud microphysics and dynamics on the shape of cloud radar Doppler spectra in warm stratiform clouds was discussed. The traditional analysis of radar Doppler moments was extended

313

Vision: Cloud-Powered Sight for All Showing the Cloud What You See  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vision: Cloud-Powered Sight for All Showing the Cloud What You See Paramvir Bahl Matthai Philipose argue that for computers to do more for us, we need to show the cloud what we see and embrace cloud General Terms Algorithms, Design, Human Factors, Languages, Performance, Security Keywords Camera, cloud

Zhong, Lin

314

Deep Maps: A Brief for Digital Palimpsest Mapping Projects (DPMPs, or Deep Maps)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEEP MAPS: A Brief for Digital Palimpsest DPMPs, or Deep Maps) SHELLEY FISHER FISHKIN paintings, drawings, maps, photos, books,

Fishkin, Shelley Fisher

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

MAGNETIC CYCLES IN A CONVECTIVE DYNAMO SIMULATION OF A YOUNG SOLAR-TYPE STAR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Young solar-type stars rotate rapidly and many are magnetically active. Some appear to undergo magnetic cycles similar to the 22 yr solar activity cycle. We conduct simulations of dynamo action in rapidly rotating suns with the three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code to explore dynamo action achieved in the convective envelope of a solar-type star rotating at five times the current solar rotation rate. We find that dynamo action builds substantial organized global-scale magnetic fields in the midst of the convection zone. Striking magnetic wreaths span the convection zone and coexist with the turbulent convection. A surprising feature of this wreath-building dynamo is its rich time dependence. The dynamo exhibits cyclic activity and undergoes quasi-periodic polarity reversals where both the global-scale poloidal and toroidal fields change in sense on a roughly 1500 day timescale. These magnetic activity patterns emerge spontaneously from the turbulent flow and are more organized temporally and spatially than those realized in our previous simulations of the solar dynamo. We assess in detail the competing processes of magnetic field creation and destruction within our simulations that contribute to the global-scale reversals. We find that the mean toroidal fields are built primarily through an {Omega}-effect, while the mean poloidal fields are built by turbulent correlations which are not well represented by a simple {alpha}-effect. During a reversal the magnetic wreaths propagate toward the polar regions, and this appears to arise from a poleward propagating dynamo wave. As the magnetic fields wax and wane in strength and flip in polarity, the primary response in the convective flows involves the axisymmetric differential rotation which varies on similar timescales. Bands of relatively fast and slow fluid propagate toward the poles on timescales of roughly 500 days and are associated with the magnetic structures that propagate in the same fashion. In the Sun, similar patterns are observed in the poleward branch of the torsional oscillations, and these may represent poleward propagating magnetic fields deep below the solar surface.

Brown, Benjamin P. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706-1582 (United States); Miesch, Mark S. [High Altitude Observatory, NCAR, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Browning, Matthew K. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S3H8 (Canada); Brun, Allan Sacha [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/Irfu Universite Paris-Diderot CNRS/INSU, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Toomre, Juri, E-mail: bpbrown@astro.wisc.edu [JILA and Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

2011-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

316

Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental Atrium: Comparison Between Experiments and CFD Predictions Title Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental Atrium: Comparison Between Experiments and CFD Predictions Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2006 Authors Jayaraman, Buvaneswari, Elizabeth U. Finlayson, Michael D. Sohn, Tracy L. Thatcher, Phillip N. Price, Emily E. Wood, Richard G. Sextro, and Ashok J. Gadgil Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 40 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5236-5250 Keywords airflow and pollutant transport group, atria, indoor airflow and pollutant transport, indoor environment department, indoor pollutant dispersion, mixed convection, turbulence model

317

Posters Mesoscale Simulations of Convective Systems with Data...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 Posters Mesoscale Simulations of Convective Systems with Data Assimilation During June 1993 in the Southern Great Plains J. Dudhia Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Division...

318

Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) systems probe the extent and composition of clouds at millimeter wavelengths. The MMCR is a zenith-pointing radar that operates at a frequency of 35 GHz. The main purpose of this radar is to determine cloud boundaries (e.g., cloud bottoms and tops). This radar will also report radar reflectivity (dBZ) of the atmosphere up to 20 km. The radar possesses a doppler capability that will allow the measurement of cloud constituent vertical velocities.

KB Widener; K Johnson

2005-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

319

A numerical study of the effect of different aerosol types on East Asian summer clouds and precipitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of anthropogenic aerosol on the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) is investigated with NCAR CAM5, a state-of-the-art climate model with aerosols direct and indirect effects. Results indicate that anthropogenic aerosol tends to cause a weakened EASM with a southward shift of precipitation in East Asia mostly by its radiative effect. Anthropogenic aerosol induced surface cooling stabilizes the boundary layer, suppresses the convection and latent heat release in northern China, and reduces the tropospheric temperature over land and land-sea thermal contrast, thus leading to a weakened EASM. Meanwhile, acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), anthropogenic aerosol can significantly increase the cloud droplet number concentration but decrease the cloud droplet effective radius over Indochina and Indian Peninsulas as well as over southwestern and northern China, inhibiting the precipitation in these regions. Thus, anthropogenic aerosol tends to reduce Southeast and South Asian summer monsoon precipitation by its indirect effect.

Jiang, Yiquan; Liu, Xiaohong; Yang, Xiuqun; Wang, Minghuai

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

ARM - Field Campaign - Cloud IOP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsCloud IOP govCampaignsCloud IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Cloud IOP 1998.04.27 - 1998.05.17 Lead Scientist : Gerald Mace For data sets, see below. Summary Monday, April 27, 1998 IOP Opening Activities: Heavy rain (nearly 2.5" since 12Z 4/26/98) at the central facility (CF) dominated the first day of the Cloud Physics/Single Column Model IOP and limited the daily activities. A 1430 GMT sonde launch commenced the 3-hour sonde launch schedule at the CF and 4 boundary facilities (BFs). Scientists/Instrumentation on Site: Citation: Has arrived and is located at the Ponca City Airport. No flights are currently planned. Flights are tentatively planned for stratus sampling when precipitation ends.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep convective clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Clouds, Aerosols and Precipitation in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean May 2009-December 2010 May 2009-December 2010 Rob Wood, University of Washington Rob Wood, University of Washington AMF Deployment Team Thanks to Mark Miller: AMF Site Scientist Mark Miller: AMF Site Scientist Kim Nitschke: AMF Site Manager CAP-MBL Proposal Team Importance of Low-Clouds for Climate Imperative that we understand the processes controlling the formation, maintenance and dissipation of low clouds in order to formation, maintenance and dissipation of low clouds in order to improve their representation in climate models. Which clouds matter for climate sensitivity? Cli t F db k

322

Cloud Computing for Telecom Systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Context: Cloud computing is reshaping the service-delivery and business-models in Information and Communications Technology (ICT). The Information Technology (IT) sector has benefited from it in (more)

Sapkota, Sagar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Energy-Efficient Cloud Computing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Centre & IT Equipment Energy Use. Proc. Digital Power...2007. pp. 1323. ACM, New York. [7] Energy Star, http://www...pp. 164177. ACM, New York. [32] Pratt, I...Vol. 53 No. 7, 2010 Energy-Efficient Cloud Computing......

Andreas Berl; Erol Gelenbe; Marco Di Girolamo; Giovanni Giuliani; Hermann De Meer; Minh Quan Dang; Kostas Pentikousis

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Short-range precipitation forecasts using assimilation of simulated satellite water vapor profiles and column cloud liquid water amounts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These observing system simulation experiments investigate the assimilation of satellite-observed water vapor and cloud liquid water data in the initialization of a limited-area primitive equations model with the goal of improving short-range precipitation forecasts. The assimilation procedure presented includes two aspects: specification of an initial cloud liquid water vertical distribution and diabatic initialization. The satellite data is simulated for the next generation of polar-orbiting satellite instruments, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and the High-Resolution Infrared Sounder (HIRS), which are scheduled to be launched on the NOAA-K satellite in the mid-1990s. Based on cloud-top height and total column cloud liquid water amounts simulated for satellite data a diagnostic method is used to specify an initial cloud water vertical distribution and to modify the initial moisture distribution in cloudy areas. Using a diabatic initialization procedure, the associated latent heating profiles are directly assimilated into the numerical model. The initial heating is estimated by time averaging the latent heat release from convective and large-scale condensation during the early forecast stage after insertion of satellite-observed temperature, water vapor, and cloud water formation.

Wu, X.; Diak, G.R.; Hayden, C.M.; Young, J.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)] [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Transitions between patterns in thermal convection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present experimental studies of the transitions between conduction, hexagons, and rolls in non-Boussinesq convection of gaseous CO{sub 2} in a cylindrical cell of radius-to-height ratio 86. Except for the transition from conduction to hexagons, transitions occur when the two states involved have nearly the same value of a generalized potential rather than at the stability limits. Conduction gives way to hexagons via the propagation of a front connecting the two states, while the transitions between hexagons and rolls are facilitated at the cell walls which appear to nucleate the minority state.

Bodenschatz, E.; de Bruyn, J.R.; Ahlers, G.; Cannell, D.S. (Department of Physics and Center for Nonlinear Science, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California (USA) Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland (Canada))

1991-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

326

The Chuva Project: How Does Convection Vary across Brazil?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CHUVA, meaning rain in Portuguese, is the acronym for the Cloud Processes of the Main Precipitation Systems in Brazil: A Contribution to Cloud-Resolving Modeling and to the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM). The CHUVA project has conducted five ...

Luiz A. T. Machado; Maria A. F. Silva Dias; Carlos Morales; Gilberto Fisch; Daniel Vila; Rachel Albrecht; Steven J. Goodman; Alan J. P. Calheiros; Thiago Biscaro; Christian Kummerow; Julia Cohen; David Fitzjarrald; Ernani L. Nascimento; Meiry S. Sakamoto; Christopher Cunningham; Jean-Pierre Chaboureau; Walter A. Petersen; David K. Adams; Luca Baldini; Carlos F. Angelis; Luiz F. Sapucci; Paola Salio; Henrique M. J. Barbosa; Eduardo Landulfo; Rodrigo A. F. Souza; Richard J. Blakeslee; Jeffrey Bailey; Saulo Freitas; Wagner F. A. Lima; Ali Tokay

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Other Locales Gulf Stream Locale -A Field Laboratory for Cloud Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gulf Stream Locale -A Field Gulf Stream Locale -A Field Laboratory for Cloud Process S. Raman Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences North Carolina State University Raleigh, NC 27695-8028 Clouds associated with the Gulf Stream Locale, (Figure 1) are in general due to the cyclogenesis or redevelopments of the storms off the east coast of the United States in winters, movement along the coast of the storms that are generated over the Gulf of Mexico in the spring and fall and mesoscale convective circulations present in all seasons. During the summer and early fall ,this region is also susceptible to hurricanes moving from the south. There have been several attempts to reproduce some of the observed synoptic and mesoscale features of these sys- tems (e.g., Krei1zberg and Perkey 1977; Holt et al. 1990;

328

Cloud condensation nuclei in Western Colorado : observations and model predictions.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Variations in the warm cloud?active portion of atmospheric aerosols, or cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), have been shown to impact cloud droplet number concentration and subsequently (more)

Ward, Daniel Stewart

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Title: Networking the Cloud: Enabling Enterprise Computing and Storage Cloud computing has been changing how enterprises run and manage their IT systems. Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Networking the Cloud: Enabling Enterprise Computing and Storage Abstract: Cloud computing has been changing how enterprises run and manage their IT systems. Cloud computing platforms provide introduction on Cloud Computing. We propose a Virtual Cloud Pool abstraction to logically unify cloud

330

SOLAR WAVE-FIELD SIMULATION FOR TESTING PROSPECTS OF HELIOSEISMIC MEASUREMENTS OF DEEP MERIDIONAL FLOWS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The meridional flow in the Sun is an axisymmetric flow that is generally directed poleward at the surface, and is presumed to be of fundamental importance in the generation and transport of magnetic fields. Its true shape and strength, however, are debated. We present a numerical simulation of helioseismic wave propagation in the whole solar interior in the presence of a prescribed, stationary, single-cell, deep meridional circulation serving as synthetic data for helioseismic measurement techniques. A deep-focusing time-distance helioseismology technique is applied to the synthetic data, showing that it can in fact be used to measure the effects of the meridional flow very deep in the solar convection zone. It is shown that the ray approximation that is commonly used for interpretation of helioseismology measurements remains a reasonable approximation even for very long distances between 12 Degree-Sign and 42 Degree-Sign corresponding to depths between 52 and 195 Mm. From the measurement noise, we extrapolate that time-resolved observations on the order of a full solar cycle may be needed to probe the flow all the way to the base of the convection zone.

Hartlep, T.; Zhao, J.; Kosovichev, A. G. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)] [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Mansour, N. N. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)] [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

331

Predicting free laminar convection heat transfer on curvilinear surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Free laminar convection on an isothermal surface of cylindrical and axisymmetric bodies of arbitrary cross section is considered in the Boussinesq approximation. The problem is solved by the method of generalized similarity in its local approximation. Universal formulae are obtained for calculating the local Nusselt number. Prediction of convection on a heated horizontal cylindrical and sphere are given as examples of the method.

Stepanyants, L.G.; Shelukho, S.I.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF BOILING HEAT CONVECTION IN A FRACTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF BOILING HEAT CONVECTION IN A FRACTURE A REPORT SUBMITTED between heat conduction and heat convection with boiling flow in a rock fracture. An experimental coefficient. This coefficient is the proportionality factor between the heat flux to a fracture surface

Stanford University

333

Environmental Distinctions between Cellular and Slabular Convective Lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The organizational mode of quasi-linear convective systems often falls within a spectrum of modes described by a line of discrete cells on one end (cellular) and an unbroken two-dimensional swath of ascent on the other (slabular). Convective ...

Richard P. James; J. Michael Fritsch; Paul M. Markowski

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Theoretical analysis of convective heat transfer enhancement of microencapsulated phase change material slurries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...This paper analyzes the convective heat transfer enhancement mechanism of microencapsulated phase change material slurries based on the analogy between convective ... addition, the conventional Nusselt number ...

Yinping Zhang; Xianxu Hu; Xin Wang

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Impact of Aerosols on Tropical Cyclones: An Investigation Using Convection-permitting Model Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The role of aerosols effect on two tropical cyclones over Bay of Bengal are investigated using a convection permitting model with two-moment mixed-phase bulk cloud microphysics scheme. The simulation results show the role of aerosol on the microphysical and dynamical properties of cloud and bring out the change in efficiency of the clouds in producing precipitation. The tracks of the TCs are hardly affected by the changing aerosol types, but the intensity exhibits significant sensitivity due to the change in aerosol contribution. It is also clearly seen from the analyses that higher heating in the middle troposphere within the cyclone center is in response to latent heat release as a consequence of greater graupel formation. Greater heating in the middle level is particularly noticeable for the clean aerosol regime which causes enhanced divergence in the upper level which, in turn, forces the lower level convergence. As a result, the cleaner aerosol perturbation is more unstable within the cyclone core and produces a more intense cyclone as compared to other two perturbations of aerosol. All these studies show the robustness of the concept of TC weakening by storm ingestion of high concentrations of CCN. The consistency of these model results gives us confidence in stating there is a high probability that ingestion of high CCN concentrations in a TC will lead to weakening of the storm but has little impact on storm direction. Moreover, as pollution is increasing over the Indian sub-continent, this study suggests pollution may be weakening TCs over the Bay of Bengal.

Hazra, Anupam; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Taraphdar, Sourav; Chen, J. P.; Cotton, William R.

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

336

Patterns of Convection in the Tropical Western Pacific  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Patterns of Convection in the Tropical Western Pacific Patterns of Convection in the Tropical Western Pacific J. H. Mather Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Convection is ubiquitous throughout the maritime continent region. However, the frequency of convec- tion is not uniform. While much of this region does not experience seasons to the same degree as one finds in mid-latitudes, the annual cycle of the sun's passage does have a large impact on convection throughout the maritime continent and the tropical western Pacific. The distribution of islands also affects convection in a variety of ways. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has three sites in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region, illustrated in Figure 1. The sites are located on Manus, Nauru, and at Darwin, Australia.

337

ARM - Field Campaign - Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsYear of Tropical Convection (YOTC) govCampaignsYear of Tropical Convection (YOTC) Campaign Links Year of Tropical Convection Website Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC) 2008.05.01 - 2010.04.30 Lead Scientist : Sally McFarlane Description Example of a sonde profile available from the ARM Archive The realistic representation of tropical convection in global atmospheric models is a long-standing challenge for weather and global climate models. The lack of fundamental knowledge in this area causes difficulties in modeling and predicting prominent phenomena of the tropical atmosphere such as the inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ), El-Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), monsoons, the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), tropical cyclones,

338

Transforming the representation of the boundary layer and low clouds for high-resolution regional climate modeling: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds in subtropical oceanic regions (e.g., Southeast Pacific) cover thousands of square kilometers and play a key role in regulating global climate (e.g., Klein and Hartmann, 1993). Numerical modeling is an essential tool to study these clouds in regional and global systems, but the current generation of climate and weather models has difficulties in representing them in a realistic way (e.g., Siebesma et al., 2004; Stevens et al., 2007; Teixeira et al., 2011). While numerical models resolve the large-scale flow, subgrid-scale parameterizations are needed to estimate small-scale properties (e.g. boundary layer turbulence and convection, clouds, radiation), which have significant influence on the resolved scale due to the complex nonlinear nature of the atmosphere. To represent the contribution of these fine-scale processes to the resolved scale, climate models use various parameterizations, which are the main pieces in the model that contribute to the low clouds dynamics and therefore are the major sources of errors or approximations in their representation. In this project, we aim to 1) improve our understanding of the physical processes in thermal circulation and cloud formation, 2) examine the performance and sensitivity of various parameterizations in the regional weather model (Weather Research and Forecasting model; WRF), and 3) develop, implement, and evaluate the advanced boundary layer parameterization in the regional model to better represent stratocumulus, shallow cumulus, and their transition. Thus, this project includes three major corresponding studies. We find that the mean diurnal cycle is sensitive to model domain in ways that reveal the existence of different contributions originating from the Southeast Pacific land-masses. The experiments suggest that diurnal variations in circulations and thermal structures over this region are influenced by convection over the Peruvian sector of the Andes cordillera, while the mostly dry mountain-breeze circulations force an additional component that results in semi-diurnal variations near the coast. A series of numerical tests, however, reveal sensitivity of the simulations to the choice of vertical grid, limiting the possibility of solid quantitative statements on the amplitudes and phases of the diurnal and semidiurnal components across the domain. According to our experiments, the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) boundary layer scheme and the WSM6 microphysics scheme is the combination of schemes that performs best. For that combination, mean cloud cover, liquid water path, and cloud depth are fairly wellsimulated, while mean cloud top height remains too low in comparison to observations. Both microphysics and boundary layer schemes contribute to the spread in liquid water path and cloud depth, although the microphysics contribution is slightly more prominent. Boundary layer schemes are the primary contributors to cloud top height, degree of adiabaticity, and cloud cover. Cloud top height is closely related to surface fluxes and boundary layer structure. Thus, our study infers that an appropriate tuning of cloud top height would likely improve the low-cloud representation in the model. Finally, we show that entrainment governs the degree of adiabaticity, while boundary layer decoupling is a control on cloud cover. In the intercomparison study using WRF single-column model experiments, most parameterizations show a poor agreement of the vertical boundary layer structure when compared with large-eddy simulation models. We also implement a new Total-Energy/Mass- Flux boundary layer scheme into the WRF model and evaluate its ability to simulate both stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds. Result comparisons against large-eddy simulation show that this advanced parameterization based on the new Eddy-Diffusivity/Mass-Flux approach provides a better performance than other boundary layer parameterizations.

Huang, Hsin-Yuan; Hall, Alex

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

339

SGP Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC): Science and Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign is a field experiment designed to collect a comprehensive data set that can be used to quantify the interactions that occur between the atmosphere, biosphere, land surface, and subsurface. A particular focus will be on how these interactions modulate the abundance and characteristics of small and medium size cumuliform clouds that are generated by local convection. These interactions are not well understood and are responsible for large uncertainties in global climate models, which are used to forecast future climate states. The campaign will be conducted from June 8 to June 30, 2007, at the U.S. Department of Energys Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains site. Data will be collected using eight aircraft equipped with a variety of specialized sensors, four specially instrumented surface sites, and two prototype surface radar systems. The architecture of Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign includes a high-altitude surveillance aircraft and enhanced vertical thermodynamic and wind profile measurements that will characterize the synoptic scale structure of the clouds and the land surface within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains site. Mesoscale and microscale structures will be sampled with a variety of aircraft, surface, and radar observations.

MA Miller; R Avissar; LK Berg; SA Edgerton; ML Fischer; T Jackson; B.Kustas; PJ Lamb; GM McFarquhar; Q Min; B Schmid; MS Torn; DD Turner

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

340

ARM - Measurement - Cloud optical depth  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

optical depth optical depth ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud optical depth Amount of light cloud droplets or ice particles prevent from passing through a column of atmosphere. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments GOES : Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites Field Campaign Instruments EC-CONVAIR580-BULK : Environment Canada Convair 580 Bulk Parameters GOES : Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep convective clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

ARM - Field Campaign - Spring Cloud IOP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsSpring Cloud IOP govCampaignsSpring Cloud IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Spring Cloud IOP 2000.03.01 - 2000.03.26 Lead Scientist : Gerald Mace For data sets, see below. Summary The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program conducted a Cloud Intensive Operational Period (IOP) in March 2000 that was the first-ever effort to document the 3-dimensional cloud field from observational data. Prior numerical studies of solar radiation propagation through the atmosphere in the presence of clouds have been limited by the necessity to use theoretical representations of clouds. Three-dimensional representations of actual clouds and their microphysical properties, such as the distribution of ice and water, had previously not been possible

342

Widget:LogoCloud | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Widget Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Widget:LogoCloud Jump to: navigation, search This widget adds css selectors and javascript for the Template:LogoCloud. For...

343

Multiscale Models for Cumulus Cloud Dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cumulus clouds involve processes on a vast range of scalesincluding cloud droplets, turbulent mixing, and updrafts and downdraftsand it is often difficult to determine how processes on different scales interact with each other. In this article, ...

Samuel N. Stechmann; Bjorn Stevens

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Template:LogoCloud | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TODO: Would be nice if logos could be vertically centered within each line of the cloud TODO: Provide a way to toggle the mouse-over behavior Usage For rendering a cloud of logos....

345

IBM research division cloud computing initiative  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cloud computing represents the latest phase in the evolution of Internet-based computing. In this paper, we describe the fundamental building blocks of cloud computing and the initiative undertaken by the IBM Research Division in this area, which includes ...

M. Naghshineh; R. Ratnaparkhi; D. Dillenberger; J. R. Doran; C. Dorai; L. Anderson; G. Pacifici; J. L. Snowdon; A. Azagury; M. VanderWiele; Y. Wolfsthal

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Disruptive technology business models in cloud computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud computing, a term whose origins have been in existence for more than a decade, has come into fruition due to technological capabilities and marketplace demands. Cloud computing can be defined as a scalable and flexible ...

Krikos, Alexis Christopher

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Cloud seeding as a technique for studying aerosol-cloud interactions in marine stratocumulus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud seeding as a technique for studying aerosol-cloud interactions in marine stratocumulus hygroscopic aerosols were introduced into a solid marine stratocumulus cloud (200 m thick) by burning hygroscopic flares mounted on an aircraft. The cloud microphysical response in two parallel seeding plumes

Miami, University of

348

Cloud Service Security Requirements Questionnaire 1. What Cloud service will you be providing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Service Security Requirements Questionnaire Exhibit G 1. What Cloud service will you) as Low/Moderate/High? If so, which? 4. Has your cloud service been audited by any eternal agencies for security and quality control? If so, please provide evidence. 5. Has your cloud service been industry

349

Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models R. S. Plant1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models R. S. Plant1 1 Department of Meteorology, University. INTRODUCTION In recent years Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs) have become an increasingly important tool for CRM data, which allows one to investigate statistical prop- erties of the lifecycles of the "clouds

Plant, Robert

350

HPI Cloud Symposium ,Operating The Cloud` 25.09.2013, Hasso-Plattner-Institut, Auditorium Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agenda HPI Cloud Symposium ,Operating The Cloud` 25.09.2013, Hasso-Plattner-Institut, Auditorium Building 09:30h Registration 10:00h Opening Prof. Dr. Christoph Meinel, HPI Potsdam 10:30h Cloud-RAID: Eine Methode zur Bereitstellung zuverlässiger Speicherressourcen in ?ffentlichen Clouds Maxim Schnajkin, HPI

Weske, Mathias

351

The Cloud Adoption Toolkit: Supporting Cloud Adoption Decisions in the Enterprise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The Cloud Adoption Toolkit: Supporting Cloud Adoption Decisions in the Enterprise Ali Khajeh-Hosseini, David Greenwood, James W. Smith, Ian Sommerville Cloud Computing Co-laboratory, School of Computer Science University of St Andrews, UK {akh, dsg22, jws7, ifs}@cs.st-andrews.ac.uk Abstract Cloud computing

Sommerville, Ian

352

Cloud Verifier: Verifiable Auditing Service for IaaS Clouds Joshua Schiffman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Verifier: Verifiable Auditing Service for IaaS Clouds Joshua Schiffman Security Architecture University Park, PA, USA yus138,hvijay,tjaeger@cse.psu.edu Abstract--Cloud computing has commoditized compute paradigm, its adoption has been stymied by cloud platform's lack of trans- parency, which leaves customers

Jaeger, Trent

353

Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 1. Forward modeling and remote sensing applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 1. Forward modeling and remote sensing broadening and drizzle growth in shallow liquid clouds remain not well understood. Detailed, cloudscale. Profiling, millimeterwavelength (cloud) radars can provide such observations. In particular, the first three

354

CLOUD COMPUTING AND INFORMATION POLICY 1 Cloud Computing and Information Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLOUD COMPUTING AND INFORMATION POLICY 1 Cloud Computing and Information Policy: Computing in a Policy Cloud? Forthcoming in the Journal of Information Technology and Politics, 5(3). Paul T. Jaeger University of Maryland Jimmy Lin University of Maryland Justin M. Grimes University of Maryland #12;CLOUD

Lin, Jimmy

355

Cloud networking and communications Cloud computing is having an important impact on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Editorial Cloud networking and communications Cloud computing is having an important impact attention has been devoted to system aspects of Cloud computing. More recently, however, the focus is shifting towards Cloud net- working and communications with evolutionary and revo- lutionary propositions

Boutaba, Raouf

356

Divergent subcritical convection in magnetized plasma from asymmetric sourcing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Asymmetric particle and heat sourcing in a plasma confined in a closed magnetic field line configuration results in convection cells, as is well known. This phenomenon occurs even if the sourcing on average produces density and temperature profiles that are subcritical, i.e., magnetohydrodynamically stable to interchange modes. Such subcritical convection is expected to be small compared to the convection from supercritical driving for which the system is interchange unstable. The ratio of subcritical to supercritical convection is expected to scale as the inverse Reynolds numbers (for large Reynolds numbers). It is shown that this ratio is, in fact, considerably larger. As marginal stability is approached, the subcritical convection grows from very small to almost the unstable convection size, i.e., of order unity. This effect may be similar to why a driven, damped harmonic oscillator increases in amplitude as resonance is approached. A numerical simulation is done to demonstrate this effect. It is also shown that transport from the large convection can be substantial.

Adler, D.T.; Hassam, A.B. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

Securely Managing Cryptographic Keys used within a Cloud Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to rapidly develop/host cloud applications Infrastructure as a Service (Iaas) - Networked access to processing power, storage Cloud Deployment Models Public Cloud Private Cloud Community Cloud Hybrid administers the Cloud Infrastructure? Who has access to my data? My activity history? Key Management Where

358

Russ S. Schumacher, John M. Haynes, Robert B. Seigel Daniel T. Lindsey Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO NOAA/NESDIS/STAR/RAMMB, Fort Collins, CO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of understanding the transport of chemical species by deep convective storms" · The project focused on three, Fort Collins, CO NOAA/NESDIS/STAR/RAMMB, Fort Collins, CO " ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! " INTRODUCTION! · In May-June 2012, the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) experiment was conducted, with the goals

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

359

6, 93519388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 6, 9351­9388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS and models G. Myhre et al Chemistry and Physics Discussions Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS satellite data and global 6, 9351­9388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS and models G. Myhre et al. Title

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

360

Cloud Microphysics Spring 2013 **odd years?**  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATS724 Cloud Microphysics (2-0-0) Spring 2013 **odd years?** Prerequisites: ATS620, ATS621; Ph, as the class will involve designing and building a simple cloud microphysical model. Course Description: **Sue and observations of nucleation, mechanisms of cloud droplet-spectra broadening, precipitation particle growth

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep convective clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud by HO, Hon Pong A Thesis Submitted;Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud by HO, Hon Pong This is to certify that I have implementations on unstructured point cloud 15 3.1 Level set initialization

Duncan, James S.

362

Cloud Security: Issues and Concerns Pierangela Samarati*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Cloud Security: Issues and Concerns Authors Pierangela Samarati* Università degli Studi di Milano, Italy sabrina.decapitani@unimi.it Keywords cloud security confidentiality integrity availability secure data storage and processing Summary The cloud has emerged as a successful computing paradigm

Samarati, Pierangela

363

Cloud Computing: Centralization and Data Sovereignty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Cloud Computing: Centralization and Data Sovereignty Primavera De Filippi, Smari McCarthy Abstract: Cloud computing can be defined as the provision of computing resources on-demand over and elasticity of costs, problems arise concerning the collection of personal information in the Cloud

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

364

Lattice Boltzmann method for double-diffusive natural convection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A lattice Boltzmann method for double-diffusive natural convection is presented. The model combines a multicomponent lattice Boltzmann scheme with a finite-difference solution of the energy equation to simulate natural convection caused by gradients in temperature and concentration. The model is validated both in two and three dimensions, and the agreement with literature data is satisfactory. A case study of thermosolutal convection of air in a cubical enclosure with horizontal thermal and solutal gradients is presented, exhibiting a rich variety of flow structures.

F. Verhaeghe; B. Blanpain; P. Wollants

2007-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

365

Numerical and Experimental Modeling of Natural Convection for a Cryogenic Prototype of a Titan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Sutherland's law D = diameter g = gravitation acceleration h = convection coefficient k = thermal

Colonius, Tim

366

Convective heat transfer characteristics of China RP-3 aviation kerosene at supercritical pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Convective heat transfer characteristics of China RP-3 aviation kerosene at supercritical pressure Keywords: Supercritical pressure Aviation kerosene Convective heat transfer Numerical study a b s t r a c convective in kerosene pipe flow is complicated. Here the convective heat transfer characteristics of China

Guo, Zhixiong "James"

367

Penetration of Convective Envelope into Stellar Core and Existence of Neutrino Loss  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the products of Penetration of Convective Envelope...convective mixing for any rate of the neutrino...superadiabaticity is determined Penetration of Convective Envelope...used.15> 459 the rate of Since the main...energy generation rate is sensitive to...smaller mass stars, penetration of convective envelope......

Ken'ichi Nomoto

1974-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Electron cloud observations : a retrospective.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A growing number of observations of electron cloud effects (ECEs) have been reported in positron and proton rings. Low-energy, background electrons ubiquitous in high-intensity particle accelerators. Amplification of electron cloud (EC) can occur under certain operating conditions, potentially giving rise to numerous effects that can seriously degrade accelerator performance. EC observations and diagnostics have contributed to a better understanding of ECEs, in particular, details of beam-induced multipacting and cloud saturation effects. Such experimental results can be used to provide realistic limits on key input parameters for modeling efforts and analytical calculations to improve prediction capability. Electron cloud effects are increasingly important phenomena in high luminosity, high brightness, or high intensity machines - Colliders, Storage rings, Damping rings, Heavy ion beams. EC generation and instability modeling increasingly complex and benchmarked against in situ data: {delta}, {delta}{sub 0}, photon reflectivity, and SE energy distributions important. Surface conditioning and use of solenoidal windings in field-free regions are successful cures: will they be enough? What are new observations and how do they contribute to body of work and understanding physics of EC?

Harkay, K.; Accelerator Systems Division (APS)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Variability of Deep Convective Cloud Characteristics Across the TWP Regime Variability of Deep Convective Cloud Characteristics Across the TWP Regime Jensen, M.P.(a)(b), Del Genio, A.D.(b), Vogelmann, A.M.(c), Miller, M.A.(c), and Johnson, K.L.(c), Columbia University (a), NASA/GISS (b), Brookhaven National Laboratory (c) Deep convective clouds and their associated anvil clouds are the most obvious feature in satellite images of tropical latitudes due to their high albedo and low infrared brightness temperature.Despite the relative ease with which these cloud types are detected, the details of their radiative properties and how they are related to the hydrological and microphysical properties of the cloud system are not well understood. We present some preliminary analysis from the use of a combination of MODIS Cloud Products

370

Separating Cloud Forming Nuclei from Interstitial Aerosol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has become important to characterize the physicochemical properties of aerosol that have initiated the warm and ice clouds. The data is urgently needed to better represent the aerosol-cloud interaction mechanisms in the climate models. The laboratory and in-situ techniques to separate precisely the aerosol particles that act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN), termed as cloud nuclei (CN) henceforth, have become imperative in studying aerosol effects on clouds and the environment. This review summarizes these techniques, design considerations, associated artifacts and challenges, and briefly discusses the need for improved designs to expand the CN measurement database.

Kulkarni, Gourihar R.

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

371

Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies conducted a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project was to review U.S. deep well drilling and stimulation activity, review rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep, high-pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. This report documents results from this project.

Stephen Wolhart

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

372

Experimental Investigation of Natural Convection in Trombe Wall Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, experiments with a passive solar building with Trombe wall in the north cold climate are carried out and discussed, and the natural convection heat transfer process has been investigated. The relativity of the factors affecting indoor...

Chen, B.; Zhao, J.; Chen, C.; Zhuang, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis Applied to a Southern Plains Convective Event  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Forecast sensitivity of an April 2012 severe convection event in northern Texas is investigated with a high resolution Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model-based Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF). Through Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis (ESA), ...

Christopher N. Bednarczyk; Brian C. Ancell

374

Theory for induced convection experiments in the tokamak edge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theory for induced convection experiments in the tokamak edge P. Helander1 , D.D. Ryutov2 , and R National Laboratory, Livermore, USA By biasing alternate divertor plates in a tokamak, one can create

375

Observation of moisture tendencies related to shallow convection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tropospheric moisture is a key factor controlling the global climate and its variability. For instance, moistening of the lower troposphere is necessary to trigger the convective phase of a Madden-Julian Oscillation. However, the relative ...

H. Bellenger; K. Yoneyama; M. Katsumata; T. Nishizawa; K. Yasunaga; R. Shirooka

376

Initiating Moist Convection in an Inhomogeneous Layer by Uniform Ascent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using aircraft data from the recent Dominica Experiment (DOMEX) project in Dominica, the authors evaluate a modified version of Woodcocks theory of moist convective initiation. Upstream of Dominica, anticorrelated fluctuations in temperature and ...

Alison D. Nugent; Ronald B. Smith

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Evaluation of Trigger Functions for Convective Parameterization Schemes Using Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Realistic simulation of different modes of atmospheric variability ranging from diurnal cycle to interannual variation in global climate models (GCMs) depends crucially on the convection trigger criteria. In this study, using the data from ...

E. Suhas; Guang J. Zhang

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Vertical Structure of Convective Systems during NAME 2004  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study describes the vertical structure of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) that characterized the 2004 North American monsoon utilizing observations from a 2875-MHz (S band) profiler and a dual-polarimetric scanning Doppler radar. Both ...

David G. Lerach; Steven A. Rutledge; Christopher R. Williams; Robert Cifelli

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Scaling Laws for the Heterogeneously Heated Free Convective Boundary Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The heterogeneously heated free convective boundary layer (CBL) is investigated by means of dimensional analysis and results from large-eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS). The investigated physical model is a CBL that ...

Chiel C. van Heerwaarden; Juan Pedro Mellado; Alberto De Lozar

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

A Unified Convection Scheme (UNICON). Part I: Formulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The author develops a unified convection scheme (UNICON) that parameterizes relative (i.e., with respect to the grid-mean vertical flow) subgrid vertical transport by nonlocal asymmetric turbulent eddies. UNICON is a process-based model of subgrid ...

Sungsu Park

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep convective clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Representing Forecast Error in a Convection-Permitting Ensemble System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ensembles provide an opportunity to greatly improve short-term prediction of local weather hazards, yet generating reliable predictions remain a significant challenge. In particular, convection-permitting ensemble forecast systems (CPEFSs) have ...

Glen S. Romine; Craig S. Schwartz; Judith Berner; Kathryn R. Fossell; Chris Snyder; Jeff L. Anderson; Morris L. Weisman

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Convective stability of carbon sequestration in anisotropic porous media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Convective stability of carbon sequestration in anisotropic porous media...media|stability theory|carbon sequestration| 1. Introduction The world's...processes occurring during carbon dioxide sequestration in underground saline aquifers...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Land-atmosphere interaction and radiative-convective equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I present work on several topics related to land-atmosphere interaction and radiative-convective equilibrium: the first two research chapters invoke ideas related to land-atmosphere interaction to better understand ...

Cronin, Timothy (Timothy Wallace)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

A Unified Convection Scheme (UNICON). Part II: Simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A unified convection scheme (UNICON) is implemented into the Community Atmosphere Model, version 5 (CAM5), and tested in single-column and global simulations forced by observed sea surface temperature. Compared to CAM5, UNICON substantially ...

Sungsu Park

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Interaction between surface and atmosphere in a convective boundary layer /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat, and thermal conductivity of the ground and grid sizegrid was stretched uniformly to 0.1 m resolution. The heatheat flux) are friction velocity and convective velocity respectively. The grid

Garai, Anirban

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Exploiting Virtualization and Cloud Computing in ATLAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ATLAS Computing Model was designed around the concept of grid computing; since the start of data-taking, this model has proven very successful in the federated operation of more than one hundred Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) sites for offline data distribution, storage, processing and analysis. However, new paradigms in computing, namely virtualization and cloud computing, present improved strategies for managing and provisioning IT resources that could allow ATLAS to more flexibly adapt and scale its storage and processing workloads on varied underlying resources. In particular, ATLAS is developing a "grid-of-clouds" infrastructure in order to utilize WLCG sites that make resources available via a cloud API. This work will present the current status of the Virtualization and Cloud Computing R&D project in ATLAS Distributed Computing. First, strategies for deploying PanDA queues on cloud sites will be discussed, including the introduction of a "cloud factory" for managing cloud VM instances. Nex...

Barreiro Megino, FH; The ATLAS collaboration; De, K; Gable, I; Hendrix, V; Panitkin, S; Paterson, M; De Silva, A; van der Ster, D; Taylor, R; Vitillo, RA; Walker, R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

The Convective Instability Pathway to Warm Season Drought in Texas. Part I: The Role of Convective Inhibition and Its Modulation by Soil Moisture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This research is designed to investigate how convective instability influences monthly mean precipitation in Texas in the summertime and to examine the modulation of convective instability and precipitation by local and regional forcings. Since ...

Boksoon Myoung; John W. Nielsen-Gammon

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

EA-1852: Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Project, Cloud County,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Project, Cloud 2: Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Project, Cloud County, Kansas EA-1852: Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Project, Cloud County, Kansas Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to authorize the expenditure of federal funds by Cloud County Community College (CCCC) for a wind energy project. CCCC has installed three wind turbines and proposes to install a fourth turbine on their campus in Concordia, Kansas, for use in their wind energy training curriculum and to provide electricity for their campus. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download January 10, 2011 EA-1852: Notice of Scoping Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Technology Project, Cloud

389

Does the ECMWF IFS convection parameterisation with stochastic physics correctly reproduce relationships between convection and the large-scale state?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Important questions concerning parameterisation of tropical convection are how should sub-grid scale variability be represented, and which large-scale variables should be used in the parameterisations? Here we compare the statistics of ...

Peter A. G. Watson; H. M. Christensen; T. N. Palmer

390

Dynamic Transitions of Surface Tension Driven Convection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the well-posedness and dynamic transitions of the surface tension driven convection in a three-dimensional (3D) rectangular box with non-deformable upper surface and with free-slip boundary conditions. It is shown that as the Marangoni number crosses the critical threshold, the system always undergoes a dynamic transition. In particular, two different scenarios are studied. In the first scenario, a single mode losing its stability at the critical parameter gives rise to either a Type-I (continuous) or a Type-II (jump) transition. The type of transitions is dictated by the sign of a computable non-dimensional parameter, and the numerical computation of this parameter suggests that a Type-I transition is favorable. The second scenario deals with the case where the geometry of the domain allows two critical modes which possibly characterize a hexagonal pattern. In this case we show that the transition can only be either a Type-II or a Type-III (mixed) transition depending on another computable non-dimensional parameter. We only encountered Type-III transition in our numerical calculations. The second part of the paper deals with the well-posedness and existence of global attractors for the problem.

Henk Dijkstra; Taylan Sengul; Shouhong Wang

2011-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

391

A Numerical Study of the Evolving Convective Boundary Layer and Orographic Circulation around the Santa Catalina Mountains in Arizona. Part I: Circulation without Deep Convection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The daytime evolution of the thermally forced boundary layer (BL) circulation over an isolated mountain, about 30 km in diameter and 2 km high, is examined by means of numerical simulations validated with data collected in the Cumulus ...

J. Cory Demko; Bart Geerts

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Slide 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Diurnal Cycle of Deep Convection Diurnal Cycle of Deep Convection Yunyan Zhang, Stephen A. Klein and Renata Mccoy PCMDI, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Multi-scale Modeling Framework (MMF) is a new approach in which the conventional cloud parameterization in global climate models (GCM) is substituted by the cloud resolving models (CRM), thus cloud related dynamics, physics and chemical processes could be represented on their native scales. In this study, we aim to develop an evaluation strategy for MMF, especially on the diurnal cycle of deep convections. 3-hourly global data for July, 1999 are collected from MMF simulations. Two analyses are shown. In tropics, we compare deep convection precipitation (PI), high cloud (CLD) and upper troposphere humidity (UTH) with the satellite observations. PI, CLD and UTH are retrieved from brightness

393

A New Greenland Deep Ice Core  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...isotopic profile with that from camp Century and with a deep-sea foraminifera...deep-sea cores. The redated Camp Century record suggests a dramatic termination...CENTURIES OF CLIMATIC RECORD FROM CAMP CENTURY ON GREENLAND ICE SHEET, SCIENCE...

W. Dansgaard; H. B. Clausen; N. Gundestrup; C. U. Hammer; S. F. Johnsen; P. M. Kristinsdottir; N. Reeh

1982-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

394

Deep-web search engine ranking algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The deep web refers to content that is hidden behind HTML forms. The deep web contains a large collection of data that are unreachable by link-based search engines. A study conducted at University of California, Berkeley ...

Wong, Brian Wai Fung

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Cloud speed impact on solar variability scaling ?? Application to the wavelet variability model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kleissl, J. , 2013. Deriving cloud velocity from an array ofCloud Speed Impact on Solar Variability Scaling -this work, we determine from cloud speeds. Cloud simulator

Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Deep Web Entity Monitoring Mohammadreza Khelghati  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep Web Entity Monitoring Mohammadreza Khelghati Database Group University of Twente, Netherlands. This data is defined as hidden web or deep web which is not accessible through search engines. It is estimated that deep web contains data in a scale several times bigger than the data accessible through

Hiemstra, Djoerd

397

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Black Forest Germany for the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to other sites as determined. In 2007 the AMF operated in the Black Forest region of Germany as part of the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS). Scientists studied rainfall resulting from atmospheric uplift (convection) in mountainous terrain, otherwise known as orographic precipitation. This was part of a six -year duration of the German Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting (QPF) Program. COPS was endorsed as a Research and Development Project by the World Weather Research Program. This program was established by the World Meteorological Organization to develop improved and cost-effective forecasting techniques, with an emphasis on high-impact weather. A large collection of data plots based on data streams from specific instruments used at Black Forest are available via a link from ARM's Black Forest site information page. Users will be requested to create a password, but the plots and the data files in the ARM Archive are free for viewing and downloading.

398

TROPIC: Transactional Resource Orchestration Platform In the Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TROPIC: Transactional Resource Orchestration Platform In the Cloud Changbin Liu, Yun Mao*, Xu Chen ­ InfrastructureasaService (IaaS) Cloud · Provide cloud infrastructure services: virtual machines (VMs), virtual block devices, VPNs · Widely adopted, e.g. Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) ­ Cloud resource

Plotkin, Joshua B.

399

International Cloud Workshop, Locarno, Switzerland, 3 Feb 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Cloud Workshop, Locarno, Switzerland, 3 Feb 2009 Impact of broken and inhomogeneous clouds on satellite cloud-phase retrieval Erwin Wolters ­ KNMI Hartwig Deneke ­ KNMI/University of Bonn;Contents Introduction CM-SAF cloud-phase retrieval method The problem ­ research question Broken clouds

Haak, Hein

400

Interconnecting Federated Clouds by Using Publish-Subscribe Service  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cloud Federation is an emerging computing model where multiple resources from independent Cloud providers are leveraged to create large-scale distributed virtual computing clusters, operating as into a single Cloud organization. This model enables the ... Keywords: Cloud Computing, Cloud Federation, Denial of Service, Intercommunication, Publish/Subscribe Service, Reliability

Christian Esposito; Massimo Ficco; Francesco Palmieri; Aniello Castiglione

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep convective clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Active Cores in Deep Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep field observations are an essential tool to probe the cosmological evolution of galaxies. In this context, X-ray deep fields provide information about some of the most energetic cosmological objects: active galactic nuclei (AGN). Astronomers are interested in detecting sufficient numbers of AGN to probe the accretion history at high redshift. This talk gives an overview of the knowledge resulting from a highly complete soft X-ray selected sample collected with ROSAT, XMM-Newton and Chandra deep fields. The principal outcome based on X-ray luminosity functions and space density evolution studies is that low-luminosity AGN evolve in a dramatically different way from high-luminosity AGN: The most luminous quasars perform at significantly earlier cosmic times and are most numerous in a unit volume at cosmological redshift z~2. In contrast, low-luminosity AGN evolve later and their space density peaks at z~0.7. This finding is also interpreted as an anti-hierarchical growth of supermassive black holes in the Universe. Comparing this with star formation rate history studies one concludes that supermassive black holes enter the cosmic stage before the bulk of the first stars. Therefore, first solutions of the so-called hen-egg problem are suggested. Finally, status developments and expectations of ongoing and future extended observations such as the XMM-COSMOS project are highlighted.

G. Hasinger; A. Mueller

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

402

ARM - Measurement - Cloud particle size distribution  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

size distribution size distribution ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud particle size distribution The number of cloud particles present in any given volume of air within a specified size range, including liquid and ice. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments WSACR : Scanning ARM Cloud Radar, tuned to W-Band (95GHz) Field Campaign Instruments CPI : Cloud Particle Imager CLDAEROSMICRO : Cloud and Aerosol Microphysical Properties

403

Organizational challenges in cloud adoption and enablers of cloud transition program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the proliferation of cloud computing, organizations have been able to get access to never seen before computing power and resources. Cloud computing has revolutionized the utilization of computing resources through ...

Rajendran, Sneha

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

A Global Climatology of Outgoing Longwave Spectral Cloud Radiative Effect and Associated Effective Cloud Properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Longwave (LW) spectral flux and cloud radiative effect (CRE) are important for understanding the earths radiation budget and cloudradiation interaction. Here, the authors extend their previous algorithms to collocated Atmospheric Infrared ...

Xianglei Huang; Xiuhong Chen; Gerald L. Potter; Lazaros Oreopoulos; Jason N. S. Cole; Dongmin Lee; Norman G. Loeb

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

CloudML : A DSL for model-based realization of applications in the cloud.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Cloud Computing offers a vast amount of resources, available for end users on a pay-as-you-go basis. The opportunity to choose between several cloud providers is (more)

Brandtzg, Eirik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Prediction of Cloud Points of Biodiesel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prediction of Cloud Points of Biodiesel ... Despite the lack of accurate data for the cloud points of biodiesel, the results obtained here allow for an adequate evaluation of the model proposed, showing that it can produce good predictions of the cloud points of mixtures of fatty acid esters. ... Because of its environmental benefits, resulting from a decrease in CO2 emissions, its origin from renewable resources, and the increase in crude oil costs, biodiesel is become increasingly attractive. ...

J. C. A. Lopes; L. Boros; M. A. Krhenbhl; A. J. A. Meirelles; J. L. Daridon; J. Pauly; I. M. Marrucho; J. A. P. Coutinho

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

407

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Simulating the Impact of Aerosols on Tropical Deep Convection Simulating the Impact of Aerosols on Tropical Deep Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: Morrison, H. C., NCAR Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Morrison H and WW Grabowski. 2011. "Cloud-system resolving model simulations of aerosol indirect effects on tropical deep convection and its thermodynamic environment." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 11(20), doi:10.5194/acp-11-10503-201. Profiles of ensemble- and horizontally averaged a) cloud water mixing ratio, b) rain mixing ratio, c) ice mixing ratio, d) cloud droplet concentration, e) rain number concentration, and f) ice number concentration, Ni, for pristine (blue), polluted (green), and highly

408

Analysis of cloud layer structure in Shouxian, China using RS92 radiosonde aided by 95 GHz cloud radar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of cloud layer structure in Shouxian, China using RS92 radiosonde aided by 95 GHz cloud to analyze cloud vertical structure over this area by taking advantage of the first direct measurements of cloud vertical layers from the 95 GHz radar. Singlelayer, twolayer, and threelayer clouds account for 28

Li, Zhanqing

409

Radiative Effects of Cloud Inhomogeneity and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiative Effects of Cloud Inhomogeneity and Geometric Association Over the Tropical Western Pacific Warm Pool X. Wu National Center for Atmospheric Research (a) Boulder, Colorado...

410

The Magellan Final Report on Cloud Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supported images and site security policies. A cloud systemcertain implications on site security policies. Our securityactivitiesboth in terms of site security policy as well as

Coghlan, Susan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

An Analysis of Cloud Absorption During  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Analysis of Cloud Absorption During ARESE II (Spring 2000) D. M. Powell, R. T. Marchand, and T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction...

412

Automated Security Compliance Tool for the Cloud.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Security, especially security compliance, is a major concern that is slowing down the large scale adoption of cloud computing in the enterprise environment. Business (more)

Ullah, Kazi Wali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Cloud Computing and Sustainability: Energy Efficiency Aspects.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Cloud computing promises a new era of service delivery and deployment in such a way that every person can access any kind of services (more)

Gholamhosseinian, Ashkan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Tropical Cloud Life Cycle and Overlap Structure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tropical Cloud Life Cycle and Overlap Structure Vogelmann, Andrew Brookhaven National Laboratory Jensen, Michael Brookhaven National Laboratory Kollias, Pavlos Brookhaven National...

415

Cloud Computing Organizational Benefits: A Managerial concern.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Context: Software industry is looking for new methods and opportunities to reduce the project management problems and operational costs. Cloud Computing concept is providing answers (more)

Mandala, Venkata

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Cloud Computing - Trends and Performance Issues.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Context: Cloud Computing is a very fascinating concept these days, it is attracting so many organiza-tions to move their utilities and applications into a dedicated (more)

Al-Refai, Ali

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Cloud computing has emerged as a model for hosting computing infrastructure and outsourcing management of that infrastructure. It offers the promise of simplified provisioning and (more)

Vrable, Michael Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

A COMPARISON OF CLOUD MICROPHYSICAL QUANTITIES WITH FORECASTS FROM CLOUD PREDICTION MODELS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program, Bethesda, MD March 15-19, 2010 Environmental Sciences Department/Atmospheric Plains (SGP) site. Cloud forecasts generated by the models are compared with cloud microphysical and radiosonde) are used to derive the cloud microphysical quantities: ice water content, liquid water content

419

Testing a cloud application: IBM SmartCloud inotes: methodologies and tools  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

IBM SmartCloud is a branded collection of Cloud products and solutions from IBM. It includes Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), Software as a Service (SaaS), and Platform as a Service (PaaS) offered through public, private and hybrid cloud delivery ... Keywords: Software testing, methodology, tool

Michael Lynch; Thomas Cerqueus; Christina Thorpe

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

AirCloud: a cloud-based air-quality monitoring system for everyone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present the design, implementation, and evaluation of AirCloud -- a novel client-cloud system for pervasive and personal air-quality monitoring at low cost. At the frontend, we create two types of Internet-connected particulate matter (PM2:5) ... Keywords: PM2.5, air quality, client-cloud calibration system

Yun Cheng, Xiucheng Li, Zhijun Li, Shouxu Jiang, Yilong Li, Ji Jia, Xiaofan Jiang

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep convective clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Cloud-Top Temperatures for Precipitating Winter Clouds JAY W. HANNA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Cloud-Top Temperatures for Precipitating Winter Clouds JAY W. HANNA NOAA/NESDIS Satellite for each precipitation type, as well as light, moderate and heavy snow and rain. The light the cloud microphysics in producing precipitation. For example, ice will only nucleate from the vapor phase

Schultz, David

422

Contribution of Microbial Activity to Carbon Chemistry in Clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of their atmospheric transport that atmospheric particles...undergo several condensation-evaporation...in cloud water. Clouds...of cloud water, precipitation...Microbiology and atmospheric processes...resource recovery. IWA Publishing...

Mickal Vatilingom; Pierre Amato; Martine Sancelme; Paolo Laj; Maud Leriche; Anne-Marie Delort

2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

423

V-041: Red Hat CloudForms Multiple Vulnerabilities | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

V-041: Red Hat CloudForms Multiple Vulnerabilities V-041: Red Hat CloudForms Multiple Vulnerabilities December 6, 2012 - 4:01am Addthis PROBLEM: Red Hat CloudForms Multiple...

424

Building mobile multimedia services: a hybrid cloud computing approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Second, we use a hybrid cloud computing...strategy. That means the i5Cloud takes advantage of in-house commodity hardware infrastructure which is usually available in most organizations, ... , i5Cloud can automat...

Dejan Kovachev; Yiwei Cao; Ralf Klamma

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

E-Cloud Build-up in Grooved Chambers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and F. Zimmermann, LC e-Cloud Activities at CERN, talkal. , Simulations of the Electron Cloud for Vari- ous Con?E-CLOUD BUILD-UP IN GROOVED CHAMBERS ? M. Venturini LBNL,

Venturini, Marco

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

A cloud-assisted design for autonomous driving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents Carcel, a cloud-assisted system for autonomous driving. Carcel enables the cloud to have access to sensor data from autonomous vehicles as well as the roadside infrastructure. The cloud assists autonomous ...

Suresh Kumar, Swarun

427

Deriving cloud velocity from an array of solar radiation measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

K. , 2011. US20110060475. Cloud tracking. U.S. Patent Bedka,technique for obtaining cloud motion from geosynchronouson advection of a frozen cloud field (Chow et al. (2011);

Bosch, J.L.; Zheng, Y.; Kleissl, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

A dual mass flux framework for boundary layer convection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A dual mass flux framework for boundary layer convection A dual mass flux framework for boundary layer convection Neggers, Roel European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Category: Modeling A new convective boundary layer scheme is presented that is currently being developed for the Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) of the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). Part of the total turbulent flux is modeled through advective mass flux by multiple updrafts, initialized at the surface. Two groups of updrafts are explicitly represented; i) updrafts that never reach their lifting condensation level, and ii) updrafts that condensate and become cloudy. Key new ingredient is the flexibility of the associated updraft area fractions, as a function of model state. As a result, an extra degree of freedom is introduced in the

429

Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Natural Convection Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility Scaling Basis Full Scale Half Scale NSTF Argonne National Laboratory's Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) - one of the world's largest facilities for ex-vessel passive decay heat removal testing-confirms the performance of reactor cavity cooling systems (RCCS) and similar passive confinement or containment decay heat removal systems in modern Small Modular Reactors. Originally built to aid in the development of General Electric's Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS), the NSTF has a long history of providing confirmatory data for the airside of the RVACS. Argonne National Laboratory's NSTF is a state-of-the-art, large-scale facility for evaluating performance

430

Large Eddy Simulation of Trade Wind Cumulus Clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A large eddy simulation (LES) model, used for studying the dry convective boundary layer, has been extended with an equation for the total water specific humidity and a condensation scheme to simulate the partly cloudy convective boundary layer. ...

J. W. M. Cuijpers; P. G. Duynkerke

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Pseudosteady-state mixed convection inside rotating spherical containers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computational study of the pseudosteady-state two-dimensional mixed convection within rotating spherical containers is presented. The computations are based on an iterative, finite-volume numerical procedure using primitive dependent variables, whereby the time-dependent continuity, momentum and energy equations in the spherical coordinate system are solved. Natural convection effect is modeled via the Boussinesq approximation. For a fixed Prandtl number of 4.62, parametric studies were performed by varying the Rayleigh number in order to cover the laminar regime adequately. For a given Rayleigh number, the ratio of Gr/Re{sup 2} was varied between 0.1 and 10. Given a Rayleigh number, the streamline patterns maintain their general shape with a dominant rotating vortex. As the forced convection effect becomes less marked, the streamlines exhibit less pronounced gradients near the surface of the sphere. As the rotational effect become more marked, the extent of the deviation from the limiting case of non-rotating spheres becomes more noticed. However, the bottom of the sphere still remains to be the region with enhanced heat transfer. Given a rotational Reynolds number, the streamline patterns are not affected greatly as the natural convection is promoted, however the temperature gradients near the surface are markedly enhanced. It is noticed that as natural convection effects are promoted, the greater portion of the sphere's surface experiences enhanced heat transfer rates. Given a Rayleigh number, the contours of the azimuthal velocity exhibit a nearly vertical equally-spaced pattern suggesting that solid-body rotation for high rotational Reynolds numbers. However, as the natural convection effects are enhanced, the contours become more slanted. The variation of the mean Nusselt number with the Reynolds and Rayleigh numbers is also quantified.

Khodadadi, J.M.; Li, W.; Shi, X.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Electron Cloud Effects in Accelerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract We present a brief summary of various aspects of the electron-cloud effect (ECE) in accelerators. For further details, the reader is encouraged to refer to the proceedings of many prior workshops, either dedicated to EC or with significant EC contents, including the entire ?ECLOUD? series [1?22]. In addition, the proceedings of the various flavors of Particle Accelerator Conferences [23] contain a large number of EC-related publications. The ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter series [24] contains one dedicated issue, and several occasional articles, on EC. An extensive reference database is the LHC website on EC [25].

Furman, M.A.

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

433

Convective exergy losses of developing slip flow in microchannels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A numerical formulation of convective exergy losses in microchannels is developed. Using a new convection model (called Non-Inverted Skew Upwind Scheme (NISUS)), the predicted velocity field is post-processed to determine frictional irreversibilities within the microchannel. Boundary conditions are established from a first-order slip velocity, based on streamwise temperature gradients and transverse velocity gradients at the wall. Parametric studies are conducted for varying flow rates, channel aspect ratios, slip coefficients and pressure ratios across the microchannel. The predicted exergy destruction results provide useful new data, from which design modifications can be made to reduce power input when transporting fluid through a microchannel.

E.O.B. Ogedengbe; G.F. Naterer; M.A. Rosen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Spiral-pattern formation in Rayleigh-Benard convection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a numerical study of the spontaneous formation of spiral patterns in Rayleigh-Benard convection in non-Boussinesq fluids. We solve a generalized two-dimensional Swift-Hohenberg equation that includes a quadratic nonlinearity and coupling to mean flow. We show that this model predicts in quantitative detail many of the features observed experimentally in studies of Rayleigh-Benard convection in CO[sub 2] gas. In particular, we study the appearance and stability of a rotating spiral state obtained during the transition from an ordered hexagonal state to a roll state.

Xi, H.; Gunton, J.D. (Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States)); Vinals, J. (Supercomputer Computations Research Institute, B-186, and Department of Chemical Engineering, B-203, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306-4052 (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

The Three-Dimensional Morphology of Simulated and Observed Convective Storms over Southern England  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A set of high-resolution radar observations of convective storms has been collected to evaluate such storms in the Met Office Unified Model during the Dynamical and Microphysical Evolution of Convective Storms (DYMECS) project. The 3-GHz ...

Thorwald H. M. Stein; Robin J. Hogan; Kirsty E. Hanley; John C. Nicol; Humphrey W. Lean; Robert S. Plant; Peter A. Clark; Carol E. Halliwell

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Convection Initiation along Soil Moisture Boundaries in the Southern Great Plains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Boundaries between two dissimilar air masses have been shown to be the focus region for convection initiation. One feature that has been shown to create these boundaries, as well as mesoscale circulation patterns conducive for convection, is soil ...

John D. Frye; Thomas L. Mote

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

The Impact of Data Assimilation Length Scales on Analysis and Prediction of Convective Storms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An idealized convective test bed for the local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF) is set up to perform storm-scale data assimilation of simulated Doppler radar observations. Convective systems with lifetimes exceeding 6 h are triggered in a ...

Heiner Lange; George C. Craig

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Physical Properties of High-Level Cloud over Land and Ocean from CloudSatCALIPSO Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Unlike other cloud types, high-level clouds play an important role, often imposing a warming effect, in the earthatmosphere radiative energy budget. In this paper, macro- and microphysical characteristics of cirrus clouds, such as their ...

Juan Huo; Daren Lu

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Network Performance of a Video Application in the Cloud.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Cloud computing is a technology that uses the internet and central remote servers to maintain data and applications. There are different cloud services of which (more)

NARISETTY, SHRAVAN

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Detecting Cirrus-Overlapping-Water Clouds and Retrieving their...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

channel (0.6 m) to retrieve cloud optical depth. Both channels are common to all weather satellite sensors. Because cirrus clouds are mostly semitransparent at infrared...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep convective clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Overview of the COPS Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics (ACM) Subgroup...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

properties of orographically induced clouds and how do these depend on dynamics, thermodynamics, and aerosol microphysics? * What is the role of aerosols and changing cloud...

442

Direct Numerical Simulations and Robust Predictions of Cloud...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the center of the bubble cloud. Credit: Computational Science and Engineering Laboratory, ETH Zurich, Switzerland Direct Numerical Simulations and Robust Predictions of Cloud...

443

Convective heat transfer in the nonstationary motion of a Maxwellian fluid between parallel planes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The convective heat-transfer problem is investigated for a Maxwellian fluid in generalized Couette flow in the case...

Z. P. Shul'man; . A. Zal'tsgendler

1970-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Mosaic Treatment of Subgrid Cloud-Radiation Interaction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Mosaic Treatment Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Mosaic Treatment of Subgrid Cloud-Radiation Interaction X. Wu Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences Iowa State University Ames, Iowa X.-Z. Liang Illinois State Water Survey University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Champaign, Illinois Introduction Improving the representation of cloud-radiation interaction is a major challenge for the global climate simulation. The development of cloud-resolving models (CRMs) and the extensive Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARMs) provide a unique opportunity for shading some lights on this problem. Current general circulation models (GCMs) predict cloud cover fractions and hydrometeor concentra- tions only in individual model layers, where clouds are assumed to be horizontally homogeneous in a

445

2, 20952131, 2002 Below-cloud aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). In addition, the understanding of wet removal processes remains crucial in local and regional pollutionACPD 2, 2095­2131, 2002 Below-cloud aerosol removal C. Andronache Title Page Abstract Introduction-cloud aerosol removal by rainfall for observed aerosol size distributions C. Andronache Boston College, Chestnut

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

446

Cloud Properties and Precipitation Formation Processes Observed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of spring time precipitation that develops in the Riyadh, Saudi Arabia region. · What are the cloud properties for developing cloud in the Riyadh, Saudi Arabia region. Research Objective #12;#12;Quality is based on calibration conducted by Kelly bosch and Dennis Afseth at Weather Modification Inc. (WMI) on 22

Delene, David J.

447

Atmospheric chemistry: Thwarting the seeds of clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... The ephemeral cloud of tiny drops that you see above the spout of your teapot forms in the same way as clouds in the sky by the condensation of ... the number of nanometre-sized particles formed through nucleation, similar to what happens above the teapot, except that organic molecules rather than water molecules are involved. ...

Paul J. Ziemann

2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

448

Public Cloud B CarbonEmission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sensors, Demand Prediction Power Capping, Green Software Services such as energy-efficient scientific) Request a Cloud service 4) Allocate service 5) Request service allocation 3) Request energy efficiency information Green Offer Directory 2) Request any `Green Offer' Routers Internet Green Broker #12;Cloud

Buyya, Rajkumar

449

The CloudNets Network Virtualization Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nets Network Virtualization Architecture Johannes Grassler jgrassler@inet.tu-berlin.de 05. Februar, 2014 Johannes Grassler jgrassler@inet.tu-berlin.de The CloudNets Network Virtualization Architecture #12;..... . .... . .... . ..... . .... . .... . .... . ..... . .... . .... . .... . ..... . .... . .... . .... . ..... . .... . ..... . .... . .... . Johannes Grassler jgrassler@inet.tu-berlin.de The CloudNets Network Virtualization Architecture #12

Schmid, Stefan

450

Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This three-year project, in cooperation with Professor Bob Houze at University of Washington, has been successfully finished as planned. Both ARM (the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program) data and cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations were used to identify the water budgets of clouds observed in two international field campaigns. The research results achieved shed light on several key processes of clouds in climate change (or general circulation models), which are summarized below. 1. Revealed the effect of mineral dust on mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) Two international field campaigns near a desert and a tropical coast provided unique data to drive and evaluate CRM simulations, which are TWP-ICE (the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment) and AMMA (the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis). Studies of the two campaign data were contrasted, revealing that much mineral dust can bring about large MCSs via ice nucleation and clouds. This result was reported as a PI presentation in the 3rd ASR Science Team meeting held in Arlington, Virginia in March 2012. A paper on the studies was published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences (Zeng et al. 2013). 2. Identified the effect of convective downdrafts on ice crystal concentration Using the large-scale forcing data from TWP-ICE, ARM-SGP (the Southern Great Plains) and other field campaigns, Goddard CRM simulations were carried out in comparison with radar and satellite observations. The comparison between model and observations revealed that convective downdrafts could increase ice crystal concentration by up to three or four orders, which is a key to quantitatively represent the indirect effects of ice nuclei, a kind of aerosol, on clouds and radiation in the Tropics. This result was published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences (Zeng et al. 2011) and summarized in the DOE/ASR Research Highlights Summaries (see http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/RMjY5/view). 3. Used radar observations to evaluate model simulations In cooperation with Profs. Bob Houze at University of Washington and Steven Rutledge at Colorado State University, numerical model results were evaluated with observations from W- and C-band radars and CloudSat/TRMM satellites. These studies exhibited some shortcomings of current numerical models, such as too little of thin anvil clouds, directing the future improvement of cloud microphysics parameterization in CRMs. Two papers of Powell et al (2012) and Zeng et al. (2013), summarizing these studies, were published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences. 4. Analyzed the water budgets of MCSs Using ARM data from TWP-ICE, ARM-SGP and other field campaigns, the Goddard CRM simulations were carried out to analyze the water budgets of clouds from TWP-ICE and AMMA. The simulations generated a set of datasets on clouds and radiation, which are available http://cloud.gsfc.nasa.gov/. The cloud datasets were available for modelers and other researchers aiming to improve the representation of cloud processes in multi-scale modeling frameworks, GCMs and climate models. Special datasets, such as 3D cloud distributions every six minutes for TWP-ICE, were requested and generated for ARM/ASR investigators. Data server records show that 86,206 datasets were downloaded by 120 users between April of 2010 and January of 2012. 5. MMF simulations The Goddard MMF (multi-scale modeling framework) has been improved by coupling with the Goddard Land Information System (LIS) and the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GOES5). It has also been optimized on NASA HEC supercomputers and can be run over 4000 CPUs. The improved MMF with high horizontal resolution (1 x 1 degree) is currently being applied to cases covering 2005 and 2006. The results show that the spatial distribution pattern of precipitation rate is well simulated by the MMF through comparisons with satellite retrievals from the CMOPRH and GPCP data sets. In addition, the MMF results were compared with three reanalyses (MERRA, ERA-Interim and CFSR). Although the MMF tends

Tao, Wei-Kuo; Houze, Robert, A., Jr.; Zeng, Xiping

2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

451

GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUD FORMATION IN DISK GALAXIES: CHARACTERIZING SIMULATED VERSUS OBSERVED CLOUD CATALOGS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of a study of simulated giant molecular clouds (GMCs) formed in a Milky Way-type galactic disk with a flat rotation curve. This simulation, which does not include star formation or feedback, produces clouds with masses ranging between 10{sup 4} M{sub ?} and 10{sup 7} M{sub ?}. We compare our simulated cloud population to two observational surveys: the Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory Galactic Ring Survey and the BIMA All-Disk Survey of M33. An analysis of the global cloud properties as well as a comparison of Larson's scaling relations is carried out. We find that simulated cloud properties agree well with the observed cloud properties, with the closest agreement occurring between the clouds at comparable resolution in M33. Our clouds are highly filamentarya property that derives both from their formation due to gravitational instability in the sheared galactic environment, as well as to cloud-cloud gravitational encounters. We also find that the rate at which potentially star-forming gas accumulates within dense regionswherein n{sub thresh} ? 10{sup 4} cm{sup 3}is 3% per 10 Myr, in clouds of roughly 10{sup 6} M{sub ?}. This suggests that star formation rates in observed clouds are related to the rates at which gas can be accumulated into dense subregions within GMCs via filamentary flows. The most internally well-resolved clouds are chosen for listing in a catalog of simulated GMCsthe first of its kind. The cataloged clouds are available as an extracted data set from the global simulation.

Benincasa, Samantha M.; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Wadsley, James [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Tasker, Elizabeth J. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

452

ARM - Field Campaign - Boundary Layer Cloud IOP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsBoundary Layer Cloud IOP govCampaignsBoundary Layer Cloud IOP Campaign Links Campaign Images Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Boundary Layer Cloud IOP 2005.07.11 - 2005.08.07 Lead Scientist : William Shaw For data sets, see below. Description Investigators from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in collaboration with scientists from a number of other institutions, carried out a month of intensive measurements at the ARM Climate Research Facility on the North Slope of Alaska in the summer of 2005. The purpose of these measurements was to determine how much the arctic land surface modifies the way low clouds reflect, absorb, and transmit solar and infrared radiation. This is an important problem because arctic clouds play a prominent role in

453

Nailing Down Ice in a Cloud Model  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nailing Down Ice in a Cloud Model Nailing Down Ice in a Cloud Model For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/ Research Highlight A research team led by scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory identified specific strengths and weaknesses of four different ice cloud retrieval algorithms. Their comparisons tested the ability of the algorithms to obtain cloud properties from radar and lidar observational measurements. The team noted the sometimes large variances in heating/cooling measurements compared to the observed data. Identifying specific weaknesses will help scientists improve our understanding of cloud properties in the atmosphere, which can be used for climate model development and evaluation. "Measuring the effective size and mass of ice crystals impacts our understanding

454

Numerical study on convection diffusion for gasification agent in underground coal gasification. Part I: establishment of mathematical models and solving method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this article is to discuss the distribution law of the gasification agent concentration in a deep-going way during underground coal gasification and the new method of solving the problem for the convection diffusion of the gas. In this paper, the basic features of convection diffusion for the gas produced in underground coal gasification are studied. On the basis of the model experiment, through the analysis of the distribution and patterns of variation for the fluid concentration field in the process of the combustion and gasification of the coal seams within the gasifier, the 3-D non-linear unstable mathematical models on the convection diffusion for oxygen are established. In order to curb such pseudo-physical effects as numerical oscillation and surfeit which frequently occurred in the solution of the complex mathematical models, the novel finite unit algorithm, the upstream weighted multi-cell balance method is advanced in this article, and its main derivation process is introduced.

Yang, L.H.; Ding, Y.M. [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China). College of Resources and Geoscience

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Boussinesq convection and motions of boundary spheres in a rotating spherical shell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RIMS­1772 Boussinesq convection and motions of boundary spheres in a rotating spherical shell #12; Boussinesq convection and motions of boundary spheres in a rotating spherical shell Keiji Kimura; Abstract Boussinesq thermal convection in rotating spheres or spherical shells has been investigated

456

Boussinesq convection and motions of boundary spheres in a rotating spherical shell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RIMS-1772 Boussinesq convection and motions of boundary spheres in a rotating spherical shell #12;Boussinesq convection and motions of boundary spheres in a rotating spherical shell Keiji Kimura Boussinesq thermal convection in rotating spheres or spherical shells has been investigated for over half

457

Evolution du contenu physique 1. Nouveau bloc couche limite convection nuages (nouvelle physique)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evolution du contenu physique 1. Nouveau bloc couche limite ­ convection ­ nuages (nouvelle physique) ON DISPOSE D'UN NOUVEAU CADRE DE TRAVAIL. ?? - Convection /relief (Jean-Yves Grandpeix, Jingmei Yu, Alain Lahelec) ++ - glace dans la convection (Arnaud Jam, Jean-Yves Grandpeix) ?? - Modèle micro-physique

Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste

458

Review of fluid flow and convective heat transfer within rotating disk cavities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review of fluid flow and convective heat transfer within rotating disk cavities with impinging jet * Corresponding author : souad.harmand@univ-valenciennes.fr Abstract Fluid flow and convective heat transfer, are treated in details in this review. The review focuses on convective heat transfer in predominantly outward

Boyer, Edmond

459

The Hadley Circulation as a RadiativeConvective Instability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hadley cell simulations over a tropical ocean are reported that suggest that the emission and absorption of thermal radiation by clouds plays an important role in the dynamics of the Hadley circulation. In particular, inclusion of interactions ...

David J. Raymond

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Performance of Deep Geothermal Energy Systems .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Geothermal energy is an important source of clean and renewable energy. This project deals with the study of deep geothermal power plants for the generation (more)

Manikonda, Nikhil

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep convective clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

. . . . . 85 . . . . . International Deep Drawing Research Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . 85 . . . . . International Deep Drawing Research Group IDDRG 2009 International 20899-855 USA e-mail: mark.iadicola@nist.gov, Web page: www

462

Multi Cloud Architecture to Provide Data Security And Integrity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract-- Cloud servers are being used to store data and application but its security is a major issue in current context. To solve the data security problems in public environment we propose an effective model for security and integrity of data stored in a cloud, through data segmentation followed by data encryption programs in a multiple cloud architecture. This architecture forms a multi cloud system where primary cloud is available for multiple users for data storage offering lesser load on client systems thereby using the cloud computing architecture. This architecture introduces a secondary cloud controlled by a single administrator which provides the data backup for primary cloud after undergoing specific segmentation and encryption algorithms to ensure security and integrity of data. The proposed system also offers protection against virus attacks by using linux as the base OS. Keywords-- Encryption, Linux, Multi cloud system, Primary cloud, Secondary cloud, Segmentation.

Nikhil Dutta; Himanshu Bakshi; Mujammill Mulla; Viraj Shinde

463

Numerical analysis of binary fluid convection in extended systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

arising in the primary subcritical bifurcation. The dynamics triggered by Eckhaus instability is discussed mixtures. For such mixtures, the onset of convection is via a subcritical Hopf bifurcation that gives rise of S. In the case of the experiment reported in [2] a S = -0.257 water-ethanol mixture is used. A final

Batiste, Oriol

464

Constraints on mantle convection from seismic tomography and flow modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis I combine high resolution seismic tomography and realistic flow modeling to constrain mantle convection. The bulk of the data used in the tomographic imaging are millions of P, pP and pwP travel time residuals, ...

Krason, Hrafnkell, 1970-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

The Influence of Wind Speed on Shallow Marine Cumulus Convection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The role of wind speed on shallow marine cumulus convection is explored using large-eddy simulations and concepts from bulk theory. Focusing on cases characteristic of the trades, the equilibrium trade wind layer is found to be deeper at stronger ...

Louise Nuijens; Bjorn Stevens

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Toward the Long-range Prediction of Severe Convective Windstorms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thunderstorm systems (or mesoscale convective system (MCS)), cause major disruption to society, including widespread power outages, tree and structural damage, and transportation accidents that affect multi- state � Left five million without power � Traveled 700 miles in 12 hours #12;June 2012 Derecho Overview http

Kuligowski, Bob

467

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Indirect Impact of Atmospheric Aerosols on an Ensemble of Deep Convective Indirect Impact of Atmospheric Aerosols on an Ensemble of Deep Convective Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Grabowski, W., NCAR Morrison, H. C., NCAR Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Grabowski WW and H Morrison. 2011. "Indirect impact of atmospheric aerosols in idealized simulations of convective-radiative quasi-equilibrium. Part II: Double-moment microphysics." Journal of Climate, 24, 1897-1912. This paper extends the previous cloud-resolving modeling study concerning the impact of cloud microphysics on convective-radiative quasi-equilibrium (CRQE) over a surface with fixed characteristics and prescribed solar input, both mimicking the mean conditions on Earth. The current study

468

ISLAND AND SHIP TRAIL CLOUDS: THE ROSETTA STONE OF CLOUDS, POLLUTION, AND CLIMATE?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cloud/Climate Feedback is a combination of words known to be important but extremely difficult to quantify or even assign a direction. A 4 % increase in boundary layer clouds would cool the earth as much as a doubling of CO{sub 2} would warm it (Randall et al, 1984). Studies have shown that warmer sea surface temperatures are associated with fewer clouds (Oreopoulos and Davies, 1992). We do not know how much of this effect is due to direct solar warming of surface water in the absence of clouds. We also know there are more eastern ocean marine boundary layer clouds in summer than winter. Do warmer sea surface temperatures or more summer-like conditions best represent global warming? Twomey, 1974 has proposed that increasing aerosol pollution would lead to brighter clouds (indirect aerosol effect). This relationship does have determined sign (i.e. cooling) but is very difficult to quantify. Cloud trails from ships and islands hold the potential of addressing Cloud/Climate Feedback by observing atmospheric response to large perturbations in turbulence and aerosol. However, before cloud trails can be used as a Rosetta Stone connecting pollution and climate, much more needs to be understood about the micro- and macrophysics of cloud trails.

W. PORCH; S. WINIECKI; L. O'STEEN

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Sensitivity of tropical deep convection in global models: effects of horizontal resolution, surface constraints and 3D atmospheric nudging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the Eastern Indian Ocean and Maritime Continent, and 174 tropical South America. The Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), and to a smaller extent the 175 South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), also have their signatures in the OLR and PR fields. When 176... larger for PR. This is 161 in agreement with previous studies, which show large model precipitation biases in tropical ocean 162 regions (Martin et al., 2010; Schiemann et al., 2014). For OLR ~85% of model configurations are in 163 good agreement...

Chemel, Charles; Russo, Maria; Hosking, Scott; Telford, Paul; Pyle, John

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Aerosol Indirect Effect on the Grid-scale Clouds in the Two-way Coupled WRF-CMAQ: Model Description, Development, Evaluation and Regional Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study implemented first, second and glaciations aerosol indirect effects (AIE) on resolved clouds in the two-way coupled WRF-CMAQ modeling system by including parameterizations for both cloud drop and ice number concentrations on the basis of CMAQpredicted aerosol distributions and WRF meteorological conditions. The performance of the newly-developed WRF-CMAQ model, with alternate CAM and RRTMG radiation schemes, was evaluated with the observations from the CERES satellite and surface monitoring networks (AQS, IMPROVE, CASTNet, STN, and PRISM) over the continental U.S. (CONUS) (12-km resolution) and eastern Texas (4-km resolution) during August and September of 2006. The results at the AQS surface sites show that in August, the NMB values for PM2.5 over the eastern/western U.S (EUS/WUS) and western U.S. (WUS) are 5.3% (?0.1%) and 0.4% (-5.2%) for WRF-CMAQ/CAM (WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG), respectively. The evaluation of PM2.5 chemical composition reveals that in August, WRF-CMAQ/CAM (WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG) consistently underestimated the observed SO4 2? by -23.0% (-27.7%), -12.5% (-18.9%) and -7.9% (-14.8%) over the EUS at the CASTNet, IMPROVE and STN sites, respectively. Both models (WRF-CMAQ/CAM, WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG) overestimated the observed mean OC, EC and TC concentrations over the EUS in August at the IMPROVE sites. Both models generally underestimated the cloud field (SWCF) over the CONUS in August due to the fact that the AIE on the subgrid convective clouds was not considered when the model simulations were run at the 12 km resolution. This is in agreement with the fact that both models captured SWCF and LWCF very well for the 4-km simulation over the eastern Texas when all clouds were resolved by the finer domain. Both models generally overestimated the observed precipitation by more than 40% mainly because of significant overestimation in the southern part of the CONUS in August. The simulations of WRF-CMAQ/CAM and WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG show dramatic improvements for SWCF, LWCF, COD, cloud fractions and precipitation over the ocean relative to those of WRF default cases in August. The model performance in September is similar to that in August except for greater overestimation of PM2.5 due to the overestimations of SO4 2-, NH4 +, NO3 -, and TC over the EUS, less underestimation of clouds (SWCF) over the land areas due to about 10% lower SWCF values and less convective clouds in September.

Yu, Shaocai; Mathur, Rohit; Pleim, Jonathan; Wong, David; Gilliam, R.; Alapaty, Kiran; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong

2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

471

ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The computing model of the ATLAS experiment was designed around the concept of grid computing and, since the start of data taking, this model has proven very successful. However, new cloud computing technologies bring attractive features to improve the operations and elasticity of scientific distributed computing. ATLAS sees grid and cloud computing as complementary technologies that will coexist at different levels of resource abstraction, and two years ago created an R&D working group to investigate the different integration scenarios. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D has been able to demonstrate the feasibility of offloading work from grid to cloud sites and, as of today, is able to integrate transparently various cloud resources into the PanDA workload management system. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D is operating various PanDA queues on private and public resources and has provided several hundred thousand CPU days to the experiment. As a result, the ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D group has gained...

Panitkin, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Caballero Bejar, J; Benjamin, D; DiGirolamo, A; Gable, I; Hendrix, V; Hover, J; Kucharczuk, K; Medrano LLamas, R; Ohman, H; Paterson, M; Sobie, R; Taylor, R; Walker, R; Zaytsev, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Cluster Formation in Contracting Molecular Clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore, through a simplified, semi-analytic model, the formation of dense clusters containing massive stars. The parent cloud spawning the cluster is represented as an isothermal sphere. This sphere is in near force balance between self-gravity and turbulent pressure. Self-gravity, mediated by turbulent dissipation, drives slow contraction of the cloud, eventually leading to a sharp central spike in density and the onset of dynamical instability. We suggest that, in a real cloud, this transition marks the late and rapid production of massive stars. We also offer an empirical prescription, akin to the Schmidt law, for low-mass star formation in our contracting cloud. Applying this prescription to the Orion Nebula Cluster, we are able to reproduce the accelerating star formation previously inferred from the distribution of member stars in the HR diagram. The cloud turns about 10 percent of its mass into low-mass stars before becoming dynamically unstable. Over a cloud free-fall time, this figure drops to 1 percent, consistent with the overall star formation efficiency of molecular clouds in the Galaxy.

Eric Huff; Steven Stahler

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

473

A Comparison of Precipitation Forecast Skill between Small Convection-Allowing and Large Convection-Parameterizing Ensembles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Submitted to Weather and Forecasting in October 2008, Accepted in January 2009 * Corresponding author) Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model ensemble, which cover a similar domain over the central-convection resolution (PCR) ensembles. Computation of various precipitation skill metrics for probabilistic

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

474

RADIAL STELLAR PULSATION AND THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONVECTION. II. TWO-DIMENSIONAL CONVECTION IN FULL AMPLITUDE RADIAL PULSATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code to simulate the interaction of convection and radial pulsation in classical variable stars. One key goal is the ability to carry these simulations to full amplitude in order to compare them with observed light curves. Previous multi-dimensional calculations were prevented from reaching full amplitude because of drift in the radial coordinate system, due to the algorithm defining radial movement of the coordinate system during the pulsation cycle. We have removed this difficulty by defining our radial coordinate flow algorithm to require that the mass in a spherical shell remain constant for every time step throughout the pulsation cycle. We have used our new code to perform two-dimensional (2D) simulations of the interaction of radial pulsation and convection. We have made comparisons between light curves from our 2D convective simulations with observed light curves and find that our 2D simulated light curves are better able to match the observed light curve shape near the red edge of the RR Lyrae instability strip than light curves from previous one-dimensional time-dependent convective models.

Geroux, Chris M.; Deupree, Robert G., E-mail: geroux@astro.ex.ac.uk [Institute for Computational Astrophysics and Department of Astronomy and Physics, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, NS B3H 3C3 (Canada)

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

475

Marine biology: Lights in the deep  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the oceans. Moreover, the tools of on-site exploration remotely operated vehicles and submersibles generally fall short of being unobtrusive. Ron Douglas, who studies deep-sea vision ... Douglas, who studies deep-sea vision at City University in London, compares exploration by submersible to taking a "Land Rover and going out into the savannah in the middle ...

Mark Schrope

2007-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

476

Leonard and Swap on 'Deep Smarts'  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An interview with Dorothy Leonard and Walter Swap: The first issue that any organization has to face is the identification of the deep smarts. Dorothy Leonard and Walter Swap are co-authors of the new book 'Deep Smarts: How to Cultivate and Transfer ...

Ubiquity staff

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Deep into Pharo ESUG 2013 Edition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep into Pharo ESUG 2013 Edition Alexandre Bergel Damien Cassou Stéphane Ducasse Jannik Laval #12;ii This book is available as a free download from http://rmod.lille.inria.fr/deep of this work. The best way to do this is with a link to this web page: creativecommons.org/licenses/ by-sa/3

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

478

Cloud-Based Transportation Management System Delivers Savings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOEs cloud based transportation management system (ATLAS) offers dramatically enhanced capabilities and modernization.

479

Virtual Cloud: Rent Out the Rented Resources Sheheryar Malik  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virtual Cloud: Rent Out the Rented Resources Sheheryar Malik Research Team OASIS INRIA Sophia.huet@inria.fr Abstract--With the advent in cloud computing technologies, use of cloud computing infrastructure to the cloud infrastructure. Over a small period of time, it has substantiated to be an attractive choice

Boyer, Edmond

480

CLOUD DROPLET NUCLEATION AND ITS CONNECTION TO AEROSOL PROPERTIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLOUD DROPLET NUCLEATION AND ITS CONNECTION TO AEROSOL PROPERTIES STEPHEN E. SCHWARTZ Environmental in cloud-free conditions and indirectly, by increasing concentratiol1S of cloud droplets thereby enhancing cloud shortwave reflectivity. These effecls are thought to be significant in the context of changes

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deep convective clouds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Low Cost, Scalable Proteomics Data Analysis Using Amazon's Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low Cost, Scalable Proteomics Data Analysis Using Amazon's Cloud Computing Services and Open and maintain. #12;Cloud Computing · Distributed or Cloud computing allows for the use of virtual computers Web Services (AWS) · EC2 ­ Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud "a web service that provides resizable compute

482

Cloud Computing Ch Zh XCheng-Zhong Xu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Cloud Computing ECE7650 Ch Zh XCheng-Zhong Xu Outline What is cloud computing CharacteristicsCharacteristics (word processing and spreadsheets) Google video for business Google sites (intranet sites and wikis) "It/2010 Autonomic Cloud Management 6 #12;4 Essential Characteristics C. Xu @ Wayne State Cloud Computing 7 Essential

Xu, Cheng-Zhong

483

Scaling Laws for Convection with Temperature-dependent Viscosity and Grain-damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical experiments of convection with grain-damage are used to develop scaling laws for convective heat flow, mantle velocity, and plate velocity across the stagnant lid and plate-tectonic regimes. Three main cases are presented in order of increasing complexity: a simple case wherein viscosity is only dependent on grainsize, a case where viscosity depends on temperature and grainsize, and finally a case where viscosity is temperature and grainsize sensitive, and the grain-growth (or healing) is also temperature sensitive. In all cases, convection with grain-damage scales differently than Newtonian convection due to the effects of grain-damage. For the fully realistic case, numerical results show stagnant lid convection, fully mobilized convection that resembles the temperature-independent viscosity case, and partially mobile or transitional convection, depending on damage to healing ratio, Rayleigh number, and the activation energies for viscosity and healing. Applying our scaling laws for the fully reali...

Foley, Bradford J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Depolarisation cooling of an atomic cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a cooling scheme based on depolarisation of a polarised cloud of trapped atoms. Similar to adiabatic demagnetisation, we suggest to use the coupling between the internal spin reservoir of the cloud and the external kinetic reservoir via dipolar relaxation to reduce the temperature of the cloud. By optical pumping one can cool the spin reservoir and force the cooling process. In case of a trapped gas of dipolar chromium atoms, we show that this cooling technique can be performed continuously and used to approach the critical phase space density for BEC

S. Hensler; A. Greiner; J. Stuhler; T. Pfau

2005-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

485

Global distribution of total cloud cover and cloud type amounts over the ocean  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the fourth of a series of atlases to result from a study of the global cloud distribution from ground-based observations. The first two atlases (NCAR/TN-201+STR and NCAR/TN-241+STR) described the frequency of occurrence of each cloud type and the co-occurrence of different types, but included no information about cloud amounts. The third atlas (NCAR/TN-273+STR) described, for the land areas of the earth, the average total cloud cover and the amounts of each cloud type, and their geographical, diurnal, seasonal, and interannual variations, as well as the average base heights of the low clouds. The present atlas does the same for the ocean areas of the earth.

Warren, S.G.; Hahn, C.J.; London, J.; Chervin, R.M.; Jenne, R.L. (Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (USA). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences; Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (USA). Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences; Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (USA). Dept. of Astrophysical, Planetary, and Atmospheric Sciences; National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (USA))

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Evaluation of desalination costs with DEEP  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Detailed analysis has shown several discrepancies and pitfalls of coupling an economic evaluation code, such as SEMER to the desalination cost evaluation code DEEP. This paper resumes our findings, which may be of interest to other DEEP users. The paper in particular deals with the following issues: why is it that power costs from nuclear systems are systematically higher in DEEP than those given by the economic evaluations made by individual organisations, (in our case, the SEMER code for example), even when the calculated construction costs are input into DEEP? Why corresponding power costs for fossil energy systems are lower? Why in particular desalination costs from Gas-Turbine Combined Cycle power system, which is now considered to be the cheapest fossil fuel option, are higher than desalination costs by Pulverised Coal system? Why DEEP calculation results with the backup heat source are 40% higher than those without the backup heat source?

S. Nisan; Linda Volpi

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Cloud-to-ground lightning characteristics of warm season Mesoscale Convection Systems in the Central United States: 1992-1993  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, by comparing the storm systems of 1992 vs.1993, it was determined whether the CG lightning characteristics of the flood producing storm systems of 1993 were vastly different than the preceding year. Results from the climatology of the CG lightning...

Hoeth, Brian Richard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

488

Towards a Characterization of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Towards a Characterization of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Towards a Characterization of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Shupe, Matthew CIRES/NOAA/ETL Kollias, Pavlos Brookhaven National Laboratory Category: Cloud Properties Mixed-phase clouds play a unique role in the Arctic, where the delicate balance of phases in these clouds can have a profound impact on the surface radiation balance and various cloud-atmosphere-radiation-surface feedback processes. A better understanding of these clouds is clearly important and has been a recent objective of the ARM program. To this end, multiple sensors including radar, lidar, and temperature soundings, have been utilized in an automated cloud type classification scheme for clouds observed at the North Slope of Alaska site. The performance of this new algorithm at identifying mixed-phase cloud conditions is compared with an

489

Application of cellular automata approach for cloud simulation and rendering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current techniques for creating clouds in games and other real time applications produce static, homogenous clouds. These clouds, while viable for real time applications, do not exhibit an organic feel that clouds in nature exhibit. These clouds, when viewed over a time period, were able to deform their initial shape and move in a more organic and dynamic way. With cloud shape technology we should be able in the future to extend to create even more cloud shapes in real time with more forces. Clouds are an essential part of any computer model of a landscape or an animation of an outdoor scene. A realistic animation of clouds is also important for creating scenes for flight simulators, movies, games, and other. Our goal was to create a realistic animation of clouds.

Christopher Immanuel, W. [Department of Physics, Vel Tech High Tech Dr. Rangarajan Dr. Sakunthala Engineering College, Tamil Nadu, Chennai 600 062 (India)] [Department of Physics, Vel Tech High Tech Dr. Rangarajan Dr. Sakunthala Engineering College, Tamil Nadu, Chennai 600 062 (India); Paul Mary Deborrah, S. [Research Department of Physics, The American College, Tamil Nadu, Madurai 625 002 (India)] [Research Department of Physics, The American College, Tamil Nadu, Madurai 625 002 (India); Samuel Selvaraj, R. [Research Department of Physics, Presidency College, Tamil Nadu, Chennai 600 005 (India)] [Research Department of Physics, Presidency College, Tamil Nadu, Chennai 600 005 (India)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

490

NIST Cloud Computing Strategy working paper, April 2011 1 of 25 NIST Strategy to build a USG Cloud Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NIST Cloud Computing Strategy working paper, April 2011 1 of 25 NIST Strategy to build a USG Cloud of United States Government (USG) secure and effective adoption of the Cloud Computing2 model to reduce costs and improve services. The working document describes the NIST Cloud Computing program efforts

491

Cloud Service Analysis - Choosing between an on-premise resource and a cloud computing service.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Cloud computing is a concept that has become increasingly popular in recent years through an increase in Internet connection capabilities, virtualization possibilities, and commercial successes. (more)

Augustsson, Keith

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Pre-Cloud Aerosol, Cloud Droplet Concentration, and Cloud Condensation Nuclei from the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere Land Study (VOCALS) Field Campaign First Quarter 2010 ASR Program Metric Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this, the first of a series of Program Metric Reports, we (1) describe archived data from the DOE G-1 aircraft, (2) illustrate several relations between sub-cloud aerosol, CCN, and cloud droplets pertinent to determining the effects of pollutant sources on cloud properties, and (3) post to the data archive an Excel spreadsheet that contains cloud and corresponding sub-cloud data.

Kleinman, LI; Springston, SR; Daum, PH; Lee, Y-N; Sedlacek, AJ; Senum, G; Wang, J

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

493

Testing a New Cirrus Cloud Parameterizaton  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Testing a New Cirrus Cloud Parameterization Testing a New Cirrus Cloud Parameterization in NCAR CCM3 D. Zurovac-Jevtic, G. J. Zhang, and V. Ramanathan Center for Atmospheric Sciences Scripps Institute of Oceanography La Jolla, California Introduction Cirrus cloud cover and ice water content (IWC) are the two most important properties of cirrus clouds. However, in general circulation models (GCMs), their treatment is very crude. For example, in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model (CCM3), IWC is prescribed as a function of column-integrated water vapor and height (Hack 1998). The in situ observations in the tropics indicate that the cirrus IWC is an order of magnitude larger than what is prescribed in the model (McFarquhar and Heymsfield 1996). The comparison with the International

494

Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storm Peak Lab Cloud Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX) Operated by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility for the U.S. Department of Energy, the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) begins its inaugural deployment November 2010 in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment, or STORMVEX. For six months, the comprehensive suite of AMF2 instruments will obtain measurements of cloud and aerosol properties at various sites below the heavily instrumented Storm Peak Lab, located on Mount Werner at an elevation of 3220 meters. The correlative data sets that will be created from AMF2 and Storm Peak Lab will equate to between 200 and 300 in situ aircraft flight hours in liquid, mixed phase, and precipitating

495

Flying Cloud Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flying Cloud Wind Farm Flying Cloud Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Flying Cloud Wind Farm Facility Flying Cloud Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner PPM Energy Inc Developer Clipper Windpower Energy Purchaser Alliant/IES Utilities Location West of Spirit Lake IA Coordinates 43.416975°, -95.422282° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.416975,"lon":-95.422282,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

496

A Global Cloud Resolving Model Goals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cloud Resolving Model Cloud Resolving Model Goals Uniform global horizontal grid spacing of 4 km or better ("cloud permitting") 100 or more layers up to at least the stratopause Parameterizations of microphysics, turbulence (including small clouds), and radiation Execution speed of at least several simulated days per wall-clock day on immediately available systems Annual cycle simulation by end of 2011. Motivations Parameterizations are still problematic. There are no spectral gaps. The equations themselves change at high resolution. GCRMs will be used for NWP within 10 years. GCRMs will be used for climate time-slices shortly thereafter. It's going to take some time to learn how to do GCRMs well. Scaling Science Length, Spatial extent, #Atoms, Weak scaling Time scale

497

NASA's Aerosol-Cloud-Ecosystems (ACE) Mission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plans for NASAs Aerosol-Cloud-Ecosystem (ACE) mission is described. Recommended by Earth Science Decadal Survey in 2007, ACE is nominally planned for a 2021 launch. ACE is...

Starr, David O'C

498

EVENT CLOUDS : lighter than air architectural structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EVENT CLOUD is a versatile covering system that allows events to happen independently to weather conditions. It consists of a lighter than air pneumatic structure, filled either with helium or hot air, that covers spaces ...

Peydro Duclos, Ignacio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

ARM Cloud Properties Working Group: Meeting Logistics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cloud Properties WG Breakout Session 2008 ARM Science Team Meeting Mar. 10, 2008, Norfolk, VA Monday March 10, 2008 1500 to 1515: R. Hogan - A Proposal for ARM support of Cloudnet...

500

Hydrated sulphuric acid in dense molecular clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......anthropogenically from combustion of fuels. Oxidized...forms readily in hydrocarbon combustion where sulphur is...dense clouds. From heat of vaporization...3 Observational Data Absorption spectra...peak absorption data in mum (cm1) for......

Flavio Scappini; Cesare Cecchi-Pestellini; Harvey Smith; William Klemperer; Alexander Dalgarno

2003-05-11T23:59:59.000Z