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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decorative vented gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Ohio Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Release Date: 9302013 Next Release Date: 10312013 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Vented and Flared Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas Vented and Flared...

2

Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Decade...

3

Ohio Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0...

4

Illinois Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

5

Methodology for estimating volumes of flared and vented natural gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The common perception in the United States that natural gas produced with oil is a valuable commodity probably dates from the 1940's. Before that time, most operators regarded natural gas associated with or dissolved in oil as a nuisance. Indeed, most associated/dissolved natural gas produced in the United States before World War II probably was flared or vented to the atmosphere. This situation has changed in the United States, where flaring and venting have decreased dramatically in recent years, in part because of environmental concerns, but also because of the changing view of the value of natural gas. The idea that gas is a nuisance is beginning to change almost everywhere, as markets for gas have developed in Europe, Japan, and elsewhere, and as operators have increasingly utilized or reinjected associated-dissolved gas in their oil-production activities. Nevertheless, in some areas natural gas continues to be flared or vented to the atmosphere. Gas flares in Russia, the Niger Delta, and the Middle East are some of the brightest lights on the nighttime Earth. As we increasingly consider the global availability and utility of natural gas, and the environmental impacts of the consumption of carbon-based fuels, it is important to know how much gas has been flared or vented, how much gas is currently being flared or vented, and the distribution of flaring or venting through time. Unfortunately, estimates of the volumes of flared and vented gas are generally not available. Despite the inconsistency and inavailability of data, the extrapolation method outlined provides a reliable technique for estimating amounts of natural gas flared and vented through time. 36 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Klett, T.R.; Gautier, D.L. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Gas generation results and venting study for transuranic waste drums  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sixteen waste drums, containing six categories of plutonium-contaminated waste, were monitored for venting and gas generation for six months. The venting devices tested appeared adequate to relieve pressure and prevent hydrogen accumulation. Most of the gas generation, primarily H2 and CO2, was due to radiolytic decomposition of the hydrogenous wastes. Comparison of the gas yields with those obtained previously in laboratory tests showed very reasonable agreement with few exceptions.

Kazanjian, A.R.; Arnold, P.M.; Simmons, W.C.; D'Amico, E.L.

1985-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

7

Michigan Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1960's: 1,861: 1,120: 808 ...

8

Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

9

Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

10

Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1960's: 3,000: 2,906: 2,802 ...

11

Other States Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 408 1992 501 530 501 1993 501 522 515 533 536 531 583 546 1994 533 616 623 620 629 654 1995 667 594 663 634 643 626 643 663 603 553 567 578 1996 549 538 625 620 693 703 709 715 676 708 682 690 1997 133 124 135 142 147 142 149 177 160 150 159 161 1998 147 134 150 148 132 117 126 132 124 121 121 123 1999 754 406 686 588 693 611 708 340 590 811 785 592 2000 147 135 152 163 175 159 187 180 175 179 176 183 2001 166 149 171 206 224 208 221 218 229 222 222 238 2002 172 163 176 196 185 177 191 184 188 180 157 165

12

Virginia Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

13

Oklahoma Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

14

Arizona Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

15

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

16

Kentucky Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

17

Oklahoma Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

18

Ohio Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

19

Arizona Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

20

Florida Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decorative vented gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

22

Illinois Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

23

Florida Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

24

VENTED FUEL ELEMENT FOR GAS-COOLED NEUTRONIC REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hollow, porous-walled fuel element filled with fissionable fuel and provided with an outlet port through its wall is described. In operation in a gas-cooled reactor, the element is connected, through its outlet port, to the vacuum side of a pump that causes a portion of the coolant gas flowing over the exterior surface of the element to be drawn through the porous walls thereof and out through the outlet port. This continuous purging gas flow sweeps away gaseous fission products as they are released by the fissioning fuel. (AEC) A fuel element for a nuclear reactor incorporating a body of metal of melting point lower than the temperature of operation of the reactor and a nuclear fuel in finely divided form dispersed in the body of metal as a settled slurry is presented. (AEC)

Furgerson, W.T.

1963-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

25

Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 1,994 1,804 1,837 1,504 1,798 1,541 1,890 1,954 1,742 2,018 1,823 1,711 2002 1,661 1,512 1,693 1,728 1,794 1,738 1,809 1,820 1,523 1,433 1,667 1,714 2003 1,728 1,590 1,801 1,753 1,774 1,675 1,639 1,702 1,612 1,661 1,555 1,617 2004 1,554 1,465 1,600 1,544 1,566 1,463 1,536 1,508 1,194 1,301 1,336 1,339 2005 1,368 1,266 1,430 1,362 1,429 1,351 1,291 1,204 609 607 862 1,021

26

Gas Combustion Appliances: Validating VENT-II Vi H. Rapp, Albert Pastor-Perez, Brett C. Singer, and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Predicting Backdrafting and Spillage for Natural-Draft Predicting Backdrafting and Spillage for Natural-Draft Gas Combustion Appliances: Validating VENT-II Vi H. Rapp, Albert Pastor-Perez, Brett C. Singer, and Craig P. Wray Environmental Energy Technologies Division April 2013 In Press as: Vi H. Rapp, Albert Pastor-Perez, Brett C. Singer, and Craig P. Wray. 2013. "Predicting Backdrafting and Spillage for Natural-Draft Gas Combustion Appliances: A Validation of VENT-II". HVAC&R Research, DOI:10.1080/10789669.2013.771948 LBNL-6193E 2 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof,

27

Coil spring venting arrangement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simple venting device for trapped gas pockets in hydraulic systems is inserted through a small access passages, operated remotely, and removed completely. The device comprises a small diameter, closely wound coil spring which is pushed through a guide temporarily inserted in the access passage. The guide has a central passageway which directs the coil spring radially upward into the pocket, so that, with the guide properly positioned for depth and properly oriented, the coil spring can be pushed up into the top of the pocket to vent it. By positioning a seal around the free end of the guide, the spring and guide are removed and the passage is sealed.

McCugh, R.M.

1975-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

28

Interim On-Site Storage of Low-Level Waste: Volume 4, Part 3: Waste Container Closures, Seals, and Gas Vents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume of the Interim On-Site Storage report series supplements Volume 4, Part 1, which includes an extensive methodology and detailed information on the types and availability of low-level waste (LLW) containers and container coatings for extended storage. Part 2, soon to be published, addresses monitoring and inspection requirements for stored LLW containers. Part 3 continues the series by providing detailed guidance on container closures, seals, and gas vents, including performance goals and key ...

1993-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

29

Christmas Tree Decorations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tree Decorations Tree Decorations Nature Bulletin No. 211-A December 18, 1965 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation CHRISTMAS TREE DECORATIONS Christmas trees, decorated or "trimmed", apparently were first used in this country during the Revolutionary War by Hessian soldiers who, hired to fight for England, were thinking of the customs in their German homeland. An account of the festivities here at Fort Dearborn, in 1804, mentions a spruce Christmas tree. Some say that a Harvard professor from Germany had one in 1824. There is reliable evidence that there was such a tree in Cambridge, Mass., in 1832; and in Philadelphia two years later. The idea and the tradition spread rapidly through this country.

30

Performance Study on the Treatment of the vent gas of the Fermentation process of Compost by Biotrickling Filters.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Kitchen waste compositing plants emit odorous gas streams with sulfur-, nitrogen-, and oxygen-containing compounds and other hydrocarbons. A pilot-scale biotrickling filter with a space of… (more)

shih, ya-ru

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Battery venting system and method  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve.

Casale, Thomas J. (Aurora, CO); Ching, Larry K. W. (Littleton, CO); Baer, Jose T. (Gaviota, CA); Swan, David H. (Monrovia, CA)

1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

32

Battery Vent Mechanism And Method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve.

Ching, Larry K. W. (Littleton, CO)

2000-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Battery venting system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve. 8 figs.

Casale, T.J.; Ching, L.K.W.; Baer, J.T.; Swan, D.H.

1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

34

Petrographic, Mineralogic, and Geochemical Studies of Hydrocarbon-derived Authigenic Carbonate Rock from Gas Venting, Seepage, Free Gas, and Gas Hydrate Sites in the Gulf of Mexico and offshore India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Authigenic carbonate rock (ACR) is derived from microbial oxidation of methane, biodegradation of crude oil, and oxidation of sedimentary organic matter. The precipitation of ACR was characterized petrographically, mineralogically, and geochemically. ACR collected from the seafloor in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and ACR recovered from drilled cores in the Krishna-Godawari (KG) basin offshore India were used. All study sites are associated with hydrocarbon gas venting, seepage, free gas, or gas hydrate. ACR from the GOM is densely cemented and extremely irregular in shape, whereas ACR from offshore India is generally an oval-shaped smooth nodule and also densely cemented. The dominant mineral in ACR is authigenic calcite. ACR contains carbon derived from sedimentary organic carbon oxidation that geologically sequesters much fossil carbon. Bulk carbon and oxygen isotopes of ACR were measured. ACR from the GOM is strongly depleted in 13C with ?13C of ?42.5? and enriched in 18O with ?18O of 4.67?. The ?13C of hydrocarbon is typically more depleted in 13C than in the associated ACR. The reason is that authigenic carbonate cements from hydrocarbon oxidation generally enclose skeletal material characterized by normal marine carbonate. Three groups that represent different hydrocarbon sources to ACR were classified in this study: primary carbon sources to ACR from (1) methane plus biodegraded oil, (2) methane, or (3) biodegraded oil. Wide ranges in ?13C (?49.12 to 14.06?) and ?18O ( 1.27 to 14.06?) were observed in ACR from offshore India. In sediments, the ?13C may be affected by differences in the rate of organic carbon oxidation, which generate varying ?13C with depth during methanogenesis. Based on the wide range in ?13C, ACR from offshore India was classified: (1) ?13C may reflect high rates of organic carbon oxidation, (2) ACR may be derived primarily from methane oxidation, and (3) ?13C may reflect low rates of organic carbon oxidation. ?18O values are heavier than those of normal marine carbonates. The ?18O may be caused by reaction with deep-sourced water that was isotopically heavier than ambient seawater. Some samples may reflect heavy ?18O from gas hydrate decomposition, but it would not cause significant heavy oxygen isotopes.

Jung, Woodong

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

ANALYSIS OF VENTING OF A RESIN SLURRY  

SciTech Connect

A resin slurry venting analysis was conducted to address safety issues associated with overpressurization of ion exchange columns used in the Purex process at the Savannah River Site (SRS). If flow to these columns were inadvertently interrupted, an exothermic runaway reaction could occur between the ion exchange resin and the nitric acid used in the feed stream. The nitric acid-resin reaction generates significant quantities of noncondensable gases, which would pressurize the column. To prevent the column from rupturing during such events, rupture disks are installed on the column vent lines. The venting analysis models accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) tests and data from tests that were performed in a vented test vessel with a rupture disk. The tests showed that the pressure inside the test vessel continued to increase after the rupture disk opened, though at a slower rate than prior to the rupture. Calculated maximum discharge rates for the resin venting tests exceeded the measured rates of gas generation, so the vent size was sufficient to relieve the pressure in the test vessel if the vent flow rate was constant. The increase in the vessel pressure is modeled as a transient phenomenon associated with expansion of the resin slurry/gas mixture upon rupture of the disk. It is postulated that the maximum pressure at the end of this expansion is limited by energy minimization to approximately 1.5 times the rupture disk burst pressure. The magnitude of this pressure increase is consistent with the measured pressure transients. The results of this analysis demonstrate the need to allow for a margin between the design pressure and the rupture disk burst pressure in similar applications.

Laurinat, J.; Hensel, S.

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

36

Electrochemical cell having improved pressure vent  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The electrochemical cell of the instant invention includes a case having a gas outlet, one or more positive electrodes positioned within the case, one or more negative electrodes positioned within the case electrode separators positioned between the positive and negative electrodes, electrolyte positioned within the case, and a pressure vent for releasing internal pressure occurring in the case to the surrounding atmosphere. The pressure vent is affixed to the case covering the gas outlet, the pressure vent includes a vent housing having a hollow interior area in gaseous communication with the surrounding atmosphere and the interior of the case via the gas outlet, a pressure release piston positioned within the hollow interior area, the pressure release piston sized to surround the gas outlet and having a seal groove configured to encapsulate all but one surface of a seal mounted within the seal groove, leaving the non-encapsulated surface of the seal exposed, and a compression spring positioned to urge the pressure release piston to compress the seal in the seal groove and block the gas outlet in the case.

Dean, Kevin (Pontiac, MI); Holland, Arthur (Troy, MI); Fillmore, Donn (Waterford, MI)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Natural Gas Vented and Flared  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

1-2013 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico NA NA NA NA NA NA 1997-2013 Louisiana NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 New Mexico NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Oklahoma NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013...

38

Natural Gas Vented and Flared  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

143,457 166,909 165,360 165,928 209,439 212,848 1936-2012 143,457 166,909 165,360 165,928 209,439 212,848 1936-2012 Alaska 6,458 10,023 6,481 10,173 10,966 11,769 1967-2012 Alaska Onshore 5,125 7,812 5,271 8,034 9,276 9,244 1992-2012 Alaska State Offshore 1,334 2,212 1,210 2,139 1,690 2,525 1992-2012 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico 12,509 14,507 14,754 13,971 15,502 16,296 1997-2012 Louisiana 6,496 4,021 4,336 4,578 6,302 NA 1967-2012 Louisiana Onshore 6,078 3,777 4,121 4,432 6,153 NA 1992-2012 Louisiana State Offshore 418 243 215 146 149 NA 1999-2012 New Mexico 929 803 481 1,586 4,360 12,259 1967-2012 Oklahoma 0 0 0 0 1967-2010 Texas 36,682 42,541 41,234 39,569 35,248 47,530 1967-2012 Texas Onshore 36,682 42,541 41,234 39,569 35,248 47,530 1992-2012

39

Natural Gas Vented and Flared  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6-2013 6-2013 Oklahoma NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Texas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Wyoming NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Other States Other States Total NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Alabama NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Arizona NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Arkansas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 California NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Colorado NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Florida NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Illinois NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Indiana NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Kansas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Kentucky NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Maryland NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Michigan NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Mississippi NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Missouri NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

40

The metallurgical integrity of the frit vent assembly diffusion bond  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Iridium alloy clad vent sets (CVSs) are now being made by Energy Systems at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. These CVSs are being made for the US Department of Energy`s (NE-53) General Purpose Heat Source- Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS-RTG) program, which is to supply electrical power for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration`s Cassini mission to Saturn. A GPHS-RTG has 72 CVSs. Each CVS encapsulates one {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel pellet. The helium gas produced from the alpha decay of the {sup 238}Pu is vented through a nominal 0.45-mm-diam hole in the vent cup of each CVS. A frit vent assembly that is electron beam welded over the vent hole allows helium gas to escape but prevents plutonia fines from exiting. The metallurgical integrity of frit vent assemblies produced by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) were compared with those produced earlier by EG&G-Mound Applied Technology, Inc. (EG&G-MAT). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) photographs were taken (at magnifications of from 126X to 1,000X) of the starting frit vent powder and the diffusion-bonded powder in finished frit vent assemblies produced by Energy Systems and EG&G-MAT. Frit vent assemblies also were metallographically prepared and visually examined/photographed at magnifications of from 50X to 1,000X. The SEM and metallographic examinations of the particle-to-particle and particle-to-foil component diffusion bonds indicated that the Energy Systems-produced and EG&G-MAT-produced frit vent assemblies have comparable metallurgical integrity. Statistical analysis of the Energy Systems production data shows that the frit vent manufacturing yield is 91%.

Ulrich, G.B. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States). Process Metallurgy Dept.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decorative vented gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Life and hydrothermal vents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life and hydrothermal vents Life and hydrothermal vents Name: williamh Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: Are there biological communities near hydrothermal vents in the ocean? Is there any life inside the hydrothermal vent? Replies: If the presence of microorganisms in hot springs and geysers are any indication, I am certain there is life inside hydrothermal vents. These heat loving organisms are termed "thermophiles" and thrive where other life dies. They are able to survive in extreme heat due to the unique way their proteins are synthesized. The May 1993 Discover has a special article on thermophiles. wizkid Life at high temperature became very interesting to molecular biologists recently. The enormously useful technique known as PCR, (polymerase chain reaction), by which very small amounts of rare DNA can be amplified to large concentrations (Jurassic Park!), depends on having a DNA polymerase (the enzyme that synthesizes complementary DNA strands during replication of chromosomes), that can work at high temperatures, or at least can survive repeated high temperature cycles. PCR depends on synthesis of DNA followed by forced separation of the daughter strands at high temperature, followed by new synthesis, to amplify DNA exponentially. At any rate, normal bacterial polymerase will not work because the high temperature cycles kill it. Enter the now infamous, patented Taq polymerase, isolated from Thermus aquaticus, a hot spring bacterium, which works after heating to up to 94 C! So knowledge of life at high temperature allowed molecular biologists to get PCR to work, with all its benefits in cloning very rare genes and amplifying small amounts of DNA for forensic work etc.

42

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

43

Vented target elements for use in an isotope-production reactor. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for producing tritium gas in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target material is placed in pins equipped with vents, and tritium gas is recovered from the coolant.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

44

Natural Gas Dry Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

45

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

46

Energy-Efficient Holiday Decorating Tips | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tips Energy-Efficient Holiday Decorating Tips December 19, 2012 - 10:36am Addthis Using LED lights for your holiday decorations can save you energy and money. | Photo courtesy of...

47

Implementation of vented fuel assemblies in the supercritical CO?-cooled fast reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis has been undertaken to investigate the utilization of fuel assembly venting in the reference design of the gas-cooled fast reactor under study as part of the larger research effort at MIT under Gen-IV NERI Project ...

McKee, Stephanie A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Transport characteristics across drum filter vents and polymer bags  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rate at which hydrogen (H {sub 2}) or a volatile organic compound (VOC) exits a layer of confinement in a vented waste drum is proportional to the concentration difference across the layer. The proportionality constant is the gas transport characteristic. A series of transport experiments were conducted to determine H{sub 2} and VOC transport characteristics across different drum filter vents and polymer bags. This report reviews the methods and results of past investigators in defining transport characteristics across filter vents and polymer bags, describes the apparatus and procedures used in these experiments, compares the reported and estimated transport characteristics with earlier results, and discusses the impact of changing the transport characteristic values used in model calculations.

Liekhus, K.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Reactor pressure vessel vented head  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell.

Sawabe, James K. (San Jose, CA)

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

50

Energy-Efficient Holiday Decorating Tips | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy-Efficient Holiday Decorating Tips Energy-Efficient Holiday Decorating Tips Energy-Efficient Holiday Decorating Tips December 19, 2012 - 10:36am Addthis Using LED lights for your holiday decorations can save you energy and money. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/peterspiro Using LED lights for your holiday decorations can save you energy and money. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/peterspiro Erik Hyrkas Erik Hyrkas Media Relations Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? You can save money on your holiday lighting while still enjoying a decorated household. With holidays almost upon us and home decorating to do, costs and energy savings should be on the brain. So as you put the finishing touches on that giant lighting display, be sure to read these energy-efficient holiday

51

Reactor pressure vessel vented head  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell. 6 figures.

Sawabe, J.K.

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

52

Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

143,457 166,909 165,360 165,928 209,439 212,848 1936-2012 143,457 166,909 165,360 165,928 209,439 212,848 1936-2012 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico 12,509 14,507 14,754 13,971 15,502 16,296 1997-2012 Alabama 2,372 1,801 2,495 2,617 3,491 NA 1967-2012 Alaska 6,458 10,023 6,481 10,173 10,966 11,769 1967-2012 Arizona 0 0 0 0 0 0 1971-2012 Arkansas 11 114 141 425 494 NA 1967-2012 California 1,879 2,127 2,501 2,790 2,424 NA 1967-2012 Colorado 1,333 1,501 1,411 1,242 1,291 NA 1967-2012 Florida 0 0 0 0 0 0 1971-2012 Illinois 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2012 Indiana 0 0 0 0 2003-2010 Kansas 363 373 353 323 307 NA 1967-2012 Kentucky 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2012 Louisiana 6,496 4,021 4,336 4,578 6,302 NA 1967-2012 Maryland 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2012 Michigan 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 NA 1967-2012

53

Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6-2013 6-2013 Alaska NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Arizona NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Arkansas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 California NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Colorado NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Florida NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Illinois NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Indiana NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Kansas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Kentucky NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Louisiana NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Maryland NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Michigan NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Mississippi NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Missouri NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Montana NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Nebraska NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Nevada NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 New Mexico NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013

54

Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

55

January 2010 Venting Flammable Liquid Storage Cabinets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unless You Have To According to NFPA 30, Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code Handbook, venting exhaust system using rigid metal piping equivalent or better than that used in construction of the cabinet. Cabinets shall NOT be vented directly into the fume hood, through the fume hood work surface. Piping must

Kolner, Brian H.

56

Extraction Loss of Natural Gas at Processing Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Withdrawals from Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Repressuring Vented and Flared...

57

Monitoring arrangement for vented nuclear fuel elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a nuclear fuel reactor core, fuel elements are arranged in a closely packed hexagonal configuration, each fuel element having diametrically opposed vents permitting 180.degree. rotation of the fuel elements to counteract bowing. A grid plate engages the fuel elements and forms passages for communicating sets of three, four or six individual vents with respective monitor lines in order to communicate vented radioactive gases from the fuel elements to suitable monitor means in a manner readily permitting detection of leakage in individual fuel elements.

Campana, Robert J. (Solana Beach, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Multiwalled carbon nanotubes decorated with cobalt oxide nanoparticles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) synthesized by spray pyrolysis were decorated with cobalt oxide nanoparticles using a simple synthesis route. This wet chemistry method yielded nanoparticles randomly anchored to the surface of the nanotubes by decomposition ...

D. G. Larrude; P. Ayala; M. E. H. Maia da Costa; F. L. Freire

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Natural Gas Dry Production (Annual Supply & Disposition)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG...

60

Bonded carbon or ceramic fiber composite filter vent for radioactive waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbon bonded carbon fiber composites as well as ceramic or carbon bonded ceramic fiber composites are very useful as filters which can separate particulate matter from gas streams entraining the same. These filters have particular application to the filtering of radioactive particles, e.g., they can act as vents for containers of radioactive waste material.

Brassell, Gilbert W. (13237 W. 8th Ave., Golden, CO 80401); Brugger, Ronald P. (Lafayette, CO)

1985-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decorative vented gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Composition of gases vented from a condenser  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Designers of systems that involve condensers often need to predict the amount of process vapor that accompanies the noncondensable gases that are vented from the condensers. An approximation is given that appears to provide, in many cases, reasonably accurate values for the mole ratio of process vapor to noncondensable gases in the vented mixture. The approximation is particularly applicable to flash and direct-contact power systems for geothermal brines and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). More regorous relationships are available for exceptional cases.

Lyon, R.N.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Vented Cavity Radiant Barrier Assembly And Method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vented cavity radiant barrier assembly (2) includes a barrier (12), typically a PV module, having inner and outer surfaces (18, 22). A support assembly (14) is secured to the barrier and extends inwardly from the inner surface of the barrier to a building surface (14) creating a vented cavity (24) between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. A low emissivity element (20) is mounted at or between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. At least part of the cavity exit (30) is higher than the cavity entrance (28) to promote cooling air flow through the cavity.

Dinwoodie, Thomas L. (Piedmont, CA); Jackaway, Adam D. (Berkeley, CA)

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

63

Hydrothermal vent complexes associated with sill intrusionsin sedimentarybasins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 477 Discussion on structure and evolution of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Karoo Basin, South the paper by Svensen et al. (2006) on South African hydrothermal vents within the Karoo Basin, particularly for their interest in our paper on hydrothermal vent complexes in the Karoo Basin (Svensen et al. 2006). Based

Podladchikov, Yuri

64

Preoperational test report, vent building ventilation system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This represents a preoperational test report for Vent Building Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) for the W-030 Ventilation Building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

Clifton, F.T.

1997-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

65

Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed Extraction Loss Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports...

66

Comparative Study of Vented vs. Unvented Crawlspaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been a significant amount of research in the area of building energy efficiency and durability. However, well-documented quantitative information on the impact of crawlspaces on the performance of residential structures is lacking. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the effects of two crawlspace strategies on the whole-house performance of a pair of houses in a mixed humid climate. These houses were built with advanced envelope systems to provide energy savings of 50% or more compared to traditional 2010 new construction. One crawlspace contains insulated walls and is sealed and semi-conditioned. The other is a traditional vented crawlspace with insulation in the crawlspace ceiling. The vented (traditional) crawlspace contains fiberglass batts installed in the floor chase cavities above the crawl, while the sealed and insulated crawlspace contains foil-faced polyisocyanurate foam insulation on the interior side of the masonry walls. Various sensors to measure temperatures, heat flux through crawlspace walls and ceiling, and relative humidity were installed in the two crawlspaces. Data from these sensors have been analyzed to compare the performance of the two crawlspace designs. The analysis results indicated that the sealed and insulated crawlspace design is better than the traditional vented crawlspace in the mixed humid climate.

Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Externality Regulation in Oil and Gas Encyclopedia of Energy, Natural Resource, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Externality Regulation in Oil and Gas Chapter 56 Encyclopedia of Energy, Natural Resource regulating well spacing, preventing of flaring or venting of natural gas, regulating production from wells oil/gas and oil/water ratios, and no-flaring and venting rules for natural gas. 1 Introduction

Garousi, Vahid

68

Why Sequence Bacteria in Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vents?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bacteria in Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vents? The project focuses on using single-cell genomics to sequence nearly a dozen genomes of uncultivated bacteria that are found in...

69

Multi-slit self-sealing ignition-arrester battery vent  

SciTech Connect

A vented battery cap is provided which is adapted to engage at least one of a plurality of fill holes in an automotive storage battery or similar lead--acid battery and which has pressure release means for venting the combustible gases produced within that storage battery under conditions, such as overcharge conditions, into the atmosphere. The pressure release means comprise a plurality of extremely narrow slits having widths in the order of 0.003 to 0.005 of an inch. The remainder of the battery cap is tightly sealed to prevent any extraneous leaks of battery gases received from the automotive battery from leaking into the atmosphere. The slits are so constructed to facilitate the safe expulsion of any volume of gas normally produced by an automotive storage battery, while virtually eliminating the likelihood that ignition of gases within the atmosphere will result in explosive consequences either within the battery cap or within the battery itself.

Heiser, J.I.; Erb, E.M.

1978-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

70

Staged venting of fuel cell system during rapid shutdown  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A venting methodology and system for rapid shutdown of a fuel cell apparatus of the type used in a vehicle propulsion system. H.sub.2 and air flows to the fuel cell stack are slowly bypassed to the combustor upon receipt of a rapid shutdown command. The bypass occurs over a period of time (for example one to five seconds) using conveniently-sized bypass valves. Upon receipt of the rapid shutdown command, the anode inlet of the fuel cell stack is instantaneously vented to a remote vent to remove all H.sub.2 from the stack. Airflow to the cathode inlet of the fuel cell stack gradually diminishes over the bypass period, and when the airflow bypass is complete the cathode inlet is also instantaneously vented to a remote vent to eliminate pressure differentials across the stack.

Clingerman, Bruce J. (Palmyra, NY); Doan, Tien M. (Columbia, MD); Keskula, Donald H. (Webster, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

A new hydrothermal scenario for the 2006 Lusi eruption, Indonesia. Insights from gas geochemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acquired a wide set of data of molecular and isotopic composition of gas sampled in several Lusi vents, in the surrounding mud volcanoes, in the closest natural gas field (Wunut), and in the hydrothermal ventsA new hydrothermal scenario for the 2006 Lusi eruption, Indonesia. Insights from gas geochemistry

Mazzini, Adriano

72

California Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 97 103 109 107 107 104 108 107 104 108 106 108 1997 111 113 85 88 213 140 121 108 122 171 175 144 1998 235 192 246 157 166 129 173 167 152 132 127 76 1999 165 135 173 110 116 91 121 117 106 92 89 53 2000 266 218 279 178 188 146 196 189 172 149 144 86 2001 207 169 217 138 146 114 152 146 134 116 111 67 2002 324 265 340 216 228 178 238 230 209 181 175 105 2003 266 228 237 343 405 431 342 333 276 316 593 170 2004 217 186 193 280 331 352 279 272 225 258 484 138 2005 143 123 127 184 218 232 184 179 148 170 319 91 2006 105 90 94 136 161 171 136 132 109 125 235 67

73

North Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 232 193 232 176 230 258 269 324 298 334 213 199 1997 229 264 293 280 303 313 258 301 327 330 321 315 1998 308 301 334 380 418 459 435 425 310 328 345 330 1999 231 194 245 204 202 206 231 307 232 227 202 212 2000 225 218 226 237 257 271 292 327 293 333 311 300 2001 269 246 276 255 245 263 289 283 250 260 281 249 2002 231 221 210 235 250 238 258 245 257 222 210 214 2003 196 167 193 174 167 161 158 171 164 181 168 170 2004 197 157 166 150 211 140 183 209 187 247 208 143 2005 175 200 247 273 271 299 324 339 300 274 283 275 2006 528 485 550 541 582 540 566 599 615 735 724 995

74

Louisiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 1,788 1,684 1,571 1,593 1,807 1,690 2,042 1,781 1,437 1,867 1,649 1,505 1992 1,707 1,639 1,564 1,775 1,752 2,153 1,623 1,737 1,907 1,568 1,595 1,518 1993 1,588 1,460 1,500 1,708 1,614 1,590 1,778 1,711 2,014 1,500 1,482 1,636 1994 1,597 1,468 1,509 1,717 1,623 1,599 1,788 1,720 2,025 1,509 1,490 1,645 1995 1,519 1,396 1,435 1,633 1,544 1,521 1,701 1,636 1,926 1,435 1,418 1,565 1996 1,545 1,443 1,514 1,471 1,528 1,939 2,042 2,033 1,985 1,930 2,083 2,192 1997 1,991 1,798 1,991 1,874 1,913 1,751 1,813 1,841 1,785 1,777 1,674 1,720 1998 1,775 1,602 1,775 1,670 1,705 1,561 1,616 1,641 1,590 1,583 1,492 1,533

75

Nevada Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

76

Indiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

77

California Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 97 103 109 107 107 104 108 107 104 108 106 108 1997 111 113 85 88 213 140 121 108 122 171 175 144 1998 235 192 246 157 166 129 173 167 152 132 127 76 1999 165 135 173 110 116 91 121 117 106 92 89 53 2000 266 218 279 178 188 146 196 189 172 149 144 86 2001 207 169 217 138 146 114 152 146 134 116 111 67 2002 324 265 340 216 228 178 238 230 209 181 175 105 2003 266 228 237 343 405 431 342 333 276 316 593 170 2004 217 186 193 280 331 352 279 272 225 258 484 138 2005 143 123 127 184 218 232 184 179 148 170 319 91 2006 105 90 94 136 161 171 136 132 109 125 235 67

78

Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 3,000 2,906 2,802 1970's 2,852 2,926 5,506 7,664 5,259 1,806 1,048 691 469 560 1980's 2,439...

79

Kansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

889 846 831 783 861 801 1980's 737 641 431 436 467 514 450 458 578 509 1990's 557 628 642 670 715 723 716 680 605 555 2000's 527 481 456 420 398 378 365 363 373 353 2010's 323 307...

80

Natural Gas Vented and Flared - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Beginning with ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decorative vented gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Montana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 32 38 34 40 43 27 63 59 60 71 67 62 1997 67 60 71 62 66 83 72 92 47 118 186 195 1998 189 147 159 177 107 76 155 129 136 0 0 0 1999 47 54 50 52 56 58 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 43 39 41 44 49 44 44 36 36 39 43 28 2001 36 32 40 35 36 36 35 33 34 32 28 27 2002 30 25 27 31 31 30 28 32 30 29 28 27 2003 34 28 30 33 34 36 32 32 29 30 43 43 2004 49 41 37 81 85 91 97 125 135 150 125 55 2005 42 36 52 46 57 57 60 55 52 56 51 66 2006 74 75 73 86 111 99 94 87 117 119 110 127 2007 154 105 167 146 404 370 357 396 406 350 423 442 2008 441 459 496 511 599 506 583 685 659 668 615 642

82

Kansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 63 63 63 61 62 57 57 55 56 58 59 61 1997 60 55 60 59 62 60 58 54 50 54 54 54 1998 55 50 54 52 52 52 45 48 48 51 49 50 1999 52 44 47 46 46 47 46 46 44 45 44 46 2000 47 43 45 50 45 44 45 45 42 42 41 41 2001 42 37 41 40 41 39 41 41 39 40 39 40 2002 40 36 40 38 40 39 39 39 36 37 36 37 2003 36 32 36 35 36 34 36 36 35 35 34 34 2004 34 32 34 33 34 33 35 34 33 33 32 32 2005 32 30 32 32 32 30 32 33 31 32 31 31 2006 30 27 30 30 30 30 31 32 31 30 31 32 2007 30 27 30 30 30 30 31 32 30 30 31 32 2008 31 28 31 31 31 31 32 33 31 30 32 32 2009 29 26 29 29 29 29 30 31 30 29 30 31

83

South Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 384 350 382 380 382 376 405 418 397 439 445 486 1992 455 445 448 468 497 447 465 459 438 450 440 465 1993 463 417 484 453 478 459 497 500 495 545 507 435 1994 385 324 383 373 409 424 506 590 595 591 601 625 1995 640 570 637 609 617 602 617 637 578 526 540 549 1996 533 516 618 620 662 658 680 685 650 689 657 669 1997 128 123 129 135 139 134 135 145 143 146 140 143 1998 145 134 148 145 129 114 122 121 118 119 114 117 1999 147 136 151 148 132 116 124 124 120 122 116 119 2000 147 135 151 147 154 142 163 157 148 157 152 153 2001 165 148 169 172 179 173 173 170 172 174 172 175

84

Michigan Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 1997 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 1998 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 1999 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2000 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2001 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2002 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2003 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2004 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2005 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2006 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277

85

New York Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1993 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1994 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

86

Missouri Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

87

Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 2,478 2,147 2,113 2,353 3,203 2,833 3,175 2,684 2,296 2,457 2,750 2,150 1992 1,337 1,107 1,379 1,254 1,439 1,833 2,083 1,970 2,009 1,630 1,835 1,812 1993 3,276 3,172 2,618 2,863 2,492 2,286 2,563 2,471 2,865 3,708 2,934 3,238 1994 3,225 3,330 3,515 3,403 3,959 4,686 3,429 2,766 3,188 3,543 3,122 3,871 1995 3,543 3,658 3,862 3,738 4,350 5,148 3,768 3,039 3,503 3,893 3,430 4,252 1996 3,461 3,537 3,340 3,922 3,459 4,520 4,339 3,794 3,556 3,781 3,809 3,865 1997 4,840 4,113 3,927 4,679 5,610 3,723 4,139 3,845 4,287 3,430 2,237 3,092 1998 2,621 2,227 2,126 2,533 3,038 2,016 2,241 2,082 2,321 1,857 1,211 1,674

88

New Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 236 220 240 230 241 229 217 221 212 215 216 223 1997 241 220 245 236 243 225 235 239 231 240 217 213 1998 231 211 235 227 233 215 226 229 221 230 209 205 1999 232 210 231 226 225 229 230 235 224 235 229 212 2000 289 245 293 242 287 251 285 246 240 278 233 242 2001 249 226 245 237 213 175 179 384 317 237 505 288 2002 304 207 214 254 269 249 266 263 247 216 202 159 2003 179 154 198 210 234 226 221 285 199 193 127 121 2004 124 128 292 275 327 338 333 302 296 454 334 322 2005 286 279 290 253 291 295 299 311 310 310 303 306 2006 270 296 252 247 242 249 251 246 234 241 236 105

89

Nebraska Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2003 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2004 2 1 1 2 2 1 3 2 2 2 2 2 2005 4 3 2 2 2 1 2 3 2 3 3 3 2006 5 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2007 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

90

Mississippi Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 217 199 223 219 237 234 239 235 213 224 218 220 1997 214 202 214 209 221 223 218 242 235 258 250 256 1998 250 222 245 225 233 220 238 232 235 234 227 236 1999 230 217 247 232 239 233 234 231 226 223 214 219 2000 205 161 204 193 213 198 210 214 205 223 216 235 2001 236 216 234 241 248 236 265 266 242 260 251 267 2002 259 299 266 255 266 262 267 274 276 280 267 298 2003 293 261 282 277 284 285 244 304 306 323 305 337 2004 319 321 331 325 340 324 322 323 287 306 289 326 2005 411 296 348 330 342 320 347 322 319 360 339 210 2006 349 331 328 359 370 362 399 398 394 423 425 439

91

Kansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 63 63 63 61 62 57 57 55 56 58 59 61 1997 60 55 60 59 62 60 58 54 50 54 54 54 1998 55 50 54 52 52 52 45 48 48 51 49 50 1999 52 44 47 46 46 47 46 46 44 45 44 46 2000 47 43 45 50 45 44 45 45 42 42 41 41 2001 42 37 41 40 41 39 41 41 39 40 39 40 2002 40 36 40 38 40 39 39 39 36 37 36 37 2003 36 32 36 35 36 34 36 36 35 35 34 34 2004 34 32 34 33 34 33 35 34 33 33 32 32 2005 32 30 32 32 32 30 32 33 31 32 31 31 2006 30 27 30 30 30 30 31 32 31 30 31 32 2007 30 27 30 30 30 30 31 32 30 30 31 32 2008 31 28 31 31 31 31 32 33 31 30 32 32 2009 29 26 29 29 29 29 30 31 30 29 30 31

92

Oregon Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2013 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

93

Maryland Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

94

West Virginia Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

95

Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 646 1995 696 4,590 4,767 4,382 4,389 4,603 4,932 5,137 1996 5,088 4,788 2,269 2,009 2,564 1,687 1,695 1,724 1,229 1,255 1,547 1,422 1997 2,411 2,381 1,594 942 490 1,391 1,344 1,185 1,114 1,130 1,058 1,750 1998 909 697 700 689 1,194 1,161 2,299 2,625 2,235 2,226 2,258 2,373 1999 1,462 1,480 993 1,254 1,131 1,316 904 776 1,291 1,249 894 1,084 2000 158 65 69 100 91 626 87 119 185 220 123 99 2001 129 98 83 55 49 47 79 274 242 254 469 68 2002 167 68 110 123 71 55 54 89 37 40 38 102 2003 39 47 66 69 67 52 66 80 67 56 48 50 2004 48 56 57 45 39 43 81 73 59 89 51 46

96

Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 2,478 2,147 2,113 2,353 3,203 2,833 3,175 2,684 2,296 2,457 2,750 2,150 1992 1,337 1,107 1,379 1,254 1,439 1,833 2,083 1,970 2,009 1,630 1,835 1,812 1993 3,276 3,172 2,618 2,863 2,492 2,286 2,563 2,471 2,865 3,708 2,934 3,238 1994 3,225 3,330 3,515 3,403 3,959 4,686 3,429 2,766 3,188 3,543 3,122 3,871 1995 3,543 3,658 3,862 3,738 4,350 5,148 3,768 3,039 3,503 3,893 3,430 4,252 1996 3,461 3,537 3,340 3,922 3,459 4,520 4,339 3,794 3,556 3,781 3,809 3,865 1997 4,840 4,113 3,927 4,679 5,610 3,723 4,139 3,845 4,287 3,430 2,237 3,092 1998 2,621 2,227 2,126 2,533 3,038 2,016 2,241 2,082 2,321 1,857 1,211 1,674

97

Arkansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 23 13 12 7 13 28 28 30 36 9 5 5 1992 33 29 32 31 30 29 30 30 30 32 32 33 1993 36 32 35 33 34 32 33 33 33 35 35 37 1994 27 25 27 25 26 25 25 26 25 27 27 28 1995 27 24 27 25 26 25 25 26 25 27 27 28 1996 17 23 8 0 31 45 28 29 25 19 25 21 1997 5 0 6 7 7 8 13 32 16 4 19 17 1998 2 0 2 2 2 3 4 11 5 1 6 6 1999 607 269 535 439 561 494 583 216 469 689 668 472 2000 1 0 1 16 21 17 23 23 27 23 24 30 2001 2 1 2 33 45 35 48 48 57 47 50 63 2002 12 15 29 41 29 25 27 24 25 17 1 5 2003 31 37 34 36 35 29 23 33 28 33 24 11 2004 28 26 24 23 21 16 18 17 17 17 17 16

98

Michigan Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 1997 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 1998 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 1999 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2000 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2001 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2002 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2003 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2004 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2005 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2006 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277

99

Alabama Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 194 200 140 132 106 82 205 152 157 192 159 134 1997 134 110 90 112 98 125 119 114 118 91 227 224 1998 125 101 87 104 91 117 114 112 112 86 206 206 1999 92 73 67 77 67 87 87 90 85 64 145 150 2000 130 149 130 112 75 80 120 97 78 98 88 105 2001 91 72 78 76 87 81 73 94 108 86 93 101 2002 122 135 99 106 129 94 107 98 103 100 103 134 2003 116 143 147 108 141 141 145 126 127 139 138 140 2004 171 119 130 154 201 208 395 182 179 207 188 181 2005 213 183 202 264 256 191 168 151 174 167 249 267 2006 271 273 301 303 289 302 383 356 262 305 242 238 2007 227 238 283 234 243 187 185 174 155 134 160 152

100

Louisiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 1,788 1,684 1,571 1,593 1,807 1,690 2,042 1,781 1,437 1,867 1,649 1,505 1992 1,707 1,639 1,564 1,775 1,752 2,153 1,623 1,737 1,907 1,568 1,595 1,518 1993 1,588 1,460 1,500 1,708 1,614 1,590 1,778 1,711 2,014 1,500 1,482 1,636 1994 1,597 1,468 1,509 1,717 1,623 1,599 1,788 1,720 2,025 1,509 1,490 1,645 1995 1,519 1,396 1,435 1,633 1,544 1,521 1,701 1,636 1,926 1,435 1,418 1,565 1996 1,545 1,443 1,514 1,471 1,528 1,939 2,042 2,033 1,985 1,930 2,083 2,192 1997 1,991 1,798 1,991 1,874 1,913 1,751 1,813 1,841 1,785 1,777 1,674 1,720 1998 1,775 1,602 1,775 1,670 1,705 1,561 1,616 1,641 1,590 1,583 1,492 1,533

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decorative vented gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Arkansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 23 13 12 7 13 28 28 30 36 9 5 5 1992 33 29 32 31 30 29 30 30 30 32 32 33 1993 36 32 35 33 34 32 33 33 33 35 35 37 1994 27 25 27 25 26 25 25 26 25 27 27 28 1995 27 24 27 25 26 25 25 26 25 27 27 28 1996 17 23 8 0 31 45 28 29 25 19 25 21 1997 5 0 6 7 7 8 13 32 16 4 19 17 1998 2 0 2 2 2 3 4 11 5 1 6 6 1999 607 269 535 439 561 494 583 216 469 689 668 472 2000 1 0 1 16 21 17 23 23 27 23 24 30 2001 2 1 2 33 45 35 48 48 57 47 50 63 2002 12 15 29 41 29 25 27 24 25 17 1 5 2003 31 37 34 36 35 29 23 33 28 33 24 11 2004 28 26 24 23 21 16 18 17 17 17 17 16

102

Mississippi Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 217 199 223 219 237 234 239 235 213 224 218 220 1997 214 202 214 209 221 223 218 242 235 258 250 256 1998 250 222 245 225 233 220 238 232 235 234 227 236 1999 230 217 247 232 239 233 234 231 226 223 214 219 2000 205 161 204 193 213 198 210 214 205 223 216 235 2001 236 216 234 241 248 236 265 266 242 260 251 267 2002 259 299 266 255 266 262 267 274 276 280 267 298 2003 293 261 282 277 284 285 244 304 306 323 305 337 2004 319 321 331 325 340 324 322 323 287 306 289 326 2005 411 296 348 330 342 320 347 322 319 360 339 210 2006 349 331 328 359 370 362 399 398 394 423 425 439

103

Wyoming Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 5,712 5,109 6,529 6,408 6,948 6,430 7,035 7,792 7,475 7,837 7,649 7,930 1992 7,430 7,009 7,475 7,039 5,797 7,809 8,770 8,218 7,442 7,505 7,662 7,580 1993 10,674 10,789 10,568 10,480 11,572 12,350 10,996 8,163 9,912 10,526 9,870 10,463 1994 11,590 11,569 11,181 10,129 9,324 10,365 10,174 10,394 10,578 10,635 10,629 10,155 1995 13,046 11,867 11,628 12,102 14,419 12,911 12,917 10,472 12,302 12,592 11,896 12,569 1996 13,000 12,042 12,951 12,509 12,793 4,939 12,847 13,190 12,355 13,227 12,716 12,883 1997 12,874 11,288 12,834 11,829 11,169 9,136 13,161 11,362 11,217 11,213 11,457 12,607 1998 753 689 750 718 689 701 717 729 724 764 745 732

104

South Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 384 350 382 380 382 376 405 418 397 439 445 486 1992 455 445 448 468 497 447 465 459 438 450 440 465 1993 463 417 484 453 478 459 497 500 495 545 507 435 1994 385 324 383 373 409 424 506 590 595 591 601 625 1995 640 570 637 609 617 602 617 637 578 526 540 549 1996 533 516 618 620 662 658 680 685 650 689 657 669 1997 128 123 129 135 139 134 135 145 143 146 140 143 1998 145 134 148 145 129 114 122 121 118 119 114 117 1999 147 136 151 148 132 116 124 124 120 122 116 119 2000 147 135 151 147 154 142 163 157 148 157 152 153 2001 165 148 169 172 179 173 173 170 172 174 172 175

105

Montana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 32 38 34 40 43 27 63 59 60 71 67 62 1997 67 60 71 62 66 83 72 92 47 118 186 195 1998 189 147 159 177 107 76 155 129 136 0 0 0 1999 47 54 50 52 56 58 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 43 39 41 44 49 44 44 36 36 39 43 28 2001 36 32 40 35 36 36 35 33 34 32 28 27 2002 30 25 27 31 31 30 28 32 30 29 28 27 2003 34 28 30 33 34 36 32 32 29 30 43 43 2004 49 41 37 81 85 91 97 125 135 150 125 55 2005 42 36 52 46 57 57 60 55 52 56 51 66 2006 74 75 73 86 111 99 94 87 117 119 110 127 2007 154 105 167 146 404 370 357 396 406 350 423 442 2008 441 459 496 511 599 506 583 685 659 668 615 642

106

Alabama Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 194 200 140 132 106 82 205 152 157 192 159 134 1997 134 110 90 112 98 125 119 114 118 91 227 224 1998 125 101 87 104 91 117 114 112 112 86 206 206 1999 92 73 67 77 67 87 87 90 85 64 145 150 2000 130 149 130 112 75 80 120 97 78 98 88 105 2001 91 72 78 76 87 81 73 94 108 86 93 101 2002 122 135 99 106 129 94 107 98 103 100 103 134 2003 116 143 147 108 141 141 145 126 127 139 138 140 2004 171 119 130 154 201 208 395 182 179 207 188 181 2005 213 183 202 264 256 191 168 151 174 167 249 267 2006 271 273 301 303 289 302 383 356 262 305 242 238 2007 227 238 283 234 243 187 185 174 155 134 160 152

107

New Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 236 220 240 230 241 229 217 221 212 215 216 223 1997 241 220 245 236 243 225 235 239 231 240 217 213 1998 231 211 235 227 233 215 226 229 221 230 209 205 1999 232 210 231 226 225 229 230 235 224 235 229 212 2000 289 245 293 242 287 251 285 246 240 278 233 242 2001 249 226 245 237 213 175 179 384 317 237 505 288 2002 304 207 214 254 269 249 266 263 247 216 202 159 2003 179 154 198 210 234 226 221 285 199 193 127 121 2004 124 128 292 275 327 338 333 302 296 454 334 322 2005 286 279 290 253 291 295 299 311 310 310 303 306 2006 270 296 252 247 242 249 251 246 234 241 236 105

108

California Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 3,565 2,780 3,074 1970's 2,499 575 1,999 1,560 1,537 1,288 1,038 960 1,253 1980's 1,386 1,907...

109

Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1960's: 129,403: 124,584: 111,499: 1970's: 100,305: 70,222: 59,821: 36,133: 34,431 ...

110

Arkansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,153 869 471 1980's 394 552 973 973 2,225 824 1,760 1,068 1,110 1,110 1990's 284 208 371 409 313 313 270 134 45 6,005 2000's 206 431 251 354 241 241 12 11 114 141 2010's 425 494...

111

Arkansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

241: 241: 12: 11: 114: 141: 2010's: 425: 494-= No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

112

Michigan Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,861 1,120 808 1970's 809 1,032 1,117 1,268 1,612 2,042 2,291 2,736 2,960 1980's 3,433 3,310...

113

Colorado Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,656 1,514 1,326 1970's 7,126 2,843 4,758 3,008 2,957 2,516 1,836 1,528 1,108 1,199 1980's 796...

114

Colorado Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 112 77 78 91 100 89 100 106 97 121 155 102 1997 173 188 180 168 228 187 188 102 189 192 185 199 1998 92 166 98 92 98 115 222 83 82 92 95 10 1999 70 71 70 65 68 66 66 66 63 67 65 64 2000 67 64 68 65 68 66 67 68 65 69 69 70 2001 77 69 75 71 73 74 73 78 76 79 78 83 2002 83 75 84 79 79 77 79 80 72 80 72 75 2003 96 86 95 92 95 92 94 96 94 98 95 90 2004 99 89 98 94 98 95 97 99 97 101 98 93 2005 103 94 103 99 103 99 102 104 102 106 102 98 2006 110 99 109 105 109 105 108 111 109 113 109 104 2007 113 103 113 109 113 109 112 114 112 116 112 107 2008 128 116 127 122 127 123 126 129 126 131 127 121

115

West Virginia Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

116

Oregon Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2012 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

117

North Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 232 193 232 176 230 258 269 324 298 334 213 199 1997 229 264 293 280 303 313 258 301 327 330 321 315 1998 308 301 334 380 418 459 435 425 310 328 345 330 1999 231 194 245 204 202 206 231 307 232 227 202 212 2000 225 218 226 237 257 271 292 327 293 333 311 300 2001 269 246 276 255 245 263 289 283 250 260 281 249 2002 231 221 210 235 250 238 258 245 257 222 210 214 2003 196 167 193 174 167 161 158 171 164 181 168 170 2004 197 157 166 150 211 140 183 209 187 247 208 143 2005 175 200 247 273 271 299 324 339 300 274 283 275 2006 528 485 550 541 582 540 566 599 615 735 724 995

118

Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 646 1995 696 4,590 4,767 4,382 4,389 4,603 4,932 5,137 1996 5,088 4,788 2,269 2,009 2,564 1,687 1,695 1,724 1,229 1,255 1,547 1,422 1997 2,411 2,381 1,594 942 490 1,391 1,344 1,185 1,114 1,130 1,058 1,750 1998 909 697 700 689 1,194 1,161 2,299 2,625 2,235 2,226 2,258 2,373 1999 1,462 1,480 993 1,254 1,131 1,316 904 776 1,291 1,249 894 1,084 2000 158 65 69 100 91 626 87 119 185 220 123 99 2001 129 98 83 55 49 47 79 274 242 254 469 68 2002 167 68 110 123 71 55 54 89 37 40 38 102 2003 39 47 66 69 67 52 66 80 67 56 48 50 2004 48 56 57 45 39 43 81 73 59 89 51 46

119

New York Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1993 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1994 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

120

Alaska Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 815 672 921 1,101 820 914 1,257 828 750 843 991 873 1992 1,627 880 1,087 827 1,093 902 1,323 1,401 1,859 1,015 1,082 1,001 1993 1,044 2,207 1,408 2,149 2,273 4,052 2,251 1,323 1,734 1,557 906 1,581 1994 615 1,300 829 1,266 1,338 2,386 1,325 779 1,021 917 534 931 1995 858 547 835 883 1,574 874 514 674 605 615 1996 682 532 552 569 588 618 691 545 634 560 528 570 1997 798 623 646 666 687 723 808 637 741 654 618 666 1998 788 615 639 658 679 715 799 630 733 647 610 658 1999 685 535 555 572 590 621 694 547 636 562 530 572 2000 728 568 590 608 627 660 738 582 677 597 564 608

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decorative vented gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Indiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

122

South Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1960's: 0: 0: 0: 1970's: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 4: 5: 5: 5: 1980's: 5: 52: 54: 85: 165: 194: 140 ...

123

New Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 5,992 5,987 4,058 1970's 2,909 2,823 5,696 3,791 1,227 1,642 1,519 5,065 8,163 4,636 1980's...

124

SourceGas- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Arkansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

SourceGas offers various incentives for high efficiency home heating and water heating equipment. Rebates are available for the purchase of direct vent wall furnaces, standard gas furnaces,...

125

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

126

Gas Explosion Tests on Con Edison's Prototype Covers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an account of continuing research by ConEdison and EPRI to address issues related to manhole events caused by the accumulation of gases in underground structures. It summarizes the results of gas explosion tests performed in 2006 and 2007 on prototype rectangular steel vented and composite vented covers for secondary boxes and new Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliant round cast iron vented Roman Stone covers for manholes.

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

127

Final Report on Explosion Tests of Clogged Vented Covers for Con Edison at Lenox  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of vented manhole covers is a potential way of diminishing the severity of explosive events, but the vents in the covers often become blocked by debris. Manhole covers with blocked vents performed in much the same way as non-vented covers in explosion tests conducted at EPRI's Lenox, Massachusetts facility.

2007-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

128

Assessment of Literature Related to Combustion Appliance Venting Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of Literature Related to Combustion Appliance Venting Systems Assessment of Literature Related to Combustion Appliance Venting Systems Title Assessment of Literature Related to Combustion Appliance Venting Systems Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5798E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Rapp, Vi H., Brett C. Singer, J. Chris Stratton, and Craig P. Wray Date Published 06/2012 Abstract In many residential building retrofit programs, air tightening to increase energy efficiency is constrained by concerns about related impacts on the safety of naturally vented combustion appliances. Tighter housing units more readily depressurize when exhaust equipment is operated, making combustion appliances more prone to backdraft or spillage. Several test methods purportedly assess the potential for depressurization-induced backdrafting and spillage, but these tests are not robustly reliable and repeatable

129

Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And Zones Of High Heat Flow In The...

130

Use a Vent Condenser to Recover Flash Steam Energy (Revised)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This revised ITP tip sheet on vent condenser to recover flash steam energy provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

Not Available

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: VentAir 62  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VentAir 62 VentAir 62 VentAir 62 logo. A ventilation airflow calculator that allows easy, accurate compliance with ASHRAE Standard 62-89. The program automates the cumbersome calculations presented by the Standard's Equation 6-1. The Windows-based program helps building designers design multiple-space ventilation systems that meet the requirements of the Standard. This tool analyzes space and system information from the VAV terminal and air handler unit schedules, calculates ventilation airflow requirements (space minimums and system-level required minimum), and provides additional or revised information for the VAV and AHU schedules. Keywords ventilation design, ASHRAE Standard 62 Validation/Testing N/A Expertise Required Knowledge of ASHRAE Standard 62 requirements and ventilation design.

132

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

133

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

134

Vent Stack Liquid N2 RTD Temperature Sensor  

SciTech Connect

This engineering note documents the installation of two temperature sensing RTD's in the BC's. Previously, the temperature sensing device used in all three cryostats consisted of a FNAL designed liquid sensing probe (see EN-168, and drawing ME-273505). This device was necessary because of the concern that overfilling LN2 into the main vent line during cooldown could create an undesirable back pressure on the relief valves or rupture disks. This could possibly hinder the relieving of argon gas at the required flow rate in a safety situation. The probe was installed on the CC, and has been operating perfectly, therefore, this probe will not be changed. Figure 1 shows the location of TS232E, the CC liquid sensing probe. Note that the probe is located downstream of the condenser outlet valve (PV210N), therefore, it effectively operates under atmospheric pressure. On the BC's, however, the probe was originally installed at a different location, upstream of the condenser outlet valve (PV110N or PV310N). This resulted in the probe effectively sensing the condenser pressure, which varied from approximately 30 psia to 60 psia during cooldown. The changing pressure meant that the corresponding temperature at which liquid appeared also changed. The probe then became inaccurate, especially at higher condenser pressures, when the probe would be fail to trip at the higher liquid temperature. The solution was to replace the original probe with an RTD. This involved using the PLC to compare the temperature sensed by the RTD to the liquid saturation temperature, calculated using the measured condenser pressure. A formula was created to calculate the saturation temperature from the condenser pressure. This formula was derived by curve fitting points taken from the NBS Technical Note 129 for nitrogen. A 2nd order equation was used to fit the points, since the accuracy was not very important for temperature comparison. The entire equation was then shifted so that the curve was above all of the actual points. This was done to insure that the formula would provide higher temperatures, so the comparison to the RTD would be conservative, switching before the temperature reached saturation. Figure 2 shows the curve used to fit the data points. The lower curve is the actual data, and the higher curve is the formula to be used. Using the formula derived, the PLC calculates a conservative saturation temperature from the condenser pressure. The condenser pressure is measured by PT110N or PT310N, on the ECN and ECS, respectively. The transmitters are Rosemount 0-75 psia pressure transmitters. The PLC then compares the calculated temperature to the measured temperature from the RTD's, EIl32E and EI332E, which are Omega platinum RTD probes, model PR-14-2-100-1/4-12-E. If the measured temperature drops below the calculated saturation temperature, an alarm signals on the view page, and the PLC automatically closes the two inlet condenser valves (PV 101N and PV102N, or PV301N and PV302N). As a final note, there are various advantages and disadvantages to using the RTD's instead of the original probe. The advantages are that the RTD's provide constant monitoring of the temperature, whereas the probe was basically designed as a switch. The RTD's are more accurate in that they can respond over the range of the condenser pressure. The probe was designed to operate under atmospheric pressure. The only disadvantage of the RTD's is that they sense temperature, therefore, they cannot distinguish saturated GN2 from liquid, while the probe was designed specifically to do so. Overall, however, the RTD's provide an acceptable solution to the problem of liquid sensing in the vent line. Figure 3 shows the final location of the RTD on the ECN. The ECS location is the same.

Wu, J.; /Fermilab

1991-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

135

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

136

An overview of BWR Mark-I containment venting risk implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Venting of boiling water reactors with Mark-I containments has been suggested as a way to prevent catastrophic failure and/or mitigate the consequences resulting from a severe accident. Based on phenomenological, human factors, and risk considerations, the potential benefits and downsides of venting Mark-I containments were analyzed. Several generic venting systems and two proposed utility systems were reviewed. Based on generic considerations, the offsite consequences during risk dominant accidents were qualitatively assessed for four different vent systems. A quantitative risk study of an early venting strategy was performed, based on the existing Peach Bottom hardware and the draft NUREG-1150 results for Peach Bottom. Appendices are also included which contain reviews of the Pilgrim and Vermont Yankee venting submitals, a response to the seven questions from the NRC about the Pilgrim venting strategy, and a review of the venting strategy directed by Revision 4 of the Boiling Water Reactor Emergency Procedures Guidelines. 16 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

Wagner, K.C.; Dallman, R.J.; Galyean, W.J.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

C47 Thermal Analysis of a Bi-Metallic Chill Vent for High Pressure ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

D14 Gold Nanoparticles in Red Ruby Glasses Used for Decoration in Thailand · D15 Soft Magnetic Properties of Nanocrystalline Fe-based P/M Cores Mixed ...

138

Periodic deep?sea hydrothermal vent activities observed by hydrophones at Mariana, Okinawa, and Mid?Atlantic Ridge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep?sea hydrothermal vent activities were studied done by digital OBS/Hs(Ocean Bottom Seismometer / Hydrophone) at three hydrothermal vent areas

Kasahara Junzo; Sato Toshinori; Nishizawa Azusa; Fujioka Kantaro

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Laclede Gas Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Infrared Heaters: 300unit Gas-fired Boiler Tune Up: 75% of cost (non-profit); 50% of cost (C&I Customers) Steam-Trap Replacements: 50% of cost Vent Dampers: 50% of cost...

140

Riser gas eliminators reduce wellhead pressures on offshore satellite platforms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Riser gas eliminators installed on the liquid export risers of five Gulf of Mexico platforms have significantly reduced wellhead pressure by releasing trapped gas. Wellhead pressures on the platforms have been reduced an average of 50 psi. The gas eliminators have been installed on lines in which the oil has undergone primary separation (gas/liquid) only and is being transported to another platform with separator pressure. Gas eliminators should be effective on other liquid lines in water depths of 50 ft or more, especially those with low velocities. The riser gas eliminator is an inverted steam trap installed at the top of the riser. The inverted steam trap has an internal float that allows the gas to vent through an orifice. The vented gas can be used for fuel supply or routed through the vent system.

Conner, S.L.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decorative vented gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

142

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

143

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

144

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

145

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Total................................................................... 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 788 736 431

146

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 463,929 423,672 401,396 369,624 350,413 From Oil Wells.................................................. 63,222 57,773 54,736 50,403 47,784 Total................................................................... 527,151 481,445 456,132 420,027 398,197 Repressuring ...................................................... 896 818 775 714 677 Vented and Flared.............................................. 527 481 456 420 398 Wet After Lease Separation................................

147

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9 8 7 9 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 368 305 300 443 331 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1 1 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 368 307 301 443 331 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 368 307 301 443 331 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

148

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 98 96 106 109 111 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 869 886 904 1,187 1,229 From Oil Wells.................................................. 349 322 288 279 269 Total................................................................... 1,218 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 5 12 23 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,218 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

149

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 7 6 6 5 Total................................................................... 7 7 6 6 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

150

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

151

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

152

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

153

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

154

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

155

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

156

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 380 350 400 430 280 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Total................................................................... 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

157

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

158

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

159

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

160

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decorative vented gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

162

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 7 5 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 34 32 22 48 34 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 34 32 22 48 34 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 34 32 22 48 34 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

163

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

164

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

165

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

166

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 17 20 18 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 198 3 0 0 0 Marketed Production

167

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

168

SUBJECT: Manual of Military Decorations and Awards: General Information, Medal of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a. Manual. In accordance with the authority in DoD Directive 5124.02 (Reference (a)) and the guidance in DoD Instruction (DoDI) 1348.33 (Reference (b)), this Manual implements the DoD Military Awards Program policies and procedures. b. Volume. This Volume: (1) Provides procedures for preparation and submittal of: recommendations for the Medal of Honor (MOH) and Defense/Joint decorations and awards; out-of-Service requests for awards; lost award recommendations; posthumous awards; award replacement; and reconsideration of award recommendations. (2) Provides detailed information regarding DoD MOH criteria. (3) Provides detailed information regarding Defense/Joint decorations and awards,

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Predicting Backdrafting and Spillage for Natural-Draft Gas Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Predicting Backdrafting and Spillage for Natural-Draft Gas Combustion Predicting Backdrafting and Spillage for Natural-Draft Gas Combustion Appliances: Validating VENT-II Title Predicting Backdrafting and Spillage for Natural-Draft Gas Combustion Appliances: Validating VENT-II Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6193E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Rapp, Vi H., Albert Pastor-Perez, Brett C. Singer, and Craig P. Wray Date Published 04/2013 Abstract VENT-II is a computer program designed to provide detailed analysis of natural draft and induced draft combustion appliance vent-systems (i.e., furnace or water heater). This program is capable of predicting house depressurization thresholds that lead to backdrafting and spillage of combustion appliances; however, validation reports of the program being applied for this

170

Why Sequence Thermoacidophiles of deep-sea hydrothermal vents?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermoacidophiles of Thermoacidophiles of deep-sea hydrothermal vents? Bacteria that live in hydrothermal vents on land and deep underwater need to be able to tolerate high temperatures and harsh, nutrient-poor environments with high concentrations of metals. As a result of living in such environments, however, these bacteria have enzymes that are stable at high temperatures, which could be useful for producing alternative fuels. Thermoacidophiles Photo: University of Delaware Aquificales bacteria are often found in thermal streams and associated with sulfide precipitation. Sequencing some of these bacterial genomes -- specifically, Thermocrinis ruber, S. rodmanii and S. kristjansonnii -- could provide researchers with so-called "anchor genomes" that would be applied in turn to studies already being done on microbial communities in

171

TRANSPORT OF WASTE SIMULANTS IN PJM VENT LINES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The experimental work was conducted to determine whether there is a potential for waste simulant to transport or 'creep' up the air link line and contaminate the pulse jet vent system, and possibly cause long term restriction of the air link line. Additionally, if simulant creep occurred, establish operating parameters for washing down the line. The amount of the addition of flush fluids and mixer downtime must be quantified.

Qureshi, Z

2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

172

Potential VOC Deflagrations in a Vented TRU Drum  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the analysis is to examine the potential for lid ejection from a vented transuranic (TRU) waste drum due to pressure buildup caused by the deflagration of hydrogen and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) inside the drum. In this analysis, the AICC pressure for a stoichiometric mixture of VOCs is calculated and then compared against the experimental peak pressure of stoichiometric combustion of propane and hexane in a combustion chamber. The experimental peak pressures of propane and hexane are about 12 percent lower than the calculated AICC pressure. Additional losses in the drum are calculated due to venting of the gases, drum bulging, waste compaction, and heat losses from the presence of waste in the drum. After accounting for these losses, the final pressures are compared to the minimum observed pressure that ejects the lid from a TRU drum. The ejection pressure of 105 psig is derived from data that was recorded for a series of tests where hydrogen-air mixtures were ignited inside sealed TRU drums. Since the calculated pressures are below the minimum lid ejection pressure, none of the VOCs and the hydrogen (up to 4 percent) mixtures present in the TRU waste drum is expected to cause lid ejection if ignited. The analysis of potential VOC deflagrations in a vented TRU drum can be applied across the DOE-Complex since TRU waste is stored in drums throughout the complex.

Mukesh, GUPTA

2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

173

Ultra-high hydrogen storage capacity of Li-decorated graphyne: A first-principles prediction  

SciTech Connect

Graphyne, consisting of sp- and sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon atoms, is a new member of carbon allotropes which has a natural porous structure. Here, we report our first-principles calculations on the possibility of Li-decorated graphyne as a hydrogen storage medium. We predict that Li-doping significantly enhances the hydrogen storage ability of graphyne compared to that of pristine graphyne, which can be attributed to the polarization of H{sub 2} molecules induced by the charge transfer from Li atoms to graphyne. The favorite H{sub 2} molecules adsorption configurations on a single side and on both sides of a Li-decorated graphyne layer are determined. When Li atoms are adsorbed on one side of graphyne, each Li can bind four H{sub 2} molecules, corresponding to a hydrogen storage capacity of 9.26 wt. %. The hydrogen storage capacity can be further improved to 15.15 wt. % as graphyne is decorated by Li atoms on both sides, with an optimal average binding energy of 0.226 eV/H{sub 2}. The results show that the Li-decorated graphyne can serve as a high capacity hydrogen storage medium.

Zhang Hongyu; Zhang Meng; Zhao Lixia; Luo Youhua [Department of Physics, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Zhao Mingwen; Bu Hongxia; He Xiujie [School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan, 250100 Shandong (China)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Hydrogen gas relief valve  

SciTech Connect

An improved battery stack design for an electrochemical system having at least one cell from which a gas is generated and an electrolyte in communication with the cell is described. The improved battery stack design features means for defining a substantially closed compartment for containing the battery cells and at least a portion of the electrolyte for the system, and means in association with the compartment means for selectively venting gas from the interior of the compartment means in response to the level of the electrolyte within the compartment means. The venting means includes a relief valve having a float member which is actuated in response to the level of the electrolyte within the compartment means. This float member is adapted to close the relief valve when the level of the electrolyte is above a predetermined level and open the relief valve when the level of electrolyte is below this predetermined level.

Whittlesey, Curtis C. (Birmingham, MI)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Clad vent set cup closure-weld-zone grinding evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Clad vent set (CVS) cups were ground in the closure-weld zone to reduce the wall-thickness variation created by the cup deep-drawing process. A significantly more uniform wall thickness would be beneficial for the CVS closure-weld operation. The goal was to reduce the average within-cup wall-thickness variation (defined as the range of wall thicknesses in the closure-weld zone) approximately 50% from the Cassini production value of 42 {micro}m. This goal was shown to be achievable but, unfortunately, not with the existing blank and formed cup thicknesses.

Ulrich, G.B.; Woods, A.T. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States); Ohriner, E.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Device and method for remotely venting a container  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Numerous incidents of fire, explosion, and ground contamination have occurred at various facilities over the last several years due to drum rupture on account of overpressurization. These incidents frequently are caused by an ignition source or a reaction between incompatible materials. The incidents may also occur simply as a result of climatic changes causing the drum to be over pressurized. A device for venting a container having a bung includes a saddle assembly securable to a container and having a support extending therefrom. A first arm is rotatably secured to the support, and the first arm extends in a first direction. A second arm has a first end portion drivingly engaged with the first arm, so that rotation of the first arm causes rotation of the second arm. A second end portion of the first arm is positionable proximate the bung of the container. A socket is operably associated and rotatable with the second end portion and is drivingly engageable with the bung, so that rotation of the socket causes corresponding rotation of the bung for thereby venting the container.

Vodila, J.M.; Bergersen, J.A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

Illuminating system and method for specialized and decorative lighting using liquid light guides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention comprises an illumination system for specialized decorative lighting including a light source, a flexible plastic tube sheath for distributing the light to a remote location, a transparent liquid core filling the tube that has an index of refraction greater than that of the plastic tube and an arrangement where light coupled from the light source is caused to leak from the liquid light guide at desired locations for the purposes of specialized lighting, such as underwater illumination in swimming pools.

Zorn, Carl J. (Yorktown, VA); Kross, Brian J. (Yorktown, VA); Majewski, Stanislaw (Grafton, VA); Wojcik, Randolph F. (Yorktown, VA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Alabama State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

From Gas Wells 134,451 125,502 109,214 101,487 84,270 87,398 1987-2012 From Shale Gas Wells 0 2012-2012 From Coalbed Wells 0 2012-2012 Repressuring 0 NA 2011-2012 Vented and...

179

Results of gas monitoring of double-shell flammable gas watch list tanks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tanks 103-SY; 101-AW; 103-, 104-, and 105-AN are on the Flammable Gas Watch List. Recently, standard hydrogen monitoring system (SHMS) cabinets have been installed in the vent header of each of these tanks. Grab samples have been taken once per week, and a gas chromatograph was installed on tank 104-AN as a field test. The data that have been collected since gas monitoring began on these tanks are summarized in this document.

Wilkins, N.E.

1995-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

180

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 5,775 5,913 6,496 5,878 5,781 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 17,741 27,632 36,637 35,943 45,963 From Oil Wells.................................................. 16 155 179 194 87 Total................................................................... 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decorative vented gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,000 4,825 6,755 7,606 3,460 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 156,333 150,972 147,734 157,039 176,221 From Oil Wells.................................................. 15,524 16,263 14,388 12,915 11,088 Total................................................................... 171,857 167,235 162,122 169,953 187,310 Repressuring ...................................................... 8 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 206 431 251 354 241 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 171,642 166,804

182

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,178 4,601 3,005 3,220 3,657 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 244,826 264,809 260,554 254,488 259,432 From Oil Wells.................................................. 36,290 36,612 32,509 29,871 31,153 Total................................................................... 281,117 301,422 293,063 284,359 290,586 Repressuring ...................................................... 563 575 2,150 1,785 1,337 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,941 1,847 955 705 688 Wet After Lease Separation................................

183

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 21,507 32,672 33,279 34,334 35,612 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,473,792 1,466,833 1,476,204 1,487,451 1,604,709 From Oil Wells.................................................. 139,097 148,551 105,402 70,704 58,439 Total................................................................... 1,612,890 1,615,384 1,581,606 1,558,155 1,663,148 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................

184

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 94 95 100 117 117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 13,527 13,846 15,130 14,524 15,565 From Oil Wells.................................................. 42,262 44,141 44,848 43,362 43,274 Total................................................................... 55,789 57,987 59,978 57,886 58,839 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,290 3,166 2,791 2,070 3,704 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 52,499 54,821 57,187 55,816 55,135

185

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 997 1,143 979 427 437 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 109,041 131,608 142,070 156,727 171,915 From Oil Wells.................................................. 5,339 5,132 5,344 4,950 4,414 Total................................................................... 114,380 136,740 147,415 161,676 176,329 Repressuring ...................................................... 6,353 6,194 5,975 6,082 8,069 Vented and Flared.............................................. 2,477 2,961 3,267 3,501 3,493 Wet After Lease Separation................................

186

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 42,475 42,000 45,000 46,203 47,117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

187

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9,907 13,978 15,608 18,154 20,244 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,188,657 1,467,331 1,572,728 1,652,504 1,736,136 From Oil Wells.................................................. 137,385 167,656 174,748 183,612 192,904 Total................................................................... 1,326,042 1,634,987 1,747,476 1,836,115 1,929,040 Repressuring ...................................................... 50,216 114,407 129,598 131,125 164,164 Vented and Flared.............................................. 9,945 7,462 12,356 16,685 16,848

188

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 71 68 69 61 61 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 648 563 531 550 531 From Oil Wells.................................................. 10,032 10,751 9,894 11,055 11,238 Total................................................................... 10,680 11,313 10,424 11,605 11,768 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,806 2,043 1,880 2,100 2,135 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 8,875 9,271 8,545 9,504 9,633 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

189

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 60,577 63,704 65,779 68,572 72,237 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 5,859,358 4,897,366 4,828,188 4,947,589 5,074,067 From Oil Wells.................................................. 999,624 855,081 832,816 843,735 659,851 Total................................................................... 6,858,983 5,752,446 5,661,005 5,791,324 5,733,918 Repressuring ...................................................... 138,372 195,150 212,638 237,723 284,491 Vented and Flared.............................................. 32,010 26,823 27,379 23,781 26,947

190

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,700 16,350 17,100 16,939 20,734 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 4,260,529 1,398,981 1,282,137 1,283,513 1,293,204 From Oil Wells.................................................. 895,425 125,693 100,324 94,615 88,209 Total................................................................... 5,155,954 1,524,673 1,382,461 1,378,128 1,381,413 Repressuring ...................................................... 42,557 10,838 9,754 18,446 19,031 Vented and Flared.............................................. 20,266 11,750 10,957 9,283 5,015 Wet After Lease Separation................................

191

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 36,000 40,100 40,830 42,437 44,227 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217

192

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.................................... 4,359 4,597 4,803 5,157 5,526 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ................................................ 555,043 385,915 380,700 365,330 333,583 From Oil Wells .................................................. 6,501 6,066 5,802 5,580 5,153 Total................................................................... 561,544 391,981 386,502 370,910 338,735 Repressuring ...................................................... 13,988 12,758 10,050 4,062 1,307 Vented and Flared .............................................. 1,262 1,039 1,331 1,611 2,316 Wet After Lease Separation................................

193

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,321 4,331 4,544 4,539 4,971 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 61,974 71,985 76,053 78,175 87,292 From Oil Wells.................................................. 8,451 9,816 10,371 8,256 10,546 Total................................................................... 70,424 81,802 86,424 86,431 97,838 Repressuring ...................................................... 1 0 0 2 5 Vented and Flared.............................................. 488 404 349 403 1,071 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 69,936 81,397 86,075 86,027 96,762

194

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,051 3,521 3,429 3,506 3,870 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

195

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,948 35,217 35,873 37,100 38,574 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,484,269 1,484,856 1,432,966 1,391,916 1,397,934 From Oil Wells.................................................. 229,437 227,534 222,940 224,263 246,804 Total................................................................... 1,713,706 1,712,390 1,655,906 1,616,179 1,644,738 Repressuring ...................................................... 15,280 20,009 20,977 9,817 8,674 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,130 3,256 2,849 2,347 3,525 Wet After Lease Separation................................

196

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7,068 7,425 7,700 8,600 8,500 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 241,776 224,560 224,112 194,121 212,276 From Oil Wells.................................................. 60,444 56,140 56,028 48,530 53,069 Total................................................................... 302,220 280,700 280,140 242,651 265,345 Repressuring ...................................................... 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 Wet After Lease Separation................................

197

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 13,487 14,370 14,367 12,900 13,920 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

198

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,897 33,917 34,593 33,828 33,828 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 98,551 97,272 97,154 87,993 85,018 From Oil Wells.................................................. 6,574 2,835 6,004 5,647 5,458 Total................................................................... 105,125 100,107 103,158 93,641 90,476 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 105,125 100,107 103,158

199

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 66  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 28. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Arizona, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.................................... 8 7 9 6 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ................................................ 305 300 443 331 233 From Oil Wells .................................................. 1 * * * * Total................................................................... 307 301 443 331 233 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .............................................. * 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 307 301 443 331 233 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed......................

200

Illuminating system and method for specialized and decorative lighting using liquid light guides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention comprises an illumination system for specialized decorative lighting including a light source, a flexible plastic tube sheath for distributing the light to a remote location, a transparent liquid core filling the tube that has an index of refraction greater than that of the plastic tube and an arrangement where light coupled from the light source is caused to leak from the liquid light guide at desired locations for the purposes of specialized lighting, such as underwater illumination in swimming pools. 5 figs.

Zorn, C.J.; Kross, B.J.; Majewski, S.; Wojcik, R.F.

1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decorative vented gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Meents, Wayne F. Analysis of natural gas in Illinois. -Champaign, IIl.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(601, gas seeps (38), landfill vents (Id), and water springs (Id). Several methods were used#12;Meents, Wayne F. Analysis of natural gas in Illinois. - Champaign, IIl. : Illinois State Geological Survey, 1981. 64 p. : ill., tables ;28 cm. - (Illinois petroleum ; 122) 1. Gas, Natural

202

Base Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

203

Gas fluidized-bed stirred media mill  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas fluidized-bed stirred media mill is provided for comminuting solid ticles. The mill includes a housing enclosing a porous fluidizing gas diffuser plate, a baffled rotor and stator, a hollow drive shaft with lateral vents, and baffled gas exhaust exit ports. In operation, fluidizing gas is forced through the mill, fluidizing the raw material and milling media. The rotating rotor, stator and milling media comminute the raw material to be ground. Small entrained particles may be carried from the mill by the gas through the exit ports when the particles reach a very fine size.

Sadler, III, Leon Y. (Tuscaloosa, AL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Income Tax Deduction for Solar-Powered Roof Vents or Fans (Indiana...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1232012 References DSIRE1 Summary Indiana allows taxpayers to take a deduction on solar-powered roof fans (or vent, also sometimes called an attic fan) installed in a home...

205

Income Tax Deduction for Solar-Powered Roof Vents or Fans  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Indiana allows taxpayers to take a deduction on solar-powered roof fans (or vent, also sometimes called an attic fan) installed in a home that the taxpayer owns or leases. The deduction is for 50%...

206

Rain Shedding and Rainwater Runoff Tests on Cast Iron Vented Manhole Covers for Con Edison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents work EPRIsolutions performed for Con Edison that compares water penetration characteristics of two types of vented manhole covers with a solid cover and a manhole with no cover under typical and very heavy rain conditions.

2007-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

207

A Handheld Sampler for Collecting Organic Samples from Shallow Hydrothermal Vents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe here a new handheld sampler, specially designed to be deployed by SCUBA divers, to collect fluid samples from shallow hydrothermal vents. The new sampler utilizes a syringe-like titanium sampling bottle with regulated filling rate to ...

Shi-Jun Wu; Can-Jun Yang; Chen-Tung Arthur Chen

208

A Handheld Sampler for Collecting Organic Samples from Shallow Hydrothermal Vents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study describes a new handheld sampler, specially designed to be deployed by scuba divers, to collect fluid samples from shallow hydrothermal vents. The new sampler utilizes a syringe-like titanium sampling bottle with a regulated filling ...

Shi-Jun Wu; Can-Jun Yang; Chen-Tung Arthur Chen

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

InnoVent InfraVest GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

InfraVest GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name InnoVentInfraVest GmbH Place Varel, Germany Zip 26316 Sector Wind energy Product Wind farm project developer based in Germany....

210

Geochemistry of hydrothermal vent fluids from the northern Juan De Fuca Ridge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The presence of aqueous organic compounds derived from sedimentary organic matter has the potential to influence a range of chemical processes in hydrothermal vent environments. For example, hydrothermal alteration experiments ...

Cruse, Anna M. (Anna Marie)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Application of Multizone HVAC Control Using Wireless Sensor Networks and Actuating Vent Registers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most residential heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems are designed to treat the home as a single zone. Single zone control consists of one thermostat, in a central area of the house that controls the HVAC operation. In a single zone system all of the vent registers are open, distributing air into all areas of the house at once. Single zone control leads to wasted energy for two reasons - all rooms being conditioned when they are not occupied, and conditioning occupied rooms, without maintaining them at the comfortable temperature for the occupants. Improved control of residential cooling and heating can be attained with a variable HVAC fan, duct, and vent system. Existing single zone systems are expensive to retrofit with the above mentioned features. Current techniques require replacing major components in the HVAC system which are both costly and time consuming, invading the user's home. An alternative to the extensive retrofit is detailed in this work. The experiments in this paper implement an automated vent louver system to solve two problems in heating homes: the problem of temperature stratification between floors and zonification between rooms, and the energy wasted to heat in unoccupied areas of the home. This paper considers the application of replacing the standard vents in each room with wireless controlled louvered vents. These vents allow for simpler, more cost effective retrofits which are also less invasive tithe end user's home. The experiments in this paper implement an automated vent louver system to reduce the energy wasted to heat unoccupied areas of the home. This test house in these experiments was a two story home. Wireless sensor-actuator networks were used to automate the test of closing off vent registers while maintaining the appropriate temperature set point in a control zone. A control zone consists of the house area where the vents are fully open. Controlling the vent registers allowed for reduced zonification between rooms on the same floor, and reduced stratification between the upstairs and downstairs. Energy savings were shown when vents were closed to heat the control zones containing the bedroom, of the office.

Watts, W.; Koplow, M.; Redfern, A.; Wright, P.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Hydrogen venting characteristics of commercial carbon-composite filters and applications to TRU waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The generation of hydrogen (by radiolysis) and of other potentially flammable gases in radioactive wastes which are in contact with hydrogenous materials is a source of concern, both from transportation and on-site storage considerations. Because very little experimental data on the generation and accumulation of hydrogen was available in actual waste materials, work was initiated to experimentally determine factors affecting the concentration of hydrogen in the waste containers, such as the hydrogen generation rate, (G-values) and the rate of loss of hydrogen through packaging and commercial filter-vents, including a new design suitable for plastic bags. This report deals only with the venting aspect of the problem. Hydrogen venting characteristics of two types of commercial carbon-composite filter-vents, and two types of PVC bag closures (heat-sealed and twist-and-tape) were measured. Techniques and equipment were developed to permit measurement of the hydrogen concentration in various layers of actual transuranic (TRU) waste packages, both with and without filter-vents. A test barrel was assembled containing known configuration and amounts of TRU wastes. Measurements of the hydrogen in the headspace verified a hydrogen release model developed by Benchmark Environmental Corporation. These data were used to calculate revised wattage Emits for TRU waste packages incorporating the new bag filter-vent.

Callis, E.L.; Marshall, R.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Cappis, J.H. [DOE, International Safeguards Div., Washington, DC (United States)] [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States New Construction Market Speaker(s): Alex Lekov Gabrielle Wong-Parodi James McMahon Victor Franco Date: May 8, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 In the new single-family home construction market, the choice of what gas furnace and gas water heater combination to install is primarily driven by first cost considerations. In this study, the authors use a life-cycle cost analysis approach that accounts for uncertainty and variability of inputs to assess the economic benefits of installing different gas furnace and water heater combinations. Among other factors, it assesses the economic feasibility of eliminating the traditional metal vents and replacing them with vents made of plastic materials used in condensing and power vent

214

Central Hudson Gas & Elec Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hudson Gas & Elec Corp Hudson Gas & Elec Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name Central Hudson Gas & Elec Corp Place New York Utility Id 3249 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NY Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png DS-IN 85 Watt (acorn Decorative) Lighting DS-MH 175 Watt (acorn Decorative) Lighting

215

Venting and Rapid Recompression Increase Survival and Improve Recovery for Red Snapper with Barotrauma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Red Snapper, Lutjanus campechanus, are the most economically important reef fish in the Gulf of Mexico. Population assessments that began in the mid-1980’s found red snapper to be severely overfished and lead to extensive regulations and harvest restrictions. As a result of these regulations many fish that are captured must be released and are known as regulatory discards. Red snapper live deep in the water column and when captured and rapidly brought to the surface they often suffer pressure-related injuries collectively known as barotrauma. These injuries include a distended abdomen and stomach eversion from the buccal cavity. High mortality of discards due to barotrauma injuries impedes recovery of the fishery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of two techniques designed to minimize barotrauma-related mortality: venting and rapid recompression. In laboratory experiments using hyperbaric chambers, I assessed sublethal effects of barotrauma and subsequent survival rates of red snapper after single and multiple simulated capture events from pressures corresponding to 30 and 60 m. I evaluated the use of rapid recompression and venting to increase survival and improve recovery indices, including the ability to evade a simulated predator. A condition index of impairment, the barotrauma reflex (BtR) score, was used to assess sublethal external barotrauma injuries, reflex responses, and behavioral responses. Greater capture depths resulted in higher BtR scores (more impairment). Non-vented fish had higher BtR scores than vented fish after both single and multiple decompression events. All fish in vented treatments from 30 and 60 m depths had 100% survival after a single capture event. Non-vented fish had 67% survival after decompression from 30 m and 17% survival from 60 m. Behaviorally, non-vented fish showed greater difficulty achieving an upright orientation upon release and less ability to evade a simulated predator than vented fish. Rapid recompression also greatly improved survival compared to surface-released fish with 96% of all rapidly recompressed fish surviving. These results clearly show that venting or rapid recompression can be effective tools for alleviating barotrauma symptoms, improving predator evasion after a catch-and-release event, and increasing survival. Fisheries managers should encourage the use of either of these two techniques to aid in the recovery of this important fishery.

Drumhiller, Karen L

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

A conduit dilation model of methane venting from lake sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, but its effects on Earth's climate remain poorly constrained, in part due to uncertainties in global methane fluxes to the atmosphere. An important source of atmospheric methane is the ...

Ruppel, Carolyn

217

Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And Zones Of High Heat Flow In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Katmai National Park, Alaska Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And Zones Of High Heat Flow In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Katmai National Park, Alaska Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A reconnaissance survey of Hg° was designed to model the 1912 Novarupta vent structure and delineate zones of near-surface high heat

218

The potential for photosynthesis in hydrothermal vents: a new avenue for life in the Universe?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform a quantitative assessment for the potential for photosynthesis in hydrothermal vents in the deep ocean. The photosynthetically active radiation in this case is from geothermal origin: the infrared thermal radiation emitted by hot water, at temperatures ranging from 473 up to 673 K. We find that at these temperatures the photosynthetic potential is rather low in these ecosystems for most known species. However, species which a very high efficiency in the use of light and which could use infrared photons till 1300nm, could achieve good rates of photosynthesis in hydrothermal vents. These organisms might also thrive in deep hydrothermal vents in other planetary bodies, such as one of the more astrobiologically promising Jupiter satellites: Europa.

Perez, Noel; Martin, Osmel; Leiva-Mora, Michel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Siberian gas venting and the end-Permian environmental crisis Henrik Svensen a,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

through spectacular pipe structures with kilometre-sized craters. Dating of a sill intrusion by the U below the flood basalts is the most important factor in controlling whether a Large Igneous Provinces

Svensen, Henrik

220

Siberian gas venting and the end-Permian environmental crisis Henrik Svensen a,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Permian atmosphere partly through spectacular pipe structures with kilometre-sized craters. Dating of a sill of the heated sedimentary rocks below the flood basalts is the most important factor in controlling whether

Podladchikov, Yuri

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decorative vented gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

U.S. Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1930's 392,528 526,159 649,106 677,311 1940's 655,967 630,212 626,782 684,115 1,010,285 896,208 1,102,033 1,067,938 810,178 853,884 1950's 801,044 793,186 848,608 810,276 723,567 773,639 864,334 809,148 633,412 571,048 1960's 562,877 523,533 425,629 383,408 341,853 319,143 375,695 489,877 516,508 525,750 1970's 489,460 284,561 248,119 248,292 169,381 133,913 131,930 136,807 153,350 167,019 1980's 125,451 98,017 93,365 94,962 107,913 94,778 97,633 123,707 142,525 141,642 1990's 150,415 169,909 167,519 226,743 228,336 283,739 272,117 256,351 103,019 110,285 2000's 91,232 96,913 99,178 98,113 96,408 119,097 129,469 143,457 166,909 165,360

222

Nitrogen geochemistry as a tracer of fluid flow in a hydrothermal vent complex in the Karoo Basin, South Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogen geochemistry as a tracer of fluid flow in a hydrothermal vent complex in the Karoo Basin and hydrothermal vent complexes (HVC) in the Karoo Basin in South Africa. The HVC formed during phreatic eruptions from the lower stratigraphic units of the Karoo Basin shows that the vitrinite reflectance and d15 N

Svensen, Henrik

223

Synthesis of Thermal Interface Materials Made of Metal Decorated Carbon Nanotubes and Polymers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the synthesis of a low modulus, thermally conductive thermal interface materials (TIM) using metal decorated nanotubes as fillers. TIMs are very important in electronics because they act as a thermally-conductive medium for thermal transfer between the interface of a heat sink and an electronic package. The performance of an electronic package decreases with increasing operating temperature, hence, there exists a need to create a TIM which has high thermal conduction to reduce the operating temperature. The TIM in this study is made from metal decorated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and Vinnapas®BP 600 polymer. The sample was functionalized using mild oxidative treatment with nitric acid (HNO3) or, with N-Methly-2-Pyrrolidone (NMP). The metals used for this experiment were copper (Cu), tin (Sn), and nickel (Ni). The metal nanoparticles were seeded using functionalized MWCNTs as templates. Once seeded, the nanotubes and polymer composites were made with or without sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), as a surfactant. Thermal conductivity (k) measurement was carried out using ASTM D-5470 method at room temperature. This setup best models the working conditions of a TIM. The TIM samples made for this study showed promise in their ability to have significant increase in thermal conduction while retaining the polymer’s mechanical properties. The highest k value that was obtained was 0.72 W/m-K for a well dispersed aligned 5 wt percent Ni@MWCNT sample. The Cu samples underperformed both Ni and Sn samples for the same synthesis conditions. This is because Cu nanoparticles were significantly larger than those of Ni and Sn. They were large enough to cause alloy scattering and too large to attach to the nanotubes. Addition of thermally-conductive fillers, such as exfoliated graphite, did not yield better k results as it sunk to the bottom during drying. The use of SDBS greatly increased the k values of the sample by reducing agglomeration. Increasing the amount of metal@MWCNT wt percent in the sample had negative or no effect to the k values. Shear testing on the sample shows it adheres well to the surface when pressure is applied, yet it can be removed with ease.

Okoth, Marion Odul

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Compact fluorescent lamp using horizontal and vertical insulating septums and convective venting geometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel design is described for a compact fluorescent lamp, including a lamp geometry which will increase light output and efficacy of the lamp in a base down operating position by providing horizontal and vertical insulating septums positioned in the ballast compartment of the lamp to provide a cooler coldspot. Selective convective venting provides additional cooling of the ballast compartment. 9 figs.

Siminovitch, M.

1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

225

Development of a model for predicting transient hydrogen venting in 55-gallon drums  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Remote drum venting was performed on a population of unvented high activity drums (HAD) in the range of 63 to 435 plutonium equivalent Curies (PEC). These 55-gallon Transuranic (TRU) drums will eventually be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). As a part of this process, the development of a calculational model was required to predict the transient hydrogen concentration response of the head space and polyethylene liner (if present) within the 55-gallon drum. The drum and liner were vented using a Remote Drum Venting System (RDVS) that provided a vent sampling path for measuring flammable hydrogen vapor concentrations and allow hydrogen to diffuse below lower flammability limit (LFL) concentrations. One key application of the model was to determine the transient behavior of hydrogen in the head space, within the liner, and the sensitivity to the number of holes made in the liner or number of filters. First-order differential mass transport equations were solved using Laplace transformations and numerically to verify the results. the Mathematica 6.0 computing tool was also used as a validation tool and for examining larger than two chamber systems. Results will be shown for a variety of configurations, including 85-gallon and 110-gallon overpack drums. The model was also validated against hydrogen vapor concentration assay measurements.

Apperson, Jason W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clemmons, James S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garcia, Michael D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sur, John C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Duan Z [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Romero, Michael J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Compact fluorescent lamp using horizontal and vertical insulating septums and convective venting geometry  

SciTech Connect

A novel design for a compact fluorescent lamp, including a lamp geometry which will increase light output and efficacy of the lamp in a base down operating position by providing horizontal and vertical insulating septums positioned in the ballast compartment of the lamp to provide a cooler coldspot. Selective convective venting provides additional cooling of the ballast compartment.

Siminovitch, Michael (El Sobrante, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

First-principles study of hydrogen storage on Ti-decorated B{sub 2}C sheet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydrogen storage capacity of Ti decorated B{sub 2}C sheet has been investigated by first-principles plane-wave calculation. It is revealed that a single Ti atom adsorbed on the B{sub 2}C sheet can strongly bind up to four hydrogen molecules. The adsorption energy is in the range of -0.36--0.82 eV/H{sub 2}, which is suitable for ambient temperature hydrogen storage. Considering the fact that Ti can be loaded on both sides of B{sub 2}C sheet, corresponding gravimetric storage capacity of Ti/B{sub 2}C system was also calculated and it can reach to about 7.0 wt%, exceeding the minimum requirement of 6.0 wt% for applications. - Graphical abstract: We investigated the hydrogen storage capacity of Ti decorated B{sub 2}C sheet. The most favorable adsorption geometries for every number of hydrogen molecules on Ti/B{sub 2}C complex are given in the figure. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ti decorated B{sub 2}C sheet serve as hydrogen storage medium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A single Ti atom adsorbed on the B{sub 2}C sheet can strongly bind up to four hydrogen molecules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adsorption energy is in moderate range of -0.36--0.82 eV/H{sub 2}.

Guo, Y.H.; Xu, B.; Xia, Y.D.; Yin, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Liu, Z.G., E-mail: liuzg@nju.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

CenterPoint Energy (Gas) - Commercial Efficiency Rebates (Oklahoma) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Efficiency Rebates (Oklahoma) Commercial Efficiency Rebates (Oklahoma) CenterPoint Energy (Gas) - Commercial Efficiency Rebates (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Construction Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Boilers: 25% of equipment costs Modulating Boiler Controls: 25% Vent Dampers: $250/boiler Boiler Reset Controls: $150/control system Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Forced-Air Furnace: $300-$400 Direct Vent Wall Furnace: $200 Hydronic Heating System: $300 Boilers: $1400-$2000/MMBtu input Modulating Boiler Controls: $1,000/MMBtu input Vent Dampers: 25% of cost Boiler Reset/Cut-Out Controls: up to $150/system Tankless Water Heater: $250

229

Natural Gas Withdrawals from Underground Storage (Annual Supply &  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

230

Injections of Natural Gas into Storage (Annual Supply & Disposition)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

231

Microbial community structure of hydrothermal deposits from geochemically different vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the effects of local fluid geochemistry on microbial communities associated with active hydrothermal vent deposits, we examined the archaeal and bacterial communities of 12 samples collected from two very different vent fields: the basalt-hosted Lucky Strike (37 17'N, 32 16.3'W, depth 1600-1750 m) and the ultramafic-hosted Rainbow (36 13'N, 33 54.1'W, depth 2270-2330 m) vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Using multiplexed barcoded pyrosequencing of the variable region 4 (V4) of the 16S rRNA genes, we show statistically significant differences between the archaeal and bacterial communities associated with the different vent fields. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays of the functional gene diagnostic for methanogenesis (mcrA), as well as geochemical modelling to predict pore fluid chemistries within the deposits, support the pyrosequencing observations. Collectively, these results show that the less reduced, hydrogen-poor fluids at Lucky Strike limit colonization by strict anaerobes such as methanogens, and allow for hyperthermophilic microaerophiles, like Aeropyrum. In contrast, the hydrogen-rich reducing vent fluids at the ultramafic-influenced Rainbow vent field support the prevalence of methanogens and other hydrogen-oxidizing thermophiles at this site. These results demonstrate that biogeographical patterns of hydrothermal vent microorganisms are shaped in part by large scale geological and geochemical processes.

Flores, Gilberto E [Portland State University; Campbell, James H [ORNL; Kirshtein, Julie D [United States Geological Survey, Reston, VA; Meneghin, Jennifer [Portland State University; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Steinberg, Joshua [Oregon Episcopal School, Portland, OR; Seewald, Jeffrey S [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Tivey, Margaret Kingston [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Voytek, Mary A [United States Geological Survey & National Aeronautics and Space Administration; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise [Portland State University; Yang, Zamin Koo [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Sensitive Detection of H2S Using Gold Nanoparticle Decorated Single-Walled Carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in large amounts in coal and natural gas processing, petroleum industries, biogas production, and sewage . The H2S and dry air gas flow rates were regulated by mass flow controllers (Alicat Scientific Incorpo sensitive conducto- metric gas nanosensors for H2S can be synthesized by electrodepositing gold

233

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Development Challenges -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Air Key Points: * Air quality risks from shale oil and gas development are generally the result of: (1) dust and engine exhaust from increased truck traffic; (2) emissions from diesel-powered pumps used to power equipment; (3) intentional flaring or venting of gas for operational reasons; and, (4) unintentional emissions of pollutants from faulty equipment or impoundments. 1 * Natural gas is efficient and clean compared to other fossil fuels, emitting less nitrogen oxide and sulfur dioxide than coal and oil, no mercury and very few particulates. However, the drilling

234

Interaction of Epithelial Cells with Surfaces and Surfaces Decorated by Molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A detailed understanding of the interface between living cells and substrate materials is of rising importance in many fields of medicine, biology and biotechnology. Cells at interfaces often form epithelia. The physical barrier that they form is one of their main functions. It is governed by the properties of the networks forming the cytoskeleton systems and by cell-to-cell contacts. Different substrates with varying surface properties modify the migration velocity of the cells. On the one hand one can change the materials composition. Organic and inorganic materials induce differing migration velocities in the same cell system. Within the same class of materials, a change of the surface stiffness or of the surface energy modifies the migration velocity, too. For our cell adhesion studies a variety of different, homogeneous substrates were used (polymers, bio-polymers, metals, oxides). In addition, an effective lithographic method, Polymer Blend Lithography (PBL), is reported, to produce patterned Self-Assembled Monolayers (SAM) on solid substrates featuring two or three different chemical functionalities. This we achieve without the use of conventional lithography like e-beam or UV lithography, only by using self-organization. These surfaces are decorated with a Teflon-like and with an amino-functionalized molecular layer. The resulting pattern is a copy of a previously created self-organized polymer pattern, featuring a scalable lateral domain size in the sub-micron range down below 100 nanometers. The resulting monolayer pattern features a high chemical and biofunctional contrast with feature sizes in the range of cell adhesion complexes like e.g. focal adhesion points.

Daniele Martini; Othmar Marti; Michael Beil; T. Paust; C. Huang; M. Moosmann; J. Jin; T. Heiler; R. Gröger; Thomas Schimmel; Stefan Walheim

2013-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

235

Landfill Gas Sequestration in Kansas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Road Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26505-0880 304-285-4132 Heino.beckert@netl.doe.gov David newell Principal Investigator Kansas Geological Survey 1930 Constant Avenue Lawrence, KS 66045 785-864-2183 dnewall@kgs.uk.edu LandfiLL Gas sequestration in Kansas Background Municipal solid waste landfills are the largest source of anthropogenic methane emissions in the United States, accounting for about 34 percent of these emissions in 2004. Most methane (CH 4 ) generated in landfills and open dumps by anaerobic decomposition of the organic material in solid-waste-disposal landfills is either vented to the atmosphere or converted to carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) by flaring. The gas consists of about 50 percent methane (CH 4 ), the primary component of natural gas, about 50 percent carbon dioxide (CO

236

Understanding landfill gas generation and migration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Landfill gas research in the US Department of Energy (DOE) from Municipal Waste (EMW) Program is focusing on two major areas of investigation: (1) Landfill gas migration processes; and (2) Landfill gas generation. With regard to gas migration, a field investigation is examining bidirectional gas movement through landfill cover materials by processes of pressure and diffusional flow. The overall purpose of the study is to quantify gas loss from the landfill reservoir by natural venting and air influx due to pumping on recovery wells. Two field sites--a humid site with clay cover and a semiarid site with sand cover--have been instrumented to examine vertical gas movement through cover materials. Results from the humid site indicate that: (1) concentrations of methane, carbon dioxide, oxygen and nitrogen in soil gas vary seasonally with soil moisture; (2) based on average methane gradients in soil gas and a simple diffusion model, up to 10E5 g methane m/sup /minus /2/ yr/sup /minus/1/ are vented through the cover materials at the humid site (area of 17 ht); and (3) during prolonged wet weather, pressure gradients of more than 2 kPa may develop between the cover materials and top of refuse, indicating that pressure flow is periodically an important mechanism for gas transport. The second project is addressing landfill gas generation. The major goal is to develop simple assay techniques to examine the gas production potential of landfilled refuse. Refuse samples extracted from various depths in a landfill are being leached by three different methods to separate microbial mass and substrate. The leachates are being subjected to Biochemical Methane Production (BMP) assays with periodic qualitative examination of microbial populations using fluorescence microscopy of live cultures and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

Bogner, J.; Rose, C.; Vogt, M.; Gartman, D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Biotic and abiotic interactions of deep-sea hydrothermal vent-endemic fish on the East Pacific Rise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of the ecology of fish endemic to hydrothermal vents on the East Pacific Rise was undertaken utilizing a variety of techniques, focusing on the bythitid Thermichthys hollisi. Stable isotope and gut content analyses ...

Buckman, Kate Lynn

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Radiant Barrier Insulation Performance in Full Scale Attics with Soffit and Ridge Venting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a limited data base on the full scale performance of radiant barrier insulation in attics. The performance of RBS have been shown to be dependent on attic ventilation characteristics. Tests have been conducted on a duplex located in Florida with soffit and ridge venting to measure attic performance. The unique features of these experiments are accurate and extensive instrumentation with heat flow meters, field verification of HFM calibration, extensive characterization of the installed ceiling insulation, ventilation rate measurements and extensive temperature instrumentation. The attics are designed to facilitate experimental changes without damaging the installed insulation. RBS performance has been measured for two natural ventilation levels for soffit and ridge venting. Previously, no full scale data have been developed for these test configurations. Test data for each of the test configurations was acquired for a minimum of two weeks with some acquired over a five week period. The Rl9 insulation performed as expected.

Ober, D. G.; Volckhausen, T. W.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 150  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Tennessee, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 400 330 305 285 310 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 NA 4,700 5,478 From Oil Wells.............................................. 2,200 2,663 3,942 R 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 2,200 2,663 3,942 4,700 5,478 Repressuring .................................................. NA NA NA NA NA Vented and Flared..........................................

240

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 122  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Jersey, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decorative vented gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 78  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 34. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - District of Columbia, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

242

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 86  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 38. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Idaho, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

243

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 80  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 34. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Connecticut, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

244

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 82  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 35. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Delaware, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

245

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 116  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 53. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Nebraska, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 96 106 109 111 114 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 886 904 1,187 1,229 943 From Oil Wells.................................................. 322 288 279 269 258 Total................................................................... 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 1,201 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 5 12 23 29 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 1,172

246

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 142  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 66. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - South Carolina, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

247

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 88  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 38. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Georgia, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

248

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 80  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 34. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Delaware, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

249

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 70  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 29. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Arizona, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year................................................ 6 7 7 6 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ........................................... 233 611 654 523 711 From Oil Wells ............................................. * * * * * From Coalbed Wells .................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells ................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 233 611 655 523 712 Repressuring ................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed.................

250

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 90  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Idaho, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

251

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 108  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 48. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Massachusetts, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

252

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 82  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 35. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - District of Columbia, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

253

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 74  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 32. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Connecticut, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

254

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 156  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 72. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Vermont, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

255

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 134  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - North Dakota, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 148 200 200 194 196 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 14,554 16,435 16,416 13,738 11,263 From Oil Wells.............................................. 41,350 46,351 54,381 73,450 81,226 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 55,904 62,786 70,797 87,188 92,489 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared..........................................

256

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 96  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Indiana, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 2,336 2,350 525 563 620 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 2,921 3,606 4,701 4,927 6,802 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 NA From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 NA Total............................................................... 2,921 3,606 4,701 4,927 6,802 Repressuring .................................................. NA NA NA NA NA Vented and Flared..........................................

257

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 140  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Oregon, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 15 14 18 21 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 454 621 409 778 821 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 454 621 409 778 821 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

258

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 78  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 34. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - District of Columbia, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

259

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 88  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Illinois, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 225 240 251 316 E 316 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 174 169 165 E 161 E 165 From Oil Wells.............................................. 5 5 5 E 5 E 5 Total............................................................... 180 174 170 E 166 E 170 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 180 174 170 166 170 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

260

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 116  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 52. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Missouri, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decorative vented gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 146  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 67. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - South Carolina, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

262

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 126  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Jersey, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

263

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 104  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 46. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Maine, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

264

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 78  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 33. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Connecticut, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

265

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 148  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - South Dakota, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 69 69 71 71 89 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 446 455 422 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 10,902 10,162 11,458 10,909 11,366 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. NA NA NA 1,098 1,561 Total............................................................... 11,349 10,616 11,880 12,007 12,927 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared..........................................

266

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 136  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Oregon, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 20 18 15 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,112 837 731 467 454 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,112 837 731 467 454 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,112 837 731 467 454 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

267

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 88  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 38. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Hawaii, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

268

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 154  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 72. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Virginia, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,521 3,429 3,506 3,870 4,132 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 71,543 76,915 143,644 R 85,508 88,610 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 71,543 76,915 143,644 R 85,508 88,610 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA NA NA Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 71,543

269

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 140  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Rhode Island, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

270

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 66  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 28. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Arizona, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year............................... 7 9 6 6 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ........................................... 300 443 331 233 611 From Oil Wells ............................................. * * * * * Total.............................................................. 301 443 331 233 611 Repressuring ................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation........................... 301 443 331 233 611 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production......................................

271

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 92  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Illinois, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 316 316 43 45 51 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ E 161 E 165 E 139 E 119 E 139 From Oil Wells.............................................. E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... NA NA E 1,250 E 1,069 E 1,299 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... E 166 E 170 E 1,394 E 1,193 E 1,443 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared..........................................

272

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 124  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Hampshire, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

273

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 108  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 48. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Maryland, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 7 7 7 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 48 35 28 43 43 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 48 35 28 43 43 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

274

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 120  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Hampshire, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

275

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 96  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Kentucky, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 14,370 14,367 12,900 13,920 14,175 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 92,795 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 92,795 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 81,723

276

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 146  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Tennessee, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 350 400 430 280 400 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 2,200 Total................................................................... 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 2,200 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA NA NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA NA NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 2,200

277

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 138  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Pennsylvania, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 40,100 40,830 42,437 44,227 46,654 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 168,501 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 168,501 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA NA NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA NA NA Wet After Lease Separation................................

278

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 104  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 47. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Massachusetts, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

279

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 126  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Hampshire, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

280

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 134  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - North Carolina, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decorative vented gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 84  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Hawaii, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

282

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 84  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - District of Columbia, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

283

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 164  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 76. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Wisconsin, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ........................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.................................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ..................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed.....................

284

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 84  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Hawaii, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

285

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 128  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 58. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Jersey, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

286

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 156  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Washington, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

287

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 112  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Minnesota, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

288

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 142  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Oregon, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 14 18 21 24 26 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 621 409 778 821 1,407 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 621 409 778 821 1,407 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

289

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 144  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 66. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Rhode Island, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

290

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 158  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Vermont, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

291

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 106  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 47. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Maryland, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 7 7 7 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 46 48 35 28 43 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 46 48 35 28 43 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

292

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 122  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Jersey, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

293

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 116  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 53. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Nebraska, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 106 109 111 114 114 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 904 1,187 1,229 943 1,033 From Oil Wells.............................................. 288 279 269 258 185 Total............................................................... 1,193 1,466 1,499 1,201 1,217 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 5 12 23 29 17 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 1,188 1,454 1,476 1,172 1,200 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

294

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 86  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Florida, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 2,845 2,000 2,742 290 13,938 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 2,845 2,000 2,742 290 13,938 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0

295

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 84  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Florida, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 2,954 2,845 2,000 2,742 290 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 2,954 2,845 2,000 2,742 290 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

296

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 118  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 54. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Nevada, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 6 6 5 5 5 Total............................................................... 6 6 5 5 5 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 6 6 5 5 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

297

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 96  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Iowa, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

298

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 130  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New York, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 5,449 5,985 6,680 6,675 6,628 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 54,851 55,339 54,232 49,607 44,273 From Oil Wells.............................................. 329 641 710 714 576 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 55,180 55,980 54,942 50,320 44,849 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared..........................................

299

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 148  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - South Carolina, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

300

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 112  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Missouri, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decorative vented gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 124  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Nevada, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 4 4 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 5 5 4 4 4 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 5 5 4 4 4 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

302

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 132  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New York, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 5,985 6,680 6,675 6,628 6,736 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 55,339 54,232 49,607 44,273 35,163 From Oil Wells.............................................. 641 710 714 576 650 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 55,980 54,942 50,320 44,849 35,813 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared..........................................

303

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 100  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Maine, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

304

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 160  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 75. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Wisconsin, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................

305

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 86  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Georgia, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

306

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 86  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 38. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Idaho, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

307

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 76  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 33. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Delaware, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

308

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 122  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Nebraska, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 114 186 322 285 276 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 1,033 1,331 2,862 2,734 2,092 From Oil Wells.............................................. 185 228 221 182 163 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 1,217 1,560 3,083 2,916 2,255 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared..........................................

309

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 118  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 53. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Missouri, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

310

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 150  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - South Dakota, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 69 71 71 89 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 455 422 0 0 1,300 From Oil Wells.............................................. 10,162 11,458 10,909 11,366 11,240 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. NA NA 1,098 1,561 NA Total............................................................... 10,616 11,880 12,007 12,927 12,540 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared..........................................

311

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 114  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Minnesota, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

312

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 152  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Vermont, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

313

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 92  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Idaho, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

314

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 100  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Maine, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

315

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 166  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Wisconsin, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ........................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.................................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ..................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed.....................

316

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 108  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Minnesota, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

317

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 94  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 41. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Illinois, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 316 43 45 51 50 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ E 165 E 139 E 119 E 139 E 1,198 From Oil Wells.............................................. E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... NA E 1,250 E 1,069 E 1,299 NA From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... E 170 E 1,394 1,193 1,443 1,203 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared..........................................

318

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 118  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 54. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Nevada, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 6 6 5 5 Total................................................................... 7 6 6 5 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 6 6 5 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

319

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 144  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 67. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - South Dakota, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 68 69 61 61 69 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 563 531 550 531 446 From Oil Wells.................................................. 10,751 9,894 11,055 11,238 10,902 Total................................................................... 11,313 10,424 11,605 11,768 11,349 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 2,043 1,880 2,100 2,135 2,071 Wet After Lease Separation................................

320

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 128  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - North Carolina, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decorative vented gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 126  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 58. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New York, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 5,913 6,496 5,878 5,781 5,449 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 27,632 36,637 35,943 45,963 54,851 From Oil Wells.................................................. 155 179 194 87 329 Total................................................................... 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 55,180 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 27,787

322

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 72  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 30. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Arizona, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year................................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ........................................... 611 654 523 711 183 From Oil Wells ............................................. * * * * 0 From Coalbed Wells .................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells ................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 611 655 523 712 183 Repressuring ................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed.................

323

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 112  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Missouri, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

324

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 160  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 75. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Wisconsin, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year .................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total.................................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ..................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production .........................................

325

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 140  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Rhode Island, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

326

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 90  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Hawaii, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

327

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 102  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 46. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Maryland, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 5 7 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 32 22 48 34 46 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 32 22 48 34 46 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 32 22 48 34 46 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

328

Case history of industrial plant steam system layup for direct-fired gas operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the facts of an industrial plant steam system layup for direct fired gas operations. Fuel price savings indicated that gas firing a paper dryer, the largest steam user in the plant, would pay for itself in one year. Conversion work is detailed. Primary gas distribution was achieved by using one line of the steam loop. Machine water heating, power venting, space heating, and air makeup heating, among other conversions, are also specified.

Stacy, G.N.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

World Natural Gas, 1978  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

World marketed production of natural gas in 1978 totaled 51.749 trillion CF (up from 50.1 TCF in 1977); this 3.3% increase, however, was slightly lower than 1977's 3.7% rise. US production, which fell 0.3% dropped to 38.6% of the world total, while the USSR share (13.137 TCF) accounted for 25.4% (for a growth rate of 7.5%). Of the world gross production of 62.032 TCF, 69.7% came from gas wells; the remainder was associated with oil. Thirty-one percent of the 10.282 TCF difference between gross and marketed gas production was used for oil reservoir repressuring, while the balance (7.094 TCF) was vented and flared. Internationally traded gas movements rose to 11.6% of production. The Netherlands, the USSR, and Canada accounted for 30.6%, 20.1% and 14.7%, respectively, of total 1978 exports. At 0.956 TCF, LNG shipments accounted for 15.9% of world trade, a 35.2% higher share than in 1977; most of this growth was due to increased Indonesia-to-Japan volumes.

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Gas Explosion Tests on East Jordan Iron Works Rectangular Composite Secondary Box Covers for Con Edison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an account of continuing research by Con Edison and EPRI to address issues related to manhole events caused by the accumulation of gases in underground structures. It summarizes the results of gas explosion tests performed in June 2008 on rectangular composite vented covers produced by East Jordan Iron Works Company.

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

331

Laclede Gas Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laclede Gas Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Laclede Gas Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Laclede Gas Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Other Commercial Weatherization Maximum Rebate Commercial Incentive: Contact Laclede Gas for general program incentive maximum Gas Boilers: 1,000,000 BTU/hr ($3,000) Continuous Modulating Burner: $15,000 cap per burner Gas-fired Boiler Tune Up: $750 per building (non-profit), $500 per boiler (C&I) High Efficiency Air-Forced Furnaces: $200-$250 Vent Dampers: $500 per boiler Steam Trap Replacements: $2,500 Primary Air Dampers: $500 Food Service Gas Steamer: $475 Food Service Gas Fryer: $350

332

KK9, Nanostructure Decorated AlGaN/GaN HEMTs for Chemical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high sensitivity of ZnO, towards the exposure to NH3, H2, O3, CO, NO2, and ethanol etc., makes it viable for gas sensing applications. Similarly, the same ...

333

Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

Alonso, Carol T. (Orinda, CA); Bender, Donald A. (Dublin, CA); Bowman, Barry R. (Livermore, CA); Burnham, Alan K. (Livermore, CA); Chesnut, Dwayne A. (Pleasanton, CA); Comfort, III, William J. (Livermore, CA); Guymon, Lloyd G. (Livermore, CA); Henning, Carl D. (Livermore, CA); Pedersen, Knud B. (Livermore, CA); Sefcik, Joseph A. (Tracy, CA); Smith, Joseph A. (Livermore, CA); Strauch, Mark S. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait`s oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R. [and others

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R.; Burnham, A.K.; Chesnut, D.A.; Comfort, W.J. III; Guymon, L.G.; Henning, C.D.; Pedersen, K.B.; Sefcik, J.A.; Smith, J.A.; Strauch, M.S.

1993-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

336

No loss fueling station for liquid natural gas vehicles  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a no loss fueling station for delivery of liquid natural gas (LNG) to a use device such as a motor vehicle. It comprises: a pressure building tank holding a quantity of LNG and gas head; means for delivering LNG to the pressure building tank; means for selectively building the pressure in the pressure building tank; means for selectively reducing the pressure in the pressure building tank; means for controlling the pressure building and pressure reducing means to maintain a desired pressure in the pressure building tank without venting natural gas to the atmosphere; and means for delivering the LNG from the pressure building tank to the use device.

Cieslukowski, R.E.

1992-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

337

Process for off-gas particulate removal and apparatus therefor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the event of a breach in the off-gas line of a melter operation requiring closure of the line, a secondary vessel vent line is provided with a particulate collector utilizing atomization for removal of large particulates from the off-gas. The collector receives the gas containing particulates and directs a portion of the gas through outer and inner annular channels. The collector further receives a fluid, such as water, which is directed through the outer channel together with a second portion of the particulate-laden gas. The outer and inner channels have respective ring-like termination apertures concentrically disposed adjacent one another on the outer edge of the downstream side of the particulate collector. Each of the outer and inner channels curves outwardly away from the collector`s centerline in proceeding toward the downstream side of the collector. Gas flow in the outer channel maintains the fluid on the channel`s wall in the form of a ``wavy film,`` while the gas stream from the inner channel shears the fluid film as it exits the outer channel in reducing the fluid to small droplets. Droplets formed by the collector capture particulates in the gas stream by one of three mechanisms: impaction, interception or Brownian diffusion in removing the particulates. The particulate-laden droplets are removed from the fluid stream by a vessel vent condenser or mist eliminator. 4 figs.

Carl, D.E.

1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

338

GAS INJECTION/WELL STIMULATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

Driver Production proposes to conduct a gas repressurization/well stimulation project on a six well, 80-acre portion of the Dutcher Sand of the East Edna Field, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. The site has been location of previous successful flue gas injection demonstration but due to changing economic and sales conditions, finds new opportunities to use associated natural gas that is currently being vented to the atmosphere to repressurize the reservoir to produce additional oil. The established infrastructure and known geological conditions should allow quick startup and much lower operating costs than flue gas. Lessons learned from the previous project, the lessons learned form cyclical oil prices and from other operators in the area will be applied. Technology transfer of the lessons learned from both projects could be applied by other small independent operators.

John K. Godwin

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Worchester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator that are used in process streams within the CWF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) to prevent MCO vent drain to either reduce air In-leakage or loss of He. The valves have couplings for transverse actuator mounting.

MISKA, C.R.

2000-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

340

Worchester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves  

SciTech Connect

These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator that are used in process streams within the CVDF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) to prevent MCO vent drain to either reduce air in-leakage or loss of He. The valves have couplings for transverse actuator mounting.

VAN KATWIJK, C.

2000-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decorative vented gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Whitey Swagelok SCHe ball valves Provide Isolation between SCHe Purge Lines C and D and the Process Vent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These valves are 1/4 inch ball valves fabricated of 316 stainless steel. Packing is TFE (standard). They provide an isolation function betwen SCHe Purge Line C, (PV-V-*079), and Purge Line D, (PV-V-*080), and the Process Vent.

MISKA, C.R.

2000-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

342

Assessment of Literature and Simulation Software Related to Combustion Appliance Venting Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of Literature Related to Assessment of Literature Related to Combustion Appliance Venting Systems V.H. Rapp, B.C. Singer, J.C. Stratton, C.P. Wray Environmental Energy Technologies Division June 2012 LBNL-5798E 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned

343

CenterPoint Energy - Business Gas Heating Rebates | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CenterPoint Energy - Business Gas Heating Rebates CenterPoint Energy - Business Gas Heating Rebates CenterPoint Energy - Business Gas Heating Rebates < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Other Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Boiler System, Modulating Boiler Burner, and Vent Dampeners: 25% of equipment cost Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Arkansas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Solutions Program: Varies Direct Install Measures: No cost to customers 85% to 91.9% Efficiency Boiler: $1,400/MMBtuh Input 92%+ Efficiency Boiler: $2000/MMBtuh Input Modulating Boiler Burners: $1,000/MMBtuh Input Vent Dampers: $250/boiler Boiler Controls: $150/system Storage Water Heater: $75 Tankless Water Heater: $500

344

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 112  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Minnesota, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

345

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 104  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 46. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Maine, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

346

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 92  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Illinois, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 240 251 316 316 316 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 169 165 E 161 E 165 E 164 From Oil Wells.............................................. 5 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 Total............................................................... 174 170 E 166 E 170 E 169 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 174 E 170 E 166 E 170 E 169 Extraction Loss...............................................

347

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 164  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 76. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Wisconsin, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year..... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total.................................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ..................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0

348

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 106  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 47. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Maryland, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 7 7 7 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 48 34 46 48 35 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 48 34 46 48 35 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 48 34 46 48 35 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production

349

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 144  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 66. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Rhode Island, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

350

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 90  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Idaho, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

351

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 140  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Oregon, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 15 15 15 14 18 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 731 467 454 621 409 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 731 467 454 621 409 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 731 467 454 621 409 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0

352

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 164  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 76. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Wisconsin, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year..... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ........................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total.................................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ..................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss..................................................

353

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 86  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Georgia, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

354

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 82  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 35. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - District of Columbia, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

355

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 122  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Nevada, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 5 5 5 5 4 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 5 5 5 5 4 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 5 5 5 5 4 Extraction Loss...............................................

356

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 96  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Iowa, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

357

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 88  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 38. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Hawaii, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

358

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 156  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 72. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Vermont, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

359

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 80  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 34. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Delaware, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

360

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 146  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 67. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - South Carolina, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decorative vented gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 146  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 67. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - South Carolina, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production

362

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 86  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Georgia, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

363

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 122  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Nevada, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 6 5 5 5 5 Total............................................................... 6 5 5 5 5 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 6 5 5 5 5 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

364

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 132  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - North Carolina, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production

365

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 156  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 72. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Vermont, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

366

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 90  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Idaho, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

367

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 70  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 29. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Arizona, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year . 9 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ........................................... 443 331 233 611 654 From Oil Wells ............................................. * * * * * Total.............................................................. 443 331 233 611 655 Repressuring ................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production...................................... 443 331 233 611 655 Extraction Loss .............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production

368

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 124  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Hampshire, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

369

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 126  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Jersey, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

370

COMPARISON OF VENTED AND ABSOLUTE PRESSURE TRANSDUCERS FOR WATER-LEVEL MONITORING IN HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU WELLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automated water-level data collected using vented pressure transducers deployed in Hanford Site Central Plateau wells commonly display more variability than manual tape measurements in response to barometric pressure fluctuations. To explain this difference, it was hypothesized that vented pressure transducers installed in some wells are subject to barometric pressure effects that reduce water-level measurement accuracy. Vented pressure transducers use a vent tube, which is open to the atmosphere at land surface, to supply air pressure to the transducer housing for barometric compensation so the transducer measurements will represent only the water pressure. When using vented transducers, the assumption is made that the air pressure between land surface and the well bore is in equilibrium. By comparison, absolute pressure transducers directly measure the air pressure within the wellbore. Barometric compensation is achieved by subtracting the well bore air pressure measurement from the total pressure measured by a second transducer submerged in the water. Thus, no assumption of air pressure equilibrium is needed. In this study, water-level measurements were collected from the same Central Plateau wells using both vented and absolute pressure transducers to evaluate the different methods of barometric compensation. Manual tape measurements were also collected to evaluate the transducers. Measurements collected during this study demonstrated that the vented pressure transducers over-responded to barometric pressure fluctuations due to a pressure disequilibrium between the air within the wellbores and the atmosphere at land surface. The disequilibrium is thought to be caused by the relatively long time required for barometric pressure changes to equilibrate between land surface and the deep vadose zone and may be exacerbated by the restriction of air flow between the well bore and the atmosphere due to the presence of sample pump landing plates and well caps. The disequilibrium is likely limited to wells screened across the water table (i.e., open to the deep vadose zone) where the depth to water is large or a low-permeability layer occurs in the vadose zone. Such wells are a pathway for air movement between the deep vadose zone and land surface and this sustains the pressure disequilibrium between the well bore and the atmosphere for longer time periods. Barometric over-response was not observed with the absolute pressure transducers because barometric compensation was achieved by directly measuring the air pressure within the well. Users of vented pressure transducers should be aware of the over-response issue in certain Hanford Site wells and ascertain if it will affect the use of the data. Pressure disequilibrium between the well and the atmosphere can be identified by substantial air movement through the wellbore. In wells exhibiting pressure disequilibrium, it is recommended that absolute pressure transducers be used rather than vented transducers for applications that require precise automated determinations of well water-level changes in response to barometric pressure fluctuations.

MCDONALD JP

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

371

Columbia Gas of Kentucky - Home Savings Rebate Program (Kentucky) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Columbia Gas of Kentucky - Home Savings Rebate Program (Kentucky) Columbia Gas of Kentucky - Home Savings Rebate Program (Kentucky) Columbia Gas of Kentucky - Home Savings Rebate Program (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Home Energy Audit: Free Forced Air Furnace: $400 Dual Fuel Furnace: $300 Tankless Water Heater: $300 Tank Water Heater: $200 Power Vent Water Heater: $250 Space Heater: $100 Provider Columbia Gas of Kentucky Columbia Gas of Kentucky offers rebates to residential customers for the purchase and installation of energy efficient appliances and equipment. Water heaters, furnaces and space heating equipment are available for cash

372

Method of and apparatus for preheating pressurized fluidized bed combustor and clean-up subsystem of a gas turbine power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a gas turbine power plant having a pressurized fluidized bed combustor, gas turbine-air compressor subsystem and a gas clean-up subsystem interconnected for fluid flow therethrough, a pipe communicating the outlet of the compressor of the gas turbine-air compressor subsystem with the interior of the pressurized fluidized bed combustor and the gas clean-up subsystem to provide for flow of compressed air, heated by the heat of compression, therethrough. The pressurized fluidized bed combustor and gas clean-up subsystem are vented to atmosphere so that the heated compressed air flows therethrough and loses heat to the interior of those components before passing to the atmosphere.

Cole, Rossa W. (E. Rutherford, NJ); Zoll, August H. (Cedar Grove, NJ)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Bidirectional gas movement through landfill cover materials, Volume 1: Instrumentation and preliminary site investigations at Mallard North Landfill, Dupage County, Illinois  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since the first commercial landfill gas recovery system was installed in 1975 at the Palos Verdes Landfill in southern California (Zimmerman et al., 1983), there have been few systematic research efforts aimed at understanding gas dynamics in the landfill and, in particular, gas exchange between the landfill and the atmosphere through the cover materials. To maximize the amount of landfill gas available to a recovery system, the impact of processes by which gas is vented or consumed in near-surface zones must be minimized. This report describes a project undertaken to monitor the flow of gas in a landfill. Data from the observations are presented. 32 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

Bogner, J.; Brubaker, K.; Tome, C.; Vogt, M.; Gartman, D.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Gas Explosion Tests on Pacific Gas and Electric Company Round Manhole Covers with the Swiveloc CPR-II - Controlled Pressure Release Manhole Cover Restraint System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents findings from the continuing research and development effort to manage and mitigate the effects of underground distribution manhole events. Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) approached the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to investigate the performance of several manhole covers, including the native PG&E solid and vented covers and new covers built by Swiveloc, LLC and designated as CPR-II. The tests were conducted at the EPRI-Lenox manhole research facility in Lenox, Massachus...

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

375

Journal of the Geological Society, London, Vol. 163, 2006, pp. 671682. Printed in Great Britain. Structure and evolution of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Karoo Basin,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, formed at c. 183 Ma, is characterized by the presence of voluminous basaltic intrusive complexes within the Karoo Basin, extrusive lava sequences and hydrothermal vent complexes. These last are pipe

Svensen, Henrik

376

Expansion and user study of CoolVent : inclusion of thermal comfort models in an early-design natural ventilation tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CoolVent, a software design tool for architects, has been improved. The work of Maria- Alejandra Menchaca-B. and colleagues has been improved to include a more robust and intuitive building and window dimensioning scheme, ...

Rich, Rebecca E. (Rebecca Eileen)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

The Effects of Infrared-Blocking Pigments and Deck Venting on Stone-Coated Metal Residential Roofs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field data show that stone-coated metal shakes and S-mission tile, which exploit the use of infraredblocking color pigments (IrBCPs), along with underside venting reduce the heat flow penetrating the conditioned space of a residence by 70% compared with the amount of heat flow penetrating roofs with conventional asphalt shingles. Stone-coated metal roof products are typically placed on battens and counter-battens and nailed through the battens to the roof deck. The design provides venting on the underside of the metal roof that reduces the heat flow penetrating a home. The Metal Construction Association (MCA) and its affiliate members installed stone-coated metal roofs with shake and S-mission tile profiles and a painted metal shake roof on a fully instrumented attic test assembly at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Measurements of roof, deck, attic, and ceiling temperatures; heat flows; solar reflectance; thermal emittance; and ambient weather were recorded for each of the test roofs and also for an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventional pigmented and direct nailed asphalt shingle roof. All attic assemblies had ridge and soffit venting; the ridge was open to the underside of the stone-coated metal roofs. A control assembly with a conventional asphalt shingle roof was used for comparing deck and ceiling heat transfer rates.

Miller, William A [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Landfill gas generation and migration: Review of current research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With regard to gas migration, a field investigation is examining bidirectional gas movement through landfill cover materials by processes of pressure and diffusional flow. The purpose of the study is to quantify gas loss from the landfill reservoir by natural venting and air influx due to pumping on recovery wells. Two field sites - a humid site with clay cover and a semiarid site with sand cover - have been instrumented to examine vertical gas movement through cover materials. Results from the humid site indicate that concentrations of methane, carbon dioxide, oxygen and nitrogen in soil gas vary seasonally with soil moisture; up to 10E5 g methane m/sup -2/ yr/sup -1/ are vented through the cover materials at the humid site (area of 17 ht); and during prolonged wet weather, pressure gradients of more than 2 kPa may develop between the cover materials and top of refuse, indicating that pressure flow is periodically an important mechanism for gas transport. Addressing landfill gas generation, the goal is to develop simple assay techniques to examined the gas production potential of landfilled refuse. Refuse samples extracted from various depths in a landfill are being leached by three different methods to separate microbial mass and substrate. The leachates are being subjected to Biochemical Methane Production (BMP) assays with periodic qualitative examination of microbial populations using fluorescence microscopy of live cultures and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Triplicate assays of the leachates that produce insignificant quantities of biogas after 90 days incubation are being amended with sucrose, a nutrient broth, or a bacterial seed. Response of gas production to each of the three amendments was similar across all samples, regardless of the leaching method originally employed, with nutrient addition producing the most stable long-term biogas production with the highest methane content. 23 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Bogner, J.; Rose, C.; Vogt, M.; Gartman, D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Engineering work plan for container venting system drill press assembly troubleshooting. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This work plan is for troubleshooting the current CVS drill press to ensure that the drill bit assembly doesn`t bind in the press plate. A drill press assembly has been fabricated for the Container Venting System (CVS). The drill bit assembly has bound in the press plate in previous revisions of this design. Initial troubleshooting of the drill press per Rev. 0 of this work plan was performed at the 200W Kaiser Machine Shop under Work Package 2H9401670F, Internal Work Order E20027. The drill press operated without jamming. Then, during the pre-operational test on 11/14/17 and the operational test on 11/17/94, two drum lids were drilled. Immediately after the test on 11/17/94, the drill was again operated, and it jammed. An inspection found shavings at the bottom of the drill bit assembly, between the drill bit sleeve and the press plate bore. This revised work plan provides direction for the machine shop to diagnose and correct this recent problem.

Prather, M.C.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Engine cooling system air venting arrangement with buoyant air purge valve  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An air vent arrangement is described for the cooling system of an automotive type engine having a radiator with a coolant inlet. The engine has coolant passages communicating with the radiator through an outlet essentially horizontally disposed, tubing connecting the radiator inlet and coolant outlet, and a thermostat in the outlet horizontally movable to open and closed positions. A horizontally disposed air bleed bypass passage is located vertically above the thermostat connecting the coolant outlet to a portion of the tubing downstream of the thermostat bypassing the same when the thermostat is in a closed position for bleeding air from the cooling system. The bypass passage has a valve therein moveable between a position blocking flow of coolant through the same and a second position opening the passage permitting the bleed of air therethrough. The valve is buoyant and constructed and arranged to pivot from a non flowblocking air bleed position into a flow blocking position in response to flow of coolant into the bypass passage acting thereagainst.

Schnizlein, M.E.

1987-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decorative vented gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

PERCOLATION ON GRAIN BOUNDARY NETWORKS: APPLICATION TO FISSION GAS RELEASE IN NUCLEAR FUELS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The percolation behavior of grain boundary networks is characterized in two- and three-dimensional lattices with circular macroscale cross-sections that correspond to nuclear fuel elements. The percolation of gas bubbles on grain boundaries, and the subsequent percolation of grain boundary networks is the primary mechanism of fission gas release from nuclear fuels. Both radial cracks and radial gradients in grain boundary property distributions are correlated with the fraction of grain boundaries vented to the free surfaces. Our results show that cracks surprisingly do not significantly increase the percolation of uniform grain boundary networks. However, for networks with radial gradients in boundary properties, the cracks can considerably raise the vented grain boundary content.

Paul C. Millett

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Level II Audit (For-profit organizations): $400 Level I Audit (For-profit organizations): $250 Programmable Thermostat: 50% of cost Steam Traps: $250 Boiler Tune Up: $500 Vent Damper: $500 O2 Trim Control: $5,000 Gas boiler 300,000 to 9,999,999 Btu/hr output: $750 - $5,000

383

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 132  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Ohio, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,917 34,593 33,828 33,828 33,735 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 97,272 97,154 87,993 85,018 77,819 From Oil Wells.................................................. 2,835 6,004 5,647 5,458 5,704 Total................................................................... 100,107 103,158 93,641 90,476 83,523 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA NA NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA NA NA Wet After Lease Separation................................

384

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 130  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - North Dakota, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 100 117 117 148 200 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 15,130 14,524 15,565 14,554 16,435 From Oil Wells.............................................. 44,848 43,362 41,768 41,350 46,351 Total............................................................... 59,978 57,886 57,333 55,904 62,786 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 2,791 2,070 2,198 3,260 7,460 Wet After Lease Separation............................

385

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 70  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 30. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - California, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 1,232 1,249 1,272 1,356 1,451 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 92,050 90,368 79,823 87,599 94,612 From Oil Wells.............................................. 304,972 278,072 269,004 264,445 254,526 Total............................................................... 397,021 368,440 348,827 352,044 349,137 Repressuring .................................................. 30,991 23,806 22,405 29,134 29,001 Vented and Flared.......................................... 2,690 3,940 3,215 2,120 1,562 Wet After Lease Separation............................

386

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 146  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Tennessee, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 400 430 280 400 330 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 2,050 1,803 2,100 2,200 1,793 Total............................................................... 2,050 1,803 2,100 2,200 1,793 Repressuring .................................................. NA NA NA NA NA Vented and Flared.......................................... NA NA NA NA NA Wet After Lease Separation............................ 2,050 1,803 2,100 2,200 1,793 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

387

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 134  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 62. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Oklahoma, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 33,279 34,334 35,612 36,704 38,060 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 1,476,204 1,487,451 1,597,915 R 1,592,524 1,640,389 From Oil Wells.............................................. 105,402 70,704 57,854 R 46,786 48,597 Total............................................................... 1,581,606 1,558,155 1,655,769 R 1,639,310 1,688,985 Repressuring .................................................. NA NA NA NA NA Vented and Flared.......................................... NA NA NA NA NA Wet After Lease Separation............................

388

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 70  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 30. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - California, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,244 1,232 1,249 1,272 1,356 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 94,790 92,050 90,368 79,823 87,599 From Oil Wells.................................................. 320,048 304,972 278,072 269,004 264,445 Total................................................................... 414,838 397,021 368,440 348,827 352,044 Repressuring ...................................................... 35,052 30,991 23,806 22,405 29,134 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,717 2,690 3,940

389

Net Withdrawals of Natural Gas from Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

390

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 130  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - North Dakota, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 95 100 117 117 148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 13,846 15,130 14,524 15,565 14,554 From Oil Wells.................................................. 44,141 44,848 43,362 R 41,768 41,350 Total................................................................... 57,987 59,978 57,886 R 57,333 55,904 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,166 2,791 2,070 R 2,198 3,260 Wet After Lease Separation................................

391

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 80  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 35. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Florida, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 3,785 3,474 3,525 2,954 2,845 Total............................................................... 3,785 3,474 3,525 2,954 2,845 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 3,785 3,474 3,525 2,954 2,845 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

392

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 114  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 52. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Montana, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,331 4,544 4,539 4,971 5,751 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 71,985 76,053 78,175 87,292 91,833 From Oil Wells.................................................. 9,816 10,371 8,256 10,546 16,722 Total................................................................... 81,802 86,424 86,431 97,838 108,555 Repressuring ...................................................... * * 2 5 9 Vented and Flared.............................................. 404 349 403 1,071 629 Wet After Lease Separation................................

393

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 100  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Kentucky, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 14,175 15,892 16,563 16,290 17,152 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 92,795 95,320 95,437 110,587 106,782 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 1,529 1,518 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. NA NA NA 2,000 5,000 Total............................................................... 92,795 95,320 95,437 114,116 113,300 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared..........................................

394

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 150  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Utah, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,601 3,005 3,220 3,657 4,092 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 264,809 260,554 254,488 259,432 279,412 From Oil Wells.................................................. 36,612 32,509 29,871 31,153 32,583 Total................................................................... 301,422 293,063 284,359 290,586 311,994 Repressuring ...................................................... 575 2,150 1,785 1,337 1,294 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,847 955 705 688 595 Wet After Lease Separation................................

395

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 94  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Kansas, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 16,957 17,387 18,120 18,946 19,713 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 401,396 369,624 350,413 332,860 327,386 From Oil Wells.............................................. 54,736 50,403 47,784 45,390 44,643 Total............................................................... 456,132 420,027 398,197 378,250 372,029 Repressuring .................................................. 775 714 677 643 620 Vented and Flared.......................................... 456 420 398 378 365 Wet After Lease Separation............................

396

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 62  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

62 62 Table 26. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Alabama, 2001-2005 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year....................................... 4,597 4,803 5,157 5,526 5,523 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ................................................... 385,915 380,700 365,330 333,583 311,479 From Oil Wells ..................................................... 6,066 5,802 5,580 5,153 5,728 Total...................................................................... 391,981 386,502 370,910 338,735 317,206 Repressuring ......................................................... 12,758 10,050 4,062 1,307 478 Vented and Flared .................................................

397

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 98  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Louisiana, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 17,100 16,939 20,734 18,838 17,459 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 1,282,137 1,283,513 1,262,361 1,212,453 1,282,075 From Oil Wells.............................................. 100,324 94,615 114,934 97,460 96,163 Total............................................................... 1,382,461 1,378,128 1,377,295 1,309,913 1,378,238 Repressuring .................................................. 9,754 18,446 19,031 8,638 10,454 Vented and Flared.......................................... 10,957 9,283 5,015

398

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 106  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 48. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Michigan, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7,425 7,700 8,600 8,500 8,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 224,560 224,112 194,121 212,276 213,421 From Oil Wells.................................................. 56,140 56,028 48,530 53,069 53,355 Total................................................................... 280,700 280,140 242,651 265,345 266,776 Repressuring ...................................................... 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324

399

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 98  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Louisiana, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 16,350 17,100 16,939 20,734 18,838 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,398,981 1,282,137 1,283,513 R 1,262,361 1,212,453 From Oil Wells.................................................. 125,693 100,324 94,615 R 114,934 97,460 Total................................................................... 1,524,673 1,382,461 1,378,128 R 1,377,295 1,309,913 Repressuring ...................................................... 10,838 9,754 18,446 19,031 8,638 Vented and Flared..............................................

400

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 154  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 72. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Virginia, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 3,429 3,506 3,870 4,132 5,179 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 76,915 143,644 85,508 88,610 103,027 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 76,915 143,644 85,508 88,610 103,027 Repressuring .................................................. NA NA NA NA NA Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 76,915 143,644 85,508 88,610 103,027

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decorative vented gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 90  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Indiana, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 2,321 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 3,135 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 3,135 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA NA NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA NA NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,064 1,309 1,464

402

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 134  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 62. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Oklahoma, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 32,672 33,279 34,334 35,612 36,704 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,466,833 1,476,204 1,487,451 R 1,597,915 1,622,046 From Oil Wells.................................................. 148,551 105,402 70,704 R 57,854 48,090 Total................................................................... 1,615,384 1,581,606 1,558,155 R 1,655,769 1,670,137 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA NA NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA NA NA

403

Portugal Egypt Figure 2. Natural gas supply and disposition in the United States, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Portugal Egypt Figure 2. Natural gas supply and disposition in the United States, 2012 (trillion cubic feet) Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Gross Withdrawals From Gas and Oil Wells Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented/Flared Reservoir Repressuring Production Dry Gas Imports Canada Trinidad/Tobago Natural Gas Storage Facilities Exports Japan Canada Mexico Additions Withdrawals Gas Industry Use Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power 29.5 0.8 0.2 3.3 2.963 0.112 0.620 0.971 0.014 24.1 1.3 2.9 2.8 2.5 2.9 7.2 0.03 9.1 0.003 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-895, "Annual Quantity and

404

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

SciTech Connect

New single-family home construction represents a significant and important market for the introduction of energy-efficient gas-fired space heating and water-heating equipment. In the new construction market, the choice of furnace and water-heater type is primarily driven by first cost considerations and the availability of power vent and condensing water heaters. Few analysis have been performed to assess the economic impacts of the different combinations of space and water-heating equipment. Thus, equipment is often installed without taking into consideration the potential economic and energy savings of installing space and water-heating equipment combinations. In this study, we use a life-cycle cost analysis that accounts for uncertainty and variability of the analysis inputs to assess the economic benefits of gas furnace and water-heater design combinations. This study accounts not only for the equipment cost but also for the cost of installing, maintaining, repairing, and operating the equipment over its lifetime. Overall, this study, which is focused on US single-family new construction households that install gas furnaces and storage water heaters, finds that installing a condensing or power-vent water heater together with condensing furnace is the most cost-effective option for the majority of these houses. Furthermore, the findings suggest that the new construction residential market could be a target market for the large-scale introduction of a combination of condensing or power-vent water heaters with condensing furnaces.

Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

405

CHARACTERIZATION OF DWPF MELTER OFF-GAS QUENCHER SAMPLE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recently received a deposit sample from the Melter Primary Off Gas System (POG) of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This sample was composed of material that had been collected while the quencher was in operation January 27, 2011 through March 31, 2011. DWPF requested, through a technical assistance request, characterization of the melter off-gas deposits by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and chemical analysis. The purpose of the Melter Off-Gas System is to reduce the amount of radioactive particles and mercury in the gases vented to the atmosphere. Gases emitted from the melter pass through the primary film cooler, quencher, Off-Gas Condensate Tank (OGCT), Steam Atomized Scrubbers (SAS), a condenser, a high efficiency mist eliminator, and a high efficiency particulate air filter, before being vented to the Process Vessel Vent System. The film coolers cool the gases leaving the melter vapor space from {approx}750 C to {approx}375 C, by introducing air and steam to the flow. In the next step, the quencher cools the gas to about 60 C by bringing the condensate from the OGCT in contact with the effluent (Figure 1). Most of the steam in the effluent is then condensed and the melter vapor space pressure is reduced. The purpose of the OGCT is to collect and store the condensate formed during the melter operation. Condensate from the OGCT is circulated to the SAS and atomized with steam. This atomized condensate is mixed with the off-gas to wet and join the particulate which is then removed in the cyclone. The next stage incorporates a chilled water condenser which separates the vapors and elemental mercury from the off-gas steam. Primary off-gas deposit samples from the DWPF melter have previously been analyzed. In 2003, samples from just past the film cooler, from the inlet of the quencher and inside the quencher were analyzed at SRNL. It was determined that the samples were a mixture of sludge and glass frit. The major component was Si along with Fe, Al, and other elements in the radioactive waste being processed. The deposits analyzed also contained U-235 fission products and actinide elements. Prior to that, deposits in the off-gas system in the DWPF nonradioactive half scale melter and the one-tenth scale integrated DWPF melter system were analyzed and determined to be mixtures of alkali rich chlorides, sulfates, borates, and fluorides entrained with iron oxides, spinels and frit particles formed by vapor-phase transport and condensation. Additional work was performed in 2007 in which researchers similarly found the deposits to be a combination of sludge and frit particles.

Newell, J.

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

406

Major transitions in evolution linked to thermal gradients above hydrothermal vents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The emergence of the main divisions of today's life: (1) unicellular prokaryotes, (2) unicellular eukaryotes, (3) multicellular eukaryotes, and (4) metazoans, are examples of the--still unexplained--major transitions in evolution. Regarding the origin of life, I have proposed that primordial life functioned as heat engine (thermosynthesis) while thermally cycled in convecting volcanic hot springs. Here I argue for a role of thermal gradients above submarine hydrothermal vents (SHV) in several major transitions. The last decade has witnessed the emergence of phononics, a novel discipline in physics based on controlled heat transport in thermal gradients. It builds thermal analogs to electronic devices: the thermal diode, the thermal transistor, the thermal switch, the thermal amplifier, the thermal memory--the thermal computer has been proposed. Encouraged by (1) the many similarities between microtubules (MT) and carbon nanotubes, which have a very high thermal conductivity, and (2) the recent discovery of a silk protein which also has a very high thermal conductivity, I combine and extend the mentioned ideas, and propose the general conjecture that several major transitions of evolution were effected by thermal processes, with four additional partial conjectures: (1) The first organisms used heat engines during thermosynthesis in convection cells; (2) The first eukaryotic cells used MT during thermosynthesis in the thermal gradient above SHV; (3) The first metazoans used transport of water or in water during thermosynthesis above SHV under an ice-covered ocean during the Gaskiers Snowball Earth; and (4) The first mammalian brain used a thermal machinery based on thermal gradients in or across the cortex. When experimentally proven these conjectures, which are testable by the methods of synthetic biology, would significantly enhance our understanding of life.

Anthonie W. J. Muller

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

407

Ruslands Gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper is about Russian natural gas and the possibility for Russia to use its reserves of natural gas politically towards the European Union to… (more)

Elkjær, Jonas Bondegaard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Regulatory Reduction RFI, 76 Fed. Reg. 6123, February 3, 2011 | Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Reduction RFI, 76 Fed. Reg. 6123, February 3, 2011 Regulatory Reduction RFI, 76 Fed. Reg. 6123, February 3, 2011 Regulatory Reduction RFI, 76 Fed. Reg. 6123, February 3, 2011 This is in reply to comments filed by the Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association (HPBA) urging the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to repeal its energy conservation standards for direct heating equipment as applied to decorative vented gas fireplaces. I support HPBA's comments because I do not believe that decorative vented gas fireplaces were ever meant to be included under the term "direct heating equipment" as that term appears in the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA). Regulatory Reduction RFI, 76 Fed. Reg. 6123, February 3, 2011 More Documents & Publications .Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association's Comments on DOE's Regulatory Burden

409

For Immediate Release  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2011 7, 2011 Daniel Cohen, Esq. Office of General Counsel U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585 RE: Regulatory Reduction RFI, 76 Fed. Reg. 6123, February 3, 2011 Dear Mr. Cohen: This is in reply to comments filed by the Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association (HPBA) urging the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to repeal its energy conservation standards for direct heating equipment as applied to decorative vented gas fireplaces. I support HPBA's comments because I do not believe that decorative vented gas fireplaces were ever meant to be included under the term "direct heating equipment" as that term appears in the Energy Policy and

410

Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation  

SciTech Connect

The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both up-flow and down-flow of fluid at rates that range between 0.5 to 214 cm/yr and 2-162 cm/yr, respectively. The fluid flow system at the mound and background sites are coupled having opposite polarities that oscillate episodically between 14 days to {approx}4 months. Stability calculations suggest that despite bottom water temperature fluctuations, of up to {approx}3 C, the Bush Hill gas hydrate mound is presently stable, as also corroborated by the time-lapse video camera images that did not detect change in the gas hydrate mound. As long as methane (and other hydrocarbon) continues advecting at the observed rates the mound would remain stable. The {_}{sup 13}C-DIC data suggest that crude oil instead of methane serves as the primary electron-donor and metabolic substrate for anaerobic sulfate reduction. The oil-dominated environment at Bush Hill shields some of the methane bubbles from being oxidized both anaerobically in the sediment and aerobically in the water column. Consequently, the methane flux across the seafloor is higher at Bush hill than at non-oil rich seafloor gas hydrate regions, such as at Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia. The methane flux across the ocean/atmosphere interface is as well higher. Modeling the methane flux across this interface at three bubble plumes provides values that range from 180-2000 {_}mol/m{sup 2} day; extrapolating it over the Gulf of Mexico basin utilizing satellite data is in progress.

Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

411

Revisions to the hydrogen gas generation computer model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waste Management Technology has requested SRTC to maintain and extend a previously developed computer model, TRUGAS, which calculates hydrogen gas concentrations within the transuranic (TRU) waste drums. TRUGAS was written by Frank G. Smith using the BASIC language and is described in the report A Computer Model of gas Generation and Transport within TRU Waste Drums (DP- 1754). The computer model has been partially validated by yielding results similar to experimental data collected at SRL and LANL over a wide range of conditions. The model was created to provide the capability of predicting conditions that could potentially lead to the formation of flammable gas concentrations within drums, and to assess proposed drum venting methods. The model has served as a tool in determining how gas concentrations are affected by parameters such as filter vent sizes, waste composition, gas generation values, the number and types of enclosures, water instrusion into the drum, and curie loading. The success of the TRUGAS model has prompted an interest in the program`s maintenance and enhancement. Experimental data continues to be collected at various sites on such parameters as permeability values, packaging arrangements, filter designs, and waste contents. Information provided by this data is used to improve the accuracy of the model`s predictions. Also, several modifications to the model have been made to enlarge the scope of problems which can be analyzed. For instance, the model has been used to calculate hydrogen concentrations inside steel cabinets containing retired glove boxes (WSRC-RP-89-762). The revised TRUGAS computer model, H2GAS, is described in this report. This report summarizes all modifications made to the TRUGAS computer model and provides documentation useful for making future updates to H2GAS.

Jerrell, J.W.

1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

412

Revisions to the hydrogen gas generation computer model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waste Management Technology has requested SRTC to maintain and extend a previously developed computer model, TRUGAS, which calculates hydrogen gas concentrations within the transuranic (TRU) waste drums. TRUGAS was written by Frank G. Smith using the BASIC language and is described in the report A Computer Model of gas Generation and Transport within TRU Waste Drums (DP- 1754). The computer model has been partially validated by yielding results similar to experimental data collected at SRL and LANL over a wide range of conditions. The model was created to provide the capability of predicting conditions that could potentially lead to the formation of flammable gas concentrations within drums, and to assess proposed drum venting methods. The model has served as a tool in determining how gas concentrations are affected by parameters such as filter vent sizes, waste composition, gas generation values, the number and types of enclosures, water instrusion into the drum, and curie loading. The success of the TRUGAS model has prompted an interest in the program's maintenance and enhancement. Experimental data continues to be collected at various sites on such parameters as permeability values, packaging arrangements, filter designs, and waste contents. Information provided by this data is used to improve the accuracy of the model's predictions. Also, several modifications to the model have been made to enlarge the scope of problems which can be analyzed. For instance, the model has been used to calculate hydrogen concentrations inside steel cabinets containing retired glove boxes (WSRC-RP-89-762). The revised TRUGAS computer model, H2GAS, is described in this report. This report summarizes all modifications made to the TRUGAS computer model and provides documentation useful for making future updates to H2GAS.

Jerrell, J.W.

1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Commercial and Industrial Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Commercial and Industrial Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Other Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Custom: 50% of project cost Program Info Start Date 06/09/2011 State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heater: $75 - $300 Furnaces: $250 - $400 Boilers: $150 - $400 Setback Thermostat: $25 - $50 Convection Oven: $100 High Efficiency Range/Oven: $500 Conveyor Oven: $500 Fryer: $500 Broiler: $100 Steam Cooker: $500 Vent Dampers for Boilers: $125 Custom: Two year buy down or 50% of project cost, whichever is less

414

Cascade Natural Gas - Commercial Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cascade Natural Gas - Commercial Efficiency Rebate Program Cascade Natural Gas - Commercial Efficiency Rebate Program Cascade Natural Gas - Commercial Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Water Heating Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount HVAC Unit Heater: $1.50-$3 / kBtuh input Warm Air Furnace: $3.00 / kBtuh input Direct Fired Radiant Heating: $6.50 / kBtuh input Boiler: $4.00 / kBtuh input Boiler Vent Damper: $1,000 Boiler Steam Trap: $80 DHW Energy Star Tankless Water Heaters: $60 / gpm Domestic Hot Water Tank: $2.50 / kBtuh input

415

Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count) Count) Data Series: Wellhead Price Imports Price Price of Imports by Pipeline Price of LNG Imports Exports Price Price of Exports by Pipeline Price of LNG Exports Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

416

Plentiful natural gas headed for big growth in Mideast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas is increasingly becoming a major contributor in the industrial development of most Middle Eastern countries. Demand there will rise steeply in coming years. This is because of the abundant and growing natural gas resources in the region, the economic benefits of using local resources, as well as increased emphasis on a cleaner environment. Today, proved reserves of natural gas in the Middle East are 45 trillion cu meters (tcm), or 1,488 trillion cu ft (tcf). This is over 30% of the world's natural gas reserves. A table presents data on reserves and production of natural gas in the region. About 20% of this gross production is rein-injecting for oil field pressure maintenance, 13% is flared or vented, and 7% is accounted as losses. The remaining 60% represents consumption in power generation, water desalination, petrochemicals and fertilizers production, aluminum and copper smelting, and fuel for refineries and other industries. The use of natural gas in these various industries is discussed. Thirteen tables present data on gas consumption by country and sector, power generation capacity, major chemicals derived from natural gas, and petrochemical plant capacities.

Hamid, S.H.; Aitani, A.M. (King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

1995-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

417

Gas purification  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas having a high carbon dioxide content is contacted with sea water in an absorber at or near the bottom of the ocean to produce a purified natural gas.

Cook, C.F.; Hays, G.E.

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

418

Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas. Under the baseline winter weather scenario, EIA expects end-of-October working gas inventories will total 3,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) and end March ...

419

Gas Week  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Guy F. Caruso, EIA AdministratorPresented to: Gas WeekHouston, TexasSeptember 24, 2003

Information Center

2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

420

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decorative vented gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

422

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

423

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

424

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

425

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

426

Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

427

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

428

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

429

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

430

Liquid natural gas as a transportation fuel in the heavy trucking industry. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report encompasses the second year of a proposed three year project with emphasis focused on fundamental research issues in Use of Liquid Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel in the Heavy Trucking Industry. These issues may be categorized as (1) direct diesel replacement with LNG fuel, and (2) long term storage/utilization of LNG vent gases produced by tank storage and fueling/handling operation. The results of this work are expected to enhance utilization of LNG as a transportation fuel. The paper discusses the following topics: (A) Fueling Delivery to the Engine, Engine Considerations, and Emissions: (1) Atomization and/or vaporization of LNG for direct injection diesel-type natural gas engines; (2) Fundamentals of direct replacement of diesel fuel by LNG in simulated combustion; (3) Distribution of nitric oxide and emissions formation from natural gas injection; and (B) Short and long term storage: (1) Modification by partial direct conversion of natural gas composition for improved storage characteristics; (2) LNG vent gas adsorption and recovery using activate carbon and modified adsorbents; (3) LNG storage at moderate conditions.

Sutton, W.H.

1997-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

431

Executive Director for Operations CONSIDERATION OF ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR CONTAINMENT VENTING SYSTEMS FOR BOILING WATER REACTORS WITH MARK I AND MARK II CONTAINMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information, options, and a recommendation from the NRC staff to impose new requirements for containment venting systems for boiling-water reactors (BWRs) with Mark I and Mark II containments. This paper is provided in response to the Commission’s staff requirements memorandum (SRM) for SECY-11-0137, “Prioritization of Recommended Actions To Be

R. W. Borchardt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 72  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 30. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Arkansas, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 7,606 3,460 3,462 R 3,814 4,773 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 157,039 176,221 180,969 R 262,911 262,905 From Oil Wells.............................................. 12,915 11,088 9,806 R 7,833 7,509 Total............................................................... 169,953 187,310 190,774 R 270,744 270,414 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 439 516 Vented and Flared.......................................... 354 241 241 R 12 11 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

433

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 76  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 32. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Colorado, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year..... 18,774 16,718 22,691 20,568 22,949 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................... 970,229 1,002,453 1,038,739 1,101,361 1,093,695 From Oil Wells................................................. 51,065 87,170 105,247 113,035 160,833 Total.................................................................. 1,021,294 1,089,622 1,143,985 1,214,396 1,254,529 Repressuring ..................................................... 8,885 9,229 9,685 10,285 10,625 Vented and Flared............................................. 1,123 1,158 1,215 1,291 1,333 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

434

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 72  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 30. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Arkansas, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 3,460 3,462 3,814 4,773 5,592 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 176,221 180,969 262,911 259,708 437,006 From Oil Wells.............................................. 11,088 9,806 7,833 7,509 7,378 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... NA NA NA 3,198 2,698 Total............................................................... 187,310 190,774 270,744 270,414 447,082 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 439 516 511 Vented and Flared.......................................... 241 241 12 11 20 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

435

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 118  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 53. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Montana, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 4,971 5,751 6,578 6,925 7,095 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 87,292 91,833 93,759 84,460 82,400 From Oil Wells.............................................. 10,546 16,722 20,278 23,092 22,995 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... NA NA NA 13,022 14,004 Total............................................................... 97,838 108,555 114,037 120,575 119,399 Repressuring .................................................. 5 9 19 6 6 Vented and Flared.......................................... 1,071 629 1,173 3,721 6,863 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

436

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 154  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Utah, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 3,657 4,092 4,858 5,197 5,578 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 259,432 279,412 322,848 276,634 337,924 From Oil Wells.............................................. 31,153 32,583 33,472 35,104 36,056 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... NA NA NA 73,623 67,619 Total............................................................... 290,586 311,994 356,321 385,361 441,598 Repressuring .................................................. 1,337 1,294 1,300 1,742 1,571 Vented and Flared.......................................... 688 595 585 1,005 1,285 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

437

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 130  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New York, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 5,878 5,781 5,449 5,985 6,680 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 35,943 45,963 54,851 55,339 54,232 From Oil Wells.............................................. 194 87 329 641 710 Total............................................................... 36,137 46,050 55,180 55,980 54,942 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 36,137 46,050 55,180 55,980 54,942

438

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 154  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Utah, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 3,220 3,657 4,092 R 4,858 5,197 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 254,488 259,432 279,412 R 322,848 350,257 From Oil Wells.............................................. 29,871 31,153 32,583 R 33,472 35,104 Total............................................................... 284,359 290,586 311,994 R 356,321 385,361 Repressuring .................................................. 1,785 1,337 1,294 1,300 1,742 Vented and Flared.......................................... 705 688 595 R 585 1,005 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 13,810 10,592 8,883 R 6,116 6,205 Marketed Production

439

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 98  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Kansas, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 17,387 18,120 18,946 19,713 19,713 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 369,624 350,413 332,860 327,386 322,836 From Oil Wells.............................................. 50,403 47,784 45,390 44,643 44,023 Total............................................................... 420,027 398,197 378,250 372,029 366,859 Repressuring .................................................. 714 677 643 620 E 618 Vented and Flared.......................................... 420 398 378 365 E 363 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. NA NA NA NA NA Marketed Production ......................................

440

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 84  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Florida, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 3,474 3,525 2,954 2,845 2,000 Total............................................................... 3,474 3,525 2,954 2,845 2,000 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 387 402 337 304 E 222 Marketed Production ...................................... 3,087 3,123 2,616 2,540 1,778 Extraction Loss...............................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decorative vented gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 118  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 53. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Montana, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 4,539 4,971 5,751 6,578 6,925 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 78,175 87,292 91,833 93,759 97,483 From Oil Wells.............................................. 8,256 10,546 16,722 20,278 23,092 Total............................................................... 86,431 97,838 108,555 114,037 120,575 Repressuring .................................................. 2 5 9 19 6 Vented and Flared.......................................... 403 1,071 629 1,173 3,721 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. NA NA NA NA NA Marketed Production ......................................

442

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 138  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Oklahoma, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 34,334 35,612 36,704 38,060 38,364 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 1,487,451 1,597,915 1,592,524 1,640,389 1,709,207 From Oil Wells.............................................. 70,704 57,854 46,786 48,597 35,186 Total............................................................... 1,558,155 1,655,769 1,639,310 1,688,985 1,744,393 Repressuring .................................................. NA NA NA NA NA Vented and Flared.......................................... NA NA NA NA NA Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. NA NA NA NA NA Marketed Production

443

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 152  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Texas, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 72,237 74,827 74,265 76,436 87,556 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 5,074,067 5,331,776 5,649,784 R 6,256,767 7,006,392 From Oil Wells.............................................. 659,851 675,061 676,649 R 704,092 754,566 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 5,733,918 6,006,837 6,326,433 R 6,960,858 7,760,958 Repressuring .................................................. 284,491 303,477 325,967 546,659 555,796 Vented and Flared..........................................

444

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 100  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Kentucky, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 12,900 13,920 14,175 15,892 16,563 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 87,608 94,259 92,795 95,320 95,437 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 87,608 94,259 92,795 95,320 95,437 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 87,608 94,259 92,795 95,320 95,437

445

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 130  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New York, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 5,781 5,449 5,985 6,680 6,675 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 45,963 54,851 55,339 54,232 49,607 From Oil Wells.............................................. 87 329 641 710 714 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 46,050 55,180 55,980 54,942 50,320 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

446

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 136  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 62. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Ohio, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 33,828 33,828 33,735 33,945 34,416 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 87,993 85,018 77,819 81,155 82,827 From Oil Wells.............................................. 5,647 5,458 5,704 5,160 5,268 Total............................................................... 93,641 90,476 83,523 86,315 88,095 Repressuring .................................................. NA NA NA NA NA Vented and Flared.......................................... NA NA NA NA NA Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. NA NA NA NA NA Marketed Production ......................................

447

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 166  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Wyoming, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 20,244 23,734 25,052 R 27,350 28,969 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 1,736,136 1,803,443 1,900,589 1,662,265 1,780,261 From Oil Wells.............................................. 192,904 200,383 211,177 R 159,039 156,133 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... NA NA NA 436,580 551,873 Total............................................................... 1,929,040 2,003,826 2,111,766 R 2,257,884 2,488,267 Repressuring .................................................. 164,164 171,616 114,343 R 8,063 9,118 Vented and Flared..........................................

448

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 166  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Wyoming, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 18,154 20,244 23,734 25,052 26,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 1,652,504 1,736,136 1,803,443 1,900,589 2,102,362 From Oil Wells.............................................. 183,612 192,904 200,383 211,177 156,066 Total............................................................... 1,836,115 1,929,040 2,003,826 2,111,766 2,258,428 Repressuring .................................................. 131,125 164,164 171,616 114,343 133,716 Vented and Flared.......................................... 16,685 16,848 31,161 31,661 47,331 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

449

Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department supports research and policy options to ensure environmentally sustainable domestic and global supplies of oil and natural gas.

450

Gas separating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

Gollan, A.

1988-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

451

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6

452

Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based assessment for Southern California Title Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based assessment for Southern California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., Neil E. Klepeis, Agnes B. Lobscheid, and Brett C. Singer Journal Environmental Health Perspectives Date Published 11/2013 Abstract Background: Residential natural gas cooking burners (NGCBs) can emit substantial quantities of pollutants and they are typically used without venting. Objective: Quantify pollutant concentrations and occupant exposures resulting from NGCB use in California homes. Methods: A mass balance model was applied to estimate time-dependent pollutant concentrations throughout homes and the "exposure concentrations" experienced by individual occupants. The model was applied to estimate nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and formaldehyde (HCHO) concentrations for one week each in summer and winter for a representative sample of Southern California homes. The model simulated pollutant emissions from NGCBs, NO2 and CO entry from outdoors, dilution throughout the home, and removal by ventilation and deposition. Residence characteristics and outdoor concentrations of CO and NO2 were obtained from available databases. Ventilation rates, occupancy patterns, and burner use were inferred from household characteristics. Proximity to the burner(s) and the benefits of using venting range hoods were also explored. Replicate model executions using independently generated sets of stochastic variable values yielded estimated pollutant concentration distributions with geometric means varying less than 10%.

453

DOE/EIA-0131(04) Natural Gas Annual 2004 Publication Date:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2004 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year................................ 341,678 373,304 387,772 393,327 405,048 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ............................................ 17,726,056 18,129,408 17,794,858 R 17,881,802 17,993,520 From Oil Wells .............................................. 6,447,820 6,371,371 6,146,420 6,237,176 6,061,912 Total............................................................... 24,173,875 24,500,779 23,941,279 R 24,118,978 24,055,432 Repressuring .................................................. 3,379,661 3,370,832 3,455,145 3,547,781 3,701,656 Vented and Flared

454

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 4  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Figure 2. Natural Gas Supply and Disposition in the United States, 2005 (Trillion Cubic Feet) Extraction Loss Gross Withdrawals From Gas and Oil Wells Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented/Flared Reservoir Repressuring Production Dry Gas Imports Canada Trinidad/Tobago Algeria Nigeria Qatar Malaysia Oman Natural Gas Storage Facilities Exports Japan Canada Mexico Additions Withdrawals Gas Industry Use Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power 23.5 0.7 0.1 3.7 3.700 0.439 0.097 0.008 0.003 0.002 0.009 0.305 0.358 0.065 18.1 0.9 3.1 3.1 1.7 4.8 3.1 6.7 0.02 5.9 Egypt 0.073 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-895, "Monthly and Annual

455

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

456

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

457

Liquid natural gas as a transportation fuel in the heavy trucking industry. Second quarterly progress report, [October 1, 1994-- December 30, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Emphasis of this project focuses on LNG research issues in use of liquefied natural as a transportation fuel in heavy trucking industry. These issues maybe categorized as: task 1--direct diesel replacement with LNG fuel; and task 2--short and long term storage. Accomplishments for these tasks are discussed. Task 1 consists of atomization, fundamentals of direct replacement, and distribution of emissions. Task 2 includes modified adsorbents, vent gas, and LNG storage at moderate conditions.

Sutton, W.H.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Understanding natural and induced gas migration through landfill cover materials: the basis for improved landfill gas recovery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vertical pressure and concentration gradients in landfill cover materials are being examined at the Mallard North Landfill in Dupage County, IL. The goal of this project is to understand venting of landfill gas and intrusion of atmospheric gases into the landfill in response to changing meteorological conditions (particularly barometric pressure and precipitation) and pumping rates at recovery wells. Nests of probes for directly measuring soil gas pressures have been installed in areas of fractured and unfractured silty clay till cover materials. The probes are at three depths: shallow (0.6 m), intermediate (1.2 m), and deep (in the top of the refuse). Preliminary results from fall 1985 suggest that soil gas pressures respond quickly to changes in barometric pressure but that concentrations of methane, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen respond more slowly to changing soil moisture conditions. An important near-surface process that limits the total amount of methane available to a gas recovery system is the activity of methanotrophs (methane-oxidizing bacteria) in oxygenated cover materials. The results of this project will be used to quantify landfill mass balance relations, improve existing predictive models for landfill gas recovery systems, and improve landfill cover design for sites where gas recovery is anticipated.

Bogner, J.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

A Feasibility Study of H{sub 2}S Abatement by Incineration of Noncondensable Gases in Vented Steam Flow from Davies-State 5206-1 Geothermal Steam Well, Geysers Geothermal Steam Field, Lake County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Determine feasibility of using an incineration-type device to accomplish the required reduction in vent steam H{sub 2}S content to meet ICAPCO rules. This approach is to be the only method considered in this feasibility study.

None

2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

460

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decorative vented gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

462

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

463

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

464

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

465

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

466

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

467

Natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Over time the electricity mix gradually shifts to lower-carbon options, led by growth in natural gas and renewable generation U.S. electricity net generation trillion kilowatthours 6

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski Usnic; Adam Sieminski Usnic

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

469

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

470

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

471

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

472

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

473

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

474

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

475

Preliminary Study of a Vented Attic Radiant Barrier System in Hot, Humid Climates Using Side-by-Side, Full-Scale Test Houses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A series of side-by-side tests was performed using two full scale test houses to determine the effectiveness of a Vented Radiant Barrier System (VRBS) in reducing the ceiling heat flux during the summer cooling season in North Florida. Another series of side-by-side tests was conducted to evaluate the effect of a VRBS on ceiling heat losses under typical North Florida winter conditions. The effect of a VRBS on the expected life of roof shingles was also evaluated.

Lear, W. E.; Barrup, T. E.; Davis, K. E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Inert gas rejection device for zinc-halogen battery systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrolytic cell for separating chlorine gas from other (foreign) gases, having an anode, a cathode assembly, an aqueous electrolyte, a housing, and a constant voltage power supply. The cathode assembly is generally comprised of a dense graphite electrode having a winding channel formed in the face opposing the anode, a gas impermeable (but liquid permeable) membrane sealed into the side of the cathode electrode over the channel, and a packing of graphite particles contained in the channel of the cathode electrode. The housing separates and parallelly aligns the anode and cathode assembly, and provides a hermetic seal for the cell. In operation, a stream of chlorine and foreign gases enters the cell at the beginning of the cathode electrode channel. The chlorine gas is dissolved into the electrolyte and electrochemically reduced into chloride ions. The chloride ions disfuse through the gas impermeable membrane, and are electrochemically oxidized at the anode into purified chlorine gas. The foreign gases do not participate in the above electrochemical reactions, and are vented from the cell at the end of the cathode electrode channel.

Hammond, Michael J. (Sterling Heights, MI); Arendell, Mark W. (Warren, MI)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

478

GAS TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the age of volatile and ever increasing natural gas fuel prices, strict new emission regulations and technological advancements, modern IGCC plants are the answer to growing market demands for efficient and environmentally friendly power generation. IGCC technology allows the use of low cost opportunity fuels, such as coal, of which there is a more than a 200-year supply in the U.S., and refinery residues, such as petroleum coke and residual oil. Future IGCC plants are expected to be more efficient and have a potential to be a lower cost solution to future CO2 and mercury regulations compared to the direct coal fired steam plants. Siemens has more than 300,000 hours of successful IGCC plant operational experience on a variety of heavy duty gas turbine models in Europe and the U.S. The gas turbines involved range from SGT5-2000E to SGT6-3000E (former designations are shown on Table 1). Future IGCC applications will extend this experience to the SGT5-4000F and SGT6-4000F/5000F/6000G gas turbines. In the currently operating Siemens ’ 60 Hz fleet, the SGT6-5000F gas turbine has the most operating engines and the most cumulative operating hours. Over the years, advancements have increased its performance and decreased its emissions and life cycle costs without impacting reliability. Development has been initiated to verify its readiness for future IGCC application including syngas combustion system testing. Similar efforts are planned for the SGT6-6000G and SGT5-4000F/SGT6-4000F models. This paper discusses the extensive development programs that have been carried out to demonstrate that target emissions and engine operability can be achieved on syngas operation in advanced F-class 50 Hz and 60 Hz gas turbine based IGCC applications.

Power For L; Satish Gadde; Jianfan Wu; Anil Gulati;