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1

DECOMMISSIONING DOCUMENTS Decommissioning Handbook The Decommissioning Handbook has  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DECOMMISSIONING DOCUMENTS DECOMMISSIONING DOCUMENTS Decommissioning Handbook The Decommissioning Handbook has been developed to incorporate examples and lessons learned, and to illustrate practices and procedures for implementing each step of the LCAM Decommissioning Implementation Guide. Decommissioning Benchmarking Study DOE's former Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) conducted a benchmarking study of its decommissioning program to analyze physical activities in facility decommissioning and to determine approaches to improve the decommissioning process. The study focused on quantifying productivity of decommissioning physical activities and identifying how productivity is affected by specific working conditions. The decommissioning benchmarking results are the foundation for several distinct products:

2

Decommissioning Documents | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Decommissioning Documents Decommissioning Documents More Documents & Publications Decommissioning Benchmarking Study Final Report Decommissioning Handbook dgappendices.pdf...

3

Decommissioning Handbook  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Decommissioning Handbook has been developed to incorporate examples and lessons learned, and to illustrate practices and procedures for implementing each step of the LCAM Decommissioing...

4

Decommissioning handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of information pertinent to the decommissioning of surplus nuclear facilities. This handbook is intended to describe all stages of the decommissioning process including selection of the end product, estimation of the radioactive inventory, estimation of occupational exposures, description of the state-of-the-art in re decontamination, remote csposition of wastes, and estimation of program costs. Presentation of state-of-the-art technology and data related to decommissioning will aid in consistent and efficient program planning and performance. Particular attention is focused on available technology applicable to those decommissioning activities that have not been accomplished before, such as remote segmenting and handling of highly activated 1100 MW(e) light water reactor vessel internals and thick-walled reactor vessels. A summary of available information associated with the planning and estimating of a decommissioning program is also presented. Summarized in particular are the methodologies associated with the calculation and measurement of activated material inventory, distribution, and surface dose level, system contamination inventory and distribution, and work area dose levels. Cost estimating techniques are also presented and the manner in which to account for variations in labor costs as impacting labor-intensive work activities is explained.

Manion, W.J.; LaGuardia, T.S.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

A manual for applying the allowable residual contamination level method for decommissioning facilities on the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the modifications that have been made to enhance the original Allowable Residual Contamination Level (ARCL) method to make it more applicable to site-specific analyses. This version considers the mixture of radionuclides present at the time of site characterization, the elapsed time after decommissioning when exposure to people could occur, and includes a calculation of the upper confidence limit of the potential dose based on sampling statistics that are developed during the site characterization efforts. The upper confidence limit of potential exposure can now be used for comparison against applicable radiation dose limits (i.e., 25 mrem/yr at Hanford). The level of confidence can be selected by the user. A wide range of exposure scenarios were evaluated; the rationale used to select the most limiting scenarios is explained. The radiation dose factors used for the inhalation and ingestion pathways were also updated to correspond with the radiation dosimetry methods utilized in the International Commission of Radiological Protection Publications 26 and 30 (ICRP 1977; 1979a,b, 1980, 1981, 1982a,b). This simplifies the calculations, since ''effective whole body'' doses are now calculated, and also brings the dosimetry methods used in the ARCL method in conformance with the rationale used by DOE in developing the 25 mrem/yr limit at Hanford. 46 refs., 21 figs., 15 tabs.

Napier, B.A.; Piepel, G.F.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Schreckhise, R.G.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Decommissioning Plan RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Decommissioning Plan Review (DPR) Module is a tool that assists DOE federal project review teams in evaluating the adequacy of the decommissioning plan prior to approval of the associated CD.

7

Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project decommissioning plan. Volume I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning the organization of the decommissioning project; decommissioning operations concept; safety and environmental assessment; information and guidance for the DOC; work breakdown structure; decommissioning operation schedule; decommissiong operations estimate; and training requirements.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Decommissioning Benchmarking Study Final Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE's former Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) conducted a benchmarking study of its decommissioning program to analyze physical activities in facility decommissioning and to determine...

9

Decommissioning Unit Cost Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Closure Site (Site) is in the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, and remediating environmental media. A number of contaminated facilities have been decommissioned, including one building, Building 779, that contained gloveboxes used for plutonium process development but did little actual plutonium processing. The actual costs incurred to decommission this facility formed much of the basis or standards used to estimate the decommissioning of the remaining plutonium-processing buildings. Recent decommissioning activities in the first actual production facility, Building 771, implemented a number of process and procedural improvements. These include methods for handling plutonium contaminated equipment, including size reduction, decontamination, and waste packaging, as well as management improvements to streamline planning and work control. These improvements resulted in a safer working environment and reduced project cost, as demonstrated in the overall project efficiency. The topic of this paper is the analysis of how this improved efficiency is reflected in recent unit costs for activities specific to the decommissioning of plutonium facilities. This analysis will allow the Site to quantify the impacts on future Rocky Flats decommissioning activities, and to develop data for planning and cost estimating the decommissioning of future facilities. The paper discusses the methods used to collect and arrange the project data from the individual work areas within Building 771. Regression and data correlation techniques were used to quantify values for different types of decommissioning activities. The discussion includes the approach to identify and allocate overall project support, waste management, and Site support costs based on the overall Site and project costs to provide a ''burdened'' unit cost. The paper ultimately provides a unit cost basis that can be used to support cost estimates for decommissioning at other facilities with similar equipment and labor costs. It also provides techniques for extracting information from limited data using extrapolation and interpolation techniques.

Sanford, P. C.; Stevens, J. L.; Brandt, R.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

10

Chapter 20 - Uranium Enrichment Decontamination & Decommissioning Fund  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0. Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund 20-1 0. Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund 20-1 CHAPTER 20 URANIUM ENRICHMENT DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING FUND 1. INTRODUCTION. a. Purpose. To establish policies and procedures for the financial management, accounting, budget preparation, cash management of the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund, referred to hereafter as the Fund. b. Applicability. This chapter applies to all Departmental elements, including the National Nuclear Security Administration, and activities that are directly or indirectly involved with the Fund. c. Requirements and Sources of the Fund. (1) The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) requires DOE to establish and administer the Fund. EPACT authorizes that the

11

Shippingport Station decommissioning project decommission plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume consists of the following appendices: long-lead-time activities, technical baseline, assessment of one-price removal of reactor vessel and internals by barge, final environmental impact statement (this forms the bulk of this volume), and record of the decision to decommission Shippingport. (DLC)

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Decommissioning at AWE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

AWE (A) has been at the heart of the UK Nuclear deterrent since it was established in the early 1950's. It is a nuclear licensed site and is governed by the United Kingdoms Nuclear Installation Inspectorate (NII). AWE plc on behalf of the Ministry of Defence (MOD) manages the AWE (A) site and all undertakings including decommissioning. Therefore under NII license condition 35 'Decommissioning', AWE plc is accountable to make and implement adequate arrangements for the decommissioning of any plant or process, which may affect safety. The majority of decommissioning projects currently being undertaken are to do with Hazard category 3, 4 or 5 facilities, systems or plant that have reached the end of their operational span and have undergone Post-Operational Clean-Out (POCO). They were either built for the production of fissile components, for supporting the early reactor fuels programmes or for processing facility waste arisings. They either contain redundant contaminated gloveboxes associated process areas, process plant or systems or a combination of all. In parallel with decommissioning project AWE (A) are undertaking investigation into new technologies to aid decommissioning projects; to remove the operative from hands on operations; to develop and implement modifications to existing process and techniques used. AWE (A) is currently going thorough a sustained phase of upgrading its facilities to enhance its scientific capability, with older facilities, systems and plant being replaced, making decommissioning a growth area. It is therefore important to the company to reduce these hazards progressively and safety over the coming years, making decommissioning an important feature of the overall legacy management aspects of AWE PLC's business. This paper outlines the current undertakings and progress of Nuclear decommissioning on the AWE (A) site. (authors)

Biles, K.; Hedges, M.; Campbell, C

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Factors Impacting Decommissioning Costs - 13576  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studied United States experience with decommissioning cost estimates and the factors that impact the actual cost of decommissioning projects. This study gathered available estimated and actual decommissioning costs from eight nuclear power plants in the United States to understand the major components of decommissioning costs. Major costs categories for decommissioning a nuclear power plant are removal costs, radioactive waste costs, staffing costs, and other costs. The technical factors that impact the costs were analyzed based on the plants' decommissioning experiences. Detailed cost breakdowns by major projects and other cost categories from actual power plant decommissioning experiences will be presented. Such information will be useful in planning future decommissioning and designing new plants. (authors)

Kim, Karen; McGrath, Richard [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)] [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Nuclear Decommissioning Financing Act (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Nuclear Decommissioning Financing Act calls for the establishment of a tax-exempt, tax-deductible decommissioning fund by the licensee of any nuclear power generating facility to pay for the...

15

Safely Decommission about how we  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and make them available to low- income communities, individuals, and community non-profit organizations to information technologies among low-income and disadvantaged groups. #12; Safely Decommission Your PCs Learn more about how we can help you effectively decommission

Blanchette, Robert A.

16

Site decommissioning management plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 48 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC staff`s strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 48 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites.

Fauver, D.N.; Austin, J.H.; Johnson, T.C.; Weber, M.F.; Cardile, F.P.; Martin, D.E.; Caniano, R.J.; Kinneman, J.D.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Decontamination and decommissioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project scope of work included the complete decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Westinghouse ARD Fuel Laboratories at the Cheswick Site in the shortest possible time. This has been accomplished in the following four phases: (1) preparation of documents and necessary paperwork; packaging and shipping of all special nuclear materials in an acceptable form to a reprocessing agency; (2) decontamination of all facilities, glove boxes and equipment; loading of generated waste into bins, barrels and strong wooden boxes; (3) shipping of all bins, barrels and boxes containing waste to the designated burial site; removal of all utility services from the laboratories; and (4) final survey of remaining facilities and certification for nonrestricted use; preparation of final report. These four phases of work were conducted in accordance with applicable regulations for D and D of research facilities and applicable regulations for packaging, transportation, and burial and storage of radioactive materials. The final result is that the Advanced Fuel Laboratories now meet requirements of ANSI 13.12 and can be released for unrestricted use. The four principal documents utilized in the D and D of the Cheswick Site were: (1) Plan for Fully Decontaminating and Decommissioning, Revision 3; (2) Environmental Assessment for Decontaminating and Decommissioning the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories, Cheswick, Pa.; (3) WARD-386, Quality Assurance Program Description for Decontaminating and Decommissioning Activities; and (4) Health Physics, Fire Control, and Site Emergency Manual. These documents are provided as Attachments 1, 2, 3 and 4.

Adams, G.A.; Bowen, W.C.; Cromer, P.M.; Cwynar, J.C.; Jacoby, W.R.; Woodsum, H.G.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Offshore decommissioning issues: Deductibility and transferability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dealing with the decommissioning of petroleum installations is a relatively new challenge to most producer countries. It is natural to expect that industry's experience in building platforms is much greater than the one of dismantling them. Even if manifold and varied efforts are underway towards establishing international best practices standards in this sector, countries still enjoy rather extensive discretionary power as they practice a particular national style in the regulation of decommissioning activities in their state's jurisdiction. The present paper offers a broad panorama of this discussion, concentrating mainly on two controversial aspects. The first one analyses the ex-ante deductibility of decommissioning costs as they constitute an ex-post expense. The second discussion refers to the assignment of decommissioning responsibility in the case of transfer of exploration and production rights to new lessees during the project's life. Finally the paper applies concepts commonly used in project financing as well as structures generally used in organising pension funds to develop insights into these discussions.

Virginia Parente; Doneivan Ferreira; Edmilson Moutinho dos Santos; Estanislau Luczynski

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Decommissioning Plan RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Decommissioning Plan Review Module Decommissioning Plan Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 C OFFICE OF D C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Decomm Rev Critical Decisi CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan missioning view Module ion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) g Plan e plicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Oper ration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

20

Decommissioning Implementation Guide  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Department of Energy (DOE) faces an enormous task in the disposition of the nation's excess facilities. Many of these facilities are large and complex and contain potentially hazardous substances. As DOE facilities complete mission operations and are declared excess, they pass into a transition phase which ultimately prepares them for disposition. The disposition phase of a facility's life-cycle usually includes deactivation, decommissioning, and surveillance and maintenance (S&M) activities.

1999-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioning cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Decontamination & decommissioning focus area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) storage wells. The manual builds on lessons learned through NETL research; the experiences of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships' (RCSPs) carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) field tests; and the acquired knowledge of industries that have been actively drilling wells for more than 100 years. In addition, the BPM provides an overview of the well-

23

Status of the NRC Decommissioning Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 21, 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published the final rule on Radiological Criteria for License Termination (the License Termination Rule or LTR) as Subpart E to 10 CFR Part 20. NRC regulations require that materials licensees submit Decommissioning Plans to support the decommissioning of its facility if it is required by license condition, or if the procedures and activities necessary to carry out the decommissioning have not been approved by NRC and these procedures could increase the potential health and safety impacts to the workers or the public. NRC regulations also require that reactor licensees submit Post-shutdown Decommissioning Activities Reports and License Termination Plans to support the decommissioning of nuclear power facilities. This paper provides an update on the status of the NRC's decommissioning program that was presented during WM'02. It discusses the staff's current efforts to streamline the decommissioning process, current issues being faced in the decommissioning program, such as partial site release and restricted release of sites, as well as the status of the decommissioning of complex sites and those listed in the Site Decommissioning Management Plan. The paper discusses the status of permanently shut-down commercial power reactors and the transfer of complex decommissioning sites and sites listed on the SDMP to Agreement States. Finally the paper provides an update of the status of various tools and guidance the NRC is developing to assist licensees during decommissioning, including an effort to consolidate and risk-inform decommissioning guidance.

Orlando, D. A.; Camper, L.; Buckley, J.; Pogue, E.; Banovac, K.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

24

Is Entombment an Acceptable Option for Decommissioning? An International Perspective - 13488  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Selection of a decommissioning strategy is one of the key steps in the preparation for decommissioning of nuclear facilities and other facilities using radioactive material. Approaches being implemented or considered by Member States include immediate dismantling, deferred dismantling and entombment. Other options or slight modifications of these strategies are also possible. Entombment has been identified in the current International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safety Standards as one of the three basic decommissioning strategies and has been defined as a decommissioning strategy by which radioactive contaminants are encased in a structurally long lived material until radioactivity decays to a level permitting the unrestricted release of the facility, or release with restrictions imposed by the regulatory body. Although all three strategies have been considered, in principle, applicable to all facilities, their application to some facilities may not be appropriate owing to political concerns, safety or environmental requirements, technical considerations, local conditions or financial considerations. The IAEA is currently revising the decommissioning Safety Standards and one of the issues widely discussed has been the applicability of entombment in the context of decommissioning and its general objective to enable removal of regulatory control from the decommissioned facility. The IAEA recently established a consultancy to collect and discuss experience and lessons learned from entombment projects, to identify regulatory requirements and expectations for applying entombment as a decommissioning option strategy, in compliance with the internationally agreed standards. (authors)

Belencan, Helen [US Department of Energy (United States)] [US Department of Energy (United States); Nys, Vincent [Federal Agency for Nuclear Control (Belgium)] [Federal Agency for Nuclear Control (Belgium); Guskov, Andrey [Scientific and Engineering Centre on Safety in Nuclear Energy (United States)] [Scientific and Engineering Centre on Safety in Nuclear Energy (United States); Francois, Patrice [Institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire (France)] [Institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire (France); Watson, Bruce [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)] [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States); Ljubenov, Vladan [International Atomic Energy Agency (Austria)] [International Atomic Energy Agency (Austria)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

STATUS OF THE NRC'S DECOMMISSIONING PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 21, 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission published the final rule on Radiological Criteria for License Termination (the License Termination Rule) as Subpart E to 10 CFR Part 20. NRC regulations require that materials licensees submit Decommissioning Plans to support the decommissioning of its facility if it is required by license condition, or if the procedures and activities necessary to carry out the decommissioning have not been approved by NRC and these procedures could increase the potential health and safety impacts to the workers or the public. NRC regulations also require that reactor licensees submit Post-shutdown Decommissioning Activities Reports and License Termination Plans to support the decommissioning of nuclear power facilities. This paper provides an update on the status of the NRC's decommissioning program. It discusses the status of permanently shut-down commercial power reactors, complex decommissioning sites, and sites listed in the Site Decommissioning Management Plan. The paper provides the status of various tools and guidance the NRC is developing to assist licensees during decommissioning, including a Standard Review Plan for evaluating plans and information submitted by licensees to support the decommissioning of nuclear facilities and the D and D Screen software for determining the potential doses from residual radioactivity. Finally, it discusses the status of the staff's current efforts to streamline the decommissioning process.

Orlando, D. A.; Camper, L. W.; Buckley, J.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

26

Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) As the DOE complex sites prepare for closure, a large number of buildings and facilities must be deactivated and decommissioned. These facilities contain many complex systems (e.g. ventilation), miles of contaminated pipelines, glove boxes, and unique processing equipment that require labor intensive deactivation and decommissioning methods. Although

27

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning Nuclear Reactors At Multiple-Reactor Stations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of large (1175-MWe) pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and large (1155-MWe) boiling water reactors {BWRs) at multiple-reactor stations. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). Safety and costs of decommissioning are estimated by determining the impact of probable features of multiple-reactor-station operation that are considered to be unavailable at a single-reactor station, and applying these estimated impacts to the decommissioning costs and radiation doses estimated in previous PWR and BWR decommissioning studies. The multiple-reactor-station features analyzed are: the use of interim onsite nuclear waste storage with later removal to an offsite nuclear waste disposal facility, the use of permanent onsite nuclear waste disposal, the dedication of the site to nuclear power generation, and the provision of centralized services. Five scenarios for decommissioning reactors at a multiple-reactor station are investigated. The number of reactors on a site is assumed to be either four or ten; nuclear waste disposal is varied between immediate offsite disposal, interim onsite storage, and immediate onsite disposal. It is assumed that the decommissioned reactors are not replaced in one scenario but are replaced in the other scenarios. Centralized service facilities are provided in two scenarios but are not provided in the other three. Decommissioning of a PWR or a BWR at a multiple-reactor station probably will be less costly and result in lower radiation doses than decommissioning an identical reactor at a single-reactor station. Regardless of whether the light water reactor being decommissioned is at a single- or multiple-reactor station: the estimated occupational radiation dose for decommissioning an LWR is lowest for SAFSTOR and highest for DECON the estimated cost of decommissioning a PWR is lowest for ENTOMB and highest for SAFSTOR the estimated cost of decommissioning a BWR is lowest for OECON and highest for SAFSTOR. In all cases, SAFSTOR has the lowest occupational radiation dose and the highest cost.

Wittenbrock, N. G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Major interviews, articles and reports in this issue include: Increasing momentum, by Gary Taylor, Entergy Nuclear, Inc.; An acceptable investment, by Tom Chrisopher, Areva, Inc.; Fuel recycling for the U.S. and abroad, by Philippe Knoche, Areva, France; We're bullish on nuclear power, by Dan R. Keuter, Entergy Nuclear, Inc.; Ten key actions for decommissioning, by Lawrence E. Boing, Argonne National Laboratory; Safe, efficient and cost-effective decommissioning, by Dr. Claudio Pescatore and Torsten Eng, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), France; and, Plant profile: SONGS decommissioning.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

Hallam, Nebraska, Decommissioned Reactor Site Fact Sheet  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Program. Objectives for the reactor were fulfilled by 1966, and the Nebraska Public Power District decommissioned and dismantled the facility between 1967 and 1969. Facility...

30

Rancho Seco--Decommissioning Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station ceased operation in June of 1989 and entered an extended period of SAFSTOR to allow funds to accumulate for dismantlement. Incremental dismantlement was begun in 1997 of steam systems and based on the successful completion of work, the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) board of directors approved full decommissioning in July 1999. A schedule has been developed for completion of decommissioning by 2008, allowing decommissioning funds to accumulate until they are needed. Systems removal began in the Auxiliary Building in October of 1999 and in the Reactor Building in January of 2000. Systems dismantlement continues in the Reactor Building and should be completed by the end of 2003. System removal is near completion in the Auxiliary Building with removal of the final liquid waste tanks in progress. The spent fuel has been moved to dry storage in an onsite ISFSI, with completion on August 21, 2002. The spent fuel racks are currently being removed from the pool, packaged and shipped, and then the pool will be cleaned. Also in the last year the reactor coolant pumps and primary piping were removed and shipped. Characterization and planning work for the reactor vessel and internals is also in progress with various cut-up and/or disposal options being evaluated. In the year ahead the remaining systems in the Reactor Building will be removed, packaged and sent for disposal, including the pressurizer. Work will be started on embedded and underground piping and the large outdoor tanks. Building survey and decontamination will begin. RFP's for removal of the vessel and internals and the steam generators are planned to fix the cost of those components. If the costs are consistent with current estimates the work will go forward. If they are not, hardened SAFSTOR/entombment may be considered.

Newey, J. M.; Ronningen, E. T.; Snyder, M. W.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

31

STANDARD OPERATING PROTOCOLS FOR DECOMMISSIONING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decommissioning projects at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites are conducted under project-specific decision documents, which involve extensive preparation time, public comment periods, and regulatory approvals. Often, the decision documents must be initiated at least one year before commencing the decommissioning project, and they are expensive and time consuming to prepare. The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is a former nuclear weapons production plant at which hazardous substances and wastes were released or disposed during operations. As a result of the releases, RFETS was placed on the National Priorities List in 1989, and is conducting cleanup activities under a federal facilities compliance agreement. Working closely with interested stakeholders and state and federal regulatory agencies, RFETS has developed and implemented an improved process for obtaining the approvals. The key to streamlining the approval process has been the development of sitewide decision documents called Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement Standard Operating Protocols or ''RSOPs.'' RSOPs have broad applicability, and could be used instead of project-specific documents. Although no two decommissioning projects are exactly the same and they may vary widely in contamination and other hazards, the basic steps taken for cleanup are usually similar. Because of this, using RSOPs is more efficient than preparing a separate project-specific decision documents for each cleanup action. Over the Rocky Flats cleanup life cycle, using RSOPs has the potential to: (1) Save over 5 million dollars and 6 months on the site closure schedule; (2) Eliminate preparing one hundred and twenty project-specific decision documents; and (3) Eliminate writing seventy-five closure description documents for hazardous waste unit closure and corrective actions.

Foss, D. L.; Stevens, J. L.; Gerdeman, F. W.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

32

Interim Storage Facility decommissioning. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decontamination and decommissioning of the Interim Storage Facility were completed. Activities included performing a detailed radiation survey of the facility, removing surface and imbedded contamination, excavating and removing the fuel storage cells, restoring the site to natural conditions, and shipping waste to Hanford, Washington, for burial. The project was accomplished on schedule and 30% under budget with no measurable exposure to decommissioning personnel.

Johnson, R.P.; Speed, D.L.

1985-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

In-Situ Decommissioning | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » In-Situ Decommissioning In-Situ Decommissioning In-Situ Decommissioning (ISD) is the permanent entombment of a facility that contains residual radiological and/or chemical contamination. The ISD approach is a cost-effective alternative to both demolition and complete removal of the structure and its content (including the cost of transport and disposal). In addition, the effective use of ISD reduces human health and safety risks while helping to attain sustainability goals through the reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, petroleum consumption and waste generation. Not all contaminated structures can be decommissioned using ISD; canditate sites must meet strict criteria.

34

FLUOR HANFORD DECOMMISSIONING UPDATE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluor Hanford is completing D&D of the K East Basin at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State this spring, with demolition expected to begin in June. Located about 400 yards from the Columbia River, the K East Basin is one of two indoor pools that formerly contained irradiated nuclear fuel, radioactive sludge and tons of contaminated debris. In unique and path-breaking work, workers finished removing the spent fuel from the K Basins in 2004. In May 2007, workers completed vacuuming the sludge into containers in the K East Basin, and transferring it into containers in the K West Basin. In December, they finished vacuuming the remainder of K West Basin sludge into these containers. The K East Basin was emptied of its radioactive inventory first because it was more contaminated than the K West Basin, and had leaked in the past. In October 2007, Fluor Hanford began physical D&D of the 8,400-square foot K East Basin by pouring approximately 14-inches of grout into the bottom of it. Grout is a type of special cement used for encasing waste. Two months later, Fluor Hanford workers completed sluicing contaminated sand from the large filter that had sieved contaminants from the basin water for more than 50 years. Next, they poured grout into the filter housing and the vault that surrounds the filter, as well as into ion exchange columns that also helped filter basin water. For a six-week period in February and March, personnel drained the approximately one million gallons of contaminated water from the K East Basin. The effort required more than 200 tanker truck loads that transported the water to an effluent treatment facility for treatment and then release. A thin fixative was also applied to the basin walls as the water was removed to hold residual contamination in place. As soon as the water was out of the basin, Fluor pumped in approximately 18 feet of 'controlled density fill' material (somewhat similar to sand) to shield workers to a safe level from the residual radioactivity. Workers then continued preparations for demolishing the structure. Currently, they are isolating utilities, removing asbestos, draining oils, and removing other items not allowed to be disposed in Hanford's Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The basin's superstructure will be demolished using a heavy industrial excavator equipped with a shear. This portion of the work is expected to be completed in September, with removal of the basin substructure to follow in 2009. D&D of the K East Basin eliminated the final major radioactive sources there, and made the Columbia River and the adjacent environment safer for everyone who lives downstream.

GERBER MS

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

35

Comparative Evaluation of Cutting Methods of Activated Concrete from Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning - 13548  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The amount of radioactive wastes from decommissioning of a nuclear power plant varies greatly depending on factors such as type and size of the plant, operation history, decommissioning options, and waste treatment and volume reduction methods. There are many methods to decrease the amount of decommissioning radioactive wastes including minimization of waste generation, waste reclassification through decontamination and cutting methods to remove the contaminated areas. According to OECD/NEA, it is known that the radioactive waste treatment and disposal cost accounts for about 40 percentage of the total decommissioning cost. In Korea, it is needed to reduce amount of decommissioning radioactive waste due to high disposal cost, about $7,000 (as of 2010) per a 200 liter drum for the low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW). In this paper, cutting methods to minimize the radioactive waste of activated concrete were investigated and associated decommissioning cost impact was assessed. The cutting methods considered are cylindrical and volume reductive cuttings. The study showed that the volume reductive cutting is more cost-effective than the cylindrical cutting. Therefore, the volume reductive cutting method can be effectively applied to the activated bio-shield concrete. (authors)

Kim, HakSoo; Chung, SungHwan; Maeng, SungJun [Central Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., 1312-70 Yuseong-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)] [Central Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., 1312-70 Yuseong-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

FY 2000 Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes activities of the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area for the past year.

None

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Sellafield Decommissioning Programme - Update and Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sellafield site in North West England has over 240 active facilities covering the full nuclear cycle from fuel manufacture through generation, reprocessing and waste treatment. The Sellafield decommissioning programme was formally initiated in the mid 1980s though several plants had been decommissioned prior to this primarily to create space for other plants. Since the initiation of the programme 7 plants have been completely decommissioned, significant progress has been made in a further 16 and a total of 56 major project phases have been completed. This programme update will explain the decommissioning arrangements and strategies and illustrate the progress made on a number of the plants including the Windscale Pile Chimneys, the first reprocessing plan and plutonium plants. These present a range of different challenges and requiring approaches from fully hands on to fully remote. Some of the key lessons learned will be highlighted.

Lutwyche, P. R.; Challinor, S. F.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

38

Guides: Design/Engineering for Deactivation & Decommissioning  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To ensure development of appropriate levels of engineering detail, DOE-EMs Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-13) has prepared this guidance for tailoring a D...

39

Safety of Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Full text of publication follows: ensuring safety during all stages of facility life cycle is a widely recognised responsibility of the operators, implemented under the supervision of the regulatory body and other competent authorities. As the majority of the facilities worldwide are still in operation or shutdown, there is no substantial experience in decommissioning and evaluation of safety during decommissioning in majority of Member States. The need for cooperation and exchange of experience and good practices on ensuring and evaluating safety of decommissioning was one of the outcomes of the Berlin conference in 2002. On this basis during the last three years IAEA initiated a number of international projects that can assist countries, in particular small countries with limited resources. The main IAEA international projects addressing safety during decommissioning are: (i) DeSa Project on Evaluation and Demonstration of Safety during Decommissioning; (ii) R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P project on Research Reactors Decommissioning Demonstration Project; and (iii) Project on Evaluation and Decommissioning of Former Facilities that used Radioactive Material in Iraq. This paper focuses on the DeSa Project activities on (i) development of a harmonised methodology for safety assessment for decommissioning; (ii) development of a procedure for review of safety assessments; (iii) development of recommendations on application of the graded approach to the performance and review of safety assessments; and (iv) application of the methodology and procedure to the selected real facilities with different complexities and hazard potentials (a nuclear power plant, a research reactor and a nuclear laboratory). The paper also outlines the DeSa Project outcomes and planned follow-up activities. It also summarises the main objectives and activities of the Iraq Project and introduces the R{sup 2}D{sup 2} Project, which is a subject of a complementary paper.

Batandjieva, B.; Warnecke, E.; Coates, R. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Services » Communication & Engagement » International Programs » Services » Communication & Engagement » International Programs » Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and US Department of Energy Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and US Department of Energy Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority in UK and US Department of Energy Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and US Department of Energy More Documents & Publications Statement of Intent between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Scanned_Agreement.pdf Statement of Intent NO. 2 between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Waste Management Nuclear Materials & Waste

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioning cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Decommissioning Under CERCLA Information Sheet | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Decommissioning Under CERCLA Information Sheet Decommissioning Under CERCLA Information Sheet Decommissioning Under CERCLA Information Sheet This Question and Answer (Q&A) Sheet discusses the use of removal authority in the conduct of decommissioning activities, consistent with the Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (May 22, 1995), and the accompanying Decommissioning Implementation Guide . The Policy and Guide establish the approach agreed upon by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It is consistent with CERCLA statutory requirements, as well as CERCLA regulatory requirements found in the National Contingency Plan (NCP), and applicable

42

An evaluation of the dismantling technologies for decommissioning of nuclear power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper is to suggest an evaluation method on the dismantling technologies for decommissioning of nuclear power plants. The parameters of evaluation are performance impacts, site-specific impacts, safety impacts, and cost impacts. The evaluation model was provided and applied for dismantling of a steam generator.

KwanSeong Jeong; ByungSeon Choi; Jeikwon Moon; Dongjun Hyun; JongHwan Lee; IkJune Kim; GeunHo Kim; JaeSeok Seo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Systematic Approach for Decommissioning Planning and Estimating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear facility decommissioning, satisfactorily completed at the lowest cost, relies on a systematic approach to the planning, estimating, and documenting the work. High quality information is needed to properly perform the planning and estimating. A systematic approach to collecting and maintaining the needed information is recommended using a knowledgebase system for information management. A systematic approach is also recommended to develop the decommissioning plan, cost estimate and schedule. A probabilistic project cost and schedule risk analysis is included as part of the planning process. The entire effort is performed by a experienced team of decommissioning planners, cost estimators, schedulers, and facility knowledgeable owner representatives. The plant data, work plans, cost and schedule are entered into a knowledgebase. This systematic approach has been used successfully for decommissioning planning and cost estimating for a commercial nuclear power plant. Elements of this approach have been used for numerous cost estimates and estimate reviews. The plan and estimate in the knowledgebase should be a living document, updated periodically, to support decommissioning fund provisioning, with the plan ready for use when the need arises.

Dam, A. S.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

44

Decommissioning of the Iraq former nuclear complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: A number of sites in Iraq have some degree of radiological contamination and require decommissioning and remediation in order to ensure radiological safety. Many of these sites in Iraq are located at the nuclear research centre at Al Tuwaitha. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Board of Governors has approved a project to assist the Government of Iraq in the evaluation and decommissioning of former facilities that used radioactive materials. The project is divided into three phases: Phase 1: collect and analyze all available data and conduct training of the Iraqi staff, Phase 2: develop a decommissioning and remediation plan, and Phase 3: implement field activities relating to decommissioning, remediation and site selection suitable for final disposal of waste. Four working groups have been established to complete the Phase 1 work and significant progress has been made in drafting a new nuclear law which will provide the legal basis for the licensing of the decommissioning of the former nuclear complex. Work is also underway to collect and analysis existing date, to prioritize future activities and to develop a waste management strategy. This will be a long-term and costly project. (authors)

Abbas, Mohammed [Ministry of Science and Technology (Iraq); Helou, Tuama; Ahmead, Bushra [Ministry of Environment (Iraq); Al-Atia, Mousa; Al-Mubarak, Mowaffak [Iraqi Radiation Sources Regulatory Authority (Iraq); Danneels, Jeffrey; Cochran, John; Sorenson, Ken [Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Coates, Roger [International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100 - 1400 Vienna (Austria)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project & Identifier Project & Identifier Tech Stage: Deployment In-Situ Decommissioning: SR09171 SRS Area Closure Projects: PBS SR-0040 3-D models of the R reactor building and P reactor vessel were delivered to SRS Area Closure Projects Page 1 of 2 Tech Fact Sheet Savannah River Site South Carolina 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning Challenge Planning for the safe and controlled deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of highly contaminated nuclear facilities requires that engineers and managers fully understand the work space in which personnel and equipment will operate. It also requires that they effectively communicate safety concerns and work sequences to the personnel who will perform the work. This crucial knowledge is conveyed in

46

CX-012137: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-012137: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modular Carbon Dioxide Capture Facility Decommission - Building 84, Room 124 CX(s) Applied: B3.6...

47

CX-005663: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-005663: Categorical Exclusion Determination Vortex Tube Project Decommissioning Project CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04292011 Location(s):...

48

West Valley Demonstration Project Phase I Decommissioning - Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project Phase I Decommissioning - Project Phase I Decommissioning - Facility Disposition Partnering Performance Agreement West Valley Demonstration Project Phase I Decommissioning - Facility Disposition Partnering Performance Agreement The Department of Energy, West Valley Demonstration Project (DOE-WVDP) and CH2M Hill B&W West Valley (CHBWV) are committed to continuous improvement and will utilize principles of the DOE Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Partnering Policy to create and foster a team environment to successfully complete the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Phase I Decommissioning - Faciltiy Disposition. West Valley Demonstration Project Phase I Decommissioning - Facility Disposition Partnering Performance Agreement More Documents & Publications CX-009527: Categorical Exclusion Determination

49

FAQS Qualification Card - Deactivation and Decommissioning | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Deactivation and Decommissioning Deactivation and Decommissioning FAQS Qualification Card - Deactivation and Decommissioning A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-DeactivationDecommissioning.docx Description Deactivation and Decommissioning Qualification Card More Documents & Publications

50

DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA In May 1995, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a policy in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for decommissioning surplus DOE facilities consistent with the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This policy ensures protection of the environment, worker health and public health, provides opportunities for stakeholder involvement, and achieves risk reduction without unnecessary delay. Consistent with the jointly issued "Guidance on Accelerating CERCLA Environmental Restoration at Federal Facilities" (August 22, 1994), this decommissioning policy encourages streamlined decision-making. This

51

University of Virginia Reactor Facility Decommissioning Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Virginia Reactor Facility started accelerated decommissioning in 2002. The facility consists of two licensed reactors, the CAVALIER and the UVAR. This paper will describe the progress in 2002, remaining efforts and the unique organizational structure of the project team.

Ervin, P. F.; Lundberg, L. A.; Benneche, P. E.; Mulder, R. U.; Steva, D. P.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

52

Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Purpose This Policy establishes the approach agreed upon by the Department of Energy (DOE) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the conduct of decommissioning projects [1] consistent with CERCLA requirements. This Policy creates a framework for the conduct of decommissioning of DOE facilities and provides guidance to EPA Regions and DOE Operations Offices on the use of CERCLA response authority to decommission such facilities. The principal objectives of this Policy are to ensure that decommissioning

53

NMSS handbook for decommissioning fuel cycle and materials licensees  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission amended its regulations to set forth the technical and financial criteria for decommissioning licensed nuclear facilities. These regulations were further amended to establish additional recordkeeping requirements for decommissioning; to establish timeframes and schedules for the decommissioning; and to clarify that financial assurance requirements must be in place during operations and updated when licensed operations cease. Reviews of the Site Decommissioning Management Plan (SDMP) program found that, while the NRC staff was overseeing the decommissioning program at nuclear facilities in a manner that was protective of public health and safety, progress in decommissioning many sites was slow. As a result NRC determined that formal written procedures should be developed to facilitate the timely decommissioning of licensed nuclear facilities. This handbook was developed to aid NRC staff in achieving this goal. It is intended to be used as a reference document to, and in conjunction with, NRC Inspection Manual Chapter (IMC) 2605, ``Decommissioning Inspection Program for Fuel Cycle and Materials Licensees.`` The policies and procedures discussed in this handbook should be used by NRC staff overseeing the decommissioning program at licensed fuel cycle and materials sites; formerly licensed sites for which the licenses were terminated; sites involving source, special nuclear, or byproduct material subject to NRC regulation for which a license was never issued; and sites in the NRC`s SDMP program. NRC staff overseeing the decommissioning program at nuclear reactor facilities subject to regulation under 10 CFR Part 50 are not required to use the procedures discussed in this handbook.

Orlando, D.A.; Hogg, R.C.; Ramsey, K.M. [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) Concepts and Approaches for Excess Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning End State - 13367  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) currently has numerous radiologically contaminated excess nuclear facilities waiting decommissioning throughout the Complex. The traditional decommissioning end state is complete removal. This commonly involves demolishing the facility, often segregating various components and building materials and disposing of the highly contaminated, massive structures containing tons of highly contaminated equipment and piping in a (controlled and approved) landfill, at times hundreds of miles from the facility location. Traditional demolition is costly, and results in significant risks to workers, as well as risks and costs associated with transporting the materials to a disposal site. In situ decommissioning (ISD or entombment) is a viable alternative to demolition, offering comparable and potentially more protective protection of human health and the environment, but at a significantly reduced cost and worker risk. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has completed the initial ISD deployment for radiologically contaminated facilities. Two reactor (P and R Reactors) facilities were decommissioned in 2011 using the ISD approach through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The SRS ISD approach resolved programmatic, regulatory and technical/engineering issues associated with avoiding the potential hazards and cost associated with generating and disposing of an estimated 124,300 metric tons (153,000 m{sup 3}) of contaminated debris per reactor. The DOE Environmental Management Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering, through the Savannah River National Laboratory, is currently investigating potential monitoring techniques and strategies to assess ISD effectiveness. As part of SRS's strategic planning, the site is seeking to leverage in situ decommissioning concepts, approaches and facilities to conduct research, design end states, and assist in regulatory interactions in broad national and international government and private industry decommissioning applications. SRS offers critical services based upon the SRS experience in decommissioning and reactor entombment technology (e.g., grout formulations for varying conditions, structural and material sciences). The SRS ISD approach follows a systems engineering framework to achieve a regulatory acceptable end state based on established protocols, attains the final end state with minimal long stewardship requirements, protects industrial workers, and protects groundwater and the environment. The ISD systems engineering framework addresses key areas of the remedial process planning, technology development and deployment, and assessment to attain the ultimate goal of natural resource stewardship and protecting the public. The development and deployment of the SRS ISD approach has established a path for ISD of other large nuclear facilities in the United States and around the globe as an acceptable remedial alternative for decommissioning nuclear facilities. (authors)

Serrato, Michael G. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Musall, John C.; Bergren, Christopher L. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was operated from 1982 until 1997. The last several years included operations with mixtures of deuterium and tritium. In September 2002, the three year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Project for TFTR was successfully completed. The need to deal with tritium contamination as well as activated materials led to the adaptation of many techniques from the maintenance work during TFTR operations to the D&D effort. In addition, techniques from the decommissioning of fission reactors were adapted to the D&D of TFTR and several new technologies, most notably the development of a diamond wire cutting process for complex metal structures, were developed. These techniques, along with a project management system that closely linked the field crews to the engineering staff who developed the techniques and procedures via a Work Control Center, resulted in a project that was completed safely, on time, and well below budget.

E. Perry; J. Chrzanowski; C. Gentile; R. Parsells; K. Rule; R. Strykowsky; M. Viola

2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

56

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference pressurized water reactor power station: Technical support for decommissioning matters related to preparation of the final decommissioning rule  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preparation of the final Decommissioning Rule by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has been assisted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff familiar with decommissioning matters. These efforts have included updating previous cost estimates developed during the series of studies on conceptually decommissioning reference licensed nuclear facilities for inclusion in the Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement (FGEIS) on decommissioning; documenting the cost updates; evaluating the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits on decommissioning; developing a revised scaling formula for estimating decommissioning costs for reactor plants different in size from the reference pressurized water reactor (PWR) described in the earlier study; defining a formula for adjusting current cost estimates to reflect future escalation in labor, materials, and waste disposal costs; and completing a study of recent PWR steam generator replacements to determine realistic estimates for time, costs and doses associated with steam generator removal during decommissioning. This report presents the results of recent PNL studies to provide supporting information in four areas concerning decommissioning of the reference PWR: updating the previous cost estimates to January 1986 dollars; assessing the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits; assessing the cost and dose impacts of recent steam generator replacements; and developing a scaling formula for plants different in size than the reference plant and an escalation formula for adjusting current cost estimates for future escalation.

Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

DOE Awards New York Decommissioning Services Contract | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New York Decommissioning Services Contract New York Decommissioning Services Contract DOE Awards New York Decommissioning Services Contract June 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor 513-246-0539 William.taylor@emcbc.doe.gov West Valley, NY -- The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a contract to CH2M Hill-B&W West Valley of Englewood, Colorado, for the Phase I Decommissioning and Facility Disposition activities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). The contract is a performance-based, cost-plus-award-fee, completion type contract with cost and schedule incentives. The total contract value is $333.4 million. DOE has selected a phased approach for decommissioning activities at the WVDP. Phase I is the first of a two-phase process for the final decommissioning of the western New York site in accordance with the West

58

Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Reactor:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Reactor: Reactor core and associated structures successfully removed; waste shipped offsite for disposal Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Reactor: Reactor core and associated structures successfully removed; waste shipped offsite for disposal September 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor’s bioshield, which contains the 700-ton reactor core, is shown prior to decommissioning. The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor's bioshield, which contains the 700-ton reactor core, is shown prior to decommissioning. Pictured here is the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor, where major decommissioning milestones were recently reached after the remaining radioactive materials from the facility’s bioshield were shipped to a licensed offsite disposal facility.

59

In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management In-Situ Decommissioning (ISD) is an effective decommissioning practice offering a safe and environmentally-favorable alternative to completely demolishing a facility and transporting its debris elsewhere for disposal. Regulatory approval to decommission a facility through ISD is authorized primarily by the Environmental Protection Agency under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). In addition, Federal Facility Agreements and local stakeholder agreements have a direct influence on ISD approval and oversight. The ISD approach limits radiation exposure and industrial hazards to workers to a greater extent than larger scale cleanout and demolition.

60

DOE Awards New York Decommissioning Services Contract | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New York Decommissioning Services Contract New York Decommissioning Services Contract DOE Awards New York Decommissioning Services Contract June 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor 513-246-0539 William.taylor@emcbc.doe.gov West Valley, NY -- The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a contract to CH2M Hill-B&W West Valley of Englewood, Colorado, for the Phase I Decommissioning and Facility Disposition activities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). The contract is a performance-based, cost-plus-award-fee, completion type contract with cost and schedule incentives. The total contract value is $333.4 million. DOE has selected a phased approach for decommissioning activities at the WVDP. Phase I is the first of a two-phase process for the final decommissioning of the western New York site in accordance with the West

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioning cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

GRR/Section 20 - Plant Decommissioning Overview | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20 - Plant Decommissioning Overview 20 - Plant Decommissioning Overview < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 20 - Plant Decommissioning Overview 20PlantDecommissioningOverview (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies BLM Regulations & Policies 43 CFR 3263.10-3263.15: Well Abandonment Geothermal Resources Operational Order No.3 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 20PlantDecommissioningOverview (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative State and federal laws have specific requirements for the decommissioning process. 20.1 to 20.2 - Will a Geothermal Well be Abandoned?

62

3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning The design and production of 3-D scale models that replicate the highly contaminated structures within the nuclear facility would provide a significant improvement in visualization of the work space, which would give managers and supervisors a more powerful tool for planning and communicating safety issues and work sequences to personnel executing the physical D&D tasks. 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning More Documents & Publications D&D Toolbox Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for Characterization D&D and Risk Assessment Tools 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D

63

E-Print Network 3.0 - application decommissioning models Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ECONOMIC MODELING OF RE-LICENSING AND DECOMMISSIONING OPTIONS FOR THE KLAMATH BASIN HYDROELECTRIC... Consultant Report Economic Modeling of Relicensing and Decommissioning Options...

64

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station: Technical support for decommissioning matters related to preparation of the final decommissioning rule  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preparation of the final Decommissioning Rule by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has been assisted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff familiar with decommissioning matters. These efforts have included updating previous cost estimates developed during the series of studies of conceptually decommissioning reference licensed nuclear facilities for inclusion in the Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement (FGEIS) on decommissioning; documenting the cost updates; evaluating the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits on decommissioning; developing a revised scaling formula for estimating decommissioning costs for reactor plants different in size from the reference boiling water reactor (BWR) described in the earlier study; and defining a formula for adjusting current cost estimates to reflect future escalation in labor, materials, and waste disposal costs. This report presents the results of recent PNL studies to provide supporting information in three areas concerning decommissioning of the reference BWR: updating the previous cost estimates to January 1986 dollars; assessing the cost and dose impacts of post-TMI-2 backfits; and developing a scaling formula for plants different in size than the reference plant and an escalation formula for adjusting current cost estimates for future escalation.

Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

MCW Laboratory Decommissioning Checklist P.I.:_______________ Date: ___________ LAB DECOMMISSIONING CHECKLIST rev. 12/12/13  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DECOMMISSIONING CHECKLIST rev. 12/12/13 Timeline Tasks Contacts Completed NA 1 month Inventory sends inventory list to appropriate contact Send email to safetyinfo@mcw.edu "Attn: Chemical, and outline appropriate path of decontamination (e.g. needs oil removed prior to disposal, requires surface

66

Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

09-00269, Rev. 0 09-00269, Rev. 0 KEY WORDS: DOE-HQ In situ Decommissioning Entombment Workshop TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS FOR IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING (ISD) WORKSHOP REPORT Patricia L. Lee, John B. Gladden, G. Timothy Jannik, Christine A. Langton, Michael G. Serrato, SRNL Chuck Urland, Erick Reynolds, PEC June 2009 Savannah River National Laboratory Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Savannah River Site

67

A review of decommissioning considerations for new reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At a time of 'nuclear renaissance' when the focus is on advanced reactor designs and construction, it is easy to overlook the decommissioning considerations because such a stage in the life of the new reactors will be some sixty years down the road. Yet, one of the lessons learned from major decommissioning projects has been that decommissioning was not given much thought when these reactors were designed three or four decades ago. Hence, the time to examine what decommissioning considerations should be taken into account is right from the design stage with regular updates of the decommissioning strategy and plans throughout the life cycle of the reactor. Designing D and D into the new reactor designs is necessary to ensure that the tail end costs of the nuclear power are manageable. Such considerations during the design stage will facilitate a more cost-effective, safe and timely decommissioning of the facility when a reactor is eventually retired. This paper examines the current regulatory and industry design guidance for the new reactors with respect to the decommissioning issues and provides a review of the design considerations that can help optimize the reactor designs for the eventual decommissioning. (authors)

Devgun, J.S.Ph.D. [Manager Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC, Chicago, IL (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

License Stewardship Approach to Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper explores both the conceptual approach to decommissioning commercial nuclear facilities using a license stewardship approach as well as the first commercial application of this approach. The license stewardship approach involves a decommissioning company taking control of a site and the 10 CFR 50 License in order to complete the work utilizing the established trust fund. In conclusion: The license stewardship approach is a novel way to approach the decommissioning of a retired nuclear power plant that offers several key advantages to all parties. For the owner and regulators, it provides assurance that the station will be decommissioned in a safe, timely manner. Ratepayers are assured that the work will be completed for the price they already have paid, with the decommissioning contractor assuming the financial risk of decommissioning. The contractor gains control of the assets and liabilities, the license, and the decommissioning fund. This enables the decommissioning contractor to control their work and eliminates redundant layers of management, while bringing more focus on achieving the desired end state - a restored site. (authors)

Daly, P.T.; Hlopak, W.J. [Commercial Services Group, EnergySolutions 1009 Commerce Park, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Ris-R-1250(EN) Decommissioning of the Nuclear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risø-R-1250(EN) Decommissioning of the Nuclear Facilities at Risø National Laboratory Descriptions on request from the Minister of Research and Information Technology. It describes the nuclear facilities;Decommissioning of Risø's nuclear facilities. Descriptions and cost assessment. Risø-R-1250(EN) 3 Contents 1

70

Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Major articles/reports in this issue include: An interesting year ahead of us, by Tom Christopher, AREVA NP Inc.; U.S.-India Civil Nuclear Cooperation; Decontamination and recycling of retired components, by Sean P. Brushart, Electric Power Research Institute; and, ANO is 33 and going strong, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. The industry innovation article is: Continuous improvement process, by ReNae Kowalewski, Arkansas Nuclear One.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Sensor Network Demonstration for In Situ Decommissioning - 13332  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Florida International University's (FIU's) Applied Research Center is currently supporting the Department of Energy's (DOE) Environmental Management Office of D and D and Facility Engineering program. FIU is supporting DOE's initiative to improve safety, reduce technical risks, and limit uncertainty within D and D operations by identifying technologies suitable to meet specific facility D and D requirements, assessing the readiness of those technologies for field deployment, and conducting feasibility studies and large scale demonstrations of promising technologies. During FY11, FIU collaborated with Savannah River National Laboratory in the development of an experimental test site for the demonstration of multiple sensor systems for potential use in the in situ decommissioning process. In situ decommissioning is a process in which the above ground portion of a facility is dismantled and removed, and the underground portion is filled with a cementious material such as grout. In such a scenario, the question remains on how to effectively monitor the structural health of the grout (cracking, flexing, and sinking), as well as track possible migration of contaminants within and out of the grouted monolith. The right types of sensors can aid personnel in better understanding the conditions within the entombed structure. Without sensors embedded in and around the monolith, it will be very difficult to estimate structural integrity and contaminant transport. Yet, to fully utilize the appropriate sensors and the provided data, their performance and reliability must be evaluated outside a laboratory setting. To this end, a large scale experimental setup and demonstration was conducted at FIU. In order to evaluate a large suite of sensor systems, FIU personnel designed and purchased a pre-cast concrete open-top cube, which served as a mock-up of an in situ DOE decommissioned facility. The inside of the cube measures 10 ft x 10 ft x 8 ft. In order to ensure that the individual sensors would be immobilized during the grout pouring activities, a set of nine sensor racks were designed. The 270 sensors provided by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Mississippi State University (MSU), University of Houston (UH), and University of South Carolina (USC) were secured to these racks based on predetermined locations. Once sensor racks were installed inside the test cube, connected and debugged, approximately 32 cubic yards of special grout material was used to entomb the sensors. MSU provided and demonstrated four types of fiber loop ring-down (FLR) sensors for detection of water, temperature, cracks, and movement of fluids. INL provided and demonstrated time differenced 3D electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), advanced tensiometers for moisture content, and thermocouples for temperature measurements. University of Houston provided smart aggregate (SA) sensors, which detect crack severity and water presence. An additional UH sensor system demonstrated was a Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) fiber optic system measuring strain, presence of water, and temperature. USC provided a system which measured acoustic emissions during cracking, as well as temperature and pH sensors. All systems were connected to a Sensor Remote Access System (SRAS) data networking and collection system designed, developed and provided by FIU. The purpose of SRAS was to collect and allow download of the raw sensor data from all the sensor system, as well as allow upload of the processed data and any analysis reports and graphs. All this information was made available to the research teams via the Deactivation and Decommissioning Knowledge Management and Information Tool (D and D KM-IT). As a current research effort, FIU is performing an energy analysis, and transferring several sensor systems to a Photovoltaic (PV) System to continuously monitor energy consumption parameters and overall power demands. Also, One final component of this research is focusing on developing an integrated data network to capture, log and analyze sensor system data in near real time from a single inte

Lagos, L.; Varona, J.; Awwad, A. [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Suite 2100, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)] [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Suite 2100, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Rivera, J.; McGill, J. [Department of Energy - DOE, Environmental Management Office (United States)] [Department of Energy - DOE, Environmental Management Office (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » D&D Workshops » Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report In recognition of the increasing attention being focused on In Situ Decommissioning (ISD or entombment) as an acceptable and beneficial decommissioning end state, EM is developing guidance for the implementation of ISD of excess facilities within the DOE complex. Consistent with the overarching DOE goals for increased personnel and environmental safety, reduced technical uncertainties and risks, and overall gains in efficiencies and effectiveness, EM initiated an ISD Technology Needs Workshop to identify the technical barriers and technology development

73

Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning The Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for the disposition of a vast number of facilities at numerous sites around the country which have been declared excess to current mission needs. Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning More Documents & Publications Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition.

74

Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » D&D Workshops » Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report In recognition of the increasing attention being focused on In Situ Decommissioning (ISD or entombment) as an acceptable and beneficial decommissioning end state, EM is developing guidance for the implementation of ISD of excess facilities within the DOE complex. Consistent with the overarching DOE goals for increased personnel and environmental safety, reduced technical uncertainties and risks, and overall gains in efficiencies and effectiveness, EM initiated an ISD Technology Needs Workshop to identify the technical barriers and technology development

75

Overview of Remote Handling Equipment Used for the NPP A1 Decommissioning - 12141  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first Czechoslovak NPP A1 was in operation from 1972 to 1977 and it was finally shutdown due to an accident (level 4 according to the INES). The presence of radioactive, toxic or hazardous materials limits personnel access to facilities and therefore it is necessary to use remote handling technologies for some most difficult characterization, retrieval, decontamination and dismantling tasks. The history of remote handling technologies utilization started in nineties when the spent nuclear fuel, including those fuel assemblies damaged during the accident, was prepared for the transport to Russia. Subsequent significant development of remote handling equipment continued during implementation of the NPP A1 decommissioning project - Stage I and ongoing Stage II. Company VUJE, Inc. is the general contractor for both mentioned stages of the decommissioning project. Various remote handling manipulators and robotics arms were developed and used. It includes remotely controlled vehicle manipulator MT-15 used for characterisation tasks in hostile and radioactive environment, special robust manipulator DENAR-41 used for the decontamination of underground storage tanks and multi-purposes robotics arms MT-80 and MT-80A developed for variety of decontamination and dismantling tasks. The heavy water evaporator facility dismantling is the current task performed remotely by robotics arm MT-80. The heavy water evaporator is located inside the main production building in the room No. 220 where loose surface contamination varies from 10 Bq/cm{sup 2} to 1x10{sup 3} Bq/cm{sup 2}, dose rate is up to 1.5 mGy/h and the feeding pipeline contained liquid RAW with high tritium content. Presented manipulators have been designed for broad range of decommissioning tasks. They are used for recognition, sampling, waste retrieval from large underground tanks, decontamination and dismantling of technological equipments. Each of the mentioned fields claims specific requirements on design of manipulator, their operation and control systems as well as tools of manipulators. Precise planning of decontamination and dismantling tasks is necessary for its successful performance by remotely controlled manipulator. The example of the heavy water evaporator demonstrates typical procedure for decommissioning of contaminated technological equipment by remotely controlled manipulators - planning of decommissioning tasks, preparatory tasks, modification of applied tools and design of specific supporting constructions for manipulator and finally decontamination and dismantling themselves. Due to the particularly demanding conditions in highly contaminated A1 NPP, a team of experts with special know-how in the field of decommissioning has grown up, and unique technological equipment enabling effective and safe work in environment with a high radiation level has been developed. (authors)

Kravarik, K.; Medved, J.; Pekar, A.; Stubna, M. [VUJE, Inc., Okruzna 5, 918 64 Trnava (Slovakia); Michal, V. [IAEA, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O.Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Vargovcik, L. [ZTS VVU Kosice, Inc., Juzna Trieda 95, 041 24 Kosice (Slovakia)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Safety analysis for Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project. Vol. 9. Pt. 1. Rev. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning the safety analysis for the decommissioning project; and permitting plan.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

DECOMMISSIONING OF A CAESIUM-137 SEALED SOURCE PRODUCTION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amersham owns a former Caesium-137 sealed source production facility. They commissioned RWE NUKEM to carry out an Option Study to determine a strategy for the management of this facility and then the subsequent decommissioning of it. The decommissioning was carried out in two sequential phases. Firstly robotic decommissioning followed by a phase of manual decommissioning. This paper describes the remote equipment designed built and operated, the robotic and manual decommissioning operations performed, the Safety Management arrangements and summarizes the lessons learned. Using the equipment described the facility was dismantled and decontaminated robotically. Some 2300kg of Intermediate Level Waste containing in the order of 4000Ci were removed robotically from the facility. Ambient dose rates were reduced from 100's of R per hour {gamma} to 100's of mR per hour {gamma}. The Telerobotic System was then removed to allow man access to complete the decommissioning. Manual decommissioning reduced ambient dose rates further to less than 1mR per hour {gamma} and loose contamination levels to less than 0.25Bq/cm2. This allowed access to the facility without respiratory protection.

Murray, A.; Abbott, H.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

78

Radiological planning and implementation for nuclear-facility decommissioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need and scope of radiological planning required to support nuclear facility decommissioning are issues addressed in this paper. The role of radiation protection engineering and monitoring professionals during project implementation and closeout is also addressed. Most of the discussion focuses on worker protection considerations; however, project support, environmental protection and site release certification considerations are also covered. One objective is to identify radiological safety issues that must be addressed. The importance of the issues will vary depending on the type of facility being decommissioned; however, by giving appropriate attention to these issues difficult decommissioning projects can be accomplished in a safer manner with workers and the public receiving minimal radiation exposures.

Valentine, A.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Some aspects of the decommissioning of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major factors influencing the choice of a national concept for the decommissioning of nuclear power plants are examined. The operating lifetimes of power generating units with nuclear reactors of various types (VVER-1000, VVER-440, RBMK-1000, EGP-6, and BN-600) are analyzed. The basic approaches to decommissioning Russian nuclear power plants and the treatment of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel are discussed. Major aspects of the ecological and radiation safety of personnel, surrounding populations, and the environment during decommissioning of nuclear installations are identified.

Khvostova, M. S., E-mail: marinakhvostova@list.ru [St. Petersburg State Maritime Technical University (Sevmashvtuz), Severodvinsk Branch (Russian Federation)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

FAQS Job Task Analyses - Deactivation and Decommissioning  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Functional Area Qualification Standard Functional Area Qualification Standard Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) DOE-STD-1166-2003 Step 1 Identify and evaluate tasks - Develop a comprehensive list of tasks that define the job. o A great starting point is the list of Duties and Responsibilities from the FAQS. o Give careful thought to additional tasks that could be considered. o Don't worry about deleting tasks at this point - that is a part of the process further down. - List the tasks (and their sources, e.g., Duties and Responsibilities #1) in the chart below. - Discuss each task as a group and come to a consensus pertaining to Importance and Frequency of the task (i.e., each team member can consent to the assigned value, even if they don't exactly agree with it).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioning cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Articles and reports in this issue include: D and D technical paper summaries; The role of nuclear power in turbulent times, by Tom Chrisopher, AREVA, NP, Inc.; Enthusiastic about new technologies, by Jack Fuller, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; It's important to be good citizens, by Steve Rus, Black and Veatch Corporation; Creating Jobs in the U.S., by Guy E. Chardon, ALSTOM Power; and, and, An enviroment and a community champion, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. The Industry Innovations article is titled Best of the best TIP achievement 2008, by Edward Conaway, STP Nuclear Operating Company.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

EA-1053: Decontaminating and Decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3: Decontaminating and Decommissioning the General Atomics 3: Decontaminating and Decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility, San Diego, California EA-1053: Decontaminating and Decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility, San Diego, California SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for low-level radioactive and mixed wastes generated by decontaminating and decommissioning activities at the U.S. Department of Energy's General Atomics' Hot Cell Facility would be transported to either a DOE owned facility, such as the Hanford site in Washington, or to a commercial facility, such as Envirocare in Utah, for treatment and/or storage and disposal. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 14, 1995 EA-1053: Finding of No Significant Impact

83

Policy Statement 3, Board Oversight of Department of Energy Decommissioning  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 Date: August 19, 1996 Subject Policy Statement on Board oversight of Department of Energy decommissioning activities at defense nuclear facilities. Summary This policy statement describes the decommissioning phase of a DOE defense nuclear facility and identifies the Board's safety oversight responsibilities for decommisioning activities. John T. Conway, Chairman Congress directed the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) to oversee Department of Energy (DOE) practices at defense nuclear facilities that could adversely affect public health and safety during any stage in the life cycle of those facilities, from design, construction, and operation through decommissioning. The Board's objective during decommissioning is identical to its objective during any other phase of a facility's life cycle: to ensure that DOE provides adequate protection of worker and public health and safety at defense nuclear facilities. Congress specifically tasked the Board with reviewing and evaluating:

84

DOE-EM'S In-Situ Decommissioning Strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addressed the current status of decommissioning projects within the Department of Energy (DOE) that have an end state of permanent entombment, referred to as in-situ decommissioning (ISD). The substance of a Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) review of ISD and the development of a strategy are summarized. The strategy first recognizes ISD as a viable decommissioning end state; secondly addresses the integration of this approach within the external and internal regulatory regimes; subsequently identifies tools that need developing; and finally presents guidance for implementation. The overall conclusion is that ISD is a viable mode of decommissioning that can be conducted within the existing structure of rules and regulations. (author)

Negin, C.A.; Urland, C.S. [Chuck, Project Enhancement Corporation, Germantown, MD (United States); Szilagyi, A.P. [Andy, U.S. Department of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Recent Sodium Technology Development for the Decommissioning of the Rapsodie and Superphenix Reactors and the Management of Sodium Wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) has recently developed and/or conducted experiments on several processes in support of the decommissioning of two French liquid-metal fast reactors (LMFRs), Rapsodie and Superphenix, as well as on the treatment of CEA sodium wastes. CEA has demonstrated that it is possible to define appropriate and efficient processes to meet the different situations encountered in decommissioning LMFRs. Mechanical techniques derived from standard technologies have been successfully applied to fast reactor decommissioning to complete primary vessel draining from sodium. In addition, specific chemical processes have been developed to deal safely with metallic sodium reactivity. Sodium-contaminated equipment has been successfully cleaned by reacting sodium with water mist in an atmosphere with carbon dioxide to form inert sodium carbonate. Bulk sodium has been successfully converted into aqueous caustic soda by injection of liquid-metallic sodium into sodium hydroxide solution. Several processes were also defined to deal with specific sodium wastes. In all cases the principle is based on a sodium/water chemical reaction where the released hydrogen and heat are controlled. With the development of a wide variety of processes, all steps in the decommissioning of LMFRs are assumed to be now properly mastered.

Rodriguez, G.; Gastaldi, O.; Baque, F. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique Cadarache (France)

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Progress in Decommissioning the Humboldt Bay Power Plant - 13604  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decommissioning of the Pacific Gas and Electric (PG and E) Company Humboldt Bay Power Plant (HBPP) Unit 3 nuclear facility has now, after more than three decades of SAFSTOR and initial decommissioning work, transitioned to full-scale decommissioning. Decommissioning activities to date have been well orchestrated and executed in spite of an extremely small work site with space constricted even more by other concurrent on-site major construction projects including the demolition of four fossil units, construction of a new generating station and 60 KV switchyard upgrade. Full-scale decommissioning activities - now transitioning from Plant Systems Removal (PG and E self-perform) to Civil Works Projects (contractor performed) - are proceeding in a safe, timely, and cost effective manner. As a result of the successful decommissioning work to date (approximately fifty percent completed) and the intense planning and preparations for the remaining work, there is a high level of confidence for completion of all HBPP Unit 3 decommissions activities in 2018. Strategic planning and preparations to transition into full-scale decommissioning was carried out in 2008 by a small, highly focused project team. This planning was conducted concurrent with other critical planning requirements such as the loading of spent nuclear fuel into dry storage at the Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) finishing December 2008. Over the past four years, 2009 through 2012, the majority of decommissioning work has been installation of site infrastructure and removal of systems and components, known as the Plant System Removal Phase, where work scope was dynamic with significant uncertainty, and it was self-performed by PG and E. As HBPP Decommissioning transitions from the Plant System Removal Phase to the Civil Works Projects Phase, where work scope is well defined, a contracting plan similar to that used for Fossil Decommissioning will be implemented. Award of five major work scopes in various stages of development are planned as they include: Turbine Building Demolition, Nuclear Facilities Demolition and Excavation, Intake and Discharge Canal Remediation, Office Facility Demobilization, and Final Site Restoration. Benefits realized by transitioning to the Civil Works Projects Phase with predominant firm fixed-price/fixed unit price contracting include single civil works contractor who can coordinate concrete shaving, liner removal, structural removal, and other demolition activities; streamline financial control; reduce PG and E overhead staffing; and provide a specialized Bidder Team with experience from other similar projects. (authors)

Rod, Kerry [PG and E Utility, Humboldt Bay Power Plant, 1000 King Salmon Ave. Eureka, CA 95503 (United States)] [PG and E Utility, Humboldt Bay Power Plant, 1000 King Salmon Ave. Eureka, CA 95503 (United States); Shelanskey, Steven K. [Anata Management Solutions, 5180 South Commerce Dr,, Suite F Murray, UT 84107 (United States)] [Anata Management Solutions, 5180 South Commerce Dr,, Suite F Murray, UT 84107 (United States); Kristofzski, John [CH2MHILL, 295 Bradley Blvd. Suite 300, Richland WA 99353 (United States)] [CH2MHILL, 295 Bradley Blvd. Suite 300, Richland WA 99353 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Development of a Preliminary Decommissioning Plan Following the International Structure for Decommissioning Costing (ISDC) of Nuclear Installations - 13361  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Structure for Decommissioning Costing (ISDC) of Nuclear Installations, published by OECD/NEA, IAEA and EC is intended to provide a uniform list of cost items for decommissioning projects and provides a standard format that permits international cost estimates to be compared. Candesco and DECOM have used the ISDC format along with two costing codes, OMEGA and ISDCEX, developed from the ISDC by DECOM, in three projects: the development of a preliminary decommissioning plan for a multi-unit CANDU nuclear power station, updating the preliminary decommissioning cost estimates for a prototype CANDU nuclear power station and benchmarking the cost estimates for CANDU against the cost estimates for other reactor types. It was found that the ISDC format provides a well defined and transparent basis for decommissioning planning and cost estimating that assists in identifying gaps and weaknesses and facilitates the benchmarking against international experience. The use of the ISDC can also help build stakeholder confidence in the reliability of the plans and estimates and the adequacy of decommissioning funding. (authors)

Moshonas Cole, Katherine; Dinner, Julia; Grey, Mike [Candesco - A Division of Kinectrics Inc, 26 Wellington E 3rd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5E 1S2 (Canada)] [Candesco - A Division of Kinectrics Inc, 26 Wellington E 3rd floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5E 1S2 (Canada); Daniska, Vladimir [DECOM a.s., Sibirska 1, 917 01 Trnava (Slovakia)] [DECOM a.s., Sibirska 1, 917 01 Trnava (Slovakia)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

An overview of U.S. decommissioning experience -- A basic introduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the US experiences in the decommissioning technical area. Sections included are: (1) an overview of the magnitude of the problem, (2) a review of the US decommissioning process, (3) regulation of decommissioning, (4) regulatory and funding requirements for decommissioning, and (5) a general overview of all on-going and completed decommissioning projects to date in the US. The final section presents a review of some issues in the decommissioning area currently being debated in the technical specialists community.

Boing, L.E.

1998-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

89

Mobile workstation for decontamination and decommissioning operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop effective mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities within the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. These mobile worksystems will be configured to operate within the environmental and logistical constraints of such facilities and to perform a number of work tasks. Our program is designed to produce a mobile worksystem with capabilities and features that are matched to the particular needs of D&D work by evolving the design through a series of technological developments, performance tests and evaluations. The project has three phases. In this the first phase, an existing teleoperated worksystem, the Remote Work Vehicle (developed for use in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building basement), was enhanced for telerobotic performance of several D&D operations. Its ability to perform these operations was then assessed through a series of tests in a mockup facility that contained generic structures and equipment similar to those that D&D work machines will encounter in DOE facilities. Building upon the knowledge gained through those tests and evaluations, a next generation mobile worksystem, the RWV II, and a more advanced controller will be designed, integrated and tested in the second phase, which is scheduled for completion in January 1995. The third phase of the project will involve testing of the RWV II in the real DOE facility.

Whittaker, W.L.; Osborn, J.F.; Thompson, B.R. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Robotics Inst.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

The Chernobyl NPP decommissioning: Current status and alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After the Chernobyl accident of April 26, 1986, many contradictory decisions were taken concerning the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) future. The principal source of contradictions was a deadline for a final shutdown of the Chernobyl NPP units. Alterations in a political and socioeconomic environment resulted in the latest decision of the Ukrainian Authorities about 2000 as a deadline for a beginning of the Chernobyl NPP decommissioning. The date seems a sound compromise among the parties concerned. However, in order to meet the data a lot of work should be done. First of all, a decommissioning strategy has to be established. The problem is complicated due to both site-specific aspects and an absence of proven solutions for the RBMK-type reactor decommissioning. In the paper the problem of decommissioning option selection is considered taking into account an influence of the following factors: relevant legislative and regulatory requirements; resources required to carry out decommissioning (man-power, equipment, technologies, waste management infrastructure, etc.); radiological and physical status of the plant, including structural integrity and predictable age and weather effects; impact of planned activities at the destroyed unit 4 and within the 30-km exclusion zone of the Chernobyl NPP; planed use of the site; socio-economic considerations.

Mikolaitchouk, H. [Atomaudit Ltd., Kiev (Ukraine); Steinberg, N. [Atomaudit Ltd., Kiev (Ukraine)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Technology needs for decommissioning and decontamination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the current view of the most important decontamination and decommissioning (D & D) technology needs for the US Department of Energy facilities for which the D & D programs are the responsibility of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. The source of information used in this assessment was a survey of the D & D program managers at each facility. A summary of needs presented in earlier surveys of site needs in approximate priority order was supplied to each site as a starting point to stimulate thinking. This document reflects a brief initial assessment of ongoing needs; these needs will change as plans for D & D are finalized, some of the technical problems are solved through successful development programs, and new ideas for D and D technologies appear. Thus, this assessment should be updated and upgraded periodically, perhaps, annually. This assessment differs from others that have been made in that it directly and solely reflects the perceived need for new technology by key personnel in the D & D programs at the various facilities and does not attempt to consider the likelihood that these technologies can be successfully developed. Thus, this list of technology needs also does not consider the cost, time, and effort required to develop the desired technologies. An R & D program must include studies that have a reasonable chance for success as well as those for which there is a high need. Other studies that considered the cost and probability of successful development as well as the need for new technology are documented. However, the need for new technology may be diluted in such studies; this document focuses only on the need for new technology as currently perceived by those actually charged with accomplishing D & D.

Bundy, R.D.; Kennerly, J.M.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and US Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Confidentiality Agreement betweenthe Nuclear Decommissioning Authorityin UKand US Department of Energy

93

Idaho Site Closes Out Decontamination and Decommissioning Project about  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site Closes Out Decontamination and Decommissioning Project Site Closes Out Decontamination and Decommissioning Project about $440 Million under Cost Idaho Site Closes Out Decontamination and Decommissioning Project about $440 Million under Cost November 8, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers demolish the Test Area North Hot Shop Complex, shown here. Workers demolish the Test Area North Hot Shop Complex, shown here. Crews demolish CPP-601, a building used during used nuclear fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Crews demolish CPP-601, a building used during used nuclear fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The Engineering Test Reactor vessel is shown here removed, loaded and ready for transport to the on-site landfill. The Engineering Test Reactor vessel is shown here removed, loaded and ready

94

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Deactivation to Decommissioning Transition  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to Decommissioning Transition to Decommissioning Transition Example Example 80 1.5 OPERATIONAL TRANSITION AND DEACTIVATION STRATEGY According to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 430.1A Life Cycle Asset Management (LCAM), the life cycle of a facility makes several transitions over the course of it's existence. The typical stages or phases include operation, (standby), deactivation, S&M, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The life cycle phases may occur as a straight through process or with long interim periods. In Fig. 1.4, "Facility Disposition Scenarios and Associated Hazard Profiles" (Ref. DOE-STD-1120-98), Scenario 2 demonstrates the life cycle phasing that most closely represents that of the 9206 Complex. Since the ultimate disposition of Building 9206 (and associated buildings and operations) is not known, a decision was made to

95

DOE Awards Contract for Decontamination & Decommissioning Project for the  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Awards Contract for Decontamination & Decommissioning Project DOE Awards Contract for Decontamination & Decommissioning Project for the East Tennessee Technology Park DOE Awards Contract for Decontamination & Decommissioning Project for the East Tennessee Technology Park April 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Mike Koentop (865) 576-0885 www.oakridge.doe.gov Oak Ridge, Tenn. - As part of its ongoing commitment to cleaning up the legacy of the Cold War at sites across the weapons complex, the U.S. Department of Energy has awarded a contract for the remaining environmental cleanup at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) to URS | CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC. The $2.2 billion contract will complete cleanup and provide support functions at ETTP, while supporting local jobs and area small businesses. "Today's contract announcement means that we can continue to meet our

96

DOE Awards Contract for Decontamination & Decommissioning Project for the  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Decontamination & Decommissioning Project Decontamination & Decommissioning Project for the East Tennessee Technology Park DOE Awards Contract for Decontamination & Decommissioning Project for the East Tennessee Technology Park April 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Mike Koentop (865) 576-0885 www.oakridge.doe.gov Oak Ridge, Tenn. - As part of its ongoing commitment to cleaning up the legacy of the Cold War at sites across the weapons complex, the U.S. Department of Energy has awarded a contract for the remaining environmental cleanup at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) to URS | CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC. The $2.2 billion contract will complete cleanup and provide support functions at ETTP, while supporting local jobs and area small businesses. "Today's contract announcement means that we can continue to meet our

97

In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

In-Situ Decommissioning In-Situ Decommissioning A Strategy for Environmental Management Reducing the Footprint of the Cold War For over a decade, the Department of Energy has focused on reducing the footprint of 60 years of nuclear research and weapons testing and production. While these facilities are no longer needed, they exist with varying degrees of radiation contamination from years of operation. Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) is the process of closing down a nuclear facility and placing it in a state that reduces or eliminates risk to the pub lic and the environment. This generally includes demolition and transport of the debris to a disposal facility. Another alternative is to dispose of the facility in place (i.e., in-situ). The concept of In-Situ Decommis-

98

Guides: Design/Engineering for Deactivation & Decommissioning | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Guides: Design/Engineering for Deactivation & Guides: Design/Engineering for Deactivation & Decommissioning Guides: Design/Engineering for Deactivation & Decommissioning To ensure development of appropriate levels of engineering detail, DOE-EM's Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-13) has prepared this guidance for tailoring a D&D project's engineering/design to meet the objectives of the CD milestones. The enhanced rigor in planning and systematic, forward looking approach to engineering/design recommended in this guidance is intended to ensure that the level of detail in technical planning and technical development, integrated with other project aspects such as safety basis modifications, leads to a high confidence that the engineered system as a whole will function as designed. As the level of

99

Completion of decommissioning: Monitoring for site release and license termination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To request termination of a license upon completion of dismantling or decommissioning activities, documenting any residual radioactivity to show that the levels are environmentally acceptable will be necessary. When the regulators approve the decommissioning plan, they establish what the release criteria for the decommissioned site will be at the time of the site release and license termination. The criteria are numeric guidelines for direct radiation in soils and on surfaces. If the regulatory body finds that the measured on-site values are below the guidelines, the site will be acceptable for unrestricted release (no radiological controls or future use). If areas are found above those values, more decontamination or cleanup of these areas may be required unless the regulatory body grants an exemption.

Boing, L.E.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

A critical review of nuclear power plant decommissioning planning studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the past decade there have been at least ten major efforts to perform comprehensive, analytical studies of the complex issues associated with decommissioning civilian nuclear power plants. These planning efforts are reviewed, using the standard framework of technology assessment. In particular, each study is analysed to determine the degree to which formal methods of decision analysis have been employed to evaluate options and make recommendations and the degree to which formal methods of consensus have been employed to engage citizen involvement and promote public acceptance. Not unexpectedly, we find that the greatest strides in decommissioning analyses have been made in forecasting the economic costs of decommissioning to licensees. Comparatively few improvements have been made in the processes used to compare the impacts of alternative technologies more broadly, or to address the legitimate concerns of interested parties more widely.

W.Timothy Lough; K.Preston White Jr.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioning cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING PLANNING AND ANALYSIS WITH GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From the mid-1950's through the 1980's, the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site produced nuclear materials for the weapons stockpile, for medical and industrial applications, and for space exploration. Although SRS has a continuing defense-related mission, the overall site mission is now oriented toward environmental restoration and management of legacy chemical and nuclear waste. With the change in mission, SRS no longer has a need for much of the infrastructure developed to support the weapons program. This excess infrastructure, which includes over 1000 facilities, will be decommissioned and demolished over the forthcoming years. Dispositioning facilities for decommissioning and deactivation requires significant resources to determine hazards, structure type, and a rough-order-of-magnitude estimate for the decommissioning and demolition cost. Geographic information systems (GIS) technology was used to help manage the process of dispositioning infrastructure and for reporting the future status of impacted facilities.

Bollinger, J; William Austin, W; Larry Koffman, L

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

102

Plan for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Project is in the planning phase of developing a decommissioning project. A Preliminary Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) Plan has been developed which provides a framework for the baseline approach, and the cost and schedule estimates. TFTR will become activated and contaminated with tritium after completion of the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments. Hence some of the D D operations will require remote handling. It is expected that all of the waste generated will be low level radioactive waste (LLW). The objective of the D D Project is to make TFTR Test Cell available for use by a new fusion experiment. This paper discusses the D D objectives, the facility to be decommissioned, estimates of activation, the technical (baseline) approach, and the assumptions used to develop cost and schedule estimates.

Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.); Commander, J.C. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Plan for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Project is in the planning phase of developing a decommissioning project. A Preliminary Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Plan has been developed which provides a framework for the baseline approach, and the cost and schedule estimates. TFTR will become activated and contaminated with tritium after completion of the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments. Hence some of the D&D operations will require remote handling. It is expected that all of the waste generated will be low level radioactive waste (LLW). The objective of the D&D Project is to make TFTR Test Cell available for use by a new fusion experiment. This paper discusses the D&D objectives, the facility to be decommissioned, estimates of activation, the technical (baseline) approach, and the assumptions used to develop cost and schedule estimates.

Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Commander, J.C. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Allowable residual-contamination levels for decommissioning facilities in the 100 areas of the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the results of a study sponsored by UNC Nuclear Industries to determine Allowable Residual Contamination Levels (ARCL) for five generic categories of facilities in the 100 Areas of the Hanford Site. The purpose of this study is to provide ARCL data useful to UNC engineers in conducting safety and cost comparisons for decommissioning alternatives. The ARCL results are based on a scenario/exposure-pathway analysis and compliance with an annual dose limit for three specific modes of future use of the land and facilities. These modes of use are restricted, controlled, and unrestricted. The information on ARCL values for restricted and controlled use provided by this report is intended to permit a full consideration of decommissioning alternatives. ARCL results are presented both for surface contamination remaining in facilities (in dpm/100 cm/sup 2/), and for unconfined surface and confined subsurface soil conditions (in pCi/g). Two confined soil conditions are considered: contamination at depths between 1 and 4 m, and contamination at depths greater than or equal to 5 m. A set of worksheets are presented in an appendix for modifying the ARCL values to accommodate changes in the radionuclide mixture or concentrations, to consider the impacts of radioactive decay, and to predict instrument responses. Finally, a comparison is made between the unrestricted release ARCL values for the 100 Area facilities and existing decommissioning and land disposal regulations. For surface contamination, the comparison shows good agreement. For soil contamination, the comparison shows good agreement if reasonable modification factors are applied to account for the differences in modeling soil contamination and licensed low-level waste.

Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Napier, B.A.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tech Assistance Tech Assistance Savannah River National Laboratory- Assess Adequacy of Process Knowledge for D&D Guidance for Determining Adequacy of Process Knowledge Page 1 of 2 Savannah River National Laboratory South Carolina Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning Challenge The Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for the disposition of a vast number of facilities at numerous sites around the country which have been declared excess to current mission needs. When such excess facilities are scheduled for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D), among the tasks the responsible project team is faced with include the evaluation and planning for the removal, characterization, and disposition of all legacy

106

Revised Analyses of Decommissioning Reference Non-Fuel-Cycle Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of non-fuel-cycle nuclear facilities that represent a significant decommissioning task in terms of decontamination and disposal activities. This study is a re-evaluation of the original study (NUREG/CR-1754 and NUREG/CR-1754, Addendum 1). The reference facilities examined in this study are the same as in the original study and include: a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 3}H-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 14}C-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 123}I-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 137}Cs sealed sources; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 241}Am sealed sources; and an institutional user laboratory. In addition to the laboratories, three reference sites that require some decommissioning effort were also examined. These sites are: (1) a site with a contaminated drain line and hold-up tank; (2) a site with a contaminated ground surface; and (3) a tailings pile containing uranium and thorium residues. Decommissioning of these reference facilities and sites can be accomplished using techniques and equipment that are in common industrial use. Essentially the same technology assumed in the original study is used in this study. For the reference laboratory-type facilities, the study approach is to first evaluate the decommissioning of individual components (e.g., fume hoods, glove boxes, and building surfaces) that are common to many laboratory facilities. The information obtained from analyzing the individual components of each facility are then used to determine the cost, manpower requirements and dose information for the decommissioning of the entire facility. DECON, the objective of the 1988 Rulemaking for materials facilities, is the decommissioning alternative evaluated for the reference laboratories because it results in the release of the facility for restricted or unrestricted use as soon as possible. For a facility, DECON requires that contaminated components either be: (1) decontaminated to restricted or unrestricted release levels or (2) packaged and shipped to an authorized disposal site. This study considers unrestricted release only. The new decommissioning criteria of July 1997 are too recent for this study to include a cost analysis of the restricted release option, which is now allowed under these new criteria. The costs of decommissioning facility components are generally estimated to be in the range of $140 to $27,000, depending on the type of component, the type and amount of radioactive contamination, the remediation options chosen, and the quantity of radioactive waste generated from decommissioning operations. Estimated costs for decommissioning the example laboratories range from $130,000 to $205,000, assuming aggressive low-level waste (LLW) volume reduction. If only minimal LLW volume reduction is employed, decommissioning costs range from $150,000 to $270,000 for these laboratories. On the basis of estimated decommissioning costs for facility components, the costs of decommissioning typical non-fuel-cycle laboratory facilities are estimated to range from about $25,000 for the decommissioning of a small room containing one or two fume hoods to more than $1 million for the decommissioning of an industrial plant containing several laboratories in which radiochemicals and sealed radioactive sources are prepared. For the reference sites of this study, the basic decommissioning alternatives are: (1) site stabilization followed by long-term care and (2) removal of the waste or contaminated soil to an authorized disposal site. Cost estimates made for decommissioning three reference sites range from about $130,000 for the removal of a contaminated drain line and hold-up tank to more than $23 million for the removal of a tailings pile that contains radioactive residue from ore-processing operations in which tin slag is processed for the recovery of rare metals. Total occupational radiation doses generally range from 0.00007 person-rem to 13 person-rem for

MC Bierschbach; DR Haffner; KJ Schneider; SM Short

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Engineering and planning for decommissioning of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the publication of NUREG-0586, ''Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities'' in January, 1981 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff has put the industry on notice that the termination of operating licenses and the final disposal of physical facilities will require the early consideration of several options and approaches and the preparation of comprehensive engineering and planning documents for the selected option at the end of useful life. This paper opens with a discussion of the options available and the principal aspects of decommissioning. The major emphasis of the composition is the nature of documents, the general approach to be followed, and special considerations to be taken into account when performing the detailed engineering and planning for decommissioning, as the end of life approaches and actual physical disposal is imminent. The author's main point of reference is on-going work by Burns and Roe, with Nuclear Energy Services, under contract to the Department of Energy's Richland Office, to perform the engineering and planning for the decommissioning of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station in Pennsylvania.

Gans, G.M. Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography. Volume 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography of 756 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the fifth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy, Division of Remedial Action Projects. Foreign as well as domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (5) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; and (7) Technical Measurements Center. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 4, and 6 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author or by title. Indexes are provided for the categories of author, corporate affiliation, title, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. The Appendix contains a list of frequently used acronyms.

Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Chilton, B.D.; Baldauf, M.F.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions. Volume 6. A selected bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography of 683 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the sixth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Foreign as well as domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's remedial action program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Facilities Contaminated with Natural Radioactivity; (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) Technical Measurements Center; and (9) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 5, and 7 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate affiliation or by publication description.

Owen, P.T.; Michelson, D.C.; Knox, N.P.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

APPLIED PHYSICS APPLIED PHYSICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSc APPLIED PHYSICS #12;MSc APPLIED PHYSICS This taught Masters course is based on the strong research in Applied Physics in the University's Department of Physics. The department has an impressive photonics and quantum optics, Physics and the Life Sciences, and solid state physics. The knowledge gained

Mottram, Nigel

111

Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Deactivation & Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers at the Savannah River Site imploded the 455-foot-tall K Reactor Cooling Tower in May 2010. The project was completed safely and contributed 36.5 square miles to the site's total footprint reduction. On August 3, 2013, contractors and the Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management successfully completed the explosive demolition of the K-1206-F Fire Water Tower, which for 54 years had been used for fire water supply at the East Tennessee Technology Park in Oak Ridge Tennessee. The 382 foot tall, 400,000-gallon water tower tank was drained and isolated from the fire water system prior to the estimated 100-ton steel structure being

112

Decontamination and Decommissioning activities photobriefing book FY 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) is dedicated to the safe and cost effective D{ampersand}D of surplus nuclear facilities. There is currently a backlog of more than 7,000 contaminated US Department of Energy facilities nationwide. Added to this are 110 licensed commercial nuclear power reactors operated by utilities learning to cope with deregulation and an aging infrastructure that supports the commercial nuclear power industry, as well as medical and other uses of radioactive materials. With this volume it becomes easy to understand the importance of addressing the unique issues and objectives associated with the D{ampersand}D of surplus nuclear facilities. This photobriefing book summarizes the decontamination and decommissioning projects and activities either completed or continuing at the ANL-E site during the year.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Commercial Decommissioning at DOE's Rocky Flats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due in large part to the number of nuclear facilities that make up the DOE complex, DOE-EM work has historically been paperwork intensive and driven by extensive regulations. Requirements for non-nuclear facilities are often grouped with those of nuclear facilities, driving up costs. Kaiser-Hill was interested in applying a commercial model to demolition of these facilities and wanted to apply necessary and sufficient standards to the work activities, but avoid applying unnecessary requirements. Faced with demolishing hundreds of uncontaminated or non-radiologically contaminated facilities, Kaiser-Hill has developed a subcontracting strategy to drastically reduce the cost of demolishing these facilities at Rocky Flats. Aiming to tailor the demolition approach of such facilities to more closely follow commercial practices, Kaiser-Hill recently released a Request for Proposals (RFP) for the demolition of the site's former central administration facility. The RFP significantly reduced requirements for compliance with specific DOE directives. Instead, the RFP required subcontractors to comply with health and safety requirements commonly found in the demolition of similar facilities in a commercial setting. This resulted in a number of bids from companies who have normally not bid on DOE work previously and at a reduced cost over previous approaches. This paper will discuss the details of this subcontracting strategy.

Freiboth, C.; Sandlin, N.; Schubert, A.; Hansen, S.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

114

Decontamination and decommissioning surveillance and maintenance report for FY 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) Program has three distinct phases: (1) surveillance and maintenance (S M); (2) decontamination and removal of hazardous materials and equipment (which DOE Headquarters in Washington, D.C., calls Phase I of remediation); and (3) decommissioning and ultimate disposal, regulatory compliance monitoring, and property transfer (which DOE Headquarters calls Phase II of remediation). A large part of D D is devoted to S M at each of the sites. Our S M activities, which are performed on facilities awaiting decommissioning, are designed to minimize potential hazards to human health and the environment by: ensuring adequate containment of residual radioactive and hazardous materials; and, providing physical safety and security controls to minimize potential hazards to on-site personnel and the general public. Typically, we classify maintenance activities as either routine or special (major repairs). Routine maintenance includes such activities as painting, cleaning, vegetation control, minor structural repairs, filter changes, and building system(s) checks. Special maintenance includes Occupational Safety and Health Act facility upgrades, roof repairs, and equipment overhaul. Surveillance activities include inspections, radiological measurements, reporting, records maintenance, and security (as required) for controlling and monitoring access to facilities. This report summarizes out FY 1991 S M activities for the Tennessee plant sites, which include the K-25 Site, the Gas Centrifuge facilities, ORNL, and the Y-12 Plant.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

A New Life Adaptive Reuse and Redevelopment of Decommissioned Commercial Nuclear Power Plants.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??My study analyzed the challenges and opportunities faced in the historic preservation and adaptive reuse of decommissioned commercial nuclear power plants. While operating, these plants (more)

Farrow, Elizabeth

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

EIS-0119: Decommissioning of Eight Surplus Production Reactors at the Harford Site, Richland, WA  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS presents analyses of potential environmental impacts of decommissioning the eight surplus production reactors at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington.

117

Statement of Intent between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Statement of Intent between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authorityfor exchange of information concerning management of radioactive waste.

118

EIS-0329: Proposed Construction, Operation, Decontamination/Decommissioning of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE's proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6) conversion facilities, at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky.

119

EIS-0119: Decommissioning of Eight Surplus Production Reactors at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS presents analyses of potential environmental impacts of decommissioning the eight surplus production reactors at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington.

120

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors: sensitivity of decommissioning radiation exposure and costs to selected parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Additional analyses of decommissioning at the reference research and test (R and T) reactors and analyses of five recent reactor decommissionings are made that examine some parameters not covered in the initial study report (NUREG/CR-1756). The parameters examined for decommissioning are: (1) the effect on costs and radiation exposure of plant size and/or type; (2) the effects on costs of increasing disposal charges and of unavailability of waste disposal capacity at licensed waste disposal facilities; and (3) the costs of and the available alternatives for the disposal of nuclear R and T reactor fuel assemblies.

Konzek, G.J.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioning cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

DOE Environmental Management Strategy and Experience for In-Situ Decommissioning  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Strategy and Experience Strategy and Experience for In Situ Decommissioning Prepared By U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Office of Engineering and Technology, EM-20 September 2009 This page is deliberately blank. DOE EM Strategy and Experience for In Situ Decommissioning i Contents Acknowledgements......................................................................................................................................iv Acronyms...................................................................................................................................................... v 1. Introduction......................................................................................................................................

122

EIS-0080: Decommissioning of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy's Remedial Actions Program Office developed this statement to assess the impacts of decommissioning the Shippingport Atomic Power Station as well as analyze possible decommissioning alternatives, evaluate potential environmental impacts associated with each alternative, and present cost estimates for each alternative.

123

EIS-0080: Decommissioning of the Shipping port Atomic Power Station, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy's Remedial Actions Program Office developed this statement to assess the impacts of decommissioning the Shippingport Atomic Power Station as well as analyze possible decommissioning alternatives, evaluate potential environmental impacts associated with each alternative, and present cost estimates for each alternative.

124

Decommissioning Cost Estimating Factors And Earned Value Integration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats 771 Project progressed from the planning stage of decommissioning a plutonium facility, through the strip-out of highly-contaminated equipment, removal of utilities and structural decontamination, and building demolition. Actual cost data was collected from the strip-out activities and compared to original estimates, allowing the development of cost by equipment groupings and types and over time. Separate data was developed from the project control earned value reporting and compared with the equipment data. The paper discusses the analysis to develop the detailed factors for the different equipment types, and the items that need to be considered during characterization of a similar facility when preparing an estimate. The factors are presented based on direct labor requirements by equipment type. The paper also includes actual support costs, and examples of fixed or one-time start-up costs. The integration of the estimate and the earned value system used for the 771 Project is also discussed. The paper covers the development of the earned value system as well as its application to a facility to be decommissioned and an existing work breakdown structure. Lessons learned are provided, including integration with scheduling and craft supervision, measurement approaches, and verification of scope completion. In summary: The work of decommissioning the Rocky Flats 771 Project process equipment was completed in 2003. Early in the planning process, we had difficulty in identifying credible data and implementing processes for estimating and controlling this work. As the project progressed, we were able to collect actual data on the costs of removing plutonium contaminated equipment from various areas over the life of this work and associate those costs with individual pieces of equipment. We also were able to develop and test out a system for measuring the earned value of a decommissioning project based on an evolving estimate. These were elements that would have been useful to us in our early planning process, and we would expect that they would find application elsewhere as the DOE weapons complex and some commercial nuclear facilities move towards closure. (authors)

Sanford, P.C.; Cimmarron, E. [Englewood, CO, B. Skokan, Office of Project Management Oversight, EM-53, United States Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) The Deactivation and Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) serves as a centralized repository providing a common interface for all D&D related activities. It assists users in gathering, analyzing, storing and sharing knowledge and information within the D&D community. This approach assists in reducing the need to rediscover the knowledge of the past while capturing the new knowledge and experiences gained during

126

DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning (Feb. 2013) DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning (Feb. 2013) The purpose of the "DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning" report is to capture the considerable technical experience gained to date for implementation of In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) projects at DOE facilities. As current and projected budgets for the EM program indicate reduced and flat funding profiles for the foreseeable future, the potential exists for this institutional knowledge to be lost as the ramp-down of project staffing commences with the cessation of ARRA. EM's Office of Deactivation & Decommissioning and Facility Engineering

127

Decommissioning of the TA-42 plutonium contaminated incinerator facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1978, a plutonium (/sup 239/Pu) contaminated incinerator facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, was decommissioned. The project involved dismantling the facility and burying the debris at an on-site radioactive solid waste disposal/storage area. Contaminated soil from the 5000 m/sup 2/ area was also buried. The facility was constructed in 1951 to incinerate /sup 239/Pu contaminated wastes. It was later used as a decontamination facility. The major features included a 185-m/sup 2/ floor area control building, incinerator, cyclone dust collector, spray cooler, venturi scrubber, air filter bank, ash separator, and two 140 000-liter ash storage tanks. Six-hundred cubic meters of debris and 1200 m/sup 3/ of soil contaminated with less than 10 nCi /sup 239/Pu per gram of soil were buried at the Laboratory disposal area. Five cubic meters of /sup 239/Pu contaminated ash residues containing more than 10 nCi /sup 239/Pu per gram of waste were packaged and stored to meet the Department of Energy's 20-year retrievable storage criteria. The operation consumed 80 work days and 5800 manhours at a cost of $150 000. This report presents the details concerning decommissioning procedures, the health physics, the waste management, the environmental surveillance results, and a cost breakdown for the operation.

Harper, J.R.; Garde, R.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Resource book: Decommissioning of contaminated facilities at Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1942 Hanford was commissioned as a site for the production of weapons-grade plutonium. The years since have seen the construction and operation of several generations of plutonium-producing reactors, plants for the chemical processing of irradiated fuel elements, plutonium and uranium processing and fabrication plants, and other facilities. There has also been a diversification of the Hanford site with the building of new laboratories, a fission product encapsulation plant, improved high-level waste management facilities, the Fast Flux test facility, commercial power reactors and commercial solid waste disposal facilities. Obsolescence and changing requirements will result in the deactivation or retirement of buildings, waste storage tanks, waste burial grounds and liquid waste disposal sites which have become contaminated with varying levels of radionuclides. This manual was established as a written repository of information pertinent to decommissioning planning and operations at Hanford. The Resource Book contains, in several volumes, descriptive information of the Hanford Site and general discussions of several classes of contaminated facilities found at Hanford. Supplementing these discussions are appendices containing data sheets on individual contaminated facilities and sites at Hanford. Twelve appendices are provided, corresponding to the twelve classes into which the contaminated facilities at Hanford have been organized. Within each appendix are individual data sheets containing administrative, geographical, physical, radiological, functional and decommissioning information on each facility within the class. 68 refs., 54 figs., 18 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Y-12 Plant decontamination and decommissioning technology logic diagram for Building 9201-4. Volume 2: Technology logic diagram  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4 (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) problems at Bldg. 9201-4 to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. This TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to D and D and waste management (WM) activities. It is essential that follow-on engineering studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in the TLD and by finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1 (Technology Evaluation), Vol. 2 (Technology Logic Diagram), and Vol. 3 (Technology Evaluation Data Sheets). Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 2 has been divided into five sections: Characterization, Decontamination, Dismantlement, Robotics/Automation, and Waste Management. Each section contains logical breakdowns of the Y-12 D and D problems by subject area and identifies technologies that can be reasonably applied to each D and D challenge.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Applied ALARA techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presentation focuses on some of the time-proven and new technologies being used to accomplish radiological work. These techniques can be applied at nuclear facilities to reduce radiation doses and protect the environment. The last reactor plants and processing facilities were shutdown and Hanford was given a new mission to put the facilities in a safe condition, decontaminate, and prepare them for decommissioning. The skills that were necessary to operate these facilities were different than the skills needed today to clean up Hanford. Workers were not familiar with many of the tools, equipment, and materials needed to accomplish:the new mission, which includes clean up of contaminated areas in and around all the facilities, recovery of reactor fuel from spent fuel pools, and the removal of millions of gallons of highly radioactive waste from 177 underground tanks. In addition, this work has to be done with a reduced number of workers and a smaller budget. At Hanford, facilities contain a myriad of radioactive isotopes that are 2048 located inside plant systems, underground tanks, and the soil. As cleanup work at Hanford began, it became obvious early that in order to get workers to apply ALARA and use hew tools and equipment to accomplish the radiological work it was necessary to plan the work in advance and get radiological control and/or ALARA committee personnel involved early in the planning process. Emphasis was placed on applying,ALARA techniques to reduce dose, limit contamination spread and minimize the amount of radioactive waste generated. Progress on the cleanup has,b6en steady and Hanford workers have learned to use different types of engineered controls and ALARA techniques to perform radiological work. The purpose of this presentation is to share the lessons learned on how Hanford is accomplishing radiological work.

Waggoner, L.O.

1998-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

131

EIS-0226: Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

26: Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West 26: Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center EIS-0226: Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center SUMMARY This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the range of reasonable alternatives to decommission and/or maintain long-term stewardship at WNYNSC. The alternatives analyzed in the EIS include the Sitewide Removal Alternative, the Sitewide Close-In-Place Alternative, the Phased Decisionmaking Alternative (Preferred Alternative), and the No Action Alternative. The analysis and information contained in the EIS are intended to assist DOE and NYSERDA with the consideration of environmental

132

EA-1889: Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Naval Reactor Plants from USS  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

89: Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Naval Reactor Plants 89: Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Naval Reactor Plants from USS Enterprise (CVN 65) at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1889: Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Naval Reactor Plants from USS Enterprise (CVN 65) at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Summary This EA, prepared by the Department of the Navy, evaluates the environmental impacts of the disposal of decommissioned, defueled, naval reactor plants from the USS Enterprise at DOE's Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. DOE participated as a cooperating agency in the preparation of this EA. The Department of the Navy issued its FONSI on August 23, 2012. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download August 23, 2012

133

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 2, Indexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is part 2 of a bibliography on nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial action. This report contains indexes on the following: authors, corporate affiliation, title words, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of a commercial uranium hexafluoride conversion (UF{sub 6}) plant. Two basic decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between cost and safety impacts: DECON, and passive SAFSTOR. A third alternative, DECON of the plant and equipment with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes. is also examined. DECON includes the immediate removal (following plant shutdown) of all radioactivity in excess of unrestricted release levels, with subsequent release of the site for public use. Passive SAFSTOR requires decontamination, preparation, maintenance, and surveillance for a period of time after shutdown, followed by deferred decontamination and unrestricted release. DECON with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes (process wastes generated at the reference plant and stored onsite during plant operation} is also considered as a decommissioning method, although its acceptability has not yet been determined by the NRC. The decommissioning methods assumed for use in each decommissioning alternative are based on state-of-the-art technology. The elapsed time following plant shutdown required to perform the decommissioning work in each alternative is estimated to be: for DECON, 8 months; for passive SAFSTOR, 3 months to prepare the plant for safe storage and 8 months to accomplish deferred decontamination. Planning and preparation for decommissioning prior to plant shutdown is estimated to require about 6 months for either DECON or passive SAFSTOR. Planning and preparation prior to starting deferred decontamination is estimated to require an additional 6 months. OECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to take 6 months for planning and about 8 months to perform the decommissioning work. Decommissioning cost, in 1981 dollars, is estimated to be $5.91 million for OECON. For passive SAFSTOR, preparing the facility for safe storage is estimated to cost $0.88 million, the annual maintenance and surveillance cost is estimated to be about $0.095 million, and deferred decontamination is estimated to cost about $6.50 million. Therefore, passive SAFSTOR for 10 years is estimated to cost $8.33 million in nondiscounted 1981 dollars. DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to cost about $4.59 million, with an annual cost of $0.011 million for long-term care. All of these estimates include a 25% contingency. Waste management costs for DECON, including the net cost of disposal of the solvent extraction lagoon wastes by shipping those wastes to a uranium mill for recovery of residual uranium, comprise about 38% of the total decommissioning cost. Disposal of lagoon waste at a commercial low-level waste burial ground is estimated to add $10.01 million to decommissioning costs. Safety analyses indicate that radiological and nonradiological safety impacts from decommissioning activities should be small. The 50-year committed dose equivalent to members of the public from airborne releases during normal decommissioning activities is estimated to 'Je about 4.0 man-rem. Radiation doses to the public from accidents are found to be very low for all phases of decommissioning. Occupational radiation doses from normal decommissioning operations (excluding transport operations) are estimated to be about 79 man-rem for DECON and about 80 man-rem for passive SAFSTOR with 10 years of safe storage. Doses from DECON with lagoon waste stabilization are about the same as for DECON except there is less dose resulting from transportation of radioactive waste. The number of fatalities and serious lost-time injuries not related to radiation is found to be very small for all decommissioning alternatives. Comparison of the cost estimates shows that DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is the least expensive method. However, this alternative does not allow unrestricted release of the site. The cumulative cost of maintenance and surveillance and the higher cost of deferred decontamination makes passive SAFSTOR more expensive than DECON. Seve

Elder, H. K.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Statement of Intent No. 2 between DOE and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Statement of Intent No. 2 between DOE and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland for exchange of information concerning management of...

136

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers achieved a significant milestone in the decommissioning of a Cold War reactor at the Savannah River Site this month after they safely removed its...

137

Statement of Intent NO. 2 between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Statement of Intent NO. 2 between the Department of Energy of the United States and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and northern Ireland for exchange of...

138

Five-Year Technology Development Strategic Plan Targets EMs Decommissioning Challenges  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

WASHINGTON, D.C. Leaders from EM headquarters and field offices and the UKs Sellafield nuclear site gathered recently to discuss developing technologies needed to address decommissioning challenges across the Cold War cleanup program.

139

Radiochemistry Lab Decommissioning and Dismantlement. AECL, Chalk River Labs, Ontario, Canada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) was originally founded in the mid 1940's to perform research in radiation and nuclear areas under the Canadian Defense Department. In the mid 50's The Canadian government embarked on several research and development programs for the development of the Candu Reactor. AECL was initially built as a temporary site and is now faced with many redundant buildings. Prior to 2004 small amounts of Decommissioning work was in progress. Many reasons for deferring decommissioning activities were used with the predominant ones being: 1. Reduction in radiation doses to workers during the final dismantlement, 2. Development of a long-term solution for the management of radioactive wastes in Canada, 3. Financial constraints presented by the number of facilities shutdown that would require decommissioning funds and the absence of an approved funding strategy. This has led to the development of a comprehensive decommissioning plan that is all inclusive of AECL's current and legacy liabilities. Canada does not have a long-term disposal site; therefore waste minimization becomes the driving factor behind decontamination for decommissioning before and during dismantlement. This decommissioning job was a great learning experience for decommissioning and the associated contractors who worked on this project. Throughout the life of the project there was a constant focus on waste minimization. This focus was constantly in conflict with regulatory compliance primarily with respect to fire regulations and protecting the facility along with adjacent facilities during the decommissioning activities. Discrepancies in historical documents forced the project to treat every space as a contaminated space until proven differently. Decommissioning and dismantlement within an operating site adds to the complexity of the tasks especially when it is being conducted in the heart of the plant. This project was very successful with no lost time accidents in over one hundred thousand hours worked, on schedule and under budget despite some significant changes throughout the decommissioning phases. The actual cost to decommission this building will come in under 9 million dollars vs. an estimated 14.5 million dollars. This paper will cover some of the unique aspects of dismantling a radioactive building that has seen pretty much every element of the periodic table pass through it with the client requirement focused on minimization of radioactive waste volumes.

Kenny, Stephen [Acting Director of Waste Management and Decommissioning Operations, AECL, Chalk River Labs, Chalk River, Ont. (Canada)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network for In-Situ Decommissioned Structures  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

10-01666, Revision 0 10-01666, Revision 0 Key Words: in situ decommissioning sensor remote monitoring end state Retention: Permanent DEVELOPMENT OF A REMOTE MONITORING SENSOR NETWORK FOR IN SITU DECOMMISSIONED STRUCTURES Panel Report November 2010 Savannah River National Laboratory Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Aiken, SC 29808 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Under Contract Number DE-AC09-08SR22470 Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network Page 2 of 34

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioning cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Main report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 1 (Main Report) contains the results in summary form.

Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for Decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preparation of this Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis is consistent with the joint U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, which establishes the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act non-time-critical removal action (NTCRA) process as an approach for decommissioning.

A. B. Culp

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

An analysis of decommissioning costs for the AFRRI TRIGA reactor facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A decommissioning cost analysis for the AFRRI TRIGA Reactor Facility was made. AFRRI is not at this time suggesting that the AFRRI TRIGA Reactor Facility be decommissioned. This report was prepared to be in compliance with paragraph 50.33 of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations which requires the assurance of availability of future decommissioning funding. The planned method of decommissioning is the immediate decontamination of the AFRRI TRIGA Reactor site to allow for restoration of the site to full public access - this is called DECON. The cost of DECON for the AFRRI TRIGA Reactor Facility in 1990 dollars is estimated to be $3,200,000. The anticipated ancillary costs of facility site demobilization and spent fuel shipment is an additional $600,000. Thus the total cost of terminating reactor operations at AFRRI will be about $3,800,000. The primary basis for this cost estimate is a study of the decommissioning costs of a similar reactor facility that was performed by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as provided in USNRC publication NUREG/CR-1756. The data in this study were adapted to reflect the decommissioning requirements of the AFRRI TRIGA. (author)

Forsbacka, Matt [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Cost Savings through Innovation in Decontamination, Decommissioning, and Dismantlement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost effective technologies for the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the DOE's Office of Science and Technology (OST) sponsored large-scale demonstration and deployment projects (LSDDPs) to help bring new technologies into the D&D programs. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) LSDDP generated a list of needs defining specific problems where improved technologies could be incorporated into ongoing D&D tasks. The needs fell into 5 major categories--characterization, dismantlement, safety, material dispositioning, and decontamination. Technologies were carefully selected that provide a large benefit for a small investment. The technologies must provide significant improvements in cost, safety, radiation exposure, waste volume reduction, or schedule savings and widely applicable throughout the DOE complex. The LSDDP project provided training for the new technologies and worked with technology suppliers to resolve any questions that arose. Since 1998, 26 technologies have been demonstrated or deployed through the LSDDP for the D&D program at the INEEL. Of the 26 demonstrated and deployed technologies, 14 were in characterization, 3 were in decontamination, 4 were in dismantlement, 3 were in safety, and 2 were in material dispositioning. To promote the use of these technologies at other sites within the DOE complex, the LSDDP team published fact sheets, videos, technology summary reports, articles in INEEL star newspaper, posters, and maintained an internet home page on the project. As a result, additional deployments have taken place at the Hanford, Mound, Fernald, Oak Ridge, Ashtabula, and West Valley. Eight of the 26 technologies evaluated were developed in foreign countries. The technologies demonstrated have been shown to be faster, less expensive, and/or safer. The technologies evaluated through the LSDDP have provided improvements in the following D&D areas: robotic underwater characterization of fuel storage pools, characterization of scrap metal for recycle, PCB and RCRA metals analysis in soil, water, paint, or sludge, subsurface characterization, personnel safety, waste disposal, scaffolding use, and remote radiation characterization of buildings and soil. It is estimated that the technologies demonstrated and deployed through this program will save more than $50 million dollars over the next 10 years at the INEEL alone. Of the $50 million estimated dollars saved, about 75% of the savings will come from characterization technologies, 11% from technologies associated with material dispositioning, 10% are associated with dismantlement technologies and the balance split between safety and decontamination.

Neal A. Yancey

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

145

Waste Management Strategy for Dismantling Waste to Reduce Costs for Power Plant Decommissioning - 13543  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decommissioning of nuclear power plants generates large volumes of radioactive or potentially radioactive waste. The proper management of the dismantling waste plays an important role for the time needed for the dismantling phase and thus is critical to the decommissioning cost. An efficient and thorough process for inventorying, characterization and categorization of the waste provides a sound basis for the planning process. As part of comprehensive decommissioning studies for Nordic NPPs, Westinghouse has developed the decommissioning inventories that have been used for estimations of the duration of specific work packages and the corresponding costs. As part of creating the design basis for a national repository for decommissioning waste, the total production of different categories of waste packages has also been predicted. Studsvik has developed a risk based concept for categorization and handling of the generated waste using six different categories with a span from extremely small risk for radiological contamination to high level waste. The two companies have recently joined their skills in the area of decommissioning on selected market in a consortium named 'ndcon' to further strengthen the proposed process. Depending on the risk for radiological contamination or the radiological properties and other properties of importance for waste management, treatment routes are proposed with well-defined and proven methods for on-site or off-site treatment, activity determination and conditioning. The system is based on a graded approach philosophy aiming for high confidence and sustainability, aiming for re-use and recycling where found applicable. The objective is to establish a process where all dismantled material has a pre-determined treatment route. These routes should through measurements, categorization, treatment, conditioning, intermediate storage and final disposal be designed to provide a steady, un-disturbed flow of material to avoid interruptions. Bottle-necks in the process causes increased space requirements and will have negative impact on the project schedule, which increases not only the cost but also the dose exposure to personnel. For these reasons it is critical to create a process that transfers material into conditioned waste ready for disposal as quickly as possible. To a certain extent the decommissioning program should be led by the waste management process. With the objective to reduce time for handling of dismantled material at site and to efficiently and environmental-friendly use waste management methods (clearance for re-use followed by clearance for recycling), the costs for the plant decommissioning could be reduced as well as time needed for performing the decommissioning project. Also, risks for delays would be reduced with a well-defined handling scheme which limits surprises. Delays are a major cost driver for decommissioning projects. (authors)

Larsson, Arne; Lidar, Per [Studsvik Nuclear AB, SE-611 82 Nykoeping (Sweden)] [Studsvik Nuclear AB, SE-611 82 Nykoeping (Sweden); Bergh, Niklas; Hedin, Gunnar [Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB, Fredholmsgatan 2, SE-721 63, Vaesteraas (Sweden)] [Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB, Fredholmsgatan 2, SE-721 63, Vaesteraas (Sweden)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a Reference Boiling Water Reactor Power Station. Main report. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWe.

Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

5098-SR-03-0 FINAL REPORT- INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BNL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

5098-LR-01-0 -LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

149

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 2, Technology Logic Diagram: Part A, Decontamination and Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents activities of decontamination and decommissioning at ORNL. Topics discussed include general problems, waste types, containment, robotics automation and decontamination processes.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Assessment of strippable coatings for decontamination and decommissioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strippable or temporary coatings were developed to assist in the decontamination of the Three Mile Island (TMI-2) reactor. These coatings have become a viable option during the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of both US Department of Energy (DOE) and commercial nuclear facilities to remove or fix loose contamination on both vertical and horizontal surfaces. A variety of strippable coatings are available to D and D professionals. However, these products exhibit a wide range of performance criteria and uses. The Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU) was commissioned to perform a 2-year investigation into strippable coatings. This investigation was divided into four parts: (1) identification of commercially available strippable coating products; (2) survey of D and D professionals to determine current uses of these coatings and performance criteria; (3) design and implementation of a non-radiological testing program to evaluate the physical properties of these coatings; and (4) design and implementation of a radiological testing program to determine decontamination factors and effects of exposure to ionizing radiation. Activities during fiscal year 1997 are described.

Ebadian, M.A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

The Windscale Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (WAGR) Decommissioning Project A Close Out Report for WAGR Decommissioning Campaigns 1 to 10 - 12474  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reactor core of the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (WAGR) has been dismantled as part of an ongoing decommissioning project. The WAGR operated until 1981 as a development reactor for the British Commercial Advanced Gas cooled Reactor (CAGR) power programme. Decommissioning began in 1982 with the removal of fuel from the reactor core which was completed in 1983. Subsequently, a significant amount of engineering work was carried out, including removal of equipment external to the reactor and initial manual dismantling operations at the top of the reactor, in preparation for the removal of the reactor core itself. Modification of the facility structure and construction of the waste packaging plant served to provide a waste route for the reactor components. The reactor core was dismantled on a 'top-down' basis in a series of 'campaigns' related to discrete reactor components. This report describes the facility, the modifications undertaken to facilitate its decommissioning and the strategies employed to recognise the successful decommissioning of the reactor. Early decommissioning tasks at the top of the reactor were undertaken manually but the main of the decommissioning tasks were carried remotely, with deployment systems comprising of little more than crane like devices, intelligently interfaced into the existing structure. The tooling deployed from the 3 tonne capacity (3te) hoist consisted either purely mechanical devices or those being electrically controlled from a 'push-button' panel positioned at the operator control stations, there was no degree of autonomy in the 3te hoist or any of the tools deployed from it. Whilst the ATC was able to provide some tele-robotic capabilities these were very limited and required a good degree of driver input which due to the operating philosophy at WAGR was not utilised. The WAGR box proved a successful waste package, adaptable through the use of waste box furniture specific to the waste-forms generated throughout the various decommissioning campaigns. The use of low force compaction for insulation and soft wastes provided a simple, robust and cost effective solution as did the direct encapsulation of LLW steel components in the later stages of reactor decommissioning. Progress through early campaigns was good, often bettering the baseline schedule, especially when undertaking the repetitive tasks seen during Neutron Shield and Graphite Core decommissioning, once the operators had become experienced with the equipment, though delays became more pronounced, mainly as a result of increased failures due to the age and maintainability of the RDM and associated equipment. Extensive delays came about as a result of the unsupported insulation falling away from the pressure vessel during removal and the inability of the ventilation system to manage the sub micron particulate generated during IPOPI cutting operations, though the in house development of revised and new methodologies ultimately led to the successful completion of PV and I removal. In a programme spanning over 12 years, the decommissioning of the reactor pressure vessel and core led to the production 110 ILW and 75 LLW WAGR boxes, with 20 LLW ISO freight containers of primary reactor wastes, resulting in an overall packaged volume of approximately 2500 cubic metres containing the estimated 460 cubic metres of the reactor structure. (authors)

Halliwell, Chris [Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield (United Kingdom)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Progress in Iraq - 13216  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Management of Iraq's radioactive wastes and decommissioning of Iraq's former nuclear facilities are the responsibility of Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST). The majority of Iraq's former nuclear facilities are in the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located a few kilometers from the edge of Baghdad. These facilities include bombed and partially destroyed research reactors, a fuel fabrication facility and radioisotope production facilities. Within these facilities are large numbers of silos, approximately 30 process or waste storage tanks and thousands of drums of uncharacterised radioactive waste. There are also former nuclear facilities/sites that are outside of Al-Tuwaitha and these include the former uranium processing and waste storage facility at Jesira, the dump site near Adaya, the former centrifuge facility at Rashdiya and the former enrichment plant at Tarmiya. In 2005, Iraq lacked the infrastructure needed to decommission its nuclear facilities and manage its radioactive wastes. The lack of infrastructure included: (1) the lack of an organization responsible for decommissioning and radioactive waste management, (2) the lack of a storage facility for radioactive wastes, (3) the lack of professionals with experience in decommissioning and modern waste management practices, (4) the lack of laws and regulations governing decommissioning or radioactive waste management, (5) ongoing security concerns, and (6) limited availability of electricity and internet. Since its creation eight years ago, the MoST has worked with the international community and developed an organizational structure, trained staff, and made great progress in managing radioactive wastes and decommissioning Iraq's former nuclear facilities. This progress has been made, despite the very difficult implementing conditions in Iraq. Within MoST, the Radioactive Waste Treatment and Management Directorate (RWTMD) is responsible for waste management and the Iraqi Decommissioning Directorate (IDD) is responsible for decommissioning activities. The IDD and the RWTMD work together on decommissioning projects. The IDD has developed plans and has completed decommissioning of the GeoPilot Facility in Baghdad and the Active Metallurgical Testing Laboratory (LAMA) in Al-Tuwaitha. Given this experience, the IDD has initiated work on more dangerous facilities. Plans are being developed to characterize, decontaminate and decommission the Tamuz II Research Reactor. The Tammuz Reactor was destroyed by an Israeli air-strike in 1981 and the Tammuz II Reactor was destroyed during the First Gulf War in 1991. In addition to being responsible for managing the decommissioning wastes, the RWTMD is responsible for more than 950 disused sealed radioactive sources, contaminated debris from the first Gulf War and (approximately 900 tons) of naturally-occurring radioactive materials wastes from oil production in Iraq. The RWTMD has trained staff, rehabilitated the Building 39 Radioactive Waste Storage building, rehabilitated portions of the French-built Radioactive Waste Treatment Station, organized and secured thousands of drums of radioactive waste organized and secured the stores of disused sealed radioactive sources. Currently, the IDD and the RWTMD are finalizing plans for the decommissioning of the Tammuz II Research Reactor. (authors)

Al-Musawi, Fouad; Shamsaldin, Emad S.; Jasim, Hadi [Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST), Al-Jadraya, P.O. Box 0765, Baghdad (Iraq)] [Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST), Al-Jadraya, P.O. Box 0765, Baghdad (Iraq); Cochran, John R. [Sandia National Laboratories1, New Mexico, Albuquerque New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories1, New Mexico, Albuquerque New Mexico 87185 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Reactor Design and Decommissioning - An Overview of International Activities in Post Fukushima Era1 - 12396  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accidents at the Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors as a result of the devastating earthquake and tsunami of March 11, 2011 have not only dampened the nuclear renaissance but have also initiated a re-examination of the design and safety features for the existing and planned nuclear reactors. Even though failures of some of the key site features at Fukushima can be attributed to events that in the past would have been considered as beyond the design basis, the industry as well as the regulatory authorities are analyzing what features, especially passive features, should be designed into the new reactor designs to minimize the potential for catastrophic failures. It is also recognized that since the design of the Fukushima BWR reactors which were commissioned in 1971, many advanced safety features are now a part of the newer reactor designs. As the recovery efforts at the Fukushima site are still underway, decisions with respect to the dismantlement and decommissioning of the damaged reactors and structures have not yet been finalized. As it was with Three Mile Island, it could take several decades for dismantlement, decommissioning and clean up, and the project poses especially tough challenges. Near-term assessments have been issued by several organizations, including the IAEA, the USNRC and others. Results of such investigations will lead to additional improvements in system and site design measures including strengthening of the anti-tsunami defenses, more defense-in-depth features in reactor design, and better response planning and preparation involving reactor sites. The question also arises what would the effect be on the decommissioning scene worldwide, and what would the effect be on the new reactors when they are eventually retired and dismantled. This paper provides an overview of the US and international activities related to recovery and decommissioning including the decommissioning features in the reactor design process and examines these from a new perspective in the post Fukushima -accident era. Accidents at the Fukushima Daiichi reactors in the aftermath of the devastating earthquake and tsunami of March 11, 2011 have slowed down the nuclear renaissance world-wide and may have accelerated decommissioning either because some countries have decided to halt or reduce nuclear, or because the new safety requirements may reduce life-time extensions. Even in countries such as the UK and France that favor nuclear energy production existing nuclear sites are more likely to be chosen as sites for future NPPs. Even as the site recovery efforts continue at Fukushima and any decommissioning decisions are farther into the future, the accidents have focused attention on the reactor designs in general and specifically on the Fukushima type BWRs. The regulatory authorities in many countries have initiated a re-examination of the design of the systems, structures and components and considerations of the capability of the station to cope with beyond-design basis events. Enhancements to SSCs and site features for the existing reactors and the reactors that will be built will also impact the decommissioning phase activities. The newer reactor designs of today not only have enhanced safety features but also take into consideration the features that will facilitate future decommissioning. Lessons learned from past management and operation of reactors as well as the lessons from decommissioning are incorporated into the new designs. However, in the post-Fukushima era, the emphasis on beyond-design-basis capability may lead to significant changes in SSCs, which eventually will also have impact on the decommissioning phase. Additionally, where some countries decide to phase out the nuclear power, many reactors may enter the decommissioning phase in the coming decade. While the formal updating and expanding of existing guidance documents for accident cleanup and decommissioning would benefit by waiting until the Fukushima project has progressed sufficiently for that experience to be reliably interpreted, the development of structured on-li

Devgun, Jas S. [Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC, Chicago, IL (United States); Laraia, Michele [private consultant, formerly from IAEA, Kolonitzgasse 10/2, 1030, Vienna (Austria); Pescatore, Claudio [OECD, Nuclear Energy Agency, Issy-les-Moulineaux, Paris (France); Dinner, Paul [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramerstrasse 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

DECOMMISSIONING OF THE NUCLEAR FACILITIES OF VKTA AT THE ROSSENDORF RESEARCH SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

VKTA decommissioned the old nuclear facilities of former GDR's (German Democratic Republic) Central Institute of Nuclear Research which was closed end of 1991. VKTA is responsible for fissile material and waste management, environmental and radiation protection and runs an accredited laboratory for environmental and radionuclide analytics. The Rossendorf research site is located east of the city of Dresden. The period from 1982 to about 1997 was mainly characterized by obtaining the necessary licenses for decommissioning and developing a new infrastructure (i.e. waste treatment facility, interim storages for fissile material and waste, clearance monitoring facility). The decommissioning work has been in progress since that time. The decommissioning projects are concentrated on three complexes: (1) the reactors and a fuel development and testing facility, (2) the radioisotope production facilities, and (3) the former liquid and solid waste storage facilities. The status of decommissioning progress and treatment of the residues will be demonstrated. Finally an outlook will be given on the future tasks of VKTA based on the ''Conception VKTA 2000 plus'', which was confirmed by the Saxonian government last year.

U. Helwig, W. Boessert

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

155

Decommissioning and PIE of the MEGAPIE spallation target  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key experiment in the Accelerated Driven Systems roadmap, the MEGAwatt PIlot Experiment (MEGAPIE) (1 MW) was initiated in 1999 in order to design and build a liquid lead-bismuth spallation target, then to operate it into the Swiss spallation neutron facility SINQ at Paul Scherrer Institute. The target has been designed, manufactured, and tested during integral tests, before irradiation carried out end of 2006. During irradiation, neutron and thermo hydraulic measurements were performed allowing deep interpretation of the experiment and validation of the models used during design phase. The decommissioning, Post Irradiation Examinations and waste management phases were defined properly. The phases dedicated to cutting, sampling, cleaning, waste management, samples preparation and shipping to various laboratories were performed by PSI teams: all these phases constitute a huge work, which allows now to perform post-irradiation examination (PIE) of structural material, irradiated in relevant conditions. Preliminary results are presented in the paper, they concern chemical characterization. The following radio-nuclides have been identified by ?-spectrometry: {sup 60}Co, {sup 101}Rh, {sup 102}Rh, {sup 108m}Ag, {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 172}Hf/Lu, {sup 173}Lu, {sup 194}Hg/Au, {sup 195}Au, {sup 207}Bi. For some of these nuclides the activities can be easily evaluated from ?-spectrometry results ({sup 207}Bi, {sup 194}Hg/Au), while other nuclides can only be determined after chemical separations ({sup 108m}Ag, {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 195}Au, {sup 129}I, {sup 36}Cl and ?-emitting {sup 208-210}Po). The concentration of {sup 129}I is lower than expected. The chemical analysis already performed on spallation and corrosion products in the lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) are very relevant for further applications of LBE as a spallation media and more generally as a coolant.

Latge, C.; Henry, J. [CEA-Cadarache, DEN-DTN, 13108 Saint-Paul-les-Durance (France); Wohlmuther, M.; Dai, Y.; Gavillet, D.; Hammer, B.; Heinitz, S.; Neuhausen, J.; Schumann, D.; Thomsen, K.; Tuerler, A.; Wagner, W. [PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Gessi, A. [ENEA, Brasimone (Italy); Guertin, A. [CNRS, Subatech, Nantes (France); Konstantinovic, M. [SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Lindau, R. [KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Maloy, S. [DOE-LANL, Los Alamos (United States); Saito, S. [JAEA, Tokai (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning operations. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop effective mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities within the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. These mobile worksystems will be configured to operate within the environmental and logistical constraints of such facilities and to perform a number of work tasks. Our program is designed to produce a mobile worksystem with capabilities and features that are matched to the particular needs of D&D work by evolving the design through a series of technological developments, performance tests and evaluations. The Phase I effort was based on a robot called the Remote Work Vehicle (RWV) that was previously developed by CMU for use in D&D operations at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building basement. During Phase I of this program, the RWV was rehabilitated and upgraded with contemporary control and user interface technologies and used as a testbed for remote D&D operations. We established a close working relationship with the DOE Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP). In the second phase, we designed and developed a next generation mobile worksystem, called Rosie, and a semi-automatic task space scene analysis system, called Artisan, using guidance from RTDP. Both systems are designed to work with and complement other RTDP D&D technologies to execute selective equipment removal scenarios in which some part of an apparatus is extricated while minimally disturbing the surrounding objects. RTDP has identified selective equipment removal as a timely D&D mission, one that is particularly relevant during the de-activation and de-inventory stages of facility transitioning as a means to reduce the costs and risks associated with subsequent surveillance and monitoring. In the third phase, we tested and demonstrated core capabilities of Rosie and Artisan; we also implemented modifications and enhancements that improve their relevance to DOE`s facility transitioning mission.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING (D AND D) TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the ongoing task of making Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) operations more efficient, this subtask has addressed the need to integrate existing characterization technologies with decontamination technologies in order to provide real-time data on the progress of contamination removal. Specifically, technologies associated with concrete decontamination and/or removal have been examined with the goal of integrating existing technologies and commercializing the resulting hybrid. The Department of Energy (DOE) has estimated that 23 million cubic meters of concrete will require disposition as 1200 buildings undergo the D&D process. All concrete removal to be performed will also necessitate extensive use of characterization techniques. The in-process characterization presents the most potential for improvement and cost-savings as compared to other types. Current methods for in-process characterization usually require cessation of work to allow for radiation surveys to assess the rate of decontamination. Combining together decontamination and characterization technologies would allow for in-process evaluation of decontamination efforts. Since the present methods do not use in-process evaluations for the progress of decontamination, they may allow for ''overremoval'' of materials (removal of contaminated along with non-contaminated materials). Overremoval increases the volume of waste and therefore the costs associated with disposal. Integrating technologies would facilitate the removal of only contaminated concrete and reduce the total volume of radioactive waste, which would be disposed of. This would eventually ensure better productivity and time savings. This project presents a general procedure to integrate the above-mentioned technologies in the form of the Technology Integration Module (TIM) along with combination lists of commercially available decontamination and characterization technologies. The scope of the project has also been expanded by FIU-HCET to evaluate a technology integration--shot blasting technology and an ultrasonic rangefinder, which are decontamination and sensor technology, respectively.

M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition. Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition. The "D&D Program Map" presents an integrated overview of DOE's complex-wide D&D project locations, scope, and issues and includes information on: * The affects of the AMERICAN Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

159

Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition. Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition. The "D&D Program Map" presents an integrated overview of DOE's complex-wide D&D project locations, scope, and issues and includes information on: * The affects of the AMERICAN Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

160

Standard Guide for Environmental Monitoring Plans for Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This guide covers the development or assessment of environmental monitoring plans for decommissioning nuclear facilities. This guide addresses: (1) development of an environmental baseline prior to commencement of decommissioning activities; (2) determination of release paths from site activities and their associated exposure pathways in the environment; and (3) selection of appropriate sampling locations and media to ensure that all exposure pathways in the environment are monitored appropriately. This guide also addresses the interfaces between the environmental monitoring plan and other planning documents for site decommissioning, such as radiation protection, site characterization, and waste management plans, and federal, state, and local environmental protection laws and guidance. This guide is applicable up to the point of completing D&D activities and the reuse of the facility or area for other purposes.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioning cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Decommissioning of TA-21-153, a /sup 227/Ac contaminated old filter building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An exhaust air filter building contaminated with /sup 227/Ac was decommissioned at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, in 1978. The building was constructed in the late 1940s to clean exhaust air from several buildings at TA-21, DP Site. It was in service until March 1970. The project involved preliminary decontamination, dismantling the building, and burying the debris at an on-site waste disposal/storage area. This report presents the details on the decommissioning procedures, health physics, waste management, environmental surveillance, and costs for the operation.

Harper, J.R.; Garde, R.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Action Memorandum for General Decommissioning Activities under the Idaho Cleanup Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Action Memorandum documents the selected alternative to perform general decommissioning activities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) under the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP). Preparation of this Action Memorandum has been performed in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended by the "Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986", and in accordance with the "National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan". An engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) was prepared and released for public comment and evaluated alternatives to accomplish the decommissioning of excess buildings and structures whose missions havve been completed.

S. L. Reno

2006-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

163

Low-level and transuranic waste transportation, disposal, and facility decommissioning cost sensitivity analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Systems Design Study (SDS) identified technologies available for the remediation of low-level and transuranic waste stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex`s Subsurface Disposal Area at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The SDS study intentionally omitted the costs of transportation and disposal of the processed waste and the cost of decommissioning the processing facility. This report provides a follow-on analysis of the SDS to explore the basis for life-cycle cost segments of transportation, disposal, and facility decommissioning; to determine the sensitivity of the cost segments; and to quantify the life-cycle costs of the 10 ex situ concepts of the Systems Design Study.

Schlueter, R. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Schafer, J.J. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Low-level and transuranic waste transportation, disposal, and facility decommissioning cost sensitivity analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Systems Design Study (SDS) identified technologies available for the remediation of low-level and transuranic waste stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex's Subsurface Disposal Area at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The SDS study intentionally omitted the costs of transportation and disposal of the processed waste and the cost of decommissioning the processing facility. This report provides a follow-on analysis of the SDS to explore the basis for life-cycle cost segments of transportation, disposal, and facility decommissioning; to determine the sensitivity of the cost segments; and to quantify the life-cycle costs of the 10 ex situ concepts of the Systems Design Study.

Schlueter, R. (Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)); Schafer, J.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Decontamination and decommissioning of building 889 at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Rocky Flats site, the building 889 decommissioning project was the first large-scale decommissioning project of a radiologically contaminated facility at Rocky Flats. The scope consisted of removal of all equipment and utility systems from the interior of the building, decontamination of interior building surfaces, and the demolition of the facility to ground level. Details of the project management plan, including schedule, engineering, cost, characterization methodologies, decontamination techniques, radiological control requirements, and demolition methods, are provided in this article. 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Dorr, K.A. [Kaiser-Hill Co., Golden, CO (United States); Hickman, M.E.; Henderson, B.J. [Rocky Mountain Remediation Services, Golden, CO (United States); Sexton, R.J. [Scientific Ecology Group, Golden, CO (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Criticality safety aspects of decontamination and decommissioning at defense nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Defense nuclear facilities have operated for forty years with a well-defined mission to produce weapons components for the nation. With the end of the cold war, the facilities` missions have changed to one of decontamination and decommissioning. Off-normal operations and use of new procedures, such as will exist during these activities, have often been among the causal factors in previous criticality accidents at process facilities. This paper explores the similarities in causal factors in previous criticality accidents to the conditions existing in current defense nuclear facilities undergoing the transition to decontamination and decommissioning. Practices to reduce the risk to workers, the public, and the environment are recommended.

Croucher, D.W.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Impact of Lack of Consistent Free Release Standards on Decommissioning Projects and Costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has had specific and dose-based standards for the release of liquids and gases for a long time, there are no regulatory mechanisms in place for the release of solid bulk materials from a nuclear power plant. Even though free releases of small quantities of solid materials continue under existing guidelines from the operating plants, the regulatory void creates major difficulties for the bulk materials that result from the decommissioning of a nuclear site. Decommissioning of a commercial nuclear power plant generates large quantities of solid bulk materials such as concrete, metal, and demolition debris. Disposition of such materials has a large impact on the overall decommissioning cost. Yet, there are no clear and cost-effective alternatives for the disposal of these materials from a regulatory perspective. This paper discusses the methodologies for clearance of solid materials1, their applicability to the disposition of bulk materials, and the impact of lack of consistent free release standards on the decommissioning projects and costs.

Devgun, J. S.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

168

Conceptual Decontamination and Decommissioning Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Conceptual Decontamination and Decommissioning Plan (D&D) was developed as a concept for progressing from the final actions of the Disposal Phase, through the Decontamination and Decommissioning Phase, and into the initiation of the Long-Term Monitoring Phase. This plan was written in a manner that coincides with many of the requirements specified in DOE Order 5820.2A. Radioactive Waste Management; ASTM El 167 87, Standard Guide for Radiation Protection Program for Decommissioning Operations; and other documents listed in Attachment 3 of the D&D Plan. However, this conceptual plan does not meet all of the requirements necessary for a Decontamination and Decommissioning plan necessary for submission to the U.S. Congress in accordance with the Land Withdrawal Act (P.L. 102-579). A complete D&D plan that will meet the requirements of all of these documents and of the Land Withdrawal Act will be prepared and submitted to Congress by October 1997.

Westinghouse Electric Corporation Waste Isolation Division, now Washington TRU Solutions LLC

1995-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

ECONOMIC MODELING OF RE-LICENSING AND DECOMMISSIONING OPTIONS FOR THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECONOMIC MODELING OF RE-LICENSING AND DECOMMISSIONING OPTIONS FOR THE KLAMATH BASIN HYDROELECTRIC, and steelhead trout on the West Coast of the United States. PacifiCorp's 169-megawatt Klamath Hydroelectric Hydroelectric Project is the only thorough, objective and transparent assessment tool that analyzes the cost

170

EIS-0364: Decommissioning of the Fast Flux Test Facility, Hanford Site, Richland, WA  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces its intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), on proposed decommissioning of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington.

171

Allowable Residual Contamination Levels in soil for decommissioning the Shippingport Atomic Power Station site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of decommissioning the Shippingport Atomic Power Station, a fundamental concern is the determination of Allowable Residual Contamination Levels (ARCL) for radionuclides in the soil at the site. The ARCL method described in this report is based on a scenario/exposure-pathway analysis and compliance with an annual dose limit for unrestricted use of the land after decommissioning. In addition to naturally occurring radionuclides and fallout from weapons testing, soil contamination could potentially come from five other sources. These include operation of the Shippingport Station as a pressurized water reactor, operations of the Shippingport Station as a light-water breeder, operation of the nearby Beaver Valley reactors, releases during decommissioning, and operation of other nearby industries, including the Bruce-Mansfield coal-fired power plants. ARCL values are presented for 29 individual radionculides and a worksheet is provided so that ARCL values can be determined for any mixture of the individual radionuclides for any annual dose limit selected. In addition, a worksheet is provided for calculating present time soil concentration value that will decay to the ARCL values after any selected period of time, such as would occur during a period of restricted access. The ARCL results are presented for both unconfined (surface) and confined (subsurface) soil contamination. The ARCL method and results described in this report provide a flexible means of determining unrestricted-use site release conditions after decommissioning the Shippingport Atomic Power Station.

Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Napier, B.A.; Soldat, J.K.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Decommissioning and Dismantling of the Floating Maintenance Base 'Lepse' - 13316  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lepse was built in Russia in 1934 and commissioned as a dry cargo ship. In 1961 she was re-equipped for use as a nuclear service ship (NSS), specifically a floating maintenance base (FMB), to support the operation of the civilian nuclear fleet (ice-breakers) of the USSR. In 1988 Lepse was taken out of service and in 1990 she was re-classified as a 'berth connected ship', located at a berth near the port of Murmansk under the ownership of Federal State Unitary Enterprise (FSUE) Atomflot. Lepse has special storage facilities for spent nuclear fuel assemblies (SFA) that have been used to store several hundred SFAs for nearly 40 years. High and intermediate-level liquid radioactive waste (LRW) is also present in the spent nuclear fuel assembly storage channels, in special tanks and also in the SFA cooling circuit. Many of the SFAs stored in Lepse are classified as damaged and cannot be removed using standard procedures. The removal of the SFA and LRW from the Lepse storage facilities is a hazardous task and requires specially designed tools, equipment and an infrastructure in which these can be deployed safely. Lepse is a significant environmental hazard in the North West of Russia. Storing spent nuclear fuel and high-level liquid radioactive waste on board Lepse in the current conditions is not acceptable with respect to Russian Federation health, safety and environmental standards and with international best practice. The approved concept design for the removal of the SFA and LRW and dismantling of Lepse requires that the ship be transported to Nerpa shipyard where specialist infrastructure will be constructed and equipment installed. One of the main complexities of the Project lies within the number of interested stakeholders involved in the Project. The Lepse project has been high focus on the international stage for many years with previous international efforts failing to make significant progress towards the objective of decommissioning Lepse. The Northern Dimension Environmental Partnership (NDEP) approved an internationally funded project to identify and prioritise nuclear and environmental hazards in NW Russia. Within this project the Lepse was recognised as being one of the highest nuclear hazards in NW Russia. Removal of SNF, SRW and LRW from Lepse requires innovative design and development of bespoke equipment. The main drivers of the NDEP Donors are first to safely transport Lepse in 2012 from her current berth close to the local population in Murmansk to the nominated dismantling shipyard, and secondly to raise Lepse from the water in 2013 onto the slip-way at the dismantling shipyard. A description is provided of the approach and progress towards preparing the Lepse for the removal of SFAs and other radioactive waste, to decontaminate and then dismantle the vessel under international donor funding. (authors)

Field, D.; Mizen, K. [Nuvia Limited (United Kingdom)] [Nuvia Limited (United Kingdom)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Recommended values for the distribution coefficient (Kd) to be used in dose assessments for decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. The site contains two reactor Containment Buildings, a Fuel Building, an Auxiliary Building, and a Turbine Building that may be contaminated. The current decommissioning plan involves removing all above grade structures to a depth of 3 feet below grade. The remaining underground structures will be backfilled. The remaining underground structures will contain low amounts of residual licensed radioactive material. An important component of the decommissioning process is the demonstration that any remaining activity will not cause a hypothetical individual to receive a dose in excess of 25 mrem/y as specified in 10CFR20 SubpartE.

Sullivan T.

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

174

Applied Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Applied Science Applied Science Correlation of predicted and measured iron oxidation states in mixed iron oxides H. D. Rosenfeld and W. L. Holstein Development of a quantitative measurement of a diesel spray core using synchrotron x-rays C.F. Powell, Y. Yue, S. Gupta, A. McPherson, R. Poola, and J. Wang Localized phase transformations by x-ray-induced heating R.A. Rosenberg, Q. Ma, W. Farrell, E.D. Crozier, G.J. Soerensen, R.A. Gordon, and D.-T. Jiang Resonant x-ray scattering at the Se edge in ferroelectric liquid crystal materials L. Matkin, H. Gleeson, R. Pindak, P. Mach, C. Huang, G. Srajer, and J. Pollmann Synchrotron-radiation-induced anisotropic wet etching of GaAs Q. Ma, D.C. Mancini, and R.A. Rosenberg Synchrotron-radiation-induced, selective-area deposition of gold on

175

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 2, Indexes. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is part 2 of a bibliography on nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial action. This report contains indexes on the following: authors, corporate affiliation, title words, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Juggernaut Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory … East Argonne, Illinois  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE/EA-1483 DOE/EA-1483 Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Juggernaut Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory - East Argonne, Illinois March 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Chicago Operations Office Argonne Area Office Argonne, Illinois Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Juggernaut Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory - East Argonne, Illinois Table of Contents Acronyms....................................................................................................................................... iii 1.0 Background ..........................................................................................................................1 1.1 Facility History ........................................................................................................1

177

Screening evaluation of radionuclide groundwater concentrations for the end state basement fill model Zion Nuclear Power Station decommissioning project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. The site contains two reactor Containment Buildings, a Fuel Building, an Auxiliary Building, and a Turbine Building that may be contaminated. The current decommissioning plan involves removing all above grade structures to a depth of 3 feet below grade. The remaining underground structures will be backfilled with clean material. The final selection of fill material has not been made.

Sullivan T.

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

178

Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's Fiscal Year 2011 Financial Statement Audit  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Uranium Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's Fiscal Year 2011 Financial Statement Audit OAS-FS-13-02 October 2012 September 7, 2012 Mr. Gregory Friedman Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Room 5D-039 Washington, DC 20585 Dear Mr. Friedman: We have audited the financial statements of the Department of Energy's (the Department) Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund (D&D Fund) as of and for the year ended September 30, 2011, and have issued our report thereon dated September 7, 2012. In planning and performing our audit of the consolidated financial statements, in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America, we considered the Department's internal control

179

Interim Status of the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment Integrated Decontamination and Decommissioning Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), and Argonne National Laboratory - East (ANL-E) teamed to establish the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) Integrated Decontamination and Decommissioning (ID&D) project to increase the use of improved technologies in D&D operations. The project is making the technologies more readily available, providing training, putting the technologies to use, and spreading information about improved performance. The improved technologies are expected to reduce cost, schedule, radiation exposure, or waste volume over currently used baseline methods. They include some of the most successful technologies proven in the large-scale demonstrations and in private industry. The selected technologies are the Pipe Explorer, the GammaCam, the Decontamination Decommissioning and Remediation Optimal Planning System (DDROPS), the BROKK Demolition Robot, the Personal Ice Cooling System (PICS), the Oxy-Gasoline Torch, the Track-Mounted Shear, and the Hand-Held Shear.

A. M Smith; G. E. Matthern; R. H. Meservey

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Environmental Assessment for decommissioning the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Weeks Island Facility, Iberia Parish, Louisiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Weeks Island site is one of five underground salt dome crude oils storage facilities operated by the Department of Energy (DOE). It is located in Iberia Parish, Louisiana. The purpose of the proposed action is to decommission the Weeks Island crude oil storage after the oil inventory has been transferred to other SPR facilities. Water intrusion into the salt dome storage chambers and the development of two sinkholes located near the aboveground facilities has created uncertain geophysical conditions. This Environmental Assessment describes the proposed decommissioning operation, its alternatives, and potential environmental impacts. Based on this analyses, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and has issued the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioning cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Cost update technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning a reference uranium hexafluoride conversion plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to update the cost estimates developed in a previous report, NUREG/CR-1757 (Elder 1980) for decommissioning a reference uranium hexafluoride conversion plant from the original mid-1981 dollars to values representative of January 1993. The cost updates were performed by using escalation factors derived from cost index trends over the past 11.5 years. Contemporary price quotes wee used for costs that have increased drastically or for which is is difficult to find a cost trend. No changes were made in the decommissioning procedures or cost element requirements assumed in NUREG/CR-1757. This report includes only information that was changed from NUREG/CR-1757. Thus, for those interested in detailed descriptions and associated information for the reference uranium hexafluoride conversion plant, a copy of NUREG/CR-1757 will be needed.

Miles, T.L.; Liu, Y.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Decommissioning and Demolition of a Redundant UK Research Facility at AWE Aldermaston - 12453  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The redundant two-storey brick built research facility on the AWE Site at Aldermaston, UK is in the closing stages of decommissioning and demolition. The facility was used for a variety of purposes up to 1995 predominately involving the use of alpha-emitting isotopes. The two main areas of alpha-based contamination have been decommissioned with the removal of hot -boxes and fume cupboards on the ground floor and HEPA filter units and ventilation equipment on the first floor. Many of these activities were undertaken using both airline fed suits, (supplied via a free standing mobile unit), and full face respirators. Asbestos materials were located and cleared from the first floor by specialist contractor. All sections of active drain running from the building to the site active effluent disposal system were removed early in the program using established techniques with specialist monitoring equipment used to provide confidence in the data required for disposal of the decommissioning debris. In particular a dedicated High Resolution Gamma Spectrometer (radioactive materials scanning unit) was utilized to categorise waste drums and wrapped packages. The building has been decommissioned and the monitoring and sampling of the structure was completed in November 2011 - the results demonstrating that the building was clear of contamination in accordance with UK clearance and exemption requirements. The demolition plan was developed and implemented in December with site excavation of foundations and site clearance currently ongoing in preparation for final site backfill activities and project close. A number of useful lessons have been learnt during the operations and are set out at the rear of the main text. (authors)

Pritchard, Paul [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston (United Kingdom)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 12  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 664 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the twelfth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Decontamination and Decommissioning Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects, analyzes, and disseminates information on environmental restoration and remedial actions. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at FTS 624-7764 or (615) 574-7764.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 12. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 664 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the twelfth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Decontamination and Decommissioning Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects, analyzes, and disseminates information on environmental restoration and remedial actions. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at FTS 624-7764 or (615) 574-7764.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Decontamination and decommissioning surveillance and maintenance report for FY 1991. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program has three distinct phases: (1) surveillance and maintenance (S&M); (2) decontamination and removal of hazardous materials and equipment (which DOE Headquarters in Washington, D.C., calls Phase I of remediation); and (3) decommissioning and ultimate disposal, regulatory compliance monitoring, and property transfer (which DOE Headquarters calls Phase II of remediation). A large part of D&D is devoted to S&M at each of the sites. Our S&M activities, which are performed on facilities awaiting decommissioning, are designed to minimize potential hazards to human health and the environment by: ensuring adequate containment of residual radioactive and hazardous materials; and, providing physical safety and security controls to minimize potential hazards to on-site personnel and the general public. Typically, we classify maintenance activities as either routine or special (major repairs). Routine maintenance includes such activities as painting, cleaning, vegetation control, minor structural repairs, filter changes, and building system(s) checks. Special maintenance includes Occupational Safety and Health Act facility upgrades, roof repairs, and equipment overhaul. Surveillance activities include inspections, radiological measurements, reporting, records maintenance, and security (as required) for controlling and monitoring access to facilities. This report summarizes out FY 1991 S&M activities for the Tennessee plant sites, which include the K-25 Site, the Gas Centrifuge facilities, ORNL, and the Y-12 Plant.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH DECOMMISSIONING THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COOLING POND  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

Farfan, E.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

187

Environmental Problems Associated With Decommissioning The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

Farfan, E. B.; Jannik, G. T.; Marra, J. C.; Oskolkov, B. Ya.; Bondarkov, M. D.; Gaschak, S. P.; Maksymenko, A. M.; Maksymenko, V. M.; Martynenko, V. I.

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

188

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 1. Main report. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE.

Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Joint US/Russian study on the development of a decommissioning strategy plan for RBMK-1000 unit No. 1 at the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this joint U.S./Russian study was to develop a safe, technically feasible, economically acceptable strategy for decommissioning Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (LNPP) Unit No. 1 as a representative first-generation RBMK-1000 reactor. The ultimate goal in developing the decommissioning strategy was to select the most suitable decommissioning alternative and end state, taking into account the socioeconomic conditions, the regulatory environment, and decommissioning experience in Russia. This study was performed by a group of Russian and American experts led by Kurchatov Institute for the Russian efforts and by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. efforts and for the overall project.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Office of Environmental Management Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund financial statements, September 30, 1995 and 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (Act) requires the Department of Energy to retain ownership and responsibility for the costs of environmental cleanup resulting from the Government`s operation of the three gaseous diffusion facilities located at the K-25 site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. The Act transferred the uranium enrichment enterprise to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) as of July 1, 1993, and established the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund (D&D Fund) to: Pay for the costs of decontamination and decommissioning at the diffusion facilities; pay the annual costs for remedial action at the diffusion facilities to the extent that the amount in the Fund is sufficient; and reimburse uranium/thorium licensees for the costs of decontamination, decommissioning, reclamation, and other remedial actions which are incident to sales to the Government.

NONE

1996-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

191

Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Juggernaut Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory … East Argonne, Illinois  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact Proposed Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Juggernaut Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory - East Argonne, Illinois AGENCY: U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1483, evaluating the decontamination and decommissioning of the Juggernaut Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E), in Argonne, Illinois. The decontamination and decommissioning of the reactor is needed to ensure the protection of the health and safety of the public, DOE and contractor employees, and the environment, consistent with DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not

192

Task 21 - Development of Systems Engineering Applications for Decontamination and Decommissioning Activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this task are to: Develop a model (paper) to estimate the cost and waste generation of cleanup within the Environmental Management (EM) complex; Identify technologies applicable to decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) operations within the EM complex; Develop a database of facility information as linked to project baseline summaries (PBSs). The above objectives are carried out through the following four subtasks: Subtask 1--D and D Model Development, Subtask 2--Technology List; Subtask 3--Facility Database, and Subtask 4--Incorporation into a User Model.

Erickson, T.A.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

FROM CONCEPT TO REALITY, IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING OF THE P AND R REACTORS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SRS recently completed an approximately three year effort to decommission two SRS reactors: P-Reactor (Building 105-P) and R-Reactor (Building 105-R). Completed in December 2011, the concurrent decommissionings marked the completion of two relatively complex and difficult facility disposition projects at the SRS. Buildings 105-P and 105-R began operating as production reactors in the early 1950s with the mission of producing weapons material (e.g., tritium and plutonium-239). The 'P' Reactor and was shutdown in 1991 while the 'R' Reactor and was shutdown in 1964. In the intervening period between shutdown and deactivation & decommissioning (D&D), Buildings 105-P and 105-R saw limited use (e.g., storage of excess heavy water and depleted uranium oxide). For Building 105-P, deactivation was initiated in April 2007 and was essentially complete by June 2010. For Building 105-R, deactivation was initiated in August 2008 and was essentially complete by September 2010. For both buildings, the primary objective of deactivation was to remove/mitigate hazards associated with the remaining hazardous materials, and thus prepare the buildings for in-situ decommissioning. Deactivation removed the following hazardous materials to the extent practical: combustibles/flammables, residual heavy water, acids, friable asbestos (as needed to protect workers performing deactivation and decommissioning), miscellaneous chemicals, lead/brass components, Freon(reg sign), oils, mercury/PCB containing components, mold and some radiologically-contaminated equipment. In addition to the removal of hazardous materials, deactivation included the removal of hazardous energy, exterior metallic components (representing an immediate fall hazard), and historical artifacts along with the evaporation of water from the two Disassembly Basins. Finally, so as to facilitate occupancy during the subsequent in-situ decommissioning, deactivation implemented repairs to the buildings and provided temporary power.

Musall, J.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

194

REVIEW OF INDUSTRIES AND GOVERNMENT AGENCIES FOR TECHNOLOGIES APPLICABLE TO DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area's (DDFA's) mission is to develop, demonstrate, and deploy improved deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) technologies. This mission requires that emphasis be continually placed on identifying technologies currently employed or under development in other nuclear as well as nonnuclear industries and government agencies. In support of DDFA efforts to clean up the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) radiologically contaminated surplus facilities using technologies that improve worker safety, reduce costs, and accelerate cleanup schedules, a study was conducted to identify innovative technologies developed for use in nonnuclear arenas that are appropriate for D&D applications.

Reilkoff, T. E.; Hetland, M. D.; O'Leary, E. M.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

195

Characterization of decontamination and decommissioning wastes expected from the major processing facilities in the 200 Areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was intended to characterize and estimate the amounts of equipment and other materials that are candidates for removal and subsequent processing in a solid waste facility when the major processing and handling facilities in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site are decontaminated and decommissioned. The facilities in this study were selected based on processing history and on the magnitude of the estimated decommissioning cost cited in the Surplus Facilities Program Plan; Fiscal Year 1993 (Winship and Hughes 1992). The facilities chosen for this study include B Plant (221-B), T Plant (221-T), U Plant (221-U), the Uranium Trioxide (UO{sub 3}) Plant (224-U and 224-UA), the Reduction Oxidation (REDOX) or S Plant (202-S), the Plutonium Concentration Facility for B Plant (224-B), and the Concentration Facility for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and REDOX (233-S). This information is required to support planning activities for current and future solid waste treatment, storage, and disposal operations and facilities.

Amato, L.C.; Franklin, J.D.; Hyre, R.A.; Lowy, R.M.; Millar, J.S.; Pottmeyer, J.A. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Kennewick, WA (United States); Duncan, D.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure - appendices. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NRC staff is in need of decommissioning bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2) located at Richland, Washington, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clear structures on the site and to restore the site to a {open_quotes}green field{close_quotes} condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities. Sensitivity of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances is also examined.

Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J.; McDuffie, P.N.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Plan for fully decontaminating and decommissioning of the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Fuel Laboratories at Cheswick, Revision 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project scope of work included the complete decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Westinghouse ARD Fuel Laboratories at the Cheswick Site in the shortest possible time. This has been accomplished in the following four phases: (1) preparation of documents and necessary paperwork; packaging and shipping of all special nuclear materials in an acceptable form to a reprocessing agency; (2) decontamination of all facilities, glove boxes and equipment; loading of generated waste into bins, barrels and strong wooden boxes; (3) shipping of all bins, barrels and boxes containing waste to the designated burial site; removal of all utility services from the laboratories; (4) final survey of remaining facilities and certification for nonrestricted use; preparation of final report. This volume contains the following 3 attachments: (1) Plan for Fully Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Fuel Laboratories at Cheswick; (2) Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Decommissioning the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories, Cheswick, PA; and (3) WARD-386, Quality Assurance Program Description for Decontamination and Decommissioning Activities.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Decision to reorganise or reorganising decisions? A First-Hand Account of the Decommissioning of the Phnix Nuclear Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Decommissioning of the Phénix Nuclear Power Plant Melchior Pelleterat de Borde, MINES ParisTech, Christophe Martin looks at the effect of ongoing organisational changes taking place in a nuclear power plant being campaigns, the Phénix nuclear power plant was taken out of service at the end of 2009. The plant has two

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

199

Expectations on Documented Safety Analysis for Deactivated Inactive Nuclear Facilities in a State of Long Term Surveillance & Maintenance or Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE promulgated 10 CFR 830 ''Nuclear Safety Management'' on October 10, 2000. Section 204 of the Rule requires that contractors at DOE hazard category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities develop a ''Documented Safety Analysis'' (DSA) that summarizes the work to be performed, the associated hazards, and hazard controls necessary to protect workers, the public, and the environment. Table 2 of Appendix A to the rule has been provided to ensure that DSAs are prepared in accordance with one of the available predetermined ''safe harbor'' approaches. The table presents various acceptable safe harbor DSAs for different nuclear facility operations ranging from nuclear reactors to decommissioning activities. The safe harbor permitted for decommissioning of a nuclear facility encompasses methods described in DOE-STD-1 120-98, ''Integration of Environment, Safety and Health into Facility Disposition Activities,'' and provisions in 29 CFR 1910.120 or 29 CFR 1926.65 (HAZWOPER). Additionally, an evaluation of public safety impacts and development of necessary controls is required when the facility being decommissioned contains radiological inventory or contamination exceeding the Rule's definition for low-level residual fixed radioactivity. This document discusses a cost-effective DSA approach that is based on the concepts of DOE-STD-I 120 and meets the 10 CFR 830 safe harbor requirements for both transition surveillance and maintenance as well as decommissioning. This DSA approach provides continuity for inactive Hanford nuclear facilities that will eventually transition into decommissioning. It also uses a graded approach that meets the expectations of DOE-STD-3011 and addresses HAZWOPER requirements to provide a sound basis for worker protection, particularly where intrusive work is being conducted.

JACKSON, M.W.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 2. Appendices. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE. This volume contains the appendices.

Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioning cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Report to Congress on Plan for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Reactors  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 6 Report to Congress on the Demonstration of the Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Decommissioned Nuclear Power Reactor Sites December 2008 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Washington, D.C. Report to Congress on the Demonstration of the Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel The picture on the cover is the Connecticut Yankee Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation site in Haddam, Connecticut, with 43 dry storage NRC-licensed dual-purpose (storage and transport) casks. ii Report to Congress on the Demonstration of the Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The House Appropriations Committee Print that accompanied the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2008, requests that the U.S. Department of Energy (the Department):

202

DOE-STD-1166-2003; Deactivation and Decommissioning Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1166-2003 September 2003 DOE STANDARD DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1166-2003 This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (423) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161;

203

Assessment of the radiological impact of a decommissioning nuclear power plant in Italy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The assessment of the radiological impact of a decommissioning Nuclear Power Plant is presented here through the results of an environmental monitoring survey carried out in the area surrounding the Garigliano Power Plant. The levels of radioactivity in soil, water, air and other environmental matrices are shown, in which {\\alpha}, {\\beta} and {\\gamma} activity and {\\gamma} equivalent dose rate are measured. Radioactivity levels of the samples from the Garigliano area are analyzed and then compared to those from a control zone situated more than 100 km away. Moreover, a comparison is made with a previous survey held in 2001. The analyses and comparisons show no significant alteration in the radiological characteristics of the area surroundings the plant, with an overall radioactivity depending mainly from the global fallout and natural sources.

A. Petraglia; C. Sabbarese; M. De Cesare; N. De Cesare; F. Quinto; F. Terrasi; A. D'Onofrio; P. Steier; L. K. Fifield; A. M. Esposito

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

204

Assessment of the radiological impact of a decommissioning nuclear power plant in Italy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The assessment of the radiological impact of a decommissioning Nuclear Power Plant is presented here through the results of an environmental monitoring survey carried out in the area surrounding the Garigliano Power Plant. The levels of radioactivity in soil, water, air and other environmental matrices are shown, in which {\\alpha}, {\\beta} and {\\gamma} activity and {\\gamma} equivalent dose rate are measured. Radioactivity levels of the samples from the Garigliano area are analyzed and then compared to those from a control zone situated more than 100 km away. Moreover, a comparison is made with a previous survey held in 2001. The analyses and comparisons show no significant alteration in the radiological characteristics of the area surroundings the plant, with an overall radioactivity depending mainly from the global fallout and natural sources.

Petraglia, A; De Cesare, M; De Cesare, N; Quinto, F; Terrasi, F; D'Onofrio, A; Steier, P; Fifield, L K; Esposito, A M; 10.1051/radiopro/2012010

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of the BORAX-V facility turbine building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Boiling Water Reactor Experiment (BORAX)-V Facility Turbine Building Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Project is described in this report. The BORAX series of five National Reactor Testing Station (NRTS) reactors pioneered intensive work on boiling water reactor (BWR) experiments conducted between 1953 and 1964. Facility characterization, decision analyses, and D&D plans for the turbine building were prepared from 1979 through 1990. D&D activities of the turbine building systems were initiated in November of 1988 and completed with the demolition and backfill of the concrete foundation in March 1992. Due to the low levels of radioactivity and the absence of loose contamination, the D&D activities were completed with no radiation exposure to the workers. The D&D activities were performed in a manner that no radiological health or safety hazard to the public or to personnel at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) remain.

Arave, A.E.; Rodman, G.R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of the BORAX-V facility turbine building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Boiling Water Reactor Experiment (BORAX)-V Facility Turbine Building Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) Project is described in this report. The BORAX series of five National Reactor Testing Station (NRTS) reactors pioneered intensive work on boiling water reactor (BWR) experiments conducted between 1953 and 1964. Facility characterization, decision analyses, and D D plans for the turbine building were prepared from 1979 through 1990. D D activities of the turbine building systems were initiated in November of 1988 and completed with the demolition and backfill of the concrete foundation in March 1992. Due to the low levels of radioactivity and the absence of loose contamination, the D D activities were completed with no radiation exposure to the workers. The D D activities were performed in a manner that no radiological health or safety hazard to the public or to personnel at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) remain.

Arave, A.E.; Rodman, G.R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release.

Michael Kruzic

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

American Recovery and Reinvestment American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers achieved a significant milestone in the decommissioning of a Cold War reactor at the Sa- vannah River Site this month after they safely re- moved its rusty, orange, 75-foot-tall dome. With the help of a 660-ton crane and lifting lugs, the work- ers pulled the 174,000-pound dome off the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor, capping more than 16 months of preparations. Workers will cut the dome into smaller pieces for disposal. Removal of the dome allows workers to access the 219,000-pound reactor vessel and two steam generators so they can remove and permanently dispose them onsite. Re- maining equipment will be moved to the cavity vacated by the vessel, and below-grade portions of the reactor will be

209

Source term characterization program for the decommissioning waste from a CANDU reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An automatic source term characterization program was developed, and its structure, logic, and function are explained here in detail. Called the CANDU Activated Source Term Evaluator (CASE), the developed program is equipped with a convenient graphical user interface; it uses MCNP for the neutron transport calculation and ORIGEN2 for activation analysis. CASE can prepare the MCNP input and run MCNP to obtain the neutron flux and the cross section. It can also prepare the ORIGEN2 input for the activation analysis of the region of interest, process the ORIGEN2 output, and compare the estimated specific activity of activated waste with the waste classification standard. CASE is expected to be very useful for reducing the engineering time, minimizing human error, and enhancing the reliability of source term evaluations of decommissioning waste from CANDU reactors.

Dong-Keun Cho; Jeong-Hun Cha; Dong-Hak Kook; Jong-Youl Lee; Heui-Joo Choi; Jongwon Choi; Won-il Ko; Jeong-Ho Park

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

May 1, 2012 May 1, 2012 CX-008288: Categorical Exclusion Determination Decommissioning of the Appliance Testing and Evaluation Center in Morgantown CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/01/2012 Location(s): West Virginia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory May 1, 2012 CX-008287: Categorical Exclusion Determination Technology Integration Program CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05/01/2012 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory May 1, 2012 CX-008286: Categorical Exclusion Determination Technology Integration Program CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 05/01/2012 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory May 1, 2012 CX-008285: Categorical Exclusion Determination E85 (Ethanol) Retail Fueling Infrastructure Installation CX(s) Applied: B5.22

211

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: RMOTC | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

August 6, 2011 August 6, 2011 CX-006696: Categorical Exclusion Determination Maintenance / Grading of Existing Roads and Road Drainages (Barrow Ditches) CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/06/2011 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC August 6, 2011 CX-006711: Categorical Exclusion Determination Reclamation of Decommissioned Batteries, Test Satellites, and Facilities CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B6.1 Date: 08/06/2011 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC July 13, 2011 CX-006694: Categorical Exclusion Determination Repetitive/Routine Maintenance Activities CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/13/2011 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC June 7, 2011 CX-006692: Categorical Exclusion Determination Work on Existing Well Location (Within 125 Feet from Well Bore) CX(s) Applied: B5.12

212

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1, 2012 1, 2012 CX-008288: Categorical Exclusion Determination Decommissioning of the Appliance Testing and Evaluation Center in Morgantown CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/01/2012 Location(s): West Virginia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory May 1, 2012 CX-008287: Categorical Exclusion Determination Technology Integration Program CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05/01/2012 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory May 1, 2012 CX-008286: Categorical Exclusion Determination Technology Integration Program CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 05/01/2012 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory May 1, 2012 CX-008285: Categorical Exclusion Determination E85 (Ethanol) Retail Fueling Infrastructure Installation CX(s) Applied: B5.22

213

Issues in UK cleanup and decommissioning; a strategic R and D programme  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nexia Solutions is contracted to manage and carry out research on behalf of the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA). This paper will describe the nuclear research ongoing and how it fits in with the UK cleanup and decommissioning strategy. The aim of the strategic R and D programme is to assist the NDA in maintaining a technical portfolio which will:- - identify and address challenges and clean-up problems that do not have an existing solution; - resolve potential inconsistencies between sites in the technical bases for certain strategic decisions and their implementation; - maintain options while developing strategy (emerging risks); - save costs by developing multi-site solutions; - provide technology, skills and facilities on the timescale required. The strategy for the R and D programme has been developed from a top-level approach by understanding the challenges which need to be addressed and prioritising these according to the objectives of the programme. The programme has demonstrated that a technical portfolio comprising six areas, each containing a number of key themes, is appropriate to address the technical challenges which the NDA faces and aligns with the NDA's technical issues register. An important aspect of the R and D programme is that it should create opportunities for undertaking the NDA mission more effectively. This arises from the emphasis given in those technical programmes which define the challenge more precisely and thus provide a platform from which to produce innovative solutions. The paper will present an overview of the strategic R and D programme along with the key technical programme areas. Examples will be provided of the technical work ongoing, and the results obtained so far. (author)

Tinsley, T.P.; Ashley, V.B.; Morgan, H.G.; Fairhall, G.A. [Nexia Solutions, British Technology Centre, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Accelerating the Whiteshell Laboratories Decommissioning Through the Implementation of a Projectized and Delivery-Focused Organization - 13074  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Whiteshell Laboratories (WL) is a nuclear research site in Canada that was commissioned in 1964 by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. It covers a total area of approximately 4,375 hectares (10,800 acres) and includes the main campus site, the Waste Management Area (WMA) and outer areas of land identified as not used for or impacted by nuclear development or operations. The WL site employed up to 1100 staff. Site activities included the successful operation of a 60 MW organic liquid-cooled research reactor from 1965 to 1985, and various research programs including reactor safety research, small reactor development, fuel development, biophysics and radiation applications, as well as work under the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. In 1997, AECL made a business decision to discontinue research programs and operations at WL, and obtained government concurrence in 1998. The Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP) was established in 2006 by the Canadian Government to remediate nuclear legacy liabilities in a safe and cost effective manner, including the WL site. The NLLP is being implemented by AECL under the governance of a Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)/AECL Joint Oversight Committee (JOC). Significant progress has since been made, and the WL site currently holds the only Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) nuclear research site decommissioning license in Canada. The current decommissioning license is in place until the end of 2018. The present schedule planned for main campus decommissioning is 30 years (to 2037), followed by institutional control of the WMA until a National plan is implemented for the long-term management of nuclear waste. There is an impetus to advance work and complete decommissioning sooner. To accomplish this, AECL has added significant resources, reorganized and moved to a projectized environment. This presentation outlines changes made to the organization, the tools implemented to foster projectization, and the benefits and positive impacts on schedule and delivery. A revised organizational structure was implemented in two phases, starting 2011 April 1, to align WL staff with the common goal of decommissioning the site through the direction of the WL Decommissioning Project General Manager. On 2011 September 1, the second phase of the reorganization was implemented and WL Decommissioning staff was organized under five Divisions: Programs and Regulatory Compliance, General Site Services, Decommissioning Strategic Planning, Nuclear Facilities and Project Delivery. A new Mission, Vision and Objectives were developed for the project, and several productivity enhancements are being implemented. These include the use of an integrated and fully re-sourced Site Wide Schedule that is updated and reviewed at Plan-of-the-Week meetings, improved work distribution throughout the year, eliminating scheduling 'push' mentality, project scoreboards, work planning implementation, lean practices and various process improvement initiatives. A revised Strategic Plan is under development that reflects the improved project delivery capabilities. As a result of these initiatives, and a culture change towards a projectized approach, the decommissioning schedule will be advanced by approximately 10 years. (authors)

Wilcox, Brian; Mellor, Russ; Michaluk, Craig [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Whiteshell Laboratories, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Whiteshell Laboratories, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Estimating boiling water reactor decommissioning costs. A user`s manual for the BWR Cost Estimating Computer Program (CECP) software: Draft report for comment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the issuance of the Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1988), nuclear power plant licensees are required to submit to the U.S. Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. This user`s manual and the accompanying Cost Estimating Computer Program (CECP) software provide a cost-calculating methodology to the NRC staff that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals. The CECP, designed to be used on a personal computer, provides estimates for the cost of decommissioning BWR power stations to the point of license termination. Such cost estimates include component, piping, and equipment removal costs; packaging costs; decontamination costs; transportation costs; burial costs; and manpower costs. In addition to costs, the CECP also calculates burial volumes, person-hours, crew-hours, and exposure person-hours associated with decommissioning.

Bierschbach, M.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

EIS-0259: Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Cruiser, Ohio Class and Los Angeles Class Naval Reactor Plants, Hanford Site, Richland (adopted from Navy)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes the alternate ways for disposing of decommissioned, defieled reactor compliments from U.S. Navy nuclear-powered cruisers, (Bainbridge, Truxtun, Long Beach, California Class and Virginia Class) and Los Angeles Class, and Ohio Class submarines.

217

Suggestion of typical phases of in-vessel fuel-debris by thermodynamic calculation for decommissioning technology of Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the decommissioning of the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (1F), the characterization of fuel-debris in cores of Units 1-3 is necessary. In this study, typical phases of the in-vessel fuel-debris were estimated using a thermodynamic equilibrium (TDE) calculation. The FactSage program and NUCLEA database were applied to estimate the phase equilibria of debris. It was confirmed that the TDE calculation using the database can reproduce the phase separation behavior of debris observed in the Three Mile Island accident. In the TDE calculation of 1F, the oxygen potential [G(O{sub 2})] was assumed to be a variable. At low G(O{sub 2}) where metallic zirconium remains, (U,Zr)O{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}, and ZrO{sub 2} were found as oxides, and oxygen-dispersed Zr, Fe{sub 2}(Zr,U), and Fe{sub 3}UZr{sub 2} were found as metals. With an increase in zirconium oxidation, the mass of those metals, especially Fe{sub 3}UZr{sub 2}, decreased, but the other phases of metals hardly changed qualitatively. Consequently, (U,Zr)O{sub 2} is suggested as a typical phase of oxide, and Fe{sub 2}(Zr,U) is suggested as that of metal. However, a more detailed estimation is necessary to consider the distribution of Fe in the reactor pressure vessel through core-melt progression. (authors)

Ikeuchi, Hirotomo; Yano, Kimihiko; Kaji, Naoya; Washiya, Tadahiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1194 (Japan); Kondo, Yoshikazu; Noguchi, Yoshikazu [PESCO Co.Ltd. (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

theoretical and applied fracture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

theoretical and applied fracture mechanics ELSEVIER Theoretical and Applied Fracture Mechanics 00 and Applied Fracture Mechanics 00 (1995) 000-000 Recently, some European countries developed defect specific. A suitable probabilistic fracture mechanic

Cizelj, Leon

219

Information on Hydrologic Conceptual Models, Parameters, Uncertainty Analysis, and Data Sources for Dose Assessments at Decommissioning Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses issues related to the analysis of uncertainty in dose assessments conducted as part of decommissioning analyses. The analysis is limited to the hydrologic aspects of the exposure pathway involving infiltration of water at the ground surface, leaching of contaminants, and transport of contaminants through the groundwater to a point of exposure. The basic conceptual models and mathematical implementations of three dose assessment codes are outlined along with the site-specific conditions under which the codes may provide inaccurate, potentially nonconservative results. In addition, the hydrologic parameters of the codes are identified and compared. A methodology for parameter uncertainty assessment is outlined that considers the potential data limitations and modeling needs of decommissioning analyses. This methodology uses generic parameter distributions based on national or regional databases, sensitivity analysis, probabilistic modeling, and Bayesian updating to incorporate site-specific information. Data sources for best-estimate parameter values and parameter uncertainty information are also reviewed. A follow-on report will illustrate the uncertainty assessment methodology using decommissioning test cases.

Meyer, Philip D.; Gee, Glendon W.; Nicholson, Thomas J.

2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

220

Finding of no significant impact, decontamination and decommissioning of Battelle Columbus Laboratories in Columbus and West Jefferson, Ohio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment has been developed by the Department of Energy in accordance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 for the proposed decommissioning of contaminated areas at the Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, Ohio. The discussions in Section 1.0 provide general background information on the proposed action. Section 2.0 describes the existing radiological and non-radiological condition of the Battelle Columbus Laboratories. Section 3.0 identifies the alternatives considered for the proposed action and describes in detail the proposed decommissioning project. Section 4.0 evaluates the potential risks the project poses to human health and the environment. Section 5.0 presents the Department of Energy's proposed action. As a result of nuclear research and development activities conducted over a period of approximately 43 years performed for the Department of Energy, its predecessor agencies, and under commercial contracts, the 15 buildings became contaminated with varying amounts of radioactive material. The Department of Energy no longer has a need to utilize the facilities and is contractually obligate to remove that contamination such that they can be used by their owners without radiological restrictions. This Environmental Assessment for the Battelle Columbus Laboratories Decommissioning Project is consistent with the direction from the Secretary of Energy that public awareness and participation be considered in sensitive projects and is an appropriate document to determine action necessary to satisfy the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act. 30 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioning cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Allowable residual contamination levels for decommissioning the 115-F and 117-F facilities at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the results of a study sponsored by UNC Nuclear Industries to determine Allowable Residual Contamination Levels (ARCL) for the 115-F and 117-F facilities at the Hanford Site. The purpose of this study is to provide data useful to UNC engineers in conducting safety and cost comparisons for decommissioning alternatives. The ARCL results are based on a scenario/exposure-pathway analysis and compliance with an annual dose limit for three specific modes of future use of the land and facilities. These modes of use are restricted, controlled, and unrestricted. Information on restricted and controlled use is provided to permit a full consideration of decommissioning alternatives. Procedures are presented for modifying the ARCL values to accommodate changes in the radionuclide mixture or concentrations and to determine instrument responses for various mixtures of radionuclides. Finally, a comparison is made between existing decommissioning guidance and the ARCL values calculated for unrestricted release of the 115-F and 117-F facilities. The comparison shows a good agreement.

Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Napier, B.A.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Cost Estimating for Decommissioning of a Plutonium Facility--Lessons Learned From The Rocky Flats Building 771 Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Closure Site is implementing an aggressive approach in an attempt to complete Site closure by 2006. The replanning effort to meet this goal required that the life-cycle decommissioning effort for the Site and for the major individual facilities be reexamined in detail. As part of the overall effort, the cost estimate for the Building 771 decommissioning project was revised to incorporate both actual cost data from a recently-completed similar project and detailed planning for all activities. This paper provides a brief overview of the replanning process and the original estimate, and then discusses the modifications to that estimate to reflect new data, methods, and planning rigor. It provides the new work breakdown structure and discusses the reasons for the final arrangement chosen. It follows with the process used to assign scope, cost, and schedule elements within the new structure, and development of the new code of accounts. Finally, it describes the project control methodology used to track the project, and provides lessons learned on cost tracking in the decommissioning environment.

Stevens, J. L.; Titus, R.; Sanford, P. C.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

223

Facility Decontamination and Decommissioning Program Surveillance and Maintenance Plan, Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Plan describes the activities performed between deactivation and final decommissioning of the following facilities located on the Nevada National Security Site, as documented in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order under the Industrial Sites program as decontamination and decommissioning sites: ? Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (EMAD) Facility: o EMAD Building (Building 25-3900) o Locomotive Storage Shed (Building 25-3901) ? Test Cell C (TCC) Facility: o Equipment Building (Building 25-3220) o Motor Drive Building (Building 25-3230) o Pump Shop (Building 25-3231) o Cryogenic Lab (Building 25-3232) o Ancillary Structures (e.g., dewars, water tower, piping, tanks) These facilities have been declared excess and are in various stages of deactivation (low-risk, long-term stewardship disposition state). This S&M Plan establishes and implements a solid, cost-effective, and balanced S&M program consistent with federal, state, and regulatory requirements. A graded approach is used to plan and conduct S&M activities. The goal is to maintain the facilities in a safe condition in a cost-effective manner until their final end state is achieved. This plan accomplishes the following: ? Establishes S&M objectives and framework ? Identifies programmatic guidance for S&M activities to be conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) ? Provides present facility condition information and identifies hazards ? Identifies facility-specific S&M activities to be performed and their frequency ? Identifies regulatory drivers, NNSA/NFO policies and procedures, and best management practices that necessitate implementation of S&M activities ? Provides criteria and frequencies for revisions and updates ? Establishes the process for identifying and dispositioning a condition that has not been previously identified or documented ? Provides instructions for implementing annual S&M inspections and activities The following facilities that were included in Revision 1 of this plan have reached final disposition and are no longer in the S&M program: ? Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility, Building 25-3110 ? Test Cell A Facility, Building 25-3113 ? TCC Facility, Building 25-3210 ? Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 26-2201 ? Super Kukla Facility, Building 27-5400

Poderis, Reed J. [NSTec] [NSTec; King, Rebecca A. [NSTec] [NSTec

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

224

Implementation of 10 CFR 20.1406 Through Life Cycle Planning for Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes a regulatory guide that the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is currently developing for use in implementing Title 10, Section 20.1406, of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 20.1406), 'Minimization of Contamination'. The intent of the regulation is to diminish the occurrence and severity of 'legacy sites' by taking measures to reduce and control contamination and facilitate eventual decommissioning. The thrust of the regulatory guide is to encourage applicants to use technically sound engineering judgment and a practical risk-informed approach to achieve the objectives of 10 CFR 20.1406. In particular, such an approach should consider the materials and processes involved (e.g., solids, liquids, gases), and focus on (1) the relative significance of potential contamination, (2) areas that are most susceptible to leaks, and (3) the appropriate level of consideration that should be incorporated in facility design and operational procedures to prevent and control contamination. (authors)

O'Donnell, E.; Ott, W.R. [Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Technical program plan for the transitioning, decommissioning, and final disposition focus area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hundreds of aging nuclear materials processing facilities within the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Weapons Complex are now being shut down and deactivated. These facilities, situated throughout the United States, will require a monumental effort to clean up safely and with minimal environmental insult. Current cleanup technologies tend to be labor intensive and expensive, they produce an unacceptably large volume of waste, and they expose workers to radioactive and other hazardous substances. This document describes an emerging program designed to develop and demonstrate new technical approaches to the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) program for DOE`s nuclear materials processing facilities. Sponsored by the DOE Office of Technology Development within the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), the program seeks to integrate the strengths of DOE`s technical, managerial, and systems engineering capabilities with those of industry, universities, and other government agencies. Once developed, these technologies will help to provide US industry with a competitive edge in the worldwide market that exists for improved environmental restoration and D&D services.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Testing, expanding and implementing pollution prevention tools for environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pollution Prevention (P2) programs and projects within the DOE Environmental Restoration (ER) and Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Programs have been independently developed and implemented at various sites. As a result, unique, innovative solutions used at one site may not be known to other sites, and other sites may continue to duplicate efforts to develop and implement similar solutions. Several DOE Program offices have funded the development of tools to assist ER/D and D P2 projects. To realize the full value of these tools, they need to be evaluated and publicized to field sites. To address these needs and concerns, Sandia National Laboratory (SNL/NM), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-OR) have teamed to pilot test DOE training and tracking tools; transfer common P2 analyses between sites, and evaluate and expand P2 tools and methodologies. The project is supported by FY 98 DOE Pollution Prevention Complex-Wide Project Funds. This paper presents the preliminary results for each of the following project modules: Training, Waste Tracking Pilot, Information Exchange, Evaluate P2 Tools for ER/D and D, Field Test of P2 Tools; and DOE Information Exchange.

Roybal, J.A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McInroy, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Watson, J. [GTS Duratek, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mizner, J. [ICF Kaiser, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Decontamination and decommissioning of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR): Project final report, Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Final Report for the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of the Argonne National Laboratory - East (ANL-E) Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) facility contains the descriptions and evaluations of the activities and the results of the EBWR D&D project. It provides the following information: (1) An overall description of the ANL-E site and EBWR facility. (2) The history of the EBWR facility. (3) A description of the D&D activities conducted during the EBWR project. (4) A summary of the final status of the facility, including the final and confirmation surveys. (5) A summary of the final cost, schedule, and personnel exposure associated with the project, including a summary of the total waste generated. This project report covers the entire EBWR D&D project, from the initiation of Phase I activities to final project closeout. After the confirmation survey, the EBWR facility was released as a {open_quotes}Radiologically Controlled Area,{close_quotes} noting residual elevated activity remains in inaccessible areas. However, exposure levels in accessible areas are at background levels. Personnel working in accessible areas do not need Radiation Work Permits, radiation monitors, or other radiological controls. Planned use for the containment structure is as an interim transuranic waste storage facility (after conversion).

Fellhauer, C.R.; Boing, L.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Aldana, J. [NES, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Decontamination and decommissioning assessment for the Waste Incineration Facility (Building 232-Z) Hanford Site, [Hanford], WA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building 232-Z is an element of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. From 1961 until 1972, plutonium-bearing combustible materials were incinerated in the building. Between 1972 and 1983, following shutdown of the incinerator, the facility was used for waste segregation activities. The facility was placed in retired inactive status in 1984 and classified as a Limited Control Facility pursuant to DOE Order 5480.5, Safety of Nuclear Facilities, and 6430.1A, General Design Criteria. The current plutonium inventory within the building is estimated to be approximately 848 grams, the majority of which is retained within the process hood ventilation system. As a contaminated retired facility, Building 232-Z is included in the DOE Surplus Facility Management Program. The objective of this Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) assessment is to remove Building 232-Z, thereby elmininating the radiological and environmental hazards associated with the plutonium inventory within the structure. The steps to accomplish the plan objectives are: (1) identifying the locations of the most significant amounts of plutonium, (2) removing residual plutonium, (3) removing and decontaminating remaining building equipment, (4) dismantling the remaining structure, and (5) closing out the project.

Dean, L.N. [Advanced Sciences, Inc., (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

POSITION OPENING APPLIED STATISTICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Assistant or Associate Professor of Applied Statistics. Employment Beginning: September 16, 2012 DescriptionPOSITION OPENING APPLIED STATISTICS Department of Decision Sciences Charles H. Lundquist College at the University of Oregon is seeking to fill one tenure-track faculty position in Applied Statistics. Rank

Shepp, Larry

230

Applied quantum mechanics 1 Applied Quantum Mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that describe the time-dependent state . If can be expressed as a power series in the perturbing potential of a one dimensional har- monic oscillator. At time t = 0 a perturbation is applied where V0-dimensional rectangular potential well for which in the range and elsewhere. It is decided to control the state

Levi, Anthony F. J.

231

Decommissioning an Active Historical Reactor Facility at the Savannah River Site - 13453  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is an 802 square-kilometer United States Department of Energy (US DOE) nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina, where Management and Operations are performed by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS). In 2004, DOE recognized SRS as structure within the Cold War Historic District of national, state and local significance composed of the first generation of facilities constructed and operated from 1950 through 1989 to produce plutonium and tritium for our nation's defense. DOE agreed to manage the SRS 105-C Reactor Facility as a potentially historic property due to its significance in supporting the U.S. Cold War Mission and for potential for future interpretation. This reactor has five primary areas within it, including a Disassembly Basin (DB) that received irradiated materials from the reactor, cooled them and prepared the components for loading and transport to a Separation Canyon for processing. The 6,317 square meter area was divided into numerous work/storage areas. The walls between the individual basin compartments have narrow vertical openings called 'slots' that permit the transfer of material from one section to another. Data indicated there was over 830 curies of radioactivity associated with the basin sediments and approximately 9.1 M liters of contaminated water, not including a large quantity of activated reactor equipment, scrap metal, and debris on the basin floor. The need for an action was identified in 2010 to reduce risks to personnel in the facility and to eliminate the possible release of contaminants into the environment. The release of DB water could potentially migrate to the aquifer and contaminate groundwater. DOE, its regulators [U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)-Region 4 and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC)] and the SC Historical Preservation Office (SHPO) agreed/concurred to perform a non-time critical removal action for the In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) of the 105-C Disassembly Basin. ISD consisted of stabilization/isolation of remaining contaminated water, sediment, activated reactor equipment, and scrap metal by filling the DB with underwater non-structural grout to the appropriate (-4.877 meter) grade-level, thence with dry area non-structural grout to the final -10 centimeter level. The roof over the DB was preserved due to its potential historical significance and to prevent the infiltration of precipitation. Forced evaporation was the form of treatment implemented to remove the approximately 9.1 M liters of contaminated basin water. Using specially formulated grouts, irradiated materials and sediment were treated by solidification/isolation thus reducing their mobility, reducing radiation exposure and creating an engineered barrier thereby preventing access to the contaminants. Grouting provided a low permeability barrier to minimize any potential transport of contaminants to the aquifer. Efforts were made to preserve the historical significance of the Reactor in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act. ISD provides a cost effective means to isolate and contain residual radioactivity from past nuclear operations allowing natural radioactive decay to reduce hazards to manageable levels. This method limits release of radiological contamination to the environment, minimizes radiation exposure to workers, prevents human/animal access to the hazardous substances, and allows for ongoing monitoring of the decommissioned facility. Field construction was initiated in August 2011; evaporator operations commenced January 2012 and ended July 2012 with over 9 M liters of water treated/removed. Over 8,525 cubic meters of grout were placed, completing in August 2012. The project completed with an excellent safety record, on schedule and under budget. (authors)

Bergren, Christopher L.; Long, J. Tony; Blankenship, John K. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Adams, Karen M. [United States Department of Energy, Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [United States Department of Energy, Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Decommissioning of the remediation systems at Waverly, Nebraska, in 2011-2012.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility in Waverly, Nebraska, from 1952 to 1974. During this time, the grain fumigant '80/20' (carbon tetrachloride/carbon disulfide) was used to preserve stored grain. In 1982, sampling by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) found carbon tetrachloride contamination in the town's groundwater. After an investigation of the contaminant distribution, the site was placed on the National Priority List (NPL) in 1986, and the CCC/USDA accepted responsibility for the contamination. An Interagency Compliance Agreement between the EPA and the CCC/USDA was finalized in May 1988 (EPA 1990). The EPA (Woodward-Clyde Consultants, contractor) started immediate cleanup efforts in 1987 with the installation of an air stripper, a soil vapor extraction system, a groundwater extraction well, and groundwater and soil gas monitoring wells (Woodward-Clyde 1986, 1988a,b). After the EPA issued its Record of Decision (ROD; EPA 1990), the CCC/USDA (Argonne National Laboratory, contractor) took over operation of the treatment systems. The CCC/USDA conducted a site investigation (Argonne 1991, 1992a,b), during which a carbon tetrachloride plume in groundwater was discovered northeast of the former facility. This plume was not being captured by the existing groundwater extraction system. The remediation system was modified in 1994 (Argonne 1993) with the installation of a second groundwater extraction well to contain the contamination further. Subsequently, a detailed evaluation of the system resulted in a recommendation to pump only the second well to conserve water in the aquifer (Argonne 1995). Sampling and analysis after implementation of this recommendation showed continued decreases in the extent and concentrations of the contamination with only one well pumping (Argonne 1999). The CCC/USDA issued quarterly monitoring reports from 1988 to 2009. Complete documentation of the CCC/USDA characterization and remediation efforts, including the quarterly monitoring reports, is on the compact disc inside the back cover of this report. The EPA reported on the progress of the remediation systems in a series of five-year reviews (EPA 1993, 1999, 2004, 2009). These reports and other EPA documentation are also on the compact disc inside the back cover of this report, along with the Woodward-Clyde (1986, 1988a,b) documentation cited. Starting in 2006, the analytical results for groundwater (the only medium still being monitored) showed no carbon tetrachloride concentrations above the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5.0 g/L. Because the cleanup goals specified in the ROD (EPA 1990) had been met, the EPA removed the site from the NPL in November 2006 (Appendix A). In 2008 the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for the remediation system was deactivated, and a year later the EPA released its fourth and final five-year report (EPA 2009), indicating that no further action was required for the site and that the site was ready for unlimited use. In 2011-2012, the CCC/USDA decommissioned the remediation systems at Waverly. This report documents the decommission process and closure of the site.

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

233

Preliminary standard review guide for Environmental Restoration/Decontamination and Decommissioning safety analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The review guide is based on the shared experiences, approaches, and philosophies of the Environmental Restoration/Decontamination and Decommissioning (ER/D&D) subgroup members. It is presented in the form of a review guide to maximize the benefit to both the safety analyses practitioner and reviewer. The guide focuses on those challenges that tend to be unique to ER/D&D cleanup activities. Some of these experiences, approaches, and philosophies may find application or be beneficial to a broader spectrum of activities such as terminal cleanout or even new operations. Challenges unique to ER/D&D activities include (1) consent agreements requiring activity startup on designated dates; (2) the increased uncertainty of specific hazards; and (3) the highly variable activities covered under the broad category of ER/D&D. These unique challenges are in addition to the challenges encountered in all activities; e.g., new and changing requirements and multiple interpretations. The experiences in approaches, methods, and solutions to the challenges are documented from the practitioner and reviewer`s perspective, thereby providing the viewpoints on why a direction was taken and the concerns expressed. Site cleanup consent agreements with predetermined dates for restoration activity startup add the dimension of imposed punitive actions for failure to meet the date. Approval of the safety analysis is a prerequisite to startup. Actions that increase expediency are (1) assuring activity safety; (2) documenting that assurance; and (3) acquiring the necessary approvals. These actions increase the timeliness of startup and decrease the potential for punitive action. Improvement in expediency has been achieved by using safety analysis techniques to provide input to the line management decision process rather than as a review of line management decisions. Expediency is also improved by sharing the safety input and resultant decisions with reviewers and regulators.

Ellingson, D.R.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4. Volume 1: Technology evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During World War 11, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was built as part of the Manhattan Project to supply enriched uranium for weapons production. In 1945, Building 9201-4 (Alpha-4) was originally used to house a uranium isotope separation process based on electromagnetic separation technology. With the startup of the Oak Ridge K-25 Site gaseous diffusion plant In 1947, Alpha-4 was placed on standby. In 1953, the uranium enrichment process was removed, and installation of equipment for the Colex process began. The Colex process--which uses a mercury solvent and lithium hydroxide as the lithium feed material-was shut down in 1962 and drained of process materials. Residual Quantities of mercury and lithium hydroxide have remained in the process equipment. Alpha-4 contains more than one-half million ft{sup 2} of floor area; 15,000 tons of process and electrical equipment; and 23,000 tons of insulation, mortar, brick, flooring, handrails, ducts, utilities, burnables, and sludge. Because much of this equipment and construction material is contaminated with elemental mercury, cleanup is necessary. The goal of the Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4 is to provide a planning document that relates decontamination and decommissioning and waste management problems at the Alpha-4 building to the technologies that can be used to remediate these problems. The Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4 builds on the methodology transferred by the U.S. Air Force to the Environmental Management organization with DOE and draws from previous technology logic diagram-efforts: logic diagrams for Hanford, the K-25 Site, and ORNL.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Report on waste burial charges. Escalation of decommissioning waste disposal costs at low-level waste burial facilities, Revision 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the requirements placed upon nuclear power reactor licensees by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is for the licensees to periodically adjust the estimate of the cost of decommissioning their plants, in dollars of the current year, as part of the process to provide reasonable assurance that adequate funds for decommissioning will be available when needed. This report, which is scheduled to be revised periodically, contains the development of a formula for escalating decommissioning cost estimates that is acceptable to the NRC. The sources of information to be used in the escalation formula are identified, and the values developed for the escalation of radioactive waste burial costs, by site and by year, are given. The licensees may use the formula, the coefficients, and the burial escalation factors from this report in their escalation analyses, or they may use an escalation rate at least equal to the escalation approach presented herein. This fourth revision of NUREG-1307 contains revised spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference PWR and the reference BWR and the ratios of disposal costs at the Washington, Nevada, and South Carolina sites for the years 1986, 1988, 1991 and 1993, superseding the values given in the May 1993 issue of this report. Burial cost surcharges mandated by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA) have been incorporated into the revised ratio tables for those years. In addition, spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference reactors and ratios of disposal costs at the two remaining burial sites in Washington and South Carolina for the year 1994 are provided. These latter results do not include any LLRWPAA surcharges, since those provisions of the Act expired at the end of 1992. An example calculation for escalated disposal cost is presented, demonstrating the use of the data contained in this report.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Report on waste burial charges: Escalation of decommissioning waste disposal costs at Low-Level Waste Burial facilities. Revision 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the requirements placed upon nuclear power reactor licensees by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is for the licensees to periodically adjust the estimate of the cost of decommissioning their plants, in dollars of the current year, as part of the process to provide reasonable assurance that adequate funds for decommissioning will be available when needed. This report, which is scheduled to be revised periodically, contains the development of a formula for escalating decommissioning cost estimates that is acceptable to the NRC. The sources of information to be used in the escalation formula are identified, and the values developed for the escalation of radioactive waste burial costs, by site and by year, are given. The licensees may use the formula, the coefficients, and the burial escalation factors from this report in their escalation analyses, or they may use an escalation rate at least equal to the escalation approach presented herein. This fifth revision of NUREG-1307 contains revised spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference PWR and the reference BWR and the ratios of disposal costs at the Washington, Nevada, and South Carolina sites for the years 1986, 1988, 1991, 1993, and 1994, superseding the values given in the June 1994 issue of this report. Burial cost surcharges mandated by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA) have been incorporated into the revised ratio tables for those years. In addition, spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference reactors and ratios of disposal costs at the two remaining burial sites in Washington and South Carolina for the year 1995 are provided. These latter results do not include any LLRWPAA surcharges, since those provisions of the Act expired at the end of 1992. An example calculation for escalated disposal cost is presented, demonstrating the use of the data contained in this report.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

EIS-0259 Final Environmental Impact Statement On The Disposal Of Decommissioned, Defueled Cruiser, Ohio Class, And Los Angeles Class Naval Reactor Plants  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

-. -. 1. PURPOSE AND NEED U.S. Navy nuclear ships are decommissioned and defieled at the end of their usefi Metime, when the cost of continued operation is not justified by their fitary capabfity, or when the ship is no longer needed. The Navy needs to disposition the reactor compartments born defieled and decommissioned ctisers, and OHIO Class and LOS ANGELES Class submarines. The number of reactor compartments under consideration by this Environmental Impact Statement is about 100. These reactor compartments are in addition to the pre-LOS ANGELES Class submarines tieady being disposed of under the Na&s 1984 Find Environmental hpact Statement (USN, 1984a). Newer types of U.S. Navy nuclear-powered stips that are not expected to be decommissioned in the next 20 years (e.g., aircraft carriers, SEAWOLF Class submarines) are not included in this fid Enviromentd Impact Statement.

238

Decommissioning samples from the Ft. Lewis, WA, solvent refined coal pilot plant: chemical analysis and biological testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from chemical analyses and limited biological assays of three sets of samples from the Ft. Lewis, WA solvent refined coal (SRC) pilot plant. The samples were collected during the process of decommissioning this facility. Chemical composition was determined for chemical class fractions of the samples by using high-resolution gas chromatography (GC), high-resolution GC/mass spectrometry (MS) and high-resolution MS. Biological activity was measuring using both the histidine reversion microbial mutagenicity assay with Salmonella typhimurium, TA98 and an initiation/promotion mouse-skin tumorigenicity assay. 19 refs., 7 figs., 27 tabs.

Weimer, W.C.; Wright, C.W.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Analytical Chemistry Applied Mathematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analytical Chemistry Applied Mathematics Architectural Engineering Architecture Architecture Electricity Markets Environmental Engineering Food Process Engineering Food Safety & Technology Architecture Information Technology & Management Integrated Building Delivery Landscape Architecture Management

Heller, Barbara

240

How To Apply  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CSCEEE undergraduate students are encouraged to apply. Required Materials Current Resume Official University Transcript (with spring courses posted andor a copy of Spring...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioning cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

81 - 11590 of 31,917 results. 81 - 11590 of 31,917 results. Download CX-005261: Categorical Exclusion Determination Silver Creek Substation Fiber Project CX(s) Applied: B4.7 Date: 02/15/2011 Location(s): Lewis County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005261-categorical-exclusion-determination Download Decommissioning Benchmarking Study Final Report DOE's former Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) conducted a benchmarking study of its decommissioning program to analyze physical activities in facility decommissioning and to determine... http://energy.gov/em/downloads/decommissioning-benchmarking-study-final-report Download Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection Guidelines, Borehole Seals Design, and RD&D Needs

242

CX-002199: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

99: Categorical Exclusion Determination 99: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002199: Categorical Exclusion Determination 661-G, Small Arms Training Area (SATA) Complex Deactivation and Decommissioning CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 04/28/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office The Small Arms Training Area (SATA) complex is being consolidated with Arms Training Area (ATA) and reusable components of the complex will be relocated. The rest of the facilities will be deactivated and decommissioned in accordance with 1C manual procedures to reduce the foot print and landlord costs. This Environmental Evaluation Checklist (EEC) evaluates the deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of the complex. This evaluation focuses on the decommissioning of the SATA facilities under the

243

Applied Energy Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Applied Energy Programs Applied Energy Programs Applied Energy Programs Los Alamos is using its world-class scientific capabilities to enhance national energy security by developing energy sources with limited environmental impact and by improving the efficiency and reliability of the energy infrastructure. CONTACT US Acting Program Director Melissa Fox (505) 663-5538 Email Applied Energy Program Office serves as the hub connecting the Laboratory's scientific and technical resources to DOE sponsors, DoD programs, and to industry. The Applied Energy Program Office manages Los Alamos National Laboratory programs funded by the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Offices of Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy, Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, and Fossil Energy. With energy use increasing across the nation and the

244

Y-12 Plant decontamination and decommissioning technology logic diagram for Building 9201-4: Volume 2, Technology Logic Diagram  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4 (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) problems at 9201-4 to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD uses information from the Strategic Roadmap for the Oak Ridge Reservation, the Oak K-25 Site technology Logic Diagram, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram, and a previous Hanford logic diagram. This TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to D&D and waste management activities. It is essential that follow-on engineering studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in the TLD and by finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between the cost and risk. The TLD consists of three volumes. Volume 1 presents an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among the environmental management goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 contains the TLD data sheets.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Decontamination and decommissioning of the Chemical Process Cell (CPC): Topical report for the period January 1985-March 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To support interim storage of vitrified High-Level Waste (HLW) at the West Valley Demonstration Project, the shielded, remotely operated Chemical Process Cell (CPC) was decommissioned and decontaminated. All equipment was removed, packaged and stored for future size reduction and decontamination. Floor debris was sampled, characterized, and vacuumed into remotely handled containers. The cell walls, ceiling, and floor were decontaminated. Three 20 Mg (22.5 ton) concrete neutron absorber cores were cut with a high-pressure water/abrasive jet cutting system and packaged for disposal. All operations were performed remotely using two overhead bridge cranes which included two 1.8 Mg (2 ton) hoists, one 14.5 Mg (16 ton) hoist, and an electromechanical manipulator or an industrial robot mounted on a mobile platform. Initial general area dose rates in the cell ranged from 1 to 50 R/h. Target levels of less than 10 mR/h general area readings were established before decontamination and decommissioning was initiated; general area dose rates between 200 mR/h and 1200 mR/h were obtained at the completion of the decontamination work. 4 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

Meigs, R. A.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

AEROSPACE SCIENCES Applied aerodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AEROSPACE SCIENCES Applied aerodynamics This year saw significant progress in industry, research labs, and academia in the development of flow-control concepts, novel configuration aerodynamic concepts, and aerodynamic im- provement technologies for enhancing the fuel efficiency and performance

Xu, Kun

247

Applied large eddy simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2971-2983. doi:10.1098/rsta.2008.0303 . Audio Supplement Audio Supplement Audio files from the Applied large eddy simulation...fidelity. | Whittle Laboratory, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1PZ...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

A Radiological Survey Approach to Use Prior to Decommissioning: Results from a Technology Scanning and Assessment Project Focused on the Chornobyl NPP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objectives of this project are to learn how to plan and execute the Technology Scanning and Assessment (TSA) approach by conducting a project and to be able to provide the approach as a capability to the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) and potentially elsewhere. A secondary objective is to learn specifics about decommissioning and in particular about radiological surveying to be performed prior to decommissioning to help ChNPP decision makers. TSA is a multi-faceted capability that monitors and analyzes scientific, technical, regulatory, and business factors and trends for decision makers and company leaders. It is a management tool where information is systematically gathered, analyzed, and used in business planning and decision making. It helps managers by organizing the flow of critical information and provides managers with information they can act upon. The focus of this TSA project is on radiological surveying with the target being ChNPP's Unit 1. This reactor was stopped on November 30, 1996. At this time, Ukraine failed to have a regulatory basis to provide guidelines for nuclear site decommissioning. This situation has not changed as of today. A number of documents have been prepared to become a basis for a combined study of the ChNPP Unit 1 from the engineering and radiological perspectives. The results of such a study are expected to be used when a detailed decommissioning plan is created.

Milchikov, A.; Hund, G.; Davidko, M.

1999-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

249

Novel Problems Associated with Accounting and Control of Nuclear Material from Decontamination and Decommissioning and in Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract The reduction in nuclear arms and the production facilities that supported the weapons programs have produced some unique problems for nuclear material control and accountability (MC&A). Many of these problems are not limited to the weapons complex, but have the potential to appear in many legacy facilities as they undergo dismantlement and disposal. Closing facilities find that what was previously defined as product has become a waste stream bringing regulatory, human, and technological conflict. The sometimes unique compositions of these materials produce both storage and measurement problems. The nuclear material accounting and control programs have had to become very adaptive and preemptive to ensure control and protection is maintained. This paper examines some of the challenges to Safeguards generated by deinventory, decontamination decommissioning, dismantlement, demolition, and waste site remediation from predictable sources and some from unpredictable sources. 1.0 Introduction The United States is eliminating many facilities that support the nuclear weapons program. With the changing political conditions around the world and changes in military capabilities, the decreased emphasis on nuclear weapons has eliminated the need for many of the aging facilities. Additionally, the recovery of plutonium from dismantled weapons and reuse of components has eliminated the need to produce more plutonium for the near future. Because the nuclear weapons program and commercial applications generally do not mix in the United States, the facilities in the DOE complex that no longer have a weapon mission are being deinventoried, decontaminated, decommissioned, and dismantled/demolished. The materials from these activities are then disposed of in various ways but usually in select waste burial sites. Additionally, the waste in many historical burial sites associated with the weapons complex are being recovered, repackaged if necessary, and disposed of in either geological sites or low-level waste sites. The type of waste from the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities varies from uncontaminated construction materials to nuclear weapon components. This variety of forms, types, and composition of nuclear material presents many challenges to MC&A. It requires the creative application of regulations, but current regulations are adequate to ensure the security and control of the nuclear material. This paper examines some of the approaches used to meet regulatory requirements and problems that occurred during D&D. Experiences are drawn for the Hanford site and elsewhere in the DOE complex.

Schlegel, Steven C.

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

250

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

11 - 25020 of 31,917 results. 11 - 25020 of 31,917 results. Download CX-005847: Categorical Exclusion Determination Rocky Reach - Maple Valley Access Road Repair CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/05/2011 Location(s): King County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005847-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005772: Categorical Exclusion Determination C-Area Characterization CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 04/13/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005772-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005774: Categorical Exclusion Determination Decommissioning of Flow Through Filter Diesel Generators CX(s) Applied: B1.27 Date: 04/12/2011

251

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Legacy Management | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

December 22, 2011 December 22, 2011 CX-007752: Categorical Exclusion Determination Routine Activities at the Hallam, Nebraska, Decommissioned Reactor Site CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.24, B3.1 Date: 12/22/2011 Location(s): Nebraska Offices(s): Legacy Management December 14, 2011 CX-007441: Categorical Exclusion Determination Routine Actions at the Central Nevada Test Area CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B3.1 Date: 12/14/2011 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): Legacy Management December 13, 2011 CX-007440: Categorical Exclusion Determination Routine Maintenance Activities at the Grand Junction Regional Airport, Colorado, Calibration Model Facility CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.24 Date: 12/13/2011 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Legacy Management December 13, 2011 CX-007439: Categorical Exclusion Determination

252

Washington | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1, 2011 1, 2011 CX-006066: Categorical Exclusion Determination Outdoor Tests, Experiments on Materials and Equipment Components CX(s) Applied: B3.11 Date: 06/21/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Office of River Protection-Richland Office June 21, 2011 CX-006065: Categorical Exclusion Determination Siting, Construction, Operation and Decommissioning of Microbiological and Biomedical Facilities CX(s) Applied: B3.12 Date: 06/21/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Office of River Protection-Richland Office June 21, 2011 CX-006064: Categorical Exclusion Determination Actions to Conserve Energy CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 06/21/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Office of River Protection-Richland Office June 20, 2011 CX-006089: Categorical Exclusion Determination

253

FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7, 2009 7, 2009 CX-000410: Categorical Exclusion Determination Deepwater Riserless Intervention System CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 12/17/2009 Location(s): Houston, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 16, 2009 CX-000375: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hydrogen Separation for Clean Coal CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 12/16/2009 Location(s): Laramie, Wyoming Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 15, 2009 CX-000464: Categorical Exclusion Determination Decommissioning of the Low-Pressure Water Tunnel Facility (LWTF) CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B1.23 Date: 12/15/2009 Location(s): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 11, 2009 CX-000462: Categorical Exclusion Determination

254

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

15, 2013 15, 2013 CX-010034: Categorical Exclusion Determination Deactivation and Decommissioning of Soil Vapor Extraction Units CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 01/15/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office January 15, 2013 CX-010033: Categorical Exclusion Determination Savannah River National Laboratory Electrolyzer 30 weight % Sulfuric Acid pH Adjustment CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/15/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office January 15, 2013 CX-010032: Categorical Exclusion Determination Separation of the Minor Actinides from the Lanthanides with Magnetic Fields CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/15/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office January 15, 2013 CX-009928: Categorical Exclusion Determination

255

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: South Carolina | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 18, 2012 June 18, 2012 CX-008629: Categorical Exclusion Determination Remove Roof Over the North-east Spill Basin 235-F CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 06/18/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office June 18, 2012 CX-008628: Categorical Exclusion Determination Decommissioning and Demolition (D&D) of 681-11N CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 06/18/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office June 7, 2012 CX-008631: Categorical Exclusion Determination Relocate Handi-House SRS-PB-01318 and Six Sealands from A-Area to N-Area Excess Area CX(s) Applied: B1.22 Date: 06/07/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office June 7, 2012 CX-008630: Categorical Exclusion Determination Surface Water and Groundwater Sampling Pen Branch Floodplain near Chemicals

256

Washington | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

26, 2010 26, 2010 CX-003272: Categorical Exclusion Determination Washington-City-Everett CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.32, B5.1 Date: 07/26/2010 Location(s): Everett, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy July 23, 2010 EIS-0119: Amended Record of Decision Decommissioning of Eight Surplus Production Reactors at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington July 22, 2010 CX-003234: Categorical Exclusion Determination Demolition of Vacant House at Bonneville Power Administration's Ross Complex CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 07/22/2010 Location(s): Clark County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration July 21, 2010 CX-003236: Categorical Exclusion Determination Augspurger Fiber Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.7, B4.7 Date: 07/21/2010 Location(s): Skamania County, Washington

257

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1, 2011 1, 2011 CX-006067: Categorical Exclusion Determination Indoor Bench-Scale Research Projects and Conventional Laboratory Operations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/21/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Office of River Protection-Richland Office June 21, 2011 CX-006066: Categorical Exclusion Determination Outdoor Tests, Experiments on Materials and Equipment Components CX(s) Applied: B3.11 Date: 06/21/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Office of River Protection-Richland Office June 21, 2011 CX-006065: Categorical Exclusion Determination Siting, Construction, Operation and Decommissioning of Microbiological and Biomedical Facilities CX(s) Applied: B3.12 Date: 06/21/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Office of River Protection-Richland Office

258

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.6 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

19, 2010 19, 2010 CX-004494: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy and Daylighting Demonstration & Assessment of Sunlight Responsive Thermochromic Window Systems CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 11/19/2010 Location(s): Jenison, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 19, 2010 CX-004489: Categorical Exclusion Determination Thai Process for Heavy Oil CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/19/2010 Location(s): Laramie, Wyoming Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 19, 2010 CX-004487: Categorical Exclusion Determination Decommission of Combustion Environmental Research Facility CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/19/2010 Location(s): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

259

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

31 - 21940 of 31,917 results. 31 - 21940 of 31,917 results. Download CX-008284: Categorical Exclusion Determination E85 (Ethanol) Retail Fueling Infrastructure Installation CX(s) Applied: B5.22 Date: 05/01/2012 Location(s): Florida Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008284-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-008288: Categorical Exclusion Determination Decommissioning of the Appliance Testing and Evaluation Center in Morgantown CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/01/2012 Location(s): West Virginia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008288-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-008289: Categorical Exclusion Determination Scale-Up of Hydrogen Transport Membranes CX(s) Applied: A9

260

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 24, 2012 July 24, 2012 CX-009067: Categorical Exclusion Determination Deactivation and Decommissioning of the D-Area Detritiation Cells and Relocation of Associated Handi-Houses CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 07/24/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office July 24, 2012 CX-009066: Categorical Exclusion Determination Characterization of Downgradient Volatile Organic Compounds Plume and Installation of Monitoring Well CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 07/24/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office July 24, 2012 CX-009065: Categorical Exclusion Determination Installation of Sentinel Wells ASB011B/011C for A-2 Air Stripper Shutdown CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 07/24/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

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261

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: South Carolina | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6, 2011 6, 2011 CX-007054: Categorical Exclusion Determination Construction of a Mock-up of the Mixed Oxide Aqueous Polishing Building Active Gallery on the 249-F Pad CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 09/06/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 6, 2011 CX-007051: Categorical Exclusion Determination Decommissioning and Demolition (D&D) of 681-11N Pumphouse CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 09/06/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 2, 2011 CX-007059: Categorical Exclusion Determination Design and Construct H Tank Farm East Hill Utilities Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09/02/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina

262

FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

14, 2010 14, 2010 CX-001594: Categorical Exclusion Determination B-29/B-31 and Related Equipment Non-Permitted Operations and Decommissioning CX(s) Applied: B1.16, B3.6 Date: 04/14/2010 Location(s): Albany, Oregon Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 12, 2010 CX-001618: Categorical Exclusion Determination Congressionally Directed Project (CDP) Award. Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology CX(s) Applied: B3.6, A1 Date: 04/12/2010 Location(s): Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 12, 2010 CX-001616: Categorical Exclusion Determination Analysis of Multiple Pathways for Converting Coal to Liquid Transportation Fuels CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/12/2010 Location(s): Grand Forks, North Dakota

263

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9, 2012 9, 2012 CX-007821: Categorical Exclusion Determination Routine Activities at the Site A/Plot M, Illinois, Decommissioned Reactor Site CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B3.1 Date: 02/09/2012 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Legacy Management February 9, 2012 CX-007846: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas - City - Mesquite CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 02/09/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy February 9, 2012 CX-007961: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fabrication of Alloys With Trace Depleted Uranium in 1750 C Tube Furnace With Argon Cover in D-0142 CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/09/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office February 9, 2012 CX-007820: Categorical Exclusion Determination

264

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

21 - 25630 of 28,560 results. 21 - 25630 of 28,560 results. Download CX-010028: Categorical Exclusion Determination Flame Forming Proppants CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/17/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010028-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-010030: Categorical Exclusion Determinationc Power to H-1Y Laydown Yard CX(s) Applied: B2.1 Date: 01/17/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010030-categorical-exclusion-determinationc Download CX-010031: Categorical Exclusion Determination Deactivation and Decommissioning of Soil Vapor Extraction Units CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 01/17/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

265

FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

19, 2010 19, 2010 CX-003045: Categorical Exclusion Determination Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Simulations of a Regenerative Process for Carbon Dioxide Capture in Advanced Gasification Based Systems CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/19/2010 Location(s): Chicago, Illinois Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory July 15, 2010 CX-003070: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gas Process Development Unit (GPDU)/Syngas (Synthetic Gas) Generator Decommissioning CX(s) Applied: B1.23, B1.27, B1.31, B3.6 Date: 07/15/2010 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory July 13, 2010 CX-003039: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Temperature Chemical Sensors for Energy Research CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/13/2010

266

West Virginia | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

May 13, 2010 May 13, 2010 CX-002246: Categorical Exclusion Determination Decommission of B4, 112, Atmospheric Cold Flow Laboratory CX(s) Applied: B1.24, B1.27, B1.31 Date: 05/13/2010 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 13, 2010 CX-002573: Categorical Exclusion Determination Millsop Community Center Energy Reduction Renovations CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B1.4, B5.1 Date: 05/13/2010 Location(s): Weirton, West Virginia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy May 10, 2010 CX-002372: Categorical Exclusion Determination Building 17 and 19 Utility Meter Install CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B2.2 Date: 05/10/2010 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory April 23, 2010 Recycling Energy Yields Super Savings

267

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.1 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

February 9, 2012 February 9, 2012 CX-007822: Categorical Exclusion Determination Routine Activities at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR), California, Site CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B3.1 Date: 02/09/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): Legacy Management February 9, 2012 CX-007821: Categorical Exclusion Determination Routine Activities at the Site A/Plot M, Illinois, Decommissioned Reactor Site CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B3.1 Date: 02/09/2012 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Legacy Management February 9, 2012 CX-007820: Categorical Exclusion Determination Routine Site Activities and Seismic Survey at Gnome-Coach Site, New Mexico CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B3.1 Date: 02/09/2012 Location(s): New Mexico Offices(s): Legacy Management January 19, 2012 CX-007540: Categorical Exclusion Determination

268

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

29, 2011 29, 2011 CX-005666: Categorical Exclusion Determination DeKalb County/Metropolitan Atlanta Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Project CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1 Date: 04/29/2011 Location(s): Marrow, Georgia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 29, 2011 CX-005664: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development and Testing of Compact Heat Exchange Reactors (CHER) for Synthesis of Liquid Fuels CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/29/2011 Location(s): Laramie, Wyoming Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 29, 2011 CX-005663: Categorical Exclusion Determination Vortex Tube Project Decommissioning Project CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/29/2011 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia

269

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

January 18, 2010 January 18, 2010 CX-000707: Categorical Exclusion Determination Florida - Clean Fuel LLC (Shovel Ready Grant project) State Energy Program CX(s) Applied: B1.24, B1.31, B2.2, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 01/18/2010 Location(s): Lakeland, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 18, 2010 CX-000731: Categorical Exclusion Determination Building 4 Equipment Decommissioning CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/18/2010 Location(s): Albany, Oregon Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 15, 2010 CX-000704: Categorical Exclusion Determination Electric Drive Semiconductor Manufacturing Center - Advanced Battery Program CX(s) Applied: B1.24, B1.31 Date: 01/15/2010 Location(s): Youngwood, Pennsylvania

270

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: West Virginia | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1, 2012 1, 2012 CX-008273: Categorical Exclusion Determination Install New Parking Lot Area Over Old Concrete Slab by Daycare at Morgantown National Energy Technology Laboratory Site CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B1.24 Date: 05/11/2012 Location(s): West Virginia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory May 9, 2012 CX-008279: Categorical Exclusion Determination Building 8 Compressor Aftercooler Rupture Disc Overflow Piping Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.15 Date: 05/09/2012 Location(s): West Virginia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory May 1, 2012 CX-008288: Categorical Exclusion Determination Decommissioning of the Appliance Testing and Evaluation Center in Morgantown CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/01/2012 Location(s): West Virginia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

271

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Texas | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

22, 2010 22, 2010 CX-002211: Categorical Exclusion Determination Deactivation and Decommissioning of the North Compost Tent CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 04/22/2010 Location(s): Amarillo, Texas Office(s): NNSA-Headquarters, Pantex Site Office April 22, 2010 CX-001693: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development for a Smart MicroGrid Testbed CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B4.4, B5.1 Date: 04/22/2010 Location(s): Arlington, Texas Office(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 22, 2010 CX-001681: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04/22/2010 Location(s): Austin, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 21, 2010 CX-002096: Categorical Exclusion Determination

272

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Oregon | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

January 18, 2010 January 18, 2010 CX-000731: Categorical Exclusion Determination Building 4 Equipment Decommissioning CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/18/2010 Location(s): Albany, Oregon Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 7, 2010 CX-000601: Categorical Exclusion Determination New Revenue Meters at Central Lincoln's Florence and Berrydale Substations CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 01/07/2010 Location(s): Lane County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration January 7, 2010 CX-000602: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tillamook-Oceanside, 115-kilovolt Substation Interconnection CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 01/07/2010 Location(s): Tillamook County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration December 2, 2009 CX-000012: Categorical Exclusion Determination

273

FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

43: Categorical Exclusion Determination 43: Categorical Exclusion Determination Site Characterization for Carbon Dioxide Storage from Coal-fired Power Facilities in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 01/22/2010 Location(s): Tuscaloosa, Alabama Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 18, 2010 CX-000731: Categorical Exclusion Determination Building 4 Equipment Decommissioning CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/18/2010 Location(s): Albany, Oregon Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 15, 2010 CX-000730: Categorical Exclusion Determination Skyonic Beneficial Carbon Dioxide Use Project: Interagency Coordinating Committees (ICCs) Area of Interest 2; Phase 1 only CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11 Date: 01/15/2010 Location(s): San Antonio, Texas

274

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.1 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

January 10, 2012 January 10, 2012 CX-007545: Categorical Exclusion Determination Deepwater Offshore Bat and Avian Monitoring Program CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.3, B3.16 Date: 01/10/2012 Location(s): Maine Offices(s): Golden Field Office January 9, 2012 CX-007546: Categorical Exclusion Determination Management and Analysis of Extreme Wave and Ice Action in the Great Lakes for Offshore Wind Platform Design CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 01/09/2012 Location(s): Michigan Offices(s): Golden Field Office December 22, 2011 CX-007754: Categorical Exclusion Determination Routine Site Activities at the Rulison, Colorado, Site CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 12/22/2011 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Legacy Management December 22, 2011 CX-007752: Categorical Exclusion Determination Routine Activities at the Hallam, Nebraska, Decommissioned Reactor Site

275

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Environmental Management | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

April 28, 2010 April 28, 2010 CX-002201: Categorical Exclusion Determination Iodine Speciation CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/28/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office April 28, 2010 CX-002199: Categorical Exclusion Determination 661-G, Small Arms Training Area (SATA) Complex Deactivation and Decommissioning CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 04/28/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office April 28, 2010 CX-002544: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bubbler Upgrade Support - Defense Waste Processing Facility CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/28/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office April 28, 2010

276

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: West Virginia | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 15, 2010 July 15, 2010 CX-003070: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gas Process Development Unit (GPDU)/Syngas (Synthetic Gas) Generator Decommissioning CX(s) Applied: B1.23, B1.27, B1.31, B3.6 Date: 07/15/2010 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory July 8, 2010 CX-002903: Categorical Exclusion Determination High-Temperature Nano-Derived Micro-H2 (Hydrogen) and -H2S (Hydrogen Sulfide) Sensors CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/08/2010 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 21, 2010 CX-002726: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency in State Buildings: Health and Human Resources CX(s) Applied: B1.24, B1.28, B1.31, B2.2, A9, B1.5, B5.1

277

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Fossil Energy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

29, 2011 29, 2011 CX-005664: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development and Testing of Compact Heat Exchange Reactors (CHER) for Synthesis of Liquid Fuels CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/29/2011 Location(s): Laramie, Wyoming Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 29, 2011 CX-005663: Categorical Exclusion Determination Vortex Tube Project Decommissioning Project CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/29/2011 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 29, 2011 CX-005662: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Use of Scrap Tires for Oil Well Stimulation CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 04/29/2011 Location(s): Upper Falls, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

278

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Fossil Energy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 19, 2010 July 19, 2010 CX-003045: Categorical Exclusion Determination Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Simulations of a Regenerative Process for Carbon Dioxide Capture in Advanced Gasification Based Systems CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/19/2010 Location(s): Chicago, Illinois Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory July 15, 2010 CX-003070: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gas Process Development Unit (GPDU)/Syngas (Synthetic Gas) Generator Decommissioning CX(s) Applied: B1.23, B1.27, B1.31, B3.6 Date: 07/15/2010 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory July 13, 2010 CX-003039: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Temperature Chemical Sensors for Energy Research CX(s) Applied: B3.6

279

Applied Science/Techniques  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Applied Science/Techniques Applied Science/Techniques Applied Science/Techniques Print The ALS is an excellent incubator of new scientific techniques and instrumentation. Many of the technical advances that make the ALS a world-class soft x-ray facility are developed at the ALS itself. The optical components in use at the ALS-mirrors and lenses optimized for x-ray wavelengths-require incredibly high-precision surfaces and patterns (often formed through extreme ultraviolet lithography at the ALS) and must undergo rigorous calibration and testing provided by beamlines and equipment from the ALS's Optical Metrology Lab and Berkeley Lab's Center for X-Ray Optics. New and/or continuously improved experimental techniques are also a crucial element of a thriving scientific facility. At the ALS, examples of such "technique" highlights include developments in lensless imaging, soft x-ray tomography, high-throughput protein analysis, and high-power coherent terahertz radiation.

280

Information Science, Computing, Applied Math  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities ISC Applied Math science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Information Science, Computing, Applied Math National security depends on science and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioning cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Environmental assessment for the construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Waste Segregation Facility at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction, operation and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the Waste Segregation Facility (WSF) for the sorting, shredding, and compaction of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) located near Aiken, South Carolina. The LLW to be processed consists of two waste streams: legacy waste which is currently stored in E-Area Vaults of SRS and new waste generated from continuing operations. The proposed action is to construct, operate, and D&D a facility to process low-activity job-control and equipment waste for volume reduction. The LLW would be processed to make more efficient use of low-level waste disposal capacity (E-Area Vaults) or to meet the waste acceptance criteria for treatment at the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at SRS.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Rosie - mobile robot worksystem for decommissioning and dismantling operations. Final report, April 1, 1996--January 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RedZone Robotics, Inc. has undertaken development of an advanced remote worksystem - Rosie - specifically designed to meet the challenges of performing a wide range of decontamination and dismantlement (D&D) operations in nuclear environments. The Rosie worksystem includes a locomotor, heavy manipulator, operator console, and control system for remote operations. The locomotor is a highly mobile platform with tether management and hydraulic power onboard. The heavy manipulator is a high-payload, long-reach boom used to deploy a wide variety of tools and/or sensors into the work area. Rosie`s advanced control system, broad work capabilities, and hardening/reliability for hazardous duty make it a new and unique capability that facilitates completion of significant cleanup projects throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) and private sector. Endurance testing of the first Rosie system from September 1995 to March 1996 has proven its capabilities and appropriateness for D&D applications. Design enhancements were incorporated into the second Rosie system to improve and add features necessary for deployment at a DOE facility decommissioning. This second Rosie unit was deployed to the Argonne National Laboratory`s CP-5 reactor facility in early December 1996, and it is currently being used in the decommissioning of the reactor there. This report will overview this second Rosie system and the design enhancements made to it based on the lessons learned during the design, fabrication, and testing of the first Rosie system. The Rosie system has been designed to be a versatile and adaptable tool that can be used in many different applications in D&D work at nuclear facilities. It can carry a wide variety of tooling, sensors, and other robotic equipment at the tip of its heavy manipulator, and it can deploy those items to many different hazardous work areas. Rosie`s capabilities and system design address the need for durability and reliability in these environments.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

283

SUSTAINABILITY WHO CAN APPLY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FUNDED BY CALL FOR SUSTAINABILITY RESEARCH STUDENT WHO CAN APPLY Undergraduate and graduate Participate in the Global Change & Sustainability Center's Research Symposium; attend workshops with faculty or publish in the U's student-run sustainability publication to be released in May 2014. Are you conducting

284

Statement of Intent by The United States Department of Energy and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited in the Field of Used Fuel and Radioactive Waste Management, Decommissioning and Environmental Restoration  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Statement of Intent by The United States Department of Energy and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited in the Field of Used Fuel and Radioactive Waste Management, Decommissioning and Environmental Restoration.

285

Applied Science/Techniques  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Applied Science/Techniques Print Applied Science/Techniques Print The ALS is an excellent incubator of new scientific techniques and instrumentation. Many of the technical advances that make the ALS a world-class soft x-ray facility are developed at the ALS itself. The optical components in use at the ALS-mirrors and lenses optimized for x-ray wavelengths-require incredibly high-precision surfaces and patterns (often formed through extreme ultraviolet lithography at the ALS) and must undergo rigorous calibration and testing provided by beamlines and equipment from the ALS's Optical Metrology Lab and Berkeley Lab's Center for X-Ray Optics. New and/or continuously improved experimental techniques are also a crucial element of a thriving scientific facility. At the ALS, examples of such "technique" highlights include developments in lensless imaging, soft x-ray tomography, high-throughput protein analysis, and high-power coherent terahertz radiation.

286

for Applied Linguistics.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

per calendar year, promptly at intervals of three months. Each pack is to contain two numbers of the Finite String. The difficulties of the first year of publication of AJCL are responsible for the d'elayed, production of this ~ack, which also contains Volume 11, Number 4 of TFS. ~k would be a rash editor indeed who guaranteed promptness without caveat. The present editbr must warn the subscriber that'the end of the diLf.iculti-es is not yet fixed for a date certa.in. AMERICAN JQURNAL OF COMPL'TATIONAL LINGUISTICS is published by the Center for Applied Linguistics for the Association for Computational Linguistics.

Assistant Nancy Jokovl Ch

287

Revised Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environmental Impact Statement for Environmental Impact Statement for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center A Summary and Guide for Stakeholders DOE/EIS-0226-D (Revised) November 2008 The West Valley Site Availability of the Revised Draft EIS for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center For further information on this Draft EIS, or to request a copy please contact: Cathern Bohan, EIS Document Manager West Valley Demonstration Project U.S. Department of Energy Ashford Office Complex 9030 Route 219 West Valley, NY 14171 Telephone: 716-942-4159 Fax: 716-942-4703 E-mail: catherine.m.bohan@wv.doe.gov Printed with soy ink on recycled paper

288

Final EIS for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the WVDP and Western New York Nuclear Service Center  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE/EIS-0226 DOE/EIS-0226 January 2010 Final Environmental Impact Statement for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center A Summary and Guide for Stakeholders The West Valley Site Availability of the Final EIS for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center For further information on this Final EIS, or to request a copy of the EIS or references, please contact: Catherine Bohan, EIS Document Manager West Valley Demonstration Project U.S. Department of Energy Ashford Office Complex 9030 Route 219 West Valley, NY 14171 Telephone: 716-942-4159 Fax: 716-942-4703 E-mail: catherine.m.bohan@wv.doe.gov

289

Implementation of 10 CFR 20.1406, Regarding Minimizing Contamination and the Generation of Waste, and Facilitating Decommissioning through the Design of Facilities and Operating Procedures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the very near future (perhaps as soon as the fall of 2007), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) anticipates receiving one or more license applications for new nuclear power plants. An important consideration for new facilities is that they be designed and operated to minimize contamination, to minimize the generation of waste, and to facilitate decommissioning. A relatively recent regulation, 10 CFR 20.1406, mandates these requirements. The regulation states, 'Applicants for licenses, other than renewals, after August 20, 1997, shall describe in the application how facility design and procedures for operation will minimize, to the extent practicable, contamination of the facility and the environment, facilitate eventual decommissioning, and minimize, to the extent practicable, the generation of radioactive waste'. This paper summarizes various initiatives taken by the NRC and industry to develop guidance for implementing 10 CFR 20.1406 before submission of license applications. (authors)

O'Donnell, E.; Ott, W.R. [Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Applied Optoelectronics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Optoelectronics Jump to: navigation, search Name: Applied Optoelectronics Place: Sugar Land, Texas Zip: 77478 Product: Applied Optoelectronics designs, develops, and manufactures...

291

ORISE: Applied health physics projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Applied health physics projects The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides applied health physics services to government agencies needing technical support...

292

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Main report, draft report for comment. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On June 27, 1988, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published in the Federal Register (53 FR 24018) the final rule for the General Requirements for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities. With the issuance of the final rule, owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the NRC for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of updated bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB alternatives, which now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste. Costs for labor, transport, and disposal activities are given in 1993 dollars. Sensitivities of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances are also examined.

Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Promoter Decommissioning by the NuRD Chromatin Remodeling Complex Triggers Synaptic Connectivity in the Mammalian Brain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary Precise control of gene expression plays fundamental roles in brain development, but the roles of chromatin regulators in neuronal connectivity have remained poorly understood. We report that depletion of the NuRD complex by invivo \\{RNAi\\} and conditional knockout of the core NuRD subunit Chd4 profoundly impairs the establishment of granule neuron parallel fiber/Purkinje cell synapses in the rodent cerebellar cortex invivo. By interfacing genome-wide sequencing of transcripts and ChIP-seq analyses, we uncover a network of repressed genes and distinct histone modifications at target gene promoters that are developmentally regulated by the NuRD complex in the cerebellum invivo. Finally, in a targeted invivo \\{RNAi\\} screen of NuRD target genes, we identify a program of NuRD-repressed genes that operate as critical regulators of presynaptic differentiation in the cerebellar cortex. Our findings define NuRD-dependent promoter decommissioning as a developmentally regulated programming mechanism that drives synaptic connectivity in the mammalian brain.

Tomoko Yamada; Yue Yang; Martin Hemberg; Toshimi Yoshida; HaYoung Cho; J.Patrick Murphy; Diasynou Fioravante; WadeG. Regehr; StevenP. Gygi; Katia Georgopoulos; Azad Bonni

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Final report on decommissioning of wells, boreholes, and tiltmeter sites, Gulf Coast Interior Salt Domes of Louisiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the late 1970s, test holes were drilled in northern Louisiana in the vicinity of Vacherie and Rayburn`s Salt Domes as part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) (rename the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM)) program. The purpose of the program was to evaluate the suitability of salt domes for long term storage or disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The Institute for Environmental Studies at Louisiana State University (IES/LSU) and Law Engineering Testing Company (LETCo) of Marietta, Georgia performed the initial field studies. In 1982, DOE awarded a contract to the Earth Technology Corporation (TETC) of Long Beach, California to continue the Gulf Coast Salt Dome studies. In 1986, DOE deferred salt domes from further consideration as repository sites. This report describes test well plugging and site abandonment activities performed by SWEC in accordance with Activity Plan (AP) 1--3, Well Plugging and Site Restoration of Work Sites in Louisiana. The objective of the work outlined in this AP was to return test sites to as near original condition as possible by plugging boreholes, removing equipment, regrading, and seeding. Appendices to this report contain forms required by State of Louisiana, used by SWEC to document decommissioning activities, and pertinent documentation related to lease/access agreements.

Not Available

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Department of Energy`s Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund fiscal year 1997 financial statement audit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants` audit of the Department of Energy`s Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund (D&D Fund) financial statements as of September 30, 1997. The auditors have expressed an unqualified opinion on the 1997 statement of financial position and the related statements of operations and changes in net position and cash flows. The 1997 financial statement audit was made under provisions of the Inspector General Act (5 U.S.C. App.) as amended, the Government Management Reform Act (31 U.S.C. 3515), and Office of Management and Budget implementing guidance. The auditor`s work was conducted in accordance with generally accepted government auditing standards. To fulfill our audit responsibilities, we contracted with the independent public accounting firm of KPMG Peat Marwick LLP (KPMG) to conduct the audit for us, subject to our review. The auditors` report on the D&D Fund`s internal control structure disclosed no reportable conditions. The auditors` report on compliance with laws and regulations disclosed one instance of noncompliance. This instance of noncompliance relates to the shortfall in Government appropriations. Since this instance was addressed in a previous audit, no further recommendation is made at this time. During the course of the audit, KPMG also identified other matters that, although not material to the financial statements, nevertheless, warrant management`s attention. These items are fully discussed in a separate letter to management.

NONE

1998-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

296

School of Applied Technology School of Applied Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

School of Applied Technology School of Applied Technology Daniel F. and Ada L. Rice Campus Illinois Institute of Technology 201 E. Loop Road Wheaton, IL 60187 630.682.6000 www.iit.edu/applied tech/ Dean and Academic Director, Information Technology and Management Programs: C. Robert Carlson Director of Operations

Heller, Barbara

297

School of Applied Technology School of Applied Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

School of Applied Technology School of Applied Technology Daniel F. and Ada L. Rice Campus Illinois Institute of Technology 201 E. Loop Road Wheaton, IL 60187 630.682.6000 www.iit.edu/applied tech/ Dean Technology and Management Programs: Mazin Safar Director, Marketing & Development: Scott Pfeiffer Director

Heller, Barbara

298

CX-000492: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: Categorical Exclusion Determination 2: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000492: Categorical Exclusion Determination Reactor In Situ Decommissioning Grout Sample Preparation and Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/20/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office The Reactor In Situ Decommissioning Grout Sample and Testing task supports the Reactor In Situ Decommissioning Projects. The grout sample preparation and testing activities will be performed at the Civil Engineering Materials Testing Laboratory, 717-5N. All testing activities will use current industry standards and no hazardous and/or radiological materials will be used during the sample preparation and testing. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-000492.pdf More Documents & Publications

299

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

51 - 25760 of 28,904 results. 51 - 25760 of 28,904 results. Page Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) As the DOE complex sites prepare for closure, a large number of buildings and facilities must be deactivated and decommissioned. http://energy.gov/em/decontamination-decommissioning-facilities-engineering-ddfe Download CX-008574: Categorical Exclusion Determination University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Anaerobic Dry Digestion Facility CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.20 Date: 05/31/2012 Location(s): Wisconsin Offices(s): Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008574-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-008582: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bay Area Photovoltaics Consortium, Photovoltaic (PV) Manufacturing Initiative - Core Subawards

300

REGULATORY STRATEGIES TO MINIMIZE GENERATION OF REGULATED WASTES FROM CLEANUP, CONTINUED USE OR DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR FACILITIES CONTAMINATED WITH POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBS) - 11198  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal costs for liquid PCB radioactive waste are among the highest of any category of regulated waste. The high cost is driven by the fact that disposal options are extremely limited. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) regulations require most liquids with PCBs at concentration of {ge} 50 parts-per-million to be disposed by incineration or equivalent destructive treatment. Disposal fees can be as high as $200 per gallon. This figure does not include packaging and the cost to transport the waste to the disposal facility, or the waste generator's labor costs for managing the waste prior to shipment. Minimizing the generation of liquid radioactive PCB waste is therefore a significant waste management challenge. PCB spill cleanups often generate large volumes of waste. That is because the removal of PCBs typically requires the liberal use of industrial solvents followed by a thorough rinsing process. In a nuclear facility, the cleanup process may be complicated by the presence of radiation and other occupational hazards. Building design and construction features, e.g., the presence of open grating or trenches, may also complicate cleanup. In addition to the technical challenges associated with spill cleanup, selection of the appropriate regulatory requirements and approach may be challenging. The TSCA regulations include three different sections relating to the cleanup of PCB contamination or spills. EPA has also promulgated a separate guidance policy for fresh PCB spills that is published as Subpart G of 40 CFR 761 although it is not an actual regulation. Applicability is based on the circumstances of each contamination event or situation. Other laws or regulations may also apply. Identification of the allowable regulatory options is important. Effective communication with stakeholders, particularly regulators, is just as important. Depending on the regulatory path that is taken, cleanup may necessitate the generation of large quantities of regulated waste. Allowable options must be evaluated carefully in order to reduce compliance risks, protect personnel, limit potential negative impacts on facility operations, and minimize the generation of wastes subject to TSCA. This paper will identify critical factors in selecting the appropriate TSCA regulatory path in order to minimize the generation of radioactive PCB waste and reduce negative impacts to facilities. The importance of communicating pertinent technical issues with facility staff, regulatory personnel, and subsequently, the public, will be discussed. Key points will be illustrated by examples from five former production reactors at the DOE Savannah River Site. In these reactors a polyurethane sealant was used to seal piping penetrations in the biological shield walls. During the intense neutron bombardment that occurred during reactor operation, the sealant broke down into a thick, viscous material that seeped out of the piping penetrations over adjacent equipment and walls. Some of the walls were painted with a PCB product. PCBs from the paint migrated into the degraded sealant, creating PCB 'spill areas' in some of these facilities. The regulatory cleanup approach selected for each facility was based on its operational status, e.g., active, inactive or undergoing decommissioning. The selected strategies served to greatly minimize the generation of radioactive liquid PCB waste. It is expected that this information would be useful to other DOE sites, DOD facilities, and commercial nuclear facilities constructed prior to the 1979 TSCA ban on most manufacturing and uses of PCBs.

Lowry, N.

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioning cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Low-Level Waste Burial Ground Environmental Surveillance Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Addendum supplements, and to some extent replaces, the preliminary description of environmental radiological surveillance programs for low-level waste burial grounds (LLWBG) used in the parent document, 11 Technology, Safety and Costs of DecolliTlissioning a Reference Low-Level Waste Burial Ground, 11 NUREG/ CR-0570. The Addendum provides additional detail and rationale for the environmental radiological surveillance programs for the two referenced sites and inventories described in NUREG/CR-0570. The rationale and performance criteria herein are expected to be useful in providing guidance for determining the acceptability of environmental surveillance programs for other inventories and other LLWBG sites. Two generic burial grounds, one located on an arid western site and the other located on a humid eastern site, are reference facilities considered in this Addendum, and as described in the parent document (NUREG/CR-0570). The two sites are assumed to have the same capacity for waste, the same radioactive waste inventory, and similar trench characteristics and operating procedures. The climate, geology, and hydrology of the two reference sites are typical of existing western and eastern sites, altnough a single population distribution was chosen for both. Each reference burial ground occupies about 70 hectares and includes 180 trenches filled with a total of 1.5 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3} of radioactive waste. In acldition, there are 10 slit trenches containing about 1.5 x 10{sup 3} m{sup 3} of high beta-gamma activity waste. In this Addendum environmental surveillance programs are described for the several periods in the life of a LLWBG: preoperational (prior to nuclear waste receipt); operational (including interim trench closures); post-operational (after all nuclear waste is received), for both short-term {up to three years) and long-term (up to 100 years) storage and custodial care; and decommissioning (only for the special case of waste removal). The specific environmental monitoring requirements for final site characterization and certification surveys are beyond the scope of this Addendum. Data collection associated with site reconnaissance and preselection is not specifically addressed, but it is recognized that such data may be useful in designing the preoperational program. Predisposal control measures, quality assurance, and record-keeping (other than inventory records) associated with waste disposal operations are also not addressed. The primary intent of routine environmental surveillance at a LLWBG is to help ensure that site activities do not cause significant transport of radioactivity from the site, resulting in an unacceptable health hazard to people. Preoperational environmental surveillance serves to determine for later comparison the background radioactivity levels, either naturally occurring or the result of man's activities (e.g. world-wide fallout or an adjacent nuclear facility), in and around the proposed burial ground site. The operational environmental surveillance program is used to estimate radiological conditions, both onsite and offsite as a possible result of burial ground activities, including trench closure(s). These data help to determine LLWBG compliance with regulatory requirements. During the post-operational period environmental surveillance should normally be an extension of the program carried out during operations, with appropriate deletions (or modifications) to account for the differences between operational and post-operational activities at the site. During the long-term storage and custodial care period, environmental surveillance serves to verify the radionuclide confinement capability of the burial ground and to identify problem situations requiring remedial action. For waste removal (exhumation), the environmental surveillance program is again modified to account for the greatly increased potential for direct radiation and contamination spread. At the time of decommissioning, "environmental surveillance" takes on a new meaning, from that of an ongoing prog

Denham, D. H.; Eddy, P. A.; Hawley, K. A.; Jaquish, R. E.; Corley, J. P.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Pilot-scale treatability testing -- Recycle, reuse, and disposal of materials from decontamination and decommissioning activities: Soda blasting demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the nature and magnitude of decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) obligations at its sites. With disposal costs rising and available storage facilities decreasing, DOE is exploring and implementing new waste minimizing D and D techniques. Technology demonstrations are being conducted by LMES at a DOE gaseous diffusion processing plant, the K-25 Site, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The gaseous diffusion process employed at Oak Ridge separated uranium-235 from uranium ore for use in atomic weapons and commercial reactors. These activities contaminated concrete and other surfaces within the plant with uranium, technetium, and other constituents. The objective of current K-25 D and D research is to make available cost-effective and energy-efficient techniques to advance remediation and waste management methods at the K-25 Site and other DOE sites. To support this objective, O`Brien and Gere tested a decontamination system on K-25 Site concrete and steel surfaces contaminated with radioactive and hazardous waste. A scouring system has been developed that removes fixed hazardous and radioactive surface contamination and minimizes residual waste. This system utilizes an abrasive sodium bicarbonate medium that is projected at contaminated surfaces. It mechanically removes surface contamination while leaving the surface intact. Blasting residuals are captured and dissolved in water and treated using physical/chemical processes. Pilot-scale testing of this soda blasting system and bench and pilot-scale treatment of the generated residuals were conducted from December 1993 to September 1994.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

NFRC Procedures for Applied Films  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Applied Films Applied Films Last update: 12/10/2013 07:29 PM NFRC now has a procedure for adding applied films to substrates in Optics5 and importing those applied film constructions into WINDOW5 to be used in a whole product calculation. The information presented below is provided to help simulators with this process. Feel free to contact us at WINDOWHelp@lbl.gov with questions or comments. NFRC Applied Film Procedure Applied Film Procedures (approved by NFRC) (PDF file) Approved Applied Film List (IGDB 33.0) (PDF file) NFRC Laminate Procedure Training Powerpoint with Examples (This Powerpoint presentation was used in the NFRC web based training sessions in December 2006 and January 2007) PowerPoint Presentation (PPT file) PowerPoint Presentation (PDF file) Help and Troubleshooting

304

Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission fifteenth water reactor safety information meeting: Volume 6, Decontamination and decommissioning, accident management, TMI-2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This six-volume report contains 140 papers out of the 164 that were presented at the Fifteenth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg, Maryland, during the week of October 26-29, 1987. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. This report, Volume 6, discusses decontamination and decommissioning, accident management, and the Three Mile Island-2 reactor accident. Thirteen reports have been cataloged separately.

Weiss, A. J. [comp.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

ANL CP-5 decontamination and decommissioning project necessary and sufficient pilot. Report of the standards identification team on the selection of the necessary and sufficient standards set  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CP-5 reactor was a heavy-water moderated and cooled, highly-enriched uranium-fueled thermal reactor designed for supplying neutrons for research. The reactor was operated almost continuously for 25 years until its final shutdown in 1979. It is situated on approximately three acres in the southwestern section of Argonne National Laboratory. In 1980, all nuclear fuel and the heavy water that could be drained from the process systems were shipped off-site, and the CP-5 facility was placed into lay-up pending funding for decommissioning. It was maintained in the lay-up condition with a minimum of maintenance until 1990, when the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) project began. This D and D project provides for the disassembly and removal of all radioactive components, equipment, and structures that are associated with the CP-5 facility. The experimental area around the CP-5 reactor has been prepared for D and D, and the area outside the facility has been remediated. The reactor primary coolant and support systems have been removed and packaged as waste. The significant remaining tasks are (1) removal of the reactor internals and the biological shield structure; (2) decontamination of the rod storage area; (3) decontamination of the various radioactive material storage and handling facilities, including the fuel pool; and (4) decontamination and dismantlement of the building. This report describes the scope of the project, identification of standards for various aspects of the project, the lessons learned, and consideration for implementation.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Journal of Applied Ecology 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Applied Ecology 2004 41, 922­933 © 2004 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing that might guide management decisions. We tested whether ideas from landscape ecology (local vs. landscape-scale, Sacramento River, succession, vegetation Journal of Applied Ecology (2004) 41, 922­933 Introduction More than

Holl, Karen

307

Groundwater Monitoring and Control Before Decommissioning of the Research Reactor VVR-S from Magurele-Bucharest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research reactor type VVR-S (tank type, water is cooler, moderator and reflector, thermal power- 2 MW, thermal energy- 9. 52 GW d) was put into service in July 1957 and, in December 1997 was shout down. In 2002, Romanian Government decided to put the research reactor in the permanent shut-down in order to start the decommissioning. This nuclear facility was used in nuclear research and radioisotope production for 40 years, without events, incidents or accidents. Within the same site, in the immediate vicinity of the research reactor, there are many other nuclear facilities: Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant, Tandem Van der Graaf heavy ions accelerator, Cyclotron, Industrial Irradiator, Radioisotope Production Center. The objectives of this work were dedicated on the water underground analyses described in the following context: - presentation of the approaches in planning the number of drillings, vertical soil profiles (characteristics, analyses, direction of the flow of underground water, uncertainties in measurements); - presentation of the instrumentation used in analyses of water, soil and vegetation samples - analyses and final conclusions on results of the measurements; - comparison of the results of measurements on underground water from drillings with the measurements results on samples from the town and the system of drinking water - supplied from the second level of underground water. According to the analysis, in general, no values higher than the Minimum Detectable Activity were detected in water samples (MDA) for Pb{sup 212}, Bi{sup 214}, Pb{sup 214}, Ac{sup 228}, but situated under values foreseen in drinking water. Distribution of Uranium As results of the Uranium determination, values higher than 0,004 mg/l (4 ppb) were detected, values that represent the average contents in the underground water. The higher values, 2-3 times higher than background, were detected in the water from the drillings F15, F12, F5, F13, drillings located between RWTP (Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant) - the 300 m{sup 3} tanks and the Spent Filters Storage (SFS). At south of this area, on the leaking direction of the underground water layer, in the drillings F1, F2, F3, F18 and at east, in F6, F7, the natural Uranium values are within the background for the underground-water. Distribution of Radon For the Radon determination with RAD 7 equipment, water samples were taken from the same piezo-metrical drilling, 2 or 4 times during of six months period, and then, the average contents were calculated, which varied between 0,35 - 2,1 Bq/l. The values higher than 1,1 -1,2 Bq/l were detected in the water taken from the drillings located in the northern part (F10, F11) and in the eastern part (F6, F8) of the Institute fences (around of the radioactive waste storage facilities). The concentrations of 0,3 - 0,5 Bq/l are in the underground-water layer 'intercepted' by the piezo-metrical drillings (F1, F2, F3) located near the Nuclear Reactor. Concentration of heavy metals: 0.04-0.08 mg/l Pb in F5, F14, F7, F8 exceeding MCA-Maximum Admissible Concentration (0.01 mg/l) for Pb, and for Zn in F5, F7, F8, F14 are 0.2-0.5 mg/l situated under MCA , and 0.18 mg/l in F18, in accordance with tendency of decreasing of concentration of contaminants. After 50 years of deploying nuclear activities on the site the underground water quality is in very good condition. Taking into consideration the direction of the underground water flow, it results that, only in the area of underground pipe, around of the research reactor and radioactive waste treatment plant, the quality of water is influenced, and remediation actions are not necessary. Based on measurements executed in F18, the water quality is the same with any other part of the region. During the decommissioning of the Research Reactor, the samples from 18 drillings will be analysed monthly, and the contents of the heavy metals, Pb and Zn, will be monitored carefully, together with all the factors: air, soil, vegetation, subsoil, water surface and underground water. A great attention will be paid t

Dragusin, Mitica [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering-Horia Hulubei - IFIN-HH, Bucharest-Magurele, Romania, POBox MG-6, 077125, Ilfov (Romania)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Applied Sedimentology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sedimentology Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book: Applied Sedimentology Author R.C. Salley Published Academic Press, 2000 DOI Not Provided...

309

temperature heat pumps applied to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Very high- temperature heat pumps applied to energy efficiency in industry Application June 21th 2012 Energy efficiency : A contribution to environmental protection Kyoto Copenhage Emission, plastics Partnership : EDF R&D Bil

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

310

IIT SCHOOL OF APPLIED TECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT IIT SCHOOL OF APPLIED TECHNOLOGY PREPARING SKILLED INDIVIDUALS, INDUSTRIAL FACILITIES, SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT, SUSTAINABILITY AND MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY. #12;BE ONE to assess, implement, and utilize current technologies, and to learn how to manage industrial operations

Heller, Barbara

311

Decommissioning of Nuclear Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

All wastes from dismantling or operations will be sent ... proceed according to the chosen strategy shipping the waste to a long-term centralized storage center, if available, or may be...

Maurizio Cumo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

BNL | Accelerators for Applied Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Accelerators for Applied Research Accelerators for Applied Research Brookhaven National Lab operates several accelerator facilities dedicated to applied research. These facilities directly address questions and concerns on a tremendous range of fields, including medical imaging, cancer therapy, computation, and space exploration. Leading scientists lend their expertise to these accelerators and offer crucial assistant to collaborating researchers, pushing the limits of science and technology. Interested in gaining access to these facilities for research? See the contact number listed for each facility. RHIC tunnel Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer The Brookhaven Linac Isoptope Producer (BLIP)-positioned at the forefront of research into radioisotopes used in cancer treatment and diagnosis-produces commercially unavailable radioisotopes for use by the

313

DOE/EA-1295: Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Decontamination and Decommissioning of Building 301 Hot Cell Facility at Argonne National Laboratory (09/00)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

95 95 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PROPOSED DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING OF BUILDING 301 HOT CELL FACILITY AT ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. Department Of Energy Chicago Operations Office September, 2000 ii TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES iv LIST OF FIGURES iv ACRONYMS v 1.0 BACKGROUND 1 1.1 Facility Description and History 1 1.2 Current Status 7 2.0 PURPOSE AND NEED 7 3.0 DESCRIPTION OF PROPOSED ACTION AND NO ACTION ALTERNATIVE 8 3.1 The Proposed Action 8 3.2 No Action Alternative 10 4.0 THE AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT 11 4.1 Site Description 11 4.2 Cultural Resources 11 4.2.1 Archaeological Sites 11 4.2.2 Historical Structures and Objects 11 4.3 Air Quality 11 5.0 ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE PROPOSED ACTION 12 5.1 Environmental Impacts of Decontamination and Demolition 12 5.1.1 Sensitive Resources

314

The case for applied astronomy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Features The case for applied astronomy Martin Elvis Martin Elvis is an astronomer...Elvis looks at our golden age of astronomy and gives his personal view of what the future may hold for space and astronomy research, as that golden age hits......

Martin Elvis

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

apply skills & experience build skills  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

senior apply skills & experience junior build skills sophomore research & execute freshman explore options1 2 3 4 s u p p o r t4-year career action plan parent about the center for career development Remind your student that it is never too soon or too late to seek an internship or summer job. build

Alvarez, Pedro J.

316

Applying Science to Everyday Life  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Applying Science to Everyday Life ... Basic science ideas and their application appear regularly in peoples daily lives. ... It should be the goal of chemistry educators and other teachers of science to provide their students (and others when given the opportunity) with an appreciation of some basic principles. ...

Norbert J. Pienta

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

317

Journal of Applied Ecology 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

herbivores provide goods and income to rural communities, have major impacts on land use and habitats-Bianchet REVIEW The management of wild large herbivores to meet economic, conservation and environmental is applied to their management across the globe. To be effective, however, management has to be science

Festa-Bianchet, Marco

318

APPLIED THERMAL ENGINEERING Manuscript Draft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the heat pump from the grid during the two hours of electrical peak power · Design of a new heat exchangerAPPLIED THERMAL ENGINEERING Manuscript Draft TITLE: Experimental assessment of a PCM to air heat This paper presents a heat exchanger prototype containing PCM material designed to provide a 1kW heating

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

319

Applied Sustainability Political Science 319  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Applied Sustainability Political Science 319 College of Charleston Spring 2013 Day/Time: TH 1 Address: fisherb@cofc.edu Office: 284 King Street, #206 (Office of Sustainability) Office Hours: by appt sustainability. It will focus on the development of semester-long sustainability projects, from conception

Young, Paul Thomas

320

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4001 - 4010 of 28,905 results. 4001 - 4010 of 28,905 results. Download CX-005976: Categorical Exclusion Determination Demolition of Trailers T116, T124, T134 CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 05/17/2011 Location(s): Batavia, Illinois Office(s): Science, Fermi Site Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005976-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003134: Categorical Exclusion Determination NEA/NEB/NS8 Deactivation and Decommissioning CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 07/16/2010 Location(s): Batavia, Illinois Office(s): Fermi Site Office, Science http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003134-categorical-exclusion-determination Download Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant- March 2012 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioning cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

West Virginia | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1, 2011 1, 2011 EIS-0445: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture and Storage Project, Mason County, West Virginia March 4, 2011 EIS-0445: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture and Storage Project, Mason County, West Virginia March 1, 2011 CX-005336: Categorical Exclusion Determination Materials Synthesis Laboratory Modifications/Additions CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/01/2011 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 1, 2011 CX-005335: Categorical Exclusion Determination National Energy Technology Laboratory Reciprocating Laboratory Decommissioning CX(s) Applied: B3.6

322

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.6 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

11, 2009 11, 2009 CX-002601: Categorical Exclusion Determination Determining Optimal Fuel Performance in Adapting Onsite Electrical Generation Platforms to Operate on Producer Gas from Fuels of Opportunity CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/11/2009 Location(s): Fridley, Minnesota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 11, 2009 CX-002606: Categorical Exclusion Determination Decommissioning of Room 94-03 CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/11/2009 Location(s): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 11, 2009 CX-000294: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Novel Biogas Desulphurization Sorbent Technology for Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell- Based Combined Heat and Power Systems

323

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

81 - 990 of 28,905 results. 81 - 990 of 28,905 results. Download CX-003070: Categorical Exclusion Determination Gas Process Development Unit (GPDU)/Syngas (Synthetic Gas) Generator Decommissioning CX(s) Applied: B1.23, B1.27, B1.31, B3.6 Date: 07/15/2010 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003070-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003686: Categorical Exclusion Determination Building 4 Electrical Upgrade CX(s) Applied: B2.3, B2.5 Date: 09/01/2010 Location(s): Albany, Oregon Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003686-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004195: Categorical Exclusion Determination

324

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

21 - 5930 of 28,905 results. 21 - 5930 of 28,905 results. Download CX-004487: Categorical Exclusion Determination Decommission of Combustion Environmental Research Facility CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/19/2010 Location(s): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004487-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004488: Categorical Exclusion Determination Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project CX(s) Applied: A7 Date: 11/19/2010 Location(s): Kansas City, Missouri Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004488-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004489: Categorical Exclusion Determination Thai Process for Heavy Oil

325

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

11 - 4820 of 26,777 results. 11 - 4820 of 26,777 results. Download CX-002199: Categorical Exclusion Determination 661-G, Small Arms Training Area (SATA) Complex Deactivation and Decommissioning CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 04/28/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002199-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002201: Categorical Exclusion Determination Iodine Speciation CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/28/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002201-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-001817: Categorical Exclusion Determination Lean Gasoline System Development for Fuel Efficient Small Cars (Warren)

326

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

21 - 25830 of 31,917 results. 21 - 25830 of 31,917 results. Download CX-004848: Categorical Exclusion Determination Decommissioning of PAR Pond Facilities CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 12/17/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004848-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005092: Categorical Exclusion Determination Non-radiological Carbon Analysis Using Oceanography International Analytical 1030 Watt Instrument CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/15/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005092-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004840: Categorical Exclusion Determination MetalZorb Best Management Practice for Storm Water Outfall K-02

327

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

41 - 11650 of 28,560 results. 41 - 11650 of 28,560 results. Download CX-005662: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Use of Scrap Tires for Oil Well Stimulation CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 04/29/2011 Location(s): Upper Falls, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005662-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005663: Categorical Exclusion Determination Vortex Tube Project Decommissioning Project CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/29/2011 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005663-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005664: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development and Testing of Compact Heat Exchange Reactors (CHER) for

328

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

11 - 10420 of 26,764 results. 11 - 10420 of 26,764 results. Download CX-004487: Categorical Exclusion Determination Decommission of Combustion Environmental Research Facility CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/19/2010 Location(s): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004487-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004488: Categorical Exclusion Determination Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project CX(s) Applied: A7 Date: 11/19/2010 Location(s): Kansas City, Missouri Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004488-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004489: Categorical Exclusion Determination Thai Process for Heavy Oil

329

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

91 - 3800 of 9,640 results. 91 - 3800 of 9,640 results. Download CX-005774: Categorical Exclusion Determination Decommissioning of Flow Through Filter Diesel Generators CX(s) Applied: B1.27 Date: 04/12/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005774-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005673: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fiscal Year 2011 Pasco District Wood Pole Replacement Projects CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/11/2011 Location(s): Pasco District, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005673-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003792: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replacement of Overhead Ground Wire - Fairview-Rogue Number 1 230-Kilovolt

330

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

31 - 9140 of 26,764 results. 31 - 9140 of 26,764 results. Download CX-000491: Categorical Exclusion Determination New A-Area Firewater Pumphouse CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 05/11/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000491-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000492: Categorical Exclusion Determination Reactor In Situ Decommissioning Grout Sample Preparation and Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/20/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000492-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000493: Categorical Exclusion Determination H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Base and Silver Chloride

331

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

81 - 6590 of 28,905 results. 81 - 6590 of 28,905 results. Download CX-000492: Categorical Exclusion Determination Reactor In Situ Decommissioning Grout Sample Preparation and Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/20/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000492-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000493: Categorical Exclusion Determination H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Base and Silver Chloride Injection CX(s) Applied: B6.1 Date: 05/28/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000493-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000494: Categorical Exclusion Determination

332

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

71 - 17680 of 31,917 results. 71 - 17680 of 31,917 results. Download CX-002738: Categorical Exclusion Determination Delivering Advanced Modeling and Simulation Capabilities to United States Manufacturers CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 06/17/2010 Location(s): Ann Arbor, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002738-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002740: Categorical Exclusion Determination Coal Use By-Product Characterization Lab Decommissioning CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/17/2010 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002740-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002743: Categorical Exclusion Determination

333

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

81 - 9790 of 26,764 results. 81 - 9790 of 26,764 results. Download CX-000462: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modeling Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate Regional Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Potential of Ozark Plateau Aquifer System, South-Central Kansas CX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9 Date: 12/11/2009 Location(s): Lawrence, Kansas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000462-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000464: Categorical Exclusion Determination Decommissioning of the Low-Pressure Water Tunnel Facility (LWTF) CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B1.23 Date: 12/15/2009 Location(s): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000464-categorical-exclusion-determination

334

New York | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

20, 2010 20, 2010 CX-002041: Categorical Exclusion Determination Town of Hempstead American Recovery and Reinvestment Strategy Strategy (S) CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 04/20/2010 Location(s): Hempstead, New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office April 20, 2010 EIS-0226: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center April 19, 2010 CX-002072: Categorical Exclusion Determination New York-City-Schenectady CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6, B5.1 Date: 04/19/2010 Location(s): Schenectady, New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy April 15, 2010 CX-001548: Categorical Exclusion Determination

335

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

71 - 17080 of 26,764 results. 71 - 17080 of 26,764 results. Download CX-002377: Categorical Exclusion Determination Offshore Wind Technology Data Collection Project CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 05/13/2010 Location(s): Lake Michigan, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002377-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002245: Categorical Exclusion Determination Subtask 3.5 - Distributed Hydrogen Supply for Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/13/2010 Location(s): Grand Forks, North Dakota Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002245-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002246: Categorical Exclusion Determination Decommission of B4, 112, Atmospheric Cold Flow Laboratory

336

West Virginia | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 17, 2010 June 17, 2010 CX-002740: Categorical Exclusion Determination Coal Use By-Product Characterization Lab Decommissioning CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/17/2010 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 9, 2010 CX-002635: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Conservation Measure (ECM) #2: MERC Well Upgrade, National Energy Technology Laboratory Morgantown, West Virginia CX(s) Applied: B5.12 Date: 06/09/2010 Location(s): Morgantown, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory June 7, 2010 EIS-0445: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture and Storage Project, Mason County, West Virginia June 4, 2010

337

Roadmap: Technical and Applied Studies -Computer Technology Applied Computer Security and Forensics Technology -Bachelor of Technical and Applied Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Technical and Applied Studies - Computer Technology Applied Computer Security (2.000) grade. #12;Roadmap: Technical and Applied Studies - Computer Technology Applied Computer and Forensics Technology - Bachelor of Technical and Applied Studies RE-BTAS-TAS-CTAC Regional College Catalog

Khan, Javed I.

338

Nevada applied ecology group publications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since January 1972, the Nevada Applied Ecology Information Center (NAEIC), Information Research and Analysis Section, Health and Safety Research Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has provided technical information support to the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) relevant to the behavior of specific radionuclides, primarily plutonium and americium, in the environment, with special emphasis on pathways to man. This bibliography represents a summary of the biomedical and environmental studies conducted by the NAEG and its contractors. The bibliography focuses on research sponsored by the NAEG. Subject areas of the publications include cover studies of soil, vegetation, animals, microorganisms, resuspension, and meteorology. All references in this publication are stored in a computerized form that is readily available for searches upon request to NAEG and it contractors. 558 refs.

Chilton, B.D.; Pfuderer, H.A.; Cox, T.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center (3/13/03)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 4 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 49 / Thursday, March 13, 2003 / Notices Dated: March 6, 2003. Gerald A. Reynolds, Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights. [FR Doc. 03-5999 Filed 3-12-03; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000-01-M DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Intent. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) are announcing their intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) and

340

Master of Science in Applied Educational Psychology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Master of Science in Applied Educational Psychology Distance Education Program A 36-credit hour distance education Selected Courses in Applied Educational Psychology Courses offered via distance education for the Applied Educational Psychology program are taught by faculty with esteemed national

Tennessee, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioning cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Assistant Professor Position In Applied Social Psychology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assistant Professor Position In Applied Social Psychology Applied Social Psychology Program Department of Psychology Colorado State University Job Description and Qualifications The Department of Psychology at Colorado State University invites applications for one tenure- track position in Applied Social

342

Applying Quantum Principles to Psychology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article starts out with a detailed example illustrating the utility of applying quantum probability to psychology. Then it describes several alternative mathematical methods for mapping fundamental quantum concepts (such as state preparation, measurement, state evolution) to fundamental psychological concepts (such as stimulus, response, information processing). For state preparation, we consider both pure states and densities with mixtures. For measurement, we consider projective measurements and positive operator valued measurements. The advantages and disadvantages of each method with respect to applications in psychology are discussed.

Jerome R Busemeyer; Zheng Wang; Andrei Khrennikov; Irina Basieva

2014-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

343

Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Apply for Weatherization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Apply Apply for Weatherization Assistance to someone by E-mail Share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Apply for Weatherization Assistance on Facebook Tweet about Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Apply for Weatherization Assistance on Twitter Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Apply for Weatherization Assistance on Google Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Apply for Weatherization Assistance on Delicious Rank Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Apply for Weatherization Assistance on Digg Find More places to share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Apply for Weatherization Assistance on AddThis.com... Plans, Implementation, & Results Weatherization Assistance Program Weatherization Services

344

Applied Materials | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Materials Materials Jump to: navigation, search Name Applied Materials Address 3050 Bowers Avenue Place Santa Clara, California Zip 95054 Sector Solar Stock Symbol AMAT Website http://www.appliedmaterials.co Coordinates 37.3775749°, -121.9794416° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.3775749,"lon":-121.9794416,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

345

CX-007811: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

11: Categorical Exclusion Determination 11: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007811: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Decommission Ground Water Monitoring Well Located on Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Fee-owned Property CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 12/14/2011 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to allow Seattle City Light access to a BPA fee-owned right-of-way (ROW) for the purpose of decommissioning a Seattle City Lightowned well. Seattle City Light historically installed ground water monitoring wells as part of the Boundary Dam licensing process in the 1950s and 1960s to study the impact of the Dam on ground water levels. One of these wells exists on BPA fee-owned ROW approximately 650 feet ahead-on-line from tower 107/1 [Ref

346

CX-000018: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CX-000018: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000018: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000018: Categorical Exclusion Determination Dismantling, Removal and Decommissioning of Contaminated Ducting and Associated Equipment in the Plutonium Facility Fan Loft and Basement of Building 350 (New Brunswick Laboratory) CX(s) Applied: B1.17, B1.16, B1.3, B6.1, B2.5 Date: 12/10/2009 Location(s): Illinois Office(s): Science, New Brunswick Laboratory The Department of Energy New Brunswick Laboratory requires the services of a Dismantling, Removal and Decommissioning contractor to dismantle and remove radiological contaminated ventilation and other mechanical equipment from the basement and fan loft areas of the Building 350 Plutonium Facility. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-000018.pdf More Documents & Publications

347

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

81 - 18690 of 28,905 results. 81 - 18690 of 28,905 results. Download CX-005299: Categorical Exclusion Determination Carbon Motors Corporation E7 Assembly Facility CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 09/23/2010 Location(s): Connersville, Indiana Office(s): Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program, Loan Guarantee Program Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005299-categorical-exclusion-determination Download Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning The Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for the disposition of a vast number of facilities at numerous sites around the country which have been declared excess to current mission... http://energy.gov/em/downloads/capturing-process-knowledge-facility-deactivation-and-decommissioning

348

EA-0813; Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Decontamination and Decommissioning Project and The Tokamak Physics Experiment at the PPPL  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

13; Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) The Tokamak Fusion 13; Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Decontamination and Decommissioning Project and The Tokamak Physics Experiment at the PPPL Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ACRONYMS Glossary of Radiological Terms SCIENTIFIC NOTATION 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR THE PROPOSED ACTIONS 1.1 TFTR D&D Project 1.2 TPX Project 1.3 Scope of Document 1.4 Local Community Relations Program 1.5 References 2.0 DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSED ACTIONS AND ALTERNATIVES 2.1 TFTR D&D Project 2.2 TPX Project 2.3 Environmental Monitoring 2.4 References 3.0 DESCRIPTION OF THE AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT 3.1 PPPL Proposed Site 3.2 ORR Alternative Site 3.3 References 4.0 ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE PROPOSED ACTIONS AND ALTERNATIVES 4.1 TFTR D&D Project 4.1.1 Impacts of Normal D&D Operations

349

Environmental assessment for the decommissioning and decontamination of contaminated facilities at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research University of California, Davis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) was established in 1958 at its present location by the Atomic Energy Commission. Research at LEHR originally focused on the health effects from chronic exposures to radionuclides, primarily strontium 90 and radium 226, using beagles to simulate radiation effects on humans. In 1988, pursuant to a memorandum of agreement between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the University of California, DOE`s Office of Energy Research decided to close out the research program, shut down LEHR, and turn the facilities and site over to the University of California, Davis (UCD) after remediation. The decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of LEHR will be managed by the San Francisco Operations Office (SF) under DOE`s Environmental Restoration Program. This environmental assessment (EA) addresses the D&D of four site buildings and a tank trailer, and the removal of the on-site cobalt 60 (Co-60) source. Future activities at the site will include D&D of the Imhoff building and the outdoor dog pens, and may include remediation of underground tanks, and the landfill and radioactive disposal trenches. The remaining buildings on the LEHR site are not contaminated. The environmental impacts of the future activities cannot be determined at this time because the extent of contamination has not yet been ascertained. The impacts of these future activities (including the cumulative impacts of the future activities and those addressed in this EA) will be addressed in future National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

RESULTS OF IONSIV IE-95 STUDIES FOR THE REMOVAL OF RADIOACTIVE CESIUM FROM K-EAST BASIN SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL POOL DURING DECOMMISSIONING ACTIVITIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report delineates the results obtained from laboratory testing of IONISIV{reg_sign} IE-95 to determine the efficacy of the zeolite for the removal of radioactive cesium from the KE Basin water prior to transport to the Effluent Treatment Facility, as described in RPP-PLAN-36158, IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-95 Studies for the removal of Radioactive Cesium from KE Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel Pool during Decommissioning Activities. The spent nuclear fuel was removed from KE Basin and the remaining sludge was layered with a grout mixture consisting of 26% Lehigh Type I/II portland cement and 74% Boral Mohave type F fly ash with a water-to-cement ratio of 0.43. The first grout pour was added to the basin floor to a depth of approximately 14 in. covering an area of 12,000 square feet. A grout layer was also added to the sludge containers located in the attached Weasel and Technical View pits.

DUNCAN JB; BURKE SP

2008-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

351

Innovative Integration of Decommissioning and Deactivation Program with Soil-Groundwater Clean Up Program Has Positive Results on Budget and Schedule: A Case Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An innovative approach to integrate the activities of a decommissioning and deactivation program (D&D) with a soil-groundwater clean up program has had significant positive results saving both money and time at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site. The accomplishments that have been achieved by the combining the two programs have been remarkable including significant cost savings, economies of scale for sampling and document generation, and alignment of common objectives. Because of the coordination of both activities area-wide ''end states'' can be formulated and be consistent with the customers' cleanup goals and federal regulations. This coordinates and aligns both the environmental clean up and D&D objectives because each must be addressed simultaneously and comprehensively. In this respect, resources from both organizations can be pooled to take advantage of the strengths of each. The new approach allows more efficient use of lean financial resources and optimizes workforce activities to attain the common objectives while being more cost effective, more protective of the environment, and optimizing the use existing resources.

Schappell, B; Rucker, G

2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

352

How to Apply for the ENERGY STAR  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Join us to learn about applying for ENERGY STAR Certification in Portfolio Manager. Understand the value of the ENERGY STAR certification, see the step-by-step process of applying, and gain tips to...

353

Roadmap: Technical and Applied Studies Computer Technology Applied Computer Security and Forensics Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Technical and Applied Studies ­ Computer Technology Applied Computer Security-division credit hours #12;Roadmap: Technical and Applied Studies ­ Computer Technology Applied Computer Security and Forensics Technology ­ Bachelor of Technical and Applied Studies [RE-BTAS-TAS-CTAC] Regional College Catalog

Sheridan, Scott

354

CX-004848: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

48: Categorical Exclusion Determination 48: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004848: Categorical Exclusion Determination Decommissioning of PAR Pond Facilities CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 12/17/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office The scope of decommissioning of the G-Area PAR Pond Facilities comprises 4 major facilities: 651-6G, 681-23G, 681-7G and 735-7G. The objective is to remove installed process equipment and to bring radiological and chemical contamination to acceptable levels. The facility end state for 681-23G, 681-7G, 651-6G and 735-7G is demolition to the building slab or to grade. The Simple Model Decommissioning of a clean facility will be used for 651-6G and 681-23G. The Integrated Sampling Model Decommissioning of potentially contaminated facility will be used for 681-7G and 735-7G. The

355

Master of Science in Applied Educational Psychology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Master of Science in Applied Educational Psychology Distance Education Program A 36-credit hour settings. Selected Courses in Applied Educational Psychology Courses offered via distance education for the Applied Educational Psychology program are taught by faculty with esteemed national and international

Tennessee, University of

356

SYLLABUS--GEOGRAPHY (GEOG)-455 APPLIED CLIMATOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SYLLABUS--GEOGRAPHY (GEOG)-455 APPLIED CLIMATOLOGY Spring 2006 Time: T-R 12:30-1:45 p.m. (BOL B95-455-001-lec@uwm.edu Textbooks: Thompson-Perry, Applied Climatology: principles and practice, (1997, graduate students will prepare a 10 page (2500 word minimum) paper on a project using applied climatology

Saldin, Dilano

357

Department of Applied Physics Introductory Handbook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Applied Physics Introductory Handbook Version 2009-05-29 #12;2 Phone: +46 (0) 8 5537 8102 www.aphys.kth.se Visiting address Roslagstullsbacken 21 Delivery address KTH Applied Physics AlbaNova University Center Roslagsvägen 30B 114 19 Stockholm Postal address KTH Applied Physics AlbaNova University

Haviland, David

358

Testing and Performance Validation of a Sensitive Gamma Ray Camera Designed for Radiation Detection and Decommissioning Measurements in Nuclear Facilities-13044  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the measurements, testing and performance validation of a sensitive gamma ray camera designed for radiation detection and quantification in the environment and decommissioning and hold-up measurements in nuclear facilities. The instrument, which is known as RadSearch, combines a sensitive and highly collimated LaBr{sub 3} scintillation detector with an optical (video) camera with controllable zoom and focus and a laser range finder in one detector head. The LaBr{sub 3} detector has a typical energy resolution of between 2.5% and 3% at the 662 keV energy of Cs-137 compared to that of NaI detectors with a resolution of typically 7% to 8% at the same energy. At this energy the tungsten shielding of the detector provides a shielding ratio of greater than 900:1 in the forward direction and 100:1 on the sides and from the rear. The detector head is mounted on a pan/tile mechanism with a range of motion of 180 degrees (pan) and 90 degrees (tilt) equivalent to 4 ? steradians. The detector head with pan/tilt is normally mounted on a tripod or wheeled cart. It can also be mounted on vehicles or a mobile robot for access to high dose-rate areas and areas with high levels of contamination. Ethernet connects RadSearch to a ruggedized notebook computer from which it is operated and controlled. Power can be supplied either as 24-volts DC from a battery or as 50 volts DC supplied by a small mains (110 or 230 VAC) power supply unit that is co-located with the controlling notebook computer. In this latter case both power and Ethernet are supplied through a single cable that can be up to 80 metres in length. If a local battery supplies power, the unit can be controlled through wireless Ethernet. Both manual operation and automatic scanning of surfaces and objects is available through the software interface on the notebook computer. For each scan element making up a part of an overall scanned area, the unit measures a gamma ray spectrum. Multiple radionuclides may be selected by the operator and will be identified if present. In scanning operation the unit scans a designated region and superimposes over a video image the distribution of measured radioactivity. For the total scanned area or object RadSearch determines the total activity of operator selected radionuclides present and the gamma dose-rate measured at the detector head. Results of hold-up measurements made in a nuclear facility are presented, as are test measurements of point sources distributed arbitrarily on surfaces. These latter results are compared with the results of benchmarked MCNP Monte Carlo calculations. The use of the device for hold-up and decommissioning measurements is validated. (authors)

Mason, John A.; Looman, Marc R.; Poundall, Adam J.; Towner, Antony C.N. [ANTECH, A. N. Technology Ltd., Unit 6, Thames Park, Wallingford, Oxfordshire, OX10 9TA (United Kingdom)] [ANTECH, A. N. Technology Ltd., Unit 6, Thames Park, Wallingford, Oxfordshire, OX10 9TA (United Kingdom); Creed, Richard; Pancake, Daniel [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Chemical surety material decontamination and decommissioning of Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemical Surety Material Laboratory area TA-3, building SM-29, room 4009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From 1982 through 1987, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) performed surety laboratory operations for the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command (MRDC). Room 4009 in building SM-29, TA-3, was used as the laboratory for work with the following chemical surety material (CSM) agents: sarin (GB), soman (GD), lewisite (L), and distilled mustard (HD) radio-labelled with H{sup 3} or C{sup 14}. The work was confined to three CSM-certified fume hoods, located in room 4009 (see diagram in Appendix C). The laboratory ceased all active operations during the late 1986 and early 1987 period. From 1987 until 1993 the laboratory was secured and the ventilation system continued to operate. During late 1992, the decision was made to utilize this laboratory space for other operations, thus a decision was made to dismantle and reconfigure this room. LANL sub-contracted Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI) to draw upon the CSM experience of the technical staff from the Hazardous Materials Research Facility (HMRF) to assist in developing a decontamination and decommissioning plan. BMI was subcontracted to devise a CSM safety training course, and a sampling and air monitoring plan for CSM material to ensure personnel safety during all disassembly operations. LANL subcontracted Johnson Controls personnel to perform all disassembly operations. Beginning in early 1993 BMI personnel from the HMRF visited the laboratory to develop both the safety plan and the sample and air monitoring plan. Execution of that plan began in September 1993 and was completed in January 1994.

Moore, T.E.; Smith, J.M.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Opportunity, risk, and success recognizing, addressing, and balancing multiple factors crucial to the success of a project management system deployed to support multi-lateral decommissioning programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses the factors involved in effectively implementing a world-class program/project management information system funded by multiple nations. Along with many other benefits, investing in and utilizing such systems improves delivery and drive accountability for major expenditures. However, there are an equally large number of impediments to developing and using such systems. To be successful, the process requires a dynamic combining of elements and strategic sequencing of initiatives. While program/project-management systems involve information technologies, software and hardware, they represent only one element of the overall system.. Technology, process, people and knowledge must all be integrated and working in concert with one another to assure a fully capable system. Major system implementations occur infrequently, and frequently miss established targets in relatively small organizations (with the risk increasing with greater complexity). The European Bank of Reconstruction (EBRD) is midway through just such an implementation. The EBRD is using funds from numerous donor countries to sponsor development of an overarching program management system. The system will provide the Russian Federation with the tools to effectively manage prioritizing, planning, and physically decommissioning assets{sub i}n northwest Russia to mitigate risks associated the Soviet era nuclear submarine program. Project-management delivery using world-class techniques supported by aligned systems has been proven to increase the probability of delivering on-time and on-budget, assuring those funding such programs optimum value for money. However, systems deployed to manage multi-laterally funded projects must be developed with appropriate levels of consideration given to unique aspects such as: accommodation of existing project management methods, consideration for differences is management structures and organizational behaviors, incorporation of unique strengths, and subtle adjustment to compensate weaknesses. This paper addresses the architecture and sequencing of implementation. (authors)

Funk, Greg; Longsworth, Paul [Fluor Cumbria, Unit 8, Galemire Court, Westlakes Science Park, Moor Row, CA24 3HY (United Kingdom)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioning cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Applied Math and Statistics: Applied Math Minor Curriculum Chart: 2013-2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applied Math and Statistics: Applied Math Minor Curriculum Chart: 2013-2014 http://matlab-training.soe.ucsc.edu/ PROBABILITY THEORY OR AMS 131 Introduction to Probability Theory CE 107 Mathematical Methods of Systems by the department. #12;Applied Math and Statistics: Applied Math Minor Curriculum Chart: 2013-2014 http

Stuart, Josh

362

Postdoctoral Position in Applied Mathematics Seminar for Applied Mathematics of ETH Zurich  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Postdoctoral Position in Applied Mathematics Seminar for Applied Mathematics of ETH Z¨urich The Seminar for Applied Mathematics (SAM) of ETH Z¨urich offers a post- doctoral position in applied a competitive salary according to the standards of ETH Z¨urich as well as the opportunity to work

Feichtinger, Hans Georg

363

PhD Position in Applied Mathematics Seminar for Applied Mathematics of ETH Zurich  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PhD Position in Applied Mathematics Seminar for Applied Mathematics of ETH Z¨urich The Seminar for Applied Mathematics (SAM) of ETH Z¨urich offers a PhD position in applied mathematics. The main research teaching load. The successful candidate will receive a competitive salary according to the standards of ETH

Feichtinger, Hans Georg

364

Applied Intellectual Capital AIC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zip: 94501-1010 Product: Applied Intellectual Capital (AIC) was founded in 1999 to fund technology development in clean energy, clean water and sustainable resources. References:...

365

Corrections APPLIED PHYSICAL SCIENCES, BIOPHYSICS AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrections APPLIED PHYSICAL SCIENCES, BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction gene, MyHC-IIb, which is thought under most circumstances not to be expressed. The physiological

Spudich, James A.

366

Applied Films Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name: Applied Films Corporation Place: Longmont, Colorado Zip: 80504 Sector: Services, Solar Product: Provider of thin film deposition equipment and services, particularly to...

367

Roadmap: Technical and Applied Studies Fraud Examination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Technical and Applied Studies ­ Fraud Examination ­ Bachelor of Technical and Applied of Fraud Examination 3 C COMT 36318 Survey of Information Security, Internet Fraud and Computer Forensics to Fraud Examination 3 C JUS 22100 Basic Interviewing 3 C Major Requirement 3 C See note 2 on page 2

Sheridan, Scott

368

GRANT APPLICATION I am applying for a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GRANT APPLICATION I am applying for a: Faculty Research Travel Grant ($2,000 Maximum) The funds University Guidelines. Partnership Grant ($2,000 Maximum) The funds must be applied to costs directly related to travel (airfare, accommodation, and meals). This grant is not intended for general costs

369

UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology Bioinformatics training Roche 454 GS-FLX Registration, Microbiomes, Variant Analysis, Whole Genomes, Transcriptomes Data Analysis and Statistics CAGE database and employer. University of Nebraska-Lincoln*Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology* 323 Filley Hall *Lincoln

Farritor, Shane

370

Applied Materials Inc AMAT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc AMAT Inc AMAT Jump to: navigation, search Name Applied Materials Inc (AMAT) Place Santa Clara, California Zip 95052-8039 Sector Solar Product US-based manufacturer of equipment used in solar (silicon, thin-film, BIPV), semiconductor, and LCD markets. References Applied Materials Inc (AMAT)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Applied Materials Inc (AMAT) is a company located in Santa Clara, California . References ↑ "Applied Materials Inc (AMAT)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Applied_Materials_Inc_AMAT&oldid=342244" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes

371

Applied Materials Wind Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Turbine Wind Turbine Jump to: navigation, search Name Applied Materials Wind Turbine Facility Applied Materials Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Applied Materials Developer Applied Materials Energy Purchaser Applied Materials Location Gloucester MA Coordinates 42.62895426°, -70.65153122° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.62895426,"lon":-70.65153122,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

372

Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project decommissioning plan. Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume appendix on activity specifications is divided into the following: site preparation; barge loading facility; facility closeout and restoration; preparation for removal of reactor pressure vessel, internals, and neutron shield tank package; heavy lifting and hauling; barge transportation; and Hanford transportation. (DLC)

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project decommissioning plan. Volume 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning the removal of both contaminated and non-contaminated piping and equipment from the Shippingport reactor.

Not Available

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project decommissioning plan. Part 2. Volume 11  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning the cost-benefit analysis for decontamination of the Shippingport reactor and radiation-contamination survey data.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project decommissioning plan. Volume XI, Part I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is divided into the following parts: radioactive waste processing, salvage/scrap value estimate, and radionuclide inventory of primary systems. (DLC)

Not Available

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project decommissioning plan. Part 2. Volume 6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning resource leveled logic report; report of remaining area work; activity specification schedules; and DOC activities.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project decommissioning plan. Part 2. Volume 9  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Appendices are included with information concerning DOE order 5480.1A on environmental protection and health protection; 29 CFR 1910.1001 and 40CFR61 concerning asbestos; Corps of Engineers permit information; Pennsylvania air standards; Pennsylvania water standards; Pennsylvania solid waste management; erosion control regulations; explosives regulations; and NPDES permit.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project decommissioning plan. Volume VI, Part II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document comprises the following: report of remaining contractor work, predecessor/successor logic report, contractor interface report (incoming and outgoing interfaces), and activity specification Barchart plot. (DLC)

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Shippingport station decommissioning project: decommissioning plan. Volume No. 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The activity specifications for solid waste management, decontamination, sludge removal, decontamination of reactor coolant purification system, and systems operation support are given, together with supplementary requirements for welding and work breakdown structure dictionary. (DLC)

Not Available

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Shipppingport Station Decommissioning Project decommissioning plan. Volume 10  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Appendices are presented concerning activation analysis; reactor and intervals removal; reactor vessel removal; escalation effects; removal of contaminated concrete; and removal of contaminated chanbers.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioning cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

How to Apply??? Students wishing to apply for a position in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as grounds maintenance and landscaping responsibilities. Work Schedule: The workHow to Apply??? Students wishing to apply for a position in the landscape your application package to: Cranbrook Educational Community Landscape Horticulture

382

Vehicle Technologies Office: Applied Battery Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Applied battery research addresses the barriers facing the lithium-ion systems that are closest to meeting the technical energy and power requirements for hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) and electric...

383

Applied Field Research Initiative Deep Vadose Zone  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Applied Field Research Initiative Applied Field Research Initiative Deep Vadose Zone Located on the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ AFRI) was established to protect water resources by addressing the challenge of preventing contamination in the deep vadose zone from reaching groundwater. Led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Initiative is a collaborative effort that leverages Department of Energy (DOE) investments in basic science and applied research and the work of site contractors to address the complex deep vadose zone contamination challenges. Challenge Many vadose zone environments within the DOE complex consist of complex stratified layers of unconsolidated and water-unsaturated sediments that are, in many places, con-

384

Roadmap: Applied Engineering Applied Engineering and Technology Management Bachelor of Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Applied Engineering ­ Applied Engineering and Technology Management ­ Bachelor of Science [AT-BS-AENG-AETM] College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology Catalog Year: 2013­2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 28-Feb-13/JS This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan

Sheridan, Scott

385

Roadmap: Applied Engineering Applied Engineering and Technology Management Bachelor of Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Applied Engineering ­ Applied Engineering and Technology Management ­ Bachelor of Science [AT-BS-AENG-AETM] College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 21-May-12/JS This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan

Sheridan, Scott

386

Roadmap: Technical and Applied Studies -Computer Technology General -Bachelor of Technical and Applied Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Technical and Applied Studies - Computer Technology General - Bachelor of Technical;Roadmap: Technical and Applied Studies - Computer Technology General - Bachelor of Technical and Applied-Mar-14/JSK This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major. However

Khan, Javed I.

387

Applied Process Engineering Laboratory | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Applied Process Engineering Laboratory Applied Process Engineering Laboratory Name Applied Process Engineering Laboratory Address 350 Hills Street, Suite #101 Place Richland, Washington Zip 99354 Region Pacific Northwest Area Coordinates 46.3389754°, -119.2716263° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.3389754,"lon":-119.2716263,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

388

Modeling International Relationships in Applied General Equilibrium  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling International Relationships in Applied General Equilibrium Modeling International Relationships in Applied General Equilibrium (MIRAGE) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Modeling International Relationships in Applied General Equilibrium (MIRAGE) Agency/Company /Organization: International Food Policy Research Institute, Centre d'Etudes Prospectives et d'Informations Internationales (CEPII) Focus Area: Economic Development Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Macroeconomic Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.ifpri.org/book-5076/ourwork/program/mirage-model RelatedTo: Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) Data Base

389

How to Apply | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

How to Apply How to Apply How to Apply Awards are made through a formal process that has changed dramatically since 2011. So let us walk you through it step by step. "Innovation pays." - John Kao, Innovation Nation Submit a Letter of Intent On October 28, 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced on the DOE SBIR website a preview version of the technical topics for which it will later accept funding applications. These topics will be found on the DOE's Funding Opportunity Announcements page. The EE SBIR page lists those topics that are cleantech (specific to EERE). We also recommend that you sign up for the EE-SBIR and DOE-SBIR mailing lists. The EE SBIR mailing list signup is at https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USEERE/subscriber/new?topic_id=USEERE_442.

390

Applied Field Research Initiative Attenuation Based Remedies  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PA00133 - March 2011 PA00133 - March 2011 Applied Field Research Initiative Attenuation Based Remedies in the Subsurface Located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, the Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) was established to develop the tools, approaches and technologies that will be required to address the technical challenges associated characteriza- tion, remediation and long-term monitoring of recalcitrant compounds in the subsurface at Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) sites. The ABRS AFRI site provides a unique setting for researchers in both applied and basic science fields. A wealth of subsurface data is available to support research activities and remedial decision making.

391

Applied Ventures LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Applied Ventures LLC Applied Ventures LLC Name Applied Ventures LLC Address 3050 Bowers Avenue Place Santa Clara, California Zip 95054 Region Southern CA Area Product Venture capital. Number of employees 1-10 Phone number (408) 727-5555 Website http://www.appliedventures.com Coordinates 37.37751°, -121.978721° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.37751,"lon":-121.978721,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

392

Meta-analysis in applied ecology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...varied with time, not space, suggesting that local...across species, sites, space and time. Applied ecologists...August 2009). An initial library of more than 500 analyses...pointers from medicine and public health. Conserv. Biol...effects across species, space and time, but exploring...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

APPLIED MATHEMATICS & COMPUTATIONAL SCI. (AS) {AMCS}  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPLIED MATHEMATICS & COMPUTATIONAL SCI. (AS) {AMCS} 510. (MATH410) Complex Analysis. 520. (MATH420. (MATH432) Game Theory. 567. (BE 567) Mathematical and Computational Modeling of Biological Systems. (M) Prerequisite(s): BE 324 and BE 350. This is an introductory course in mathematical biology. The emphasis

Carpick, Robert W.

394

Uniform insulation applied-B ion diode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An applied-B field extraction ion diode has uniform insulation over an anode surface for increased efficiency. When the uniform insulation is accomplished with anode coils, and a charge-exchange foil is properly placed, the ions may be focused at a point on the z axis.

Seidel, David B. (Albuquerque, NM); Slutz, Stephen A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Applying Knowledge Management techniques for building corporate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applying Knowledge Management techniques for building corporate memories Ian Watson AI-CBR Computer-based reasoning and knowledge management... www.ai-cbr.org ...coincidentally I've just written a book about this... ...plug the book!!! www.ai-cbr.org Outline · Talk about ­ Knowledge ­ Knowledge management ­ Why CBR

Watson, Ian

396

Applying Quantitative Marketing Techniques to the Internet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Blattberg and Deighton [1991] laid out a good framework for Internet marketing in their articleApplying Quantitative Marketing Techniques to the Internet by Alan L. Montgomery Carnegie Mellon with clickstream data. I illustrate these four modeling techniques and discuss their potential for solving Internet

Faloutsos, Christos

397

Faculty of Engineering Bachelor of Applied Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Environmental Engineering; Electrical Engineering; Industrial Engineering and Mechanical, Automotive & MaterialsFaculty of Engineering Bachelor of Applied Science in Engineering The demands on professional engineers around the world are increasing in terms of what they must address: our society must confront

398

Applying Global Optimization in Structural Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

structure Dynamic loading Challenges "Dwarfing visitors, the 70-foot-tall Corliss steam engine powered steam engine in the world. Of engines like the Corliss, William Dean Howells wrote, 'In these thingsApplying Global Optimization in Structural Engineering Dr. George F. Corliss Electrical

399

NONLOCAL COMPUTATIONAL METHODS APPLIED TO COMPOSITE STRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to model the degradation of organic or ceramic matrix composites structures (OMC or CMC) even under simple description of heterogeneous materia ls like organic or ceramic matrix composites. New sophisticatedNONLOCAL COMPUTATIONAL METHODS APPLIED TO COMPOSITE STRUCTURES N. GERMAIN1, F. FEYEL1 and J. BESSON

Boyer, Edmond

400

Building on a Base: Applying Physics Education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building on a Base: Applying Physics Education Research to Physics Teaching S.J. Pollock CU Boulder Concept Inventory (FCI) R. Hake, "...A six-thousand-student survey..." AJP 66, 64-74 (`98). = post. Pre R. App. Pre R. Care. Pre Math Pre Effort Pre Skept. Pre Overall Post Indep. Post Coher. Post Conc

Colorado at Boulder, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioning cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

APPLYING THE ZACHMAN FRAMEWORK DIMENSIONS TO SUPPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPLYING THE ZACHMAN FRAMEWORK DIMENSIONS TO SUPPORT BUSINESS PROCESS MODELING Pedro Sousa123.caetano, jose.tribolet}@inov.pt Business process models assist business and information technology managers with disparate blueprints for the same process and no formal procedures to sort out their relevance. In fact

402

Does Bertrand's rule apply to macronutrients?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...gastrointestinal system. In Handbook of physiology. Section 13 comparative...Christensen2001Optimal diet theory: when does it work, and when and why does it fail?. Anim. Behav. 61...Nutr. Soc. 60, 145-156. Does Bertrand's rule apply to macronutrients...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Roadmap: Technical and Applied Studies -Computer Technology Networking -Bachelor of Technical and Applied Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Technical and Applied Studies - Computer Technology Networking - Bachelor of Technical-May-14/JSK This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major. However or individualized specialization selected in consultation with an advisor. #12;Roadmap: Technical and Applied

Khan, Javed I.

404

B.S. Applied Physics Program B.S. in Applied Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B.S. Applied Physics Program B.S. in Applied Physics Department(s) Physics and Astronomy College and magnetism 3. understanding of thermodynamics 4. understanding of modern physics 5. ability to perform modern laboratory experiments 6. ability to perform an independent physics research project 7. ability

Hemmers, Oliver

405

Fundamental & Applied Bioenergy | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bioenergy Bioenergy SHARE Fundamental and Applied Bioenergy Steven Brown (left) and Shihui Yang have developed a microbial strain with an improved ability to convert wood products to biofuel as part of research within the DOE BioEnergy Science Center.Source: ORNL News article ORNL researchers are investigating the biological mechanisms underlying production of biofuels so that those mechanisms can be improved and used to develop a new generation of efficient bioenergy strategies that will reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil and help curb carbon emissions. Fundamental and applied bioenergy research at ORNL includes studies conducted within the BioEnergy Science Center and the following research areas: Bioconversion Science and Technology Plant-Microbe Interfaces

406

Apply for Beam Time | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Apply for Beam Time Apply for Beam Time NEXT PROPOSAL DEADLINE: March 7, 2014 @ 11:59 PM (Chicago time) Submit Proposal » SEE ALSO: Calendar: deadlines, run & review dates Help Page: frequently asked questions, tips for success, common errors, blank forms, instructions Review Criteria Sectors Directory: check CAT websites for info about managed beam time The Run 2014-2 proposal submission deadline is 11:59 p.m. (Chicago time) March 7, 2014. The system will open to accept proposals beginning December 20, 2013. NEW USERS: to avoid delays and to make the most of your time on site, read Become a User. You must register as a user and receive a badge number before submitting a proposal. About the Beam Time Request Process All beam time at the APS must be requested each cycle through the web-based

407

Title Page Applied and Environmental Microbiology 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Applied and Environmental Microbiology 1 Applied and Environmental Microbiology 1 2 Title Natural Competence in Thermoanaerobacter and Thermoanaerobacterium Species 3 Running Title Thermonanerobacter Natural Competence 4 5 Authors and Affiliations 6 A. Joe Shaw 1,2 , David A. Hogsett 1 , Lee R. Lynd 1,2,3 * 7 1 Mascoma Corporation, Lebanon, NH 03766 8 2 Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 9 3 Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 10 11 Corresponding Author 12 Lee R. Lynd 13 Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 14 Phone: 603.646.2231 15 Email: lee.lynd@dartmouth.edu 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 Copyright © 2010, American Society for Microbiology and/or the Listed Authors/Institutions. All Rights Reserved.

408

Slip Line Field Applied To Deep Drawing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Slip Line Field is a numerical method applied for modelling plane?strain processes. This method has been successfully checked properly for sheet drawing. Flange deformation in deep drawing is considered without change in thickness. A drawing mechanical test has been developed in order to reproduce the flange stresses state in sheet strips with the rolling direction selected. The fundamentals of this test and some experimental results obtained from it have been presented previously in different Congresses. In this work an algorithm based on SLF has been implemented and theoretical results evaluated for different conditions. The algorithm have been applied to a mild DDQ steel and to a DDQ AISI 304 stainless steel. Theoretical and experimental results are compared. A good concordance in them has been found out under some conditions. One of the most important aspects is that it must not be considered tensile material properties but a modified behavior under multiaxial conditions.

V. Miguel; J. Benet; J. Coello; A. Calatayud; A. Martnez

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Apply process integration to waste minimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article presents a systematic method for identifying process modifications to minimize waste generation. It is based on the hierarchical decision procedure, which provides a framework for identifying process improvement options and evaluating heat and mass integration opportunities. The article deals specifically with an adaptation of the hierarchical decision approach for use in pollution abatement applications. The article also illustrates the use of the technique by applying it to the fluid catalytic cracking unit at Amoco Oil Co.'s Yorktown, VA, refinery.

Rossiter, A.P.; Spriggs, H.D. (Linnhoff March, Inc., Leesburg, VA (United States)); Klee, H. Jr. (Amoco Corp., Chicago, IL (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Applying Calibration to Improve Uncertainty Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND 1.1 Introduction The oil and gas industry is full of uncertainty. In addition to significant subsurface uncertainty and uncertainty in oil and gas prices, there are other risks, e.g., political, that contribute to uncertainty... that is commonly applied in other industries for assessing forecasts and was initially developed to assess weather forecasts (Brier, 1950). Lichtenstein and Fischhoff (1977) summarized the background for the 3 Brier score and its components. The Brier score...

Fondren, Mark Edward

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

411

Fluid Bed Combustion Applied to Industrial Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of its relatively recent application to coal fired steam production, fluid beds have been uti lized in industry for over 60 years. Beginning in Germany in the twenties for coal gasification, the technology was applied to catalytic cracking of heavy... system cost), use of minimum excess air required, and maintaining the min"imum reactor temperature neces sary to sustain combustion. For superautogenous fuels, where incineration. only is desired, minimum capital cost is achieved by using direct bed...

Mullen, J. F.; Sneyd, R. J.

412

Applied Studies and Technology (AS&T) | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Applied Studies and Technology (AS&T) Applied Studies and Technology (AS&T) Applied Studies and Technology (AS&T) DOE established the Environmental Sciences Laboratory (ESL) in...

413

Applied Environmental Microbiology | VIMSS - Virtual Institute for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection of Soil Samples Collection of Soil Samples Identification of Natural Stressors Profiling of Microbial Population Field and Simulated Conceptual Model Facilities The Applied Environmental Microbiology (AEM) Core is the source of environmental data and samples that determine the stressors that will be studied, pro-vides the environments for growing the organisms to be tested, simulates stressed environments, and verifies the conceptual models to determine how these stress regulatory pathways control the biogeochemistry of contaminated sites. The specific goals of the AEM Core are to: Survey and map DOE sites contaminated by metals and radionuclides using chemical and molecular/ microbiological parameters to determine major microbial populations and potential stressors for Desulfovibrio vulgaris,

414

Determining when NEPA applies to nonfederal activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than a quarter century after enactment of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), unresolved questions still persist regarding its applicability to state and private actions. This is particularly true when such projects are undertaken to support the needs of a federal agency. Proposed below is a paradigm for determining when NEPA applies to state or privately conducted, but federally influenced or inspired, actions. The paradigm employs a set of five sequential tests for determining if a state or privately conducted action is subject to the requirements of NEPA.

Eccleston, C.H., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

415

6.728 Applied Quantum and Statistical Physics, Fall 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elementary quantum mechanics and statistical physics. Introduces applied quantum physics. Emphasizes experimental basis for quantum mechanics. Applies Schrodinger's equation to the free particle, tunneling, the harmonic ...

Bulovic, Vladimir, 1970-

416

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research...

417

Apply: Building Energy Efficiency Frontiers and Incubator Technologies...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Apply: Building Energy Efficiency Frontiers and Incubator Technologies (BENEFIT) - 2014 (DE-FOA-0001027) Apply: Building Energy Efficiency Frontiers and Incubator Technologies...

418

Applying Risk Communication to the Transportation of Radioactive...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Applying Risk Communication to the Transportation of Radioactive Materials Applying Risk Communication to the Transportation of Radioactive Materials Participants should expect to...

419

Rational Catalyst Design Applied to Development of Advanced Oxidation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Catalyst Design Applied to Development of Advanced Oxidation Catalysts for Diesel Emission Control Rational Catalyst Design Applied to Development of Advanced Oxidation...

420

Applying Climate Information for Adaptation Decision-Making:...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Applying Climate Information for Adaptation Decision-Making: A Guidance and Resource Document Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Applying Climate...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioning cxs applied" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Grand Challenge for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Grand Challenge for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage...

422

'Grand Challenge' for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

'Grand Challenge' for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage Solicitation 'Grand Challenge' for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage Solicitation DOE is issuing a...

423

Grand Challenge for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Grand Challenge for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage: Statement of Objectives Grand Challenge for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage: Statement of...

424

James Webb Space Telescope: PM Lessons Applied - Eric Smith,...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

James Webb Space Telescope: PM Lessons Applied - Eric Smith, Deputy Program Director, NASA James Webb Space Telescope: PM Lessons Applied - Eric Smith, Deputy Program Director,...

425

Energy Department Announces Up to $14 Million for Applying Landscape...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Up to 14 Million for Applying Landscape Design to Cellulosic Bioenergy Energy Department Announces Up to 14 Million for Applying Landscape Design to Cellulosic Bioenergy October...

426

Optical Diagnostics and Modeling Tools Applied to Diesel HCCI...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Optical Diagnostics and Modeling Tools Applied to Diesel HCCI Optical Diagnostics and Modeling Tools Applied to Diesel HCCI 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Caterpillar Engine...

427

The Applied Mathematics for Power Systems (AMPS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increased deployment of new technologies, e.g., renewable generation and electric vehicles, is rapidly transforming electrical power networks by crossing previously distinct spatiotemporal scales and invalidating many traditional approaches for designing, analyzing, and operating power grids. This trend is expected to accelerate over the coming years, bringing the disruptive challenge of complexity, but also opportunities to deliver unprecedented efficiency and reliability. Our Applied Mathematics for Power Systems (AMPS) Center will discover, enable, and solve emerging mathematics challenges arising in power systems and, more generally, in complex engineered networks. We will develop foundational applied mathematics resulting in rigorous algorithms and simulation toolboxes for modern and future engineered networks. The AMPS Center deconstruction/reconstruction approach 'deconstructs' complex networks into sub-problems within non-separable spatiotemporal scales, a missing step in 20th century modeling of engineered networks. These sub-problems are addressed within the appropriate AMPS foundational pillar - complex systems, control theory, and optimization theory - and merged or 'reconstructed' at their boundaries into more general mathematical descriptions of complex engineered networks where important new questions are formulated and attacked. These two steps, iterated multiple times, will bridge the growing chasm between the legacy power grid and its future as a complex engineered network.

Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

428

Entropy viscosity method applied to Euler equations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The entropy viscosity method [4] has been successfully applied to hyperbolic systems of equations such as Burgers equation and Euler equations. The method consists in adding dissipative terms to the governing equations, where a viscosity coefficient modulates the amount of dissipation. The entropy viscosity method has been applied to the 1-D Euler equations with variable area using a continuous finite element discretization in the MOOSE framework and our results show that it has the ability to efficiently smooth out oscillations and accurately resolve shocks. Two equations of state are considered: Ideal Gas and Stiffened Gas Equations Of State. Results are provided for a second-order time implicit schemes (BDF2). Some typical Riemann problems are run with the entropy viscosity method to demonstrate some of its features. Then, a 1-D convergent-divergent nozzle is considered with open boundary conditions. The correct steady-state is reached for the liquid and gas phases with a time implicit scheme. The entropy viscosity method correctly behaves in every problem run. For each test problem, results are shown for both equations of state considered here. (authors)

Delchini, M. O.; Ragusa, J. C. [Nuclear Engineering Department, Texas A and M University, 3133 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3133 (United States); Berry, R. A. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Applied Energy Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Management Management Jump to: navigation, search Name Applied Energy Management Place Huntersville, North Carolina Zip 28078 Sector Efficiency, Renewable Energy Product North Carolina-based, energy efficiency and renewable energy service and construction company. Coordinates 35.409853°, -80.842716° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.409853,"lon":-80.842716,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

430

How to Apply for ENERGY STAR® Certification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü "How To" Series How to Apply for ENERGY STAR ® Certification Commercial buildings that earn EPA's ENERGY STAR certification perform in the top 25 percent of similar buildings nationwide, as verified by a Licensed Professional (a Professional Engineer or a Registered Architect). ENERGY STAR certified buildings use an average of 35 percent less energy and are responsible for 35 percent fewer greenhouse gas emissions than average buildings. To qualify for the ENERGY STAR, a property must achieve an ENERGY STAR score of 75 or higher on EPA's 1 - 100 scale, which compares a property's energy performance to

431

Nonextensive statistical dynamics applied to wall turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We apply a formalism of nonextensive statistical mechanics to experimental wall turbulence data, for the first time to our knowledge. Wind tunnel data for velocity differences a streamwise distance $r$ apart are compared to the prediction from theory as developed by Beck. The simplest theory, in which all free parameters are removed, is found to reproduce statistics for the wall-normal velocity component remarkably well, even for $r$ well beyond the corresponding integral scale, while the corresponding description of the streamwise velocity fluctuations is reasonable at separations below the integral scale. A least-squares 2-parameter fit is performed, and the dependence of the optimum parameter values on wall separation and $r$ is analysed. Both parameters are found to be approximately independent of wall-separation in the logarithmic sub-layer.

Simen Ellingsen; Per-ge Krogstad

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

432

Apply reliability centered maintenance to sealless pumps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on reliability centered maintenance (RCM) which is considered a crucial part of future reliability engineering. RCM determines the maintenance requirements of plants and equipment in their operating context. The RCM method has been applied to the management of critical sealless pumps in fire/toxic risk services, typical of the petrochemical industry. The method provides advantages from a detailed study of any critical engineering system. RCM is a team exercise and fosters team spirit in the plant environment. The maintenance strategy that evolves is based on team decisions and relies on maximizing the inherent reliability built into the equipment. RCM recommends design upgrades where this inherent reliability is being questioned. Sealless pumps of canned motor design are used as main reactor charge pumps in PVC plants. These pumps handle fresh vinyl chloride monomer (VCM), which is both carcinogenic and flammable.

Pradhan, S. (Exxon Chemicals Canada, Ontario (Canada))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Pipeline rehabilitation using field applied tape systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bare steel pipelines were first installed years before the turn of the century. Pipeline operators soon realized the lie of bare steel could be greatly enhanced by applying coatings. Thus began ``pipeline rehabilitation.`` Many of the older pipelines were exposed, evaluated, coated and returned to service. This procedure has reached new heights in recent years as coated pipelines of the twentieth century, having lived past their original design life, are now subject to coating failure. Many operator companies with pipelines thirty years or older are faced with ``replace or recondition.`` Considering the emphasis on cost restraints and environmental issues, replacing an existing pipeline is often not the best decision. Rehabilitation is a preferred solution for many operators.

Reeves, C.R. [Tapecoat Co., Evanston, IL (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

434

ASC/Nursing Engineering and Applied Science September 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASC/Nursing Engineering and Applied Science September 2010 5 11 6 6 7 8 Residence Days Residence First date to apply to graduate for Spring 2011 (tentative) First date to apply to graduate for Spring April Exam Period 22 25 Extended Program Spring Term begins Last date to apply to graduate for Spring

Offin, Dan

435

Innovation in practice: Philips Applied Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Different business environments within Philips demand different innovation approaches. In a high-tech business-to-business environment with demanding lead customers, innovation is driven by customer intimacy. In a fast-moving business-to-consumer environment, a combination of consumer marketing intelligence and technology is required, captured in a clear process to meet the critical time-to-market requirements. Innovation outside the existing business scope of the regular Philips divisions is handled separately. The role of Philips Applied Technologies (Apptech) is described, including competencies and processes. The central questions addressed in this paper are: 'Which innovation models are being used by Philips?' and 'What is the role of Apptech in the innovation processes and how does Apptech effectuate its role?' An open approach is evolving wherein innovation is performed in international networks of partners in new markets and with complementary skills. Assuming the task of integrator in such a network, entrepreneurs and lead customers complete the current technical and process-oriented capabilities of Apptech.

John Van Den Elst; Ronald Tol; Ruud Smits

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Roadmap: Applied Engineering Manufacturing Systems Bachelor of Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Applied Engineering ­ Manufacturing Systems ­ Bachelor of Science [AT 15000 Introduction to Human Communication 3 Fulfills Kent Core Additional Kent Core Requirement 3 See #12;Roadmap: Applied Engineering ­ Manufacturing Systems ­ Bachelor of Science [AT

Sheridan, Scott

437

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Case School of Applied Science...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Case School of Applied Science Ohio State University - OH 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Case School of Applied Science, Ohio State University (OH.0-01 ) Eliminated from...

438

Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2008 Year...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

8 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2008 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2008 Year-End...

439

Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2009 Year...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2009 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2009 Year-End...

440

Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2010 Year...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2010 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2010 Year-End...

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441

Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2011 Year...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2011 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2011 Year-End...

442

Research Blogs as a Tool for Applied Biodiversity Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Applied Biodiversity Sciences Perspectives Series is a student-directed collection of contributions from graduate student and faculty members of the integrative, NSF-IGERT Applied Biodiversity Sciences (ABS) program at Texas A&M University...

Petriello, Michael A

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

443

The Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science Response to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: ................................................................................................12 Chemical Engineering/Engineering Chemistry ProgramsThe Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science Response to: Where Next? Toward a University Plan April 15, 2010 Revised October 27, 2010 #12;i Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science: Create

Linder, Tamás

444

X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) Applied to Soot & What...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) Applied to Soot & What It Can Do for You X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) Applied to Soot & What It Can Do for You Presentation given at DEER...

445

CX-003399: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3399: Categorical Exclusion Determination 3399: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003399: Categorical Exclusion Determination 100 K Area Utilities Reroute CX(s) Applied: B1.26 Date: 05/26/2010 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Environmental Management, Office of River Protection-Richland Office The Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, needs to accelerate decommissioning and demolition (D&D) of the 100 K Area ancillary facilities, 100 K waste site remediation, and 105-K East and 105-K West reactor disposition. The proposed activities would provide for the isolation of 100 K area utilities to facilitate achieving cold and dark conditions for the facilities subject to D&D and remediation. The proposed activities would include the elimination of raw water withdrawals from the

446

CX-000525: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

25: Categorical Exclusion Determination 25: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000525: Categorical Exclusion Determination Isolation of Fire Water System, 261-H Consolidated Incineration Facility CX(s) Applied: B1.27 Date: 09/09/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office The fire water header to the 261-H Consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) will be isolated in preparation for Decontamination and Decommissioning of the CIF facility. Five post indicator valves feeding fire lines to CIF from the main fire water header will be removed and replaced with a blind flange on the main header. This will completely disconnect the CIF facility from any fire water service. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-000525.pdf More Documents & Publications

447

CX-009528: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

528: Categorical Exclusion Determination 528: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009528: Categorical Exclusion Determination WVDP-2012-01 WVDP Reservoir Interconnecting Canal Maintenance Activities CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/02/2012 Location(s): New York Offices(s): West Valley Demonstration Project The purpose of this project is to mitigate impedance of design flow and drainage between the two West Valley Demonstration Project water supply reservoirs. Sedimentation and bank sloughing has resulted in filling of the reservoir interconnecting canal impeding design water flow within the system. CX-009528.pdf More Documents & Publications West Valley Demonstration Project Phase I Decommissioning - Facility Disposition Partnering Performance Agreement CX-009527: Categorical Exclusion Determination

448

CX-005774: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

74: Categorical Exclusion Determination 74: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005774: Categorical Exclusion Determination Decommissioning of Flow Through Filter Diesel Generators CX(s) Applied: B1.27 Date: 04/12/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office The proosed activity will retire the Flow Through Filter (FTF) 254-1F and FTF 241-74F diesel generators (DG) and render them out of commission (OOC) per Manual 8Q, Procedure 121. The Site Air Subject Matter Experts notified South Carolina Deparment of Health and Environmental Control on March 29, 2010 that four (241-19F, 241-74F, 254-4F, and 254-1F) diesel generators in FTF were removed from service per document SRNS-J2220-2010-00020, RSM Track#10820. The Identification numbers are 046F, 144F, 44EF, and 190F.

449

CX-001126: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1126: Categorical Exclusion Determination 1126: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001126: Categorical Exclusion Determination 183-2C Removal of Switchgear Cubicle CX(s) Applied: B4.10 Date: 02/24/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office The proposed decommissioning end-state for this project is to remove and demolish portions of the switchgear, (cubicles 1 and 2), from the 183-2C substation and relocate cubicle #3. The breakers from cubicle #3 will be salvaged and turned over to Site Infrastructure (SI). All other portions of the substation, not affected by the removal of cubicle #3, will be left in place. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-001126.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-000894: Categorical Exclusion Determination

450

CX-002204: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

204: Categorical Exclusion Determination 204: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002204: Categorical Exclusion Determination Re-stabilize the Coatings on Polychlorinated Biphenyl Contaminated Areas in Ford Building CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/16/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office The custodial responsibility for 690-N, the Ford Building's (also known as the Process Heat Exchanger Repair Facility) was transferred from Spent Fuel Project (SFP) Facility to Area Completion Projects in July 2009 with the intention of decommissioning of the facility. However, due to scoping changes the facility was pulled back. While in the custody of SFP, the semi-annual inspection of the polychlorinated biphenyl stabilized floor was observed to have degradation to the point that it required