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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioned defueled naval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

EA-1889: Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Naval Reactor Plants from USS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

89: Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Naval Reactor Plants 89: Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Naval Reactor Plants from USS Enterprise (CVN 65) at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1889: Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Naval Reactor Plants from USS Enterprise (CVN 65) at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Summary This EA, prepared by the Department of the Navy, evaluates the environmental impacts of the disposal of decommissioned, defueled, naval reactor plants from the USS Enterprise at DOE's Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. DOE participated as a cooperating agency in the preparation of this EA. The Department of the Navy issued its FONSI on August 23, 2012. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download August 23, 2012

2

EIS-0259 Final Environmental Impact Statement On The Disposal Of Decommissioned, Defueled Cruiser, Ohio Class, And Los Angeles Class Naval Reactor Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-. -. 1. PURPOSE AND NEED U.S. Navy nuclear ships are decommissioned and defieled at the end of their usefi Metime, when the cost of continued operation is not justified by their fitary capabfity, or when the ship is no longer needed. The Navy needs to disposition the reactor compartments born defieled and decommissioned ctisers, and OHIO Class and LOS ANGELES Class submarines. The number of reactor compartments under consideration by this Environmental Impact Statement is about 100. These reactor compartments are in addition to the pre-LOS ANGELES Class submarines tieady being disposed of under the Na&s 1984 Find Environmental hpact Statement (USN, 1984a). Newer types of U.S. Navy nuclear-powered stips that are not expected to be decommissioned in the next 20 years (e.g., aircraft carriers, SEAWOLF Class submarines) are not included in this fid Enviromentd Impact Statement.

3

EIS-0259 Final Environmental Impact Statement On The Disposal Of Decommissioned, Defueled Cruiser, Ohio Class, And Los Angeles Class Naval Reactor Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

... -. FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR LEAD REMOVAL FROM AND STRUCTURAL RESTORATION OF CRUISER, OHIO, AND LOS ANGELES CLASS REACTOR COMPARTMENT DISPOSAL PACWGES Appendix A A-i . Table of Contents E~CUT~ S~Y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..A.3 1. ~TRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .." . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..A.3 2. DESCR~TION OF S~ELD~G LEAD CONTmD ~ REACTOR commmm PAcmGEs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..A.4 2.1 PermanentSMeldingLead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..A-4 2.2 MisceUaneousLead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..A-5 2.3 Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ................"A-5 2.4 Assumptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................A-5 3. SHIELD~G LEAD REMOVQ

4

TMI-2 (Three Mile Island Unit 2) core region defueling  

SciTech Connect

In July of 1982, a video camera was inserted into the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor vessel providing the first visual evidence of core damage. This inspection, and numerous subsequent data acquisition tasks, revealed a central void /approx/1.5 m (5 ft) deep. This void region was surrounded by partial length fuel assemblies and ringed on the periphery by /approx/40 full-length, but partial cross-section, fuel assemblies. All of the original 177 fuel assemblies exhibited signs of damage. The bottom of the void cavity was covered with a bed of granular rubble, fuel assembly upper end fittings, control rod spiders, fuel rod fragments, and fuel pellets. It was obvious that the normal plant refueling system not suitable for removing the damaged core. A new system of defueling tools and equipment was necessary to perform this task. Design of the new system was started immediately, followed by >1 yr of fabrication. Delivery and checkout of the defueling system occurred in mid-1985. Actual defueling was initiated in late 1985 with removal of the debris bed at the bottom of the core void. Obstructions to the debris, such as end fittings and fuel rod fragments ere removed first; then /approx/23,000 kg (50,000lb) of granular debris was quickly loaded into canisters. Core region defueling was completed in late 1987, /approx/2 yr after it was initiated.

Rodabaugh, J.M.; Cowser, D.K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Disassembly and defueling of the upper core support assembly  

SciTech Connect

During normal operation of the reactor plant, the upper core support assembly (UCSA) holds the fuel assemblies in a defined geometry and establishes the flow path of the reactor coolant in the reactor vessel. Sometime during the course of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 accident, molten core material melted through a portion of the UCSA and flowed outside the confines of the core region into normally inaccessible areas. As a result, the UCSA must now be disassembled to remove the relocated core material. The paper includes UCSA description, a discussion of equipment design basis, and a discussion of the defueling approach.

Rodabaugh, J.M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

DECOMMISSIONING DOCUMENTS Decommissioning Handbook The Decommissioning Handbook has  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DECOMMISSIONING DOCUMENTS DECOMMISSIONING DOCUMENTS Decommissioning Handbook The Decommissioning Handbook has been developed to incorporate examples and lessons learned, and to illustrate practices and procedures for implementing each step of the LCAM Decommissioning Implementation Guide. Decommissioning Benchmarking Study DOE's former Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) conducted a benchmarking study of its decommissioning program to analyze physical activities in facility decommissioning and to determine approaches to improve the decommissioning process. The study focused on quantifying productivity of decommissioning physical activities and identifying how productivity is affected by specific working conditions. The decommissioning benchmarking results are the foundation for several distinct products:

7

Decommissioning Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Decommissioning Handbook is a technical guide for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The decommissioning of a nuclear facility involves the removal of the radioactive and, for practical reasons, hazardous materials to enable the facility to be released and not represent a further risk to human health and the environment. This handbook identifies and technologies and techniques that will accomplish these objectives. The emphasis in this handbook is on characterization; waste treatment; decontamination; dismantling, segmenting, demolition; and remote technologies. Other aspects that are discussed in some detail include the regulations governing decommissioning, worker and environmental protection, and packaging and transportation of the waste materials. The handbook describes in general terms the overall decommissioning project, including planning, cost estimating, and operating practices that would ease preparation of the Decommissioning Plan and the decommissioning itself. The reader is referred to other documents for more detailed information. This Decommissioning Handbook has been prepared by Enserch Environmental Corporation for the US Department of Energy and is a complete restructuring of the original handbook developed in 1980 by Nuclear Energy Services. The significant changes between the two documents are the addition of current and the deletion of obsolete technologies and the addition of chapters on project planning and the Decommissioning Plan, regulatory requirements, characterization, remote technology, and packaging and transportation of the waste materials.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Decommissioning Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

area. The organizations has been actively performing and supporting others in performing decommissioning of former nuclear sites. Staff members are recognized as subject matter...

9

Supercomputer decommissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supercomputer decommissioning Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues submit Roadrunner supercomputer: Rest in...

10

Decommissioning Handbook  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Decommissioning Handbook has been developed to incorporate examples and lessons learned, and to illustrate practices and procedures for implementing each step of the LCAM Decommissioing...

11

Graphite Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many of the international participants in the EPRI Decommissioning Technology Program use graphite as a moderator material in their gas cooled reactors. This report reviews the current options for the management and disposal of irradiated nuclear graphite following the decommissioning of these nuclear installations. It also discusses specific issues associated with the disposal of graphite, and outlines innovative options for recycling or reusing products formed from the irradiated material.

2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

12

Decommissioning Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this EPRI Technical Report is to provide a series of pre-planning guidance documents for the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant. This guidance is based in part upon Nuclear Decommissioning Plans (NDPs) developed by Commonwealth Edison (now Exelon) following the premature closure of Zion Station in 1998 as well as from other industry references and experience. These NDPs focus on the planning activities over the period from prior to final shutdown through the transition period into de...

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Decommissioning handbook  

SciTech Connect

This document is a compilation of information pertinent to the decommissioning of surplus nuclear facilities. This handbook is intended to describe all stages of the decommissioning process including selection of the end product, estimation of the radioactive inventory, estimation of occupational exposures, description of the state-of-the-art in re decontamination, remote csposition of wastes, and estimation of program costs. Presentation of state-of-the-art technology and data related to decommissioning will aid in consistent and efficient program planning and performance. Particular attention is focused on available technology applicable to those decommissioning activities that have not been accomplished before, such as remote segmenting and handling of highly activated 1100 MW(e) light water reactor vessel internals and thick-walled reactor vessels. A summary of available information associated with the planning and estimating of a decommissioning program is also presented. Summarized in particular are the methodologies associated with the calculation and measurement of activated material inventory, distribution, and surface dose level, system contamination inventory and distribution, and work area dose levels. Cost estimating techniques are also presented and the manner in which to account for variations in labor costs as impacting labor-intensive work activities is explained.

Manion, W.J.; LaGuardia, T.S.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Decommissioning Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Documents Decommissioning Documents Decommissioning Documents More Documents & Publications CX-002246: Categorical Exclusion Determination Decommissioning Handbook CX-003134:...

15

Decommissioning Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Documents Decommissioning Documents Decommissioning Documents More Documents & Publications CX-002246: Categorical Exclusion Determination Decommissioning Handbook CX-000018:...

16

Naval applications study areas  

SciTech Connect

This memorandum discusses study areas and items that will require attention for the naval studies of the utilization of nuclear propulsion in a submarine-based missile system.

Hadley, J. W.

1962-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

17

Decommissioning Handbook | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decommissioning Handbook Decommissioning Handbook The Decommissioning Handbook has been developed to incorporate examples and lessons learned, and to illustrate practices and...

18

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs, Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix D: Part A, Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Management  

SciTech Connect

Volume 1 to the Department of Energy`s Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Management Programs Environmental Impact Statement evaluates a range of alternatives for managing naval spent nuclear fuel expected to be removed from US Navy nuclear-powered vessels and prototype reactors through the year 2035. The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) considers a range of alternatives for examining and storing naval spent nuclear fuel, including alternatives that terminate examination and involve storage close to the refueling or defueling site. The EIS covers the potential environmental impacts of each alternative, as well as cost impacts and impacts to the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program mission. This Appendix covers aspects of the alternatives that involve managing naval spent nuclear fuel at four naval shipyards and the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Kesselring Site in West Milton, New York. This Appendix also covers the impacts of alternatives that involve examining naval spent nuclear fuel at the Expended Core Facility in Idaho and the potential impacts of constructing and operating an inspection facility at any of the Department of Energy (DOE) facilities considered in the EIS. This Appendix also considers the impacts of the alternative involving limited spent nuclear fuel examinations at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. This Appendix does not address the impacts associated with storing naval spent nuclear fuel after it has been inspected and transferred to DOE facilities. These impacts are addressed in separate appendices for each DOE site.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

EA-1889-FEA-FONSI-2012.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UNITED STATES UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT ON THE DISPOSAL OF DECOMMISSIONED, DEFUELED NAVAL REACTOR PLANTS FROM USS ENTERPRISE (CVN 65) AUGUST 2012 FINAL USS ENTERPRISE EA RESPONSIBLE AGENCIES: Lead Federal Agency: U.S. Department of the Navy Cooperating Agency: U.S. Department of Energy TITLE: Final Environmental Assessment on the Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled, Naval Reactor Plants from USS ENTERPRISE (CVN 65) FINAL USS ENTERPRISE EA S-1 SUMMARY: The United States Navy proposes to remove the reactor compartments of USS ENTERPRISE (CVN 65), hereafter referred to as ENTERPRISE, at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS & IMF), prepare the reactor compartments for disposal

20

Decommissioning Plan RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Decommissioning Plan Review (DPR) Module is a tool that assists DOE federal project review teams in evaluating the adequacy of the decommissioning plan prior to approval of the associated CD.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioned defueled naval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Nuclear Plant Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the 1990s several nuclear utilities proceeded with full decommissioning of their nuclear power plants based on perceived economics. This major shift to immediate decommissioning presented a significant challenge to the industry in terms of the development of a decommissioning process and a comprehensive updated regulatory framework. EPRI responded by undertaking the formation of the Decommissioning Support Program. The initial work involved conducting a series of topical workshops directed to specific...

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

22

Decommissioning Experiences and Lessons Learned: Decommissioning Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1995, the United States (US) Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued revised decommissioning regulations that provided a dose-based site release limit and detailed supporting regulatory guidance. This report summarizes the decommissioning cost experiences at US nuclear plants, including information about radwaste volumes and the cost of radwaste disposal based on the current regulatory situation in the US.

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

23

Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Directorate, Washington ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Directorate, Washington, DC. NVLAP Lab Code: 100565-10. Address and Contact Information: Naval Reactors ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

24

Power Reactor Decommissioning Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past two decades the NRC regulated nuclear industry has encountered and dealt with a diverse range of political, financial and technological challenges while decommissioning its nuclear facilities. During that time, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities has evolved into a mature industry in the United States with a number of large power reactors successfully decommissioned and their NRC licenses terminated. One of the challenges discussed in this report is site release standards, required ...

2011-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

25

Decommissioning Yankee Rowe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the process and progress of the decommissioning of the Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Plant in Massachusetts. In 32 years Yankee Rowe was a safe, reliable and economical power source for New England. The uncertain near-term availability of disposal facilities for low-level waste, spent fuel, and other high level waste presents special challenges to the decommissioning. The decommissioning plan was submitted to the USNRC in December 1993 with final approval anticipated in 1994. Topics highlighted in this article are the decommissioning plan and the component removal program.

Heider, K.J.; Mellor, R.A.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Decommissioning Benchmarking Study Final Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE's former Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) conducted a benchmarking study of its decommissioning program to analyze physical activities in facility decommissioning and to determine...

27

Microsoft Word - Enterprise EA (for public)2.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

enclosure to letter enclosure to letter UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT ON THE DISPOSAL OF DECOMMISSIONED, DEFUELED NAVAL REACTOR PLANTS FROM USS ENTERPRISE (CVN 65) SEPTEMBER 2011 DRAFT USS ENTERPRISE EA RESPONSIBLE AGENCIES: Lead Federal Agency: U.S. Department of the Navy Cooperating Agency: U.S. Department of Energy TITLE: Draft Environmental Assessment on the Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled, Naval Reactor Plants from USS ENTERPRISE (CVN 65) DRAFT USS ENTERPRISE EA i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. PURPOSE AND NEED ..................................................................................................................... 1-1 1.1 Background ................................................................................................................................. 1-2

28

Decommissioning at AWE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AWE (A) has been at the heart of the UK Nuclear deterrent since it was established in the early 1950's. It is a nuclear licensed site and is governed by the United Kingdoms Nuclear Installation Inspectorate (NII). AWE plc on behalf of the Ministry of Defence (MOD) manages the AWE (A) site and all undertakings including decommissioning. Therefore under NII license condition 35 'Decommissioning', AWE plc is accountable to make and implement adequate arrangements for the decommissioning of any plant or process, which may affect safety. The majority of decommissioning projects currently being undertaken are to do with Hazard category 3, 4 or 5 facilities, systems or plant that have reached the end of their operational span and have undergone Post-Operational Clean-Out (POCO). They were either built for the production of fissile components, for supporting the early reactor fuels programmes or for processing facility waste arisings. They either contain redundant contaminated gloveboxes associated process areas, process plant or systems or a combination of all. In parallel with decommissioning project AWE (A) are undertaking investigation into new technologies to aid decommissioning projects; to remove the operative from hands on operations; to develop and implement modifications to existing process and techniques used. AWE (A) is currently going thorough a sustained phase of upgrading its facilities to enhance its scientific capability, with older facilities, systems and plant being replaced, making decommissioning a growth area. It is therefore important to the company to reduce these hazards progressively and safety over the coming years, making decommissioning an important feature of the overall legacy management aspects of AWE PLC's business. This paper outlines the current undertakings and progress of Nuclear decommissioning on the AWE (A) site. (authors)

Biles, K.; Hedges, M.; Campbell, C

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Estimating decommissioning costs: The 1994 YNPS decommissioning cost study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Early this year, Yankee Atomic Electric Company began developing a revised decommissioning cost estimate for the Yankee Nuclear Power Station (YNPS) to provide a basis for detailed decommissioning planning and to reflect slow progress in siting low-level waste (LLW) and spent-nuclear-fuel disposal facilities. The revision also reflects the need to change from a cost estimate that focuses on overall costs to a cost estimate that is sufficiently detailed to implement decommissioning and identify the final cost of decommissioning.

Szymczak, W.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), Stockholm Intl Peace Research Inst, Oxford University Oress 337 p., 1997. Arkin, WM and J Handler, Naval Geochemistry (eds. AC Sigleo and A Hattori), Lewis Publishers, Inc., Chelsea, MI, 97-119, 1985. Brungot, AL

31

Fracture of aluminum naval structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structural catastrophic failure of naval vessels due to extreme loads such as underwater or air explosion, high velocity impact (torpedoes), or hydrodynamic loads (high speed vessels) is primarily caused by fracture. ...

Galanis, Konstantinos, 1970-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Nuclear Decommissioning Financing Act (Maine)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Nuclear Decommissioning Financing Act calls for the establishment of a tax-exempt, tax-deductible decommissioning fund by the licensee of any nuclear power generating facility to pay for the...

33

Site decommissioning management plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 48 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC staff`s strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 48 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites.

Fauver, D.N.; Austin, J.H.; Johnson, T.C.; Weber, M.F.; Cardile, F.P.; Martin, D.E.; Caniano, R.J.; Kinneman, J.D.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives...

35

2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Naval Nuclear Propulsion...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program The...

36

Connecticut Yankee Decommissioning Experience Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several U.S. nuclear power plants entered decommissioning in the 1990's. Based on current information, the next group of plants whose license will expire will not begin decommissioning for nearly a decade. This report provides detailed information on the decommissioning of one power reactor - Connecticut Yankee, in order to provide their experience for future plants.

2006-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

37

The Decontamination and Decommissioning Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4.1.4 NUCLEAR SUBSTANCE ROOM DECOMMISSIONING FORM The permit holder shall ensure that prior to decommissioning any area, room or enclosure where the permitted activity has been conducted: non: ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ #12;Contamination Monitoring Results Provide a floor plan of the lab/area to be decommissioned

Kemner, Ken

38

DECOMMISSIONING PLAN AND RADIOLOGICAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cabot Performance Materials (Cabot) holds NRC License SMC-1562, covering storage of radioactive materials at both their Revere and Reading sites in Pennsylvania. Former ore processing at the Revere facility generated waste slag contaminated with uranium and thorium. In 1988, Cabot began onsite decommissioning activities for the Revere facility, including site

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Naval Petroleum Reserves | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Naval Petroleum Reserves For much of the 20th century, the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves served as a contingency source of fuel for the Nation's military. All that...

40

Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Directorate, Washington ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Directorate, Washington, DC. NVLAP Lab Code: 100565-0. Address and Contact Information: ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioned defueled naval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Directorate, Washington ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Directorate, Washington, DC. NVLAP Lab Code: 100565-2. Address and Contact Information: Point Loma, Bldg. ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

42

NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY Information Technology Solutions  

power (CHP) or emergency backup power Small, High Efficiency, Recuperated Ceramic Turboshaft Engine NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY T RANSFER ...

43

EA-1889: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Draft Environmental Assessment 9: Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1889: Draft Environmental Assessment Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Naval Reactor Plants from USS Enterprise (CVN 65) The Department of the Navy has prepared a Draft Environmental Assessment (EA) on the Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled, Naval Reactor Plants from the USS Enterprise. The world's first nuclear-powered naval aircraft carrier, Enterprise, is scheduled for decommissioning in 2013, following 51 consecutive years of service. Because the preferred alternative is to dispose of the Enterprise reactor plants at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site*, the Department of Energy is a cooperating agency for this EA. For additional information on the Draft Enterprise EA, please contact Mary Mascianica at (360) 476-7111.

44

Decommissioning Plan RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decommissioning Plan Review Module Decommissioning Plan Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 C OFFICE OF D C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Decomm Rev Critical Decisi CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan missioning view Module ion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) g Plan e plicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Oper ration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

45

Decommissioning Technology Experience Reports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents four summary reports on field applications and demonstration tests of several nuclear plant deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) technologies. Specifically presented are findings from: (1) concrete decontamination technology tests at Rancho Seco; (2) a large bore piping decontamination and characterization demonstration at Big Rock Point; (3) gamma ray imaging for D&D applications; and (4) novel techniques for large tank and vessel removal at Trojan and Rancho Seco.

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

46

International Research Reactor Decommissioning Project  

SciTech Connect

Many research reactors have been or will be shut down and are candidates for decommissioning. Most of the respective countries neither have a decommissioning policy nor the required expertise and funds to effectively implement a decommissioning project. The IAEA established the Research Reactor Decommissioning Demonstration Project (R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P) to help answer this need. It was agreed to involve the Philippine Research Reactor (PRR-1) as model reactor to demonstrate 'hands-on' experience as it is just starting the decommissioning process. Other facilities may be included in the project as they fit into the scope of R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P and complement to the PRR-1 decommissioning activities. The key outcome of the R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P will be the decommissioning of the PRR-1 reactor. On the way to this final goal the preparation of safety related documents (i.e., decommissioning plan, environmental impact assessment, safety analysis report, health and safety plan, cost estimate, etc.) and the licensing process as well as the actual dismantling activities could provide a model to other countries involved in the project. It is expected that the R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P would initiate activities related to planning and funding of decommissioning activities in the participating countries if that has not yet been done.

Leopando, Leonardo [Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Quezon City (Philippines); Warnecke, Ernst [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING AT THEEAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGYPAR...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING AT THEEAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGYPARK, ER-B-99-01 DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING AT THEEAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGYPARK, ER-B-99-01 The East...

48

DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decommissioning means permanently removing a nuclear facility from service and reducing radioactive material on the licensed site to levels that would permit termination of the NRC license. On June 27, 1988, the NRC issued general requirements on decommissioning that contained technical and financial criteria and dealt with planning needs, timing, funding mechanisms, and environmental review

unknown authors

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Designing Reactors to Facilitate Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

Critics of nuclear power often cite issues with tail-end-of-the-fuel-cycle activities as reasons to oppose the building of new reactors. In fact, waste disposal and the decommissioning of large nuclear reactors have proven more challenging than anticipated. In the early days of the nuclear power industry the design and operation of various reactor systems was given a great deal of attention. Little effort, however, was expended on end-of-the-cycle activities, such as decommissioning and disposal of wastes. As early power and test reactors have been decommissioned difficulties with end-of-the-fuel-cycle activities have become evident. Even the small test reactors common at the INEEL were not designed to facilitate their eventual decontamination, decommissioning, and dismantlement. The results are that decommissioning of these facilities is expensive, time consuming, relatively hazardous, and generates large volumes of waste. This situation clearly supports critics concerns about building a new generation of power reactors.

Richard H. Meservey

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Second EPRI International Decommissioning Workshop at Bristol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the proceedings of an international EPRI workshop on decommissioning and radioactive waste management. The workshop focused on a wide range of decommissioning topics, including general approaches, technical developments, and project experiences. The information presented will assist individual utilities in their decommissioning projects, and has the potential to reduce decommissioning costs.

2004-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

51

Decommissioning in the mature nuclear power industry  

SciTech Connect

Procedures for decommissioning a nuclear power plant or a spent fuel reprocessing plant are described. (DCC)

Anderson, F.H.; Slansky, C.M.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Decontamination & decommissioning focus area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

EA-1889: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1889: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Naval Reactor Plants from USS Enterprise (CVN 65) The Department of the Navy has prepared a Final Environmental Assessment (EA) and Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) on the Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled, Naval Reactor Plants from the USS Enterprise. Because the preferred alternative is to dispose of the Enterprise reactor plants at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site*, the Department of Energy is a cooperating agency for this EA. For additional information on the Enterprise EA and FONSI, please contact Mary Mascianica at (360) 476-7111. *Naval reactor compartments, reactor core barrels, reactor closure heads,

54

Geothermal energy at Long Beach Naval Shipyard and Naval Station and at Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station, California. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to determine and evaluate sources of geothermal energy at two military bases in southern California, the Long Beach Naval Shipyard and Naval Station and the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station. One part of the project focused on the natural geothermal characteristics beneath the naval bases. Another part focused on the geothermal energy produced by oilfield operations on and adjacent to each base. Results of the study are presented here for the US Department of the Navy to use in its program to reduce its reliance on petrolem by the development of different sources of energy. The study was accomplished under a cooperative agreement between the US Department of Energy's San Francisco Operations Office and the Department of the Navy's Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, California, for joint research and development of geothermal energy at military installations.

Higgins, C.T.; Chapman, R.H.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

EIS-0259: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0259: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0259: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0259: Final Environmental Impact Statement Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Cruiser, Ohio Class, Los Angeles and Class Naval Reactor Plants This Environmental Impact Statement analyzes the alternate ways for disposing of decommissioned, defieled reactor compliments from U.S. Navy nuclear-powered cruisers, (Bainbridge, Truxtun, Long Beach, California Class and Virginia Class) and Los Angeles Class, and Ohio Class submarines. Final Environmental Impact Statement on the Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Cruiser, Ohio Class, Los Angeles and Class Naval Reactor Plants, DOE/EIS-0259 (April 1996) EIS-0259-FEIS-01-1996_0.pdf EIS-0259-FEIS-02-1996_0.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1889: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant

56

Naval Nuclear Propulsion Plants | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Naval Nuclear Propulsion Plants In naval nuclear propulsion plants, fissioning of uranium atoms in the reactor core produces heat. Because the fission process also produces...

57

EA-1008: Continued Development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Continued Development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (Sitewide), Natrona County, Wyoming EA-1008: Continued Development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (Sitewide), Natrona...

58

EA-1236: Preparation for Transfer of Ownership of Naval Petroleum...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

236: Preparation for Transfer of Ownership of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, Natrona County, WY EA-1236: Preparation for Transfer of Ownership of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3,...

59

Distributed energy resources at naval base ventura county building 1512  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Naval Base Ventura County Standby Generator OptimizationC&H Engineering performed a standby generator optimizationOn Naval Base Ventura County Standby Generator Optimization

Bailey, Owen C.; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Naval Sea...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Naval Sea Systems Command 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Naval Sea Systems Command fewm13nswcphiladelphiahighres.pdf fewm13nswcphiladelphia.pdf More...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioned defueled naval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A Review of OLED Research at Naval Research Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Division at Naval Research Laboratory. Her research is focused on organic light emitting diode (OLED) material and devices. She will discuss the research activities at Naval...

62

More About NNSA's Naval Reactors Office | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Naval Reactors Office The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program provides militarily effective nuclear propulsion plants and ensures their safe, reliable and long-lived operation. This...

63

decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) storage wells. The manual builds on lessons learned through NETL research; the experiences of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships' (RCSPs) carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) field tests; and the acquired knowledge of industries that have been actively drilling wells for more than 100 years. In addition, the BPM provides an overview of the well-

64

Decommissioning Pre-Planning Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility experiences in recent years show that significant cost savings will result from advance planning for the eventual closure of nuclear power plants. This report provides a framework for planning ahead for plant decommissioning by drawing upon the experiences of utilities currently involved in decommissioning. It identifies important advance planning decisions, tasks, and contributing disciplines, establishes activity precedence relationships, and defines data requirements. The report also describes...

2001-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

65

Money Related Decommissioning and Funding Decision Making  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

'Money makes the world go round', as the song says. It definitely influences decommissioning decision-making and financial assurance for future decommissioning. This paper will address two money-related decommissioning topics. The first is the evaluation of whether to continue or to halt decommissioning activities at Fermi 1. The second is maintaining adequacy of financial assurance for future decommissioning of operating plants. Decommissioning costs considerable money and costs are often higher than originally estimated. If costs increase significantly and decommissioning is not well funded, decommissioning activities may be deferred. Several decommissioning projects have been deferred when decision-makers determined future spending is preferable than current spending, or when costs have risen significantly. Decommissioning activity timing is being reevaluated for the Fermi 1 project. Assumptions for waste cost-escalation significantly impact the decision being made this year on the Fermi 1 decommissioning project. They also have a major impact on the estimated costs for decommissioning currently operating plants. Adequately funding full decommissioning during plant operation will ensure that the users who receive the benefit pay the full price of the nuclear-generated electricity. Funding throughout operation also will better ensure that money is available following shutdown to allow decommissioning to be conducted without need for additional funds.

Goodman, Lynne S. [Detroit Edison Company, 6400 N. Dixie Highway, Newport, Michigan 48162 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Status of the NRC Decommissioning Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On July 21, 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published the final rule on Radiological Criteria for License Termination (the License Termination Rule or LTR) as Subpart E to 10 CFR Part 20. NRC regulations require that materials licensees submit Decommissioning Plans to support the decommissioning of its facility if it is required by license condition, or if the procedures and activities necessary to carry out the decommissioning have not been approved by NRC and these procedures could increase the potential health and safety impacts to the workers or the public. NRC regulations also require that reactor licensees submit Post-shutdown Decommissioning Activities Reports and License Termination Plans to support the decommissioning of nuclear power facilities. This paper provides an update on the status of the NRC's decommissioning program that was presented during WM'02. It discusses the staff's current efforts to streamline the decommissioning process, current issues being faced in the decommissioning program, such as partial site release and restricted release of sites, as well as the status of the decommissioning of complex sites and those listed in the Site Decommissioning Management Plan. The paper discusses the status of permanently shut-down commercial power reactors and the transfer of complex decommissioning sites and sites listed on the SDMP to Agreement States. Finally the paper provides an update of the status of various tools and guidance the NRC is developing to assist licensees during decommissioning, including an effort to consolidate and risk-inform decommissioning guidance.

Orlando, D. A.; Camper, L.; Buckley, J.; Pogue, E.; Banovac, K.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

67

Decommissioning Standard Review Plans and Risk-Informing Decommissioning Regulation: Selected 1999 Industry/NRC Decommissioning Lice nsing Interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the technical support EPRI provided the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Decommissioning Working Group in 1999. This volume includes two initiatives that produced four draft Decommissioning Standard Review Plans (DSRPs). It also includes an evaluation entitled Spent Fuel Pool Seismic Failure Frequency in Support of Risk-Informed Decommissioning -- Emergency Planning.

1999-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

Power Burst Facility (PBF) Reactor Reactor Decommissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactor Decommissioning Click here to view Click here to view Reactor Decommissioning Click on an image to enlarge A crane removes the reactor vessel from the Power Burst Facility...

69

Management of Naval Reactors' Cyber Security Program, OIG-0884  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Naval Reactors' Naval Reactors' Cyber Security Program DOE/IG-0884 April 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 April 12, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Management of Naval Reactors' Cyber Security Program" INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Naval Reactors Program (Naval Reactors), an organization within the National Nuclear Security Administration, provides the military with safe and reliable nuclear propulsion plants to power warships and submarines. Naval Reactors maintains responsibility for activities supporting the United States Naval fleet nuclear propulsion systems, including research and

70

Innovative implementation of decommissioning activities at Yankee  

SciTech Connect

The decommissioning of the Yankee Rowe reactor is described. Reactor dismantlement, radioactive waste manageemnt, and cost are discussed.

Kadak, A.C.; Maret, G.A.; Mellor, R.A.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

Comparative naval architecture analysis of diesel submarines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many comparative naval architecture analyses of surface ships have been performed, but few published comparative analyses of submarines exist. Of the several design concept papers, reports and studies that have been written ...

Torkelson, Kai Oscar

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The dynamics of naval resource allocation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Naval policy planning requires viewing the entire spectrum of annual resource allocation, over a long period. Emerging research into the trade offs between force asset levels and fund flows to support those assets is described. The method underlying ...

Rolf Clark

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

On the road to decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

This article is a review of the planning of the decommissioning of the Yankee Rowe and Trojan reactors, with special note given to the issue of waste disposal. Transportation of the major Yankee Rowe components to the Barnwell site was discussed, and Portland General`s involvement with the Northwest Compact is noted.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

A Comparative Perspective on Reactor Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparative perspective on decommissioning, based on facts and figures as well as the national policies, is useful in identifying mutually beneficial 'lessons learned' from various decommissioning programs. In this paper we provide such a perspective on the US and European approaches based on a review of the programmatic experience and the decommissioning projects. The European countries selected for comparison, UK, France, and Germany, have nuclear power programs comparable in size and vintage to the US program but have distinctly different policies at the federal level. The national decommissioning scene has a lot to do with how national nuclear energy policies are shaped. Substantial experience exists in all decommissioning programs and the technology is in a mature state. Substantial cost savings can result from sharing of decommissioning information, technologies and approaches among various programs. However, the Achilles' heel for the decommissioning industry remains the lack of appropriate disposal facilities for the nuclear wastes. (authors)

Devgun, J.S. [Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC, 55 E. Monroe Street, Chicago, IL 60603 (United States); Zelmer, R. [Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Office, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, 1900 City Park Drive, Suite 200, Ottawa, Ontario K1J 1A3 (Canada)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Assessment of foreign decommissioning technology with potential application to US decommissioning needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to identify and technically assess foreign decommissioning technology developments that may represent significant improvements over decommissioning technology currently available or under development in the United States. Technology need areas for nuclear power reactor decommissioning operations were identified and prioritized using the results of past light water reactor (LWR) decommissioning studies to quantitatively evaluate the potential for reducing cost and decommissioning worker radiation dose for each major decommissioning activity. Based on these identified needs, current foreign decommissioning technologies of potential interest to the US were identified through personal contacts and the collection and review of an extensive body of decommissioning literature. These technologies were then assessed qualitatively to evaluate their uniqueness, potential for a significant reduction in decommissioning costs and/or worker radiation dose, development status, and other factors affecting their value and applicability to US needs.

Allen, R.P.; Konzek, G.J.; Schneider, K.J.; Smith, R.I.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) Decontamination & Decommissioning/ Facilities Engineering (D&D/FE) As the DOE complex sites prepare for closure, a large number of buildings and facilities must be deactivated and decommissioned. These facilities contain many complex systems (e.g. ventilation), miles of contaminated pipelines, glove boxes, and unique processing equipment that require labor intensive deactivation and decommissioning methods. Although

77

from Savannah River National Laboratory  

In-situ decommissioning Excess de-fueled nuclear facilities are often sturdy, hardened structures with enclosed contaminated equipment

78

EA-0531: Proposed Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Proposed Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3, Garfield County, Colorado EA-0531: Proposed Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil Shale...

79

The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves To ensure sufficient fuel for the fleet, the Government began withdrawing probable oil-bearing...

80

Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project: overview and justification  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this booklet is to brief the reader on the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project and to summarize the benefits of funding the project in FY 1984. Background information on the station and the decommissioning project is provided in this section of the booklet; the need for a reactor decommissining demonstration is discussed in the next section; and a summary of how the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP) provides the needed demonstration is provided in the final section.

Coffman, F.E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioned defueled naval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Regulatory Process for Decommissioning Nuclear Power Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NRC revised decommissioning rule 10 CFR 50.82 in 1996 to make significant changes in the regulatory process for nuclear power plant licensees. This report provides a summary of ongoing federal agency and industry activities. It also describes the regulatory requirements applicable, or no longer applicable, to nuclear power plants at the time of permanent shutdown through the early decommissioning stage. The report describes the major components of a typical decommissioning plan, and provides industry...

1998-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

82

Decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

After careful planning and input from regulatory agencies and the community, a decommissioning plan for the HFBR has been finalized. A Feasibility Study was completed and a...

83

Decommissioning Benchmarking Study Final Report | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benchmarking Study Final Report Decommissioning Benchmarking Study Final Report DOE's former Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) conducted a benchmarking study of its...

84

Reactor Decommissioning Projects | Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor(BGRR) BGRR Overview BGRR Complex Description Decommissioning Decision BGRR Complex Cleanup Actions BGRR Documents BGRR Science &...

85

Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's Fiscal Year 2008 and 2007 Financial Statement Audit, OAS-FS-10-05 Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and...

86

Title 10, Chapter 641 Pertaining to Naval Petroleum Reserves in U.S.C. |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Title 10, Chapter 641 Pertaining to Naval Petroleum Reserves in Title 10, Chapter 641 Pertaining to Naval Petroleum Reserves in U.S.C. Title 10, Chapter 641 Pertaining to Naval Petroleum Reserves in U.S.C. CITE: 10USC7420 CHAPTER 641--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES CITE: 10USC7421 CHAPTER 641--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES CITE: 10USC7422 CHAPTER 641--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES CITE: 10USC7423 CHAPTER 641--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES CITE: 10USC7424 CHAPTER 641--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES CITE: 10USC7425 CHAPTER 641--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES CITE: 10USC7427 CHAPTER 641--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES CITE: 10USC7428 CHAPTER 641--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES CITE: 10USC7429 CHAPTER 641--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES CITE: 10USC7430 CHAPTER 641--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES CITE: 10USC7431 CHAPTER 641--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES CITE: 10USC7432 CHAPTER 641--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES

87

Yangtze Patrol: American Naval Forces in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Yangtze Patrol: American Naval Forces in China A Selected, Partially-Annotated Bibliography literature of the United States Navy in China. mvh #12;"Like Chimneys in Summer" The thousands of men who served on the China Station before World War II have been all but forgotten, except in the mythology

88

EA-1053: Decontaminating and Decommissioning the General Atomics...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

53: Decontaminating and Decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility, San Diego, California EA-1053: Decontaminating and Decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell...

89

3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning The design and production of 3-D scale models that replicate the highly contaminated...

90

DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA In May 1995, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a policy in...

91

Rancho Seco--Decommissioning Update  

SciTech Connect

The Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station ceased operation in June of 1989 and entered an extended period of SAFSTOR to allow funds to accumulate for dismantlement. Incremental dismantlement was begun in 1997 of steam systems and based on the successful completion of work, the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) board of directors approved full decommissioning in July 1999. A schedule has been developed for completion of decommissioning by 2008, allowing decommissioning funds to accumulate until they are needed. Systems removal began in the Auxiliary Building in October of 1999 and in the Reactor Building in January of 2000. Systems dismantlement continues in the Reactor Building and should be completed by the end of 2003. System removal is near completion in the Auxiliary Building with removal of the final liquid waste tanks in progress. The spent fuel has been moved to dry storage in an onsite ISFSI, with completion on August 21, 2002. The spent fuel racks are currently being removed from the pool, packaged and shipped, and then the pool will be cleaned. Also in the last year the reactor coolant pumps and primary piping were removed and shipped. Characterization and planning work for the reactor vessel and internals is also in progress with various cut-up and/or disposal options being evaluated. In the year ahead the remaining systems in the Reactor Building will be removed, packaged and sent for disposal, including the pressurizer. Work will be started on embedded and underground piping and the large outdoor tanks. Building survey and decontamination will begin. RFP's for removal of the vessel and internals and the steam generators are planned to fix the cost of those components. If the costs are consistent with current estimates the work will go forward. If they are not, hardened SAFSTOR/entombment may be considered.

Newey, J. M.; Ronningen, E. T.; Snyder, M. W.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

92

STANDARD OPERATING PROTOCOLS FOR DECOMMISSIONING  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning projects at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites are conducted under project-specific decision documents, which involve extensive preparation time, public comment periods, and regulatory approvals. Often, the decision documents must be initiated at least one year before commencing the decommissioning project, and they are expensive and time consuming to prepare. The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is a former nuclear weapons production plant at which hazardous substances and wastes were released or disposed during operations. As a result of the releases, RFETS was placed on the National Priorities List in 1989, and is conducting cleanup activities under a federal facilities compliance agreement. Working closely with interested stakeholders and state and federal regulatory agencies, RFETS has developed and implemented an improved process for obtaining the approvals. The key to streamlining the approval process has been the development of sitewide decision documents called Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement Standard Operating Protocols or ''RSOPs.'' RSOPs have broad applicability, and could be used instead of project-specific documents. Although no two decommissioning projects are exactly the same and they may vary widely in contamination and other hazards, the basic steps taken for cleanup are usually similar. Because of this, using RSOPs is more efficient than preparing a separate project-specific decision documents for each cleanup action. Over the Rocky Flats cleanup life cycle, using RSOPs has the potential to: (1) Save over 5 million dollars and 6 months on the site closure schedule; (2) Eliminate preparing one hundred and twenty project-specific decision documents; and (3) Eliminate writing seventy-five closure description documents for hazardous waste unit closure and corrective actions.

Foss, D. L.; Stevens, J. L.; Gerdeman, F. W.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

93

2003 NEI/EPRI Decommissioning Forum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NEI/EPRI Decommissioning Forum provides a comprehensive overview of the challenges facing the industry in the completion of the nuclear power plant life cycle. This report presents the proceedings of the NEI/EPRI 2003 Decommissioning Forum, which focused on license termination, material clearance values, funding, and final site release requirements.

2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

94

Updated Costs for Decommissioning Nuclear Power Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This update of 1978 NRC cost estimates--in 1984 dollars--also estimates the costs of several special manpower and licensing options for decommissioning nuclear power facilities. The fully developed methodology offers utilities a sound basis on which to estimate the costs of decommissioning specific plants.

1985-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

95

Preparing for Decommissioning: The Oyster Creek Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report chronicles the process of preparing GPU Nuclear's Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station for early retirement and decommissioning. The Oyster Creek experience has great relevance to the nuclear industry, as future decommissioning projects will benefit from the comprehensive preplanning work performed there.

2000-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

96

In-Situ Decommissioning | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » In-Situ Decommissioning In-Situ Decommissioning In-Situ Decommissioning (ISD) is the permanent entombment of a facility that contains residual radiological and/or chemical contamination. The ISD approach is a cost-effective alternative to both demolition and complete removal of the structure and its content (including the cost of transport and disposal). In addition, the effective use of ISD reduces human health and safety risks while helping to attain sustainability goals through the reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, petroleum consumption and waste generation. Not all contaminated structures can be decommissioned using ISD; canditate sites must meet strict criteria.

97

Fuel Cell Power Plant Experience Naval Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

clean clean Fuel Cell Power Plant Experience Naval Applications US Department of Energy/ Office of Naval Research Shipboard Fuel Cell Workshop Washington, DC March 29, 2011 FuelCell Energy, the FuelCell Energy logo, Direct FuelCell and "DFC" are all registered trademarks (®) of FuelCell Energy, Inc. *FuelCell Energy, Inc. *Renewable and Liquid Fuels Experience *HTPEM Fuel Cell Stack for Shipboard APU *Solid Oxide Experience and Applications DOE-ONR Workshop FuelCell Energy, the FuelCell Energy logo, Direct FuelCell and "DFC" are all registered trademarks (®) of FuelCell Energy, Inc. FuelCell Energy, Inc. * Premier developer of fuel cell technology - founded in 1969 * Over 50 power installations in North America, Europe, and Asia * Industrial, commercial, utility

98

FY 2000 Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

This document describes activities of the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area for the past year.

None

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Proceedings: 3rd EPRI International Decommissioning and Radioactive Waste Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI held its 3rd International Decommissioning Workshop in collaboration with EDF in Lyon, France. This workshop focused on a wide range of decommissioning topics, including general approaches, technical developments and project experiences. The information presented will assist individual utilities in their decommissioning projects with the potential to reduce decommissioning costs.

2005-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

100

Designing decommissioning into new reactor designs  

SciTech Connect

One of the lessons learned from decommissioning of existing reactors has been that decommissioning was not given much thought when these reactors were designed some three or four decades ago. Recently, the nuclear power has seen a worldwide resurgence and many new advanced reactor designs are either on the market or nearing design completion. Most of these designs are evolutionary in nature and build on the existing and proven technologies. They also incorporate many improvements and take advantage of the substantial operating experience. Nevertheless, by and large, the main factors driving the design of new reactors are the safety features, safeguards considerations, and the economic factors. With a large decommissioning experience that already exists in the nuclear industry, and with average decommissioning costs at around six hundred million dollars for each reactor in today's dollars, it is necessary that decommissioning factors also be considered as a part of the early design effort. Even though decommissioning may be sixty years down the road from the time they go on line, it is only prudent that new designs be optimized for eventual decommissioning, along with the other major considerations. (authors)

Devgun, J.S.; CHMM, Ph.D. [Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC, Chicago, IL (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioned defueled naval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

TA-2 Water Boiler Reactor Decommissioning Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report addresses the Phase 2 decommissioning of the Water Boiler Reactor, biological shield, other components within the biological shield, and piping pits in the floor of the reactor building. External structures and underground piping associated with the gaseous effluent (stack) line from Technical Area 2 (TA-2) Water Boiler Reactor were removed in 1985--1986 as Phase 1 of reactor decommissioning. The cost of Phase 2 was approximately $623K. The decommissioning operation produced 173 m{sup 3} of low-level solid radioactive waste and 35 m{sup 3} of mixed waste. 15 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs.

Durbin, M.E. (ed.); Montoya, G.M.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Monitoring the recovery of decommissioned roads with citizen scientists in the Clearwater National Forest, Idaho  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

monitoring following road decommissioning . Wildlands CPR,research on road decommissioning, which will in turn allowService. 2003. Road decommissioning monitoring report 2002.

Court, Katherine; Switalski, T. Adam; Broberg, Len; Lloyd, Rebecca

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Wildlife Use of Open and Decommissioned Roads on the Clearwater National Forest, Idaho  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the effectiveness of road decommissioning (Switalski et al.hunting season. Road decommissioning has been recommended toresulting from road decommissioning has also been predicted

Switalski, T. Adam; Broberg, Len; Holden, Anna

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Road Decommissioning: Minimising the Adverse Ecological Effects of Roads i9n European Agriculture Landscapes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

road corridors post-decommissioning, especially those roadsof RRE - that of road decommissioning. To date even thoughFor this reason, road decommissioning can potentially: (1)

Dolan, Lisa; Whelan, Pdraig M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

More About NNSA's Naval Reactors Office | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

to skip to the main content Facebook Flickr RSS Twitter YouTube More About NNSA's Naval Reactors Office | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the...

106

Distributed energy resources at naval base ventura county building 1512  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

up by a DER system. Distributed Energy Resources at NavalFebruary 2003. Distributed Energy Resources in Practice: ARyan. January 2004. Distributed Energy Resources Customer

Bailey, Owen C.; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Oil Shale Reserves...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil Shale Reserves Site - 013 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Naval Oil Shale Reserves Site (013 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site...

108

13.400 Introduction to Naval Architecture, Fall 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction to principles of naval architecture, ship geometry, hydrostatics, calculation and drawing of curves of form, intact and damaged stability, hull structure strength calculations and ship resistance. Projects ...

Herbein, David

109

Guides: Design/Engineering for Deactivation & Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

To ensure development of appropriate levels of engineering detail, DOE-EMs Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-13) has prepared this guidance for tailoring a D...

110

Trojan PWR Decommissioning: Large Component Removal Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the decommissioning of large commercial nuclear plants in the United States is in its infancy, the technical challenges with associated radioactive waste management are clear. This report describes the removal and disposal of four steam generators and one pressurizer from the Trojan nuclear power plant, the first large PWR to be decommissioned in the United States. The report chronicles the problems, successes, and lessons learned in this project, which was completed on schedule and under budget in...

1997-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

111

Safety of Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Full text of publication follows: ensuring safety during all stages of facility life cycle is a widely recognised responsibility of the operators, implemented under the supervision of the regulatory body and other competent authorities. As the majority of the facilities worldwide are still in operation or shutdown, there is no substantial experience in decommissioning and evaluation of safety during decommissioning in majority of Member States. The need for cooperation and exchange of experience and good practices on ensuring and evaluating safety of decommissioning was one of the outcomes of the Berlin conference in 2002. On this basis during the last three years IAEA initiated a number of international projects that can assist countries, in particular small countries with limited resources. The main IAEA international projects addressing safety during decommissioning are: (i) DeSa Project on Evaluation and Demonstration of Safety during Decommissioning; (ii) R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P project on Research Reactors Decommissioning Demonstration Project; and (iii) Project on Evaluation and Decommissioning of Former Facilities that used Radioactive Material in Iraq. This paper focuses on the DeSa Project activities on (i) development of a harmonised methodology for safety assessment for decommissioning; (ii) development of a procedure for review of safety assessments; (iii) development of recommendations on application of the graded approach to the performance and review of safety assessments; and (iv) application of the methodology and procedure to the selected real facilities with different complexities and hazard potentials (a nuclear power plant, a research reactor and a nuclear laboratory). The paper also outlines the DeSa Project outcomes and planned follow-up activities. It also summarises the main objectives and activities of the Iraq Project and introduces the R{sup 2}D{sup 2} Project, which is a subject of a complementary paper.

Batandjieva, B.; Warnecke, E.; Coates, R. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Decommissioning Pre-Planning Manual: Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Interim Technical Report provides a framework for pre-planning for the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant. It identifies important planning decisions, tasks, and contributing disciplines, establishes activity precedence relationships and defines data requirements. The report identifies actions that utilities can take now to ease the transition to decommissioning status, and will be of value to utilities planning plant closures in the future.

2000-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

113

Naval Reserve Force : cost and benefit analysis of reducing the number of Naval Surface Reserve Force operating budget holders ; .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Quadrennial Defense Review 1997 recommended reductions of civilian and military personnel associated with infrastructure. The Naval Reserve Force is aggressively pursuing options to reduce (more)

Young, Eric Coy

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Geothermal energy at Long Beach Naval Shipyard and Naval Station and at Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station, California. Final Report 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to determine and evaluate sources of geothermal energy at two military bases in southern California, the Long Beach Naval Shipyard and Naval Station and the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station. One part of the project focused on the natural geothermal characteristics beneath the naval bases. Another part focused on the geothermal energy produced by oilfield operations on and adjacent to each base. Results of the study are presented here for the US Department of the Navy to use in its program to reduce its reliance on petroleum by the development of different sources of energy. The project required research of various reports and data, both published and unpublished, particularly those of the California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil and Gas and of oil companies with leases on or adjacent to the naval bases. Important field investigations included the measurement of well-head temperatures of fluids produced from selected oil wells at each naval base and a detailed gravity survey of the Seal Beach naval base and vicinity. The well-head temperatures were needed to evaluate individual wells as sources of geothermal energy, while the gravity survey attempted to discover subsurface geologic structures that might contain geothermal fluids of temperatures higher than those predicted by the regional geothermal conditions.

Higgins, C.T.; Chapman, R.H.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Decommissioning Regulatory Process Interactions in 2000: EPRI Support to NEI for NRC Proposed Decommissioning Rule Revision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the technical support EPRI provided to the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Decommissioning Working Group in 2000. It includes the material supplied to the NEI for their use in generating comments on behalf of the nuclear energy industry concerning the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) new draft regulations on decommissioning.

2000-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

116

Success Story: Naval Medical Center San Diego Co-Generation Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Success Story: Naval Medical Center San Diego Co-Generation Project Success Story: Naval Medical Center San Diego Co-Generation Project Presentation covers the FUPWG Fall Meeting,...

117

Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Communication & Engagement » International Programs » Services » Communication & Engagement » International Programs » Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and US Department of Energy Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and US Department of Energy Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority in UK and US Department of Energy Confidentiality Agreement between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and US Department of Energy More Documents & Publications Statement of Intent between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Scanned_Agreement.pdf Statement of Intent NO. 2 between the US Department of Energy and UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Waste Management Nuclear Materials & Waste

118

Decommissioning Under CERCLA Information Sheet | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decommissioning Under CERCLA Information Sheet Decommissioning Under CERCLA Information Sheet Decommissioning Under CERCLA Information Sheet This Question and Answer (Q&A) Sheet discusses the use of removal authority in the conduct of decommissioning activities, consistent with the Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (May 22, 1995), and the accompanying Decommissioning Implementation Guide . The Policy and Guide establish the approach agreed upon by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It is consistent with CERCLA statutory requirements, as well as CERCLA regulatory requirements found in the National Contingency Plan (NCP), and applicable

119

A Tabu Search Heuristic for Resource Management in Naval Warfare  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effective utilization of scarce resources, in particular weapon resources, is a prominent issue in naval anti-air warfare. In this paper, defence plans are constructed to guide the allocation and scheduling of different types of defence weapons against ... Keywords: defence plan, naval warfare, resource management, tabu search, weapon

Dale E. Blodgett; Michel Gendreau; Franois Guertin; Jean-Yves Potvin; Ren Sguin

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NAVAL SPENT FUEL RAIL SHIPMENT NAVAL SPENT FUEL RAIL SHIPMENT ACCIDENT EXERCISE OBJECTIVES * Familiarize stakeholders with the Naval spent fuel ACCIDENT EXERCISE OBJECTIVES Familiarize stakeholders with the Naval spent fuel shipping container characteristics and shipping practices * Gain understanding of how the NNPP escorts who accompany the spent fuel shipments will interact with civilian emergency services representatives g y p * Allow civilian emergency services agencies the opportunity to evaluate their response to a pp y p simulated accident * Gain understanding of how the communications links that would be activated in an accident involving a Naval spent fuel shipment would work 1 NTSF May 11 ACCIDENT EXERCISE TYPICAL TIMELINE * Conceptual/Organizational Meeting - April 6 E R T i d it t t d TYPICAL TIMELINE

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioned defueled naval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of the Naval  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of the Naval Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of the Naval Air Warfare Center, New Jersey Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of the Naval Air Warfare Center, New Jersey Author USGS Published Publisher Not Provided, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of the Naval Air Warfare Center, New Jersey Citation USGS. Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of the Naval Air Warfare Center, New Jersey [Internet]. 2013. [updated 2013/01/03;cited 2013/11/22]. Available from: http://water.usgs.gov/ogw/bgas/toxics/NAWC-surface.html

122

Waste Logic Decommissioning Waste Manager 2.0 Users Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Decommissioning Waste Manager, part of EPRI's Waste Logic series of computer programs, analyzes decommissioning waste cost and volume reduction strategies with the intent of quantifying the existing waste management program for any given waste generator.

2001-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

123

3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project & Identifier Project & Identifier Tech Stage: Deployment In-Situ Decommissioning: SR09171 SRS Area Closure Projects: PBS SR-0040 3-D models of the R reactor building and P reactor vessel were delivered to SRS Area Closure Projects Page 1 of 2 Tech Fact Sheet Savannah River Site South Carolina 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning Challenge Planning for the safe and controlled deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of highly contaminated nuclear facilities requires that engineers and managers fully understand the work space in which personnel and equipment will operate. It also requires that they effectively communicate safety concerns and work sequences to the personnel who will perform the work. This crucial knowledge is conveyed in

124

Disposal of personal property from ERDA facilities being decommissioned  

SciTech Connect

Problem areas which should be considered early in planning the decommissioning of a facility are pointed out. (LK)

French, J.D.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Uranium enrichment decontamination and decommissioning fund, 1995 report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes strategies for the decontamination and decommissioning of gaseous diffusion plants. Progress in remedial action activities are discussed.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Maintaining Quality in a Decommissioning Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The decommissioning of AECL's Whiteshell Laboratories is Canada's largest nuclear decommissioning project to date. This research laboratory has operated for forty years since it was set up in 1963 in eastern Manitoba as the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment, complete with 60 MW(Th) test reactor, hot cells, particle accelerators, and multiple large-scale research programs. Returning the site to almost complete green state will require several decades of steady work in combination with periods of storage-with-surveillance. In this paper our approach to maintaining quality during the long decommissioning period is explained. In this context, 'quality' includes both regulatory aspects (compliance with required standards) and business aspects (meeting the customers' needs and exceeding their expectations). Both aspects are discussed, including examples and lessons learned. The five years of development and implementation of a quality assurance program for decommissioning the WL site have led to a number of lessons learned. Many of these are also relevant to other decommissioning projects, in Canada and elsewhere: - Early discussions with the regulator can save time and effort later in the process; - An iterative process in developing documentation allows for steady improvements and input throughout the process; - Consistent 2-way communication with staff regarding the benefits of a quality program assists greatly in adoption of the philosophy and procedures; - Top-level management must lead in promoting quality; - Field trials of procedures ('beta testing') ensures they are easy to use as well as useful. Success in decommissioning the Whiteshell Laboratories depends on the successful implementation of a rigorous quality program. This will help to ensure both safety and efficiency of all activities on site, from planning through execution and reporting. The many aspects of maintaining this program will continue to occupy quality practitioners in AECL, reaping steady benefits to AECL and to its customers, the people of Canada.

Attas, Michael [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Whiteshell Laboratories, Pinawa, Manitoba, R0E 1L0 (Canada)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station Decommissioning Experience Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several U.S. nuclear power plants entered decommissioning in the 1990s. Based on current information, the next group of plants whose license will expire will not begin decommissioning for nearly a decade. This report provides detailed information on the decommissioning of one plant, the Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station, in order to capture its experience for future plants.

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

128

Proceedings: Decommissioning - Plant Reconfiguration and Engineering Processes Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's Plant Reconfiguration and Engineering Processes Workshop -- the seventh in a series -- will help utility personnel evaluate technologies for decommissioning nuclear power plants. This workshop focused on specific aspects of plant reconfiguration and engineering processes as they relate to nuclear plant decommissioning. The information presented will help utilities assess approaches to restructuring of plant engineering processes and reconfiguration management to meet individual decommissioning pro...

2001-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

129

Maine Yankee Decommissioning - Experience Report: Detailed Experiences 1997-2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several U.S. nuclear power plants began the decommissioning process in the 1990s. Based on current information, it will be several years before the next group of plant licenses expires, and the plants begin decommissioning. This report provides detailed information on the decommissioning of one power reactor, Maine Yankee, in order to document their experience for future plants.

2005-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

130

Concrete Characterization and Dose Modeling During Plant Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several U.S. nuclear power plants entered decommissioning in the 1990's. The cost effective characterization of contaminated concrete remains a challenge for plants currently undergoing decommissioning. This report provides detailed information on projects involving the characterization, dose modeling, remediation and disposal of contaminated concrete at a number of plants undergoing decommissioning.

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

Proceedings: EPRI International Decommissioning and Radioactive Waste Workshop at Dounreay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the proceedings of an EPRI international workshop on decommissioning and radioactive waste management. EPRI initiated this continuing workshop series to aid utility personnel in assessing the technologies utilized in the decommissioning of nuclear power plants and facilities. The information presented will help individual utilities assess the benefits of the various programs, including their potential to reduce decommissioning costs.

2003-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

132

Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2006  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Major articles/reports in this issue include: NPP Krsko revised decommissioning program, by Vladimir Lokner and Ivica Levanat, APO d.o.o., Croatia, and Nadja Zeleznik and Irena Mele, ARAO, Slovenia; Supporting the renaissance, by Marilyn C. Kray, Exelon Nuclear; Outage world an engineer's delight, by Tom Chrisopher, Areva, NP Inc.; Optimizing refueling outages with R and D, by Ross Marcoot, GE Energy; and, A successful project, by Jim Lash, FirstEnergy.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

FAQS Qualification Card - Deactivation and Decommissioning | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deactivation and Decommissioning Deactivation and Decommissioning FAQS Qualification Card - Deactivation and Decommissioning A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-DeactivationDecommissioning.docx Description Deactivation and Decommissioning Qualification Card More Documents & Publications

134

DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA In May 1995, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a policy in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for decommissioning surplus DOE facilities consistent with the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This policy ensures protection of the environment, worker health and public health, provides opportunities for stakeholder involvement, and achieves risk reduction without unnecessary delay. Consistent with the jointly issued "Guidance on Accelerating CERCLA Environmental Restoration at Federal Facilities" (August 22, 1994), this decommissioning policy encourages streamlined decision-making. This

135

West Valley Demonstration Project Phase I Decommissioning - Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Phase I Decommissioning - Project Phase I Decommissioning - Facility Disposition Partnering Performance Agreement West Valley Demonstration Project Phase I Decommissioning - Facility Disposition Partnering Performance Agreement The Department of Energy, West Valley Demonstration Project (DOE-WVDP) and CH2M Hill B&W West Valley (CHBWV) are committed to continuous improvement and will utilize principles of the DOE Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Partnering Policy to create and foster a team environment to successfully complete the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Phase I Decommissioning - Faciltiy Disposition. West Valley Demonstration Project Phase I Decommissioning - Facility Disposition Partnering Performance Agreement More Documents & Publications CX-009527: Categorical Exclusion Determination

136

Yankee Rowe Decommissioning Experience Record: Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Yankee Atomic's experiences in the process of decommissioning the Yankee Rowe nuclear power plant. This volume presents lessons learned during work finished by September 1997. A second volume, to be published in 1998, will complete the experience record. The recommendations and insights in this report will be valuable to other utilities with permanently shutdown plants.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

137

Sodium Reactor Experiment decommissioning. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE) located at the Rockwell International Field Laboratories northwest of Los Angeles was developed to demonstrate a sodium-cooled, graphite-moderated reactor for civilian use. The reactor reached full power in May 1958 and provided 37 GWh to the Southern California Edison Company grid before it was shut down in 1967. Decommissioning of the SRE began in 1974 with the objective of removing all significant radioactivity from the site and releasing the facility for unrestricted use. Planning documentation was prepared to describe in detail the equipment and techniques development and the decommissioning work scope. A plasma-arc manipulator was developed for remotely dissecting the highly radioactive reactor vessels. Other important developments included techniques for using explosives to cut reactor vessel internal piping, clamps, and brackets; decontaminating porous concrete surfaces; and disposing of massive equipment and structures. The documentation defined the decommissioning in an SRE dismantling plan, in activity requirements for elements of the decommissioning work scope, and in detailed procedures for each major task.

Carroll, J.W.; Conners, C.C.; Harris, J.M.; Marzec, J.M.; Ureda, B.F.

1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Decontamination and decommissioning focus area. Technology summary  

SciTech Connect

This report presents details of the facility deactivation, decommissioning, and material disposition research for development of new technologies sponsored by the Department of Energy. Topics discussed include; occupational safety, radiation protection, decontamination, remote operated equipment, mixed waste processing, recycling contaminated metals, and business opportunities.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 Disposition Decision Analysis and Timeline  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Report to Congress provides a summary of the analysis supporting DOE's determination to dispose of the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 through sale of all right, title, interest on the open market.

140

Distributed energy resources at naval base ventura county building 1512  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the prices of electricity and gas, that might make PV costprices increase by 10% Distributed Energy Resources at Naval Base Ventura Country Building 1512 over current Public Works levels, then PV

Bailey, Owen C.; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioned defueled naval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Distributed energy resources at naval base ventura county building 1512  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the affects of energy prices and tariff structures on energythe default SCE tariff, total energy bills for Building 1512$0.1097. This tariff Distributed Energy Resources at Naval

Bailey, Owen C.; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Purpose This Policy establishes the approach agreed upon by the Department of Energy (DOE) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the conduct of decommissioning projects [1] consistent with CERCLA requirements. This Policy creates a framework for the conduct of decommissioning of DOE facilities and provides guidance to EPA Regions and DOE Operations Offices on the use of CERCLA response authority to decommission such facilities. The principal objectives of this Policy are to ensure that decommissioning

143

Management of Decommissioning on a Multi-Facility Site  

SciTech Connect

The management of the decommissioning of multi-facility sites may be inadequate or inappropriate if based on approaches and strategies developed for sites consisting of only a single facility. The varied nature of activities undertaken, their interfaces and their interdependencies are likely to complicate the management of decommissioning. These issues can be exacerbated where some facilities are entering the decommissioning phase while others are still operational or even new facilities are being built. Multi-facility sites are not uncommon worldwide but perhaps insufficient attention has been paid to optimizing the overall site decommissioning in the context of the entire life cycle of facilities. Decommissioning management arrangements need to be established taking a view across the whole site. A site-wide decommissioning management system is required. This should include a project evaluation and approval process and specific arrangements to manage identified interfaces and interdependencies. A group should be created to manage decommissioning across the site, ensuring adequate and consistent practices in accordance with the management system. Decommissioning management should be aimed at the entire life cycle of facilities. In the case of multi facility sites, the process becomes more complex and decommissioning management arrangements need to be established with a view to the whole site. A site decommissioning management system, a group that is responsible for decommissioning on site, a site project evaluation and approval process and specific arrangements to manage the identified interfaces are key areas of a site decommissioning management structure that need to be addressed to ensure adequate and consistent decommissioning practices. A decommissioning strategy based on single facilities in a sequential manner is deemed inadequate.

Laraia, Michele; McIntyre, Peter; Visagie, Abrie [IAEA, Vienna and NECSA (South Africa)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

NMSS handbook for decommissioning fuel cycle and materials licensees  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission amended its regulations to set forth the technical and financial criteria for decommissioning licensed nuclear facilities. These regulations were further amended to establish additional recordkeeping requirements for decommissioning; to establish timeframes and schedules for the decommissioning; and to clarify that financial assurance requirements must be in place during operations and updated when licensed operations cease. Reviews of the Site Decommissioning Management Plan (SDMP) program found that, while the NRC staff was overseeing the decommissioning program at nuclear facilities in a manner that was protective of public health and safety, progress in decommissioning many sites was slow. As a result NRC determined that formal written procedures should be developed to facilitate the timely decommissioning of licensed nuclear facilities. This handbook was developed to aid NRC staff in achieving this goal. It is intended to be used as a reference document to, and in conjunction with, NRC Inspection Manual Chapter (IMC) 2605, ``Decommissioning Inspection Program for Fuel Cycle and Materials Licensees.`` The policies and procedures discussed in this handbook should be used by NRC staff overseeing the decommissioning program at licensed fuel cycle and materials sites; formerly licensed sites for which the licenses were terminated; sites involving source, special nuclear, or byproduct material subject to NRC regulation for which a license was never issued; and sites in the NRC`s SDMP program. NRC staff overseeing the decommissioning program at nuclear reactor facilities subject to regulation under 10 CFR Part 50 are not required to use the procedures discussed in this handbook.

Orlando, D.A.; Hogg, R.C.; Ramsey, K.M. [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel disposal Container System Description Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container System supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Disposal containers/waste packages are loaded and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred underground through the access drifts using a rail mounted transporter, and emplaced in emplacement drifts. The Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container System provides long term confinement of the naval spent nuclear fuel (SNF) placed within the disposal containers, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval operations. The Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container System provides containment of waste for a designated period of time and limits radionuclide release thereafter. The waste package maintains the waste in a designated configuration, withstands maximum credible handling and rockfall loads, limits the waste form temperature after emplacement, resists corrosion in the expected handling and repository environments, and provides containment of waste in the event of an accident. Each naval SNF disposal container will hold a single naval SNF canister. There will be approximately 300 naval SNF canisters, composed of long and short canisters. The disposal container will include outer and inner cylinder walls and lids. An exterior label will provide a means by which to identify a disposal container and its contents. Different materials will be selected for the waste package inner and outer cylinders. The two metal cylinders, in combination with the Emplacement Drift System, drip shield, and the natural barrier will support the design philosophy of defense-in-depth. The use of materials with different properties prevents a single mode failure from breaching the waste package. The inner cylinder and inner cylinder lids will be constructed of stainless steel while the outer cylinder and outer cylinder lids will be made of high-nickel alloy.

N. E. Pettit

2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

146

Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was operated from 1982 until 1997. The last several years included operations with mixtures of deuterium and tritium. In September 2002, the three year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Project for TFTR was successfully completed. The need to deal with tritium contamination as well as activated materials led to the adaptation of many techniques from the maintenance work during TFTR operations to the D&D effort. In addition, techniques from the decommissioning of fission reactors were adapted to the D&D of TFTR and several new technologies, most notably the development of a diamond wire cutting process for complex metal structures, were developed. These techniques, along with a project management system that closely linked the field crews to the engineering staff who developed the techniques and procedures via a Work Control Center, resulted in a project that was completed safely, on time, and well below budget.

E. Perry; J. Chrzanowski; C. Gentile; R. Parsells; K. Rule; R. Strykowsky; M. Viola

2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

147

Audit Report - Naval Reactors Information Technology System Development Efforts, IG-0879  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Naval Reactors Information Naval Reactors Information Technology System Development Efforts DOE/IG-0879 December 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits & Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 December 21, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ADMINISTRATOR, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on the "Naval Reactors Information Technology System Development Efforts" INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Naval Reactors Program (Naval Reactors), an organization within the National Nuclear Security Administration, was established to provide the military with safe and reliable nuclear propulsion plants to power warships and submarines. Naval Reactors maintains responsibility

148

Decommissioning: Reactor Pressure Vessel Internals Segmentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning a nuclear plant covers a wide variety of challenging projects. One of the most challenging areas is the removal and disposal of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and the RPV internals. This report describes commercial reactor pressure vessel segmentation projects that have been completed and discusses several projects that are still in the planning stages. The report also covers lessons learned from each project.

2001-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

149

Yankee Rowe Decommissioning Experience Record: Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Yankee Atomic Electric Company's (YAEC) recent experiences in the process of decommissioning the Yankee Rowe nuclear power plant. This volume supplements Volume 1 by presenting more lessons learned during work finished by September 1998. In 1999, EPRI will publish a final report completing the experience record. The recommendations and insights in this report will be valuable to other utilities with permanently shut down plants.

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

150

DOE Awards New York Decommissioning Services Contract | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New York Decommissioning Services Contract New York Decommissioning Services Contract DOE Awards New York Decommissioning Services Contract June 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor 513-246-0539 William.taylor@emcbc.doe.gov West Valley, NY -- The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a contract to CH2M Hill-B&W West Valley of Englewood, Colorado, for the Phase I Decommissioning and Facility Disposition activities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). The contract is a performance-based, cost-plus-award-fee, completion type contract with cost and schedule incentives. The total contract value is $333.4 million. DOE has selected a phased approach for decommissioning activities at the WVDP. Phase I is the first of a two-phase process for the final decommissioning of the western New York site in accordance with the West

151

DOE Awards New York Decommissioning Services Contract | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New York Decommissioning Services Contract New York Decommissioning Services Contract DOE Awards New York Decommissioning Services Contract June 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor 513-246-0539 William.taylor@emcbc.doe.gov West Valley, NY -- The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a contract to CH2M Hill-B&W West Valley of Englewood, Colorado, for the Phase I Decommissioning and Facility Disposition activities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). The contract is a performance-based, cost-plus-award-fee, completion type contract with cost and schedule incentives. The total contract value is $333.4 million. DOE has selected a phased approach for decommissioning activities at the WVDP. Phase I is the first of a two-phase process for the final decommissioning of the western New York site in accordance with the West

152

Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Reactor:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Reactor: Reactor core and associated structures successfully removed; waste shipped offsite for disposal Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Reactor: Reactor core and associated structures successfully removed; waste shipped offsite for disposal September 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor’s bioshield, which contains the 700-ton reactor core, is shown prior to decommissioning. The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor's bioshield, which contains the 700-ton reactor core, is shown prior to decommissioning. Pictured here is the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor, where major decommissioning milestones were recently reached after the remaining radioactive materials from the facility’s bioshield were shipped to a licensed offsite disposal facility.

153

In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management In-Situ Decommissioning (ISD) is an effective decommissioning practice offering a safe and environmentally-favorable alternative to completely demolishing a facility and transporting its debris elsewhere for disposal. Regulatory approval to decommission a facility through ISD is authorized primarily by the Environmental Protection Agency under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). In addition, Federal Facility Agreements and local stakeholder agreements have a direct influence on ISD approval and oversight. The ISD approach limits radiation exposure and industrial hazards to workers to a greater extent than larger scale cleanout and demolition.

154

Yankee Nuclear Power Station - analysis of decommissioning costs  

SciTech Connect

The preparation of decommissioning cost estimates for nuclear power generating stations has received a great deal of interest in the last few years. Owners are required by regulation to ensure that adequate funds are collected for the timely decommissioning of their facilities. The unexpected premature shutdown of several facilities and uncertainties associated with radioactive waste disposal and long-term spent-fuel storage, when viewed in the light of a deregulated electric utility industry, has caused many companies to reevaluate their decommissioning cost estimates. The decommissioning of the Yankee Nuclear Power Station represents the first large-scale project involving the complete decontamination and dismantlement of a commercial light water nuclear power generation facility in the United States. Since this pressurized water reactor operated for 32 yr at a respectable 74% lifetime capacity factor, the actual costs and resources required to decommission the plant, when compared with decommissioning estimates, will yield valuable benchmarking data.

Lessard, L.P. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

155

GRR/Section 20 - Plant Decommissioning Overview | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20 - Plant Decommissioning Overview 20 - Plant Decommissioning Overview < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 20 - Plant Decommissioning Overview 20PlantDecommissioningOverview (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies BLM Regulations & Policies 43 CFR 3263.10-3263.15: Well Abandonment Geothermal Resources Operational Order No.3 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 20PlantDecommissioningOverview (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative State and federal laws have specific requirements for the decommissioning process. 20.1 to 20.2 - Will a Geothermal Well be Abandoned?

156

3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning The design and production of 3-D scale models that replicate the highly contaminated structures within the nuclear facility would provide a significant improvement in visualization of the work space, which would give managers and supervisors a more powerful tool for planning and communicating safety issues and work sequences to personnel executing the physical D&D tasks. 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning More Documents & Publications D&D Toolbox Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for Characterization D&D and Risk Assessment Tools 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D

157

Decommissioning Handbook for Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook lays out the steps necessary to fully decommission a coal-fired power plant. The handbook includes ways to handle permitting, environmental cleanup, site dismantlement, and site remediation, and discusses overall decommissioning costs. It is based on three actual case studies of coal plants recently decommissioned: the Arkwright coal-fired plant of Georgia Power, the Watts Bar coal-fired plant of TVA, and the Port Washington coal-fired plant of Wisconsin Electric Power.

2004-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

158

Proceedings: Decommissioning, Decontamination, ALARA, and Worker Safety Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This workshop on decontamination, ALARA, and worker safety was the sixth in a series initiated by EPRI to aid utility personnel in assessing the technologies for decommissioning nuclear power plants. The workshop focused on specific aspects of decommissioning related to the management of worker radiation exposure and safety. The information presented will help individual utilities assess benefits of programs in these areas for their projects, including their potential to reduce decommissioning costs.

None

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Proceedings: Decommissioning, Decontamination, ALARA, and Worker Safety Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This workshop on decontamination, ALARA, and worker safety was the sixth in a series initiated by EPRI to aid utility personnel in assessing the technologies for decommissioning nuclear power plants. The workshop focused on specific aspects of decommissioning related to the management of worker radiation exposure and safety. The information presented will help individual utilities assess benefits of programs in these areas for their projects, including their potential to reduce decommissioning costs.

2000-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

160

Decommissioning Low Level Waste Management and Reduction Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear plants undertaking decommissioning projects find that costs of low-level waste (LLW) management are a substantial portion of the total cost. To assist the industry in planning and optimizing their decommissioning radwaste management practices, EPRI developed a guide with more than 75 areas of guidance and an extensive lessons learned section. Using this report will aid utilities in successfully planning, executing, and disposing of low-level wastes during a decommissioning project.

1999-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioned defueled naval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Decommissioning Process for Fossil-Fueled Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a staged process for the decommissioning and possible demolition of fossil-fueled power generating facilities. Drawn from experience with power and major industrial facilities, the report provides the owner/operator of a plant that is approaching the end of its useful life with an overview of the key elements necessary to successfully implement decommissioning. The process is applicable to full decommissioning, demolition, and closure; to partial scenarios (that is, partial dismantl...

2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

162

HEAVY WATER COMPONENTS TEST REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) Decommissioning Project was initiated in 2009 as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Removal Action with funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). This paper summarizes the history prior to 2009, the major D&D activities, and final end state of the facility at completion of decommissioning in June 2011. The HWCTR facility was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. In 2009 the $1.6 billion allocation from the ARRA to SRS for site footprint reduction at SRS reopened the doors to HWCTR - this time for final decommissioning. Alternative studies concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning was to remove the reactor vessel, both steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. The transfer coffin, originally above grade, was to be placed in the cavity vacated by the reactor vessel and the remaining below grade spaces would be grouted. Once all above equipment including the dome was removed, a concrete cover was to be placed over the remaining footprint and the groundwater monitored for an indefinite period to ensure compliance with environmental regulations.

Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

163

Chapter 20 - Uranium Enrichment Decontamination & Decommissioning Fund  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0. Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund 20-1 0. Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund 20-1 CHAPTER 20 URANIUM ENRICHMENT DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING FUND 1. INTRODUCTION. a. Purpose. To establish policies and procedures for the financial management, accounting, budget preparation, cash management of the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund, referred to hereafter as the Fund. b. Applicability. This chapter applies to all Departmental elements, including the National Nuclear Security Administration, and activities that are directly or indirectly involved with the Fund. c. Requirements and Sources of the Fund. (1) The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) requires DOE to establish and administer the Fund. EPACT authorizes that the

164

Decommissioning of U.S. Uranium Production Facilities  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report analyzes the uranium production facility decommissioning process and its potential impact on uranium supply and prices. 1995 represents the most recent publication year.

Information Center

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Idaho Site Closes Out Decontamination and Decommissioning Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FALLS, Idaho - The Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) successfully closed out a 796 million nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning project. The work was completed about...

166

Tag: Naval Reactors | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Naval Reactors Naval Reactors Tag: Naval Reactors Displaying 1 - 7 of 7... Category: Employees & Retirees "Cook"ing at Y-12 for 70 years We have an enduring mission. Y-12 plays a key role in it. And a nuclear deterrent remains the ultimate insurance policy for America. More... Category: News Y-12 Knows Uranium Y-12 produces many forms of uranium. More... Category: News A Rich Resource Requires Recovery Given the value and scarcity of enriched uranium, Y-12 recycles and reuses as much of it as possible. More... Category: News Seawolf Manufacturing Challenge For decades, attack submarines were either fast or quiet - but never both. The fast subs were so loud that an enemy could hear them long before they were within striking distance. More... Category: News Reliable fuel source

167

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Norfolk Naval Station - VA 05  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Norfolk Naval Station - VA 05 Norfolk Naval Station - VA 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NORFOLK NAVAL STATION (VA.05) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Norfolk , Virginia VA.05-1 Evaluation Year: 1993 VA.05-1 Site Operations: Demonstration of extinguishing a uranium fire at the Fire Fighters School for AEC contractors. VA.05-3 VA.05-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on the limited quantity of materials handled VA.05-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium VA.05-2 Radiological Survey(s): Yes - Health and Safety Monitoring during operations only VA.05-2 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

168

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC CATALOG 7 JUNE 2013 Quick Facts..............................................................................................................................................................4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC CATALOG ­ 7 JUNE 2013 1 CONTENTS Quick Facts......................................................................................................................................................26 #12;NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC CATALOG ­ 7 JUNE 2013 2 Curriculum Listing...............................................................................................................................................428 Energy Core Group

169

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC CATALOG 3 JAN 2013 Quick Facts..............................................................................................................................................................4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC CATALOG ­ 3 JAN 2013 1 CONTENTS Quick Facts......................................................................................................................................................26 #12;NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC CATALOG ­ 3 JAN 2013 2 Curriculum Listing ................................................................................................427 Energy Core Group

170

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC CATALOG 8 MARCH 2013 Quick Facts..............................................................................................................................................................4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC CATALOG ­ 8 MARCH 2013 1 CONTENTS Quick Facts......................................................................................................................................................26 #12;NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC CATALOG ­ 8 MARCH 2013 2 Curriculum Listing ................................................................................................428 Energy Core Group

171

Naval petroleum and oil shale reserves: Annual report of operations, FY 1987  

SciTech Connect

Production and reserves, development and exploration, revenues and expenditures, sales, environment and safety, and litigation are discussed for naval petroleum reserves numbers one through three and for naval oil shale reserves. 28 figs., 21 tabs. (ACT)

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

NPS-SCAT electrical power system ; Naval Postgraduate School Solar Cell Array Tester .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Naval Postgraduate School Solar Cell Array Tester (NPS-SCAT) seeks to expand the CubeSat knowledge base and provide learning possibilities at the Naval Postgraduate School. (more)

Dorn, Lawrence Tyrone.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Statement on Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities before the House Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy & Water Development | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > Statement on Defense Nuclear

174

FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactor Programs before the House Appropriations Committee, Energy and Water Development Subcommittee | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony on Nuclear ...

175

Statement on Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactors Activities before the House Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy & Water Development | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > Statement on Defense Nuclear

176

FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Naval Reactor Programs before the House Appropriations Committee, Energy and Water Development Subcommittee | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Congressional Testimony > FY 2012 Budget Hearing Testimony on Nuclear ...

177

Bayesian Analysis for the Site-Specific Dose Modeling in Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Decommissioning is the process of closing down a facility. In nuclear power plant decommissioning, it must be determined that that any remaining radioactivity at a (more)

Ling, Xianbing

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Statement of Intent No. 2 between DOE and the Nuclear Decommissioning...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement of Intent No. 2 between DOE and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Statement of Intent No. 2 between DOE and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Statement of Intent...

179

Environmental Assessments (EA) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 4, 2011 November 4, 2011 EA-1905: Final Environmental Assessment Department of Energy Funding For Double Eagle Water System, Carlsbad, New Mexico (November 2011) November 1, 2011 EA-1866: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Argonne National Laboratory Modernization Planning October 31, 2011 EA-1769: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Houston Advanced Research Center, Battleground Energy Recovery Project, Deer Park, Harris County, Texas (October 2011) October 28, 2011 EA-1889: Draft Environmental Assessment Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Naval Reactor Plants from USS Enterprise (CVN 65) October 20, 2011 EA-1812: Draft Environmental Assessment Haxtun Wind Energy Project, Logan and Phillips Counties, Colorado

180

FAMS DECOMMISSIONING END-STATE ALTERNATIVE EVALUATION  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear Material Management (NMM) completed a comprehensive study at the request of the Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR) in 2004 (Reference 11.1). The study evaluated the feasibility of removal and/or mitigation of the Pu-238 source term in the F-Area Material Storage (FAMS) facility during on-going material storage operations. The study recommended different options to remove and/or mitigate the Pu-238 source term depending on its location within the facility. During April 2005, the Department of Energy (DOE) sent a letter of direction (LOD) to Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) directing WSRC to implement a new program direction that would enable an accelerated shutdown and decommissioning of FAMS (Reference 11.2). Further direction in the LOD stated that effective December 1, 2006 the facility will be transitioned to begin deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) activities. To implement the LOD, Site D&D (SDD) and DOE agreed the planning end-state would be demolition of the FAMS structure to the building slab. SDD developed the D&D strategy, preliminary cost and schedule, and issued the deactivation project plan in December 2005 (Reference 11.3). Due to concerns and questions regarding the FAMS planning end-state and in support of the project's Critical Decision 1, an alternative study was performed to evaluate the various decommissioning end-states and the methods by which those end-states are achieved. This report documents the results of the alternative evaluation which was performed in a structured decision-making process as outlined in the E7 Manual, Procedure 2.15, ''Alternative Studies'' (Reference 11.4).

Grimm, B; Stephen Chostner, S; Brenda Green, B

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioned defueled naval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Ris-R-1250(EN) Decommissioning of the Nuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risø-R-1250(EN) Decommissioning of the Nuclear Facilities at Risø National Laboratory Descriptions on request from the Minister of Research and Information Technology. It describes the nuclear facilities;Decommissioning of Risø's nuclear facilities. Descriptions and cost assessment. Risø-R-1250(EN) 3 Contents 1

182

Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09-00269, Rev. 0 09-00269, Rev. 0 KEY WORDS: DOE-HQ In situ Decommissioning Entombment Workshop TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS FOR IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING (ISD) WORKSHOP REPORT Patricia L. Lee, John B. Gladden, G. Timothy Jannik, Christine A. Langton, Michael G. Serrato, SRNL Chuck Urland, Erick Reynolds, PEC June 2009 Savannah River National Laboratory Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Savannah River Site

183

Decontamination and decommissioning experience at Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 1  

SciTech Connect

A description is presented of the experience obtained from decontamination and decommissioning of the Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 1 located at the Idaho Nuclear Engineering Laboratory, Scottsville, Idaho. Included are the planning, preparation, and operations associated with the removal and processing of radioactively contaminated sodium-potassium eutectic alloy (NaK) and decontamination and decommissioning of the facility. (auth)

Kendall, E.W.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Decommissioning considerations at a time of nuclear renaissance  

SciTech Connect

At a time of renaissance in the nuclear power industry, when it is estimated that anywhere between 60 to 130 new power reactors may be built worldwide over the next 15 years, why should we focus on decommissioning? Yet it is precisely the time to examine what decommissioning considerations should be taken into account as the industry proceeds with developing final designs for new reactors and the construction on the new build begins. One of the lessons learned from decommissioning of existing reactors has been that decommissioning was not given much thought when these reactors were designed three or four decades ago. Even though decommissioning may be sixty years down the road from the time they go on line, eventually all reactors will be decommissioned. It is only prudent that new designs be optimized for eventual decommissioning, along with the other major considerations. The overall objective in this regard is that when the time comes for decommissioning, it can be completed in shorter time frames, with minimum generation of radioactive waste, and with better radiological safety. This will ensure that the tail end costs of the power reactors are manageable and that the public confidence in the nuclear power is sustained through the renaissance and beyond. (author)

Devgun, Jas S. [Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC, 55 E. Monroe St, Chicago, IL 60603 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Optimising waste management performance - The key to successful decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: On the 1. of April 2005 the United Kingdom's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority became responsible for the enormous task of decommissioning the UK's civilian nuclear liabilities. The success of the NDA in delivering its key objectives of safer, cheaper and faster decommissioning depends on a wide range factors. It is self-evident, however, that the development of robust waste management practices by those charged with decommissioning liability will be at the heart of the NDA's business. In addition, the implementation of rigorous waste minimisation techniques throughout decommissioning will deliver tangible environmental benefits as well as better value for money and release funds to accelerate the decommissioning program. There are mixed views as to whether waste minimisation can be achieved during decommissioning. There are those that argue that the radioactive inventory already exists, that the amount of radioactivity cannot be minimised and that the focus of activities should be focused on waste management rather than waste minimisation. Others argue that the management and decommissioning of the UK's civilian nuclear liability will generate significant volumes of additional radioactive waste and it is in this area where the opportunities for waste minimisation can be realised. (author)

Keep, Matthew [Entec UK Limited. 17 Angel Gate. City Road. London EC1V 2SH (United Kingdom)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

License Stewardship Approach to Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

The paper explores both the conceptual approach to decommissioning commercial nuclear facilities using a license stewardship approach as well as the first commercial application of this approach. The license stewardship approach involves a decommissioning company taking control of a site and the 10 CFR 50 License in order to complete the work utilizing the established trust fund. In conclusion: The license stewardship approach is a novel way to approach the decommissioning of a retired nuclear power plant that offers several key advantages to all parties. For the owner and regulators, it provides assurance that the station will be decommissioned in a safe, timely manner. Ratepayers are assured that the work will be completed for the price they already have paid, with the decommissioning contractor assuming the financial risk of decommissioning. The contractor gains control of the assets and liabilities, the license, and the decommissioning fund. This enables the decommissioning contractor to control their work and eliminates redundant layers of management, while bringing more focus on achieving the desired end state - a restored site. (authors)

Daly, P.T.; Hlopak, W.J. [Commercial Services Group, EnergySolutions 1009 Commerce Park, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

A review of decommissioning considerations for new reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At a time of 'nuclear renaissance' when the focus is on advanced reactor designs and construction, it is easy to overlook the decommissioning considerations because such a stage in the life of the new reactors will be some sixty years down the road. Yet, one of the lessons learned from major decommissioning projects has been that decommissioning was not given much thought when these reactors were designed three or four decades ago. Hence, the time to examine what decommissioning considerations should be taken into account is right from the design stage with regular updates of the decommissioning strategy and plans throughout the life cycle of the reactor. Designing D and D into the new reactor designs is necessary to ensure that the tail end costs of the nuclear power are manageable. Such considerations during the design stage will facilitate a more cost-effective, safe and timely decommissioning of the facility when a reactor is eventually retired. This paper examines the current regulatory and industry design guidance for the new reactors with respect to the decommissioning issues and provides a review of the design considerations that can help optimize the reactor designs for the eventual decommissioning. (authors)

Devgun, J.S.Ph.D. [Manager Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC, Chicago, IL (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station - Unit 1 Decommissioning Experience Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides detailed information on the successful decommissioning activities of San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 1 (SONGS 1). The report describes their experiences and lessons learned for managers of US and international plants beginning or currently engaged in decommissioning.

2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

189

Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning The Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for the disposition of a vast number of facilities at numerous sites around the country which have been declared excess to current mission needs. Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning More Documents & Publications Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition.

190

Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » D&D Workshops » Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report In recognition of the increasing attention being focused on In Situ Decommissioning (ISD or entombment) as an acceptable and beneficial decommissioning end state, EM is developing guidance for the implementation of ISD of excess facilities within the DOE complex. Consistent with the overarching DOE goals for increased personnel and environmental safety, reduced technical uncertainties and risks, and overall gains in efficiencies and effectiveness, EM initiated an ISD Technology Needs Workshop to identify the technical barriers and technology development

191

An Integrated Approach To Decommissioning Radwaste Management: The Beginning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the near future, Russia will be forced to start large-scale decommissioning programs embracing nuclear submarines, nuclear power plants, defense and nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) facilities, and numerous research reactors (RR). In this situation any attempt to promote D&D programs has the utmost importance. These obvious considerations stimulated the participation of the St. Petersburg Institute of Technology in the IAEA CRP on Decommissioning Techniques for Research Reactors with the project entitled "Decontamination and Waste Management in the Course of Research Reactors Decommissioning." The aims of the present study were the following: to estimate waste arising from RR decommissioning; to gather and evaluate information on decontamination and radioactive waste management techniques and materials recycling methods applicable for decommissioning purposes; and to develop a computerized multicriteria decision-making tool for determination of the appropriateness of various techniques ...

Victor Tsvetkov Sergey; Sergey A. Medvedev; Sergey K. Neljubov

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Standard Guide for Radiation Protection Program for Decommissioning Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide provides instruction to the individual charged with the responsibility for developing and implementing the radiation protection program for decommissioning operations. 1.2 This guide provides a basis for the user to develop radiation protection program documentation that will support both the radiological engineering and radiation safety aspects of the decommissioning project. 1.3 This guide presents a description of those elements that should be addressed in a specific radiation protection plan for each decommissioning project. The plan would, in turn, form the basis for development of the implementation procedures that execute the intent of the plan. 1.4 This guide applies to the development of radiation protection programs established to control exposures to radiation and radioactive materials associated with the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The intent of this guide is to supplement existing radiation protection programs as they may pertain to decommissioning workers, members of...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » D&D Workshops » Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report Technology Requirements for In-Situ Decommissioning Workshop Report In recognition of the increasing attention being focused on In Situ Decommissioning (ISD or entombment) as an acceptable and beneficial decommissioning end state, EM is developing guidance for the implementation of ISD of excess facilities within the DOE complex. Consistent with the overarching DOE goals for increased personnel and environmental safety, reduced technical uncertainties and risks, and overall gains in efficiencies and effectiveness, EM initiated an ISD Technology Needs Workshop to identify the technical barriers and technology development

194

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1995 Thesis Advisor: Michael J. Zyda Thesis Co-Advisor: John S. Falby #12;Public reporting burden-18 REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave Blank) 2. REPORT DATEApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited. THESIS NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey

Zyda, Michael

195

Distributed Energy Resources at Naval Base Ventura County Building 1512  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-55340 Distributed Energy Resources at Naval Base Ventura County Building 1512 Prepared, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. #12;Distributed Energy Resources and the Distributed Energy Program of DOE also provided prior funding to develop and validate the DER-CAM model

196

Estimating the Economic Benefits of Forward-Engaged Naval Forces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In preparing for the 1997 quadrennial defense review, US Navy leaders asked us if we could quantify the economic benefits of forward-engaged naval forces and communicate them to policy makers. Until this point, the only evidence of such benefits was ... Keywords: INDUSTRIES--PETROLEUM-NATURAL GAS, MILITARY--COST EFFECTIVENESS

Robert E. Looney; David A. Schrady; Ronald L. Brown

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

DECOMMISSIONING OF HOT CELL FACILITIES AT THE BATTELLE COLUMBUS LABORATORIES  

SciTech Connect

Battelle Columbus Laboratories (BCL), located in Columbus, Ohio, must complete decontamination and decommissioning activities for nuclear research buildings and grounds at its West Jefferson Facilities by 2006, as mandated by Congress. This effort includes decommissioning several hot cells located in the Hot Cell Laboratory (Building JN-1). JN-1 was originally constructed in 1955, and a hot cell/high bay addition was built in the mid 1970s. For over 30 years, BCL used these hot cell facilities to conduct research for the nuclear power industry and several government agencies, including the U.S. Navy, U.S. Army, U.S. Air Force, and the U.S. Department of Energy. As a result of this research, the JN-1 hot cells became highly contaminated with mixed fission and activation products, as well as fuel residues. In 1998, the Battelle Columbus Laboratories Decommissioning Project (BCLDP) began efforts to decommission JN-1 with the goal of remediating the site to levels of residual contamination allowing future use without radiological restrictions. This goal requires that each hot cell be decommissioned to a state where it can be safely demolished and transported to an off-site disposal facility. To achieve this, the BCLDP uses a four-step process for decommissioning each hot cell: (1) Source Term Removal; (2) Initial (i.e., remote) Decontamination; (3) Utility Removal; and (4) Final (i.e., manual) Decontamination/Stabilization. To date, this process has been successfully utilized on 13 hot cells within JN-1, with one hot cell remaining to be decommissioned. This paper will provide a case study of the hot cell decommissioning being conducted by the BCLDP. Discussed will be the methods used to achieve the goals of each of the hot cell decommissioning stages and the lessons learned that could be applied at other sites where hot cells need to be decommissioned.

Weaver, Patrick; Henderson, Glenn; Erickson, Peter; Garber, David

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

198

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions  

SciTech Connect

The 394 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eleventh in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (8) Technical Measurements Center, (9) Remedial Action Program, and (10) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies.

Knox, N.P.; Webb, J.R.; Ferguson, S.D.; Goins, L.F.; Owen, P.T.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions  

SciTech Connect

The 576 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the tenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title work, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords.

Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Ferguson, S.D.; Fielden, J.M.; Schumann, P.L.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Proceedings: 4th EPRI International Decommissioning and Radioactive Waste Workshop, Madrid, Spain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI held its 4th International Decommissioning Workshop in collaboration with ENRESA and Union Fenosa in Madrid, Spain. This workshop focused on a wide range of decommissioning topics, including general approaches, technical developments, and project experiences. The information presented will assist individual utilities in their planning and conduct of decommissioning projects with the potential to reduce decommissioning costs.

2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioned defueled naval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Proceedings: 1998 EPRI/NEI Decommissioning Technology Workshop: Monterey, California, December 7-9, 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI and NEI provide technical and regulatory support to utilities planning or involved in nuclear plant decommissioning projects. The second joint Decommissioning Technology Workshop provided the opportunity for utility representatives and selected vendors to exchange information related to nuclear plant decommissioning projects. The workshop focused on recent utility decommissioning experience, technological developments and regulatory updates.

1999-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

202

The impact of dry spent-fuel storage on decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several utilities have made decisions to decommission nuclear plants. Other utilities are currently investigating the economic and technical feasibility of decommissioning versus continued operations. As a result, assessments are being made to determine the impact of dry spent-fuel storage on decommissioning. This assessment is being made on a comparison of wet and dry storage (including modifications to current wet storage systems). Not only are the capital and operating costs of the equipment or modifications being evaluated, but staffing levels, interference with other decommissioning activities, and the ability to eventually transfer the fuel to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all factor into the assessments. In the case of the Rancho Seco nuclear generating station, the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) developed three objectives related to spent-fuel disposition to support the safe and economical closure of the plant. These objectives are as follows: 1. Minimize occupational and public radiation exposure. 2. Minimize decommissioning costs, including the need to maintain the spent-fuel pool. 3. Prepare the fuel for DOE acceptance. These rather universal goals are being met for Rancho Seco through the use of a canister-based spent-fuel storage and transportation system, the NUHOMS system. This paper discusses the economic and technical impacts of dry spent-fuel storage on decommissioning, more specifically as it relates to the decommissioning of the Rancho Seco plant.

Bowser, R.C.; Taylor, M. Jr. (Pacific Nuclear, San Jose, CA (United States)); Miller, K.R. (Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Herald, CA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Decommissioning Plan of the Musashi Reactor and Its Progress  

SciTech Connect

The Musashi Reactor is a TRIGA-II, tank-type research reactor, as shown in Table 1. The reactor had been operated at maximum thermal power level of 100 kW since first critical, January 30, 1963. Reactor operation was shut down due to small leakage of water from the reactor tank on December 21,1989. After shutdown, investigation of the causes, making plan of repair and discussions on restart or decommissioning had been done. Finally, decision of decommissioning was made in May, 2003. The initial plan of the decommissioning was submitted to the competent authority in January, 2004. Now, the reactor is under decommissioning. The plan of decommissioning and its progress are described. In conclusion: considering the status of undertaking plan of the waste disposal facility for the low level radioactive waste from research reactors, the phased decommissioning was selected for the Musashi Reactor. First phase of the decommissioning activities including the actions of permanent shutdown and delivering the spent nuclear fuels to US DOE was completed.

Tanzawa, Tomio [Atomic Energy Research Laboratory, Musashi Institute of Technology, Ozenji 971, Asao-ku, Kawasaki, 215-0013 (Japan)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William [Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, 625 Indiana Ave., NW, Suite 700, Washington, DC 20004-2901 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Some aspects of the decommissioning of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

The major factors influencing the choice of a national concept for the decommissioning of nuclear power plants are examined. The operating lifetimes of power generating units with nuclear reactors of various types (VVER-1000, VVER-440, RBMK-1000, EGP-6, and BN-600) are analyzed. The basic approaches to decommissioning Russian nuclear power plants and the treatment of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel are discussed. Major aspects of the ecological and radiation safety of personnel, surrounding populations, and the environment during decommissioning of nuclear installations are identified.

Khvostova, M. S., E-mail: marinakhvostova@list.ru [St. Petersburg State Maritime Technical University (Sevmashvtuz), Severodvinsk Branch (Russian Federation)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Decommissioning of Ris's nuclear facilities. Descriptions and cost assessment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nuclear facilities at Ris National Laboratory to be decommissioned and gives an assessment of the work to be done and the costs incurred. Three decommissioning scenarios were considered with decay times of 10, 25 and 40 years for the DR 3 reactor. The assessments conclude, however, that there will not be much to gain by allowing for the longer decay periods; some operations still will need to be performed remotely. Furthermore, the report describes some of the legal and licensing framework for the decommissioning and gives an assessment of the amounts of radioactive waste to be transferred to a Danish repository. ISBN 87-550-2844-6; 87-550-2846-2 (Internet)

Edited Kurt Lauridsen

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

FAQS Job Task Analyses - Deactivation and Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Functional Area Qualification Standard Functional Area Qualification Standard Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) DOE-STD-1166-2003 Step 1 Identify and evaluate tasks - Develop a comprehensive list of tasks that define the job. o A great starting point is the list of Duties and Responsibilities from the FAQS. o Give careful thought to additional tasks that could be considered. o Don't worry about deleting tasks at this point - that is a part of the process further down. - List the tasks (and their sources, e.g., Duties and Responsibilities #1) in the chart below. - Discuss each task as a group and come to a consensus pertaining to Importance and Frequency of the task (i.e., each team member can consent to the assigned value, even if they don't exactly agree with it).

208

Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2008  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Articles and reports in this issue include: D and D technical paper summaries; The role of nuclear power in turbulent times, by Tom Chrisopher, AREVA, NP, Inc.; Enthusiastic about new technologies, by Jack Fuller, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; It's important to be good citizens, by Steve Rus, Black and Veatch Corporation; Creating Jobs in the U.S., by Guy E. Chardon, ALSTOM Power; and, and, An enviroment and a community champion, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. The Industry Innovations article is titled Best of the best TIP achievement 2008, by Edward Conaway, STP Nuclear Operating Company.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Uranium enrichment decontamination and decommissioning fund  

SciTech Connect

One of the most challenging issues facing the Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management is the cleanup of the three gaseous diffusion plants. In October 1992, Congress passed the Energy Policy Act of 1992 and established the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund to accomplish this task. This mission is being undertaken in an environmentally and financially responsible way by: devising cost-effective technical solutions; producing realistic life-cycle cost estimates, based on practical assumptions and thorough analysis; generating coherent long-term plans which are based on risk assessments, land use, and input from stakeholders; and, showing near-term progress in the cleanup of the gaseous diffusion facilities at Oak Ridge.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

210

Constructing Predictive Estimates for Worker Exposure to Radioactivity During Decommissioning: Analysis of Completed Decommissioning Projects - Master Thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of completed decommissioning projects is used to construct predictive estimates for worker exposure to radioactivity during decommissioning activities. The preferred organizational method for the completed decommissioning project data is to divide the data by type of facility, whether decommissioning was performed on part of the facility or the complete facility, and the level of radiation within the facility prior to decommissioning (low, medium, or high). Additional data analysis shows that there is not a downward trend in worker exposure data over time. Also, the use of a standard estimate for worker exposure to radioactivity may be a best estimate for low complete storage, high partial storage, and medium reactor facilities; a conservative estimate for some low level of facility radiation facilities (reactor complete, research complete, pits/ponds, other), medium partial process facilities, and high complete research facilities; and an underestimate for the remaining facilities. Limited data are available to compare different decommissioning alternatives, so the available data are reported and no conclusions can been drawn. It is recommended that all DOE sites and the NRC use a similar method to document worker hours, worker exposure to radiation (person-rem), and standard industrial accidents, injuries, and deaths for all completed decommissioning activities.

Dettmers, Dana Lee; Eide, Steven Arvid

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Research Laboratory - DC 02  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Research Laboratory - DC 02 Research Laboratory - DC 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY (DC.02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Washington , D.C. DC.02-4 Evaluation Year: 1987 DC.02-4 Site Operations: Research and development on thermal diffusion. DC.02-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - AEC licensed - Military facility DC.02-4 DC.02-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium, Thorium DC.02-2 DC.02-3 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD DC.02-4 Also see Documents Related to NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY DC.02-1 - AEC Memorandum and Source Material License No. C-3393;

212

NAVAL REACTORS PHYSICS HANDBOOK. VOLUME I. SELECTED BASIC TECHNIQUES  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work is to present the most pertinent parts of the body of physics knowledge which has been built up in the course of the Naval and Shippingport (PWR) Reactor Programs, with the aim of providing a background of understanding for those interested in nuclear core design. Volume 1 of this handbook was planned to bring together topics in the basic theoretical and experimental material which are of especially wide interest, including those common to both thermal and intermediate neutron energy reactor types. The physics design of light water-moderated and -cooled reactors is covered in Volume 2 (classified), and that of intermediate neutron-energy power reactors in Volume 3. The emphasis in Volume 1 is thus on light water reactor systems, and as many recent advances in reactor physics of the Naval and Shippingport Reactor Programs as possible have been included.

Radkowsky, A. ed.

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Naval Construction Battalion Center Gulfport - Mississippi Power Partnership Success Story  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction Battalion Center Construction Battalion Center Gulfport - Mississippi Power Partnership Success Story Utilities Hardening Project Joe Bosco May 5, 2009 May 5, 2009 * Naval Construction Battalion Center * Established 1942 - Gulfport * Home of Atlantic Fleet Seabees Home of Atlantic Fleet Seabees * Mission: Prepare for & support all facets of the mobilization of construction forces * Naval Construction Battalion Center * 1,100 Acres * 9+ MVA; $3M/yr in Electricity 9+ MVA; $3M/yr in Electricity * One of two Battalion Centers in U.S. * Economic Impact - $500M Mississippi Power Company * Headquartered - Gulfport * Subsidiary y of Southern Comp pany y * Serves 23 counties Southeast Mississippi * 192,000 retail customers * * Generating capacity: 3 166 192 kW Generating capacity: 3,166,192 kW

214

United States Naval Surface Warfare Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Naval Surface Warfare Center Naval Surface Warfare Center Jump to: navigation, search Hydro | Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Name United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Address Carderock, 9500 MacArthur Boulevard West Place Bethesda, Maryland Zip 20817 Sector Hydro Phone number (301) 227-1574 Website http://www.dt.navy.mil/hyd/fac Coordinates 38.9782231°, -77.1973878° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.9782231,"lon":-77.1973878,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

215

1996 environmental monitoring report for the Naval Reactors Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 1996 at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) are presented in this report. The NRF is located on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and contains three naval reactor prototypes and the Expended Core Facility, which examines developmental nuclear fuel material samples, spent naval fuel, and irradiated reactor plant components/materials. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with state and federal regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Energy (DOE).

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Policy Statement 3, Board Oversight of Department of Energy Decommissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Date: August 19, 1996 Subject Policy Statement on Board oversight of Department of Energy decommissioning activities at defense nuclear facilities. Summary This policy statement describes the decommissioning phase of a DOE defense nuclear facility and identifies the Board's safety oversight responsibilities for decommisioning activities. John T. Conway, Chairman Congress directed the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) to oversee Department of Energy (DOE) practices at defense nuclear facilities that could adversely affect public health and safety during any stage in the life cycle of those facilities, from design, construction, and operation through decommissioning. The Board's objective during decommissioning is identical to its objective during any other phase of a facility's life cycle: to ensure that DOE provides adequate protection of worker and public health and safety at defense nuclear facilities. Congress specifically tasked the Board with reviewing and evaluating:

217

Collection 4 MODIS Land Product Subsets will be decommissioned...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 MODIS Land Product Subsets will be decommissioned on January 31, 2009 The ORNL NASA DAAC will discontinue the distribution of Collection 4 MODIS Land Product Subsets on January...

218

Experimental Boiling Water Reactor decontamination and decommissioning project  

SciTech Connect

The author begins by discussing the problems encountered during decontamination and decommissioning. Next, he discusses waste packaging and recycling. His last topic of lessons learned is subdivided into prevention and early detection, recovery issues, management issues, and noteworthy practices.

Fellhauer, C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Technology Development Div.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

EA-1053: Decontaminating and Decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Decontaminating and Decommissioning the General Atomics 3: Decontaminating and Decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility, San Diego, California EA-1053: Decontaminating and Decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility, San Diego, California SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for low-level radioactive and mixed wastes generated by decontaminating and decommissioning activities at the U.S. Department of Energy's General Atomics' Hot Cell Facility would be transported to either a DOE owned facility, such as the Hanford site in Washington, or to a commercial facility, such as Envirocare in Utah, for treatment and/or storage and disposal. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 14, 1995 EA-1053: Finding of No Significant Impact

220

Future AI and Robotics Technology for Nuclear Plants Decommissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robotics Program The Robotics Program within the Nuclear Engineering Division is developing new technologies. Currently, we are exploring opportunities in applications for nuclear reactor operation, maintenance of remote energy installations, decontamination and decommissioning, and minimally invasive surgery

Hu, Huosheng

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioned defueled naval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

DOE-EM'S In-Situ Decommissioning Strategy  

SciTech Connect

This paper addressed the current status of decommissioning projects within the Department of Energy (DOE) that have an end state of permanent entombment, referred to as in-situ decommissioning (ISD). The substance of a Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) review of ISD and the development of a strategy are summarized. The strategy first recognizes ISD as a viable decommissioning end state; secondly addresses the integration of this approach within the external and internal regulatory regimes; subsequently identifies tools that need developing; and finally presents guidance for implementation. The overall conclusion is that ISD is a viable mode of decommissioning that can be conducted within the existing structure of rules and regulations. (author)

Negin, C.A.; Urland, C.S. [Chuck, Project Enhancement Corporation, Germantown, MD (United States); Szilagyi, A.P. [Andy, U.S. Department of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Standard Guide for Preparing Characterization Plans for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This standard guide applies to developing nuclear facility characterization plans to define the type, magnitude, location, and extent of radiological and chemical contamination within the facility to allow decommissioning planning. This guide amplifies guidance regarding facility characterization indicated in ASTM Standard E 1281 on Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Plans. This guide does not address the methodology necessary to release a facility or site for unconditional use. This guide specifically addresses: 1.1.1 the data quality objective for characterization as an initial step in decommissioning planning. 1.1.2 sampling methods, 1.1.3 the logic involved (statistical design) to ensure adequate characterization for decommissioning purposes; and 1.1.4 essential documentation of the characterization information. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate saf...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Decommissioning of BG/P Systems and Resources | Argonne Leadership...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. Feedback Form Decommissioning of BGP Systems and Resources On December 31 at 23:59:59 GMT (6PM Central),...

224

Decommissioning the UHTREX Reactor Facility at Los Alamos, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Ultra-High Temperature Reactor Experiment (UHTREX) facility was constructed in the late 1960s to advance high-temperature and gas-cooled reactor technology. The 3-MW reactor was graphite moderated and helium cooled and used 93% enriched uranium as its fuel. The reactor was run for approximately one year and was shut down in February 1970. The decommissioning of the facility involved removing the reactor and its associated components. This document details planning for the decommissioning operations which included characterizing the facility, estimating the costs of decommissioning, preparing environmental documentation, establishing a system to track costs and work progress, and preplanning to correct health and safety concerns in the facility. Work to decommission the facility began in 1988 and was completed in September 1990 at a cost of $2.9 million. The facility was released to Department of Energy for other uses in its Los Alamos program.

Salazar, M.; Elder, J.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

The Decommissioning of the Trino Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following a referendum in Italy in 1987, the four Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) owned and operated by the state utility ENEL were closed. After closing the NPPs, ENEL selected a ''safestore'' decommissioning strategy; anticipating a safestore period of some 40-50 years. This approach was consistent with the funds collected during plant operation, and was reinforced by the lack of both a waste repository and a set of national free release limits for contaminated materials in Italy. During 1999, twin decisions were made to privatize ENEL and to transform the nuclear division into a separate subsidiary of the ENEL group. This group was renamed Sogin and during the following year, ownership of the company was transferred to the Italian Treasury. On formation, Sogin was asked by the Italian government to review the national decommissioning strategy. The objective of the review was to move from a safestore strategy to a prompt decommissioning strategy, with the target of releasing all of the nuclear sites by 2020. It was recognized that this target was conditional upon the availability of a national LLW repository together with interim stores for both spent fuel and HLW by 2009. The government also agreed that additional costs caused by the acceleration of the decommissioning program would be considered as stranded costs. These costs will be recovered by a levy on the kWh price of electricity, a process established and controlled by the Regulator of the Italian energy sector. Building on the successful collaboration to develop a prompt decommissioning strategy for the Latina Magnox reactor (1), BNFL and Sogin agreed to collaborate on an in depth study for the prompt decommissioning of the Sogin PWR at Trino. BNFL is currently decommissioning six NPPs and is at an advanced stage of planning for two further units, having completed a full and rigorous exercise to develop Baseline Decommissioning Plans (BDP's) for these stations. The BDP exercise utilizes the full range of BNFL decommissioning experience and knowledge to develop a strategy, methodology and cost for the decommissioning of NPPs. Over the past year, a prompt decommissioning strategy for Trino has been developed. The strategy has been based on the principles of minimizing waste products that require long term storage, maximizing 'free release' materials and utilizing existing and regulatory approved technologies.

Brusa, L.; DeSantis, R.; Nurden, P. L.; Walkden, P.; Watson, B.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

226

Proceedings: 9th EPRI International Decommissioning and Radioactive Waste Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) held the 9th EPRI International Decommissioning and Radioactive Waste Workshop in collaboration with Enresa on November 2-4, 2010 in Madrid, Spain. A parallel session with EU CARBOWASTE focused on technologies and methodologies for management of graphite wastes. The Workshop featured a visit to the Jose Cabrera Nuclear Power Plant, which is presently undergoing decommissioning. This proceedings document contains the abstracts and presentation slides from the p...

2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

227

Program Change Management During Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning a nuclear power plant is a complex project, which involves the coordination of several different departments and the management of changing plant conditions, programs, and regulations. As plants meet certain project Milestones, the evolution of such plant programs and regulations can help optimize project execution and cost. This report provides information about these Milestones and the plant departments and programs that change throughout a decommissioning project.

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

228

Executive Director for Operations FINAL RULE ON DECOMMISSIONING TRUST PROVISIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To request Commission approval to publish in the Federal Register a final rule on decommissioning trust provisions. BACKGROUND: The staff submitted Proposed Rule on Decommissioning Trust Provisions, (SECY-01-0049) to the Commission on March 23, 2001. The Commission issued a staff requirements memorandum (SRM) on April 20, 2001, approving publication of the proposed rule. The proposed rule was published in the Federal Register on May 30, 2001 (66 FR 29244). The staff issued

William D. Travers; Brian Richter Nrr/drip/rprp

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves annual report of operations for fiscal year 1996  

SciTech Connect

During fiscal year 1996, the Department of Energy continued to operate Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 in California and Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 in Wyoming through its contractors. In addition, natural gas operations were conducted at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3. All productive acreage owned by the Government at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 in California was produced under lease to private companies. The locations of all six Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves are shown in a figure. Under the Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976, production was originally authorized for six years, and based on findings of national interest, the President was authorized to extend production in three-year increments. President Reagan exercised this authority three times (in 1981, 1984, and 1987) and President Bush authorized extended production once (in 1990). President Clinton exercised this authority in 1993 and again in October 1996; production is presently authorized through April 5, 2000. 4 figs. 30 tabs.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

230

The unit cost factors and calculation methods for decommissioning - Cost estimation of nuclear research facilities  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The uncertainties of decommissioning costs increase high due to several conditions. Decommissioning cost estimation depends on the complexity of nuclear installations, its site-specific physical and radiological inventories. Therefore, the decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities must be estimated in accordance with the detailed sub-tasks and resources by the tasks of decommissioning activities. By selecting the classified activities and resources, costs are calculated by the items and then the total costs of all decommissioning activities are reshuffled to match with its usage and objectives. And the decommissioning cost of nuclear research facilities is calculated by applying a unit cost factor method on which classification of decommissioning works fitted with the features and specifications of decommissioning objects and establishment of composition factors are based. Decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities are composed of labor cost, equipment and materials cost. Of these three categorical costs, the calculation of labor costs are very important because decommissioning activities mainly depend on labor force. Labor costs in decommissioning activities are calculated on the basis of working time consumed in decommissioning objects and works. The working times are figured out of unit cost factors and work difficulty factors. Finally, labor costs are figured out by using these factors as parameters of calculation. The accuracy of decommissioning cost estimation results is much higher compared to the real decommissioning works. (authors)

Kwan-Seong Jeong; Dong-Gyu Lee; Chong-Hun Jung; Kune-Woo Lee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Deokjin-dong 150, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

U.S. Department Of Energy Naval Reactors Laboratory Field Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Of Energy Naval Reactors Laboratory Field Office Knolls Laboratory National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination Summary Form BUILDING A10...

232

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC CATALOG 7 JUNE 2013 Quick Facts..............................................................................................................................................................4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC CATALOG ­ 7 JUNE 2013 1 CONTENTS Quick Facts...............................................................................................................................................435 Energy Core Group .............................................................................................................................................438 Certificate in Defense Energy - Curriculum 234

233

Distributed Energy Resources at Naval Base Ventura County Building 1512: A Sensitivity Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Naval Base Ventura County Standby Generator Optimization20 Figure 7: Standby Charge Sensitivity Separate24 Figure 11: Standby Charge Sensitivity Analysis

Bailey, Owen C.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Decontamination & Decommissioning Equipment Tracking System (DDETS)  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the Department of Energy (DOE)(EM-50), the Scientific Computing Unit developed a prototype system to track information and data relevant to equipment and tooling removed during decontamination and decommissioning activities. The DDETS proof-of-concept tracking system utilizes a one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) bar coding technology to retain and track information such as identification number, manufacturer, requisition information, and various contaminant information, etc. The information is encoded in a bar code, printed on a label and can be attached to corresponding equipment. The DDETS was developed using a proven relational database management system which allows the addition, modification, printing, and deletion of data. In addition, communication interfaces with bar code printers and bar code readers were developed. Additional features of the system include: (a) Four different reports available for the user (REAPS, transaction, and two inventory), (b) Remote automated inventory tracking capabilities, (c) Remote automated inventory tracking capability (2D bar codes allow equipment to be scanned/tracked without being linked to the DDETS database), (d) Edit, update, delete, and query capabilities, (e) On-line bar code label printing utility (data from 2D bar codes can be scanned directly into the data base simplifying data entry), and (f) Automated data backup utility. Compatibility with the Reportable Excess Automated Property System (REAPS) to upload data from DDETS is planned.

Cook, S.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Mobile workstation for decontamination and decommissioning operations  

SciTech Connect

This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop effective mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities within the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. These mobile worksystems will be configured to operate within the environmental and logistical constraints of such facilities and to perform a number of work tasks. Our program is designed to produce a mobile worksystem with capabilities and features that are matched to the particular needs of D&D work by evolving the design through a series of technological developments, performance tests and evaluations. The project has three phases. In this the first phase, an existing teleoperated worksystem, the Remote Work Vehicle (developed for use in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building basement), was enhanced for telerobotic performance of several D&D operations. Its ability to perform these operations was then assessed through a series of tests in a mockup facility that contained generic structures and equipment similar to those that D&D work machines will encounter in DOE facilities. Building upon the knowledge gained through those tests and evaluations, a next generation mobile worksystem, the RWV II, and a more advanced controller will be designed, integrated and tested in the second phase, which is scheduled for completion in January 1995. The third phase of the project will involve testing of the RWV II in the real DOE facility.

Whittaker, W.L.; Osborn, J.F.; Thompson, B.R. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Robotics Inst.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

An overview of U.S. decommissioning experience -- A basic introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the US experiences in the decommissioning technical area. Sections included are: (1) an overview of the magnitude of the problem, (2) a review of the US decommissioning process, (3) regulation of decommissioning, (4) regulatory and funding requirements for decommissioning, and (5) a general overview of all on-going and completed decommissioning projects to date in the US. The final section presents a review of some issues in the decommissioning area currently being debated in the technical specialists community.

Boing, L.E.

1998-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

237

Technology needs for decommissioning and decontamination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the current view of the most important decontamination and decommissioning (D & D) technology needs for the US Department of Energy facilities for which the D & D programs are the responsibility of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. The source of information used in this assessment was a survey of the D & D program managers at each facility. A summary of needs presented in earlier surveys of site needs in approximate priority order was supplied to each site as a starting point to stimulate thinking. This document reflects a brief initial assessment of ongoing needs; these needs will change as plans for D & D are finalized, some of the technical problems are solved through successful development programs, and new ideas for D and D technologies appear. Thus, this assessment should be updated and upgraded periodically, perhaps, annually. This assessment differs from others that have been made in that it directly and solely reflects the perceived need for new technology by key personnel in the D & D programs at the various facilities and does not attempt to consider the likelihood that these technologies can be successfully developed. Thus, this list of technology needs also does not consider the cost, time, and effort required to develop the desired technologies. An R & D program must include studies that have a reasonable chance for success as well as those for which there is a high need. Other studies that considered the cost and probability of successful development as well as the need for new technology are documented. However, the need for new technology may be diluted in such studies; this document focuses only on the need for new technology as currently perceived by those actually charged with accomplishing D & D.

Bundy, R.D.; Kennerly, J.M.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves. Annual report of operations, Fiscal year 1992  

SciTech Connect

During fiscal year 1992, the reserves generated $473 million in revenues, a $181 million decrease from the fiscal year 1991 revenues, primarily due to significant decreases in oil and natural gas prices. Total costs were $200 million, resulting in net cash flow of $273 million, compared with $454 million in fiscal year 1991. From 1976 through fiscal year 1992, the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves generated more than $15 billion in revenues and a net operating income after costs of $12.5 billion. In fiscal year 1992, production at the Naval Petroleum Reserves at maximum efficient rates yielded 26 million barrels of crude oil, 119 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 164 million gallons of natural gas liquids. From April to November 1992, senior managers from the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves held a series of three workshops in Boulder, Colorado, in order to build a comprehensive Strategic Plan as required by Secretary of Energy Notice 25A-91. Other highlights are presented for the following: Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1--production achievements, crude oil shipments to the strategic petroleum reserve, horizontal drilling, shallow oil zone gas injection project, environment and safety, and vanpool program; Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2--new management and operating contractor and exploration drilling; Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3--steamflood; Naval Oil Shale Reserves--protection program; and Tiger Team environmental assessment of the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

239

DOE Awards Contract for Decontamination & Decommissioning Project for the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decontamination & Decommissioning Project Decontamination & Decommissioning Project for the East Tennessee Technology Park DOE Awards Contract for Decontamination & Decommissioning Project for the East Tennessee Technology Park April 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Mike Koentop (865) 576-0885 www.oakridge.doe.gov Oak Ridge, Tenn. - As part of its ongoing commitment to cleaning up the legacy of the Cold War at sites across the weapons complex, the U.S. Department of Energy has awarded a contract for the remaining environmental cleanup at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) to URS | CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC. The $2.2 billion contract will complete cleanup and provide support functions at ETTP, while supporting local jobs and area small businesses. "Today's contract announcement means that we can continue to meet our

240

In-Situ Decommissioning: A Strategy for Environmental Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

In-Situ Decommissioning In-Situ Decommissioning A Strategy for Environmental Management Reducing the Footprint of the Cold War For over a decade, the Department of Energy has focused on reducing the footprint of 60 years of nuclear research and weapons testing and production. While these facilities are no longer needed, they exist with varying degrees of radiation contamination from years of operation. Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) is the process of closing down a nuclear facility and placing it in a state that reduces or eliminates risk to the pub lic and the environment. This generally includes demolition and transport of the debris to a disposal facility. Another alternative is to dispose of the facility in place (i.e., in-situ). The concept of In-Situ Decommis-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioned defueled naval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Guides: Design/Engineering for Deactivation & Decommissioning | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guides: Design/Engineering for Deactivation & Guides: Design/Engineering for Deactivation & Decommissioning Guides: Design/Engineering for Deactivation & Decommissioning To ensure development of appropriate levels of engineering detail, DOE-EM's Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-13) has prepared this guidance for tailoring a D&D project's engineering/design to meet the objectives of the CD milestones. The enhanced rigor in planning and systematic, forward looking approach to engineering/design recommended in this guidance is intended to ensure that the level of detail in technical planning and technical development, integrated with other project aspects such as safety basis modifications, leads to a high confidence that the engineered system as a whole will function as designed. As the level of

242

Idaho Site Closes Out Decontamination and Decommissioning Project about  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Closes Out Decontamination and Decommissioning Project Site Closes Out Decontamination and Decommissioning Project about $440 Million under Cost Idaho Site Closes Out Decontamination and Decommissioning Project about $440 Million under Cost November 8, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers demolish the Test Area North Hot Shop Complex, shown here. Workers demolish the Test Area North Hot Shop Complex, shown here. Crews demolish CPP-601, a building used during used nuclear fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Crews demolish CPP-601, a building used during used nuclear fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The Engineering Test Reactor vessel is shown here removed, loaded and ready for transport to the on-site landfill. The Engineering Test Reactor vessel is shown here removed, loaded and ready

243

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Deactivation to Decommissioning Transition  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Decommissioning Transition to Decommissioning Transition Example Example 80 1.5 OPERATIONAL TRANSITION AND DEACTIVATION STRATEGY According to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 430.1A Life Cycle Asset Management (LCAM), the life cycle of a facility makes several transitions over the course of it's existence. The typical stages or phases include operation, (standby), deactivation, S&M, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The life cycle phases may occur as a straight through process or with long interim periods. In Fig. 1.4, "Facility Disposition Scenarios and Associated Hazard Profiles" (Ref. DOE-STD-1120-98), Scenario 2 demonstrates the life cycle phasing that most closely represents that of the 9206 Complex. Since the ultimate disposition of Building 9206 (and associated buildings and operations) is not known, a decision was made to

244

DOE Awards Contract for Decontamination & Decommissioning Project for the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Awards Contract for Decontamination & Decommissioning Project DOE Awards Contract for Decontamination & Decommissioning Project for the East Tennessee Technology Park DOE Awards Contract for Decontamination & Decommissioning Project for the East Tennessee Technology Park April 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Mike Koentop (865) 576-0885 www.oakridge.doe.gov Oak Ridge, Tenn. - As part of its ongoing commitment to cleaning up the legacy of the Cold War at sites across the weapons complex, the U.S. Department of Energy has awarded a contract for the remaining environmental cleanup at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) to URS | CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC. The $2.2 billion contract will complete cleanup and provide support functions at ETTP, while supporting local jobs and area small businesses. "Today's contract announcement means that we can continue to meet our

245

Completion of decommissioning: Monitoring for site release and license termination  

SciTech Connect

To request termination of a license upon completion of dismantling or decommissioning activities, documenting any residual radioactivity to show that the levels are environmentally acceptable will be necessary. When the regulators approve the decommissioning plan, they establish what the release criteria for the decommissioned site will be at the time of the site release and license termination. The criteria are numeric guidelines for direct radiation in soils and on surfaces. If the regulatory body finds that the measured on-site values are below the guidelines, the site will be acceptable for unrestricted release (no radiological controls or future use). If areas are found above those values, more decontamination or cleanup of these areas may be required unless the regulatory body grants an exemption.

Boing, L.E.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Pending Issues In Decommissioning Of Nuclear Installations In Developing Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While decommissioning technology and infrastructures are reasonably mature in fully developed countries at the beginning of the third millennium, this is not necessarily the case for some developing countries. It is unfortunate that many of these countries have given little or no attention to early planning and creation of infrastructures for the decommissioning of their nuclear installations, which in many cases are candidates for permanent shutdown in the near future. Critical areas include inter alia (1) poor or no allocation of decommissioning funds, (2) uncertain availability of affordable technologies, (3) unclear definition of roles and responsibilities including lack of regulations, (4) inadequate management and organization techniques, (5) perceived low priority and weak political support, and (6) lack of human and technical resources, particularly in the long term. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is a unique forum to identify and address current and prospecti...

Michele Laraia International

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Fallon Naval Air Station Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Fallon Naval Air Station Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fallon Naval Air Station Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.38,"lon":-118.65,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

248

Proceedings: Decommissioning--License Termination Plans and Final Site Release Workshop  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the proceedings of an EPRI workshop dealing with the subject of decommissioning license termination and final site release. The workshop was the ninth in a series designed to aid utility personnel in assessing technologies for decommissioning nuclear power plants. It focused on specific aspects of license termination activities and final site release as they relate to nuclear plant decommissioning. The information presented will help utilities control decommissioning costs by selecting the best practices and technologies

None

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Proceedings: Decommissioning--License Termination Plans and Final Site Release Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the proceedings of an EPRI workshop dealing with the subject of decommissioning license termination and final site release. The workshop was the ninth in a series designed to aid utility personnel in assessing technologies for decommissioning nuclear power plants. It focused on specific aspects of license termination activities and final site release as they relate to nuclear plant decommissioning. The information presented will help utilities control decommissioning costs by selecti...

2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

250

Decommissioning: License Termination and Final Site Release: Proceedings of EPRI Technical Workshop, October 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the proceedings of an EPRI workshop on decommissioning license termination and final site release. The workshop was the eighth in a series designed to aid utility personnel in assessing technologies for decommissioning nuclear power plants. This workshop focused on specific aspects of license termination and final site release as they relate to nuclear plant decommissioning. The information presented will help utilities control decommissioning costs by selecting the best practices an...

2002-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

251

EA-0531: Proposed Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil Shale  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31: Proposed Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil 31: Proposed Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3, Garfield County, Colorado EA-0531: Proposed Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3, Garfield County, Colorado SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for a Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3 which would be implemented over a five-year period that would encompass a total of 200 wells in Garfield County, Colorado. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 9, 1991 EA-0531: Final Environmental Assessment Proposed Natural Gas Protection Program for Naval Oil Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3 August 9, 1991 EA-0531: Finding of No Significant Impact

252

Proceedings: EPRI/NEI Decommissioning Workshop: San Antonio, Texas, December 10-12, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI and NEI are actively engaged in providing technical support to utilities planning or involved in nuclear plant decommissioning projects. The first joint Nuclear Decommissioning Workshop provided a forum for utility representatives and selected vendors to exchange information related to decommissioning of nuclear power plants. The workshop focused on the utility experience related to major projects currently under way, technology developments and regulatory issues.

1998-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

253

Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tech Assistance Tech Assistance Savannah River National Laboratory- Assess Adequacy of Process Knowledge for D&D Guidance for Determining Adequacy of Process Knowledge Page 1 of 2 Savannah River National Laboratory South Carolina Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning Challenge The Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for the disposition of a vast number of facilities at numerous sites around the country which have been declared excess to current mission needs. When such excess facilities are scheduled for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D), among the tasks the responsible project team is faced with include the evaluation and planning for the removal, characterization, and disposition of all legacy

254

Regulatory Reform and License Termination Planning in Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) must be safe and cost-effective and consider the needs of a wide range of stakeholders. The creative tension among these objectives has provided opportunities to reform the way these plants are regulated and managed in decommissioning. Enlightened and visionary leaders from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and industry are seizing these opportunities to create new paradigms for risk-informed regulation; creative stakeholder involvement; and effective, end-state focused, license termination planning.

Michael J. Meisner

2000-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

255

Worldwide Overview of Lessons Learned from Decommissioning Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With an increasing number of radioactive facilities and reactors now reaching the end of their useful life and being taken out of service, there is a growing emphasis worldwide on the safe and efficient decommissioning of such plants. There is a wealth of experience already gained in decommissioning projects for all kinds of nuclear facilities. It is now possible to compare and discuss progress and accomplishments worldwide. In particular, rather than on the factual descriptions of projects, technologies and case histories, it is important to focus on lessons learned: in this way, the return of experience is felt to effectively contribute to progress. Key issues - inevitably based on a subjective ranking - are presented in this paper. Through the exchange of lessons learned, it is possible to achieve full awareness of the need for resources for and constraints of safe and cost-effective decommissioning. What remains now is the identification of specific, remaining issues that may hinder or delay the smooth progress of decommissioning. To this end, lessons learned provide the necessary background information; this paper tries to make extensive use of practical experience gained by the international community.

Laraia, Michele [IAEA, Vienna (Austria)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Application of Non-Nuclear Robotics to Nuclear Industry Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Segmentation of radioactive components, including reactor cavity internals, has proved to be a challenging job for the nuclear power industry during decommissioning. The innovative use of robotic technology to perform debris cleanup can help utilities maximize worker safety. This report documents a first of its kind robotics experience at Connecticut Yankee.

2004-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

257

Commander, Naval Base ATTN: Ms. Cheryl Barnett Building N-26  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.J>?j 1.2 1990 .J>?j 1.2 1990 Commander, Naval Base ATTN: Ms. Cheryl Barnett Building N-26 Code N 9 E Norfolk, Virginia 23511-6002 Dear Ms. Barnett: I enjoyed speaking with you on the phone. The Department of Energy (DOE) has established its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) to identify sites formerly utilized by its predecessor agencies in the early days of the nation's atomic energy program and to determine the potential for these sites to contain radiological contamination, related to DOE's past activities, which may require remedial action. When necessary, radiological surveys of individual sites are performed to provide the data necessary to make this necessary determination. As we discussed, in July 1956, the Atomic Energy Commission (a DOE

258

Naval Reactors Facility environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 2001 at the Naval Reactors Facility are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U. S. Department of Energy.

NONE

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

259

Naval Reactors Facility environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 1999 at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Naval Reactors Facility environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 2000 at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

None

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioned defueled naval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Naval Reactors Facility Environmental Monitoring Report, Calendar Year 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 2003 at the Naval Reactors Facility are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy.

None

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

The Financing of Decommissioning - A View on Legal Aspects in the European Union  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the future, an increasing number of nuclear power plants will be definitively closed and undergoing decommissioning. Realising the inseparable connection between the safe performance of decommissioning activities and its financing, the European Union is concerned about the availability of sufficient financial means for carrying out the decommissioning process by the time they are needed. Analysing which measures have been taken by the EU to ensure and harmonise the financing of decommissioning, the author illustrates the draft directives of the European Commission known as the 'nuclear package', which contain rules regarding the funding of decommissioning. In this context, he also descends to the envisaged Commission's analysis about the various concepts established in the Member States with respect to financing the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The author comes to the conclusion that the EU has taken first initiatives to promote a transparent and harmonised system of regulations and standards concerning the financing of decommissioning across the Union. (author)

Fillbrandt, M. [Gesellschaft fiir Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Schwertnergasse 1, 50667 Cologne (Germany)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Decommissioning of U.S. uranium production facilities  

SciTech Connect

From 1980 to 1993, the domestic production of uranium declined from almost 44 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} to about 3 million pounds. This retrenchment of the U.S. uranium industry resulted in the permanent closing of many uranium-producing facilities. Current low uranium prices, excess world supply, and low expectations for future uranium demand indicate that it is unlikely existing plants will be reopened. Because of this situation, these facilities eventually will have to be decommissioned. The Uranium Mill Tailings and Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) vests the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with overall responsibility for establishing environmental standards for decommissioning of uranium production facilities. UMTRCA also gave the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) the responsibility for licensing and regulating uranium production and related activities, including decommissioning. Because there are many issues associated with decommissioning-environmental, political, and financial-this report will concentrate on the answers to three questions: (1) What is required? (2) How is the process implemented? (3) What are the costs? Regulatory control is exercised principally through the NRC licensing process. Before receiving a license to construct and operate an uranium producing facility, the applicant is required to present a decommissioning plan to the NRC. Once the plan is approved, the licensee must post a surety to guarantee that funds will be available to execute the plan and reclaim the site. This report by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) represents the most comprehensive study on this topic by analyzing data on 33 (out of 43) uranium production facilities located in Colorado, Nebraska, New Mexico, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Washington.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Request for Naval Reactors Comment on Proposed Prometheus Space Flight Nuclear Reactor High Tier Reactor Safety Requirements and for Naval Reactors Approval to Transmit These Requirements to JPL  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this letter is to request Naval Reactors comments on the nuclear reactor high tier requirements for the PROMETHEUS space flight reactor design, pre-launch operations, launch, ascent, operation, and disposal, and to request Naval Reactors approval to transmit these requirements to Jet Propulsion Laboratory to ensure consistency between the reactor safety requirements and the spacecraft safety requirements. The proposed PROMETHEUS nuclear reactor high tier safety requirements are consistent with the long standing safety culture of the Naval Reactors Program and its commitment to protecting the health and safety of the public and the environment. In addition, the philosophy on which these requirements are based is consistent with the Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group recommendations on space nuclear propulsion safety (Reference 1), DOE Nuclear Safety Criteria and Specifications for Space Nuclear Reactors (Reference 2), the Nuclear Space Power Safety and Facility Guidelines Study of the Applied Physics Laboratory.

D. Kokkinos

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

265

EA-1236: Preparation for Transfer of Ownership of Naval Petroleum Reserve  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

236: Preparation for Transfer of Ownership of Naval Petroleum 236: Preparation for Transfer of Ownership of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, Natrona County, WY EA-1236: Preparation for Transfer of Ownership of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, Natrona County, WY SUMMARY This EA evaluates activities that DOE would conduct in anticipation of possible transfer of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) out of Federal operation. Proposed activities would include accelerated plugging and abandoning of uneconomic wells, complete reclamation and restoration of abandoned sites including dismantling surface facilities, batteries, roads, test satellites, electrical distribution systems and associated power poles, when they are no longer needed for production, and the development of the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC).

266

Development Wells At Fallon Naval Air Station Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Naval Air Station Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Naval Air Station Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Fallon Naval Air Station Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Fallon Naval Air Station Area Exploration Technique Development Wells Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes As was mentioned previously, the Navy signed a development contract with Ormat in 2005 to produce power from a potential resource on the SE corner of the main side portion of NAS Fallon. Additionally the GPO began additional exploration activities on the Bombing Range 16 in collaboration with the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy. The introduction of $9.1M of Recovery Act funds in early 2009 led to a broadening as well as an

267

Sale of the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Petroleum Reserves » Naval Reserves » Sale of the Elk Services » Petroleum Reserves » Naval Reserves » Sale of the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve Sale of the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve Energy Secretary Federico Pena (left) and Occidental Petroleum's David Hentschel sign the historic transfer agreement with Patricia Godley, DOE's Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, who orchestrated the sale, looking on. Energy Secretary Federico Pena (left) and Occidental Petroleum's David Hentschel sign the historic transfer agreement with Patricia Godley, DOE's Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, who orchestrated the sale, looking on. On February 5, 1998, the Department of Energy and Occidental Petroleum Corporation concluded the largest divestiture of federal property in the history of the U.S. government.

268

Design and analysis of a permanent magnet generator for naval applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the electrical and magnetic design and analysis of a permanent magnet generation module for naval applications. Numerous design issues are addressed and several issues are raised about the potential ...

Rucker, Jonathan E. (Jonathan Estill)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Modular machinery arrangement and its impact in early-stage naval electric ship design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical power demands for naval surface combatants are projected to rise with the development of increasingly complex and power intensive combat systems. This trend also coincides with the need of achieving maximum fuel ...

Jurkiewicz, David J. (David James)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

EA-1008: Continued Development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (Sitewide), Natrona County, Wyoming  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to continue development of the U.S. Department of Energy's Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 located in Natrona County, Wyoming over the next...

271

Development of A Mesoscale Ensemble Data Assimilation System at The Naval Research Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) has been adopted and implemented at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) for mesoscale and storm-scale data assimilation to study the impact of ensemble assimilation of high-resolution observations, including those ...

Qingyun Zhao; Fuqing Zhang; Teddy Holt; Craig H. Bishop; Qin Xu

272

Application and analysis of stiffened side shell panel failure for naval patrol craft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over their lifetime, naval patrol craft are subjected to many different types of loading scenarios, most of which are perfectly safe. In rare instances, through a variety of different reasons, these craft are loaded beyond ...

Mothander, Matthew K. A., Lieutenant (Matthew Kristian Alden)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Analyzing the effects of component reliability on naval Integrated Power System quality of service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Integrated Power System (IPS) is a key enabling technology for future naval vessels and their advanced weapon systems. While conventional warship designs utilize separate power systems for propulsion and shipboard ...

Hawbaker, Benjamin F. (Benjamin Forrest)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Preservation and Implementation of Decommissioning Lessons Learned in the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

SciTech Connect

Over the past several years, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has actively worked to capture and preserve lessons learned from the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. More recently, NRC has involved industry groups, the Organization of Agreement States (OAS), and the Department of Energy (DOE) in the effort to develop approaches to capture, preserve and disseminate decommissioning lessons learned. This paper discusses the accomplishments of the working group, some lessons learned by the NRC in the recent past, and how NRC will incorporate these lessons learned into its regulatory framework. This should help ensure that the design and operation of current and future nuclear facilities will result in less environmental impact and more efficient decommissioning. In summary, the NRC will continue capturing today's experience in decommissioning so that future facilities can take advantage of lessons learned from today's decommissioning projects. NRC, both individually and collectively with industry groups, OAS, and DOE, is aggressively working on the preservation and implementation of decommissioning lessons learned. The joint effort has helped to ensure the lessons from the whole spectrum of decommissioning facilities (i.e., reactor, fuel cycle, and material facilities) are better understood, thus maximizing the amount of knowledge and best practices obtained from decommissioning activities. Anticipated regulatory activities at the NRC will make sure that the knowledge gained from today's decommissioning projects is preserved and implemented to benefit the nuclear facilities that will decommission in the future.

Rodriguez, Rafael L. [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Federal and State Materials and Environmental Management Programs, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Southwest Division, Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Demand Side Management Program Implementation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper covers some of the major aspects of the development and execution of the Southwest Division, Naval Facilities Engineering Command (SOUTHWESTNAVFACENGCOM) Energy and Water Program. The program covers Naval and Marine facilities in 14 western states. It started from zero in 1992 and has grown to a program which has identified and is in the process of implementing energy and water savings projects totaling over $115,000,000.

Gates, G. G.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

4.1.4 NUCLEAR SUBSTANCE ROOM DECOMMISSIONING FORM The permit holder shall ensure that prior to decommissioning any area, room or enclosure where  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and efficiency of telerobotics in the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear power plants. Currently, we, LLC Nuclear Engineering Technology Initiatives The Nuclear Engineering (NE) Division carries out · Decontamination & Decommissioning ­ Laser processing technology for decontamination of surfaces · Refractory Alloy

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

277

Draft principles, policy, and acceptance criteria for decommissioning of U.S. Department of Energy contaminated surplus facilities and summary of international decommissioning programs  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning activities enable the DOE to reuse all or part of a facility for future activities and reduce hazards to the general public and any future work force. The DOE Office of Environment, Health and Safety has prepared this document, which consists of decommissioning principles and acceptance criteria, in an attempt to establish a policy that is in agreement with the NRC policy. The purpose of this document is to assist individuals involved with decommissioning activities in determining their specific responsibilities as identified in Draft DOE Order 5820.DDD, ``Decommissioning of US Department of Energy Contaminated Surplus Facilities`` (Appendix A). This document is not intended to provide specific decommissioning methodology. The policies and principles of several international decommissioning programs are also summarized. These programs are from the IAEA, the NRC, and several foreign countries expecting to decommission nuclear facilities. They are included here to demonstrate the different policies that are to be followed throughout the world and to allow the reader to become familiar with the state of the art for environment, safety, and health (ES and H) aspects of nuclear decommissioning.

Singh, B.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[USDOE Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards, Washington, DC (United States). Systems Analysis and Standards Div.; Gillette, J.; Jackson, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deactivation & Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers at the Savannah River Site imploded the 455-foot-tall K Reactor Cooling Tower in May 2010. The project was completed safely and contributed 36.5 square miles to the site's total footprint reduction. On August 3, 2013, contractors and the Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management successfully completed the explosive demolition of the K-1206-F Fire Water Tower, which for 54 years had been used for fire water supply at the East Tennessee Technology Park in Oak Ridge Tennessee. The 382 foot tall, 400,000-gallon water tower tank was drained and isolated from the fire water system prior to the estimated 100-ton steel structure being

279

Carbon-14 Bioassay for Decommissioning of Hanford Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The old production reactors at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site used large graphite piles as the moderator. As part of long-term decommissioning plans, the potential need for 14C radiobioassay of workers was identified. Technical issues associated with 14C bioassay and worker monitoring were investigated, including anticipated graphite characterization, potential intake scenarios, and the bioassay capabilities that may be required to support the decommissioning of the graphite piles. A combination of urine and feces sampling would likely be required for the absorption type S 14C anticipated to be encountered. However the concentrations in the graphite piles appear to be sufficiently low that dosimetrically significant intakes of 14C are not credible, thus rendering moot the need for such bioassay.

Carbaugh, Eugene H.; Watson, David J.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Executive Director for Operations PROPOSED RULE ON DECOMMISSIONING TRUST PROVISIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To request Commission approval to publish a proposed rule in the Federal Register on decommissioning trust agreement requirements. BACKGROUND: The staff presented a rulemaking plan (SECY-00-0002) to the Commission on December 30, 1999. The plan discussed two actions relating to amending nuclear power reactor decommissioning trust provisions i.e., to amend 10 CFR 50.75 and revise Regulatory Guide 1.159. Subsequently, in a February 9, 2000, staff requirements memorandum (SRM) to the Executive Director for Operations (Attachment 1), the Commission authorized the staff to proceed with the rulemaking plan. Further, the Commission instructed the staff that any specific trust fund terms and conditions necessary to protect the funds fully should be set out in the rule itself, not in the regulatory guide. Sample language for trust agreements consistent with the terms and conditions within the rule may be provided within the associated regulatory guide. The attached Federal Register notice (FRN) responds to the SRM. DISCUSSION: Contact:

William D. Travers; Brian Richter

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioned defueled naval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Decommissioning of the Special Metallurgical Building at Mound Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Special Metallurgical Building at Mound Laboratory, a building of 18,515 sq ft of floor space, was decommissioned. This decommissioned facility formerly housed 238PU processes for the fabrication of radioisotopic fueled heat sources. The 238PU work was conducted in 585 linear ft of gloveboxes occupying approximately 12,600 sq ft of the building. All of the gloveboxes, process services, building services, interior walls, and ceilings were removed to the point of exit at the roof. Eighty-five percent of the filter banks occupying 700 sq ft of floor space was also removed. Special procedures and special equipment were used to reduce the amount of 238PU in the building from approximately 100,000 Ci at the start of the effort to less than 0.3 Ci without a significant release to the environment.

Harris, W. R.; Kokenge, B. R.; Marsh, G. C.

1965-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

Decommissioning San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Unit 1 (SONGS-1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning a nuclear power plant and termination of the plant license requires the removal of highly activated materials from inside the nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Such a task presents a major challenge in terms of technology, project management, and worker exposure. This report documents the approach taken by Southern California Edison (SCE) in their highly successful reactor vessel internals (RVI) segmentation of San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Unit 1 (SONGS-1). The report detail...

2005-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

283

Remediation of Embedded Piping: Trojan Nuclear Plant Decommissioning Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization, decontamination, survey, and/or removal of contaminated embedded piping can have a substantial financial impact on decommissioning projects, depending on the project approach. This report presents a discussion of the Trojan Embedded Pipe Remediation Project (EPRP) activities, including categorization and characterization of affected piping, modeling for the proposed contamination acceptance criteria, and evaluations of various decontamination and survey techniques. The report also descr...

2000-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

284

TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS FOR IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING WORKSHOP REPORT  

SciTech Connect

In recognition of the increasing attention being focused on In Situ Decommissioning (ISD or entombment) as an acceptable and beneficial decommissioning end state, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is developing guidance for the implementation of ISD of excess facilities within the DOE complex. Consistent with the overarching DOE goals for increased personnel and environmental safety, reduced technical uncertainties and risks, and overall gains in efficiencies and effectiveness, EM's Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-23) initiated efforts to identify the technical barriers and technology development needs for the optimal implementation of ISD. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), as the EM Corporate Laboratory, conducted an ISD Technology Needs Workshop to identify the technology needs at DOE sites. The overall goal of the workshop was to gain a full understanding of the specific ISD technical challenges, the technologies available, and those needing development. The ISD Workshop was held December 9-10, 2008 in Aiken, SC. Experienced decommissioning operations personnel from Richland Operations Office (RL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and Savannah River Site (SRS) along with scientists and engineers specific expertise were assembled to identify incremental and 'game changing' solutions to ISD technology challenges. The workshop and follow-up activities yielded 14 technology needs statements and the recommendation that EM-23 prioritize and pursue the following specific technology development and deployment actions. For each action, the recommended technology acquisition mechanisms (competitive solicitation (CS) or direct funding (TCR)) are provided. Activities that are time critical for ISD projects, or require unique capabilities that reside in the DOE Laboratory system will be funded directly to those institutions. Activities that have longer lead times and where the private sector, universities or other agencies are expected to have greater expertise will be accomplished through an open, competitive solicitation process. Several areas will require joint efforts from the two classes of resources.

Jannik, T.; Lee, P.; Gladden, J.; Langton, C.; Serrato, M.; Urland, C.; Reynolds, E.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

285

Innovative Graphite Removal Technology for Graphite Moderated Reactor Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report defines a trial program to support the development of a new concept for the removal of reactor graphite by remote in-situ size reduction and vacuum transfer, known as nibble-and-vacuum. This new approach to graphite retrieval has significant potential for simplifying the decommissioning process of graphite moderated reactors. It produces graphite gravel, which has potential as feedstock for processes such as gasification/steam reforming. This report includes definition of the trial program, t...

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

286

Decontamination and decommissioning surveillance and maintenance report for FY 1991  

SciTech Connect

The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) Program has three distinct phases: (1) surveillance and maintenance (S M); (2) decontamination and removal of hazardous materials and equipment (which DOE Headquarters in Washington, D.C., calls Phase I of remediation); and (3) decommissioning and ultimate disposal, regulatory compliance monitoring, and property transfer (which DOE Headquarters calls Phase II of remediation). A large part of D D is devoted to S M at each of the sites. Our S M activities, which are performed on facilities awaiting decommissioning, are designed to minimize potential hazards to human health and the environment by: ensuring adequate containment of residual radioactive and hazardous materials; and, providing physical safety and security controls to minimize potential hazards to on-site personnel and the general public. Typically, we classify maintenance activities as either routine or special (major repairs). Routine maintenance includes such activities as painting, cleaning, vegetation control, minor structural repairs, filter changes, and building system(s) checks. Special maintenance includes Occupational Safety and Health Act facility upgrades, roof repairs, and equipment overhaul. Surveillance activities include inspections, radiological measurements, reporting, records maintenance, and security (as required) for controlling and monitoring access to facilities. This report summarizes out FY 1991 S M activities for the Tennessee plant sites, which include the K-25 Site, the Gas Centrifuge facilities, ORNL, and the Y-12 Plant.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

A NOVEL APPROACH TO SPENT FUEL POOL DECOMMISSIONING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been at the forefront of developing methods to reduce the cost and schedule of deactivating spent fuel pools (SFP). Several pools have been deactivated at the INL using an underwater approach with divers. These projects provided a basis for the INL cooperation with the Dresden Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 SFP (Exelon Generation Company) deactivation. It represents the first time that a commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) SFP was decommissioned using this underwater coating process. This approach has advantages in many aspects, particularly in reducing airborne contamination and allowing safer, more cost effective deactivation. The INL pioneered underwater coating process was used to decommission three SFPs with a total combined pool volume of over 900,000 gallons. INL provided engineering support and shared project plans to successfully initiate the Dresden project. This report outlines the steps taken by INL and Exelon to decommission SFPs using the underwater coating process. The rationale used to select the underwater coating process and the advantages and disadvantages are described. Special circumstances are also discussed, such as the use of a remotely-operated underwater vehicle to visually and radiologically map the pool areas that were not readily accessible. A larger project, the INTEC-603 SFP in-situ (grouting) deactivation, is reviewed. Several specific areas where special equipment was employed are discussed and a Lessons Learned evaluation is included.

R. L. Demmer

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Present Status Of Research Reactor Decommissioning Program In Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At present, Indonesia has 3 research reactors: MTR-type multipurpose reactor of 30 MW at Serpong site, TRIGA-type research reactor of 1 MW at Bandung site, and small TRIGA - type reactor of 100 kW at Yogyakarta Research Center. The oldest one is the TRIGA reactor at Bandung site, which went critical at 250 kW in 1964, then was operated at maximum of 1000 kW by 1971. The reactor has operated for a total of 35 years. There is no decision for decommissioning this reactor; however, slowly but surely, it will be an object for a near-future decommissioning program. Anticipation of the situation is necessary. For the Indonesian case, early decommissioning strategy for a research reactor and restricted use of the site for another nuclear installation is favorable under high land pricing, availability of radwaste repository, and cost analysis. Graphite from Triga reactor reflector is recommended for direct disposal after conditioning, without volume reduction treatment. Development of human ...

Mulyanto And Gunandjar

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

MAUT approach for selecting a proper decommissioning scenario  

SciTech Connect

When dismantling scenarios are selected, not only the quantitatively calculated results but also the qualitatively estimated results should be considered with a logical and systematic process. In this case, the MAUT (Multi-Attribute Utility Theory) is widely used for the quantification of subjective judgments in various fields of a decision making. This study focuses on the introduction and application of the MAUT method for the selection of decommissioning scenarios. To evaluate decommissioning scenarios, nine evaluation attributes are considered. These attributes are: the primary cost, the peripheral cost, the waste treatment cost, the worker's exposure, the worker's safety, the work difficulty, the originality of the dismantling technologies, their contributions to other industries, public relations for, and an understanding of the public. The weighting values of the attributes were determined by using the AHP (Analytic Hierarchy Process) method and their utility functions are produced from several questionnaires for the decision makers. As an implementation, this method was applied to evaluate two scenarios, the plasma arc cutting scenario and the nibbler cutting scenario for decommissioning the thermal column in KRR- 1 (Korea Research Reactor-1). As a result, this method has many merits even although it is difficult to produce the utility function of each attribute. However, once they are setup it is easy to measure the alternatives' values and it can be applied regardless of the number of alternatives. (authors)

Kim, S.K.; Park, K.W.; Lee, H.S.; Jung, C.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

A Novel Approach to Spent Fuel Pool Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

The Dresden Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) (Exelon Generation Co.) was decommissioned using a new underwater coating strategy developed in cooperation with the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This was the first time that a commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) SFP was decommissioned using this underwater coating approach. This approach has advantages in many aspects, particularly in reducing airborne contamination and in safer, more cost effective deactivation. The process was pioneered at the INL and used to decommission three SFPs with a total combined pool volume of over 900,000 gallons. The INL provided engineering support and shared project plans to successfully initiate the Dresden project. This report outlines the steps taken by the INL and Exelon on the pathway for this activity. The rationale used to select the underwater coating option and the advantages and disadvantages are shown. Special circumstances, such as the use of a remotely operated underwater vehicle to visually and radiologically map the pool areas that were not readily accessible, are discussed. Several specific areas where special equipment was employed are given and a lessons learned evaluation is included.

R.L. Demmer; J.B. Panozzo; R.J. Christensen

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Decommissioning the Dresden Unit 1 Spent Fuel Pool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Dresden Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1 Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) (Exelon Generation Co.) was decommissioned using a new underwater coating strategy developed in cooperation with the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This was the first time that a commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) SFP was decommissioned using this underwater coating approach. This approach has advantages in many aspects, particularly in reducing airborne contamination and in safer, more cost effective deactivation. The process was pioneered at the INL and used to decommission three SFPs with a total combined pool volume of over 900,000 gallons. The INL provided engineering support and shared project plans to successfully initiate the Dresden project. This report outlines the steps taken by the INL and Exelon on the pathway for this activity. The rationale used to select the underwater coating option and the advantages and disadvantages are shown. Special circumstances, such as the use of a remotely operated underwater vehicle to map (visually and radiologically) the pool areas that were not readily accessible, are discussed. Several specific areas where special equipment was employed are given and a lessons learned evaluation is included. (authors)

Demmer, R.L.; Bargelt, R.J. [Idaho National Laboratory, P. O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-7113 (United States); Panozzo, J.B.; Christensen, R.J. [Exelon Generation Company, LLC, Dresden Nuclear Power Station, Warrenville, IL 60555 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

NALDA (Naval Aviation Logistics Data Analysis) CAI (computer aided instruction)  

SciTech Connect

Data Systems Engineering Organization (DSEO) personnel developed a prototype computer aided instruction CAI system for the Naval Aviation Logistics Data Analysis (NALDA) system. The objective of this project was to provide a CAI prototype that could be used as an enhancement to existing NALDA training. The CAI prototype project was performed in phases. The task undertaken in Phase I was to analyze the problem and the alternative solutions and to develop a set of recommendations on how best to proceed. The findings from Phase I are documented in Recommended CAI Approach for the NALDA System (Duncan et al., 1987). In Phase II, a structured design and specifications were developed, and a prototype CAI system was created. A report, NALDA CAI Prototype: Phase II Final Report, was written to record the findings and results of Phase II. NALDA CAI: Recommendations for an Advanced Instructional Model, is comprised of related papers encompassing research on computer aided instruction CAI, newly developing training technologies, instructional systems development, and an Advanced Instructional Model. These topics were selected because of their relevancy to the CAI needs of NALDA. These papers provide general background information on various aspects of CAI and give a broad overview of new technologies and their impact on the future design and development of training programs. The paper within have been index separately elsewhere.

Handler, B.H. (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (USA)); France, P.A.; Frey, S.C.; Gaubas, N.F.; Hyland, K.J.; Lindsey, A.M.; Manley, D.O. (Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (USA)); Hunnum, W.H. (North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill, NC (USA)); Smith, D.L. (Memphis State Univ., TN (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Renewable Energy Optimization Report for Naval Station Newport  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2008, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to encourage the development of renewable energy (RE) on potentially contaminated land and mine sites. As part of this effort, EPA is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate RE options at Naval Station (NAVSTA) Newport in Newport, Rhode Island. NREL's Renewable Energy Optimization (REO) tool was utilized to identify RE technologies that present the best opportunity for life-cycle cost-effective implementation while also serving to reduce energy-related carbon dioxide emissions and increase the percentage of RE used at NAVSTA Newport. The technologies included in REO are daylighting, wind, solar ventilation preheating (SVP), solar water heating, photovoltaics (PV), solar thermal (heating and electric), and biomass (gasification and cogeneration). The optimal mix of RE technologies depends on several factors including RE resources; technology cost and performance; state, utility, and federal incentives; and economic parameters (discount and inflation rates). Each of these factors was considered in this analysis. Technologies not included in REO that were investigated separately per NAVSTA Newport request include biofuels from algae, tidal power, and ground source heat pumps (GSHP).

Robichaud, R.; Mosey, G.; Olis, D.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport utilities metering, Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed this report for the US Navy`s Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport, Rhode Island (NUWC). The purpose of the report was to review options for metering electricity and steam used in the NUWC compound, and to make recommendations to NUWC for implementation under a follow-on project. An additional NUWC concern is a proposed rate change by the servicing utility, Newport Electric, which would make a significant shift from consumption to demand billing, and what effect that rate change would have on the NUWC utility budget. Automated, remote reading meters are available which would allow NUWC to monitor its actual utility consumption and demand for both the entire NUWC compound and by end-use in individual buildings. Technology is available to perform the meter reads and manipulate the data using a personal computer with minimal staff requirement. This is not meant to mislead the reader into assuming that there is no requirement for routine preventive maintenance. All equipment requires routine maintenance to maintain its accuracy. While PNL reviewed the data collected during the site visit, however, it became obvious that significant opportunities exist for reducing the utility costs other than accounting for actual consumption and demand. Unit costs for both steam and electricity are unnecessarily high, and options are presented in this report for reducing them. Additionally, NUWC has an opportunity to undertake a comprehensive energy resource management program to significantly reduce its energy demand, consumption, and costs.

Carroll, D.M.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport utilities metering, Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed this report for the US Navy's Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport, Rhode Island (NUWC). The purpose of the report was to review options for metering electricity and steam used in the NUWC compound, and to make recommendations to NUWC for implementation under a follow-on project. An additional NUWC concern is a proposed rate change by the servicing utility, Newport Electric, which would make a significant shift from consumption to demand billing, and what effect that rate change would have on the NUWC utility budget. Automated, remote reading meters are available which would allow NUWC to monitor its actual utility consumption and demand for both the entire NUWC compound and by end-use in individual buildings. Technology is available to perform the meter reads and manipulate the data using a personal computer with minimal staff requirement. This is not meant to mislead the reader into assuming that there is no requirement for routine preventive maintenance. All equipment requires routine maintenance to maintain its accuracy. While PNL reviewed the data collected during the site visit, however, it became obvious that significant opportunities exist for reducing the utility costs other than accounting for actual consumption and demand. Unit costs for both steam and electricity are unnecessarily high, and options are presented in this report for reducing them. Additionally, NUWC has an opportunity to undertake a comprehensive energy resource management program to significantly reduce its energy demand, consumption, and costs.

Carroll, D.M.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Appendices. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

Appendices are presented concerning the evaluations of decommissioning financing alternatives; reference site description; reference BWR facility description; radiation dose rate and concrete surface contamination data; radionuclide inventories; public radiation dose models and calculated maximum annual doses; decommissioning methods; generic decommissioning information; immediate dismantlement details; passive safe storage, continuing care, and deferred dismantlement details; entombment details; demolition and site restoration details; cost estimating bases; public radiological safety assessment details; and details of alternate study bases.

Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

RESPONSE TO NRC REQUEST FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON DECOMMISSIONING FUNDING STATUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is understood that this information is required to be submitted per the regulations referenced in the RAI, and the 2011 Decommissioning Cost Estimate will be modified to include all required information to preclude the need for future RAI's. RAI #1: On March 29, 2011, SMUD provided the following radiological decommissioning costs associated with the license termination for Rancho Seco: The total decommissioning costs are now estimated to be $504.3 million, with an estimated $22.2 million in remaining costs.

Attention John Hickman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Final Site-Specific Decommissioning Inspection Report for the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Report of site-specific decommissioning in-process inspection activities at the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor Facility.

Sarah Roberts

2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

299

A Plutonium Finishing Plant Model for the Cercla Removal Action and Decommissioning Construction Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The joint policy between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for decommissioning buildings at DOE facilities documents an agreement between the agencies to perform decommissioning activities including demolition under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The use of removal actions for decommissioning integrates EPA oversight authority, DOE lead agency responsibility, and state authority for decommissioning activities. Once removal actions have been performed under CERCLA, a construction completion report is required to document the completion of the required action. Additionally, a decommissioning report is required under DOE guidance. No direct guidance was found for documenting completion of decommissioning activities and preparing a final report that satisfies the CERCLA requirements and the DOE requirements for decommissioning. Additional guidance was needed for the documentation of construction completion under CERCLA for D and D projects undertaken under the joint policy that addresses the requirements of both agencies. A model for the construction completion report was developed to document construction completion for CERCLA D and D activities performed under the joint EPA/DOE policy at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The model documentation report developed at PFP integrates the DOE requirements for establishing decommissioning end-points, documenting end-point completion and preparing a final decommissioning report with the CERCLA requirements to document completion of the action identified in the Action Memorandum (AM). The model includes the required information on health and safety, data management, cost and schedule and end-points completion. (authors)

Hopkins, A. [Fluor Hanford, Inc, Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Proceedings of the 2007 ANS Topical Meeting on Decommissioning, Decontamination, and Reutilization - DD and R 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society (ANS) Topical Meeting on Decommissioning, Decontamination, and Reutilization (DD and R 2007), 'Capturing Decommissioning Lessons Learned', is sponsored by the ANS Decommissioning, Decontamination and Reutilization; Environmental Sciences; and Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Divisions. This meeting provides a forum for an international exchange of technical knowledge and project management experience gained from the ongoing process of decommissioning nuclear facilities. Of particular note is the number of projects that are approaching completion. This document gathers 113 presentations given at this meeting.

NONE

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioned defueled naval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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301

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors: sensitivity of decommissioning radiation exposure and costs to selected parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Additional analyses of decommissioning at the reference research and test (R and T) reactors and analyses of five recent reactor decommissionings are made that examine some parameters not covered in the initial study report (NUREG/CR-1756). The parameters examined for decommissioning are: (1) the effect on costs and radiation exposure of plant size and/or type; (2) the effects on costs of increasing disposal charges and of unavailability of waste disposal capacity at licensed waste disposal facilities; and (3) the costs of and the available alternatives for the disposal of nuclear R and T reactor fuel assemblies.

Konzek, G.J.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Carl Vinson and pre-war naval legislation 1932-1940  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the end of World War I, the United States Navy was in the midst of a building program designed to make it a "Navy Second to None." However, the post-war desire to avoid involvement in another international conflict led the United States to retreat from the aggressive naval policy of President Woodrow Wilson. America initiated and supported conferences which led to the Washington Naval Treaty of 1922 and the London Naval Treaty of 1930, both of which limited the maximum strength of the world's naval powers. In addition, throughout the 1920's and early 1930's the United States failed to build up to the levels allowed by the treaties, causing the Navy to slowly age toward obsolescence. This situation changed in the period from 1933 to 1940 as Congressman Carl Vinson of Georgia, chairman of the House Naval Affairs Committee, drafted and saw to the passage of legislation designed to once again provide the United States with a powerful navy as part of a strong national defense. Vinson obtained passage of naval construction legislation in 1934, 1937, 1938, and 1940, and supported the annual and supplemental appropriation acts which funded the newly authorized construction. In doing so, Vinson overcame opposition from pacifists and isolationists in Congress who feared America would be drawn into another European war. Vinson also had to persuade fiscal conservatives opposed to increasing the budget deficit that funding naval construction was in the nation's best interests. Additionally, Vinson obtained the often reluctant support of President Franklin Roosevelt to insure final approval of his legislation. This study examines Vinson's efforts to provide the Navy the ships with which it eventually fought World War II. it looks at committee hearings, House and Senate debates, and behind the scenes conferences between Vinson and officials of the Navy Department and Roosevelt Administration which helped decide the course of naval expansion. It shows that while many people contributed passing naval construction legislation, Carl Vinson was the driving force behind the expansion of the Navy. Without Vinson's pre-war legislation, the Navy could not have been prepared to effectively fight the Second World War.

Svonavec, Stephen Charles

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Progressive Application Decommissioning Models for U.S. Power and Research Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents progressive engineering techniques and experiences in decommissioning projects performed by Bums and Roe Enterprises within the last fifteen years. Specifically, engineering decommissioning technical methods and lessons learned are discussed related to the Trojan Large Component Removal Project, San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) Decommissioning Project and the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) Decommissioning Project Study. The 25 years since the 1979 TMI accident and the events following 9/11 have driven the nuclear industry away from excessive, closed/elitist conservative methods towards more pragmatic results-oriented and open processes. This includes the essential recognition that codes, standards and regulatory procedures must be efficient, effective and fit for purpose. Financial and open-interactive stakeholder pressures also force adherence to aggressive risk reduction posture in the area of a safety, security and operations. The engineering methods and techniques applied to each project presented unique technical solutions. The decommissioning design for each project had to adopt existing design rules applicable to construction of new nuclear power plants and systems. It was found that the existing ASME, NRC, and DOE codes and regulations for deconstruction were, at best, limited or extremely conservative in their applicability to decommissioning. This paper also suggests some practical modification to design code rules in application for decommissioning and deconstruction. The representative decommissioning projects, Trojan, SONGS and Brookhaven, are discussed separately and the uniqueness of each project, in terms of engineering processes and individual deconstruction steps, is discussed. Trojan Decommissioning. The project included removal of entire NSSS system. The engineering complexity was mainly related to the 1200 MW Reactor. The approach, process of removal, engineering method related to protect the worker against excessive radiation exposure, transportation, and satisfying applicable rules and regulations, were the major problems to overcome. The project's successful completed earned a patent award. SONGS Decommissioning. The reactor's spherical containment and weakened integrity was the scope of this decommissioning effort. The aspects of structure stability and method of deconstruction is the major part of the presentation. The economical process of deconstruction, aspects of structural stability, worker safety, and the protection of the surrounding environment from contamination is highlighted in this section. BGRR Decommissioning Study. BREI was commissioned by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to evaluate and analyze the stability, and progressive decommissioning, and removal of BGRR components. This analysis took the form of several detailed decommissioning studies that range from disassembly and removal of the unit's graphite pile to the complete environmental restoration of the reactor site. While most of the facility's decommissioning effort is conventional, the graphite pile and its biological shield present the greatest challenge. The studies develop a unique method of removing high-activity waste trapped in the graphite joints. (authors)

Studnicka, Z.; Lacy, N.H.; Nicholas, R.G.; Campagna, M.; Morgan, R.D. [Bums and Roe Enterprises, Inc., 800 Kinderkamack Road, Oradell, NJ 07649 (United States); Sawruk, W. [ABS Consulting, Inc., 5 Birdsong Court, Shillington, PA 19607 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities: First lessons Learned from UP1, Marcoule, France  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On September 30, 1997, UP1, Marcoule Fuel reprocessing facility, dissolved its last spent Fuel rod. Final shutdown and stage 1 decommissioning began immediately after, under the supervision of CODEM , a consortium composed of The French Atomic Energy Commission, COGEMA, France fuel Cycle Company and EDF, the French Electricity Utility. The goal of the decommissioning program was to achieve stage 2 decommissioning , as per IAEA standards, within a period of about 15 years. 10 years later, a significant amount of decontamination and decommissioning works has been conducted with success. The contractual structure under which the program was launched has been profoundly modified, and the capacity of The French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and AREVA NC to complete full decommissioning programs has been confirmed. In the present document, we propose to examine the main aspects involved in the management of such decommissioning programs, and highlight, with significant examples, the main lessons learnt. In conclusion: As of 2007, UP1 decommissioning program proves to be a success. The choice of early decommissioning, the partnership launched between the French Atomic Energy Commission as owner of the site and decommissioning fund, with AREVA NC as operator and main contractor of the decommissioning works has been a success. The French Atomic Energy commission organized a contractual framework ensuring optimal safety conditions and work completion, while AREVA NC gained a unique experience at balancing the various aspects involved in the conduction of complete decommissioning programs. Although such a framework may not be applicable to all situations and facilities, it provides a positive example of a partnership combining institutional regulations and industrial efficiency.

Chabeuf, Jean-Michel; Boya, Didier [AREVA, AREVA NC Marcoule, 30130 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); CEA, Marcoule, 30130 Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Heavy Water Components Test Reactor Decommissioning - Major Component Removal  

SciTech Connect

The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility (Figure 1) was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR facility is on high, well-drained ground, about 30 meters above the water table. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. It was not a defense-related facility like the materials production reactors at SRS. The reactor was moderated with heavy water and was rated at 50 megawatts thermal power. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In 1965, fuel assemblies were removed, systems that contained heavy water were drained, fluid piping systems were drained, deenergized and disconnected and the spent fuel basin was drained and dried. The doors of the reactor facility were shut and it wasn't until 10 years later that decommissioning plans were considered and ultimately postponed due to budget constraints. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR again. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. The $1.6 billion allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to SRS for site clean up at SRS has opened the doors to the HWCTR again - this time for final decommissioning. During the lifetime of HWCTR, 36 different fuel assemblies were tested in the facility. Ten of these experienced cladding failures as operational capabilities of the different designs were being established. In addition, numerous spills of heavy water occurred within the facility. Currently, radiation and radioactive contamination levels are low within HWCTR with most of the radioactivity contained within the reactor vessel. There are no known insults to the environment, however with the increasing deterioration of the facility, the possibility exists that contamination could spread outside the facility if it is not decommissioned. An interior panoramic view of the ground floor elevation taken in August 2009 is shown in Figure 2. The foreground shows the transfer coffin followed by the reactor vessel and control rod drive platform in the center. Behind the reactor vessel is the fuel pool. Above the ground level are the polar crane and the emergency deluge tank at the top of the dome. Note the considerable rust and degradation of the components and the interior of the containment building. Alternative studies have concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning is to remove the reactor vessel, steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. Characterization studies along with transport models have concluded that the remaining below grade equipment that is left in place including the transfer coffin will not contribute any significant contamination to the environment in the future. The below grade space will be grouted in place. A concrete cover will be placed over the remaining footprint and the groundwater will be monitored for an indefinite period to ensure compliance with environmental regulations. The schedule for completion of decommissioning is late FY2011. This paper describes the concepts planned in order to remove the major components including the dome, the reactor vessel (RV), the two steam generators (SG), and relocating the transfer coffin (TC).

Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

306

Heavy Water Components Test Reactor Decommissioning - Major Component Removal  

SciTech Connect

The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility (Figure 1) was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR facility is on high, well-drained ground, about 30 meters above the water table. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. It was not a defense-related facility like the materials production reactors at SRS. The reactor was moderated with heavy water and was rated at 50 megawatts thermal power. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In 1965, fuel assemblies were removed, systems that contained heavy water were drained, fluid piping systems were drained, deenergized and disconnected and the spent fuel basin was drained and dried. The doors of the reactor facility were shut and it wasn't until 10 years later that decommissioning plans were considered and ultimately postponed due to budget constraints. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR again. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. The $1.6 billion allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to SRS for site clean up at SRS has opened the doors to the HWCTR again - this time for final decommissioning. During the lifetime of HWCTR, 36 different fuel assemblies were tested in the facility. Ten of these experienced cladding failures as operational capabilities of the different designs were being established. In addition, numerous spills of heavy water occurred within the facility. Currently, radiation and radioactive contamination levels are low within HWCTR with most of the radioactivity contained within the reactor vessel. There are no known insults to the environment, however with the increasing deterioration of the facility, the possibility exists that contamination could spread outside the facility if it is not decommissioned. An interior panoramic view of the ground floor elevation taken in August 2009 is shown in Figure 2. The foreground shows the transfer coffin followed by the reactor vessel and control rod drive platform in the center. Behind the reactor vessel is the fuel pool. Above the ground level are the polar crane and the emergency deluge tank at the top of the dome. Note the considerable rust and degradation of the components and the interior of the containment building. Alternative studies have concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning is to remove the reactor vessel, steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. Characterization studies along with transport models have concluded that the remaining below grade equipment that is left in place including the transfer coffin will not contribute any significant contamination to the environment in the future. The below grade space will be grouted in place. A concrete cover will be placed over the remaining footprint and the groundwater will be monitored for an indefinite period to ensure compliance with environmental regulations. The schedule for completion of decommissioning is late FY2011. This paper describes the concepts planned in order to remove the major components including the dome, the reactor vessel (RV), the two steam generators (SG), and relocating the transfer coffin (TC).

Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

307

Decommissioning Economics and Risk Advisor: An Introduction to DERAD Version 2.0: Volume 1: EPRI's Nuclear Decommissioning Program; Volume 2: Methodology Description; Volume 3: Program Manual; Volume 4: Using DERAD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning of commercial nuclear plants in the United States is estimated to cost hundreds of millions of dollars per plant. EPRI's Decommissioning Economics and Risk Advisor (DERAD) Version 2.0 is a decision analysis support tool designed to help utilities evaluate the economics and financial risk of decommissioning nuclear power plants. This report provides examples and case studies to support DERAD use.

1996-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

308

Decommissioning Cost Estimating Factors And Earned Value Integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats 771 Project progressed from the planning stage of decommissioning a plutonium facility, through the strip-out of highly-contaminated equipment, removal of utilities and structural decontamination, and building demolition. Actual cost data was collected from the strip-out activities and compared to original estimates, allowing the development of cost by equipment groupings and types and over time. Separate data was developed from the project control earned value reporting and compared with the equipment data. The paper discusses the analysis to develop the detailed factors for the different equipment types, and the items that need to be considered during characterization of a similar facility when preparing an estimate. The factors are presented based on direct labor requirements by equipment type. The paper also includes actual support costs, and examples of fixed or one-time start-up costs. The integration of the estimate and the earned value system used for the 771 Project is also discussed. The paper covers the development of the earned value system as well as its application to a facility to be decommissioned and an existing work breakdown structure. Lessons learned are provided, including integration with scheduling and craft supervision, measurement approaches, and verification of scope completion. In summary: The work of decommissioning the Rocky Flats 771 Project process equipment was completed in 2003. Early in the planning process, we had difficulty in identifying credible data and implementing processes for estimating and controlling this work. As the project progressed, we were able to collect actual data on the costs of removing plutonium contaminated equipment from various areas over the life of this work and associate those costs with individual pieces of equipment. We also were able to develop and test out a system for measuring the earned value of a decommissioning project based on an evolving estimate. These were elements that would have been useful to us in our early planning process, and we would expect that they would find application elsewhere as the DOE weapons complex and some commercial nuclear facilities move towards closure. (authors)

Sanford, P.C.; Cimmarron, E. [Englewood, CO, B. Skokan, Office of Project Management Oversight, EM-53, United States Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Shutdown plus 3 - a look at Yankee decommissioning experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In three years, the Yankee Nuclear Power Station has not only made the transition from a facility with a full power operating license to a shut down facility but to a facility with a mature and experienced organization poised to effectively and efficiently decommission the remainder of the plant. Opportunities were acted upon to reduce the cost of running and dismantling a shut-down facility. This paper describes some of those opportunities and Yankee`s future strategy for dismantling in an environment with limited waste disposal availability.

Szymczak, W.J. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

Environmental restoration and decontamination & decommissioning safety documentation. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This document presents recommendations of a working group designated by the Environmental Restoration and Remediation (ER) and Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) subcommittees of the Westinghouse M&O (Management and Operation) Nuclear Facility Safety Committee. A commonalty of approach to safety documentation specific to ER and D&D activities was developed and is summarized below. Allowance for interpretative tolerance and documentation flexibility appropriate to the activity, graded for hazard category, duration, and complexity, was a primary consideration in development of this guidance.

Hansen, J.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Frauenholz, L.H. [Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc. (United States); Kerr, N.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

311

Technology issues for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The approach for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor has evolved from a conservative plan based on cutting up and burying all of the systems, to one that considers the impact tritium contamination will have on waste disposal, how large size components may be used as their own shipping containers, and even the possibility of recycling the materials of components such as the toroidal field coils and the tokamak structure. In addition, the project is more carefully assessing the requirements for using remotely operated equipment. Finally, valuable cost database is being developed for future use by the fusion community.

Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Commander, J.C. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate in tact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate if from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,424 cubic meters or 31,945 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were design and tested for the reactor ISD project and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and work flow considerations, the recommended maximum lift height is 5 feet with 24 hours between lifts. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R-Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs and testing, and fill placement strategy. This information is applicable to decommissioning both the 105-P and 105-R facilities. The ISD process for the entire 105-P and 105-R reactor facilities will require approximately 250,000 cubic yards (191,140 cubic meters) of grout and 2,400 cubic yards (1,840 cubic meters) of structural concrete which will be placed over a twelve month period to meet the accelerated schedule ISD schedule. The status and lessons learned in the SRS Reactor Facility ISD process will be described.

Langton, C.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.; Serrato, M.

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

313

Decontamination and decommissioning of a fuel reprocessing pilot plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SYNOPSIS The strontium Semiworks Pilot Fuel Reprocessing Plant at the Hanford Site in Washington State was decommissioned by a combination of dismantlement and entombment. The facility contained 9600 Ci of Sr-90 and 10 Ci of plutonium. Process cells were entombed in place. The above-grade portion of one cell with 1.5-m- (5-ft-) thick walls and ceilings was demolished by means of expanding grout. A contaminated stack was remotely sandblasted and felled by explosives. The entombed structures were covered with a 4.6-m- (15-ft-) thick engineered earthen barrier. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Heine, W.F.; Speer, D.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

DOE Environmental Management Strategy and Experience for In-Situ Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategy and Experience Strategy and Experience for In Situ Decommissioning Prepared By U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Office of Engineering and Technology, EM-20 September 2009 This page is deliberately blank. DOE EM Strategy and Experience for In Situ Decommissioning i Contents Acknowledgements......................................................................................................................................iv Acronyms...................................................................................................................................................... v 1. Introduction......................................................................................................................................

315

Spent Fuel Pool Cooling and Cleanup During Decommissioning: Experience at Trojan Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operation of original in-plant spent fuel pool facilities at shutdown power plants is expensive compared to available alternatives and can interfere with the decommissioning process. This report describes the approach taken in the Trojan Decommissioning Project to establish independent cooling and cleanup services for the fuel pool until the spent fuel is placed in dry storage.

1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Interim Report on Cumulative Risk Assessment for Radiological and Chemical Constituents of Concern at Decommissioning Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning nuclear facilities focus extensive efforts on site characterization to demonstrate regulatory compliance in the termination of site licenses. Many decommissioning sites, while recognizing radiological characterization and assessment needs, lacked experience in chemical risk assessment. This report documents plant approaches for performing cumulative risk assessments of both radiological and non-radiological constituents of concern.

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

317

September 10, 2003, Board Public Meeting - Naval Reactors Approach to Oversight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 25 22 As I previously mentioned this morning, we will receive testimony from experienced representatives from other organizations. First, I would like to welcome representatives from the U.S. Naval Sea Systems Command, Mr. Thomas Beckett and Mr. Storm Kauffman. If you would be kind enough to give your names and titles so the stenographer can identify you for the record. MR. BECKETT: Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Thomas H. Beckett. I ' m the Deputy Director for Naval Reactors, a joint Department of the Navy/Department of Energy Program. MR. KAUFFMAN: Storm Kauffman. I ' m the Director of Reactor Safety and Analysis for the Naval Reactors Program CHAIRMAN CONWAY: Mr. Beckett. MR. BECKETT: Thank you, Mr. Chairman, and let me thank you and the other Board Members f

318

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Ordnance Test Station - CA 06  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ordnance Test Station - CA 06 Ordnance Test Station - CA 06 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NAVAL ORDNANCE TEST STATION (CA.06) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: China Lake Naval Weapons Center Salt Wells Pilot Plant CA.06-1 Location: Inyokern , California CA.06-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CA.06-1 Site Operations: Naval facility; experimental development work on shape charges and quality castings on a pilot plant scale. CA.06-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication that radioactive materials were handled at the site CA.06-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated CA.06-1 Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None CA.06-1 Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see

319

DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning (Feb. 2013) DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning (Feb. 2013) The purpose of the "DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning" report is to capture the considerable technical experience gained to date for implementation of In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) projects at DOE facilities. As current and projected budgets for the EM program indicate reduced and flat funding profiles for the foreseeable future, the potential exists for this institutional knowledge to be lost as the ramp-down of project staffing commences with the cessation of ARRA. EM's Office of Deactivation & Decommissioning and Facility Engineering

320

Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) The Deactivation and Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) serves as a centralized repository providing a common interface for all D&D related activities. It assists users in gathering, analyzing, storing and sharing knowledge and information within the D&D community. This approach assists in reducing the need to rediscover the knowledge of the past while capturing the new knowledge and experiences gained during

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioned defueled naval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station: Comparison of two decommissioning cost estimates developed for the same commercial nuclear reactor power station  

SciTech Connect

This study presents the results of a comparison of a previous decommissioning cost study by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and a recent decommissioning cost study of TLG Engineering, Inc., for the same commercial nuclear power reactor station. The purpose of this comparative analysis on the same plant is to determine the reasons why subsequent estimates for similar plants by others were significantly higher in cost and external occupational radiation exposure (ORE) than the PNL study. The primary purpose of the original study by PNL (NUREG/CR-0672) was to provide information on the available technology, the safety considerations, and the probable costs and ORE for the decommissioning of a large boiling water reactor (BWR) power station at the end of its operating life. This information was intended for use as background data and bases in the modification of existing regulations and in the development of new regulations pertaining to decommissioning activities. It was also intended for use by utilities in planning for the decommissioning of their nuclear power stations. The TLG study, initiated in 1987 and completed in 1989, was for the same plant, Washington Public Supply System's Unit 2 (WNP-2), that PNL used as its reference plant in its 1980 decommissioning study. Areas of agreement and disagreement are identified, and reasons for the areas of disagreement are discussed. 31 refs., 3 figs., 22 tabs.

Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:23:58 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selection Procedures 20 Naval Officers 20 Other U.S. Military Officers 20 International Students 20 Civilian

323

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains 693 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. Foreign, as well as domestic, literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are Surplus Facilities Management Program, Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, and Uranium Mill Tailings Management. Chapter sections for chapters 1 and 2 include: Design, Planning, and Regulations; Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Land Decontamination and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; and General Studies. The references within each chapter are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author or by title. Indexes are provided for (1) author; (2) corporate affiliation; (3) title; (4) publication description; (5) geographic location; and (6) keywords. An appendix of 202 bibliographic references without abstracts or indexes has been included in this bibliography. This appendix represents literature identified but not abstracted due to time constraints.

Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Fielden, J.M.; Johnson, C.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Decommissioning of the high flux beam reactor at Brookhaven Lab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high-flux beam reactor (HFBR) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory was a heavy water cooled and moderated reactor that achieved criticality on Oct. 31, 1965. It operated at a power level of 40 megawatts. An equipment upgrade in 1982 allowed operations at 60 megawatts. After a 1989 reactor shutdown to reanalyze safety impact of a hypothetical loss of coolant accident, the reactor was restarted in 1991 at 30 megawatts. The HFBR was shut down in December 1996 for routine maintenance and refueling. At that time, a leak of tritiated water was identified by routine sampling of groundwater from wells located adjacent to the reactor's spent fuel pool. The reactor remained shut down for almost three years for safety and environmental reviews. In November 1999 the United States Dept. of Energy decided to permanently shut down the HFBR. The decontamination and decommissioning of the HFBR complex, consisting of multiple structures and systems to operate and maintain the reactor, were complete in 2009 after removing and shipping off all the control rod blades. The emptied and cleaned HFBR dome, which still contains the irradiated reactor vessel, is presently under 24/7 surveillance for safety. Detailed dosimetry performed for the HFBR decommissioning during 1996-2009 is described in the paper. (authors)

Hu, J.P. [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Reciniello, R.N. [Radiological Control Div., Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Holden, N.E. [National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains 693 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. Foreign, as well as domestic, literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are Surplus Facilities Management Program, Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, and Uranium Mill Tailings Management. Chapter sections for chapters 1 and 2 include: Design, Planning, and Regulations; Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Land Decontamination and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; and General Studies. The references within each chapter are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author or by title. Indexes are provided for (1) author; (2) corporate affiliation; (3) title; (4) publication description; (5) geographic location; and (6) keywords. An appendix of 202 bibliographic references without abstracts or indexes has been included in this bibliography. This appendix represents literature identified but not abstracted due to time constraints.

Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Fielden, J.M.; Johnson, C.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:29:51 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- graduate School a naval university, un- ified in policy, procedure and purpose. In addition to its Naval PROCEDURES U.S. NAVAL OFFICERS U.S. Navy officers interested in admis- sion to one of the curricula offered in the submission. Requests for admission or questions regarding admission procedures should be directed to the Dean

327

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:28:55 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, procedures and objectives. In 1973, the Naval Postgraduate School, together with the Naval War College. ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES U.S. NAVAL OFFICERS U.S. Navy officers interested in ad- mission to one- ity of quotas assigned to each country. The procedures for application are con- tained in OPNAV

328

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:29:10 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, procedures and objectives. In 1973, the Naval Postgraduate School, together with the Naval War College or local bookstores, or from other students. ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES U.S. NAVAL OFFICERS U.S. Navy officers. Their admission is subject to availabil- ity of quotas assigned to each country. The procedures for application

329

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:28:34 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, procedures and objectives. In 1973, the Naval Postgraduate School, together with the Naval War College Navy West Coast Match racing cham- pionships. ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES U.S. NAVAL OFFICERS U.S. Navy, and procedural guidance for the Navy's graduate education program. Included is material concerning officer

330

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:29:21 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, procedures and objectives. In 1973, the Naval Postgraduate School, together with the Naval War College MILITARY OFFICERS ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES U.S. NAVAL OFFICERS U.S. Navy officers interested in ad- Military- ity of quotas assigned to each country. The procedures for application are con- 8 #12;GENERAL

331

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:28:45 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, procedures and objectives. In 1973, the Naval Postgraduate School, together with the Naval War College- change system and stocks all required supplies. ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES U.S. NAVAL OFFICERS ACADEMIC of quotas assigned to each country. The procedures for application are con- 10 #12;GENERAL INFORMATION

332

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:29:42 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Naval Postgraduate School, in effect, a naval university, unified in policies, procedures and objec bookstores, or from other students. ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES U.S. NAVAL OFFICERS U. S. Navy officers interested. The procedures for application are contained in OPNAV INSTRUCTION 4950. IE. Corre- spondence must be processed

333

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:28:23 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, procedures and objectives. In 1973, the Naval Postgraduate School, together with the Naval War College Navy West Coast Match racing cham- pionships. ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES U.S. NAVAL OFFICERS U.S. Navy, policy, and procedural guidance for the Navy's graduate education program. Included is material

334

Analysis of operating alternatives for the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station Cogeneration Facility at Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California  

SciTech Connect

The Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southwestern Division commissioned Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to determine the most cost-effective approach to the operation of the cogeneration facility in the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station (NCTS) at the Naval Air Station North Island (NASNI). Nineteen alternative scenarios were analyzed by PNL on a life-cycle cost basis to determine whether to continue operating the cogeneration facility or convert the plant to emergency-generator status. This report provides the results of the analysis performed by PNL for the 19 alternative scenarios. A narrative description of each scenario is provided, including information on the prime mover, electrical generating efficiency, thermal recovery efficiency, operational labor, and backup energy strategy. Descriptions of the energy and energy cost analysis, operations and maintenance (O&M) costs, emissions and related costs, and implementation costs are also provided for each alternative. A summary table presents the operational cost of each scenario and presents the result of the life-cycle cost analysis.

Parker, S.A.; Carroll, D.M.; McMordie, K.L.; Brown, D.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Shankle, S.A.; Stucky, D.J.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Implementation plan for operating alternatives for the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station cogeneration facility at Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is to facilitate energy efficiency improvements at federal facilities. This is accomplished by a balanced program of technology development, facility assessment, and use of cost-sharing procurement mechanisms. Technology development focuses upon the tools, software, and procedures used to identify and evaluate energy efficiency technologies and improvements. For facility assessment, FEMP provides metering equipment and trained analysts to federal agencies exhibiting a commitment to improve energy use efficiency. To assist in procurement of energy efficiency measures, FEMP helps federal agencies devise and implement performance contracting and utility demand-side management strategies. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) supports the FEMP mission of energy systems modernization. Under this charter, the Laboratory and its contractors work with federal facility energy managers to assess and implement energy efficiency improvements at federal facilities nationwide. The SouthWestern Division of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command, in cooperation with FEMP, has tasked PNL with developing a plan for implementing recommended modifications to the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station (NCTS) cogeneration plant at the Naval Air Station North Island (NASNI) in San Diego. That plan is detailed in this report.

Carroll, D.M.; Parker, S.A.; Stucky, D.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning Nuclear Reactors At Multiple-Reactor Stations  

SciTech Connect

Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of large (1175-MWe) pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and large (1155-MWe) boiling water reactors {BWRs) at multiple-reactor stations. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). Safety and costs of decommissioning are estimated by determining the impact of probable features of multiple-reactor-station operation that are considered to be unavailable at a single-reactor station, and applying these estimated impacts to the decommissioning costs and radiation doses estimated in previous PWR and BWR decommissioning studies. The multiple-reactor-station features analyzed are: the use of interim onsite nuclear waste storage with later removal to an offsite nuclear waste disposal facility, the use of permanent onsite nuclear waste disposal, the dedication of the site to nuclear power generation, and the provision of centralized services. Five scenarios for decommissioning reactors at a multiple-reactor station are investigated. The number of reactors on a site is assumed to be either four or ten; nuclear waste disposal is varied between immediate offsite disposal, interim onsite storage, and immediate onsite disposal. It is assumed that the decommissioned reactors are not replaced in one scenario but are replaced in the other scenarios. Centralized service facilities are provided in two scenarios but are not provided in the other three. Decommissioning of a PWR or a BWR at a multiple-reactor station probably will be less costly and result in lower radiation doses than decommissioning an identical reactor at a single-reactor station. Regardless of whether the light water reactor being decommissioned is at a single- or multiple-reactor station: the estimated occupational radiation dose for decommissioning an LWR is lowest for SAFSTOR and highest for DECON the estimated cost of decommissioning a PWR is lowest for ENTOMB and highest for SAFSTOR the estimated cost of decommissioning a BWR is lowest for OECON and highest for SAFSTOR. In all cases, SAFSTOR has the lowest occupational radiation dose and the highest cost.

Wittenbrock, N. G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Naval Research Laboratory Multiscale Targeting Guidance for T-PARC and TCS-08  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of The Observing System Research and Predictability Experiment (THORPEX) Pacific Asian Regional Campaign (T-PARC) and the Office of Naval Researchs (ONRs) Tropical Cyclone Structure-08 (TCS-08) experiments, a variety of real-time ...

Carolyn A. Reynolds; James D. Doyle; Richard M. Hodur; Hao Jin

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Mitigation action plan sale of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills) Kern County, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1, also called {open_quotes}Elk Hills{close_quotes}), a Federally-owned oil and gas production field in Kern County, California, was created by an Executive Order issued by President Taft on September 2, 1912. He signed another Executive Order on December 13, 1912, to establish Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (NPR-2), located immediately south of NPR-1 and containing portions of the town of Taft, California. NPR-1 was not developed until the 1973-74 oil embargo demonstrated the nation`s vulnerability to oil supply interruptions. Following the embargo, Congress passed the Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976 which directed that the reserve be explored and developed to its fall economic potential at the {open_quotes}maximum efficient rate{close_quotes} (MER) of production. Since Elk Hills began full production in 1976, it has functioned as a commercial operation, with total revenues to the Federal government through FY 1996 of $16.4 billion, compared to total exploration, development and production costs of $3.1 billion. In February 1996, Title 34 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1996 (P.L. 104-106), referred to as the Elk Hills Sales Statute, directed the Secretary of Energy to sell NPR-1 by February 10, 1998.The Secretary was also directed to study options for enhancing the value of the other Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserve properties such as NPR-2, located adjacent to NPR-1 in Kern County- Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) located in Natrona County, Wyoming; Naval Oil Shale Reserves No. 1 and No. 3 (NOSR-1 and NOSR-3) located in Garfield County, Colorado; and Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 2 (NOSR-2) located in Uintah and Carbon Counties, Utah. The purpose of these actions was to remove the Federal government from the inherently non-Federal function of operating commercial oil fields while making sure that the public would obtain the maximum value from the reserves.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 26, 1997 February 26, 1997 EIS-0189: Record of Decision Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, WA December 1, 1996 EA-1111: Final Environmental Assessment K Pool Fish Rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington October 21, 1996 EA-1177: Final Environmental Assessment Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants August 1, 1996 EIS-0189: Final Environmental Impact Statement Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington May 1, 1996 EIS-0244: Final Environmental Impact Statement Plutonium Finishing Plant Stabilization April 1, 1996 EIS-0259: Final Environmental Impact Statement Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Cruiser, Ohio Class, Los Angeles and Class Naval Reactor Plants April 1, 1996 EIS-0259: Final Environmental Impact Statement

340

Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 28, 2012 August 28, 2012 EA-1909: Finding of No Significant Impact South Table Wind Project, Kimball County, NE August 24, 2012 EA-1929: Finding of No Significant Impact NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Molybdenum-99 August 23, 2012 EA-1889: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Naval Reactor Plants from USS Enterprise (CVN 65) August 15, 2012 EA-1917: Finding of No Significant Impact Wave Energy Test Facility Project, Newport, OR August 7, 2012 EA-1845: Finding of No Significant Impact Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC Regarding Order Granting Long-Term Authorization to Export Liquefied Natural Gas from Sabine Pass LNG Terminal to Non-Free Trade Agreement Nations, Cameron Parish, LA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioned defueled naval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Latest Documents and Notices | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

24, 2012 24, 2012 EA-1929: Finding of No Significant Impact NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Molybdenum-99 August 24, 2012 EA-1929: Final Environmental Assessment NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Molybdenum-99 August 23, 2012 EA-1889: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Naval Reactor Plants from USS Enterprise (CVN 65) August 21, 2012 EA-1886: Draft Environmental Assessment Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Kevin Dome Carbon Storage Project, Shelby, Toole County, MT August 17, 2012 EIS-0414: Record of Decision Energia Sierra Juarez Transmission Project August 15, 2012

342

Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the ORNL Decontamination and Decommissioning Program FY 1993--2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration D D program. The purpose and objectivesof this program include: (1) surveillance and maintenance (S M) of facilities awaiting decommissioning; (2) planning for the orderly decommissioning of these facilities; and (3) implementation of a program to accomplish facility disposition in a safe, cost-effective, and timely manner. Participating D D contractors are required to prepare formal plans that document the S M programs established for each site. This report has been prepared to provide this documentation for those facilities included in the ORNL D D Program.

Ford, M.K.; Holder, L. Jr.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Deactivation and Decommissioning Planning and Analysis with Geographic Information Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the mid-1950's through the 1980's, the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site produced nuclear materials for the weapons stockpile, for medical and industrial applications, and for space exploration. Although SRS has a continuing defense-related mission, the overall site mission is now oriented toward environmental restoration and management of legacy chemical and nuclear waste. With the change in mission, SRS no longer has a need for much of the infrastructure developed to support the weapons program. This excess infrastructure, which includes over 1000 facilities, will be decommissioned and demolished over the forthcoming years. Dis-positioning facilities for decommissioning and deactivation requires significant resources to determine hazards, structure type, and a rough-order-of-magnitude estimate for the decommissioning and demolition cost. Geographic information systems (GIS) technology was used to help manage the process of dis-positioning infrastructure and for reporting the future status of impacted facilities. Several thousand facilities of various ages and conditions are present at SRS. Many of these facilities, built to support previous defense-related missions, now represent a potential hazard and cost for maintenance and surveillance. To reduce costs and the hazards associated with this excess infrastructure, SRS has developed an ambitious plan to decommission and demolish unneeded facilities in a systematic fashion. GIS technology was used to assist development of this plan by: providing locational information for remote facilities, identifying the location of known waste units adjacent to buildings slated for demolition, and for providing a powerful visual representation of the impact of the overall plan. Several steps were required for the development of the infrastructure GIS model. The first step involved creating an accurate and current GIS representation of the infrastructure data. This data is maintained in a Computer Aided Design (CAD) system and had to be imported into a GIS framework. Since the data is maintained in a different format in CAD, import into GIS involved several spatial processing steps to convert various geometric shapes present in the CAD data to self-closing polygons. The polygons represent facility footprints in plan or map view. Once these were successfully imported and converted, building identifier attributes from the CAD had to be associated with the appropriate polygons in GIS. Attributes are stored as graphical information in a CAD system and are not 'attached' to a building in a relational sense. In GIS, attributes such as building names, building area, hazards, or other descriptive information, must be associated or related to the spatial polygon representing a particular building. This spatial relationship between building polygons and the descriptive attribute information is very similar to relating tables of information in a relational database in which each table record has a unique identifier that can be used to join or relate that table to other tables of information present in the database. The CAD building identifiers were imported into the GIS and several spatial processing steps were used to associate building polygons with the correct identifiers. These spatial steps involved determining the intersection of and nearest identifiers with each building polygon in the GIS. Automating this process in GIS saved a significant amount of time. Once a current and geographically correct representation of the infrastructure data had been created in GIS, field-engineering teams collected information for each facility. This information included the building area, radiological hazards and the associated area, industrial hazards such as asbestos or mercury, structure type (e.g. hardened, industrial, nuclear), annual surveillance and monitoring cost, and other engineering data. The facility engineering data was used in a simple model to determine the rough-order-of-magnitude cost for decontaminating and demolishing each facility. Finally, the engineering and cost d

Bollinger, James S.; Koffman, Larry D.; Austin, William E. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Bldg. 735-A, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 2, Indexes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is part 2 of a bibliography on nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial action. This report contains indexes on the following: authors, corporate affiliation, title words, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

EIS-0226: Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

26: Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West 26: Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center EIS-0226: Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center SUMMARY This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the range of reasonable alternatives to decommission and/or maintain long-term stewardship at WNYNSC. The alternatives analyzed in the EIS include the Sitewide Removal Alternative, the Sitewide Close-In-Place Alternative, the Phased Decisionmaking Alternative (Preferred Alternative), and the No Action Alternative. The analysis and information contained in the EIS are intended to assist DOE and NYSERDA with the consideration of environmental

346

Application of Mobile Agents to Robust Teleoperation of Internet Robots in Nuclear Decommissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to harness nuclear fusion for energy production. The Committee recommends $474,617,000 for fusion energy the Alcator C- Mod facility and provides only enough funding for decommissioning and existing graduate

Hu, Huosheng

347

Evaluation of Radionuclides in Concrete Shielding for Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shielding / Special Issue on the 11th International Conference on Radiation Shielding and the 15th Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division (Part 2) / Decontamination/Decommissioning

Yen-Fu Chen; Yen-Kung Lin; Rong-Jiun Sheu; Shiang-Huei Jiang

348

Waste minimization value engineering workshop for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Omega West Reactor Decommissioning Project  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory Pollution Prevention Program Office sponsored a Value Engineering (VE) Workshop to evaluate recycling options and other pollution prevention and waste minimization (PP/WMin) practices to incorporate into the decommissioning of the Omega West Reactor (OWR) at the laboratory. The VE process is an organized, systematic approach for evaluating a process or design to identify cost saving opportunities, or in this application, waste reduction opportunities. This VE Workshop was a facilitated process that included a team of specialists in the areas of decontamination, decommissioning, PP/WMin, cost estimating, construction, waste management, recycling, Department of Energy representatives, and others. The uniqueness of this VE Workshop was that it used an interdisciplinary approach to focus on PP/WMin practices that could be included in the OWR Decommissioning Project Plans and specifications to provide waste reduction. This report discusses the VE workshop objectives, summarizes the OWR decommissioning project, and describes the VE workshop activities, results, and lessons learned.

Hartnett, S.; Seguin, N. [Benchmark Environmental Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burns, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

349

The First Decommissioning of a Fusion Reactor Fueled by Deuterium-Tritium  

SciTech Connect

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Plasma Physics Laboratory of Princeton University (PPPL) was the first fusion reactor fueled by a mixture of deuterium and tritium (D-T) to be decommissioned in the world. The decommissioning was performed over a period of three years and was completed safely, on schedule, and under budget. Provided is an overview of the project and detail of various factors which led to the success of the project. Discussion will cover management of the project, engineering planning before the project started and during the field work as it was being performed, training of workers in the field, the novel adaptation of tools from other industry, and the development of an innovative process for the use of diamond wire to segment the activated/contaminated vacuum vessel. The success of the TFTR decommissioning provides a viable model for the decommissioning of D-T burning fusion devices in the future.

Charles A. Gentile; Erik Perry; Keith Rule; Michael Williams; Robert Parsells; Michael Viola; James Chrzanowski

2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

350

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of a commercial uranium hexafluoride conversion (UF{sub 6}) plant. Two basic decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between cost and safety impacts: DECON, and passive SAFSTOR. A third alternative, DECON of the plant and equipment with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes. is also examined. DECON includes the immediate removal (following plant shutdown) of all radioactivity in excess of unrestricted release levels, with subsequent release of the site for public use. Passive SAFSTOR requires decontamination, preparation, maintenance, and surveillance for a period of time after shutdown, followed by deferred decontamination and unrestricted release. DECON with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes (process wastes generated at the reference plant and stored onsite during plant operation} is also considered as a decommissioning method, although its acceptability has not yet been determined by the NRC. The decommissioning methods assumed for use in each decommissioning alternative are based on state-of-the-art technology. The elapsed time following plant shutdown required to perform the decommissioning work in each alternative is estimated to be: for DECON, 8 months; for passive SAFSTOR, 3 months to prepare the plant for safe storage and 8 months to accomplish deferred decontamination. Planning and preparation for decommissioning prior to plant shutdown is estimated to require about 6 months for either DECON or passive SAFSTOR. Planning and preparation prior to starting deferred decontamination is estimated to require an additional 6 months. OECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to take 6 months for planning and about 8 months to perform the decommissioning work. Decommissioning cost, in 1981 dollars, is estimated to be $5.91 million for OECON. For passive SAFSTOR, preparing the facility for safe storage is estimated to cost $0.88 million, the annual maintenance and surveillance cost is estimated to be about $0.095 million, and deferred decontamination is estimated to cost about $6.50 million. Therefore, passive SAFSTOR for 10 years is estimated to cost $8.33 million in nondiscounted 1981 dollars. DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to cost about $4.59 million, with an annual cost of $0.011 million for long-term care. All of these estimates include a 25% contingency. Waste management costs for DECON, including the net cost of disposal of the solvent extraction lagoon wastes by shipping those wastes to a uranium mill for recovery of residual uranium, comprise about 38% of the total decommissioning cost. Disposal of lagoon waste at a commercial low-level waste burial ground is estimated to add $10.01 million to decommissioning costs. Safety analyses indicate that radiological and nonradiological safety impacts from decommissioning activities should be small. The 50-year committed dose equivalent to members of the public from airborne releases during normal decommissioning activities is estimated to 'Je about 4.0 man-rem. Radiation doses to the public from accidents are found to be very low for all phases of decommissioning. Occupational radiation doses from normal decommissioning operations (excluding transport operations) are estimated to be about 79 man-rem for DECON and about 80 man-rem for passive SAFSTOR with 10 years of safe storage. Doses from DECON with lagoon waste stabilization are about the same as for DECON except there is less dose resulting from transportation of radioactive waste. The number of fatalities and serious lost-time injuries not related to radiation is found to be very small for all decommissioning alternatives. Comparison of the cost estimates shows that DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is the least expensive method. However, this alternative does not allow unrestricted release of the site. The cumulative cost of maintenance and surveillance and the higher cost of deferred decontamination makes passive SAFSTOR more expensive than DECON. Seve

Elder, H. K.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Radiochemistry Lab Decommissioning and Dismantlement. AECL, Chalk River Labs, Ontario, Canada  

SciTech Connect

Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) was originally founded in the mid 1940's to perform research in radiation and nuclear areas under the Canadian Defense Department. In the mid 50's The Canadian government embarked on several research and development programs for the development of the Candu Reactor. AECL was initially built as a temporary site and is now faced with many redundant buildings. Prior to 2004 small amounts of Decommissioning work was in progress. Many reasons for deferring decommissioning activities were used with the predominant ones being: 1. Reduction in radiation doses to workers during the final dismantlement, 2. Development of a long-term solution for the management of radioactive wastes in Canada, 3. Financial constraints presented by the number of facilities shutdown that would require decommissioning funds and the absence of an approved funding strategy. This has led to the development of a comprehensive decommissioning plan that is all inclusive of AECL's current and legacy liabilities. Canada does not have a long-term disposal site; therefore waste minimization becomes the driving factor behind decontamination for decommissioning before and during dismantlement. This decommissioning job was a great learning experience for decommissioning and the associated contractors who worked on this project. Throughout the life of the project there was a constant focus on waste minimization. This focus was constantly in conflict with regulatory compliance primarily with respect to fire regulations and protecting the facility along with adjacent facilities during the decommissioning activities. Discrepancies in historical documents forced the project to treat every space as a contaminated space until proven differently. Decommissioning and dismantlement within an operating site adds to the complexity of the tasks especially when it is being conducted in the heart of the plant. This project was very successful with no lost time accidents in over one hundred thousand hours worked, on schedule and under budget despite some significant changes throughout the decommissioning phases. The actual cost to decommission this building will come in under 9 million dollars vs. an estimated 14.5 million dollars. This paper will cover some of the unique aspects of dismantling a radioactive building that has seen pretty much every element of the periodic table pass through it with the client requirement focused on minimization of radioactive waste volumes.

Kenny, Stephen [Acting Director of Waste Management and Decommissioning Operations, AECL, Chalk River Labs, Chalk River, Ont. (Canada)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network for In-Situ Decommissioned Structures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10-01666, Revision 0 10-01666, Revision 0 Key Words: in situ decommissioning sensor remote monitoring end state Retention: Permanent DEVELOPMENT OF A REMOTE MONITORING SENSOR NETWORK FOR IN SITU DECOMMISSIONED STRUCTURES Panel Report November 2010 Savannah River National Laboratory Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Aiken, SC 29808 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Under Contract Number DE-AC09-08SR22470 Development of a Remote Monitoring Sensor Network Page 2 of 34

353

Nuclear reactor decommissioning. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning nuclear power and research reactor decommissioning and decontamination plans, costs, and safety standards. References discuss the design and evaluation of protective confinement, entombment, and dismantling systems. Topics include decommissioning regulations and rules, public and occupational radiation exposure estimates, comparative evaluation, and reactor performance under high neutron flux conditions. Waste packaging and disposal, environmental compliance, and public opinion are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Main report  

SciTech Connect

Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 1 (Main Report) contains the results in summary form.

Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Comparison of Decommissioning Dose Modeling Codes for Nuclear Power Plant Use: RESRAD and DandD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of power plants are currently in the decommissioning phase. As the plants seek to terminate their operating license, they need to successfully conduct definite dose assessments. To assist these utilities in selecting an analysis code and appropriate input data, EPRI conducted a code comparison. However, this report was done as the industry's input to the NRC on their evolving review and improvement of decommissioning modeling. In early 2000, EPRI will publish a report for the commercial nuclear ...

1999-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

356

Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for Decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex  

SciTech Connect

Preparation of this Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis is consistent with the joint U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, which establishes the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act non-time-critical removal action (NTCRA) process as an approach for decommissioning.

A. B. Culp

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Characterization and Dose Modeling of Soil, Sediment and Bedrock During Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A decommissioning nuclear power plant must confirm that the radionuclides present in the soils, sediments, and bedrock left on site at the time of license termination will meet the appropriate dose limits for site release. This process involves the characterization, dose modeling, and if required, remediation, of these media. At some decommissioning nuclear power plants, the management of contaminated soil, sediments, and bedrocks was a major project that led to generation of remediation projects and rad...

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

358

Decommissioning of the Nuclear Licensed Facilities at the Fontenay aux Roses CEA Center  

SciTech Connect

This is a summary of the program for the decommissioning of all the CEA's facilities in Fontenay aux Roses. The particularity of this center is that it is located in a built-up area. Taking into account the particularities of the various buildings and the levels of radioactivity in them, it was possible to devise a coherent, optimized program for the CEA-FAR licensed nuclear facility decommissioning operations.

Jeanjacques, Michel; Piketty, Laurence; Mandard, Lionel; Pedron, Guy; Boissonneau, Jean Francois; Fouquereau, Alain; Pichereau, Eric; Lethuaire, Nathalie; Estivie, David; Binet, Cedric; Meden, Igor [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Direction de l'Energie Nucleaire, Direction deleguee des Activites Nucleaires de Saclay, Departement des Reacteurs et des Services Nucleaires, Service d'Assainissement de Fontenay Aux Roses : 18, route du Panorama, BP6, 92265 Fontenay aux Roses Cedex (France)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Effect of Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning Costs on Plant Life Cycle Decisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear utilities implementing Life Cycle Management (LCM) Programs and facing run-relicense-retire decisions need to evaluate the financial cost/benefit of such decisions. Decommissioning costs are one element of these evaluations. This report includes a decommissioning cost estimate for Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (CCNPP) that can be used as a reference source by nuclear utilities involved in LCM and license renewal (LR) decisions.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Proceedings: 8th EPRI International Decommissioning and Radioactive Waste Management Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) collaborated with E.On Kernkraft to hold the 8th EPRI International Decommissioning and Radwaste Management Workshop in Hamburg, Germany on October 6-8, 2009. A parallel session with EU CARBOWASTE focused on technologies and methodologies for management of graphite wastes. The Workshop featured a visit to the Stade nuclear power plant, which is presently undergoing decommissioning. This proceedings document contains the abstracts and presentation slides from t...

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioned defueled naval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Trojan Nuclear Power Plant Reactor Vessel and Internals Removal: Trojan Nuclear Plant Decommissioning Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One goal of the EPRI Decommissioning Technology Program is to capture the growing utility experience in nuclear plant decommissioning activities for the benefit of other utilities facing similar challenges in the future. This report provides historical information on the background, scope, organization, schedule, cost, contracts, and support activities associated with the Trojan Nuclear Plant Reactor Vessel and Internals Removal (RVAIR) Project. Also discussed are problems, successes, and lessons learned...

2000-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

362

Success Story: Naval Medical Center San Diego Co-Generation Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Success Story Success Story Success Story Naval Medical Center San Diego Naval Medical Center San Diego Co-Generation Project Co-Generation Project Karen Jackson, SDG&E Karen Jackson, SDG&E Project Manager Project Manager Edward Thibodo, NAVFAC SW Edward Thibodo, NAVFAC SW Energy Team Contract Energy Team Contract ' ' s Lead s Lead NAVFAC Contractor NAVFAC Contractor ' ' s Guide: s Guide:   Partnering Philosophy Partnering Philosophy - - " " We W are partners e are partners in every contract we award. Partnering is in every contract we award. Partnering is an attitude that we both work hard to an attitude that we both work hard to develop, an it requires both of us to take develop, an it requires both of us to take some extra risk and trust one another. some extra risk and trust one another.

363

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Ordnance Plant - MI 0-03  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Plant - MI 0-03 Plant - MI 0-03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NAVAL ORDNANCE PLANT (MI.0-03) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DoD for action Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Centerline , Michigan MI.0-03-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.0-03-1 Site Operations: Assembled bomb components. MI.0-03-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - Referred to DoD MI.0-03-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DoD for action MI.0-03-1 Also see Documents Related to NAVAL ORDNANCE PLANT MI.0-03-1 - DOE Letter; J.Fiore to C.Shafer; Subject: Information on

364

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Proving Ground - VA 0-01  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proving Ground - VA 0-01 Proving Ground - VA 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NAVAL PROVING GROUND (VA.0-01 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Dahlgren , Virginia VA.0-01-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 VA.0-01-1 Site Operations: Site operations were not specified; this site was identified on the 1954 Accountable Station Lists. VA.0-01-1 VA.0-01-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Referred to DOD VA.0-01-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD VA.0-01-1 Also see Documents Related to NAVAL PROVING GROUND VA.0-01-1 - DOE Letter; Fiore to Schafer; Referral of DOD or Former

365

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Ordnance Laboratory - MD 0-03  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ordnance Laboratory - MD 0-03 Ordnance Laboratory - MD 0-03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NAVAL ORDNANCE LABORATORY (MD.0-03 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Naval Ordnance Laboratory - White Oak Location: White Oak Area , Silver Spring , Maryland MD.0-03-1 MD.0-03-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 MD.0-03-2 Site Operations: Research and development - may have involved radioactive materials because the site was identified on a 1955 Accountability Station List. MD.0-03-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - NRC licensed MD.0-03-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Specifically Identified Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None specifically indicated Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD MD.0-03-2

366

Investigation on the continued production of the Naval Petroleum Reserves beyond April 5, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The authority to produce the Naval Petroleum Reserves (NPRs) is due to expire in April 1991, unless extended by Presidential finding. As provided in the Naval Petroleum Reserves Production act of 1976 (Public Law 94-258), the President may continue production of the NPRs for a period of up to three years following the submission to Congress, at least 180 days prior to the expiration of the current production period, of a report that determines that continued production of the NPRs is necessary and a finding by the President that continued production is in the national interest. This report assesses the need to continue production of the NPRs, including analyzing the benefits and costs of extending production or returning to the shut-in status that existed prior to 1976. This continued production study considers strategic, economic, and energy issues at the local, regional, and national levels. 15 figs., 13 tabs.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves annual report of operations, Fiscal year 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During FY 1991 the Reserves generating $654 million in revenues, a $52 million increase from the Fy 1990 revenues, reflecting the increase in FY 1991 oil prices during the Gulf War. Total costs were $200 million, resulting in net cash flow of $454 million, compared with $423 million in FY 1990. Revenues for FY 1992 are expected to decrease, reflecting a decrease in production and prices. In FY 1991, production at the NPRs at maximum efficient rates yielded 28 million barrels of crude oil, 125 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 183 million gallons of natural gas liquids. Additional highlights on the following topics are included: legislative change, Naval Petroleum Reserve-1 (NPR-1) exploration, NPR-1 horizontal drilling, NPR-1 shallow oil zone gas injection project, NPR-1 FY 1991-1997 long range plan, NPR-1 environment and safety, NPR-2 exploration drilling, NPR-3 steamflood, Naval Oil Shale Reserves gas migration prevention.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves annual report of operations, Fiscal year 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During FY 1991 the Reserves generating $654 million in revenues, a $52 million increase from the Fy 1990 revenues, reflecting the increase in FY 1991 oil prices during the Gulf War. Total costs were $200 million, resulting in net cash flow of $454 million, compared with $423 million in FY 1990. Revenues for FY 1992 are expected to decrease, reflecting a decrease in production and prices. In FY 1991, production at the NPRs at maximum efficient rates yielded 28 million barrels of crude oil, 125 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 183 million gallons of natural gas liquids. Additional highlights on the following topics are included: legislative change, Naval Petroleum Reserve-1 (NPR-1) exploration, NPR-1 horizontal drilling, NPR-1 shallow oil zone gas injection project, NPR-1 FY 1991-1997 long range plan, NPR-1 environment and safety, NPR-2 exploration drilling, NPR-3 steamflood, Naval Oil Shale Reserves gas migration prevention.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Office at the University of New  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office at the University of Office at the University of New Mexico - NM 0-03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NAVAL OFFICE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO (NM.0-03) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Albuquerque , New Mexico NM.0-03-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NM.0-03-1 Site Operations: Site was a transshipment station for equipment to the Los Alamos site. NM.0-03-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Referred to DOD NM.0-03-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None NM.0-03-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD NM.0-03-1 Also see Documents Related to NAVAL OFFICE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO

370

Cost Savings through Innovation in Decontamination, Decommissioning, and Dismantlement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost effective technologies for the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the DOE's Office of Science and Technology (OST) sponsored large-scale demonstration and deployment projects (LSDDPs) to help bring new technologies into the D&D programs. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) LSDDP generated a list of needs defining specific problems where improved technologies could be incorporated into ongoing D&D tasks. The needs fell into 5 major categories--characterization, dismantlement, safety, material dispositioning, and decontamination. Technologies were carefully selected that provide a large benefit for a small investment. The technologies must provide significant improvements in cost, safety, radiation exposure, waste volume reduction, or schedule savings and widely applicable throughout the DOE complex. The LSDDP project provided training for the new technologies and worked with technology suppliers to resolve any questions that arose. Since 1998, 26 technologies have been demonstrated or deployed through the LSDDP for the D&D program at the INEEL. Of the 26 demonstrated and deployed technologies, 14 were in characterization, 3 were in decontamination, 4 were in dismantlement, 3 were in safety, and 2 were in material dispositioning. To promote the use of these technologies at other sites within the DOE complex, the LSDDP team published fact sheets, videos, technology summary reports, articles in INEEL star newspaper, posters, and maintained an internet home page on the project. As a result, additional deployments have taken place at the Hanford, Mound, Fernald, Oak Ridge, Ashtabula, and West Valley. Eight of the 26 technologies evaluated were developed in foreign countries. The technologies demonstrated have been shown to be faster, less expensive, and/or safer. The technologies evaluated through the LSDDP have provided improvements in the following D&D areas: robotic underwater characterization of fuel storage pools, characterization of scrap metal for recycle, PCB and RCRA metals analysis in soil, water, paint, or sludge, subsurface characterization, personnel safety, waste disposal, scaffolding use, and remote radiation characterization of buildings and soil. It is estimated that the technologies demonstrated and deployed through this program will save more than $50 million dollars over the next 10 years at the INEEL alone. Of the $50 million estimated dollars saved, about 75% of the savings will come from characterization technologies, 11% from technologies associated with material dispositioning, 10% are associated with dismantlement technologies and the balance split between safety and decontamination.

Neal A. Yancey

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

371

U.S. Department of Energy Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves combined financial statements, September 30, 1996 and 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves (NPOSR) produces crude oil and associated hydrocarbons from the Naval Petroleum Reserves (NPR) numbered 1, 2, and 3, and the Naval Oil Shale Reserves (NOSR) numbered 1, 2, and 3 in a manner to achieve the greatest value and benefits to the US taxpayer. NPOSR consists of the Naval Petroleum Reserve in California (NPRC or Elk Hills), which is responsible for operations of NPR-1 and NPR-2; the Naval Petroleum Oil Shale Reserve in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming (NPOSR-CUW), which is responsible for operations of NPR-3, NOSR-1, 2, and 3 and the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC); and NPOSR Headquarters in Washington, DC, which is responsible for overall program direction. Each participant shares in the unit costs and production of hydrocarbons in proportion to the weighted acre-feet of commercially productive oil and gas formations (zones) underlying the respective surface lands as of 1942. The participating shares of NPR-1 as of September 30, 1996 for the US Government and Chevron USA, Inc., are listed. This report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants` audit of the Department of Energy`s (Department) Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves (NPOSR) financial statements as of September 30, 1996.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Action Memorandum for Decommissioning of TAN-607 Hot Shop Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is documenting the selection of an alternative for the TAN-607 Hot Shop Area using a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act non-time-critical removal action (NTCRA). The scope of the removal action is limited to TAN-607 Hot Shop Area. An engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) has assisted the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office in identifuomg the most effective method for performing the decommissioning of this structure whose mission has ended. TAN-607 Hot Shop Area is located at Test Area North Technical Support Facility within the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The selected alternative consists of demolishing the TAN-607 aboveground structures and components, removing belowground noninert components (e.g. wood products), and removing the radiologically contaminated debris that does not meet remedial action objectives (RAOs), as defined in the Record of Decision Amendment for the V-Tanks and Explanation of Significant Differences for the PM-2A Tanks at Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-10.

M. A. Pinzel

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-03-0 FINAL REPORT- INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Group Differences in Safety Climate Among Workers in the Nuclear Decommissioning and Demolition Industry in the United States.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study investigated group differences in safety climate among workers in the nuclear decommissioning and demolition (D&D) industry in the United States. The study population (more)

Findley, Michael Everett

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BNL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

5098-LR-01-0 -LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

376

EIS-0251: Department of the Navy Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Container System for the Management of Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel (November 1996)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Final Environmental Impact Statementaddresses six general alternative systems for the loading, storage, transport, and possible disposal of naval spent nuclear fuel following examination.

377

DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING (D AND D) TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION  

SciTech Connect

As part of the ongoing task of making Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) operations more efficient, this subtask has addressed the need to integrate existing characterization technologies with decontamination technologies in order to provide real-time data on the progress of contamination removal. Specifically, technologies associated with concrete decontamination and/or removal have been examined with the goal of integrating existing technologies and commercializing the resulting hybrid. The Department of Energy (DOE) has estimated that 23 million cubic meters of concrete will require disposition as 1200 buildings undergo the D&D process. All concrete removal to be performed will also necessitate extensive use of characterization techniques. The in-process characterization presents the most potential for improvement and cost-savings as compared to other types. Current methods for in-process characterization usually require cessation of work to allow for radiation surveys to assess the rate of decontamination. Combining together decontamination and characterization technologies would allow for in-process evaluation of decontamination efforts. Since the present methods do not use in-process evaluations for the progress of decontamination, they may allow for ''overremoval'' of materials (removal of contaminated along with non-contaminated materials). Overremoval increases the volume of waste and therefore the costs associated with disposal. Integrating technologies would facilitate the removal of only contaminated concrete and reduce the total volume of radioactive waste, which would be disposed of. This would eventually ensure better productivity and time savings. This project presents a general procedure to integrate the above-mentioned technologies in the form of the Technology Integration Module (TIM) along with combination lists of commercially available decontamination and characterization technologies. The scope of the project has also been expanded by FIU-HCET to evaluate a technology integration--shot blasting technology and an ultrasonic rangefinder, which are decontamination and sensor technology, respectively.

M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition. Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition. The "D&D Program Map" presents an integrated overview of DOE's complex-wide D&D project locations, scope, and issues and includes information on: * The affects of the AMERICAN Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

379

Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition. Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition. The "D&D Program Map" presents an integrated overview of DOE's complex-wide D&D project locations, scope, and issues and includes information on: * The affects of the AMERICAN Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

380

Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the ORNL Decontamination and Decommissioning Program FY 1993--2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration D&D program. The purpose and objectivesof this program include: (1) surveillance and maintenance (S&M) of facilities awaiting decommissioning; (2) planning for the orderly decommissioning of these facilities; and (3) implementation of a program to accomplish facility disposition in a safe, cost-effective, and timely manner. Participating D&D contractors are required to prepare formal plans that document the S&M programs established for each site. This report has been prepared to provide this documentation for those facilities included in the ORNL D&D Program.

Ford, M.K.; Holder, L. Jr.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioned defueled naval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Decommissioning And Its Financing In Belgium: Better To Prevent Than To Cure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since 1985 the Belgian legislature has taken measures to guarantee the financing of the ultimate life period of nuclear facilities. An agreement was concluded with the utilities for the settlement of financial provisions for the later decommissioning of all commercial nuclear power plants. In 1991, the preventive measures were extended to all other nuclear facilities in the country, including healing actions for those plants having a lack of financial provisions to carry out the later decommissioning programs, as well as plants for which the operator or owner has failed to satisfy his legal obligation to decommission the plant. In 1997, the legislature extended the precautionary measures to financing for the remediation of all sites within the country containing radioactive substances liable to present risks for the public health or for the environment. The implementation and control of the measures taken since 1991 have been entrusted by laws to ONDRAF/NIRAS. 1.0 THE EVOLUTION...

Marnix Braeckeveldt Roger; Roger Verbeke; Manfred Schrauben; Ingrid Verstraeten

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Standard Guide for Environmental Monitoring Plans for Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide covers the development or assessment of environmental monitoring plans for decommissioning nuclear facilities. This guide addresses: (1) development of an environmental baseline prior to commencement of decommissioning activities; (2) determination of release paths from site activities and their associated exposure pathways in the environment; and (3) selection of appropriate sampling locations and media to ensure that all exposure pathways in the environment are monitored appropriately. This guide also addresses the interfaces between the environmental monitoring plan and other planning documents for site decommissioning, such as radiation protection, site characterization, and waste management plans, and federal, state, and local environmental protection laws and guidance. This guide is applicable up to the point of completing D&D activities and the reuse of the facility or area for other purposes.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Decision to reorganise or reorganising decisions? A First-Hand Account of the Decommissioning of the Phnix Nuclear Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of scheduled nuclear reactor shutdowns. It was also the approach adopted for the study presented here, which in the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. ORGANISATIONAL THEORY AND RESEARCH TOOL VALIDATION The study of the Decommissioning of the Phénix Nuclear Power Plant Melchior Pelleterat de Borde, MINES ParisTech, Christophe Martin

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

384

Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves. Annual report of operations, Fiscal year 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During fiscal year 1993, the reserves generated $440 million in revenues, a $33 million decrease from the fiscal year 1992 revenues, primarily due to significant decreases in oil and natural gas prices. Total costs were $207 million, resulting in net cash flow of $233 million, compared with $273 million in fiscal year 1992. From 1976 through fiscal year 1993, the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves generated $15.7 billion in revenues for the US Treasury, with expenses of $2.9 billion. The net revenues of $12.8 billion represent a return on costs of 441 percent. See figures 2, 3, and 4. In fiscal year 1993, production at the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves at maximum efficient rates yielded 25 million barrels of crude oil, 123 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 158 million gallons of natural gas liquids. The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves has embarked on an effort to identify additional hydrocarbon resources on the reserves for future production. In 1993, in cooperation with the US Geological Survey, the Department initiated a project to assess the oil and gas potential of the program`s oil shale reserves, which remain largely unexplored. These reserves, which total a land area of more than 145,000 acres and are located in Colorado and Utah, are favorably situated in oil and gas producing regions and are likely to contain significant hydrocarbon deposits. Alternatively the producing assets may be sold or leased if that will produce the most value. This task will continue through the first quarter of fiscal year 1994.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

385

Naval petroleum and oil shale reserves: Annual report of operations, Fiscal Year 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Market prices for curde oil experienced their greatest decline in history during 1986, with substantial effect on the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves. Sales procedures which had served the Department well in prior years during periods when oil prices were stable or rising were found inadequate to cope with these declines, and new sales procedures were developed and implemented. Congressional concern that the Government receive fair prices from Naval Petroleum Reserves (NPR) petroleum sales also led to Public Law No. 99-413, enacted on August 29, 1986, which amended title 10, United States Code, Chapter 641. This law sets a minimum price, using two criteria, under which petroleum from the NPR cannot be sold. Notwithstanding the decline in oil and gas prices, revenues from the sale of NPR petroleum totaled $763 million in 1986. Although this represented a 41% decline from 1985 receipts, the 1986 revenues well exceeded net program expenditures of $157 million. Because of the decline in prevailing oil prices during the second quarter of 1986, major cost reductions of $3.4 million were implemented at NPR-3, and even greater reductions are planned for 1987 to ensure the profitability of that field. The decline in energy prices also affected plans to protect natural gas underlying Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 3 (NOSR-3). Two of 14 planned wells were drilled and are available for production. Unfortunately, efforts to sell gas from these wells have been unsuccessful, and further drilling has been delayed until the gas market is stronger. 16 figs., 20 tabs.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center RMOTC at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RMOTC RMOTC The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC), is an operating oil field focusing on environmentally-balanced energy technologies and alternatives, and is the premiere energy testing and demonstration field in the nation. 3 3 * the opportunity to explore environmentally- balanced solutions to the nation's energy issues * opportunities to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate a variety of energy related technologies * a chance to collaborate with top professionals in the energy, environmental technology, and engineering fields * shared industry knowledge through technology transfer via reports, journal articles, and presentations Located within the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) near Casper, Wyoming, RMOTC offers: RMOTC Offers Solutions 4 4 The Administration and Engineering

387

Quality assurance assessment of new efficient lighting systems for Naval ships. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Ballasts and lamps, which have been selected to replace existing lamp/ballast systems based on improved performance, were tested to determine if they meet standard Naval MIL specifications. Fifty ballasts manufactured by Advance Transformer Corporation and Universal Manufacturing Corp., and 100 lamps manufactured by GTE were tested to determine their quality assurance and durability. These components met all of the MIL specifications that lamp/ballast systems in use must meet. In addition, these new systems have an improved system efficacy, 62 lumens per watt, and lower third harmonics, which will reduce the need for generating capacity for lighting on ships.

Verderber, R.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Appendices  

SciTech Connect

Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and EMTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed data that support the results given in Volume 1, including unit-component data.

Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Updates to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Consolidated NMSS Decommissioning Guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In September 2003, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff in the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards (NMSS) consolidated and updated the policies and guidance of its decommissioning program in a three-volume NUREG report, NUREG-1757, 'Consolidated NMSS Decommissioning Guidance' [1,2,3]. This NUREG report provides guidance on: planning and implementing license termination under the NRC's License Termination Rule (LTR), in 10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E; complying with the radiological criteria for license termination; and complying with the requirements for financial assurance and record-keeping for decommissioning and timeliness in decommissioning of materials facilities. The staff plans to periodically update NUREG-1757, so that it reflects current NRC decommissioning policy. In September 2005, the staff issued, for public comment, draft Supplement 1 to NUREG-1757 [4], which contains proposed updates to the three volumes of NUREG-1757. Draft Supplement 1 includes new and revised decommissioning guidance that addresses some of the LTR implementation issues, which were analyzed by the staff in two Commission papers (SECY-03-0069, Results of the LTR Analysis [5]; and SECY-04-0035, Results of the LTR Analysis of the Use of Intentional Mixing of Contaminated Soil [6]). These issues include restricted use and institutional controls, onsite disposal of radioactive materials under 10 CFR 20.2002, selection and justification of exposure scenarios based on reasonably foreseeable future land use (realistic scenarios), intentional mixing of contaminated soil, and removal of material after license termination (a follow-up to the LTR Analysis issue on the relationship between the LTR and the current case-by-case approach for release of solid materials). The staff also developed new and revised guidance on other issues, including the risk-informed graded approach for engineered barriers. This paper is a follow-up to a poster session and paper at Waste Management 2004, which presented the new Consolidated NMSS Decommissioning Guidance in NUREG-1757. This paper discusses the issues addressed in the current update to NRC's decommissioning guidance and explores the relationships between the issues. (authors)

Banovac, K.L.; Johnson, R.L.; Schmidt, D.W. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Criticality safety aspects of decontamination and decommissioning at defense nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect

Defense nuclear facilities have operated for forty years with a well-defined mission to produce weapons components for the nation. With the end of the cold war, the facilities` missions have changed to one of decontamination and decommissioning. Off-normal operations and use of new procedures, such as will exist during these activities, have often been among the causal factors in previous criticality accidents at process facilities. This paper explores the similarities in causal factors in previous criticality accidents to the conditions existing in current defense nuclear facilities undergoing the transition to decontamination and decommissioning. Practices to reduce the risk to workers, the public, and the environment are recommended.

Croucher, D.W.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Action Memorandum for General Decommissioning Activities under the Idaho Cleanup Project  

SciTech Connect

This Action Memorandum documents the selected alternative to perform general decommissioning activities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) under the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP). Preparation of this Action Memorandum has been performed in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended by the "Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986", and in accordance with the "National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan". An engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) was prepared and released for public comment and evaluated alternatives to accomplish the decommissioning of excess buildings and structures whose missions havve been completed.

S. L. Reno

2006-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

392

Lessons learned from decommissioning of a research lab and how to apply these on upcoming decommissioning projects at the Studsvik site  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The clearance of material and release of buildings for unconditional use are crucial factors for the waste amounts coming from decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The possibilities for clearance is also very much dependent on the regulatory body's ability to put in place the correct regulations or legislations. During the last decade the development of new guidelines for decommissioning has taken place. The implementation of these guidelines on a national level has not been fast but in Sweden it is on its way. This paper will describe the Swedish situation from the point of view of a decommissioner, i.e. an organization in need of clear and long term regulations. (authors)

Ellmark, Christoffer; Eriksson, Anders; Lindberg, Maria [Studsvik RadWaste AB, SE-611 82 Nykoeping (Sweden)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:29:32 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- graduate School in effect, a naval univer- sity, unified in policies, procedures and ob- jectives. In 1973;GENERAL INFORMATION ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES U.S. NAVAL OFFICERS U.S. Navy officers interested in admis- sion to availability of quotas assigned to each country. The procedures for application are contained in OPNAV

394

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:24:38 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organizations 18 Student Council 18 Selection Procedures 19 Naval Officers 19 Other U.S. Military Officers 19 in matters involving curricula, facilities, procedures and policies deemed worthy of attention. The OSAC. SELECTION PROCEDURES NAVAL OFFICERS Selection for the Navy fully funded graduate education program is based

395

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:25:15 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

20 Selection Procedures 20 Naval Officers 20 Other U.S. Military Officers 20 International Military administration. It functions in an advisory capacity in matters involving curricula, facilities, procedures graduate education program. SELECTION PROCEDURES NAVAL OFFICERS Selection for the Navy fully funded

396

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:23:11 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for Executive Education 11 NPS Curricula Summary 13 ADMISSIONS 16 Selection Procedures 16 Naval SELECTION PROCEDURES NAVAL OFFICERS Selection for the Navy fully funded graduate education program is based may be admitted to most curricula. The procedures for application are available from the Security

397

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:27:00 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

15 Faculty Organizations 16 Student Council 17 Admissions 18 Selection Procedures 18 Naval Officers, procedures and policies deemed worthy of attention. The OSAC is comprised of thirty-five student for the Navy's fully funded graduate education program. SELECTION PROCEDURES NAVAL OFFICERS Selection

398

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:23:43 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organizations 17 Student Council 17 ADMISSIONS 18 Selection Procedures 18 Naval Officers 18 Other U.S. Military. It functions in an advisory capacity in matters involving curricula, facilities, procedures and policies deemed funded graduate education program. SELECTION PROCEDURES NAVAL OFFICERS Selection for the Navy fully

399

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:24:49 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Council 18 Selection Procedures 19 Naval Officers 19 Other U.S. Military Officers 19 International involving curricula, facilities, procedures and policies deemed worthy of attention. The OSAC is comprised. SELECTION PROCEDURES NAVAL OFFICERS Selection for the Navy fully funded graduate education program is based

400

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:24:27 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selection Procedures 20 Naval Officers 20 Other U.S. Military Officers 20 International Military Officers 20 administration. It functions in an advisory capacity in matters involving curricula, facilities, procedures funded graduate education program. SELECTION PROCEDURES NAVAL OFFICERS Selection for the Navy fully

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioned defueled naval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Radiological Surveys Performed in Support of the Demolition and Bulk Disposal Decommissioning Method  

SciTech Connect

Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company is decommissioning the Haddam Neck Plant using the 'Demolition and Bulk Disposal' method, or commonly referred to as 'Rip and Ship'. In general, completing the project using this method entails the removal of all irradiated fuel and highly contaminated systems and components, and the subsequent demolition of the above ground portions of most site structures. Since most structures are removed from site, cost and time savings are realized by virtually eliminating the need for remediation. However, this method of decommissioning creates more waste, both radiological and non-radiological, which must be segregated, packaged and disposed of properly. Prior to demolition, various types of radiological surveys must be performed and work controls put into place to minimize the spread of contamination to other areas of the site, and to prevent the inadvertent release of radioactive materials from the site. This paper will discuss the various types of radiological surveys performed, and controls implemented, in support of the demolition and bulk material disposal decommissioning method, with the emphasis on pre-demolition surveys. Details will be provided on the release criteria, survey design, survey implementation and data analysis on each of the various surveys, as well as a discussion on the controls implemented to prevent the various wastes from inadvertently being shipped to an inappropriate disposal facility. This paper will also strive to provide lessons learned for future projects that utilize the demolition and bulk disposal decommissioning method. (authors)

Yetter, R.F. [Babcock Services, Inc., 1840 Terminal Drive, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Newson, C.T. [Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, 362 Injun Hollow Road, East Hampton, CT 06424 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

CALL FOR PAPERS Abstract Deadline: January 13, 2012 ANS Embedded Topical on Decommissioning,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Changes the rules for nuclear decommissioning funds that are to be used to clean up closed nuclear plant Subsidies and Incentives for New Nuclear Reactors Research and Development · Generation IV program technologies · Investment in human resources and infrastructure in the nuclear sciences and engineering fields

Kemner, Ken

403

Determining Background Radiation Levels in Support of Decommissioning Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a technical reference for determining background radiation levels in support of surveys for decommissioning nuclear power facilities. Careful planning and data evaluation are essential for a valid survey. The report discusses important considerations for successful establishment of background levels for soils, surfaces, structures, and groundwater. It also explores alternatives to performing a formal background study.

2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

404

Conceptual Decontamination and Decommissioning Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Conceptual Decontamination and Decommissioning Plan (D&D) was developed as a concept for progressing from the final actions of the Disposal Phase, through the Decontamination and Decommissioning Phase, and into the initiation of the Long-Term Monitoring Phase. This plan was written in a manner that coincides with many of the requirements specified in DOE Order 5820.2A. Radioactive Waste Management; ASTM El 167 87, Standard Guide for Radiation Protection Program for Decommissioning Operations; and other documents listed in Attachment 3 of the D&D Plan. However, this conceptual plan does not meet all of the requirements necessary for a Decontamination and Decommissioning plan necessary for submission to the U.S. Congress in accordance with the Land Withdrawal Act (P.L. 102-579). A complete D&D plan that will meet the requirements of all of these documents and of the Land Withdrawal Act will be prepared and submitted to Congress by October 1997.

Westinghouse Electric Corporation Waste Isolation Division, now Washington TRU Solutions LLC

1995-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

405

Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Program. Surveillance and Maintenance Plan, FY 1992--2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is part of the Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) Programs (ERWM). The objective of the ER Program is to provide Y-12 the capability to meet applicable environmental regulations through facility development activities and site remedial actions. The WM Program supports the ER program. The D and D Program provides collective management of sites within the Plant which are in need of decontamination and decommissioning efforts, prioritizes those areas in terms of health, safety, and environmental concerns, and implements the appropriate level of remedial action. The D and D Program provides support to identifiable facilities which formerly served one or more of the many Plant functions. Program activities include (1) surveillance and maintenance of facilities awaiting decommissioning; (2) planning safe and orderly facility decommissioning; and (3) implementing a program to accomplish facility disposition in a safe, cost effective, and timely manner. In order to achieve the first objective, a formal plan which documents the surveillance and maintenance needs for each facility has been prepared. This report provides this documentation for the Y-12 facilities currently included in the D and D Program, as well as those planned for future inclusion in the Program, and includes projected resource requirements for the planning period of FY 1993 through FY 2000.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Final Status Survey for the Largest Decommissioning Project on Earth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assist the United States Department of Energy's (US DOE's) re-industrialization efforts at its gaseous diffusion site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, known as the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), the US DOE awarded a 6-year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) contract to BNG America (formerly BNFL Inc.) in 1997. The ETTP 3-Building D and D Project included the removal and disposition of the materials and equipment from the K-33, K-31, and K-29 Gaseous Diffusion Plant buildings. The three buildings comprise more than 4.8 million square feet (446,000 square meters) of floor surface area and more than 350 million pounds (148 million kilograms) of hazardous and radioactively contaminated material, making it the largest nuclear D and D project in progress anywhere in the world. The logistical hurdles involved in a project of this scope and magnitude required an extensive amount of Engineering and Health Physics professionals. In order to accomplish the Final Status Survey (FSS) for a project of this scope, the speed and efficiency of automated survey equipment was essential. Surveys of floors, structural steel and ceilings up to 60 feet (18 meters) were required. The FSS had to be expanded to include additional remediation and surveys due to characterization surveys and assumptions regarding the nature and extent of contamination provided by the US DOE. Survey design and technical bases had to consider highly variable constituents; including uranium from depleted to low enrichment, variable levels of Technetium-99 and transuranic nuclides, which were introduced into the cascade during the 1960's when recycled uranium (RU) from Savannah River was re-enriched at the facility. The RU was transported to unexpected locations from leaks in the cascade by complex building ventilation patterns. The primary survey tool used for the post remediation and FSS was the Surface Contamination Monitor (SCM) and the associated Survey Information Management System (SIMS), developed by Shonka Research Associates, Inc. (SRA). Final Status Radiological surveys have been performed over the last year on a 24-hour per day and seven day per week basis. As many as eight SCMs have been in use at any one time. Each SCM can perform over 250,000 measurements per hour, simultaneously collecting both scan and static measurement requirements to meet FSS regulatory requirements. Thus, efficient management and quality control of giga-bytes of data was needed. In addition, some surveys were accomplished with traditional instrumentation and with some using other automated systems such as smear counters. The FSS Reports required integration of all of the data in a format that permitted undemanding verification by DOE using the ORISE/ESSAP IVT contractor. A project of this scope and magnitude could not have been accomplished without the use of the SCM and SIMS. This paper reports on the survey and logistical issues that required ingenuity of the entire 1,700-person workforce to resolve. In particular, this paper summarizes the issues addressed and resolved by the integrated team of survey technicians, subject matter experts (SMEs), radiological engineers, data processing staff and BNG America management. (authors)

Dubiel, R.W. [Millennium Services, Inc., 222 Creekstone Ridge, Woodstock, GA 30188 (United States); Miller, J. [BNG America, 804 S. Illinois Avenue, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Quayle, D. [Shonka Research Associates, Inc., 704 S. Illinois Avenue, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix D, Part B: Naval spent nuclear fuel management  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the following attachments: transportation of Naval spent nuclear fuel; description of Naval spent nuclear receipt and handling at the Expended Core Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; comparison of storage in new water pools versus dry container storage; description of storage of Naval spent nuclear fuel at servicing locations; description of receipt, handling, and examination of Naval spent nuclear fuel at alternate DOE facilities; analysis of normal operations and accident conditions; and comparison of the Naval spent nuclear fuel storage environmental assessment and this environmental impact statement.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Decommissioning the physics laboratory, building 777-10A, at the Savannah River Site (SRS)  

SciTech Connect

SRS recently completed a four year mission to decommission {approx}250 excess facilities. As part of that effort, SRS decommissioned a 48,000 ft{sup 2} laboratory that housed four low-power test reactors, formerly used by SRS to determine reactor physics. This paper describes and reviews the decommissioning, with a focus on component segmentation and handling (i.e. hazardous material removal, demolition, and waste handling). The paper is intended to be a resource for engineers, planners, and project managers, who face similar decommissioning challenges. Building 777-10A, located at the south end of SRS's A/M-Area, was built in 1953 and had a gross area of {approx}48,000 ft{sup 2}. Building 777-10A had two main areas: a west wing, which housed four experimental reactors and associated equipment; and an east wing, which housed laboratories, and shops, offices. The reactors were located in two separate areas: one area housed the Process Development Pile (PDP) reactor and the Lattice Test Reactor (LTR), while the second area housed the Standard Pile (SP) and the Sub-critical Experiment (SE) reactors. The west wing had five levels: three below and three above grade (floor elevations of -37', -28', -15', 0', +13'/+16' and +27' (roof elevation of +62')), while the east wing had two levels: one below and one above grade (floor elevations of -15' and 0' (roof elevation of +16')). Below-grade exterior walls were constructed of reinforced concrete, {approx}1' thick. In general, above-grade exterior walls were steel frames covered by insulation and corrugated, asbestos-cement board. The two interior walls around the PDP/LTR were reinforced concrete {approx}5' thick and {approx}30' high, while the SP/SE reactors resided in a reinforced, concrete cell with 3.5'-6' thick walls/roof. All other interior walls were constructed of metal studs covered with either asbestos-cement or gypsum board. In general, the floors were constructed of reinforced concrete on cast-in-place concrete beams below-grade and concrete on metal beams above-grade. The roofs were flat concrete slabs on metal beams. Building 777-10A was an important SRS research and development location. The reactors helped determine safe operational limits and loading patterns for fuel used in the SRS production reactors, and supported various low power reactor physics studies. All four reactors were shut down and de-inventoried in the 1970's. The building was DD and R 2007, Chattanooga, Tennessee, September 16-19, 2007 169 subsequently used by various SRS organizations for office space, audio/visual studio, and computer network hub. SRS successfully decommissioned Building 777-10A over a thirty month period at a cost of {approx}$14 M ({approx}$290/ft{sup 2}). The decommissioning was a complex and difficult effort due to the building's radiological contamination, height, extensive basement, and thick concrete walls. Extensive planning and extensive hazard analysis (e.g. of structural loads/modifications leading to unplanned collapse) ensured the decommissioning was completed safely and without incident. The decommissioning met contract standards for residual contamination and physical/chemical hazards, and was the last in a series of decommissioning projects that prepared the lower A/M-Area for SRS's environmental restoration program.

Musall, John C.; Cope, Jeff L. [Washington Savannah River Company, Savannah River Site, Buildings 706-20C, Aiken, South Carolina 29802 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Department of Energy, Office of Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Request for Records Disposition Authority Leave Blank (NARA Use Only) (See Instructions on reverse) Job Number I / {£. 0- _~ To. National Archives and Records Administration (NIR) NI-'-r 3 7- 6 6 J Washington, DC 20408 Date Received 1 From (Agencyor establishment) Department of Energy Notification to Agency 2 MajorSubdivrsion In accordance with the provisions of 44 Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy USC 3303a. the disposition request. In- cluding amendments. ISapproved except for 3 Minorsubcrvrsron Items that may be marked "disposrtron not Office of Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves approved" or "withdrawn" In column 10 4 Nameof Personwith whom to confer 5 Telephone (Includearea code) [ Pamela Gentel 301-903-1856 6 Agency Certification

410

Major General Harold Holesinger The Adjutant General Illinois Kilitary and Naval Dept.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

General Harold Holesinger General Harold Holesinger The Adjutant General Illinois Kilitary and Naval Dept. 1301 North MacArthur Boulevard Springfield, Illinois 62702-2399 Dear General Holesinger: I am enclosing a copy of the radiological survey report for the National Guard Armory, Chicago, Illinois. Although the data ncted in the report indicate levels of radioactivity in excess of current guidelines, the radioactive residues presently there do not pose a health hazard provided they were not disturbed in the past and will not be disturbed in the future; i.e., no excavation, building, or construction that would disturb the areas in which contamination was found. Based on these data and on an authority record review, the National Guard Armory property is being authorized for remedial action and will be

411

FEMP ESPC Success Story - U.S. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a m a m ESPC Success Stories Environmental Stewardship and Cost Savings These photographs chronicle the installation of the wind turbines at John Paul Jones Hill, Guantanamo Bay. The four wind turbine towers are about 185 feet high. The blade lengths are 90 feet. The top of the blades are about 275 feet off the g round. The blades rotate at a maximum of 22 RPM, or a rotation every three seconds. This translates to a blade tip speed of 140 mph. During construction there were as many as 20 workers on the project. However, operating the wind turbines will only take one part-time staff-person who will check on them daily. Photos courtesy of: Jeffrey M. Johnston, Public Works Officer, Guantanamo Bay; Paul DelSignore, NFESC; Daniel Ingold, NORESCO. U.S. NAVAL STATION

412

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Supply Depot AEC Warehouse - NY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Supply Depot AEC Warehouse - Supply Depot AEC Warehouse - NY 36 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NAVAL SUPPLY DEPOT, AEC WAREHOUSE (NY.36) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Building 546 , Scotia , New York NY.36-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.36-1 Site Operations: This facility served as a storage and transshipment point for feed materials between the Hanford and commercial metal fabricators in the northeastern states. NY.36-1 NY.36-2 NY.36-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Referred to DOD NY.36-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium, Thorium Metals NY.36-1 NY.36-2 NY.36-3 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD NY.36-1

413

Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center RMOTC at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Renewable Energy Scoping Meeting & Renewable Energy Scoping Meeting March 26, 2004 2 2 RMOTC The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC), is an operating oil field focusing on environmentally-balanced energy technologies and alternatives, and is the premiere energy testing and demonstration field in the nation. 3 3 * the opportunity to explore environmentally- balanced solutions to the nation's energy issues * opportunities to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate a variety of energy related technologies * a chance to collaborate with top professionals in the energy, environmental technology, and engineering fields * shared industry knowledge through technology transfer via reports, journal articles, and presentations Located within the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) near Casper, Wyoming, RMOTC offers:

414

Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center RMOTC at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OILFIELD TESTING OILFIELD TESTING OILFIELD TESTING CENTER CENTER 2 2 HISTORY OF TEAPOT DOME Mark Milliken 3 3 TEAPOT DOME LOCATION 4 4 Salt Creek 670 MMBBLS 722 BCF Teapot Dome 27 MMBBLS 57 BCF N P R - 3 Cumulative Production 5 5 The Great White Fleet December 1907 - February 1909 6 6 THE END OF COAL-FIRED SHIPS * 2-week cruising time. * Labor and time intensive cleaning and reloading. * At the mercy of foreign countries for coal supply. * 1912: All battleships will be oil-powered. Great White Fleet 7 7 NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES ARE BORN * 1908: Dr. Otis Smith, USGS Director, recommends DOI retain oil lands for fuel reserve for Navy. * 1909: Taft withdraws 3,000,000 acres in Wyoming and California. * 1910: Concern over the President's authority to withdraw lands, so Congress passed the Pickett Act. * 1910: Taft issues a 2nd land withdrawal executive

415

Quality assurance assessment of new efficient lighting systems for naval ships. Final report. Revision  

SciTech Connect

Ballasts and lamps, which have been selected to replace existing lamp/ballast systems based on improved performance, were tested to determine if they meet standard Naval MIL specifications. Fifty ballasts manufactured by Advance Transformer Corporation and Universal Manufacturing Corporation and 100 lamps manufactured by GTE were tested to determine their quality assurance and durability. These components met all of the MIL specifications that lamp/ballast systems in use must meet. These new systems have an improved system efficacy, 62 lumens per watt, and lower third harmonics, which will reduce the need for generating capacity for lighting on ships. An addendum to the original study describes the assessment of the performance of the advanced ballast system with a new F-17 fluorescent lamp. The results indicate the system performs reliably and shows increased efficacy. This new lamp/ballast system reduces the harmonic content to within Navy limits, and improves the power factor, resulting in a 50% reduction in line current.

Verderber, R.R.; Morse, O.; Dumm, C.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

AUTOMATED RADIOLOGICAL MONITORING AT A RUSSIAN MINISTRY OF DEFENCE NAVAL SITE.  

SciTech Connect

The Arctic Military Environmental Cooperation (AMEC) Program is a cooperative effort between the military establishments of the Kingdom of Norway, the Russian Federation, and the US. This paper discusses joint activities conducted over the past year among Norwegian, Russian, and US technical experts on a project to develop, demonstrate and implement automated radiological monitoring at Russian Navy facilities engaged in the dismantlement of nuclear-powered strategic ballistic missile launching submarines. Radiological monitoring is needed at these facilities to help protect workers engaged in the dismantlement program and the public living within the footprint of routine and accidental radiation exposure areas. By providing remote stand-alone monitoring, the Russian Navy will achieve added protection due to the defense-in-depth strategy afforded by local (at the site), regional (Kola) and national-level (Moscow) oversight. The system being implemented at the Polyaminsky Russian Naval Shipyard was developed from a working model tested at the Russian Institute for Nuclear Safety, Moscow, Russia. It includes Russian manufactured terrestrial and underwater gamma detectors, smart controllers for graded sampling, radio-modems for offsite transmission of the data, and a data fusion/display system: The data fusion/display system is derived from the Norwegian Picasso AMEC Environmental Monitoring software package. This computer package allows monitoring personnel to review the real-time and historical status of monitoring at specific sites and objects and to establish new monitoring protocols as required, for example, in an off-normal accident situation. Plans are being developed to implement the use of this system at most RF Naval sites handling spent nuclear fuel.

MOSKOWITZ,P.D.; POMERVILLE,J.; GAVRILOV,S.; KISSELEV,V.; DANIYLAN,V.; BELIKOV,A.; EGORKIN,A.; SOKOLOVSKI,Y.; ENDREGARD,M.; KROSSHAVN,M.; SUNDLING,C.V.; YOKSTAD,H.

2001-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

417

AUTOMATED RADIOLOGICAL MONITORING AT A RUSSIAN MINISTRY OF DEFENSE NAVAL SITE.  

SciTech Connect

The Arctic Military Environmental Cooperation (AMEC) Program is a cooperative effort between the military establishments of the Kingdom of Norway, the Russian Federation, and the US. This paper discusses joint activities conducted over the past year among Norwegian, Russian, and US technical experts on a project to develop, demonstrate and implement automated radiological monitoring at Russian Navy facilities engaged in the dismantlement of nuclear-powered strategic ballistic missile launching submarines. Radiological monitoring is needed at these facilities to help protect workers engaged in the dismantlement program and the public living within the footprint of routine and accidental radiation exposure areas. By providing remote stand-alone monitoring, the Russian Navy will achieve added protection due to the defense-in-depth strategy afforded by local (at the site), regional (Kola) and national-level (Moscow) oversight. The system being implemented at the Polyaminsky Russian Naval Shipyard was developed from a working model tested at the Russian Institute for Nuclear Safety, Moscow, Russia. It includes Russian manufactured terrestrial and underwater gamma detectors, smart controllers for graded sampling, radio-modems for offsite transmission of the data, and a data fusion/display system: The data fusion/display system is derived from the Norwegian Picasso AMEC Environmental Monitoring software package. This computer package allows monitoring personnel to review the real-time and historical status of monitoring at specific sites and objects and to establish new monitoring protocols as required, for example, in an off-normal accident situation. Plans are being developed to implement the use of this system at most RF Naval sites handling spent nuclear fuel.

MOSKOWITZ,P.D.; POMERVILLE,J.; GAVRILOV,S.; KISSELEV,V.; DANIYLAN,V.; BELIKOV,A.; EGORKIN,A.; SOKOLOVSKI,Y.; ENDREGARD,M.; KROSSHAVN,M.; SUNDLING,C.V.; YOKSTAD,H.

2001-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

418

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 13: Part 2, Indexes. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is part 2 of a bibliography on nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial action. This report contains indexes on the following: authors, corporate affiliation, title words, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word.

Goins, L.F.; Webb, J.R.; Cravens, C.D.; Mallory, P.K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Capturing Historical Knowledge for Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Plants: Summary of Historical Site Assessments at Eight Decommis sioning Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes approaches utilized and experience gained in the development of early characterization activities by a number of nuclear power plants undergoing decommissioning. In particular, the report provides experience and lessons of performing the Historical Site Assessment, or HSA.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Decommissioning and Safety Issues of Liquid-Mercury Waste Generated from High-Power Spallation Sources with Particle Accelerators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron Data / Special Issue on the 11th International Conference on Radiation Shielding and the 15th Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division (Part 2) / Decontamination/Decommissioning

S. Chiriki; J. Fachinger; R. Moormann; H.-K. Hinssen; A. Bukaemskiy; R. Odoj

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioned defueled naval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Two Approaches to Reactor Decommissioning: 10 CFR Part 50 License Termination and License Amendment, Lessons Learned from the Regulatory Perspective  

SciTech Connect

Trojan Nuclear Plant (Trojan) and Maine Yankee Nuclear Plant (Maine Yankee) were the first two power reactors to complete decommissioning under the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) License Termination Rule (LTR), 10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E. The respective owners' decisions to decommission the sites resulted in different approaches to both the physical aspects of the decommissioning, and the approach for obtaining approval for completing the decommissioning in accordance with regulations. Being in different States, the two single-unit pressurized water reactor sites had different State requirements and levels of public interest that impacted the decommissioning approaches. This resulted in significant differences in decommissioning planning, conduct of decommissioning operations, volumes of low- level radioactive waste disposed, and the final status survey (FSS) program. While both licensees have Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installations (ISFSIs), Trojan obtained a separate license for the ISFSI in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR Part 72 and terminated their 10 CFR Part 50 license. Maine Yankee elected to obtain a general license under 10 CFR Part 50 for the ISFSI and reduce the physical site footprint to the ISFSI through a series of license amendments. While the NRC regulations are flexible and allow different approaches to ISFSI licensing there are separate licensing requirements that must be addressed. In 10 CFR 50.82, the NRC mandates public participation in the decommissioning process. For Maine Yankee, public input resulted in the licensee entering into an agreement with a concerned citizen group and resulted in State legislation that significantly lowered the dose limit below the NRC radiological criteria of 25 mrem (0.25 mSv) per year (yr) in 10 CFR 20.1402 for unrestricted use. The lowering of the radiological criteria resulted in a significant dose modeling effort using site-specific Derived Concentrations Guideline Levels (DCGLs) that were well below the NRC DCGL screening values. This contributed to a longer than anticipated period to obtain NRC approval of the Maine Yankee License Termination Plan (LTP). By employing the lessons learned from its first LTP submittal, which was not accepted by the NRC staff, Trojan was able to obtain approval of its revised LTP promptly. While both licensees provided final status survey reports (FSSRs) for NRC approval, the Trojan approach to decommissioning and data management allowed NRC to efficiently review FSS records and supporting documentation. Therefore, NRC was able to review Trojan's FSSR more efficiently than Maine Yankee's FSSR. This paper describes the regulatory impacts of the two different approaches to the decommissioning, the development of licensee required plans, decommissioning operations and records, the differences in licensing processes, and the lessons learned for improving the processes. (authors)

Watson, B.A.; Buckley, J.T.; Craig, C.M. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Materials Safety and Safeguards, Decommissioning Directorate (T7E18), Washington, D.C. 20555 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Juggernaut Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory … East Argonne, Illinois  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE/EA-1483 DOE/EA-1483 Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Juggernaut Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory - East Argonne, Illinois March 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Chicago Operations Office Argonne Area Office Argonne, Illinois Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Juggernaut Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory - East Argonne, Illinois Table of Contents Acronyms....................................................................................................................................... iii 1.0 Background ..........................................................................................................................1 1.1 Facility History ........................................................................................................1

423

Waste Logic(TM): Decommissioning Waste Manager, Version 2.1 and Solid Waste Manager, Version 2.1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste Logic(TM) Decommissioning Waste Manager, Version 2.1: Rising program costs and a more competitive business environment have made solid waste management a major cost concern. Effective management of solid waste can reduce long range operating costs for a large nuclear plant by millions of dollars. To assist waste managers in maximizing potential cost savings, EPRI developed the Waste Logic Decommissioning Waste Manager(TM) computer code. It provides a comprehensive methodology for capturing and quan...

2003-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

424

Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's Fiscal Year 2011 Financial Statement Audit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's Fiscal Year 2011 Financial Statement Audit OAS-FS-13-02 October 2012 September 7, 2012 Mr. Gregory Friedman Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Room 5D-039 Washington, DC 20585 Dear Mr. Friedman: We have audited the financial statements of the Department of Energy's (the Department) Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund (D&D Fund) as of and for the year ended September 30, 2011, and have issued our report thereon dated September 7, 2012. In planning and performing our audit of the consolidated financial statements, in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America, we considered the Department's internal control

425

Development of a safety assessment approach for decontamination and decommissioning operations at nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for nearly 1000 nuclear facilities which will eventually be decommissioned. In order to ensure that the health and safety of the workers, other personnel on site and the public in general is maintained during decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) operations, a methodology specifically for use in evaluating the nuclear safety of the associated activities is being developed within the Department. This methodology represents not so much a departure from that currently fish in the DOE when conducting safety assessments of operations at nuclear facilities but, rather, a formalization of those methods specifically adapted to the D&D activities. As such, it is intended to provide the safety assessment personnel with a framework on which they can base their technical judgement, to assure a consistent approach to safety assessment of D&D operations and to facilitate the systematic collection of data from facilities in the post-operational part of the life cycle.

Worthington, P.R. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Cowgill, M.G. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Decommissioning Anddismantling Of The Research Reactor Salaspils. I. Conceptual Study And The First Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In May 1995, the Latvian government decided to shut down the Research Reactor Salaspils (SRR) and to dis pense with nuclear energy in future. The reactor is out of operation since July 1998. A conceptual study for the decommissioning of SRR has been carried out by Noell-KRC-Energie- und Umweltlechnik GmbH at 1998-1999 years. The Latvian government decided in October 26 1999 to start the direct dismantling to "green field" at 2001 year. The first decommissioning and dismantling results from preparation measures in 1999 year are presented and discussed. The main efforts was devoted to collecting and conditioning of "historical" radioactive wastes from different storages outside and inside of reactor hall. All non-radioactive equipments and materials outside of reactor buildings were free-released and dismantled for reusing and conventional disposing. Weakly contaminated materials from reactor hall were collected and removed for free-release measurements. 1.0 INTRODUCTION The res...

Andris Abramenkovs Ministry; Andris Abramenkovs; Arnis Ezergailis; State Enterprise vides Projekti; Dzintars Kalnin

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Standard Guide for Preparing Waste Management Plans for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide addresses the development of waste management plans for potential waste streams resulting from decommissioning activities at nuclear facilities, including identifying, categorizing, and handling the waste from generation to final disposal. 1.2 This guide is applicable to potential waste streams anticipated from decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities whose operations were governed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or Agreement State license, under Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, or Department of Defense (DoD) regulations. 1.3 This guide provides a description of the key elements of waste management plans that if followed will successfully allow for the characterization, packaging, transportation, and off-site treatment or disposal, or both, of conventional, hazardous, and radioactive waste streams. 1.4 This guide does not address the on-site treatment, long term storage, or on-site disposal of these potential waste streams. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address ...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Health and environmental hazards of CdTe photovoltaic module production, use and decommissioning  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Health and environmental (H&E) risks presented by CdTe photovoltaic module production, use and decommissioning have been reviewed and discussed by several authors. Several H&E concerns exit. The estimated risks are based on extrapolations of toxicity, environmental mobility, and bioavailability data for other inorganic cadmium compounds. Little information, however, is available about CdTe itself. In response to the increased interest in CdTe, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has been engaged in a cooperative research program with the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), the Fraunhofer Institute for Solid State Technology (IFT), and the GSF Institute of Chemical Ecology to develop fundamental toxicological and environmental data for CdTe. This paper describes the results of these studies, and their potential implications with respect to the H&E hazards presented by CdTe module production, use and decommissioning.

Moskowitz, P.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Steinberger, H. [Fraunhofer Institut fur Festkorpertechnologie, Munchen (Germany); Thumm, W. [GSF-Institute of Ecological Chemistry, Oberschleissheim (Germany)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Transforming criticality control methods for EBR-II fuel handling during reactor decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

A review of the Department of Energy (DOE) request to decommission the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) was conducted in order to develop a scope of work and analysis method for performing the safety review of the facility. Evaluation of the current national standards, DOE orders, EBR-II nuclear safeguards and criticality control practices showed that a decommissioning policy for maintaining criticality safety during a long term fuel transfer process did not exist. The purpose of this research was to provide a technical basis for transforming the reactor from an instrumentation and measurement controlled system to a system that provides both physical constraint and administrative controls to prevent criticality accidents. Essentially, this was done by modifying the reactor core configuration, reactor operations procedures and system instrumentation to meet the safety practices of ANS-8.1-1983. Subcritical limits were determined by applying established liquid metal reactor methods for both the experimental and computational validations.

Eberle, C.S.; Dean, E.M.; Angelo, P.L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

Environmental Assessment for decommissioning the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Weeks Island Facility, Iberia Parish, Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

The Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Weeks Island site is one of five underground salt dome crude oils storage facilities operated by the Department of Energy (DOE). It is located in Iberia Parish, Louisiana. The purpose of the proposed action is to decommission the Weeks Island crude oil storage after the oil inventory has been transferred to other SPR facilities. Water intrusion into the salt dome storage chambers and the development of two sinkholes located near the aboveground facilities has created uncertain geophysical conditions. This Environmental Assessment describes the proposed decommissioning operation, its alternatives, and potential environmental impacts. Based on this analyses, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and has issued the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Cost update technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning a reference uranium hexafluoride conversion plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to update the cost estimates developed in a previous report, NUREG/CR-1757 (Elder 1980) for decommissioning a reference uranium hexafluoride conversion plant from the original mid-1981 dollars to values representative of January 1993. The cost updates were performed by using escalation factors derived from cost index trends over the past 11.5 years. Contemporary price quotes wee used for costs that have increased drastically or for which is is difficult to find a cost trend. No changes were made in the decommissioning procedures or cost element requirements assumed in NUREG/CR-1757. This report includes only information that was changed from NUREG/CR-1757. Thus, for those interested in detailed descriptions and associated information for the reference uranium hexafluoride conversion plant, a copy of NUREG/CR-1757 will be needed.

Miles, T.L.; Liu, Y.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Fort St. Vrain Decommissioning: Final Site Radiation Survey: Summary Report and Lessons Learned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the final step in the decommissioning process at Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCo) Fort St. Vrain nuclear power plant. The final site radiation survey documents that all nuclear facility surfaces meet the established release limits for unrestricted use. The survey formed the legal basis for the termination of the Fort St. Vrain nuclear license, which occurred in August 1997. The lessons learned in this process will be valuable to other utilities with permanently shutdown p...

1998-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

433

Use of Probabilistic Methods in Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning Dose Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance on the use of probabilistic dose analysis in the demonstration of regulatory compliance for final release of decommissioned nuclear plant sites. It also addresses probabilistic dose analysis and the interpretation of its results in general terms. Finally, the report examines the use of the RESRAD 6.0 as a tool for screening dose analysis and for site-specific probabilistic dose analysis.

2002-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

434

Vibratory Shear Enhanced Process Filtration for Processing Decommissioning Wastes at Rancho Seco  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many non-nuclear industries use a vibratory shear enhanced filtration process (VSEP) to separate solids in liquid streams. Unlike other methods, including the application of a precoat of filter media, the VSEP does not generate any secondary waste, making it seem ideally suited for nuclear power plant radwaste systems. This report presents the results of laboratory and pilot scale in-plant testing of VSEP's ability to successfully process radioactive decommissioning waste. Testing at Rancho Seco showed t...

2003-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

435

Use of In-Situ Gamma Spectroscopy During Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to leakage and other events that may occur during nuclear power plant operations, soil, concrete and bedrock have the potential to become contaminated, and therefore must be characterized to demonstrate that they meet strict regulatory site release limits. This report provides detailed information on the use of portable gamma spectroscopy systems for the characterization and Final Status Survey of soil, concrete and bedrock contaminated with radionuclides at a number of plants undergoing decommission...

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

436

"The Fourth Dimension of Naval Tactics": The U.S. Navy and Public Relations, 1919-1939  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prior to 1917, the United States Navy only utilized public relations techniques during times of war or to attract recruits into naval service. Following World I, the Navy confronted several daunting problems, including the postwar demobilization of naval assets, the proposed creation of an independent air service, and a public desire for naval arms limitation which many officers believed would endanger the Navy's ability to fulfill its missions. These issues threatened the generous support that the Navy had received from Congress for a quarter of a century, and also hampered the service's attempts to incorporate new weapons systems into its arsenal and recruit high-quality manpower. In response to these challenges, the Navy developed a peacetime public relations capability during the interwar period, despite the fact that many senior naval officials placed a low priority on public relations. Their attitude led subordinates in different parts of the Navy Department to perform public relations tasks despite lacking official orders to carry out such work. Such efforts were haphazard, redundant, handicapped by tradition, and dependent largely upon individual initiative. To augment its meager capabilities, the Navy relied upon external groups, such as the Navy League, to lobby the public for naval expansion. The service also developed formal and informal ties to the mass media, particularly the rapidly expanding motion picture industry. These disparate elements attempted to convince the public that the Navy was a haven for morally upright masculine behavior, a service able to integrate aircraft and submarines into its force structure and keep their operators safe, and a vital national asset with value beyond basic national defense. During the interwar period, the Navy expanded and reorganized the ways in which it courted public opinion. By forging ties with motion picture studios, radio broadcasters, and the print media, it was able to improve the image of the service, attract high quality recruits, and gained the public support for its drive to gain the resources needed to modernize and expand the fleet. During the same era, naval officials became more adept at minimizing the negative impact of the accidents linked to the development of aviation and submarines. Developments of the era laid the foundation for the institutional development of public relations and enhanced media relations during World War II and in the decades that followed.

Wadle, Ryan David

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions. Volume 1. A selected bibliography  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography of 633 references represents the first in a series to be produced by the Remedial Actions Program Information Center (RAPIC) containing scientific, technical, economic, and regulatory information concerning the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Major chapters selected for this bibliography are Facility Decommissioning, Uranium Mill Tailings Cleanup, Contaminated Site Restoration, and Criteria and Standards. The references within each chapter are arranged alphabetically by leading author, corporate affiliation, or title of the document. When the author is not given, the corporate affiliation appears first. If these two levels of authorship are not given, the title of the document is used as the identifying level. Indexes are provided for (1) author(s), (2) keywords, (3) title, (4) technology development, and (5) publication description. An appendix of 123 entries lists recently acquired references relevant to decommissioning of nuclear facilities. These references are also arranged according to one of the four subject categories and followed by author, title, and publication description indexes. The bibliography was compiled from a specialized data base established and maintained by RAPIC to provide information support for the Department of Energy's Remedial Actions Program, under the cosponsorship of its three major components: Surplus Facilities Management Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Actions Program, and Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Actions Program. RAPIC is part of the Ecological Sciences Information Center within the Information Center Complex at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Faust, R.A.; Fore, C.S.; Knox, N.P.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Release and disposal of materials during decommissioning of Siemens MOX fuel fabrication plant at Hanau, Germany  

SciTech Connect

In September 2006, decommissioning and dismantling of the Siemens MOX Fuel Fabrication Plant in Hanau were completed. The process equipment and the fabrication buildings were completely decommissioned and dismantled. The other buildings were emptied in whole or in part, although they were not demolished. Overall, the decommissioning process produced approximately 8500 Mg of radioactive waste (including inactive matrix material); clearance measurements were also performed for approximately 5400 Mg of material covering a wide range of types. All the equipment in which nuclear fuels had been handled was disposed of as radioactive waste. The radioactive waste was conditioned on the basis of the requirements specified for the projected German final disposal site 'Schachtanlage Konrad'. During the pre-conditioning, familiar processes such as incineration, compacting and melting were used. It has been shown that on account of consistently applied activity containment (barrier concept) during operation and dismantling, there has been no significant unexpected contamination of the plant. Therefore almost all the materials that were not a priori destined for radioactive waste were released without restriction on the basis of the applicable legal regulations (chap. 29 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance), along with the buildings and the plant site. (authors)

Koenig, Werner [TUEV NORD EnSys Hannover GmbH and Co. KG (Germany); Baumann, Roland [Siemens AG, Power Generation (Germany)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Decontamination and decommissioning surveillance and maintenance report for FY 1991. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program has three distinct phases: (1) surveillance and maintenance (S&M); (2) decontamination and removal of hazardous materials and equipment (which DOE Headquarters in Washington, D.C., calls Phase I of remediation); and (3) decommissioning and ultimate disposal, regulatory compliance monitoring, and property transfer (which DOE Headquarters calls Phase II of remediation). A large part of D&D is devoted to S&M at each of the sites. Our S&M activities, which are performed on facilities awaiting decommissioning, are designed to minimize potential hazards to human health and the environment by: ensuring adequate containment of residual radioactive and hazardous materials; and, providing physical safety and security controls to minimize potential hazards to on-site personnel and the general public. Typically, we classify maintenance activities as either routine or special (major repairs). Routine maintenance includes such activities as painting, cleaning, vegetation control, minor structural repairs, filter changes, and building system(s) checks. Special maintenance includes Occupational Safety and Health Act facility upgrades, roof repairs, and equipment overhaul. Surveillance activities include inspections, radiological measurements, reporting, records maintenance, and security (as required) for controlling and monitoring access to facilities. This report summarizes out FY 1991 S&M activities for the Tennessee plant sites, which include the K-25 Site, the Gas Centrifuge facilities, ORNL, and the Y-12 Plant.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Environmental Problems Associated With Decommissioning The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decommissioned defueled naval" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH DECOMMISSIONING THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COOLING POND  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

Farfan, E.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

442

Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 12. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

The 664 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the twelfth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Decontamination and Decommissioning Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and key word. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects, analyzes, and disseminates information on environmental restoration and remedial actions. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at FTS 624-7764 or (615) 574-7764.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

This document was downloaded on May 22, 2013 at 14:34:19 Author(s) Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the Naval Auxiliary Air Station to house trans- sonic and supersonic wind tunnels and jet com- bustion pits tunnels and jet com- bustion pits. The third and next building increment is expected to comprise a General

444

Recycling Of Uranium- And Plutonium-Contaminated Metals From Decommissioning Of The Hanau Fuel Fabrication Plant  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning of a nuclear facility comprises not only actual dismantling but also, above all, management of the resulting residual materials and waste. Siemens Decommissioning Projects (DP) in Hanau has been involved in this task since 1995 when the decision was taken to decommission and dismantle the Hanau Fuel Fabrication Plant. Due to the decommissioning, large amounts of contaminated steel scrap have to be managed. The contamination of this metal scrap can be found almost exclusively in the form of surface contamination. Various decontamination technologies are involved, as there are blasting and wiping. Often these methods are not sufficient to meet the free release limits. In these cases, SIEMENS has decided to melt the scrap at Siempelkamp's melting plant. The plant is licensed according to the German Radiation Protection Ordinance Section 7 (issue of 20.07.2001). The furnace is a medium frequency induction type with a load capacity of 3.2 t and a throughput of 2 t/h for steel melting. For safety reasons, the furnace is widely operated by remote handling. A highly efficient filter system of cyclone, bag filter and HEPA-filter in two lines retains the dust and aerosol activity from the off-gas system. The slag is solidified at the surface of the melt and gripped before pouring the liquid iron into a chill. Since 1989, in total 15,000 t have been molten in the plant, 2,000 t of them having been contaminated steel scrap from the decommissioning of fuel fabrication plants. Decontamination factors could be achieved between 80 and 100 by the high affinity of the uranium to the slag former. The activity is transferred to the slag up to nearly 100 %. Samples taken from metal, slag and dust are analyzed by gamma measurements of the 186 keV line of U235 and the 1001 keV line of Pa234m for U238. All produced ingots showed a remaining activity less than 1 Bq/g and could be released for industrial reuse.

Kluth, T.; Quade, U.; Lederbrink, F. W.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

445

Recycling Of Uranium- And Plutonium-Contaminated Metals From Decommissioning Of The Hanau Fuel Fabrication Plant  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning of a nuclear facility comprises not only actual dismantling but also, above all, management of the resulting residual materials and waste. Siemens Decommissioning Projects (DP) in Hanau has been involved in this task since 1995 when the decision was taken to decommission and dismantle the Hanau Fuel Fabrication Plant. Due to the decommissioning, large amounts of contaminated steel scrap have to be managed. The contamination of this metal scrap can be found almost exclusively in the form of surface contamination. Various decontamination technologies are involved, as there are blasting and wiping. Often these methods are not sufficient to meet the free release limits. In these cases, SIEMENS has decided to melt the scrap at Siempelkamp's melting plant. The plant is licensed according to the German Radiation Protection Ordinance Section 7 (issue of 20.07.2001). The furnace is a medium frequency induction type with a load capacity of 3.2 t and a throughput of 2 t/h for steel melting. For safety reasons, the furnace is widely operated by remote handling. A highly efficient filter system of cyclone, bag filter and HEPA-filter in two lines retains the dust and aerosol activity from the off-gas system. The slag is solidified at the surface of the melt and gripped before pouring the liquid iron into a chill. Since 1989, in total 15,000 t have been molten in the plant, 2,000 t of them having been contaminated steel scrap from the decommissioning of fuel fabrication plants. Decontamination factors could be achieved between 80 and 100 by the high affinity of the uranium to the slag former. The activity is transferred to the slag up to nearly 100 %. Samples taken from metal, slag and dust are analyzed by gamma measurements of the 186 keV line of U235 and the 1001 keV line of Pa234m for U238. All produced ingots showed a remaining activity less than 1 Bq/g and could be released for industrial reuse.

Kluth, T.; Quade, U.; Lederbrink, F. W.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

446

The Belgoprocess Strategy Relating to the Management of Materials from Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

Belgium started its nuclear program quite early. The first installations were constructed in the fifties, and presently, more than 55 % of the Belgian electricity production is provided by nuclear power plants. After 30 years of nuclear experience, Belgium started decommissioning of nuclear facilities in the eighties with two main projects: the BR3-PWR plant and the Eurochemic reprocessing plant. The BR3-decommissioning project is carried out at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, while the decommissioning of the former Eurochemic reprocessing plant is managed and operated by Belgoprocess n.v., which is also operating the centralized waste treatment facilities and the interim storage for Belgian radioactive waste. Some fundamental principles have to be considered for the management of materials resulting from the decommissioning of nuclear installations, equipment and/or components, mainly based on the guidelines of the ''IAEA-Safety Fundamentals. The Principles of Radioactive Waste Management. Safety Series No. 111-F, IAEA, Vienna, 1995'' with respect to radioactive waste management. Two of the fundamental principles indicated in this document are specifically dealing with the strategy for the management of materials from decommissioning, ''Generation of radioactive waste shall be kept to the minimum practicable'' (seventh principle), and ''Radioactive waste shall be managed in such a way that it will not impose undue burdens on future generations'' (fifth principle). Based on these fundamental principles, Belgoprocess has made a straightforward choice for a strategy with minimization of the amount of materials to be managed as radioactive waste. This objective is obtained through the use of advanced decontamination techniques and the unconditional release of decontaminated materials. Unconditionally released materials are recycled, such as i.e., metal materials that are removed to conventional melting facilities, or are removed to conventional industrial disposal sites if they have no remaining value. In order to achieve these objectives, Belgoprocess uses techniques and equipment that enable the high degrees of decontamination to be obtained, while based on commercially available technology. As an example, for concrete surfaces, where the contamination has not penetrated deeply, significant improvement in operation efficiency was achieved when developing dry hand held and automated floor and wall shaving systems as an alternative for scabbling. As it was also shown that it is economically interesting to decontaminate metal components to unconditional release levels using dry abrasive blasting techniques, an industrial automated dry abrasive blasting unit was installed in the Belgoprocess central decontamination infrastructure. Moreover, a specific facility was developed and operations started for taking representative samples and monitoring concrete material in view of the final demolition and unconditional release of remaining structures of buildings after completing all dismantling and decontamination work.

Teunckens, L.; Lewandowski, P.; Walthery, R.; Ooms. B.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

447

Using Net-Zero Energy Projects to Enable Sustainable Economic Redevelopment at the Former Brunswick Air Naval Base  

SciTech Connect

A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites. The Brunswick Naval Air Station is a naval air facility and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Super Fund site that is being cleaned up, and closed down. The objective of this report is not only to look at the economics of individual renewable energy technologies, but also to look at the systemic benefits that can be gained when cost-effective renewable energy technologies are integrated with other systems and businesses in a community; thus multiplying the total monetary, employment, and quality-of-life benefits they can provide to a community.

Huffman, S.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Regulatory Experiences for the Decommissioning of the Research Reactor in Korea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first research reactor in Korea (KRR-1, TRIGA Mark-II) has operated since 1962, and the second one (KRR-2, TRIGA Mark-III), since 1972. Both of them were phased out in 1995 due to their lives and the operation of a new research reactor, HANARO (30 MW thermal power) operated by KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). After deciding the shutdown by the Nuclear Development and Utilization Committee in March 1996, KAERI began to prepare the decommissioning plan, including the environmental impact assessment, and submitted the plan to the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) in December 1998. Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) reviewed document and prepared the review report in 1999. KINS is an organization of technical expertise which performs regulatory functions, entrusted by the MOST in accordance with the Atomic Energy Act and its Enforcement Decree. The review report written by KINS was consulted by the Special Committee on Nuclear Safety in January 2000. The committee submitted their consultation results to the Nuclear Safety Commission for the final approval by the Minister of MOST. The license was issued in November 2000. With the consent of the Korean government to the US Record of Decision, the spent fuel of KRR-1 and 2 was safely transported to the United States in July 1998. The decontamination and dismantling of KRR-2 was completed at the end of 2005 but the decommissioning of KRR-1 has been suspended by the problem for the memorial of the reactor. After the decommissioning of the research reactor is finished, the site will be returned to the site owner, Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO). In this paper, the state-of-art and lessons learnt from recent regulatory activities for decommissioning of KRR- 2 are summarized. In conclusion: since the shutdown of KRR-1 and 2 had been decided, the safe assessment and licensing review were carried out after applying for decommissioning plan of those research reactors by operator. Through the safety assessment and license review, the plan was approved in 2000. The D and D of KRR-2 except Reactor hall of KRR-1 has been performed safely and completed in 2005. On the other hand the integrated safety for the decommissioning has been confirmed by regulatory team inspection. The radioactive waste arising from the dismantling work has been packed mainly in a 4 m{sup 3} containers and stored on site, reactor hall of KRR-2, until the LILW disposal facility is operational. For the whole dismantling work, with respect to the ALARA principle, not only worker protection from radiation and industrial hazard, but also the environment protection should be the first priority. Also much attention has been paid to the record keeping for the future decommissioning of nuclear power plants.

CHOI, Kyung-Woo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, P.O Box 114, Yuseong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming, Casper, Wyoming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the preliminary environmental findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming (NPOSR-CUW) conducted June 6 through 17, 1988. NPOSR consists of the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) in Wyoming, the Naval Oil Shale Reserves No. 1 and 3 (NOSR-1 and NOSR-3) in Colorado and the Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 2 (NOSR-2) in Utah. NOSR-2 was not included in the Survey because it had not been actively exploited at the time of the on-site Survey. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, lead and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team specialists are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with NPOSR. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at NPOSR and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team has developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing specific environmental problems identified at NOSR-3 during the on-site Survey. There were no findings associated with either NPR-3 or NOSR-1 that required Survey-related sampling and Analysis. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Summary report. The Summary Report will reflect the final determinations of the NPOSR-CUW Survey and the other DOE site-specific Surveys. 110 refs., 38 figs., 24 tabs.

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Report to the President on agreements and programs relating to the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy monitors commercial natural gas production activities along the boundaries of Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 1 and Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 3, which are located in Garfield County, Colorado, and were created in the early part of this century to provide a future source of shale oil for the military. In response to the private sector`s drilling of natural gas wells along the south and southwest boundaries of the Reserves, which began in the early 1980`s, the Department developed a Natural Gas Protection Program to protect the Government`s resources from drainage due to the increasing number of commercial gas wells contiguous to Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 3. This report provides an update of the Gas Protection Program being implemented and the agreements that have been placed in effect since December 19, 1991, and also includes the one communitized well containing Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 lands. The Protection Program employs two methods to protect the Government`s resources: (1) sharing with the private sector in the costs and production of wells by entering into ``communitization`` agreements; and (2) drilling wholly-owned Government wells to ``offset`` commercial wells that threaten to drain natural gas from the Reserves. The methods designed to protect the Government`s resources are achieving their objective of abating gas drainage and migration. As a result of the Protection Program, the Department of Energy is able to produce natural gas and either sell its share on the open market or transfer it for use at Government facilities. The Natural Gas Protection Program is a reactive, ongoing program that is continually revised as natural gas transportation constraints, market conditions, and nearby commercial production activities change.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z