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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decibel dba a-weighted" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Microsoft Word - NEPA18_Final.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

River Exhibition of History, Science and Technology CRITFC Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission CWA Clean Water Act dB Decibels dBA A-weighted sound level DCG Derived...

2

ORNL: Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates (Agreement...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates (Agreement ID:23278) 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

3

ORNL: Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates (Agreement...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates H. -T. Lin, A. A. Wereszczak, and S. Waters Oak Ridge National Laboratory This presentation does not contain any proprietary,...

4

Denton County Electric Cooperative d/b/a CoServ Electric Smart...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Denton County Electric Cooperative dba CoServ Electric Smart Grid Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead Denton County Electric Cooperative dba CoServ Electric...

5

Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates H. -T. Lin, A. A. Wereszczak, M. L. Santella, and G. Muralidharan Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) This presentation does not...

6

SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR LNG DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, LLC (D/B/A Oregon...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

LNG DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, LLC (DBA Oregon LNG) - FE DKT. NO. 12-48-LNG - ORDER 3100 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR LNG DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, LLC (DBA Oregon LNG) - FE DKT. NO. 12-48-LNG...

7

DBA-VM: Dynamic Bandwidth Allocator for Virtual Machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DBA-VM: Dynamic Bandwidth Allocator for Virtual Machines Ahmed Amamou, Manel Bourguiba, Kamel for Virtual Machines with regard to the established SLAs. The proposed scheme enforces the isolation between the virtual machines through the transmission bandwidth adjustment at the network I/O channel

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

8

Ultra Soy of America DBA USA Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformation UC 19-6-401 et seq. -Udhaya Energyfor Low CarbonAmerica DBA USA

9

Legal Business Name and DBA Name (as applicable) Permanent Business Address (number & street or P.O. Box) (Required)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Legal Business Name and DBA Name (as applicable) Permanent Business Address (number & street or P) Permanent Remittance (Address (if different from Business Address) (Required) City, State and Zip code Email, Santa Cruz Payee Setup Request (204) Required in lieu of IRS W-9 when doing business with the State

California at Santa Cruz, University of

10

AR Ins. Lic. #245544 CA Ins. Lic. #0633005 d/b/a in CA Seabury & Smith Insurance Program Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AR Ins. Lic. #245544 · CA Ins. Lic. #0633005 d/b/a in CA Seabury & Smith Insurance Program Management 68186A (8/13) ©Seabury & Smith, Inc. 2013 · 877-249-7868 Healthcare reform is in full Marsh U.S. Consumer, a service of Seabury & Smith, Inc. at 877-249-7868 for more information. #12;

Miami, University of

11

Data:Ec9d1804-3594-46e8-a661-7b5dba04c4b3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744b55997c1cc No revisionEc01d6d9-0b5c-46e0-8010-da811753d74a Nob5dba04c4b3 No revision has been approved for

12

Data:0fe694fe-a8c0-4d81-80f7-720c8ec90dba | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision has been approved for this page. It is

13

Data:940086a8-3d2a-4138-b8db-b873bfc67dba | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 No revisione0a2d50bdf35248292f1 No revisionedead8-4241-4b53-933a-90a289b19506 Nob873bfc67dba No

14

Data:D51bf497-5b5e-47d4-bdde-ab5fc8dba8d4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744 No revision has been approved97069579d6 No revisionbac-26b2-4414-8796-ae81e3d25fea No1-84362f0309a2fc8dba8d4

15

LEGAL BUSINESS NAME AND DBA NAME (as applicable) PERSON OR SOLE PROPRIETOR -ENTER FULL NAME HERE (Last, First) (REQUIRED) PERMANENT BUSINESS Address-(number & Street or P.O. Box) (REQUIRED) PERMANENT REMITTANCE Address (if different from Business Address)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LEGAL BUSINESS NAME AND DBA NAME (as applicable) PERSON OR SOLE PROPRIETOR -ENTER FULL NAME HERE (Last, First) (REQUIRED) PERMANENT BUSINESS Address- (number & Street or P.O. Box) (REQUIRED) PERMANENT REMITTANCE Address (if different from Business Address) (OPTIONAL) CAMPUS MAIL STOP (Complete ONLY after

California at Santa Cruz, University of

16

QwMaxSat: A Weighted Partial MaxSAT Solver  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12; Koshimura, M., Zhang, T., Fujita, H., & Hasegawa, R. (2012). QMaxSAT: A Partial Max-SAT SolverQwMaxSat: A Weighted Partial MaxSAT Solver 2013725 C304 ERATO #12;Problem Solving with MaxSAT 2 Original Problem MaxSAT Problem MaxSAT Model Max

Banbara, Mutsunori

17

MUSIC GENRE CLASSIFICATION USING NOVEL FEATURES AND A WEIGHTED VOTING Dalwon Jang, Minho Jin, and Chang D. Yoo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MUSIC GENRE CLASSIFICATION USING NOVEL FEATURES AND A WEIGHTED VOTING METHOD Dalwon Jang, Minho Jin classification system based on two novel features and a weighted voting method. The proposed features, modulation classification system. 1. INTRODUCTION With the recent proliferation of digital music, there is increas- ing

Yoo, Chang D.

18

Characterizing system dynamics with a weighted and directed network constructed from time series data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we propose a novel method to transform a time series into a weighted and directed network. For a given time series, we first generate a set of segments via a sliding window, and then use a doubly symbolic scheme to characterize every windowed segment by combining absolute amplitude information with an ordinal pattern characterization. Based on this construction, a network can be directly constructed from the given time series: segments corresponding to different symbol-pairs are mapped to network nodes and the temporal succession between nodes is represented by directed links. With this conversion, dynamics underlying the time series has been encoded into the network structure. We illustrate the potential of our networks with a well-studied dynamical model as a benchmark example. Results show that network measures for characterizing global properties can detect the dynamical transitions in the underlying system. Moreover, we employ a random walk algorithm to sample loops in our networks, and find that time series with different dynamics exhibits distinct cycle structure. That is, the relative prevalence of loops with different lengths can be used to identify the underlying dynamics.

Sun, Xiaoran, E-mail: sxr0806@gmail.com [Shenzhen Graduate School, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen 518055 (China) [Shenzhen Graduate School, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen 518055 (China); School of Mathematics and Statistics, The University of Western Australia, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia); Small, Michael, E-mail: michael.small@uwa.edu.au [School of Mathematics and Statistics, The University of Western Australia, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia)] [School of Mathematics and Statistics, The University of Western Australia, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia); Zhao, Yi [Shenzhen Graduate School, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen 518055 (China)] [Shenzhen Graduate School, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Xue, Xiaoping [Department of Mathematics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150025 (China)] [Department of Mathematics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150025 (China)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

Lithuanian Mathematical Journal, Vol. 44, No. 1, 2004 A WEIGHTED GOODNESS-OF-FIT TEST FOR GARCH(1, 1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lithuanian Mathematical Journal, Vol. 44, No. 1, 2004 A WEIGHTED GOODNESS-OF-FIT TEST FOR GARCH(1 that the observations follow a GARCH(1, 1) model. We study the asymptotic distribution of the statistics of the form Qn lead to and provide a rigorous justification for Portmanteau goodness-of-fit tests for GARCH(1, 1

Kokoszka, Piotr

20

An evaluation of a weight-lifting belt and back injury prevention training class for fleet service clerks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 3142 NS 0. 0323 0. 8390 NS 0. 1181 NS 0. 1606 NS 0. 4043 NS 0. 0703 NS ' Significant at pc0. 05. NS Non-Significant at pe0. 05 8: Belt Group 8&T: Belt & Training Group L: Line(inside/Outside Aircraft) BR: Bagroom C: Cabin Service M...AN EVALUATION OF A WEIGHT-LIFTING BELT AND BACK INJURY PREVENTION TRAINING CLASS FOR FLEET SERVICE CLERKS A Thesis by CHERYL RENEE REDDELL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Reddell, Cheryl Renee?

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decibel dba a-weighted" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Vision Industries dba Vision Motor Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformation UCOpenVerona,HamptonVinland,InformationVirydFL LLC Jump

22

Deema A. Al-Saleh ORACLE Developer & DBA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project: Educational Program for intermediate kids school / web-based on 3D using VRML and HTML. Petra Salaries. Registration. QA. Documentation. Online Exams. Inventory. Others. #12;2/3 3/2006 ­ 2008- Report Manager Module. Implementation of the INTEGRA ERP system. Responsible of the quality assurance

23

Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10IO1OP001Long-Term StorageDepartmentSystem forTextileManaged

24

Magnetic Resonance Imaging Indicates Decreased Choroidal and Retinal Blood Flow in the DBA/2J Mouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

proteins: tyrosinase-related protein 1 (Tyrp1), which causes iris stromal atrophy,6 and glycoprotein

Duong, Timothy Q.

25

SEMI-ANNUAL REPORT FOR LNG DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, LLC (d/b/a OREGON LNG -  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromCommentsRevolving Loan Funds Revolving2SECRETARYSEMI-ANNUALNFTA*)

26

SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR LNG DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, LLC (D/B/A Oregon LNG) -  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromCommentsRevolving Loan FundsDepartment ofNO. 3600ORDER 3412 |FE

27

SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR WALLER LNG SERVICES, LLC D/B/A WALLER POINT LNG -  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromCommentsRevolving Loan FundsDepartment ofNO.FE DKT. NO. 12-152-LNG

28

Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10IO1OP001Long-Term StorageDepartmentSystem

29

ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights,Information OfOpenALDACOR INC Jump to:Information

30

Denton County Electric Cooperative d/b/a CoServ Electric Smart Grid Project  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (The following text09-0018-CXBasin JumpTexasProgramme

31

Chapeau Inc dba BluePoint Energy Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:Energy Information on PV2009 |Chamblee, Georgia:OpenChannelview,Chapeau Inc

32

ORNL: Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates (Agreement ID:23278)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLC Order No. EA-178-A1ORAU South0/120 FUNGIBLE AND251|

33

Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health andofIanJenniferLeslieEnergy LoanOfficialLow-Cost Direct Bonded

34

Tradespace exploration for space system architectures : a weighted graph framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many systems undergo significant architecture-level change during their lifecycles as a result of exogenous system disturbances (e.g. budget reduction or changes in stakeholder requirements), failure to develop critical ...

Davison, Peter Leslie

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Identification of limiting case between DBA and SBDBA (CL break area sensitivity): A new model for the boron injection system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atucha-2 is a Siemens-designed PHWR reactor under construction in the Republic of Argentina. Its geometrical complexity and (e.g., oblique Control Rods, Positive Void coefficient) required a developed and validated complex three dimensional (3D) neutron kinetics (NK) coupled thermal hydraulic (TH) model. Reactor shut-down is obtained by oblique CRs and, during accidental conditions, by an emergency shut-down system (JDJ) injecting a highly concentrated boron solution (boron clouds) in the moderator tank, the boron clouds reconstruction is obtained using a CFD (CFX) code calculation. A complete LBLOCA calculation implies the application of the RELAP5-3D{sup C} system code. Within the framework of the third Agreement 'NA-SA - Univ. of Pisa' a new RELAP5-3D control system for the boron injection system was developed and implemented in the validated coupled RELAP5-3D/NESTLE model of the Atucha 2 NPP. The aim of this activity is to find out the limiting case (maximum break area size) for the Peak Cladding Temperature for LOCAs under fixed boundary conditions. (authors)

Gonzalez Gonzalez, R.; Petruzzi, A.; D'Auria, F. [San Piero A Grado Nuclear Research Group GRNSPG, Univ. of Pisa, Via Livornese 1291-56122, San Piero a Grado - Pisa (Italy); Mazzantini, O. [Nucleo-electrica Argentina Sociedad Anonima (NA-SA), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Transient simulation of feedwater vaporization during a DBA LOP/LOCA using RELAP5/MOD3.1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current design and testing requirements for the feedwater check valves (FWCVs) at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station (GGNS) are established from original licensing requirements that necessitate extremely restrictive air testing with tight allowable leakage limits. As a direct result of these requirements, the original high endurance hard seats in the FWCVs were modified with elastomeric seals to provide a sealing surface capable of meeting the stringent air leakage limits. However, due to the relatively short functional life of the elastomeric seals compared to the hard seats, the overall reliability of the sealing function actually decreased. The original design and testing requirements were based on limited analysis and the belief that all of the high energy feedwater vaporized during the LOCA blowdown. These phenomena would have resulted in completely voided feedwater lines and thus a steam environment within the feedwater leak pathway. Given this condition, the appropriate testing criteria would be based on air with a relatively tight allowable limit. To challenge these criteria, a comprehensive design basis accident analysis was developed using the RELAP5/MOD3.1 thermal-hydraulic code. Realistic assumptions were used to more accurately model the post-accident fluid conditions within the feedwater system. The results of this analysis demonstrated that no leakage flow exists from the reactor vessel to the condenser through the feedwater piping during the reactor vessel blowdown phase. The analysis results also established more accurate allowable leakage limits, determined the real effective margins associated with the FWCV safety functions, and led to design changes that improved the overall functional performance of the valves.

Harrell, J.R. [ENERCON Services, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States); Fuller, R.W. [Entergy Operations, Inc., Port Gibson, MS (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Data:67639909-6467-41c1-a2fc-8dba36d02da5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 No revision has been approvedea02758d3 No revision has1574de6f No revision has been approved

38

Data:Acb01105-cdda-4a21-ad72-e9d5041dba80 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onb5-dcc1fcffd1f2 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currentlya4ce1d3e29b7 No

39

Data:Dbe9dba8-a636-4a26-8108-fbeaeb06285c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744 No revisionDbdad3b1-04dc-40cd-843e-921faaade910 No revision has been approved for this page.

40

Data:7dba46ce-0497-4366-aca3-a501a1aaacd9 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 No revision has6a0216321b Nof667a9d7d88cc1e8c1443c Nod-5000bbb042b0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decibel dba a-weighted" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Data:3dba3487-6b69-4f18-aeff-52765963d902 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3a87dcc95b No revision has been approved64ec514 No revision has been approved for this page. It

42

Data:3fbb07ae-6dba-4cc1-a8f8-633247684142 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3a87dcc95b No revision has beend26-1acc36863a1d No revision

43

Data:F61dba3c-bede-490b-9a89-f21eaf866c65 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has been approved for this page. It6d-bcfb5222116ea91d395f7fdfa673aa1f4743 No revision has-f21eaf866c65

44

Data:65c87f52-3325-4d8d-ba4d-2b958cf0ccce | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 No revision has been approved fore6e8eee4495-afb210887c9bf3ac6ed3cc6 No revision has been

45

Data:72053874-37f3-4221-b92d-ba7f30301a4b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 No revision has6a0216321b No revision has been approved for this779a9a2a3278 No revisionf30301a4b No

46

Data:72a72d79-0a4e-47da-91df-de1dba2c60e4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 No revision has6a0216321b No revision has been approved for-e7599dcd5a17 No

47

Data:1e1dba06-f5bd-4860-b42a-dd3781dd577e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision5af6d400c2d No revisionb-80ce915ef62f No revision has

48

Data:1fb894cb-3e2c-4dba-8e17-dd8dd9321d94 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision5af6d400c2d No529a57c00c0 No revision has75f38de27d No revision has7-dd8dd9321d94 No

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Data:2423970d-0a59-409a-afa9-a5dba3e52437 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision5af6d400c2d4-4797-b850-d42be48a30cf No revisionf-e4d20400b3b9687d635a8 No08b0e5ee6

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Data:25345c67-a9d6-430d-ba28-a86c7e1a8ffe | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 Noc7e1a8ffe No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our

51

Data:B5195ae6-0a70-4928-b065-dbcb0cfb2dba | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onb5-dcc1fcffd1f2 No revision has38865d08 No revision has-4ae2-aa45-110457d20bf58328-b55aab9a4cae No revision

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Data:B9d1e634-097c-4dba-9491-2cf368c35db3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onb5-dcc1fcffd1f2 No revision has38865d08d442d74d244 No revision has been approved for1-2cf368c35db3 No revision has been

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Data:Bbcced56-2662-4ed0-9dba-bed39e0ac1de | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onb5-dcc1fcffd1f2 No revision has38865d08d442d74d244d9f062625d8 No revision

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Data:Bee82d81-fae0-4d58-bd69-19c5dd6dba2e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onb5-dcc1fcffd1f2 NoBcfd1c1f-01b6-4a11-8667-d236d8565086 Nobdddf01a916dBed43de6-1013-4ad2-b40b-68cf5a45e541

55

Data:5d4a5055-afa4-489d-ba47-148a272d1ca1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 No revision has been approved for this page. It iscc-a07d-594e07a9584d-0db16d26ab38 Nofafbd53e7d

56

Data:5deae483-2d09-4dba-a2a9-aec39f1eaaf5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 No revision has been approved for this page. It1f847bdc66 Nob886-32235ca9aa51 No

57

Data:07ebea2b-96a0-4c1d-ba40-44aa6205e84a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable Solutions6ae4e73fc Nof7e0a4fb No2aeb24eac2eb No revisionb0-2803da709495

58

Data:47dba9df-429b-4171-8a20-aae2ebcd6de3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3a87dcc95b No revisione66e17fc7f7 Nofa3d068c3333 No revision has been approvedcdad542

59

Data:4b818dba-a1cd-41e8-8f1b-36b2c342bc83 | Open Energy Information  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3a87dcc95b No revisione66e17fc7f7d25b394 Noc98dd29320 No revision

60

Data:0f2b061d-ba46-4f58-9cb3-3bbe865f08bd | Open Energy Information  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for thise2856597771 No revision has beenb15006a4573bbe865f08bd No

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decibel dba a-weighted" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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61

Data:A53eaad1-da7d-489d-ba10-8e45c193259b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 Nod2db5b31cb44 Noddefe0-db39-48c0-ac98-7941b3451e3c No revision

62

Data:A60c81d4-dba7-4901-b1fe-f79ec6bda696 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 Nod2db5b31cb44 Noddefe0-db39-48c0-ac98-7941b3451e3cf8e56363f No revision has been

63

Data:Ae57551c-d8f2-49db-a1bc-95834949f8fa | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onb5-dcc1fcffd1f2 No revision has beenb2f1-0963489fea4e No revision has been approved for this page. It is4361d2a00

64

Data:8c31dba9-331f-4d72-8d9b-7d63193fb4e8 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 No revisione0a2d50bdf No18fed1db5 No30e696c No revision has been approved for thisb-7d63193fb4e8 No

65

Data:96f2913f-8ba7-421f-bd96-dba51f832143 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 No revisione0a2d50bdf35248292f1 No789501c8a3b5d3f-8637-e4b2dd7a9399 No revision has

66

Data:Ceba555d-ba45-42d0-99bf-2e2d19c6f55f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onb5-dcc1fcffd1f2bb71-d4159a938742e80b26cc4 Nodbb-44ce-80f8-79eb97a58f0aCeb670fe-3e5d-4c0b-84ba-05d4a2664868

67

Data:Dba28942-ea1c-4fe9-80da-06e91bfb5489 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744 No revision hasDafcf4ac-ca67-414f-9d31-84001343bbeb No revision hasff-e7bca1230a59-8d56-516dc5d87ae8

68

Data:Dba74d36-87bb-4a6d-a55b-67d341da9431 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744 No revision hasDafcf4ac-ca67-414f-9d31-84001343bbeb No revision

69

Data:Dcabad47-7dba-4cc5-8ac4-5e15a5621f44 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744 No revisionDbdad3b1-04dc-40cd-843e-921faaade910 No revisionb82a5cccd0d8 Noa-20d238a5f2f8 No revision

70

Data:E15b0aed-d18c-4682-844e-0361894b3dba | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744b55997c1cc No revision has been approved for thisc4d368cd00 No revision has been approved for this

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Data:E269f569-335e-49db-a972-ed615f31eefb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744b55997c1cc No revision has been approved for thisc4d368cd00 No7f16e656 Nobaf48d7fc15f31eefb No revision has

72

Data:E5551d6d-0dba-4262-9a7c-4504d80c5ea2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744b55997c1cc No revision has been approved for-1837723ccd6b No3f21d72298d8ae87cdeebe41-4428970b11a84504d80c5ea2

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Data:7905f3d8-b1ce-4f4d-ba10-7dd0110efd93 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 No revision has6a0216321b Nof667a9d7d88 No revision has929d8dd1bb No revision has been

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Data:84dba7e1-9c77-49a0-9137-9c7b9f9bf573 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 No revisione0a2d50bdf No revisionb27d098e No revision has been9f55a0b5 Noce9c5bba5f40 No

75

Data:876e7eb5-f642-48bb-a55c-302dd46dba5d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 No revisione0a2d50bdf No revisionb27d098e Nod173ef850e7b37914bbdf Noc-54044054ab55 No

76

Data:8ab23eb9-edba-4c3d-ba5c-c9527258ef1f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 No revisione0a2d50bdf No18fed1db5 No revision has been approved forbfe2db6d86

77

Data:37e3c29a-54a7-4f47-bd70-d81020dba005 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 Noc7e1a8ffef-15f046e6d97e No revision has been approvedf-a75290ac3f46 No

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Data:3f66dba2-4d5c-4340-88a9-eee287a12674 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3a87dcc95b No revision has beend26-1acc36863a1d No revision has been approved for this

79

Data:40dba58b-1f3f-472b-b66a-83c80683b2e7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3a87dcc95b No revision has beend26-1acc36863a1df4498 No revision has been approved for

80

Fiber optic inclination detector system having a weighted sphere with reference points  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fiber optic inclination detector system for determining the angular displacement of an object from a reference surface includes a simple mechanical transducer which requires a minimum number of parts and no electrical components. The system employs a single light beam which is split into two light beams and provided to the transducer. Each light beam is amplitude modulated upon reflecting off the transducer to detect inclination. The power values associated with each of the reflected light beams are converted by a pair of photodetectors into voltage signals, and a microprocessor manipulates the voltage signals to provide a measure of the angular displacement between the object and the reference surface.

Cwalinski, Jeffrey P. (Ballston Lake, NY)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decibel dba a-weighted" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A weighted ?{sub 1}-minimization approach for sparse polynomial chaos expansions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work proposes a method for sparse polynomial chaos (PC) approximation of high-dimensional stochastic functions based on non-adapted random sampling. We modify the standard ?{sub 1}-minimization algorithm, originally proposed in the context of compressive sampling, using a priori information about the decay of the PC coefficients, when available, and refer to the resulting algorithm as weighted?{sub 1}-minimization. We provide conditions under which we may guarantee recovery using this weighted scheme. Numerical tests are used to compare the weighted and non-weighted methods for the recovery of solutions to two differential equations with high-dimensional random inputs: a boundary value problem with a random elliptic operator and a 2-D thermally driven cavity flow with random boundary condition.

Peng, Ji [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Hampton, Jerrad [Aerospace Engineering Sciences Department, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Doostan, Alireza, E-mail: alireza.doostan@colorado.edu [Aerospace Engineering Sciences Department, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Moving Forward: A Weight Lossg g Intervention of African-American  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Poor diet, lack of regular physical activity and obesity contribute to breast cancer progressionobesity-binding protein (IGFBP-3) Contributes to chronic inflammation #12;Diet, Physical Activity and B t CBreast Cancer of insulin-like growth factors (IGF-1) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP 3)factor

Illinois at Chicago, University of

83

A Weighted Residual Framework for Formulation and Analysis of Direct Transcription Methods for Optimal Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. First condition in Eqn. (2.2) provides n number of equations which can theoretically solve for n number of unknown components of x . Next, we look at a constrained optimization problem in the form, min x J = (x) : Rn ! R; subject to (x) = 0 2 Rm... with inequality constraints as fol- lowing: min x J = (x) : Rn ! R; subject to (x) 0 2 Rm; m < n: (2.8) For this problem, we derive the conditions for optimality using slack variables and Lagrange multipliers. Slack variables are used to convert...

Singh, Baljeet

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

84

HAP FINS/BUDGET Janet Backe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HAP FINS/BUDGET Jay Black CIO Janet Backe Director Marie Rutledge Functional Lead Steven Freed and FINS/BUDGET Nick Oliver Technical (50%) A&T Vincent Wong DBA Ken Zhu DBA Luis Fernandes DBA PS Admin

85

INTERNATIONAL UNION OF OPERATING ENGINEERS NATIONAL HAZMAT PROGRAM - MILWAUKEE WORM DRIVE CIRCULAR SAW OENHP{number_sign}: 2001-02, VERSION A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Florida International University's (FIU) Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) evaluated five saws for their effectiveness in cutting specially prepared fiberglass-reinforced plywood crates. These crates were built as surrogates for crates that presently hold radioactively contaminated glove boxes at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Los Alamos facility. The Milwaukee worm drive circular saw was assessed on August 14, 2001. During the FIU test of efficacy, a team from the Operating Engineers National Hazmat Program (OENHP) evaluated the occupational safety and health issues associated with this technology. The Milwaukee worm drive circular saw is a hand-held tool with a 7 1/4-inch diameter circular blade for cutting wood. The saw contains a fixed upper and a retractable lower blade guard to prevent access to the blade during use. The unit is operated with an on/off guarded trigger switch; and is supported with a handgrip mounted on top of the saw. An adjustable lever sets the depth of cut. The retractable blade guard permits blind or plunge cuts and protects from blade access during shutdown and blade coast. Kickback, the sudden reaction to a pinched blade, is possible when using this saw and could cause the saw to lift up and out of the work piece toward the operator. Proper work position and firm control of the saw minimizes the potential for a sprain or strain. Care needs to be exercised to support the work piece properly and to not force the tool. Personal noise sampling indicated that one worker was near the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Action Level of 85 decibels (dBA) while the other was at the Action Level with time-weighted averages (TWA's) of 82.7 and 84.6 dBA, respectively. These data are not entirely representative as they were gathered during a simulation and not at the actual worksite. Additional sampling should be conducted on-site, but the workers should wear hearing protection until it is determined that it is no longer necessary. Air sampling was performed while the workers dismantled the fiberglass-reinforced crates. The total nuisance dust sample for the Milwaukee circular saw was 36.07 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m{sup 3}), which is much higher than the OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 15 mg/m{sup 3} and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV) of 10 mg/m{sup 3}. Galson Laboratories considered the fiber analysis void due to the overloading of the filter. The PEL for fiberglass is 1 fiber per cubic centimeter (f/cc).

Unknown

2002-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

86

RESEARCH AREA SPACE REGISTRATION USING HASP DATA ENTRY FORM Please fill in this form, using one form for each individual room.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

600 volts Other electrical hazards Equipment Autoclave Battery Charging Area Centrifuge Chainsaw Refrigerant containing equipment Sonicator Sources generating noise > 85 decibels Storage tank Welding

Pawlowski, Wojtek

87

INTERNATIONAL UNION OF OPERATING ENGINEERS NATIONAL HAZMAT PROGRAM - PORTER-CABLE CIRCULAR SAW OENHP: 2001-04, VERSION A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Florida International University's (FIU) Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) evaluated five saws for their effectiveness in cutting specially prepared fiberglass-reinforced plywood crates. These crates were built as surrogates for crates that presently hold radioactively contaminated glove boxes at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Los Alamos facility. The Porter-Cable circular saw was assessed on August 15-16, 2001 (Porter-Cable No.1 and Porter-Cable No.2, respectively). During the FIU test of efficacy, a team from the Operating Engineers National Hazmat Program (OENHP) evaluated the occupational safety and health issues associated with this technology. The Porter-Cable saw is a straightforward machine for cutting wood of varying thickness. The blade is fully guarded with a fixed upper and a lower retractable guard. The lower guard retracts as the blade engages the work piece. The unit is operated with an on/off guarded trigger switch and is supported with a handgrip mounted near the front of the saw. The saw is equipped with a directional nozzle, which aims sawdust away from the operator and the line of cut. An optional vacuum system, attached to the directional nozzle, is used to remove and collect dust. During the demonstration of Porter-Cable No.1, personal noise sampling indicated that one worker was under and one was at the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Action Level of 85 decibels (dBA) with time-weighted averages (TWA's) of 82.7 and 84.6 dBA, respectively. During the demonstration of Porter-Cable No.2, however, both workers did exceed the Action Level with TWA's of 89.7 and 90.0 dBA. These data are not entirely representative as they were gathered during a simulation and not at the actual worksite. Additional sampling should be conducted on-site, but the workers should wear hearing protection until it is determined that it is no longer necessary. The total nuisance dust sample for Porter-Cable No.1 was 3.53 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m{sup 3}), which is lower than the OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 15 mg/m{sup 3} and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV) of 10 mg/m{sup 3}. Porter-Cable No.2's nuisance dust results yielded a value of 22.05 mg/m{sup 3}, which is over the PEL and TLV. The fiber analysis for the first demonstration yielded 12.9 fibers per cubic centimeter (f/cc), which is much higher than the PEL of 1 f/cc. Galson Laboratories considered the fiber analysis for the second demonstration void due to the overloading of dust on the filter. Kickback, the sudden reaction to a pinched blade, is possible with this saw and could cause the saw to lift up and out of the work piece and toward the operator. Proper work position and firm control of the saw minimizes the potential for a sprain or strain. Care needs to be exercised to support the work piece properly and to not force the tool.

Unknown

2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

INTERNATIONAL UNION OF OPERATING ENGINEERS NATIONAL HAZMAT PROGRAM - EVOLUTION 180 CIRCULAR SAW OENHP: 2001-03, VERSION A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Florida International University's (FIU) Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) evaluated five saws for their effectiveness in cutting specially prepared fiberglass-reinforced plywood crates. These crates were built as surrogates for crates that presently hold radioactively contaminated gloveboxes at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Los Alamos facility. The Evolution 180 circular saw was assessed on August 14, 2001. During the FIU test of efficacy, a team from the Operating Engineers National Hazmat Program (OENHP) evaluated the occupational safety and health issues associated with this technology. The Evolution 180 is a portable, metal cutting circular saw with a 7-inch diameter blade. The blade is contained within the main housing and has a retractable lower blade guard to prevent operator access to the blade during operation and shutdown. The saw is equipped with a chip collector. The maximum cutting thickness for metal is one-quarter inch and can cut steel tubing and pipe 2 inches in diameter. The unit is operated with an on/off guarded trigger switch and is supported with the hand guide mounted to the side of the saw. An adjustable lever sets the depth of the cut. The machine's circuitry will automatically shut the saw motor off if excessive overload is detected during operation. The one-half hour demonstration involved vertical and horizontal cuts and blade changes. During this process, operators experienced binding of the saw. This caused the blade to become hot, causing the sawdust collected in the chip collector to smoke. Care should be exercised to use the appropriate blade for the application, operator training, and personal protective equipment (PPE). Personal noise sampling indicated that neither worker was over the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Action Level of 85 decibels (dBA) with time-weighted averages (TWA's) of 69.1 and 68.8 dBA. The personal noise sample taken during the special demonstration with the stainless steel plate had a TWA of 69.8 dBA. These data are not entirely representative as they were gathered during a simulation and not at the actual worksite. Additional sampling should be conducted on-site, but the workers should wear hearing protection until it is determined that it is no longer necessary. The total nuisance dust sample for the Evolution 180 circular saw was 3.5 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m{sup 3}), which is lower than the OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 15 mg/m{sup 3} and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV) of 10 mg/m{sup 3}. The fiber analysis yielded 1.74 fibers per cubic centimeter (f/cc), which is above the PEL of 1 f/cc. Although the nuisance dust levels were low, fiberglass dust levels were higher than the PEL. Since fiberglass dust is known to be a strong skin irritant and a possible human carcinogen, the workers should continue to wear appropriate suits and gloves, as well as a full-face air-purifying respirator. The respirator should be equipped with a combination organic vapor and acid gas cartridge in combination with a High Particulate Air (HEPA) filter, since particulate filter, since during the demonstration, the workers complained of an odd smell, which may have been from the breakdown of the fiberglass.

Unknown

2002-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

89

Experimental Studies of Ilmenite as a Weighting Material in Oil-based Drilling Fluids for HPHT Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ilmenite (FeTiO_(3)), with a mean particle size of 30 - 45 m, was first introduced into the oil industry as weighting material in 1976. However, its use was limited mainly because of its abrasiveness to drilling equipment. Recently, a superfine...

Xiao, Jie

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

90

A weighted reverse Cuthill-McKee procedure for finite element method algorithms to solve strongly anisotropic electrodynamic problems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a technique for improving the convergence rate of a generalized minimum residual (GMRES) algorithm applied for the solution of a algebraic system produced by the discretization of an electrodynamic problem with a tensorial electrical conductivity. The electrodynamic solver considered in this work is a part of a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code in the low magnetic Reynolds number approximation. The code has been developed for the analysis of MHD interaction during the re-entry phase of a space vehicle. This application is a promising technique intensively investigated for the shock mitigation and the vehicle control in the higher layers of a planetary atmosphere. The medium in the considered application is a low density plasma, characterized by a tensorial conductivity. This is a result of the behavior of the free electric charges, which tend to drift in a direction perpendicular both to the electric field and to the magnetic field. In the given approximation, the electrodynamics is described by an elliptical partial differential equation, which is solved by means of a finite element approach. The linear system obtained by discretizing the problem is solved by means of a GMRES iterative method with an incomplete LU factorization threshold preconditioning. The convergence of the solver appears to be strongly affected by the tensorial characteristic of the conductivity. In order to deal with this feature, the bandwidth reduction in the coefficient matrix is considered and a novel technique is proposed and discussed. First, the standard reverse Cuthill-McKee (RCM) procedure has been applied to the problem. Then a modification of the RCM procedure (the weighted RCM procedure, WRCM) has been developed. In the last approach, the reordering is performed taking into account the relation between the mesh geometry and the magnetic field direction. In order to investigate the effectiveness of the methods, two cases are considered. The RCM and WRCM procedures has successfully improved the convergence rate of the GMRES solver. For strong anisotropies, the WRCM procedure appears to have a higher convergence rate. The same behavior is shown when applying the methods to the rebuilding of an hypersonic MHD experiment.

Cristofolini, Andrea; Latini, Chiara; Borghi, Carlo A. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 2, 40136 Bologna (Italy)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

An assessment of the impact of a weight management program on adolescents' food choices and self-esteem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. No significant changes were noted in the control group after the 12-week period. Nutrient analysis of the Menu Selection Test showed that after the intervention subjects indicated lower intakes of energy, protein, carbohydrate, total fat, saturated fat... theaters, and concession stands at sporting events to make food choices. Convenience foods are another source of energy for adolescents. Nearly all of these food sources are high in total and saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium. Snacking between...

Kuhl, Kathleen Marie

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Comfort by Design: An Introduction to HVAC's Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comfort by Design An Introduction to HVACs Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) Technology Keith Reihl kreihl@hvac.mea.com ESL-KT-14-11-13 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 HVAC Market Overview 0% 27% 9% 5% 4... Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 How LOUD is a traditional HVAC unit? 33 dB(A) Library 50 dB(A) Refrigerator 60 dB(A) Conversation 78 dB(A) Vacuum 25 dB(A) Recording Studio 65-75 dB(A) Residential 3-ton HVAC Unit How Q IET are VRF...

Reihl,K.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Data:08aa6b78-5a0d-43db-a1c0-6cb913da07a5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable Solutions6ae4e73fc Nof7e0a4fbc9b253bedd No revisionc872f0ecb1ce6c9c9

94

Data:A62dfd7d-ba2a-4c2b-b58a-36e0242b7e43 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 Nod2db5b31cb44 Noddefe0-db39-48c0-ac98-7941b3451e3cf8e56363f No revision hasfe535dd99 No revision

95

Data:E5175eb4-3f7f-42db-a8e1-7eba5e5f7f09 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744b55997c1cc No revision has been approved for-1837723ccd6b No3f21d72298d8ae87cdee No

96

INTERNATIONAL UNION OF OPERATING ENGINEERS NATIONAL HAZMAT PROGRAM - DEWALT RECIPROCATING SAW OENHP{number_sign}: 2001-01, VERSION A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Florida International University's (FIU) Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) evaluated five saws for their effectiveness in cutting specially prepared fiberglass-reinforced plywood crates. These crates were built as surrogates for crates that presently hold radioactively contaminated glove boxes at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Los Alamos facility. The DeWalt reciprocating saw was assessed on August 13, 2001. During the FIU test of efficacy, a team from the Operating Engineers National Hazmat Program (OENHP) evaluated the occupational safety and health issues associated with this technology. The DeWalt reciprocating saw is a hand-held industrial tool used for cutting numerous materials, including wood and various types of metals depending upon the chosen blade. Its design allows for cutting close to floors, corners, and other difficult areas. An adjustable shoe sets the cut at three separate depths. During the demonstration for the dismantling of the fiberglass-reinforced plywood crate, the saw was used for extended continuous cutting, over a period of approximately two hours. The dismantling operation involved vertical and horizontal cuts, saw blade changes, and material handling. During this process, operators experienced vibration to the hand and arm in addition to a temperature rise on the handgrip. The blade of the saw is partially exposed during handling and fully exposed during blade changes. Administrative controls, such as duty time of the operators and the machine, operator training, and personal protective equipment (PPE), such as gloves, should be considered when using the saw in this application. Personal noise sampling indicated that both workers were exposed to noise levels exceeding the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Action Level of 85 decibels (dBA) with time-weighted averages (TWA's) of 88.3 and 90.6 dBA. Normally, a worker would be placed in a hearing conservation program if his TWA was greater than the Action Level. In this case, however, monitoring was conducted during a simulation, not during the actual work conducted at the worksite. Additional sampling should be conducted at the worksite to determine the actual noise levels for the workers. Until it is determined that the actual TWA's are less than the Action Level, the workers should use PPE. A training program on the proper use and wearing of the selected PPE should be provided to each worker. Nuisance dust monitoring yielded a concentration of 10.69 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m{sup 3}). Although this is less than the OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 15 mg/m{sup 3}, it is above the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV) of 10 mg/m{sup 3}. Fiberglass dust monitoring yielded a fiber count of 1.7 fibers per cubic centimeter (f/cc). This is above the PEL and the TLV of 1.0 f/cc. Therefore, controls should be implemented (engineering or PPE) to reduce the workers' exposure to the dust. Respirators should be used if engineering controls do not sufficiently control the dust or fiberglass generated. Respirators should be equipped with an organic vapor and acid gas cartridge with a High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter, since during the demonstration, the workers complained of an odd smell, which may have been from the breakdown of the fiberglass.

Unknown

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

OMB Approval: 1205-0508 Expiration Date: 03/31/2016  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

No 3. Is the employer requesting consideration of Davis-Bacon (DBA) or McNamara Service Contract (SCA

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

98

USACE Defense Base Act Insurance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.305) BUILDING STRONG®3 #12;Which Contracts Require DBA Insurance?q All construction and service contract

US Army Corps of Engineers

99

Development of a weighted-average estimator from a maximum-likelihood estimator and an instrumental-variable estimator in a structural model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, is written as mx y Ab Sou 1hl zz mx x ? Ab?' S?? (3. 2) and we will now spend some time explaining its form. Write a = (1, ? P&) and assume an independent estimator of Z, S?, is avail- able. Fuller (1981) shows that maximizing the likelihood equations... ? z, + u? t = 1, 2, . . . , a?s' = 1, 2, 3, . . . , b? (2. 1c) The total number of observations, n, is equal to a?b?. The experimenter has available an instrumental variable for the unobservable ze =&a+sr&W, +re, t=1, 2, . . . , a?. (2. 1d...

Gruben, David Christopher

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Nordyne: Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-01/0210) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Nordyne, LLC dba Garrison Heating and Cooling Products failed to certify various residential central air conditioners and central air...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decibel dba a-weighted" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

FY 2014 Projects for Improving the Design, Construction, and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Gas Technology dba Gas Technology Institute (Des Plaines, Ill.) - Simultaneous Waste Heat and Water Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gases for Advanced Energy Systems. The...

102

CX-011736: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Inc. dba Valparaiso University - Solar Thermal Electrolytic Production of Magnesium from Magnesium Oxide CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11212013 Location(s): Indiana...

103

A DESK GUIDE TO THE DAVIS-BACON ACT  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for Contractors on Federal Contracts and DBA-Covered Federally Financed or Assisted Construction Projects Introduction. The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Desk...

104

Mechanistic studies on palladium-catalyzed carbon-nitrogen bond forming reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Precatalyst species present in a solution of Pd?(dba)? and Xantphos were identified as Pd(Xantphos)(dba) and Pd(Xantphos)? by use of p NMR and independent syntheses. Pd(Xantphos)? was found to form at high ligand ...

Klingensmith, Liane M. (Liane May)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

RESEARCH AREA SPACE REGISTRATION USING HASP DATA ENTRY FORM Please fill in this form, using one form for each individual room.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Storage Aggregate storage of any one chemical > 5 gal or > 40 lb Chemical Storage Cabinet Battery Charging Area Centrifuge Chainsaw Drains Equipment ­ Etching (like the water jet system) Equipment > 85 decibels Storage tank Welding #12;2 Hazard Sources Specific Hazard Sources Present Risk Level

Manning, Sturt

106

Acoustic Analysis of R.E.E.L. Semi-Reveberant Sound Chamber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institute ASHRAE The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers ANSI American National Standards Institute dB Decibel Lp Sound Pressure Level (dB) Lw Sound Power Level (dB) BKG Background Noise TL Sound... PROCEDURE .......................................................................16 H.V.I. Standard ....................................................................................................................18 SONE Calculation...

Elliston, Sean David

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

107

IEEETRANSACTIONS ON SONICS AND ULTRASONICS,VOL. SU-30, NO. 4, JULY 1983 231 ln Vivo Measurement of Thickness or of Speed of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and for in vivo thickness measurement of the mitral valve andin viiro measurementof the aorticand tricuspid valves, many othertissues of interest which also canbe thinner than the range resolution length suchas valves. The reflection coefficient R and the transmission coefficient T,expressed in decibels, for the ex- tended media

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

108

Presenters: Peter Wasko, Mn/DOT Metro District  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

levels are used to measure the intensity of sounds and are described in terms of decibels. #12;4 Common two important purposes: 1. gives a single number measure of noise level by integrating sound levels Highway Administration (FHWA) · The FHWA does not have actual noise standards, but has guidelines of an L

Minnesota, University of

109

CNA: Compromise Agreement (2013-SE-1430)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE and CNA International, Inc., d/b/a MC Appliance Corp. entered into a Compromise Agreement to resolve a case involving the distribution in commerce of noncompliant freezers.

110

Special Contract Requirements Enclosure 2 INSTRUCTIONS TO CONTRACTING OFFICERS: The Special Contract Requirement "Workers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Special Contract Requirements Enclosure 2 INSTRUCTIONS TO CONTRACTING OFFICERS: The Special Contract Requirement "Workers Compensation Insurance (Defense Base Act) (APRIL 2011)" shall be included in the contract as applicable. Whenever Defense Base Act (DBA) insurance is required under the contract

US Army Corps of Engineers

111

Advancing Analytical Methods for Characterization of Anionic Carbohydrate Biopolymers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

here a heparin disaccharide), IPR and C18 stationary phase;of a C18 column with the IPR which separates analytes via anseparation of tinzaparin where IPR used in A) TrBA, B) DBA,

Langeslay, Derek Joseph

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Intramolecular Heck couplings of unactivated alkyl electrophiles : synthetic and mechanistic studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method for the palladium-catalyzed intramolecular Heck coupling of unactivated alkyl bromides and chlorides is described. The optimal catalyst system was composed of Pd2(MeO-dba)3 as the metal source and N-heterocyclic ...

Firmansjah, Luke

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

E-Print Network 3.0 - aircraft noise annoyance Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a gentle breeze... at 350m 35-45 dBA American Wind Energy Association - Tom Gray "Wind turbine noise (at 200 m) is as loud Source: Salt, Alec N. - Department of Otolaryngology,...

114

Northland: Order (2014-CE-23002)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE ordered Northland Corporation d/b/a AGA Marvel to pay a $16,000 civil penalty after finding Northland had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

115

Introduction: Administration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In a heavily loaded system, the DBA will forbid that ad­hoc queries are entered during standard working hours per min). ``Load profile'': List of DB commands with frequencies. Of course, the queries

Brass, Stefan

116

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spent water used in producing biodiesel. Biodiesel production within California is anticipated FOR REDUCING BIODIESEL FACILITY WATER CONSUMPTION AND WASTEWATER DISCHARGE JULY 2013 CEC5002013018 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: American Biodiesel, Inc. dba Community Fuels

117

Matthews Fan: Proposed Penalty (2014-CE-32012)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Matthews-Gerbar, Ltd. d/b/a Matthews Fan Company failed to certify a variety of ceiling fans as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

118

Quasi-Ohmic Single Molecule Charge Transport through Highly Conjugated meso-to-meso Ethyne-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

obtained from Sigma-Aldrich. The Au(111) electrode used for preparing the molecule- modified substrates. Pd(PPh3)4 Pd(PPh3)2Cl2, tris(dibenzylideneacetone)dipalladium(0) (Pd2dba3), triphenylarsine (AsPh3) Pd(PPh3)4 , THF/DIEA, 35-40 C; (ii) Pd2dba3, P(o-tol)3, THF/Et3N, 60 C; (iii) TBAF, THF, 0 C; (iv

Borguet, Eric

119

An analysis of the data collection modes of a digital weather radar system with respect to significant severe weather features  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS. Conclusions Recommendations Page 109 109 111 REFERENCES. APPENDIX A. APPENDIX B. 113 115 131 143 viii LIST OF TABLES Table Page WSR/TAM-2 Weather Radar Technical Characteristics. . . 20 Antenna Scan Rates (rpm... reduction techniques can be applied. The usual pracr. ice is to measure the returned power in terms of decibels with respect to a standard reference power level, normally 1 mw. Power levels are then expressed in units of dBm, either above (+) or below...

Neyland, Michael Arthur

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Analytic description of dipole-bound anion photodetachment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analytical model for a dipole-bound anion (DBA) is proposed based on the exactly solvable three-dimensional Schroedinger equation for the excess electron bound by dipole potential of the parent neutral molecule (NM) in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The model gives reasonable analytical approximation for the dependence of the DBA binding energy on the NM dipole moment previously found numerically by many authors. The cross section of one-photon photodetachment of DBA is calculated in explicit analytical form. In the limit of high photon frequency, {omega}, the calculated cross-section displays {approx}{omega}{sup -2} behavior, which agrees perfectly with the experimental data [Bailey et al., J. Chem. Phys 104, 6976 (1996)]. At the threshold, the cross section demonstrates Gailitis-Damburg oscillations. Numerical dependence is provided for the maximal value of the cross section as a function of the NM dipole moment and the binding energy of the excess electron.

Chernov, V. E.; Dolgikh, A. V.; Zon, B. A. [Voronezh State University, 1 University Sq., Voronezh, 394006 (Russian Federation)

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decibel dba a-weighted" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Quantum Clock Synchronization with a Single Qudit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clock synchronization for nonfaulty processes in multiprocess networks is indispensable for a variety of technologies. A reliable system must be able to resynchronize the nonfaulty processes upon some components failing causing the distribution of incorrect or conflicting information in the network. The task of synchronizing such networks is related to detectable Byzantine agreement (DBA), which can classically be solved using recursive algorithms if and only if less than one-third of the processes are faulty. Here we introduce a nonrecursive quantum algorithm that solves the DBA and achieves clock synchronization in the presence of arbitrary many faulty processes by using only a single quantum system.

Armin Tavakoli; Adn Cabello; Marek ?ukowski; Mohamed Bourennane

2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

122

Immuno-Isolation of Pancreatic Islet Allografts Using Pegylated Nanotherapy Leads to Long-Term  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

if creation of ``stealth'' islets encapsulated within a thin cage of pegylated material of 100­200 nanometers of the created ``stealth'' DBA/2 (H-2d ) islets in vivo by comparing glycemic profiles across 4 groups, construction of ``stealth'' islets by pegylation-based nanotherapeutics not only supports islet structure

Fahmy, Tarek

123

Teddico: Noncompliance Determination (2012-SE-5409)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to The Electrical Design, Development and Implementation Company d/b/a Teddico finding that a variety of basic models of magnetic probe-start metal halide lamp fixtures do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

124

Project Sponsor Professor Peter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Sponsor Professor Peter McGearoge Project Director Nicki Matthew Audit / Quality Mazars Architect IT ServicesProcess Owners Build Team Lead Nicki Matthew Project Manager ­ Unit4 Joe Cairney Student Lifecycle Project Board InfrastructureDBA's TBC TBC TBC Process 1 Process 2 Project Sponsor ­ Unit

Levi, Ran

125

INSTRUCTIONS TO CONTRACTING OFFICERS: The Special Contract Requirement "Workers Compensation Insurance (Defense Base Act) Services (OCT 2008)"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INSTRUCTIONS TO CONTRACTING OFFICERS: The Special Contract Requirement "Workers Compensation Insurance (Defense Base Act) ­ Services (OCT 2008)" shall be included in the contract as applicable. Whenever Defense Base Act (DBA) insurance is required under the contract for services, the following

US Army Corps of Engineers

126

State Contracting and Procurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

State Contracting and Procurement Registration System (SCPRS) Illustrated User Manual #12;2 State Contracting and Procurement Registration System (SCPRS) Rev. 4/23/09 Copyright © 2008 RFP Depot, LLC dba Bid@bidsync.com Website: http://www.bidsync.com #12;3 State Contracting and Procurement Registration System (SCPRS) Rev. 4

127

Enclosure 3 INSTRUCTIONS TO CONTRACTING OFFICERS: The special contract requirement "Workers Compensation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10 Enclosure 3 INSTRUCTIONS TO CONTRACTING OFFICERS: The special contract requirement "Workers Compensation Insurance (Defense Base Act) (April 2011)" shall be included in the contract as applicable. Whenever Defense Base Act (DBA) insurance is required under the contract, the following special contract

US Army Corps of Engineers

128

Important reminders for block grant projects October 24, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Important reminders for block grant projects October 24, 2011 EECBG Grant Recipients-- Thank you of government may retain original weekly certified payrolls in accordance with DBA and submit copies@energy.state.ca.us. #12;Recipients that are not local units of government must submit the original signed weekly certified

129

DATE OCT 07 2011 RECD. OCT 07 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DATE OCT 07 2011 RECD. OCT 07 2011 DOCKET 11-CAI-03 BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION. Kane Attorney for ENERGY SAVING PROS, LLC., dba ENERGYPROS #12;BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION/5/2011)ENERGY COMMISSION STAFF COMPLAINANT RESPONDENT California Solar Systems 1411 Rusch Court California

130

A Bayesian Approach to Online Performance Modeling for Database Appliances using Gaussian Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

agreements (SLAs) and to maintain peak performance for database management systems (DBMS), database, and resource provisioning. Accurately predicting response times of DBMS queries is necessary for a DBA an efficient and highly ac- curate online DBMS performance model that is robust in the face of changing

Waterloo, University of

131

A Bayesian Approach to Online Performance Modeling for Database Appliances using Gaussian Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- tain peak performance for database management systems (DBMS), database administrators (DBAs) need. Accurately predicting response times of DBMS queries is necessary for a DBA to effectively achieve and highly accurate online DBMS performance model that is robust in the face of changing workloads, data

Aboulnaga, Ashraf

132

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Professor Presents Unique Theory of Evolution in New Book  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are formed during a short period of evolutionary plasticity in which the species can change its properties, Czech Republic. About BookSurge BookSurge Publishing is a DBA of On-Demand Publishing LLC, a subsidiary of Amazon.com Inc., (NASDAQ AMZN). BookSurge is a pioneer in self-publishing and print-on-demand services

Flegr, Jaroslav

133

Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 123,000 246,000 246,000 185,000 1,320 132,000 132 13,200 1,320 1,320 132  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 123,000 246,000 246,000 185,000 1,320 132,000 132 13,200 1,320 1 BAP BKF BBF IDP DBA Grid Sample Label DOSS Chemical Test 133-3638 38.00 .25 Chemical Test 133-3638

134

Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 32,700 65,300 65,300 49,000 350 35,000 35 3,500 350 350 35  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 32,700 65,300 65,300 49,000 350 35,000 35 3,500 350 350 35 BBF IDP DBA Grid Sample Label DOSS Chemical Test OR.1103.001.001.SJT01.NL2 .42 Chemical Test OR.1103.001.001.SJT01.NL

135

Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 32,700 65,300 65,300 49,000 350 35,000 35 3,500 350 350 35  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 32,700 65,300 65,300 49,000 350 35,000 35 3,500 350 350 35 BBF IDP DBA Grid Sample Label DOSS Chemical Test 133-3251 14.00 1.5 .59 Chemical Test 133-3251

136

Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 123,000 246,000 246,000 185,000 1,320 132,000 132 13,200 1,320 1,320 132  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 123,000 246,000 246,000 185,000 1,320 132,000 132 13,200 1,320 1 BAP BKF BBF IDP DBA Grid Sample Label DOSS Chemical Test 133-3385 3.80 .25 Chemical Test 133-3385

137

Chemical Analyses 123,000 246,000 246,000 185,000 1,320 132,000 132 13,200 1,320 1,320 132  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Analyses 123,000 246,000 246,000 185,000 1,320 132,000 132 13,200 1,320 1,320 132 BBF IDP DBA Grid Sample Label DOSS Chemical Test 133-3642 17.00 0.82 0.56 .78 Chemical Test 133-3642

138

Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 123,000 246,000 246,000 185,000 1,320 132,000 132 13,200 1,320 1,320 132  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 123,000 246,000 246,000 185,000 1,320 132,000 132 13,200 1,320 1 BAP BKF BBF IDP DBA Grid Sample Label DOSS Chemical Test DM.1101.09.WS.Comp01_05.NL2 .41 Chemical Test DM.1101.09.WS

139

Versonel: Order (2014-CE-21009)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE ordered Smart Surplus, Inc. d/b/a Versonel to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Versonel had failed to certify that certain models of refrigerators and residential clothes dryers comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

140

CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT For On-going Construction Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT For On-going Construction Project TO: Deans, Directors, Chairpersons Alarm System UHM 05-537A CONTRACTOR: Biven's Electric, Inc. Dba West Coast Construction SCOPE OF WORK OF CONSTRUCTION FROM 7:30 AM TO 4:30 PM ACCESSIBLE ROUTES: No accessible routes will be affected by this test

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decibel dba a-weighted" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Matthews Fan: Order (2014-CE-32012)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE ordered Matthews-Gerbar, Ltd. d/b/a Matthews Fan Company to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Matthews had failed to certify that certain models of ceiling fans comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

142

Role of Vaccination in the Control of Turkey Coccidiosis: Vaccine Associated Oocyst Shedding, Lesions, and Mucosal Gene Expression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

possible without the concerted effort of several groups and individuals. I would like to acknowledge Willmar Poultry Company d.b.a. Ag Forte for financially supporting my education and research. The Life Science Innovations ? Research Group offered... coccidiosis vaccination, Willmar Poultry Farms (WPF) (Willmar, MN) conducted a series of trials to determine the efficacy of Coccivac-T? in their commercial system. For a three month period, Coccivac-T? vaccination replaced the traditionally used ionophore...

Behl, Michelle 1983-

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

143

Certification Status Search Tool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Certification Status Search Tool (SB/DVBE) Illustrated User Manual #12;2 Certification Status Search Tool (SB/DVBE) Rev. 5/14/09 Copyright © 2008 RFP Depot, LLC dba BidSync All Rights Reserved://www.bidsync.com #12;3 Certification Status Search Tool (SB/DVBE) Rev. 5/14/09 Introduction BidSync is a powerful e

144

The effect of topography on SAR calibration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During normal synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processing, a flat earth is assumed when performing radiometric corrections such as antenna pattern and scattering area removal. Here the authors examine the effects of topographic variations on these corrections. Local slopes will cause the actual scattering area to be different from that calculated using the flat earth assumption. It is shown that this effect, which is present for both airborne and spaceborne SAR data, may easily cause calibration errors larger than a decibel. Ignoring the topography during antenna pattern removal is expected to be negligible for spaceborne SAR's. In this paper they show how these effects can be taken into account if a digital elevation model is available for the imaged area. It is also shown that not taking the topography into account during antenna pattern removal introduces polarimetric calibration errors.

Zyl, J.J. van; Chapman, B.D.; Dubois, P. (California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.); Shi, Jiancheng (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in aModular Classroom Test Bed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goals of this research effort were to develop, evaluate, and demonstrate a practical HVAC system for classrooms that consistently provides classrooms with the quantity of ventilation in current minimum standards, while saving energy, and reducing HVAC-related noise levels. This research was motivated by several factors, including the public benefits of energy efficiency, evidence that many classrooms are under-ventilated, and public concerns about indoor environmental quality in classrooms. This project involved the installation and verification of the performance of an Improved Heat Pump Air Conditioning (IHPAC) system, and its comparison, a standard HVAC system having an efficiency of 10 SEER. The project included the verification of the physical characteristics suitable for direct replacement of existing 10 SEER systems, quantitative demonstration of improved energy efficiency, reduced acoustic noise levels, quantitative demonstration of improved ventilation control, and verification that the system would meet temperature control demands necessary for the thermal comfort of the occupants. Results showed that the IHPAC met these goals. The IHPAC was found to be a direct bolt-on replacement for the 10 SEER system. Calculated energy efficiency improvements based on many days of classroom cooling or heating showed that the IHPAC system is about 44% more efficient during cooling and 38% more efficient during heating than the 10 SEER system. Noise reduction was dramatic, with measured A-weighed sound level for fan only operation conditions of 34.3 dB(A), a reduction of 19 dB(A) compared to the 10 SEER system. Similarly, the IHPAC stage-1 and stage-2 compressor plus fan sound levels were 40.8 dB(A) and 42.7 dB(A), reductions of 14 and 13 dB(A), respectively. Thus, the IHPAC is 20 to 35 times quieter than the 10 SEER systems depending upon the operation mode. The IHPAC system met the ventilation requirements and was able to provide consistent outside air supply throughout the study. Indoor CO2 levels with simulated occupancy were maintained below 1000 ppm. Finally temperature settings were met and controlled accurately. The goals of the laboratory testing phase were met and this system is ready for further study in a field test of occupied classrooms.

Apte, Michael G.; Buchanan, Ian S.; Faulkner, David; Fisk,William J.; Lai, Chi-Ming; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

New Conducting and Electrically Switching Molecular Materials based on Main Group and Transition Metal Ions Bridged by TCNQ Derivatives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to me. Dr. Hanhua Zhao helped me enormously by training me in synthesis and general lab skills and took interest in my life and well-being like a father. Dr. Akira Ota and Dr. Xinyi Wang helped me acquire many important skills and to learn critical...-Bridge-Acceptor (DBA) junction and exhibits unprecedented electronic behavior that can be tuned by modification of the molecule with desire functional groups. Given the obvious power of this approach, the synthesis and device development of molecules in electronic...

Zhang, Zhongyue

2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

147

Standby gen-set meets increased noise, exhaust emissions standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atlantic Detroit Diesel-Allison worked with Floyd Manufacturing to develop an enclosure that would address the noise and exhaust requirements for standby generator sets. Specially designed sound baffles knock down the sound in critical areas. An architectural sound insulated wall further isolates the noise. The installation is equipped with a DeSOP oxidation silencer with a sound attenuation rating of 53 dB(A). The silencer incorporates a catalytic converter that reduces CO, VOC, SO[sub 2] and particulates in the 80 to 90% range. Diesel odor is virtually eliminated. 3 figs.

McNeely, M.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Data:Ec9db326-c346-4548-b38a-0621843aff9e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744b55997c1cc No revisionEc01d6d9-0b5c-46e0-8010-da811753d74a Nob5dba04c4b3 No revision has been approved

149

Data:Ec9e470a-443f-48f6-a589-2308e26de278 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744b55997c1cc No revisionEc01d6d9-0b5c-46e0-8010-da811753d74a Nob5dba04c4b3 No revision has been

150

Data:Ec9e6a69-824c-438a-a3c1-629292832b19 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744b55997c1cc No revisionEc01d6d9-0b5c-46e0-8010-da811753d74a Nob5dba04c4b3 No revision has been92832b19 No

151

Data:Eca116ba-8be4-4cf8-b96b-98de1f09a3e1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744b55997c1cc No revisionEc01d6d9-0b5c-46e0-8010-da811753d74a Nob5dba04c4b3 No revision has been92832b19

152

Data:Eca82732-a8a8-440c-8b4a-d27f012c2433 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744b55997c1cc No revisionEc01d6d9-0b5c-46e0-8010-da811753d74a Nob5dba04c4b3 No revision has

153

Data:Ecac9c5f-edc9-47a2-999a-af414e7cfbca | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744b55997c1cc No revisionEc01d6d9-0b5c-46e0-8010-da811753d74a Nob5dba04c4b3 No revision

154

Data:Ecb40698-ae55-4261-8d21-f31da5a818c5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744b55997c1cc No revisionEc01d6d9-0b5c-46e0-8010-da811753d74a Nob5dba04c4b3 No

155

Data:Ecbcd5ef-67e2-4d7a-b567-16cb5d0b63d2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744b55997c1cc No revisionEc01d6d9-0b5c-46e0-8010-da811753d74a Nob5dba04c4b3

156

Ultralife Corporation formerly Ultralife Batteries Inc | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformation UC 19-6-401 et seq. -Udhaya Energyfor Low CarbonAmerica DBA

157

Centrifuges Replacement Study Proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

characteristics, features of equipment, auxiliaries furnished, overall dims., mat?ls. of constr., est. wt. and complete motor data. 3 3 8 2 NOISE LEVEL DATA for all equipment generating a sound level of 80 DBA or higher, at 3 feet distance... power unit. Meets all requirements 1.3.17 Vibration monitor. Meets all requirements 1.3.18 Transport lock. Meets all requirements 1.3.19 Variable frequency drive system with drive motor and v-belt drive with guard. Meets all requirements 1...

Iqbal, Muhammad

2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

158

Data:0fe92159-5064-4ae7-92a2-f7463447c7e2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision has been approved for this page. It

159

Data:0ff1dfb9-4ddc-4524-b171-92d01922b718 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision has been approved for this page.

160

Data:0ff9d81d-4cdb-48b6-8016-6285002c39f3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision has been approved for this

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decibel dba a-weighted" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Data:0ffbb30b-dbc9-4810-9dc9-f59135cd115a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision has been approved for

162

Data:0ffeb756-0dab-47f0-b52f-1ee5361c9e60 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision has been approved

163

Data:100a418b-e2cd-44a4-a8d6-f028d62708ed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision has been approved28d62708ed No revision

164

Data:100f6aed-0059-4e48-a69f-02c21dc54689 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision has been approved28d62708ed No

165

Data:1016aa32-74fb-41b3-b77a-09552347c844 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision has been approved28d62708ed

166

Data:1019e054-c2e3-45d1-8791-679e99c478f0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision has been approved28d62708ed9e99c478f0

167

Data:101b1f83-4ac3-45d4-a1f8-e35e0f289879 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision has been

168

Data:101b59a4-598e-44b6-b47d-5b600aa73466 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision has been00aa73466 No revision has been

169

Data:101cedc3-1779-4223-befa-760125240bf4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision has been00aa73466 No revision has

170

Data:101d0db9-15e3-420b-8013-6b7dfe683846 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision has been00aa73466 No revision

171

Data:1024a868-af5f-4450-994a-f94f20b28281 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision has been00aa73466 No revisionf20b28281

172

Data:1030f063-4b37-4b6e-87aa-f3467beae156 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision has been00aa73466 No

173

Data:1035b80c-ba0d-4449-b50b-5fe6d91e40b7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision has been00aa73466 Nod91e40b7 No

174

Data:103b6bf8-cacd-4660-8dbf-f3780b7637b3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision has been00aa73466 Nod91e40b7

175

Data:103da415-d2d0-41c1-a5ef-1bd5b5c3a90b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision has been00aa73466

176

Data:1048fab5-37e3-4af6-99a3-d2c61f0ec3a6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision has

177

Data:1049cb48-7ce9-4326-ac15-425fbb555156 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision hasfbb555156 No revision has been

178

Data:104fceaa-697d-4f02-a3b1-ddc2d13fa09a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision hasfbb555156 No revision has

179

Data:10516ced-e3a8-40e8-b7d5-06e4c7f3aca9 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision hasfbb555156 No revision

180

Data:105af332-46b2-46b4-82b3-bd4810b377fa | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision hasfbb555156 No revision10b377fa No

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decibel dba a-weighted" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Data:105c0f39-435a-4588-99fb-0029f819acda | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision hasfbb555156 No revision10b377fa

182

Data:1065c311-963a-4f7e-939e-5ca7ecb4b569 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision hasfbb555156 No

183

Data:106886dc-19ab-46ed-a3d3-eda3a03c0876 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision hasfbb555156 Noeda3a03c0876 No revision

184

Data:1068f93e-19be-4a18-b762-654c2e36e273 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision hasfbb555156 Noeda3a03c0876 No

185

Data:106c6ec3-d129-4dfd-877a-f0d97c6f1bd4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision hasfbb555156 Noeda3a03c0876

186

Data:106ff99d-9ce6-4bff-950a-b22db26cf8cc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision hasfbb555156

187

Data:1076a85b-6a9b-47b6-b701-d5b53a6099f4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision hasfbb555156b53a6099f4 No revision has

188

Data:1079c2a8-f748-439f-af1b-4a8487e3457f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision hasfbb555156b53a6099f4 No revision

189

Data:10887bc6-6ed7-4c8c-9aca-da1c7e629fb7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision hasfbb555156b53a6099f4 No

190

Data:10a335b1-d26b-4dea-a53b-1139ab2ebe33 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision hasfbb555156b53a6099f4 Noab2ebe33 No

191

Data:10a985d5-082f-4348-9608-7b65ba1f3e71 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision hasfbb555156b53a6099f4 Noab2ebe33

192

Data:10af5f8a-d1f8-4406-9d28-6f69d74d4001 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision hasfbb555156b53a6099f4

193

Data:10af61ae-1dbd-49c7-a0c7-2084ecf17144 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision

194

Data:10b3d8d0-6cab-4d30-b666-bdd48a68f346 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision66-bdd48a68f346 No revision has been

195

Data:10be322b-8d9e-4033-a2e9-2595aa28b9cb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision66-bdd48a68f346 No revision has

196

Data:10c28040-698e-4ba1-8f2d-8e51f7180a9e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision66-bdd48a68f346 No revision has1f7180a9e

197

Data:10e07815-b458-4516-856b-1271fd37a731 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision66-bdd48a68f346 No revision

198

Data:10e1d7de-42d4-46a0-9b17-baebba18db03 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision66-bdd48a68f346 No

199

Data:10e74c75-2f92-42d8-b3fd-5c32530cd5c0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision66-bdd48a68f346 Nofd-5c32530cd5c0 No

200

Data:10ee8738-d451-46d9-9688-7bb695f00c5b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision66-bdd48a68f346 Nofd-5c32530cd5c0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decibel dba a-weighted" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Data:10f02fad-aa66-4924-a638-6338d9007368 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No revision66-bdd48a68f346

202

Data:10f721a2-bff1-402d-bb48-a2d90170fce7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba No

203

Data:10f7e085-558b-4885-b4c8-52ffe80cce2e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2e No revision has been approved for

204

Data:10fbb8cf-358b-41cf-9f79-b0874ef3687d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2e No revision has been approved

205

Data:11011259-fa9c-4c3b-a6a0-46cd0ef22777 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2e No revision has been

206

Data:1101feab-6452-45f9-acf0-0497f8d48f0e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2e No revision has

207

Data:11083806-f97c-4f05-bbcb-45e8cae534cc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2e No revision hasbbcb-45e8cae534cc

208

Data:1109b305-0872-4c90-b32a-3c2adf56625a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2e No revision

209

Data:11161c72-e121-4f10-9b80-46d9fedede8d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2e No revision0-46d9fedede8d No

210

Data:111858a1-d484-43ba-8acd-a636377202b9 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2e No revision0-46d9fedede8d

211

Data:11230453-d3f2-4057-9588-b99e27ba4e9e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2e No

212

Data:11230d58-c940-4ad2-a5f0-c6c4899237d2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2e Noc4899237d2 No revision has been

213

Data:1124317f-5652-47f3-8d31-694fcafda1a3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2e Noc4899237d2 No revision has

214

Data:1129d5e1-92d6-4ca4-8c20-127cd7cd729a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2e Noc4899237d2 No revision

215

Data:112ec36e-487e-4c47-aeed-15543b91baa3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2e Noc4899237d2 No

216

Data:1135e92f-e57a-4191-b73a-0feabda1731e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2e Noc4899237d2 Nofeabda1731e No

217

Data:113d8f10-3078-4509-95f0-7b99d363b321 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2e Noc4899237d2 Nofeabda1731e

218

Data:113ee003-d855-41dd-9d4d-fe1de9172e0c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2e Noc4899237d2

219

Data:113fc6b3-1a77-407e-8a75-0653dc2437f4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2e Noc4899237d23dc2437f4 No revision

220

Data:114520d4-26dd-4665-b70a-5a5841caea01 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2e Noc4899237d23dc2437f4 No

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decibel dba a-weighted" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Data:114839b3-d12b-41f1-a7f4-f3282d23d88e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2e Noc4899237d23dc2437f4 No82d23d88e

222

Data:115319d7-8380-4833-b4ab-c11ce5f84b40 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2e Noc4899237d23dc2437f4

223

Data:1154ef1b-9514-41f3-a8c6-19b81b300d6b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2e Noc4899237d23dc2437f4b81b300d6b

224

Data:115cfb06-bff8-4736-8bad-f96d9ef548ab | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2e

225

Data:1161d68a-ce5e-4a52-b43e-0a1f252b0520 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2ee-0a1f252b0520 No revision has

226

Data:1168e29b-5be5-4863-82c9-998fc5958f3b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2ee-0a1f252b0520 No revision

227

Data:116a7632-80a1-4eae-975e-dd36a4b5cefc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2ee-0a1f252b0520 No

228

Data:1174db4b-28c9-4a6f-afd2-543f3c52f57e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2ee-0a1f252b0520 Noafd2-543f3c52f57e

229

Data:1179caae-3b05-4f05-906d-3a5d36f8ffa6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2ee-0a1f252b0520

230

Data:117aae3b-e935-4bee-9491-037a803e1f5f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2ee-0a1f252b05203e1f5f No revision

231

Data:117d68ac-397c-4686-857a-7f4ff2dce981 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2ee-0a1f252b05203e1f5f No

232

Data:1180eb44-c458-4afb-96ab-f13dca8ea3df | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba Noc8-52ffe80cce2ee-0a1f252b05203e1f5f

233

Data:1189a3c9-6707-4a3c-88f1-d325851b41eb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision has been approved for720c8ec90dba

234

A Few Words on How to Make the Best of Your Early Career | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchThe Office of FossilMembership |9 TABLE 10DepartmentDOE DBA Desk Guide

235

A Glimpse at What's Between the Covers of the Market Assessment |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchThe Office of FossilMembership |9 TABLE 10DepartmentDOE DBA Desk

236

A History of Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the United  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchThe Office of FossilMembership |9 TABLE 10DepartmentDOE DBA

237

Data:9402b9a0-73bf-4ad0-bcd0-d2791aae850f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 No revisione0a2d50bdf35248292f1 No revisionedead8-4241-4b53-933a-90a289b19506 Nob873bfc67dba

238

Data:9405338d-76b8-43d5-a99f-6386dc173069 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 No revisione0a2d50bdf35248292f1 No revisionedead8-4241-4b53-933a-90a289b19506 Nob873bfc67dba386dc173069

239

Application of the MELCOR code to design basis PWR large dry containment analysis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MELCOR computer code has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories under USNRC sponsorship to provide capability for independently auditing analyses submitted by reactor manufactures and utilities. MELCOR is a fully integrated code (encompassing the reactor coolant system and the containment building) that models the progression of postulated accidents in light water reactor power plants. To assess the adequacy of containment thermal-hydraulic modeling incorporated in the MELCOR code for application to PWR large dry containments, several selected demonstration designs were analyzed. This report documents MELCOR code demonstration calculations performed for postulated design basis accident (DBA) analysis (LOCA and MSLB) inside containment, which are compared to other code results. The key processes when analyzing the containment loads inside PWR large dry containments are (1) expansion and transport of high mass/energy releases, (2) heat and mass transfer to structural passive heat sinks, and (3) containment pressure reduction due to engineered safety features. A code-to-code benchmarking for DBA events showed that MELCOR predictions of maximum containment loads were equivalent to similar predictions using a qualified containment code known as CONTAIN. This equivalency was found to apply for both single- and multi-cell containment models.

Phillips, Jesse; Notafrancesco, Allen (USNRC, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, Rockville, MD); Tills, Jack Lee (Jack Tills & Associates, Inc., Sandia Park, NM)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Polarization-dependent all-optical modulator with ultra-high modulation depth based on a stereo graphene-microfiber structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report an in-line polarization-dependent all-optical fiber modulator based on a stereo graphene-microfiber structure (GMF) by utilizing the lab-on-rod technique. Owing to the unique spring-like geometry, an ultra-long GMF interaction length can be achieved, and an ultra-high modulation depth (MD) of ~7.5 dB and a high modulation efficiency (ME) of ~0.2 dB/mW were demonstrated for one polarization state. The MD and ME are more than one order larger than those of other graphene-waveguide hybrid all-optical modulators. By further optimizing the transferring and cleaning process, the modulator can quickly switch between transparent and opaque states for both the two polarization states with a maximized MD of tens of decibels. This modulator is compatible with current fiber-optic communication systems and may be applied in the near future to meet the impending need for ultrafast optical signal processing.

Xu, Fei; Zheng, Bi-cai; Shao, Guang-hao; Ge, Shi-jun; Lu, Yan-qing

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decibel dba a-weighted" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Shotgun Proteomics Identifies Proteins Specific for Acute Renal...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

was measured by protein-level spectral counts adopting a weighted fold-change statistic, assigning increased weight for more frequently observed proteins. We have...

242

Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center report to the Steering Committee. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Trace Element Removal (TER) test block, and a simultaneous testing of the Lime Forced Oxidation process with DBA addition (LDG). At the end of the month, a series of Duct Injection tests began in a study to determine the efficiencies of alkaline injection for removing trace elements (mercury). On the Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, low temperature performance testing continued this month as measurements were taken for NO{sub x} removal efficiency, residual ammonia slip, and SO{sub 3} generation across the catalysts installed in the SCR reactor. This report describes the status of the facilities and test activities at the pilot and mini-pilot plants.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Degradation and failure characteristics of NPP containment protective coating systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A research program to investigate the performance and potential for failure of Service Level 1 coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is in progress. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause failure as identified by the industry coatings expert panel. The period of interest for performance covers the time from application of the coating through 40 years of service, followed by a medium-to-large break loss-of-coolant accident scenario, which is a design basis accident (DBA) scenario. The interactive program elements are discussed in this report and the application of these elements to the System 5 coating system (polyamide epoxy primer, carbon steel substrate) is used to evaluate performance.

Sindelar, R.L.

2000-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

244

Degradation and Failure Characteristics of NPP Containment Protective Coating Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A research program to investigate the performance and potential for debris formation of Service Level I coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is being performed at the Savannah River Technology Center. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause coating disbondment as identified by the Industry Coatings Expert Panel. The period of interest for performance covers the time from application of the coating through 40 years of service, followed by a medium-to-large break loss-of-coolant accident scenario, which is a design basis accident (DBA) scenario. The interactive program elements are described in this report and the application of these elements to evaluate the performance of the specific coating system of Phenoline 305 epoxy-phenolic topcoat over Carbozinc 11 primer on a steel substrate. This system is one of the predominant coating systems present on steel substrates in NPP containment.

Sindelar, R.L.

2001-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

245

Neutron Hole States of Mo-93,95  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I I I0 IO 20 3040 50 60 0 I I I I I I IO 20 30 40 5Q 60 IO 2- 0 I I I lo 20 X) 40 50 60 I j I I I l 0 lo 20 30 4050 60 8, .(deg) 8,~. (deg) {deg) {deg) FIG. 2. Angular distributions for the +Mo(P, d)93Mo reaction. The errors sho....20 l X=2 0.769 2=4 0.8l6 2=2 Mo(d, t) Mo l IGO= P IQ IO? IG 10 IQ 10 IGO? IQ I I I I l.092 2=2+4 = IO IQ)- l.674 All the angular distributions obtained along mith the D%'BA fits for the states analyzed in the "Mo(d, t)9'Mo...

Bindal, P. K.; Youngblood, David H.; Kozub, R. L.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Final Scientific/Technical Report Carbon Capture and Storage Training Northwest - CCSTNW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details the activities of the Carbon Capture and Storage Training Northwest (CCSTNW) program 2009 to 2013. The CCSTNW created, implemented, and provided Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) training over the period of the program. With the assistance of an expert advisory board, CCSTNW created curriculum and conducted three short courses, more than three lectures, two symposiums, and a final conference. The program was conducted in five phases; 1) organization, gap analysis, and form advisory board; 2) develop list serves, website, and tech alerts; 3) training needs survey; 4) conduct lectures, courses, symposiums, and a conference; 5) evaluation surveys and course evaluations. This program was conducted jointly by Environmental Outreach and Stewardship Alliance (dba. Northwest Environmental Training Center NWETC) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL).

Workman, James

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

247

2011 Hyundai Sonata 4932 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid HEV (VIN KMHEC4A43BA004932). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the AVTA for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the DOE.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

2010 Honda Civic Hybrid UltraBattery Conversion 5577 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Honda Civic HEV UltraBattery Conversion (VIN JHMFA3F24AS005577). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the AVTA for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the DOE.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

2011 Chevrolet Volt VIN 0815 Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), including testing the PHEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 12,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Chevrolet Volt PHEV (VIN 1G1RD6E48BU100815). The battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation (eTec) dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the AVTA for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the DOE.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

2010 Honda Insight VIN 0141 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Honda Insight HEV (VIN: JHMZE2H78AS010141). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

2010 Ford Fusion VIN 4757 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Ford Fusion HEV (VIN: 3FADP0L34AR144757). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

2010 Toyota Prius VIN 6063 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Toyota Prius HEV (VIN JTDKN3DU5A0006063). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

2010 Honda Insight VIN 1748 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Honda Insight HEV (VIN: JHMZE2H59AS011748). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

2010 Toyota Prius VIN 0462 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Toyota Prius HEV (VIN: JTDKN3DU2A5010462). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Data:Ecbd7933-8804-446e-a809-8cbba6f34984 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744b55997c1cc No revisionEc01d6d9-0b5c-46e0-8010-da811753d74a Nob5dba04c4b3Ecbd7933-8804-446e-a809-8cbba6f34984

256

Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental control technology. Final technical monthly report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Trace Element Removal (TER) test block. A second phase of the lime Forced Oxidation process with DBA addition (LDG) was also conducted simultaneously on the Pilot System this month. This month the ECTC was off-line from 6/9 through 6/19 to complete a Facility retrofit project. During this brief outage, modifications were made to the ECTC Flue Gas Handling System to enhance the facility capabilities, and to prepare for future High Velocity Wet FGD Testing. On the Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the low temperature performance testing resumed this month as measurements were taken for NO{sub x} removal efficiency, residual ammonia slip, and SO{sub 3} generation across the new SCR catalysts.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Analysis of main steam isolation valve leakage in design basis accidents using MELCOR 1.8.6 and RADTRAD.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analyses were performed using MELCOR and RADTRAD to investigate main steam isolation valve (MSIV) leakage behavior under design basis accident (DBA) loss-of-coolant (LOCA) conditions that are presumed to have led to a significant core melt accident. Dose to the control room, site boundary and LPZ are examined using both approaches described in current regulatory guidelines as well as analyses based on best estimate source term and system response. At issue is the current practice of using containment airborne aerosol concentrations as a surrogate for the in-vessel aerosol concentration that exists in the near vicinity of the MSIVs. This study finds current practice using the AST-based containment aerosol concentrations for assessing MSIV leakage is non-conservative and conceptually in error. A methodology is proposed that scales the containment aerosol concentration to the expected vessel concentration in order to preserve the simplified use of the AST in assessing containment performance under assumed DBA conditions. This correction is required during the first two hours of the accident while the gap and early in-vessel source terms are present. It is general practice to assume that at {approx}2hrs, recovery actions to reflood the core will have been successful and that further core damage can be avoided. The analyses performed in this study determine that, after two hours, assuming vessel reflooding has taken place, the containment aerosol concentration can then conservatively be used as the effective source to the leaking MSIV's. Recommendations are provided concerning typical aerosol removal coefficients that can be used in the RADTRAD code to predict source attenuation in the steam lines, and on robust methods of predicting MSIV leakage flows based on measured MSIV leakage performance.

Salay, Michael (United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, D.C.); Kalinich, Donald A.; Gauntt, Randall O.; Radel, Tracy E.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

A COMPREHENSIVE SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSIS OF DB WHITE DWARFS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a detailed analysis of 108 helium-line (DB) white dwarfs based on model atmosphere fits to high signal-to-noise optical spectroscopy. We derive a mean mass of 0.67 M{sub sun} for our sample, with a dispersion of only 0.09 M{sub sun}. White dwarfs also showing hydrogen lines, the DBA stars, comprise 44% of our sample, and their mass distribution appears similar to that of DB stars. As in our previous investigation, we find no evidence for the existence of low-mass (M < 0.5 M{sub sun}) DB white dwarfs. We derive a luminosity function based on a subset of DB white dwarfs identified in the Palomar-Green Survey. We show that 20% of all white dwarfs in the temperature range of interest are DB stars, although the fraction drops to half this value above T{sub eff} {approx} 20,000 K. We also show that the persistence of DB stars with no hydrogen features at low temperatures is difficult to reconcile with a scenario involving accretion from the interstellar medium, often invoked to account for the observed hydrogen abundances in DBA stars. We present evidence for the existence of two different evolutionary channels that produce DB white dwarfs: the standard model where DA stars are transformed into DB stars through the convective dilution of a thin hydrogen layer and a second channel where DB stars retain a helium atmosphere throughout their evolution. We finally demonstrate that the instability strip of pulsating V777 Her white dwarfs contains no non-variables, if the hydrogen content of these stars is properly accounted for.

Bergeron, P.; Wesemael, F.; Dufour, Pierre; Beauchamp, A.; Hunter, C.; Gianninas, A.; Limoges, M.-M.; Dufour, Patrick; Fontaine, G. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Saffer, Rex A. [Strayer University, 234 Mall Boulevard, Suite G-50, King of Prussia, PA 19406 (United States); Ruiz, M. T. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Liebert, James, E-mail: bergeron@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: wesemael@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: gianninas@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: limoges@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: dufourpa@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: fontaine@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: alain.beauchamp@fti-ibis.com, E-mail: chris.hunter@yale.edu, E-mail: rex.saffer@strayer.edu, E-mail: mtruiz@das.uchile.cl [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

259

E-Print Network 3.0 - applying power spectral Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: applying power spectral Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Windowed Fourier Transform LUCAS J. VAN VLIET Summary: of as a weighted averaging filter applied to the...

260

Production and analysis of a Southern Ocean state estimate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A modern general circulation model of the Southern Ocean with one-sixth of a degree resolution is optimized to the observed ocean in a weighted least squares sense. Convergence toward the state estimate solution is carried ...

Mazloff, Matthew R

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decibel dba a-weighted" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Solitary lift : redesigning the base and tilter modules to meet customer needs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A theoretical investigation towards the redesign of the base and the tilting module of the Solitary Lift prototype improved the machine with a weight reduction of 5.731bs. Besides lighter weight, the other criteria used ...

Vasquez, Elliot B. (Elliot Benjamin), 1982-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

SpeeDP: A new algorithm to compute the SDP relaxations of Max ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oct 15, 2010 ... matrix A of a weighted graph G = (V,E), the Max-Cut problem calls for a ...... Further, in [21] the authors report a comparison of a matlab.

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

The Role of Demand Response in Default Service Pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Pennsylvania use the PJM real-time spot market price tosince the hourly real-time PJM prices are not known untilfive minutes. The hourly PJM price is a weighted average of

Barbose, Galen; Goldman, Chuck; Neenan, Bernie

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

The southern ocean meridional overturning circulation as diagnosed from an eddy permitting state estimate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A modern general circulation model of the Southern Ocean with one-sixth of a degree resolution is optimized to the observed ocean in a weighted least squares sense. Convergence to the state estimate solution is carried out ...

Mazloff, Matthew R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Relative Risks Analysis in Nutritional Epidemiology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

confidence intervals, something that can occur in Fieller's interval. Furthermore, we study the real Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI-2005) data set from the NIH-AARP Study of Diet and Health, consider a weighted logistic regression model in which...

Wang, Yanqing

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Coordinated Vehicle Platoon Control: Weighted and Constrained Consensus and Communication Network Topologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coordinated Vehicle Platoon Control: Weighted and Constrained Consensus and Communication Network a new method for enhancing highway safety and efficiency by coordinated control of vehicle platoons. One performance. Vehicle deployment is formulated as a weighted and constrained consensus control problem

Zhang, Hongwei

267

Optimal multi-robot path planning with temporal logic constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we present a method for automatically planning optimal paths for a group of robots that satisfy a common high level mission specification. Each robot's motion in the environment is modeled as a weighted ...

Ulusoy, Alphan

268

Refrigerator Efficiency in Ghana: Tailoring an appliance market transformation program design for Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

households fall into which rate category, and on this based calculated a weighted average marginal price of electricityhousehold in 2001 (EIA, 2005a). Recent data from Ghana indicates that the average marginal price of electricity (

Ben Hagan, Essel; Van Buskirk, Robert; Ofosu-Ahenkorah, Alfred; McNeil, Michael A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Exposure Evaluation for Benzene, Lead and Noise in Vehicle and Equipment Repair Shops  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An exposure assessment was performed at the equipment and vehicle maintenance repair shops operating at the U. S. Department of Energy Hanford site, in Richland, Washington. The maintenance shops repair and maintain vehicles and equipment used in support of the Hanford cleanup mission. There are three general mechanic shops and one auto body repair shop. The mechanics work on heavy equipment used in construction, cranes, commercial motor vehicles, passenger-type vehicles in addition to air compressors, generators, and farm equipment. Services include part fabrication, installation of equipment, repair and maintenance work in the engine compartment, and tire and brake services. Work performed at the auto body shop includes painting and surface preparation which involves applying body filler and sanding. 8-hour time-weighted-average samples were collected for benzene and noise exposure and task-based samples were collected for lead dust work activities involving painted metal surfaces. Benzene samples were obtained using 3M 3520 sampling badges and were analyzed for additional volatile organic compounds. These compounds were selected based on material safety data sheet information for the aerosol products used by the mechanics for each day of sampling. The compounds included acetone, ethyl ether, toluene, xylene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone, and trichloroethylene. Laboratory data for benzene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone and trichloroethylene were all below the reporting detection limit. Airborne concentrations for acetone, ethyl ether, toluene and xylene were all less than 10% of their occupational exposure limit. The task-based samples obtained for lead dusts were submitted for a metal scan analysis to identify other metals that might be present. Laboratory results for lead dusts were all below the reporting detection limit and airborne concentration for the other metals observed in the samples were less than 10% of the occupational exposure limit. Noise dosimetry sampling was performed on a random basis and was representative of the different work activities within the four shops. Twenty three percent of the noise samples exceeded the occupational exposure limit of 85 decibels for an 8-hour time-weightedaverage. Work activities where noise levels were higher included use of impact wrenches and grinding wheels.

Sweeney, Lynn C.

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

270

Clonal deletion of self-reactive T cells in irradiation bone marrow chimeras and neonatally tolerant mice. Evidence for intercellular transfer of Mlsa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tolerance to Mlsa has been shown to be associated with clonal deletion of cells carrying TCR beta chain variable regions V beta 6 or V beta 8.1 in mice possessing I-E antigens. To evaluate the rules of tolerance induction to Mlsa we prepared irradiation bone marrow chimeras expressing Mlsa or Mlsb and I-E by different cell types. Deletion of V beta 6+, Mlsa-reactive T cells required the presence of Mlsa and I-E products either on bone marrow-derived cells or on irradiated recipient cells. Tolerance was induced when Mlsa and I-E were expressed by distinct cells of the chimera. Also neonatally tolerized mice exhibited depletion of V beta 6+ cells after injection of I-E- Mlsa spleen cells (DBA/1) into newborn I-E+ Mlsb mice (BALB/c x B10.G)F1. These results suggest that the product of the Mlsa locus is soluble and/or may be transferred from cell to cell and bound to I-E antigens. The chimera experiments also showed that tolerance to Mlsa is H-2 allele independent, i.e., is apparently unrestricted. Differentiation of chimeric (H-2d/Mlsa x H-2q/Mlsb)F1 stem cells in either an H-2d or an H-2q thymus revealed that tolerance assessed by absence of V beta 6+ T cells is not dependent on the thymically determined restriction specificity of T cells.

Speiser, D.E.; Schneider, R.; Hengartner, H.; MacDonald, H.R.; Zinkernagel, R.M. (Univ. Hospital, Zuerich (Switzerland))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Flexibility in the Design of the NSLS-II Lattice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NSLS-II light source is a proposed 3 GeV storage ring, with the potential for ultra-low emittance [1]. The lattice design uses a 30 cell DBA structure with a periodicity of 15, with alternating long and short straight sections. All cells are tuned achromatic to maximize the emittance reduction achieved as damping wigglers are added to the ring. Recent optimization of the lattice consisted of increasing the number of possible hard X-ray beam ports using three pole wigglers, reducing the number of magnets (quadrupoles and sextupoles) and shifting the magnets to allow easier extraction of the photon beams. The impact of the reduction of magnets on the lattice flexibility will be presented in terms of the tuning range possible for the lattice parameters: tune, emittance, chromaticity, and beta function matching to user insertion devices (IDs). This flexibility is important for optimizing the lattice linear and nonlinear properties, the dynamic aperture, and its impact on beam lifetime, as well as matching the user source requirements and for value engineering of magnets and power supplies.

Kramer,S.L.; Guo, W.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

272

Application of the DG-1199 methodology to the ESBWR and ABWR.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Appendix A-5 of Draft Regulatory Guide DG-1199 'Alternative Radiological Source Term for Evaluating Design Basis Accidents at Nuclear Power Reactors' provides guidance - applicable to RADTRAD MSIV leakage models - for scaling containment aerosol concentration to the expected steam dome concentration in order to preserve the simplified use of the Accident Source Term (AST) in assessing containment performance under assumed design basis accident (DBA) conditions. In this study Economic and Safe Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) RADTRAD models are developed using the DG-1199, Appendix A-5 guidance. The models were run using RADTRAD v3.03. Low Population Zone (LPZ), control room (CR), and worst-case 2-hr Exclusion Area Boundary (EAB) doses were calculated and compared to the relevant accident dose criteria in 10 CFR 50.67. For the ESBWR, the dose results were all lower than the MSIV leakage doses calculated by General Electric/Hitachi (GEH) in their licensing technical report. There are no comparable ABWR MSIV leakage doses, however, it should be noted that the ABWR doses are lower than the ESBWR doses. In addition, sensitivity cases were evaluated to ascertain the influence/importance of key input parameters/features of the models.

Kalinich, Donald A.; Gauntt, Randall O.; Walton, Fotini

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

A Design Report of the Baseline for PEP-X: an Ultra-Low Emittance Storage Ring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past year, we have worked out a baseline design for PEP-X, as an ultra-low emittance storage ring that could reside in the existing 2.2-km PEPII tunnel. The design features a hybrid lattice with double bend achromat (DBA) cells in two arcs and theoretical minimum emittance (TME) cells in the remaining four arcs. Damping wigglers are used to reduce the horizontal emittance to 86 pm-rad at zero current for a 4.5 GeV electron beam. At a design current of 1.5 A, the horizontal emittance increases, due to intrabeam scattering, to 164 pm-rad when the vertical emittance is maintained at a diffraction limited 8 pm-rad. The baseline design will produce photon beams achieving a brightness of 10{sup 22} (ph/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1% BW) at 10 keV in a 3.5-m conventional planar undulator. Our study shows that an optimized lattice has adequate dynamic aperture, while accommodating a conventional off-axis injection system. In this report, we present the results of study, including the lattice properties, nonlinear dynamics, intra-beam scattering and Touschek lifetime, RF system, and collective instabilities. Finally, we discuss the possibility of partial lasing at soft X-ray wavelengths using a long undulator in a straight section.

Bane, Karl; Bertsche, Kirk; Cai, Yunhai; Chao, Alex; Corbett, Willian; Fox, John; Hettel, Robert; Huang, Xiaobiao; Huang, Zhirong; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Nosochkov, Yuri; Novokhatski, Sasha; Radedeau, Thomas; Raubenheimer, Tor; Rivetta, Claudio; Safranek, James; Seeman, John; Stohr, Joachim; Stupakov, Gennady; Wang, Lanfa; Wang, Min-Huey; /SLAC

2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

274

A Spatio-Temporal Model of House Prices in the US  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In the literature on spatial econometrics the degree of cross section dependence is calibrated by means of a weighting matrix. For example the (i; j) elements of a weighting matrix, wij, could take a value of 1 if the ith and jth areas... of xit and ft. How- ever, we allow "0its to be weakly dependent across i. This, for example, allows the idiosyn- cratic errors to follow the Spatial Autoregressive (SAR), or the Spatial Moving Average (SMA) processes introduced by Whittle (1954), Cli...

Holly, Sean; Pesaran, M Hashem; Yamagata, Takashi

275

Sodium fast reactor gaps analysis of computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of an expert-opinion elicitation activity designed to qualitatively assess the status and capabilities of currently available computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety calculations of advanced sodium fast reactors, and identify important gaps. The twelve-member panel consisted of representatives from five U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, and BNL), the University of Wisconsin, the KAERI, the JAEA, and the CEA. The major portion of this elicitation activity occurred during a two-day meeting held on Aug. 10-11, 2010 at Argonne National Laboratory. There were two primary objectives of this work: (1) Identify computer codes currently available for SFR accident analysis and reactor safety calculations; and (2) Assess the status and capability of current US computer codes to adequately model the required accident scenarios and associated phenomena, and identify important gaps. During the review, panel members identified over 60 computer codes that are currently available in the international community to perform different aspects of SFR safety analysis for various event scenarios and accident categories. A brief description of each of these codes together with references (when available) is provided. An adaptation of the Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) for computational modeling and simulation is described for use in this work. The panel's assessment of the available US codes is presented in the form of nine tables, organized into groups of three for each of three risk categories considered: anticipated operational occurrences (AOOs), design basis accidents (DBA), and beyond design basis accidents (BDBA). A set of summary conclusions are drawn from the results obtained. At the highest level, the panel judged that current US code capabilities are adequate for licensing given reasonable margins, but expressed concern that US code development activities had stagnated and that the experienced user-base and the experimental validation base was decaying away quickly.

Carbajo, Juan (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Ludewig, Hans (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki-ken, Japan); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki-ken, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d'%C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache %3CU%2B2013%3E CEA, France)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Mechanical-biological waste treatment and the associated occupational hygiene in Finland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A special feature of waste management in Finland has been the emphasis on the source separation of kitchen biowaste (catering waste); more than two-thirds of the Finnish population participates in this separation. Source-separated biowaste is usually treated by composting. The biowaste of about 5% of the population is handled by mechanical-biological treatment. A waste treatment plant at Mustasaari is the only plant in Finland using digestion for kitchen biowaste. For the protection of their employees, the plant owners commissioned a study on environmental factors and occupational hygiene in the plant area. During 1998-2000 the concentrations of dust, microbes and endotoxins and noise levels were investigated to identify possible problems at the plant. Three different work areas were investigated: the pre-processing and crushing hall, the bioreactor hall and the drying hall. Employees were asked about work-related health problems. Some problems with occupational hygiene were identified: concentrations of microbes and endotoxins may increase to levels harmful to health during waste crushing and in the bioreactor hall. Because employees complained of symptoms such as dry cough and rash or itching appearing once or twice a month, it is advisable to use respirator masks (class P3) during dusty working phases. The noise level in the drying hall exceeded the Finnish threshold value of 85 dBA. Qualitatively harmful factors for the health of employees are similar in all closed waste treatment plants in Finland. Quantitatively, however, the situation at the Mustasaari treatment plant is better than at some Finnish dry waste treatment plants. Therefore is reasonable to conclude that mechanical sorting, which produces a dry waste fraction for combustion and a biowaste fraction for anaerobic treatment, is in terms of occupational hygiene better for employees than combined aerobic treatment and dry waste treatment.

Tolvanen, Outi K. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, P.O. Box 35, 40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)]. E-mail: outolvan@bytl.jyu.fi; Haenninen, Kari I. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, P.O. Box 35, 40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

MODULAR AND FULL SIZE SIMPLIFIED BOILING WATER REACTOR DESIGN WITH FULLY PASSIVE SAFETY SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK B204 The overall goal of this three-year research project was to develop a new scientific design of a compact modular 200 MWe and a full size 1200 MWe simplified boiling water reactors (SBWR). Specific objectives of this research were: (1) to perform scientific designs of the core neutronics and core thermal-hydraulics for a small capacity and full size simplified boiling water reactor, (2) to develop a passive safety system design, (3) improve and validate safety analysis code, (4) demonstrate experimentally and analytically all design functions of the safety systems for the design basis accidents (DBA) and (5) to develop the final scientific design of both SBWR systems, 200 MWe (SBWR-200) and 1200 MWe (SBWR-1200). The SBWR combines the advantages of design simplicity and completely passive safety systems. These advantages fit well within the objectives of NERI and the Department of Energy's focus on the development of Generation III and IV nuclear power. The 3-year research program was structured around seven tasks. Task 1 was to perform the preliminary thermal-hydraulic design. Task 2 was to perform the core neutronic design analysis. Task 3 was to perform a detailed scaling study and obtain corresponding PUMA conditions from an integral test. Task 4 was to perform integral tests and code evaluation for the DBA. Task 5 was to perform a safety analysis for the DBA. Task 6 was to perform a BWR stability analysis. Task 7 was to perform a final scientific design of the compact modular SBWR-200 and the full size SBWR-1200. A no cost extension for the third year was requested and the request was granted and all the project tasks were completed by April 2003. The design activities in tasks 1, 2, and 3 were completed as planned. The existing thermal-hydraulic information, core physics, and fuel lattice information was collected on the existing design of the simplified boiling water reactor. The thermal-hydraulic design were developed. Based on a detailed integral system scaling analysis, design parameters were obtained and designs of the compact modular 200 MWe SBWR and the full size 1200 MWe SBWR were developed. These reactors are provided with passive safety systems. A new passive vacuum breaker check valve was designed to replace the mechanical vacuum beaker check valve. The new vacuum breaker check valve was based on a hydrostatic head, and was fail safe. The performance of this new valve was evaluated both by the thermal-hydraulic code RELAP5 and by the experiments in a scaled SBWR facility, PUMA. In the core neutronic design a core depletion model was implemented to PARCS code. A lattice design for the SBWR fuel assemblies was performed. Design improvements were made to the neutronics/thermal-hydraulics models of SBWR-200 and SBWR-1200, and design analyses of these reactors were performed. The design base accident analysis and evaluation of all the passive safety systems were completed as scheduled in tasks 4 and 5. Initial conditions for the small break loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) and large break LOCA using REALP5 code were obtained. Small and large break LOCA tests were performed and the data was analyzed. An anticipated transient with scram was simulated using the RELAP5 code for SBWR-200. The transient considered was an accidental closure of the main steam isolation valve (MSIV), which was considered to be the most significant transient. The evaluation of the RELAP5 code against experimental data for SBWR-1200 was completed. In task 6, the instability analysis for the three SBWR designs (SBWR-1200, SBWR-600 and SBWR-200) were simulated for start-up transients and the results were similar. Neither the geysering instability, nor the loop type instability was predicted by RAMONA-4B in the startup simulation following the recommended procedure by GE. The density wave oscillation was not observed at all because the power level used in the simulation was not high enough. A study was made of the potential instabilities by imposing an unrealistically high power ramp in a short time period, as suggested by GE. RAMON

M. Ishii; S. T. Revankar; T. Downar; Y. Xu, H. J. Yoon; D. Tinkler; U. S. Rohatgi

2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

278

DIAGNOSING VULNERABILITY, EMERGENT PHENOMENA, and VOLATILITY in MANMADE NETWORKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

properties 4. Additive effect to grid #12;16 Wind power contributions - MW wind energy as a % of total energy structures: MANMADE proposal the network of networks that comprise Europe's critical infrastructure of network Conversion of HV grid map into a weighted graph Substation, power plant Modes #12;5 Weighted graph

Arrowsmith, David

279

Current as of: 1/11/10 UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering Design Requirements for Mechatronic Football Players and Performance Evaluation Tests Scoring with the Engineering Design Requirements based upon its designated position. Each evaluation event is scored on a scale to meet the design requirement). A composite test score for each player will be computed by a weighted

Batill, Stephen M.

280

Welding an LHC bending magnet held in place by CERN?s hydraulic press  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A powerful hydraulic press has been installed at CERN. Rated at 27 000 tonnes, it has enough force to lift a weight equivalent to almost four Eiffel towers. The press is used to hold magnets in place as their casings are welded together or opened up.

Laurent Guiraud

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decibel dba a-weighted" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

On Orbits of Operators on Hilbert Space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the norms is not a sufficient condition to imply hypercyclicity by constructing a weighted bilateral shift that, on one hand, satisfies the orbit-density property (in the sense defined above), but, on the other hand, fails to be hypercyclic. The second major...

Smith, Lidia

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

282

Electro-chemo-mechanical response of a free-standing polypyrrole strip.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, some researchers called them artificial muscles [6-7], due to their resemblance with natural muscles and efficiently, is the way of working under an external force, for example, when we must lift a weight. In this setting, our main concern in to know how a free standing polypyrrole strip (the heart of any artificial

Otero, Toribio Fernndez

283

Attention and biased competition in multi-voxel object representations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In a multidimensional voxel space, the response to simultaneously-presented categories was well described as a weighted.e., univariate) fMRI methods (13­15), these recently discov- ered multivariate pattern analysis techniques have to understand attentional influences in large-scale multivariate representations of simultaneously

VanRullen, Rufin

284

Minimum Mean Squared Error Interference Alignment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

maximize sum utility, due to the associated loss in degrees of freedom. One approach to distributedunchen, 80290 Munich, Germany Email: {dschmidt,utschick}@tum.de Department of Electrical Engineering utility, where the utility depends on rate or SINR, a weighted sum MSE objective is used to compute

Kuzmanovic, Aleksandar

285

A geodesic voting shape prior to constrain the level set evolution for the segmentation of tubular  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A geodesic voting shape prior to constrain the level set evolution for the segmentation of tubular a geodesic voting method to segment tree struc- tures, such as retinal or cardiac blood vessels. Many authors have used minimal cost paths, or similarly geodesics relative to a weight potential P, to find a vessel

Cohen, Laurent

286

A GEODESIC VOTING METHOD FOR THE SEGMENTATION OF TUBULAR TREE AND CENTERLINES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A GEODESIC VOTING METHOD FOR THE SEGMENTATION OF TUBULAR TREE AND CENTERLINES Youssef Rouchdy1´el´ecom ParisTech, CNRS LTCI, 75013 Paris, France ABSTRACT This paper presents a geodesic voting method paths, or similarly geodesics relative to a weight potential P, to find a vessel between two end points

Cohen, Laurent

287

10/31/2011 1 Eco-Region Protection Indicator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10/31/2011 1 Eco-Region Protection Indicator for the 2011 release of the Natural Resource in the protected area points layer for the 2010 version of the World Database of Protected Areas (WDPA) after to a weighted average of 17% of biome area protected, which is based on a revised target established

Columbia University

288

Image Processing Apr. 16, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- The Discrete Fourier transform Log power spectrum #12;Review - The Convolution Theorem The Fourier frequency components Fourier (1807): Periodic functions could be represented as a weighted sum of sines and cosines Image courtesy of Technology Review #12;Review - Fourier Transform We want

Erdem, Erkut

289

Fundamentals of Image Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fourier transform Log power spectrum #12;Review - The Convolution Theorem The Fourier transform components Fourier (1807): Periodic functions could be represented as a weighted sum of sines and cosines Image courtesy of Technology Review #12;Review - Fourier Transform We want to understand

Erdem, Erkut

290

Maximum Likelihood Sub-band Weighting for Robust Speech Recognition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, bins of log filter-band energy (FBE) in each sub-band are multiplied with a weighting factor depending on the reliability of the sub-band. For each sub-band, zero padding is performed on the log FBE vector lengthening. For the DCT has the size of full-band FBE vector, the feature vector consists of the correlations across

291

Dynamic Generation of Discrete Random Variates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and updates a weight in O(2log N) expected time in the worst case. We then show how to reduce the update time to O(log N) amortized expected time. We nally show how to apply our techniques to a lookup-table technique in order to obtain expected constant...

Matias, Yossi; Vitter, Jeffrey Scott; Ni, Wen-Chun

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Apprenticeship Learning Using Linear Programming Umar Syed USYED@CS.PRINCETON.EDU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

existing methods for apprentice- ship learning output policies that are "mixed", i.e. randomized function is un- known to the apprentice, but is assumed to be a weighted combination of several known functions. The apprentice is also assumed to have access to demonstrations from an- other agent, called

Bowling, Michael

293

Phosphorous Computer Modeling of Crystalline Electrolytes: Lithium Thiophosphates and Phosphates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-search algorithm · Minimum-energy migration paths were determined via the construction of a weighted graph Results: Abstract Recently, lithium thiophosphate materials suitable for usage as solid electrolytes with PAW functionals generated using atompaw, and used in pwscf and abinit) · Formation energies

Holzwarth, Natalie

294

SPATIAL PYRAMID MINING FOR LOGO DETECTION IN NATURAL SCENES University of California Santa Barbara  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiently detect a variety of different lettering or design marks associated with a brand. Features in an image are marked by matching rules to representative examples selected via a weighted cosine similarity measure. Logos are localized in an image via density-based clustering of matched features. Precision vs

California at Santa Barbara, University of

295

The Role of Acculturation in Nutrition Behaviors among Low Income Hispanic Women Living in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of respondents (70.0%, N= 1,709) has a weight statuses above normal and at a higher proportion than women in the State of Texas and the nation. Acculturation continues to interest social and behavioral researchers but variations on conceptualization, definition...

Atehortua, Nelson

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

296

Source and Listener Directivity for Interactive Wave-based Sound Propagation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Source and Listener Directivity for Interactive Wave-based Sound Propagation Ravish Mehra, Lakulish realistic acoustic effects produced by wave-based sound propagation for directional sources and listeners at the listener position as a weighted sum of precomputed SH sound fields. We propose a novel plane-wave

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

297

Asymptotic normalization coefficients and the Be-7(p, gamma)B-8 astrophysical S factor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the results of two proton transfer reactions, B-10(Be-7, B-8)Be-9 and N-14(Be-7, B-8)C-13, to obtain a weighted average of the measured asymptotic normalization coefficients for the virtual transition 7Be +pB-8. These coefficients...

Azhari, A.; Burjan, V.; Carstoiu, F.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Kroha, V.; Mukhamedzhanov, AM; Nunes, FM; Tang, X.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

1996 InternationalConference on Parallel Processing PARALLEL IMPLEMENTATION OF CONE BEAM TOMOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

projections us- ing computed tomography (CT) is the noninvasive measure of structure from external as follows: A. Weight projection data B. Convolve weighted projection data Pe*(u,v) = P&L, U) * h(u) C1996 InternationalConference on Parallel Processing PARALLEL IMPLEMENTATION OF CONE BEAM TOMOGRAPHY

Chaudhary, Vipin

299

EE-MAC: Energy Efficient Sensor MAC layer Protocol Afraa Attiah, Mustafa Ilhan Akbas, Mainak Chatterjee, Damla Turgut  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chatterjee, Damla Turgut Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science University of Central access control (MAC) protocol for distributed wireless sensor networks. EE-MAC achieves a low-duty-cycle and active states. We consider a weighted linear combination of delay and energy saving as the performance

Turgut, Damla

300

Optimality, Fairness, and Robustness in Speed Scaling Designs --Extended Version  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scaler to minimize a weighted sum of expected response time and energy use per job. We prove) minimize the total energy used in order to meet job deadlines, e.g., [6, 25] (ii) minimize the average of expected response time and energy usage per job [1, 5]. In this work we focus on the third objective

Andrew, Lachlan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decibel dba a-weighted" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The structure of simple Lie algebras with some representations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. If fiPO, then the sero linear form is a weight of the algebra H and H c: R . PROOF. Suppose h, h'Cfl, then Ahh' = [h, h']Efl Since 5 is a nilpotent algebra, then for a sufficiently large n n times 0 ~[h, . . . , [h, [h, h'

Davenport, William Harold

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

A Thermochemical and Theoretical Study of the Phenylpyridine Isomers M. A. V. Ribeiro da Silva,* M. A. R. Matos, and C. A. Rio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Wang, G. Nichols, and J. S. Chickos Department of Chemistry, UniVersity of MissourisSt. Louis, St-gas chromatography. The enthalpy of sublimation of 4-phenylpyridine was obtained as a weighted mean of the value by correlation-gas chromatography, and the enthalpy of sublimation of the para isomer determined both by Calvet

Chickos, James S.

303

Weighted Marshall-Olkin Bivariate Exponential Distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weighted Marshall-Olkin Bivariate Exponential Distribution Ahad Jamalizadeh & Debasis Kundu of weighted Marshall-Olkin bivariate exponential distribu- tions. This new singular distribution has of this paper is to introduce a weighted Marshall-Olkin bivariate exponential (WMOBE) distribution, using

Kundu, Debasis

304

204 BULLETIN OF TRE UNITEII sfrxrnsFISTI coxaiissIoN. red flesh and are delicious eating. The growth of lhis ish in a place  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

it passes from a weight of S gmms to S kilograms [$ ounce to 153 pouurls: about], jucreasing a tliousaucl Rhiiid carp and those of Montreuil-sur-lder are highly esteemccl, viliile those of the Lot River pass in big boxes for f'i.01~two to tliree weeks in running river mfer, so as to be rid of` the muddy taste

305

Weight and volume changing device with liquid metal transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents a weight-changing device based on the transfer of mass. We chose liquid metal (Ga-In-Tin eutectic) and a bi-directional pump to control the mass that is injected into or removed from a target object. ...

Niiyama, Ryuma

306

Predicting Classes in Need of Refactoring: An Application of Static Metrics Liming Zhao Jane Huffman Hayes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In general, the following process is followed by a software team performing refactoring: Identify code1 Predicting Classes in Need of Refactoring: An Application of Static Metrics Liming Zhao Jane to predicting refactoring candidates. Using a selected set of static metrics and a weighted ranking method

Hayes, Jane E.

307

www.goviks.com For additional information about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Idaho State, Montana, Sacramento State, Montana State and Northern Colorado. Viking Home Events take-725-8585 Cheerleading & Dance (M/W), Darlene Brady, 503-725-5604 Scholarships Scholarships are determined by each coach quarterly fee. Personal Fitness Students may use the Stott Center exercise facilities including a weight

308

Technique for information retrieval using enhanced latent semantic analysis generating rank approximation matrix by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A technique for information retrieval includes parsing a corpus to identify a number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. A weighted morpheme-by-document matrix is generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus and based at least in part on a weighting function. The weighted morpheme-by-document matrix separately enumerates instances of stems and affixes. Additionally or alternatively, a term-by-term alignment matrix may be generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. At least one lower rank approximation matrix is generated by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix and/or the term-by-term alignment matrix.

Chew, Peter A; Bader, Brett W

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

309

Armor systems including coated core materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

Chu, Henry S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lillo, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McHugh, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

Armor systems including coated core materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

311

Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Steffler, Eric D.; Swank, W. David

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

312

Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

Daniels, Michael A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Heaps, Ronald J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Steffler, Eric D (Idaho Falls, ID); Swank, William D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

313

Methods of producing armor systems, and armor systems produced using such methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

Chu, Henry S; Lillo, Thomas M; McHugh, Kevin M

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

314

Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 0.015-0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in the alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the Mo content.

Leitnaker, James M. (Kingston, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Control of bed height in a fluidized bed gasification system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a fluidized bed apparatus a method for controlling the height of the fdized bed, taking into account variations in the density of the bed. The method comprises taking simultaneous differential pressure measurements at different vertical elevations within the vessel, averaging the differential pressures, determining an average fluidized bed density, then periodically calculating a weighting factor. The weighting factor is used in the determination of the actual bed height which is used in controlling the fluidizing means.

Mehta, Gautam I. (Greensburg, PA); Rogers, Lynn M. (Export, PA)

1983-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

316

EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR PARTICLE PHYSICS CERN--PPE/93--38  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

observables relating to global event shapes, energy correlations and jet rates. The data have been compared to about 10%, and the final result, based on a weighted average, is: ff s (M Z 0) = 0:120 \\Sigma 0 2 , S. Dado 22 , G.M.Dallavalle 2 , S. De Jong 13 , L.A. del Pozo 5 , H.Deng 17 , A. Dieckmann 11

317

Gravity Control produced by a Thermoionic Current through the Air at Very Low Pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It was observed that samples hung above a thermoionic current exhibit a weight decrease directly proportional to the intensity of the current. The observed phenomenon appears to be absolutely new and unprecedented in the literature and can not be understood in the framework of the general relativity. It is pointed out the possibility that this unexpected effect is connected with a possible correlation between gravity and electromagnetism.

Fran De Aquino

2006-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

318

On Assessing Robustness in Transportation Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that commodity. Also, for each commodity i, a weight wti : E R+ 0 is dened that quanties the provided quality of service (QoS), when this com- modity is routed along an edge e or a path p, where wti(p) = ep wti(e). Smaller weight means better QoS. When a commodity is not routed along its shortest w.r.t. wti (optimal w

Zaroliagis, Christos D.

319

Numerical procedure for calculating temperature profiles in LMFBR coolant channels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new numerical procedure (which makes use of a weighted residuals procedure in space and a fully-implicit finite difference procedure in time), for calculating temperatures in an LMFBR coolant channel has been developed and incorporated into the Super System Code (SSC). This procedure is highly accurate on a nodal basis and has greatly increased computational efficiency as compared to the method formerly in SSC.

Horak, W.C.; Kennett, R.J.; Guppy, J.G.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

The Application of Integrated Logistic Support Concepts in Energy Project Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compressed Air Energy Storage Nuclear Fisioo - LWR, LMFBR Open Cycle MHO Steam Systems Trash Energy Conversion EVALUATION CRITERIA Geothermal: Liquid dominated Vapor Dominated HDR ? Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Steam System Advanced Steam Sys tern... of the system is evaluated. Each cri terion is assigned a weight (ai)' Parameters (Yk) which are directly measurable from the candidate systems are also analyzed here. Several times ILS considerations enter into criteria definitions. The output...

Meher-Homji, C. B.; Polad, F. S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decibel dba a-weighted" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The smallest possible heat engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct the smallest possible self contained heat engines; one composed of only two qubits, the other of only a single qutrit. The engines are self-contained as they do not require external sources of work and/or control. They are able to produce work which is used to continuously lift a weight. Despite the dimension of the engine being small, it is still able to operate at the Carnot efficiency.

Noah Linden; Sandu Popescu; Paul Skrzypczyk

2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

322

National K-12 Educator Conference; "Earth Then, Earth Now: Our Changing Climate" (July 23-24, 2008)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the support of the Department of Energy, the National Science Teachers Association and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Imaginary Lines Inc. (dba Sally Ride Science) delivered a highly successful 2-day conference to 165 K-12 educators on climate change. The event took place on July 23rd and 24th, 2008 at the NOAA facility in Silver Spring, MD. The conference celebrated the 25th anniversary of Dr. Sally Rides first flight into space in 1983 and examined how our understanding of Earth has changed in those 25 years. One the first day of the conference, participants heard a keynote talk delivered by Dr. Sally Ride, followed by presentations by well-known climate change scientists: Dr. Richard Somerville, Dr. Inez Fung and Dr. Susan Solomon. These sessions were concurrently webcast and made available to educators who were unable to attend the conference. On the second day of the conference, participants attended breakout sessions where they performed climate change activities (e.g. Neato Albedo!, Greenhouse in a Bottle, Shell-Shocked) that they could take back to their classrooms. Additional break-out sessions on using remote sensing images to illustrate climate change effects on Earths surface and how to address the climate change debate, were also offered. During lunch, participants attended an Educator Street Fair and had the opportunity to interact with representatives from NOAA, NASA, the EPA, NEEF and the JASON project. A follow-up evaluation survey was administered to all conference attendees immediately following the conference to evaluate its effectiveness. The results of this survey were overwhelmingly positive. The conference materials: presentation Power Points, workshop handouts and activities were available for teachers to download after the conference from the Sally Ride Science website. In summary, the approximately $55K support for the Department of Energy was used to help plan, deliver and evaluate the Earth Then, Earth Now: Our Changing Climate, conference which took place on July 23rd and 24th, 2008 at the NOAA facility in Silver Spring, MD.

Flammer, Karen; O'Shaughnessy, Tam

2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

323

Essential requirement of I-A region-identical host bone marrow or bone marrow-derived cells for tumor neutralization by primed L3T4+ T cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The antitumor activity of Meth A-hyperimmunized BALB/c mouse spleen cells (Meth A-Im-SPL) was assayed by the Winn test in H-2 incompatible bone marrow chimeras in closed colony CD-1 (nu/nu), inbred DDD/1(nu/nu) (H-2s), or inbred BALB/c(nu/nu) (H-2d) mice as recipients. We found that Meth A-Im-SPL suppressed Meth A growth in the chimera nude mice which were reconstituted with bone marrow cells of the H-2d haplotype (i.e., BALB/c, DBA/2 and B10.D2), but not in the chimeras which were reconstituted with bone marrow cells of the H-2a, H-2b, or H-2k haplotype (i.e., B10.A, B10, and B10.BR). These results suggested that H-2 restriction occurred between Meth A-Im-SPL and bone marrow or bone marrow-derived cells in tumor neutralization. Furthermore, Meth A-Im-SPL did not suppress Meth 1 tumors (antigenically distinct from Meth A tumors) in the presence or absence of mitomycin C-treated Meth A in a Winn assay. These results suggested that there is tumor specificity in the effector phase as well as in the induction phase. The phenotype of the effectors in the Meth A-Im-SPL was Thy-1.2+ and L3T4+, because Meth A-Im-SPL lost their antitumor activity with pretreatment with anti-Thy-1.2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) and complement or anti-L3T4 mAb and complement, but not with anti-Lyt-2.2 mAb and complement or complement alone. Positively purified L3T4+ T cells from Meth A-Im-SPL (Meth A-Im-L3T4), obtained by the panning method, suppressed the tumor growth in the chimera nude mice which were reconstituted with bone marrow cells of B10.KEA2 mice (that were I-A region-identical with Meth A-Im-L3T4 cells but not others in H-2) as well as B10.D2 cells (that were fully identical with Meth A-Im-L3T4 cells in H-2). We conclude that Meth A-Im-SPL (L3T4+) neutralized the tumors in collaboration with I-A region-identical host bone marrow or bone marrow-derived cells, and the neutralization was not accompanied by the bystander effect.

Ozawa, H.; Iwaguchi, T.; Kataoka, T.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Estimation of 6 groups of effective delayed neutron fraction based on continuous energy Monte Carlo method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New method is proposed to estimate effective fraction of delayed neutrons radiated from precursors categorized into 6 groups of decay constant. Instead of adjoint flux {Phi}*, an expected number of fission neutrons in next generations, M, is applied as a weight function [1]. Introduction of M enables us to calculate the fraction based on continuous energy Monte Carlo method. For the calculation of the fraction, an algorithm is established and implemented into the MCNP-5 code. The method is verified using reactor period data obtained in reactivity measurements. (authors)

Nauchi, Y.; Kameyama, T. [Central Research Inst., Electric Power Industry, 2-11-1 Iwado-Kita, Komae-shi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

A study of the trophodynamic relationships among zooplankton groups in the Gulf of Mexico utilizing biomass determined by dry weight and ash-free dry weight analyses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A STUDY OF THE TROPHODYNAMIC RELATIONSHIPS AMONG ZOOPLANKTON GROUPS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO UTILIZING BIOMASS DETERMINED BY DRY WEIGHT AND ASH-FREE DRY WEIGHT ANALYSES A Thesis by ALAN YAUTAK KWOK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A... WEIGHT AND ASH-FREE DRY WEIGHT ANALYSES A Thesis by ALAN YAUTAK KWOK Approved as to style and content by: '7 (Chairman of Committee) )l&z J( ii (Member) ember) (Head of Department) May 1980 ABSTRACT A Study of the Trophodynamic Relat1onships...

Kwok, Alan Yautak

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Proposed Junction-Box Stress Test (Using an Added Weight) for Use During the Module Qualification (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. Furthermore, there are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the j-box adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to the preliminary results conducted using representative materials and components.

Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S. R.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Computational procedures for weighted projective spaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a pdf print of the homonymous Maple file, freely available at http://www.maplesoft.com/applications/view.aspx?SID=127621, providing procedures which are able to produce the toric data associated with a (polarized) weighted projective space i.e. fans, polytopes and their equivalences. More originally it provides procedures which are able to detect a weights vector Q starting from either a fan or a polytope: we will call this process the recognition of a (polarized) weighted projective space. Moreover it gives procedures connecting polytopes of a polarized weighted projective space with an associated fan and viceversa.

Rossi, Michele

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Electrodeposition of amorphous ternary nickel-chromium-phosphorus alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a method of forming amorphous ternary nickel-phosphorus-chromium alloy deposits by electrodeposition on an electrically conductive substrate. It comprises: subjecting the substrate to an applied current density between about 20 and 40 A/dm{sup 2} at a temperature from the range of about 20{degrees} to 30{degrees} C. in a bath comprising: a chromium salt and a nickel salt in a weight ratio of about 3:1, a phosphorus source of about 0.3 M P concentration; about 0.3 M of a complexing agent; about 0.1 M of a supporting salt; and about 0.1 M of buffer.

Guilinger, T.R.

1990-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

329

Amplitude modulation of wind turbine noise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Due to swish and thump amplitude modulation, the noise of wind turbines cause more annoyance than other environmental noise of the same average level. The wind shear accounts for the thump modulation (van den Berg effect). Making use of the wind speed measurements at the hub height, as well as at the top and the bottom of the rotor disc (Fig.1), the non-standard wind profile is applied. It causes variations in the A-weighted sound pressure level, LpA. The difference between the maximum and minimum of LpA characterizes thump modulation (Fig.2).

Makarewicz, Rufin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Description of FLIPSIM V: a General Firm Level Policy Simulation Model.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) determined by a OP which maximizes expected utility~ Expected net returns are ca1culated using a weighted average of past yields and prices, modified for relevant loan rates, target prices, expected disaster or crop insurance payments , and acreage set... in this section of the model are being planned. 5 The farm programs in the model are activated separately by options specified by the analyst. When the net loan rate (price support) for a crop is greater than its market price, the operator's share of the crop...

Richardson, James W.; Nixon, Clair J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Singular subfactors of II_1 factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hilbert space H. Herein, we shall only concern ourselves with separable von Neumann algebras. B(H) will denote the bounded linear operators over H and all von Neumann algebras in B(H) shall be assumed to be unital; that is, they contain the identity... imprecise about. Any semifinite von Neumann algebra admits a normal, faithful, semifinite tracial weight ?. A weight is a map initially defined on the positive cone S+ of S mapping into [0,?] that respects multiplication by nonnegative reals and is linear...

Wiggins, Alan Daniel

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

332

On Statistical Aspects of Qjets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The process by which jet algorithms construct jets and subjets is inherently ambiguous and equally well motivated algorithms often return very different answers. The Qjets procedure was introduced by the authors to account for this ambiguity by considering many reconstructions of a jet at once, allowing one to assign a weight to each interpretation of the jet. Employing these weighted interpretations leads to an improvement in the statistical stability of many measurements. Here we explore in detail the statistical properties of these sets of weighted measurements and demonstrate how they can be used to improve the reach of jet-based studies.

Stephen D. Ellis; Andrew Hornig; David Krohn; Tuhin S. Roy

2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

333

Weighted Guidelines | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012NuclearBradleyBudgetFurnaces andWebmasterEnergyA>Weighted

334

Continuous-Estimator Representation for Monte Carlo Criticality Diagnostics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An alternate means of computing diagnostics for Monte Carlo criticality calculations is proposed. Overlapping spherical regions or estimators are placed covering the fissile material with a minimum center-to-center separation of the 'fission distance', which is defined herein, and a radius that is some multiple thereof. Fission neutron production is recorded based upon a weighted average of proximities to centers for all the spherical estimators. These scores are used to compute the Shannon entropy, and shown to reproduce the value, to within an additive constant, determined from a well-placed mesh by a user. The spherical estimators are also used to assess statistical coverage.

Kiedrowski, Brian C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

335

Tools and Methods for Hardening Communication Security of Energy Delivery Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the research and development work the TT Government Solutions (TTGS), d.b.a. Applied Communication Sciences (ACS), team performed for the Department of Energy Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems (CEDS) program. It addresses the challenges in protecting critical grid control and data communication, including the identification of vulnerabilities and deficiencies of communication protocols commonly used in energy delivery systems (e.g., ICCP, DNP3, C37.118, C12.22), as well as the development of effective means to detect and prevent the exploitation of such vulnerabilities and deficiencies. The team consists of TT Government Solutions (TTGS), a leading provider of communications solutions that has extensive experience in commercializing communications solutions. TTGS also has deep cyber security research and development expertise supporting a variety of customers. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), a leader in the cyber security research for the power grid. UIUC brings unique experience in designing secure communication protocols to this project. Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), an independent nonprofit that conducts research and development relating to the generation, delivery and use of electricity for the benefit of the public. EPRI brings to this effort its extensive technical expertise and its utility connections, with members representing more than 90 percent of the electricity generated and delivered in the United States. DTE Energy, the 10th largest electric utility in the US, which helps ensure that this project focuses on the needs of utilities and is rightly positioned to address the needs of the market place. We designed, developed, and demonstrated a modular and extensible ADEC-G (Agent-based, Distributed, Extensible Cybersecurity for the Grid) system for monitoring/detecting abnormal energy delivery systems (EDS) protocol usage and ensuring security coverage. Our approach consists of i. An online system with stateful model based checkers (SMBCs) that helps utilities monitor EDS protocol communication contexts and flag abnormal session behaviors; ii. An offline framework that security tool developers, operators, and auditors can use to verify security properties (leverages formal methods). The modular design of the ADEC-G online system enables its easy extension to cover added protocol features, to introduce new monitoring capabilities, and to apply to additional communication protocols. Its monitoring capabilities and user interface features also facilitate visibilities into ongoing communication patterns and quick grasps of suspicious communication activities. The offline framework provides a platform not only for rigorous validation of security coverage, but also for systematic refinement of checker design leveraging the counter traces generated by the model checking tool. The ADEC-G online monitoring/detection system and the offline validation framework are both operational and have been demonstrated in various settings. The ADEC-G online system has also been integrated into TTGS SecureSmart Managed Security Services offering and been employed to perform security assessment in a section of a utilitys operational network as well as in other Smart Grid security pilot project offerings. TTGS is also in discussions with several system integrators for incorporating the integrated SecureSmart Managed Security Services offering as the cyber security solution for the nce of Operations Technology (OT) and Information Technology (IT).

Gadgil, Shrirang; Lin, Yow-Jian; Ghosh, Abhrajit; Samtani, Sunil; Kang, Jaewon; Siegell, Bruce; Kaul, Vikram; Unger, John; De Bruet, Andre; Martinez, Catherine; Vermeulen, Gerald; Rasche, Galen; Sternfeld, Scott; Berthier, Robin; Bobba, Rakesh; Campbell, Roy; Sanders, Williams; Lin, Yow-Jian

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

336

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved HVAC system for portable classrooms was specified to address key problems in existing units. These included low energy efficiency, poor control of and provision for adequate ventilation, and excessive acoustic noise. Working with industry, a prototype improved heat pump air conditioner was developed to meet the specification. A one-year measurement-intensive field-test of ten of these IHPAC systems was conducted in occupied classrooms in two distinct California climates. These measurements are compared to those made in parallel in side by side portable classrooms equipped with standard 10 SEER heat pump air conditioner equipment. The IHPAC units were found to work as designed, providing predicted annual energy efficiency improvements of about 36 percent to 42 percent across California's climate zones, relative to 10 SEER units. Classroom ventilation was vastly improved as evidenced by far lower indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations. TheIHPAC units were found to provide ventilation that meets both California State energy and occupational codes and the ASHRAE minimum ventilation requirements; the classrooms equipped with the 10 SEER equipment universally did not meet these targets. The IHPAC system provided a major improvement in indoor acoustic conditions. HVAC system generated background noise was reduced in fan-only and fan and compressor modes, reducing the nose levels to better than the design objective of 45 dB(A), and acceptable for additional design points by the Collaborative on High Performance Schools. The IHPAC provided superior ventilation, with indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations that showed that the Title 24 minimum ventilation requirement of 15 CFM per occupant was nearly always being met. The opposite was found in the classrooms utilizing the 10 SEER system, where the indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations frequently exceeded levels that reflect inadequate ventilation. Improved ventilation conditions in the IHPAC lead to effective removal of volatile organic compounds and aldehydes, on average lowering the concentrations by 57 percent relative to the levels in the 10 SEER classrooms. The average IHPAC to 10 SEER formaldehyde ratio was about 67 percent, indicating only a 33 percent reduction of this compound in indoor air. The IHPAC thermal control system provided less variability in occupied classroom temperature than the 10 SEER thermostats. The average room temperatures in all seasons tended to be slightly lower in the IHPAC classrooms, often below the lower limit of the ASHRAE 55 thermal comfort band. State-wide and national energy modeling provided conservative estimates of potential energy savings by use of the IHPAC system that would provide payback a the range of time far lower than the lifetime of the equipment. Assuming electricity costs of $0.15/kWh, the perclassroom range of savings is from about $85 to $195 per year in California, and about $89 to $250 per year in the U.S., depending upon the city. These modelsdid not include the non-energy benefits to the classrooms including better air quality and acoustic conditions that could lead to improved health and learning in school. Market connection efforts that were part of the study give all indication that this has been a very successful project. The successes include the specification of the IHPAC equipment in the CHPS portable classroom standards, the release of a commercial product based on the standards that is now being installed in schools around the U.S., and the fact that a public utility company is currently considering the addition of the technology to its customer incentive program. These successes indicate that the IHPAC may reach its potential to improve ventilation and save energy in classrooms.

Apte, Michael G.; Norman, Bourassa; Faulkner, David; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Hotchi, Toshfumi; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Wang, Duo

2008-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

337

Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We take the perspective of a microgrid that has installed distribution energy resources (DER) in the form of distributed generation with combined heat and power applications. Given uncertain electricity and fuel prices, the microgrid minimizes its expected annual energy bill for various capacity sizes. In almost all cases, there is an economic and environmental advantage to using DER in conjunction with demand response (DR): the expected annualized energy bill is reduced by 9percent while CO2 emissions decline by 25percent. Furthermore, the microgrid's risk is diminished as DER may be deployed depending on prevailing market conditions and local demand. In order to test a policy measure that would place a weight on CO2 emissions, we use a multi-criteria objective function that minimizes a weighted average of expected costs and emissions. We find that greater emphasis on CO2 emissions has a beneficial environmental impact only if DR is available and enough reserve generation capacity exists. Finally, greater uncertainty results in higher expected costs and risk exposure, the effects of which may be mitigated by selecting a larger capacity.

Siddiqui, Afzal; Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Lai, Judy

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Apparatus and system for multivariate spectral analysis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and system for determining the properties of a sample from measured spectral data collected from the sample by performing a method of multivariate spectral analysis. The method can include: generating a two-dimensional matrix A containing measured spectral data; providing a weighted spectral data matrix D by performing a weighting operation on matrix A; factoring D into the product of two matrices, C and S.sup.T, by performing a constrained alternating least-squares analysis of D=CS.sup.T, where C is a concentration intensity matrix and S is a spectral shapes matrix; unweighting C and S by applying the inverse of the weighting used previously; and determining the properties of the sample by inspecting C and S. This method can be used by a spectrum analyzer to process X-ray spectral data generated by a spectral analysis system that can include a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an Energy Dispersive Detector and Pulse Height Analyzer.

Keenan, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Kotula, Paul G. (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

339

The Neutrino Mass Hierarchy from Nuclear Reactor Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10 years from now reactor neutrino experiments will attempt to determine which neutrino mass eigenstate is the most massive. In this letter we present the results of more than seven million detailed simulations of such experiments, studying the dependence of the probability of successfully determining the mass hierarchy upon the analysis method, the neutrino mass matrix parameters, reactor flux models, geoneutrinos and, in particular, combinations of baselines. We show that a recently reported spurious dependence of the data analysis upon the high energy tail of the reactor spectrum can be removed by using a weighted Fourier transform. We determine the optimal baselines and corresponding detector locations. For most values of the CP-violating, leptonic Dirac phase delta, a degeneracy prevents NOvA and T2K from determining either delta or the hierarchy. We determine the confidence with which a reactor experiment can determine the hierarchy, breaking the degeneracy.

Emilio Ciuffoli; Jarah Evslin; Xinmin Zhang

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

340

Work extraction and thermodynamics for individual quantum systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermodynamics is traditionally concerned with systems comprised of a large number of particles. Here we present a framework for extending thermodynamics to individual quantum systems, including explicitly a thermal bath and work-storage device (essentially a `weight' that can be raised or lowered). We prove that the second law of thermodynamics holds in our framework, and give a simple protocol to extract the optimal amount of work from the system, equal to its change in free energy. Our results apply to any quantum system in an arbitrary initial state, in particular including non-equilibrium situations. The optimal protocol is essentially reversible, similar to classical Carnot cycles, and indeed, we show that it can be used it to construct a quantum Carnot engine.

Paul Skrzypczyk; Anthony J. Short; Sandu Popescu

2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decibel dba a-weighted" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

A H-infinity Fault Detection and Diagnosis Scheme for Discrete Nonlinear System Using Output Probability Density Estimation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, a H-infinity fault detection and diagnosis (FDD) scheme for a class of discrete nonlinear system fault using output probability density estimation is presented. Unlike classical FDD problems, the measured output of the system is viewed as a stochastic process and its square root probability density function (PDF) is modeled with B-spline functions, which leads to a deterministic space-time dynamic model including nonlinearities, uncertainties. A weighting mean value is given as an integral function of the square root PDF along space direction, which leads a function only about time and can be used to construct residual signal. Thus, the classical nonlinear filter approach can be used to detect and diagnose the fault in system. A feasible detection criterion is obtained at first, and a new H-infinity adaptive fault diagnosis algorithm is further investigated to estimate the fault. Simulation example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

Zhang Yumin; Lum, Kai-Yew [Temasek Laboratories, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117508 (Singapore); Wang Qingguo [Depa. Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

342

Heavy-duty truck population, activity and usage patterns. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the study was to update the heavy-duty truck (HDT) population, activity (e.g., vehicle miles traveled (VMT), numbers of starts and trips, trip duration, etc.), and usage patterns type of service/business (e.g., delivery, construction, etc.), area of operation (i.e., local, short-haul, long-haul) for HDT`s registered and/or operated in California. The population and activity estimates were done on a weight-class-specific basis light-heavy-duty, medium-heavy-duty and heavy-heavy-duty. Population, activity and usage estimates were based primarily on Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) registration data and Truck Inventory and Usage Survey (TIUS) data. In addition to the analysis of existing data (i.e., DMV and TIUS), 42 HDTs were fitted with on-board data loggers that recorded numbers of trips and starts, daily VMT and travel by time-of-day.

Fischer, M.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Data assimilation for stratified convection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show how the 3DVAR data assimilation methodology can be used in the astrophysical context of a two-dimensional convection flow. We study the way this variational approach finds best estimates of the current state of the flow from a weighted average of model states and observations. We use numerical simulations to generate synthetic observations of a vertical two-dimensional slice of the outer part of the solar convection zone for varying noise levels and implement 3DVAR when the covariance matrices are scalar. Our simulation results demonstrate the capability of 3DVAR to produce error estimates of system states between up to tree orders of magnitude below the original noise level present in the observations. This work exemplifies the importance of applying data assimilation techniques in simulations of the stratified convection.

Svedin, Andreas; Brandenburg, Axel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Kron Reduction of Graphs with Applications to Electrical Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consider a weighted and undirected graph, possibly with self-loops, and its corresponding Laplacian matrix, possibly augmented with additional diagonal elements corresponding to the self-loops. The Kron reduction of this graph is again a graph whose Laplacian matrix is obtained by the Schur complement of the original Laplacian matrix with respect to a subset of nodes. The Kron reduction process is ubiquitous in classic circuit theory and in related disciplines such as electrical impedance tomography, smart grid monitoring, transient stability assessment in power networks, or analysis and simulation of induction motors and power electronics. More general applications of Kron reduction occur in sparse matrix algorithms, multi-grid solvers, finite--element analysis, and Markov chains. The Schur complement of a Laplacian matrix and related concepts have also been studied under different names and as purely theoretic problems in the literature on linear algebra. In this paper we propose a general graph-theoretic f...

Dorfler, Florian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Opcode counting for performance measurement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods, systems and computer program products are disclosed for measuring a performance of a program running on a processing unit of a processing system. In one embodiment, the method comprises informing a logic unit of each instruction in the program that is executed by the processing unit, assigning a weight to each instruction, assigning the instructions to a plurality of groups, and analyzing the plurality of groups to measure one or more metrics. In one embodiment, each instruction includes an operating code portion, and the assigning includes assigning the instructions to the groups based on the operating code portions of the instructions. In an embodiment, each type of instruction is assigned to a respective one of the plurality of groups. These groups may be combined into a plurality of sets of the groups.

Gara, Alan; Satterfield, David L; Walkup, Robert E

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

346

Smart Onboard Inspection of High Pressure Gas Fuel Cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of natural gas as an alternative fuel in automotive applications is not widespread primarily because of the high cost and durability of the composite storage tanks. Tanks manufactured using carbon fiber are desirable in weight critical passenger vehicles because of the low density of carbon fiber. The high strength of carbon fiber also translates to a weight reduction because thinner wall designs are possible to withstand the internal pressure loads. However, carbon fiber composites are prone to impact damage that over the life of the storage tank may lead to an unsafe condition for the vehicle operator. A technique that potentially may be a reliable indication of developing hazardous conditions in composite fuel tanks is imbedded fiber optics. The applicability of this technique to onboard inspection is discussed and results from preliminary lab testing indicate that fiber optic sensors can reliably detect impact damage.

Beshears, D.L.; Starbuck, J.M.

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

347

Ballasted photovoltaic module and module arrays  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photovoltaic (PV) module assembly including a PV module and a ballast tray. The PV module includes a PV device and a frame. A PV laminate is assembled to the frame, and the frame includes an arm. The ballast tray is adapted for containing ballast and is removably associated with the PV module in a ballasting state where the tray is vertically under the PV laminate and vertically over the arm to impede overt displacement of the PV module. The PV module assembly can be installed to a flat commercial rooftop, with the PV module and the ballast tray both resting upon the rooftop. In some embodiments, the ballasting state includes corresponding surfaces of the arm and the tray being spaced from one another under normal (low or no wind) conditions, such that the frame is not continuously subjected to a weight of the tray.

Botkin, Jonathan (El Cerrito, CA); Graves, Simon (Berkeley, CA); Danning, Matt (Oakland, CA)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

348

Interpreting scattering wave functions in the presence of energy-dependent interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In scattering theory, the squared relative wave function $|\\phi({\\bf q},{\\bf r})|^2$ is often interpreted as a weight, due to final-state interactions, describing the probability enhancement for emission with asymptotic relative momentum $q$. An equivalence relation also links the integral of the squared wave function over all coordinate space to the density of states. This relation, which plays an important role in understanding two-particle correlation phenomenology, is altered for the case where the potential is energy dependent, as is assumed in various forms of reaction theory. Here, the modification to the equivalence relation is derived, and it is shown that the squared wave function should be augmented by a additional factor if it is to represent the emission enhancement for final-state interactions. Examples with relativistic vector interactions, e.g., the Coulomb interaction, are presented.

Scott Pratt

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

349

Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Volume I.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective was to consolidate and evaluate all geologic, environmental, and legal and institutional information in existing records and files, and to apply a uniform methodology to the evaluation and ranking of sites to allow the making of creditable forecasts of the supply of geothermal energy which could be available in the region over a 20 year planning horizon. A total of 1265 potential geothermal resource sites were identified from existing literature. Site selection was based upon the presence of thermal and mineral springs or wells and/or areas of recent volcanic activity and high heat flow. 250 sites were selected for detailed analysis. A methodology to rank the sites by energy potential, degree of developability, and cost of energy was developed. Resource developability was ranked by a method based on a weighted variable evaluation of resource favorability. Sites were ranked using an integration of values determined through the cost and developability analysis. 75 figs., 63 tabs.

Bloomquist, R. Gordon

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Investigation of coal stockpiles of Tuncbilek thermal power plant with respect to time under atmospheric conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal power plants have delayed the coal that they will use at stockpiles mandatorily. If these coal stockpiles remain at the stockyards over a certain period of time, a spontaneous combustion can be started itself. Coal stocks under combustion threat can cost too much economically to coal companies. Therefore, it is important to take some precautions for saving the stockpiles from the spontaneous combustion. In this research a coal stockpile at Tuncbilek Thermal Power Plant which was formed in 5 m wide, 10 m long, and 3 m height with a weight of 120 tons to observe internal temperature changes with respect to time under normal atmospheric conditions. Later, internal temperature measurements were obtained at 20 points distributed all over two layers in the stockpile. The parameters, such as air temperature, humidity, atmosphere pressure, wind speed and direction, which are effective on the stockpiles, were measured and used to obtain the graphs of stockpiles' internal temperature.

Ozdeniz, A.H. [Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey). Dept. of Mining Engineering

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Derivation of Equivalent Continuous Dilution for Cyclic, Unsteady Driving Forces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article uses an analytical approach to determine the dilution of an unsteadily-generated solute in an unsteady solvent stream, under cyclic temporal boundary conditions. The goal is to find a simplified way of showing equivalence of such a process to a reference case where equivalent dilution is defined as a weighted average concentration. This derivation has direct applications to the ventilation of indoor spaces where indoor air quality and energy consumption cannot in general be simultaneously optimized. By solving the equation we can specify how much air we need to use in one ventilation pattern compared to another to obtain same indoor air quality. Because energy consumption is related to the amount of air exchanged by a ventilation system, the equation can be used as a first step to evaluate different ventilation patterns effect on the energy consumption. The use of the derived equation is demonstrated by representative cases of interest in both residential and non-residential buildings.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Technical University of Denmark, Department of Civil Engineering; Mortensen, Dorthe K.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

System and method employing a self-organizing map load feature database to identify electric load types of different electric loads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method identifies electric load types of a plurality of different electric loads. The method includes providing a self-organizing map load feature database of a plurality of different electric load types and a plurality of neurons, each of the load types corresponding to a number of the neurons; employing a weight vector for each of the neurons; sensing a voltage signal and a current signal for each of the loads; determining a load feature vector including at least four different load features from the sensed voltage signal and the sensed current signal for a corresponding one of the loads; and identifying by a processor one of the load types by relating the load feature vector to the neurons of the database by identifying the weight vector of one of the neurons corresponding to the one of the load types that is a minimal distance to the load feature vector.

Lu, Bin; Harley, Ronald G.; Du, Liang; Yang, Yi; Sharma, Santosh K.; Zambare, Prachi; Madane, Mayura A.

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

353

Central Limit Theorems for Empirical Processes Based on Stochastic Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uniform processes (for each t 2 E, X(t) is uniform on (0; 1)) and w(x) is a \\weight" func- tion satisfying some regularity properties. Then we give an example when X(t) := Ft(Bt) : t 2 E = [1; 2], where Bt is a Brownian motion and Ft is the distribution... ; P outer expectation on ( ;A;P) E ; P inner expectation on ( ;A;P) X, Xnj, X(t), Xt, Xnj(t) random variables or processes on ( ;A;P) P , Pnj laws of X, Xnj or laws of X(t), Xnj(t) if de ned Pf , Pnjf R f dP , R f dPnj F ( ) distribution...

Yang, Yuping

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

354

Alignment of RNA molecules: Binding energy and statistical properties of random sequences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new statistical approach to the problem of pairwise alignment of RNA sequences is proposed. The problem is analyzed for a pair of interacting polymers forming an RNA-like hierarchical cloverleaf structures. An alignment is characterized by the numbers of matches, mismatches, and gaps. A weight function is assigned to each alignment; this function is interpreted as a free energy taking into account both direct monomer-monomer interactions and a combinatorial contribution due to formation of various cloverleaf secondary structures. The binding free energy is determined for a pair of RNA molecules. Statistical properties are discussed, including fluctuations of the binding energy between a pair of RNA molecules and loop length distribution in a complex. Based on an analysis of the free energy per nucleotide pair complexes of random RNAs as a function of the number of nucleotide types c, a hypothesis is put forward about the exclusivity of the alphabet c = 4 used by nature.

Valba, O. V., E-mail: valbaolga@gmail.com [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University) (Russian Federation); Nechaev, S. K., E-mail: sergei.nechaev@gmail.com [Universite Paris Sud, LPTMS (France); Tamm, M. V., E-mail: thumm.m@gmail.com [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

Electrodeposition of amorphous ternary nickel-chromium-phosphorus alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a method of forming amorphous ternary nickel-phosphorus-chromium alloy deposits by electrodeposition on an electrically conductive substrate. It comprises: subjecting the substrate to an applied current density between about 20 and 40 A/dm{sup 2} at a temperature from the range of about 20{degrees} to 30{degrees}C in a bath. The bath comprising: a chromium salt and a nickel salt in a weight ratio of about 3:1, a phosphorus source at about 0.3 MP concentration; about 0.3 M of a complexing agent; about 0.1 M of a supporting salt; and about 1.0 M of buffer.

Guilinger, T.R.

1990-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

356

Influence of refraction on wind turbine noise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A semi-empirical method is applied to calculate the time-average sound level of wind turbine noise generation and propagation. Both are affected by wind shear refraction. Under upwind conditions the partially ensonified zone separates the fully ensonified zone (close to the turbine) and the shadow zone (far away from the turbine). Refraction is described in terms of the wind speed linear profile fitted to the power law profile. The rotating blades are treated as a two-dimensional circular source in the vertical plane. Inside the partially ensonified zone the effective A-weighted sound power decreases to zero when the receiver moves from the turbine toward the shadow zone. The presented results would be useful in practical applications to give a quick estimate of the effect of refraction on wind turbine noise.

Makarewicz, Rufin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Optimizing Medium Baseline Reactor Neutrino Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10 years from now medium baseline reactor neutrino experiments will attempt to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy from the observed antineutrino spectra. In this letter we present the results of more than four million detailed simulations of such experiments, studying the dependence of the probability of successfully determining the hierarchy upon the analysis method, the neutrino mass matrix parameters, reactor flux models and, in particular, combinations of baselines. We show that the strong dependence of the hierarchy determination upon mass differences and flux models found by Qian et al. results from a spurious dependence of the Fourier analysis upon the high energy tail of the reactor spectrum which can be removed by using a weighted Fourier transform. Such experiments necessarily use flux from multiple reactors at distinct baselines, smearing the oscillation signal and thus impeding the determination of the hierarchy. Using the results of our simulations, we determine the optimal baselines and corre...

Ciuffoli, Emilio; Zhang, Xinmin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

SAGEWASP. Optimal Electric Utility Expansion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SAGE-WASP is designed to find the optimal generation expansion policy for an electrical utility system. New units can be automatically selected from a user-supplied list of expansion candidates which can include hydroelectric and pumped storage projects. The existing system is modeled. The calculational procedure takes into account user restrictions to limit generation configurations to an area of economic interest. The optimization program reports whether the restrictions acted as a constraint on the solution. All expansion configurations considered are required to pass a user supplied reliability criterion. The discount rate and escalation rate are treated separately for each expansion candidate and for each fuel type. All expenditures are separated into local and foreign accounts, and a weighting factor can be applied to foreign expenditures.

Clark, P.D.II; Ullrich, C.J. [Lakeland Electric and Water, FL (United States)

1989-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

359

A compact ultra-clean system for deploying radioactive sources inside the KamLAND detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a compact, ultra-clean device used to deploy radioactive sources along the vertical axis of the KamLAND liquid-scintillator neutrino detector for purposes of calibration. The device worked by paying out and reeling in precise lengths of a hanging, small-gauge wire rope (cable); an assortment of interchangeable radioactive sources could be attached to a weight at the end of the cable. All components exposed to the radiopure liquid scintillator were made of chemically compatible UHV-cleaned materials, primarily stainless steel, in order to avoid contaminating or degrading the scintillator. To prevent radon intrusion, the apparatus was enclosed in a hermetically sealed housing inside a glove box, and both volumes were regularly flushed with purified nitrogen gas. An infrared camera attached to the side of the housing permitted real-time visual monitoring of the cable's motion, and the system was controlled via a graphical user interface.

T. I. Banks; S. J. Freedman; J. Wallig; N. Ybarrolaza; A. Gando; Y. Gando; H. Ikeda; K. Inoue; Y. Kishimoto; M. Koga; T. Mitsui; K. Nakamura; I. Shimizu; J. Shirai; A. Suzuki; Y. Takemoto; K. Tamae; K. Ueshima; H. Watanabe; B. D. Xu; H. Yoshida; S. Yoshida; A. Kozlov; C. Grant; G. Keefer; A. Piepke; T. Bloxham; B. K. Fujikawa; K. Han; K. Ichimura; H. Murayama; T. O'Donnell; H. M. Steiner; L. A. Winslow; D. A. Dwyer; R. D. McKeown; C. Zhang; B. E. Berger; C. E. Lane; J. Maricic; T. Miletic; M. Batygov; J. G. Learned; S. Matsuno; M. Sakai; G. A. Horton-Smith; K. E. Downum; G. Gratta; Y. Efremenko; O. Perevozchikov; H. J. Karwowski; D. M. Markoff; W. Tornow; K. M. Heeger; J. A. Detwiler; S. Enomoto; M. P. Decowski

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Alcohol-free alkoxide process for containing nuclear waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a method of containing nuclear waste. A composition is first prepared of about 25 to about 80%, calculated as SiO.sub.2, of a partially hydrolyzed silicon compound, up to about 30%, calculated as metal oxide, of a partially hydrolyzed aluminum or calcium compound, about 5 to about 20%, calculated as metal oxide, of a partially hydrolyzed boron or calcium compound, about 3 to about 25%, calculated as metal oxide, of a partially hydrolyzed sodium, potassium or lithium compound, an alcohol in a weight ratio to hydrolyzed alkoxide of about 1.5 to about 3% and sufficient water to remove at least 99% of the alcohol as an azeotrope. The azeotrope is boiled off and up to about 40%, based on solids in the product, of the nuclear waste, is mixed into the composition. The mixture is evaporated to about 25 to about 45% solids and is melted and cooled.

Pope, James M. (Monroeville, PA); Lahoda, Edward J. (Edgewood, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "decibel dba a-weighted" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A Fit to the Galactic Cosmic Ray Hydrogen and Helium Spectra at Voyager 1 at Low Energies and Earth Based Measurements at Much Higher Energies with Identical Rigidity Independent Source Spectra for the Hydrogen and Helium Nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Voyager 1 data from beyond the heliopause provide the first direct measurements of the interstellar cosmic ray spectra below 1 GeVnuc. In this paper we combine these Voyager measurements of H and He nuclei from 3-600 MeVnuc with higher energy measurements at 1 AU from the BESS and PAMELA experiments up to 100 GeVnuc. Using a Weighted Leaky Box Model for propagation in the galaxy, we obtain an excellent fit to these new Voyager observations and the much higher energy spectra up to 100 GeVnuc by using source spectra which are P-2.28, with the exponent independent of rigidity from low to high rigidities; along with a rigidity dependence of the diffusion path length which is P-0.5 at rigidities 1.00 GV, and possibly changing to P1.0 at lower rigidities.

Webber, W R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Three-dimensional gravity modeling and focusing inversion using rectangular meshes.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rectangular grid cells are commonly used for the geophysical modeling of gravity anomalies, owing to their flexibility in constructing complex models. The straightforward handling of cubic cells in gravity inversion algorithms allows for a flexible imposition of model regularization constraints, which are generally essential in the inversion of static potential field data. The first part of this paper provides a review of commonly used expressions for calculating the gravity of a right polygonal prism, both for gravity and gradiometry, where the formulas of Plouff and Forsberg are adapted. The formulas can be cast into general forms practical for implementation. In the second part, a weighting scheme for resolution enhancement at depth is presented. Modelling the earth using highly digitized meshes, depth weighting schemes are typically applied to the model objective functional, subject to minimizing the data misfit. The scheme proposed here involves a non-linear conjugate gradient inversion scheme with a weighting function applied to the non-linear conjugate gradient scheme's gradient vector of the objective functional. The low depth resolution due to the quick decay of the gravity kernel functions is counteracted by suppressing the search directions in the parameter space that would lead to near-surface concentrations of gravity anomalies. Further, a density parameter transformation function enabling the imposition of lower and upper bounding constraints is employed. Using synthetic data from models of varying complexity and a field data set, it is demonstrated that, given an adequate depth weighting function, the gravity inversion in the transform space can recover geologically meaningful models requiring a minimum of prior information and user interaction.

Commer, M.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Seismometer using a vertical long natural-period rotational pendulum with magnetic levitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have demonstrated a highly sensitive/wideband vertical-component seismometer using an astatic rotational pendulum to obtain a long natural period. This seismometer employs magnetic levitation for removing any parasitic resonances of a spring to support a weight due to gravity and the thermal dependence of the spring constant. The pendulum has a cylindrical plunger-type permanent magnet that has a weight at one side of its end edge. The plunger magnet is inserted into a uniform magnetic field generated by a window-frame-type permanent magnet, and attached to two crossed-leaf spring hinges as a rotational axis outside of the bore of the magnet. Magnetic forces applied to the plunger magnet counterbalance the gravitational force at the weight. To realize stable operation of the rotational pendulum without any unnecessary movements of the plunger magnet, a tilt of lines of the magnetic force in the bore of the window-frame magnet was compensated by a tilted magnetic-pole surface near to its opening. The field uniformity reached 10{sup -4} owing to this compensation. The thermal dependence of a magnetic field strength of about 10{sup -3}/K was also compensated by as much as 9x10{sup -5}/K by Ni-Fe metal having a negative permeability coefficient. The metal was attached along the sidewalls of the window-frame magnet. To determine the feedback control parameters for a feedback control seismometer, the natural period of a prototype rotational pendulum was measured. It was more than 8 s, and was able to be changed from 5 to 8 s by using an additional magnetic spring, similar to the voice coil actuator of a speaker. This change was in accordance with theoretical calculations, and showed that the pendulum movement did not include a big nonlinearity caused by the tilt of the lines of the magnetic force. No parasitic resonances were found during experiments. A velocity feedback-control circuit and a capacitance position detector to measure the weight position were applied to the rotational pendulum for building a feedback control seismometer. Observations showed that the noise level of the seismometer was less than about 10{sup -8} m/s at 1 Hz. This fruitful value is close to the specifications of the most sensitive seismometer, such as STS-I. However, low-frequency noise of about 10{sup -7} m/s, caused by a buoyancy change at the pendulum weight arising from atmospheric pressure variation, could be recognized. To decrease the noise, a vacuum chamber to isolate the atmospheric pressure variation should be employed in the next step of the study.

Otake, Yuji; Araya, Akito; Hidano, Kazuo [ERI, Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

Low-complexity atlas-based prostate segmentation by combining global, regional, and local metrics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To improve the efficiency of atlas-based segmentation without compromising accuracy, and to demonstrate the validity of the proposed method on MRI-based prostate segmentation application. Methods: Accurate and efficient automatic structure segmentation is an important task in medical image processing. Atlas-based methods, as the state-of-the-art, provide good segmentation at the cost of a large number of computationally intensive nonrigid registrations, for anatomical sites/structures that are subject to deformation. In this study, the authors propose to utilize a combination of global, regional, and local metrics to improve the accuracy yet significantly reduce the number of required nonrigid registrations. The authors first perform an affine registration to minimize the global mean squared error (gMSE) to coarsely align each atlas image to the target. Subsequently, atarget-specific regional MSE (rMSE), demonstrated to be a good surrogate for dice similarity coefficient (DSC), is used to select a relevant subset from the training atlas. Only within this subset are nonrigid registrations performed between the training images and the target image, to minimize a weighted combination of gMSE and rMSE. Finally, structure labels are propagated from the selected training samples to the target via the estimated deformation fields, and label fusion is performed based on a weighted combination of rMSE and local MSE (lMSE) discrepancy, with proper total-variation-based spatial regularization. Results: The proposed method was applied to a public database of 30 prostate MR images with expert-segmented structures. The authors method, utilizing only eight nonrigid registrations, achieved a performance with a median/mean DSC of over 0.87/0.86, outperforming the state-of-the-art full-fledged atlas-based segmentation approach of which the median/mean DSC was 0.84/0.82 when applying to their data set. Conclusions: The proposed method requires a fixed number of nonrigid registrations, independent of atlas size, providing desirable scalability especially important for a large or growing atlas. When applied to prostate segmentation, the method achieved better performance to the state-of-the-art atlas-based approaches, with significant improvement in computation efficiency. The proposed rationale of utilizing jointly global, regional, and local metrics, based on the information characteristic and surrogate behavior for registration and fusion subtasks, can be extended naturally to similarity metrics beyond MSE, such as correlation or mutual information types.

Xie, Qiuliang; Ruan, Dan, E-mail: druan@mednet.ucla.edu [The Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)] [The Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Development and Application of a Habitat Suitability Ranking Model for the New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus) is currently listed as a state threatened species in New Mexico and has been identified as potentially occurring within the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) boundary. We describe the development of a model to identify and rank habitat at LANL that may be suitable for occupation by this species. The model calculates a habitat suitability ranking (HSR) based on total plant cover, plant species composition, total number of plant species, and plant height. Input data for the model is based on the measurement of these variables at known locations where this species has been found within the Jemez Mountains. Model development included the selection of habitat variables, developing a probability distribution for each variable, and applying weights to each variable based on their overall importance in defining the suitability of the habitat. The habitat variables (HV) include plant cover (HV1), grass/forb cover (HV2), plant height (HV3), number of forbs (HV4), number of grasses (HV5), and sedge/rush cover (HV6). Once the HVs were selected, probability values were calculated for each. Each variable was then assigned a ''weighting factor'' to reflect the variables' importance relative to one another with respect to contribution to quality of habitat. The least important variable, sedge/rush cover, was assigned a weight factor of ''1'' with increasing values assigned to each remaining variable as follows: number of forbs = 3, number of grasses = 3, plant height = 5, grass/forb cover = 6, and total plant cover = 7. Based on the probability values and weighting factors, a HSR is calculated as follows: HSR = (P{sub HV1}(7) + P{sub HV2}(6) + P{sub HV3}(5) + P{sub HV4}(3) + P{sub HV5}(3) + P{sub HV6}(1)). Once calculated, the HSR values are placed into one of four habitat categorical groupings by which management strategies are applied.

James Biggs; Mary Mullen; Kathryn Bennett

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Physico-chemical fracturing and cleaning of coal. [Treatment with CO/sub 2/ in water at high pressure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a method of producing a crushable coal and reducing the metallic values in coal represented by Si, Al, Ca, Na, K, and Mg, which comprises contacting a coal/water mix in a weight ratio of from about 4:1 to 1:6 in the presence of CO/sub 2/ at pressures of about 100 to 1400 psi and a minimum temperature of about 15/sup 0/C for a period of about one or more hours to produce a treated coal/water mix. In the process the treated coal/water mix has reduced values for Ca and Mg of up to 78% over the starting mix and the advantageous CO/sub 2/ concentration is in the range of about 3 to 30 g/L. Below 5 g/L CO/sub 2/ only small effects are observed and above 30 g/L no further special advantages are achieved. The coal/water ratios in the range 1:2 to 2:1 are particularly desirable and such ratios are compatible with coal water slurry applications.

Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.R.

1983-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

367

ASSESS (Analytic System and Software for Evaluating Safeguards and Security) update: Current status and future developments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Analytic System and Software for Evaluating Safeguards and Security (ASSESS) has been released for use by DOE field offices and their contractors. In October, 1989, we offered a prototype workshop to selected representatives of the DOE community. Based on the prototype results, we held the first training workshop at the Central Training Academy in January, 1990. Four additional workshops are scheduled for FY 1990. ASSESS is a state-of-the-art analytical tool for management to conduct integrated evaluation of safeguards systems at facilities handling facilities. Currently, ASSESS focuses on the threat of theft/diversion of special nuclear material by insiders, outsiders, and a special form of insider/outsider collusion. ASSESS also includes a neutralization module. Development of the tool is continuing. Plans are underway to expand the capabilities of ASSESS to evaluate against violent insiders, to validate the databases, to expand the neutralization module, and to assist in demonstrating compliance with DOE Material Control and Accountability (MC A) Order 5633.3. These new capabilities include the ability to: compute a weighted average for performance capability against a spectrum of insider adversaries; conduct defense-in-depth analyses; and analyze against protracted theft scenarios. As they become available, these capabilities will be incorporated in our training program. ASSESS is being developed jointly by Lawrence Livermore and Sandia National Laboratories under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Safeguards and Security.

Al-Ayat, R.A. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Cousins, T.D. (USDOE, Washington, DC (USA)); Hoover, E.R. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

U.S. Residential Photovoltaic (PV) System Prices, Q4 2013 Benchmarks: Cash Purchase, Fair Market Value, and Prepaid Lease Transaction Prices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The price of photovoltaic (PV) systems in the United States (i.e., the cost to the system owner) has dropped precipitously in recent years, led by substantial reductions in global PV module prices. This report provides a Q4 2013 update for residential PV systems, based on an objective methodology that closely approximates the book value of a PV system. Several cases are benchmarked to represent common variation in business models, labor rates, and module choice. We estimate a weighted-average cash purchase price of $3.29/W for modeled standard-efficiency, polycrystalline-silicon residential PV systems installed in the United States. This is a 46% decline from the 2013-dollar-adjusted price reported in the Q4 2010 benchmark report. In addition, this report frames the cash purchase price in the context of key price metrics relevant to the continually evolving landscape of third-party-owned PV systems by benchmarking the minimum sustainable lease price and the fair market value of residential PV systems.

Davidson, C.; James, T. L.; Margolis, R.; Fu, R.; Feldman, D.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

A conservative spectral method for the Boltzmann equation with anisotropic scattering and the grazing collisions limit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the formulation of a conservative spectral method for the Boltzmann collision operator with anisotropic scattering cross-sections. The method is an extension of the conservative spectral method of Gamba and Tharkabhushanam [17,18], which uses the weak form of the collision operator to represent the collisional term as a weighted convolution in Fourier space. The method is tested by computing the collision operator with a suitably cut-off angular cross section and comparing the results with the solution of the Landau equation. We analytically study the convergence rate of the Fourier transformed Boltzmann collision operator in the grazing collisions limit to the Fourier transformed Landau collision operator under the assumption of some regularity and decay conditions of the solution to the Boltzmann equation. Our results show that the angular singularity which corresponds to the Rutherford scattering cross section is the critical singularity for which a grazing collision limit exists for the Boltzmann operator. Additionally, we numerically study the differences between homogeneous solutions of the Boltzmann equation with the Rutherford scattering cross section and an artificial cross section, which give convergence to solutions of the Landau equation at different asymptotic rates. We numerically show the rate of the approximation as well as the consequences for the rate of entropy decay for homogeneous solutions of the Boltzmann equation and Landau equation.

Gamba, Irene M. [Department of Mathematics, The University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); ICES, The University of Texas at Austin, 201 E. 24th St., Stop C0200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Haack, Jeffrey R. [Department of Mathematics, The University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Un-Casimir effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we present the un-Casimir effect, namely the study of the Casimir energy related to the presence of an un-particle component in addition to the electromagnetic field contribution. We derive this result by considering modifications of the Feynman propagator in the unparticle sector. The contribution of unparticles turns out to be the integral of Casimir energies for particles at fixed mass with a weight depending on the scaling dimension. The distinctive feature of the un-Casimir effect is a fractalization of metallic plates. This fact emerges through a new dependence of the Casimir energy on the distance between plates, that scales with a continuous power controlled by the scaling dimension. More importantly the un-Casimir effect offers a reliable testbed for unparticle physics. We find bounds on the unparticle scale that are independent on the effective coupling constant describing the interaction between the scale invariant sector and ordinary matter. Therefore the un-Casimir effect, contrary to what found in previous unparticle physics situations (\\textit{e.g.} g-2 and a variety LEP/LHC data analyses), actually removes the ambiguity associated to the value of such a coupling. We also discuss some of the possible implications for unparticle physics when non-perfect conducting plates are considered.

Antonia M. Frassino; Piero Nicolini; Orlando Panella

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

371

Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance metrics of airflow, sound, and combustion product capture efficiency (CE) were measured for a convenience sample of fifteen cooking exhaust devices, as installed in residences. Results were analyzed to quantify the impact of various device- and installation-dependent parameters on CE. Measured maximum airflows were 70% or lower than values noted on product literature for 10 of the devices. Above-the-cooktop devices with flat bottom surfaces (no capture hood) including exhaust fan/microwave combination appliances were found to have much lower CE at similar flow rates, compared to devices with capture hoods. For almost all exhaust devices and especially for rear-mounted downdraft exhaust and microwaves, CE was substantially higher for back compared with front burner use. Flow rate, and the extent to which the exhaust device extends over the burners that are in use, also had a large effect on CE. A flow rate of 95 liters per second (200 cubic feet per minute) was necessary, but not sufficient, to attain capture efficiency in excess of 75% for the front burners. A-weighted sound levels in kitchens exceeded 57 dB when operating at the highest fan setting for all 14 devices evaluated for sound performance.

Singer, Brett C.; Delp, William W.; Apte, Michael G.; Price, Philip N.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Examination of a Junction-Box Adhesion Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of its adhesion system. The details of the proposed test will be described, in addition to the preliminary results obtained using representative materials and components. The described discovery experiments examine moisture-cured silicone, foam tape, and hot-melt adhesives used in conjunction with PET or glass module 'substrates.' To be able to interpret the results, a set of material-level characterizations was performed, including thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. PV j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then placed inside an environmental chamber (at 85C, 85% relative humidity). Some systems did not remain attached through the discovery experiments. Observed failure modes include delamination (at the j-box/adhesive or adhesive/substrate interface) and phase change/creep. The results are discussed in the context of the application requirements, in addition to the plan for the formal experiment supporting the proposed modification to the qualification test.

Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Pileup Per Particle Identification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new method for pileup mitigation by implementing "pileup per particle identification" (PUPPI). For each particle we first define a local shape $\\alpha$ which probes the collinear versus soft diffuse structure in the neighborhood of the particle. The former is indicative of particles originating from the hard scatter and the latter of particles originating from pileup interactions. The distribution of $\\alpha$ for charged pileup, assumed as a proxy for all pileup, is used on an event-by-event basis to calculate a weight for each particle. The weights describe the degree to which particles are pileup-like and are used to rescale their four-momenta, superseding the need for jet-based corrections. Furthermore, the algorithm flexibly allows combination with other, possibly experimental, probabilistic information associated with particles such as vertexing and timing performance. We demonstrate the algorithm improves over existing methods by looking at jet $p_T$ and jet mass. We also find an improvement on non-jet quantities like missing transverse energy.

Daniele Bertolini; Philip Harris; Matthew Low; Nhan Tran

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

374

Kron Reduction of Graphs with Applications to Electrical Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consider a weighted and undirected graph, possibly with self-loops, and its corresponding Laplacian matrix, possibly augmented with additional diagonal elements corresponding to the self-loops. The Kron reduction of this graph is again a graph whose Laplacian matrix is obtained by the Schur complement of the original Laplacian matrix with respect to a subset of nodes. The Kron reduction process is ubiquitous in classic circuit theory and in related disciplines such as electrical impedance tomography, smart grid monitoring, transient stability assessment in power networks, or analysis and simulation of induction motors and power electronics. More general applications of Kron reduction occur in sparse matrix algorithms, multi-grid solvers, finite--element analysis, and Markov chains. The Schur complement of a Laplacian matrix and related concepts have also been studied under different names and as purely theoretic problems in the literature on linear algebra. In this paper we propose a general graph-theoretic framework for Kron reduction that leads to novel and deep insights both on the mathematical and the physical side. We show the applicability of our framework to various practical problem setups arising in engineering applications and computation. Furthermore, we provide a comprehensive and detailed graph-theoretic analysis of the Kron reduction process encompassing topological, algebraic, spectral, resistive, and sensitivity analyses. Throughout our theoretic elaborations we especially emphasize the practical applicability of our results.

Florian Dorfler; Francesco Bullo

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Image compression technique  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace`s equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image. 16 figs.

Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

1997-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

376

Commuting behavior of western U.S. residents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimation and interpretation of commutes to work has been studied extensively with respect to gender, race, and income. While the literature is extensive in these areas, there has been little research on regional differences between US states and territories. Since data which reports the commute to work is in average minutes, the distance traveled is estimated using estimates of the distance between home and work county centroids. The models differ in estimation of in-county commutes. The first assumes that the commute is equal to the radius of the county and the second estimates the commute as a weighted distance based on place location. Two data sets are compared, US National Guard data and US census data. Goal of this paper is to make conclusions about the commuting behavior of western residents through the use of these estimates, and therefore to provide a estimation method for distance commutes which can be used in further research. It is concluded that the radius method of estimation may be an over estimation, in particular in the western states. Since the non-western states are generally more homogeneously populated, this overestimation is not observed. It is recommended that the place location method be used for similar research, in particular studies dealing with western states. Suggestions are made for further research and recommendations are made for the US Army National Guard in regards to recruiting.

Caviglia, J. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Continuous process for conversion of coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved process for converting coal to liquid and gaseous products wherein the liquid products predominate and wherein reactor, tubing, and valve plugging due to carbonate salt formation is reduced by reacting crushed low-rank coal containing about 12 to 30% by weight of water in a solvent at a temperature in the range of about 455.degree. to 500.degree. C., under about 2000 to 5000 psi pressure of a H.sub.2 /CO mixture for a liquid residence time of about 20 to 60 minutes. The solvent is a fraction of liquid product defined on a weight basis as being made up of about 55% of which distills at less than 250.degree. C./lmm, about 20% of which is soluble in THF, and about 25% of which is carbon polymer and indigenous inorganic matter. The solvent is further defined as containing at least about 5 weight % of partially hydrogenated aromatics and/or fully hydrogenated aromatics and little or no alkylated aromatics or higher alkanes.

Knudson, Curtis L. (Grand Forks, ND); Willson, Warrack G. (Grand Forks, ND); Baker, Gene G. (Grand Forks, ND); Sondreal, Everett A. (Grand Forks, ND); Farnum, Sylvia A. (Grand Forks, ND)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Flexible ocean upwelling pipe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Development of computer program ENAUDIBL for computation of the sensation levels of multiple, complex, intrusive sounds in the presence of residual environmental masking noise  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relative audibility of multiple sounds occurs in separate, independent channels (frequency bands) termed critical bands or equivalent rectangular (filter-response) bandwidths (ERBs) of frequency. The true nature of human hearing is a function of a complex combination of subjective factors, both auditory and nonauditory. Assessment of the probability of individual annoyance, community-complaint reaction levels, speech intelligibility, and the most cost-effective mitigation actions requires sensation-level data; these data are one of the most important auditory factors. However, sensation levels cannot be calculated by using single-number, A-weighted sound level values. This paper describes specific steps to compute sensation levels. A unique, newly developed procedure is used, which simplifies and improves the accuracy of such computations by the use of maximum sensation levels that occur, for each intrusive-sound spectrum, within each ERB. The newly developed program ENAUDIBL makes use of ERB sensation-level values generated with some computational subroutines developed for the formerly documented program SPECTRAN.

Liebich, R. E.; Chang, Y.-S.; Chun, K. C.

2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

Conversion of Ethanol to Hydrocarbons on Hierarchical HZSM-5 Zeolites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study reports synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity of the nano-size hierarchical HZSM-5 zeolite with high mesoporosity produced via a solvent evaporation procedure. Further, this study compares hierarchical zeolites with conventional HZSM-5 zeolite with similar Si/Al ratios for the ethanol-to-hydrocarbon conversion process. The catalytic performance of the hierarchical and conventional zeolites was evaluated using a fixed-bed reactor at 360 C, 300 psig, and a weight hourly space velocity of 7.9 h-1. For the low Si/Al ratio zeolite (~40), the catalytic life-time for the hierarchical HZSM-5 was approximately 2 times greater than the conventional HZSM-5 despite its coking amount deposited 1.6 times higher than conventional HZSM-5. For the high Si/Al ratio zeolite (~140), the catalytic life-time for the hierarchical zeolite was approximately 5 times greater than the conventional zeolite and the amount of coking deposited was 2.1 times higher. Correlation was observed between catalyst life time, porosity, and the crystal size of the zeolite. The nano-size hierarchical HZSM-5 zeolites containing mesoporosity demonstrated improved catalyst life-time compared to the conventional catalyst due to faster removal of products, shorter diffusion path length, and the migration of the coke deposits to the external surface from the pore structure.

Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Zhang, He; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Measurement of Event Shapes in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at Center-of-Mass Energy 1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of event shape observables in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV is presented. The data for this analysis were recorded by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. The variables studied are the transverse thrust and thrust minor, both defined in the plane perpendicular to the beam direction. The observables are measured using energies from unclustered calorimeter cells. In addition to studies of the differential distributions, we present the dependence of event shape mean values on the leading jet transverse energy. Data are compared with pythia Tune A and to resummed parton level predictions that were matched to fixed order results at NLO accuracy (NLO+NLL). Predictions from pythia Tune A agree fairly well with the data. However, the underlying event contributes significantly to these observables, making it difficult to make direct comparisons to the NLO+NLL predictions, which do not account for the underlying event. To overcome this difficulty, we introduce a new observable, a weighted difference of the mean values of the thrust and thrust minor, which is less sensitive to the underlying event, allowing for a comparison with NLO+NLL. Both pythia Tune A and the NLO+NLL calculations agree well within the 20% theoretical uncertainty with the data for this observable, indicating that perturbative QCD successfully describes shapes of the hadronic final states.

Aaltonen, T.; Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Flow Distances on Open Flow Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Open flow network is a weighted directed graph with a source and a sink, depicting flux distributions on networks in the steady state of an open flow system. Energetic food webs, economic input-output networks, and international trade networks, are open flow network models of energy flows between species, money or value flows between industrial sectors, and goods flows between countries, respectively. Flow distances (first-passage or total) between any given two nodes $i$ and $j$ are defined as the average number of transition steps of a random walker along the network from $i$ to $j$ under some conditions. They apparently deviate from the conventional random walk distance on a closed directed graph because they consider the openness of the flow network. Flow distances are explicitly expressed by underlying Markov matrix of a flow system in this paper. With this novel theoretical conception, we can visualize open flow networks, calculating centrality of each node, and clustering nodes into groups. We apply fl...

Guo, Liangzhu; Shi, Peiteng; Wang, Jun; Huang, Xiaohan; Zhang, Jiang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

3.5 D temperature model of a coal stockpile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Overproduced coal mines that are not sold should remain in coal stock sites. If these coal stockpiles remain at the stock yards over a certain period of time, a spontaneous combustion can be started. Coal stocks under combustion threat can cost too much economically to coal companies. Therefore, it is important to take some precautions for saving the stockpiles from the spontaneous combustion. In this research, a coal stock which was 5 m wide, 10 m long, and 3 m in height, with a weight of 120 tons, was monitored to observe internal temperature changes with respect to time under normal atmospheric conditions. Internal temperature measurements were obtained at 20 points distributed all over the two layers in the stockpile. Temperatures measured by a specially designed mechanism were then stored into a computer every 3 h for a period of 3 months. Afterward, this dataset was used to delineate 3.5 D temporal temperature distribution models for these two levels, and they were used to analyze and interpret what was seen in these models to derive some conclusions. It was openly seen, followed, and analyzed that internal temperature changes in the stockpile went up to 31{sup o}C by 3.5 D models created for this research.

Ozdeniz, A.H.; Corumluoglu, O.; Kalayci, I.; Sensogut, C. [Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey). Dept. of Mining Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Towards Decentralized Trading: A Topological Investigation of the Dutch Medium and Low Voltage Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The traditional Power Grid has been designed in a hierarchical fashion, with Energy pushed from the large scale production facilities towards the end users. But with the increasing availability of micro and medium scale generating facilities, the situation is changing. Many end users can now produce energy and share it over the Power Grid. Naturally, end users need to have incentives to do so and might want to be able to act in an open decentralized energy market. In the present work, we offer a novel analysis of the Medium and Low Voltage Power Grids of the North Netherlands using statistical tools from the Complex Network Analysis field. We use a weighted model based on actual Grid data and propose a set of statistical measures to evaluate the adequacy of the current infrastructure for a decentralized energy market. Further, we use the insight gained by the analysis to propose parameters that tie the statistical topological measures to economic factors that might influence the attractiveness to the end user...

Pagani, Giuliano Andrea

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Stochastic, real-space, imaginary-time evaluation of third-order FeynmanGoldstone diagrams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new, alternative set of interpretation rules of FeynmanGoldstone diagrams for many-body perturbation theory is proposed, which translates diagrams into algebraic expressions suitable for direct Monte Carlo integrations. A vertex of a diagram is associated with a Coulomb interaction (rather than a two-electron integral) and an edge with the trace of a Green's function in real space and imaginary time. With these, 12 diagrams of third-order many-body perturbation (MP3) theory are converted into 20-dimensional integrals, which are then evaluated by a Monte Carlo method. It uses redundant walkers for convergence acceleration and a weight function for importance sampling in conjunction with the Metropolis algorithm. The resulting Monte Carlo MP3 method has low-rank polynomial size dependence of the operation cost, a negligible memory cost, and a naturally parallel computational kernel, while reproducing the correct correlation energies of small molecules within a few mE{sub h} after 10{sup 6} Monte Carlo steps.

Willow, Soohaeng Yoo [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States) [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Center for Superfunctional Materials, Department of Chemistry, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyojadong, Namgu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Hirata, So, E-mail: sohirata@illinois.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States) [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

386

Semiclassical (SC) Description of Electronically Non-AdiabaticDynamics via the Initial Value Representation (IVR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The initial value representation (IVR) of semiclassical (SC) theory is used in conjunction with the Meyer-Miller/Stock-Thoss description of electronic degrees of freedom in order to treat electronically non-adiabatic processes. It is emphasized that the classical equations of motion for the nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom that emerge in this description are precisely the Ehrenfest equations of motion (the force on the nuclei is the force averaged over the electronic wavefunction), but that the trajectories given by these equations of motion do not have the usual shortcomings of the traditional Ehrenfest model when they are used within the SC-IVR framework. For example, in the traditional Ehrenfest model (a mixed quantum-classical approach) the nuclear motion emerges from a non-adiabatic encounter on an average potential energy surface (a weighted average according to the population in the various electronic states), while the SC-IVR describes the correct correlation between electronic and nuclear dynamics, i.e., the nuclear motion is on one potential energy surface or the other depending on the electronic state. Calculations using forward-backward versions of SC-IVR theory (FB-IVR) are presented to illustrate this behavior. An even more approximate version of the SC-IVR, the linearized approximation (LSC-IVR), is slightly better than the traditional Ehrenfest model, but since it cannot describe quantum coherence effects, the LSC-IVR is also not able to describe the correct correlation between nuclear and electronic dynamics.

Ananth, V.; Venkataraman, C.; Miller, W.H.

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

387

The structure and intensity of energy use: Trends in five OECD nations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines trends in the structure and intensity of final energy demand in five OECD nations between 1973 and 1988. Our focus is on primary energy use, which weights fuels by their thermal content and multiplies district heat and electricity by factors of 1.15 and 3.24 to approximate the losses that occur in the conversion and distribution of these energy carriers. Growth in the level of energy-using activities, given 1973 energy intensities (energy use per unit of activity), would have raised primary energy use by 47% in the US, 44% in Norway, 33% in Denmark, 37% in West Germany, and 54% in Japan. Reductions in end-use energy intensities, given 1973 activity levels, would have reduced primary energy use by 20% in the US, 3% in Norway, 20% in Denmark, 17% in West Germany, and 14% in Japan. Growth in national income parallelled increases in a weighted index of energy-using activities in the US, West Germany, and Denmark but substantially outstripped activity growth in Norway and Japan. We conclude that changes in the structure of a nation's economy may lead to substantial changes in its energy/GDP ratio that are unrelated to changes in the technical efficiency of energy utilization. Similarly, changes in energy intensities may be greater or less than the aggregate change in the energy/GDP ratio of a given country, a further warning that this ratio may be an unreliable indicator of technical efficiency.

Howarth, R.B.; Schipper, L.; Andersson, B.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

The structure and intensity of energy use: Trends in five OECD nations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines trends in the structure and intensity of final energy demand in five OECD nations between 1973 and 1988. Our focus is on primary energy use, which weights fuels by their thermal content and multiplies district heat and electricity by factors of 1.15 and 3.24 to approximate the losses that occur in the conversion and distribution of these energy carriers. Grouch in the level of energy-using activities, given 1973 energy intensities (energy use per unit of activity), would have raised primary energy use by 46% in the US, 42% in Norway, 33% in Denmark, 37% in West Germany, and 53% in Japan. Reductions in end-use energy intensities, given 1973 activity levels, would have reduced primary energy use by 19% in the US, 3% in Norway, 20% in Denmark, 15% in West Germany, and l4% in Japan. Growth in national income parallelled increases in a weighted index of energy-using activities in the US, West Germany, and Denmark but substantially outstripped activity growth in Norway and Japan. We conclude that changes in the structure of a nation's economy may lead to substantial changes in its energy/GDP ratio that are unrelated to changes in the technical efficiency of energy utilization. Similarly, changes in energy intensities may be greater or less than the aggregate change in the energy/GDP ratio of a given country, a further warning that this ratio may be an unreliable indicator of technical efficiency.

Howarth, R.B.; Schipper, L. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Andersson, B. (Stockholm School of Economics (Sweden))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

The structure and intensity of energy use: Trends in five OECD nations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines trends in the structure and intensity of final energy demand in five OECD nations between 1973 and 1988. Our focus is on primary energy use, which weights fuels by their thermal content and multiplies district heat and electricity by factors of 1.15 and 3.24 to approximate the losses that occur in the conversion and distribution of these energy carriers. Growth in the level of energy-using activities, given 1973 energy intensities (energy use per unit of activity), would have raised primary energy use by 47% in the US, 44% in Norway, 33% in Denmark, 37% in West Germany, and 54% in Japan. Reductions in end-use energy intensities, given 1973 activity levels, would have reduced primary energy use by 20% in the US, 3% in Norway, 20% in Denmark, 17% in West Germany, and 14% in Japan. Growth in national income parallelled increases in a weighted index of energy-using activities in the US, West Germany, and Denmark but substantially outstripped activity growth in Norway and Japan. We conclude that changes in the structure of a nation`s economy may lead to substantial changes in its energy/GDP ratio that are unrelated to changes in the technical efficiency of energy utilization. Similarly, changes in energy intensities may be greater or less than the aggregate change in the energy/GDP ratio of a given country, a further warning that this ratio may be an unreliable indicator of technical efficiency.

Howarth, R.B.; Schipper, L.; Andersson, B.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

The structure and intensity of energy use: Trends in five OECD nations. Revision  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines trends in the structure and intensity of final energy demand in five OECD nations between 1973 and 1988. Our focus is on primary energy use, which weights fuels by their thermal content and multiplies district heat and electricity by factors of 1.15 and 3.24 to approximate the losses that occur in the conversion and distribution of these energy carriers. Grouch in the level of energy-using activities, given 1973 energy intensities (energy use per unit of activity), would have raised primary energy use by 46% in the US, 42% in Norway, 33% in Denmark, 37% in West Germany, and 53% in Japan. Reductions in end-use energy intensities, given 1973 activity levels, would have reduced primary energy use by 19% in the US, 3% in Norway, 20% in Denmark, 15% in West Germany, and l4% in Japan. Growth in national income parallelled increases in a weighted index of energy-using activities in the US, West Germany, and Denmark but substantially outstripped activity growth in Norway and Japan. We conclude that changes in the structure of a nation`s economy may lead to substantial changes in its energy/GDP ratio that are unrelated to changes in the technical efficiency of energy utilization. Similarly, changes in energy intensities may be greater or less than the aggregate change in the energy/GDP ratio of a given country, a further warning that this ratio may be an unreliable indicator of technical efficiency.

Howarth, R.B.; Schipper, L. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Andersson, B. [Stockholm School of Economics (Sweden)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Life cycle assessment of a national policy proposal - The case of a Swedish waste incineration tax  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the core of EU and Swedish waste policy is the so-called waste hierarchy, according to which waste should first be prevented, but should otherwise be treated in the following order of prioritisation: reuse, recycling when environmentally motivated, energy recovery, and last landfilling. Some recent policy decisions in Sweden aim to influence waste management in the direction of the waste hierarchy. In 2001 a governmental commission assessed the economic and environmental impacts of introducing a weight-based tax on waste incineration, the purpose of which would be to encourage waste reduction and increase materials recycling and biological treatment. This paper presents the results of a life cycle assessment (LCA) of the waste incineration tax proposal. It was done in the context of a larger research project concerning the development and testing of a framework for Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA). The aim of this paper is to assess the life cycle environmental impacts of the waste incineration tax proposal, and to investigate whether there are any possibilities of more optimal design of such a tax. The proposed design of the waste incineration tax results in increased recycling, but only in small environmental improvements. A more elaborate tax design is suggested, in which the tax level would partly be related to the fossil carbon content of the waste.

Bjoerklund, Anna E. [Division of Environmental Strategies Research - fms, Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas vaeg 30 III, SE-100 44, Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: annab@infra.kth.se; Finnveden, Goeran [Division of Environmental Strategies Research - fms, Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas vaeg 30 III, SE-100 44, Stockholm (Sweden)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Efficiency at optimal work from finite reservoirs: a probabilistic perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We revisit the classic thermodynamic problem of maximum work extraction from two arbitrary sized hot and cold reservoirs, modelled as perfect gases. Assuming ignorance about the extent to which the process has advanced, which implies an ignorance about the final temperatures, we quantify the prior information about the process and assign a prior distribution to the unknown temperature(s). This requires that we also take into account the temperature values which are regarded to be unphysical in the standard theory, as they lead to a contradiction with the physical laws. Instead in our formulation, such values appear to be consistent with the given prior information and hence are included in the inference. We derive estimates of the efficiency at optimal work from the expected values of the final temperatures, and show that these values match with the exact expressions in the limit when any one of the reservoirs is very large compared to the other. For other relative sizes of the reservoirs, we suggest a weighting procedure over the estimates from two valid inference procedures, that generalizes the procedure suggested earlier in [J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. {\\bf 46}, 365002 (2013)]. Thus a mean estimate for efficiency is obtained which agrees with the optimal performance to a high accuracy.

Ramandeep S. Johal

2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

393

Method And Aparatus For Improving Resolution In Spectrometers Processing Output Steps From Non-Ideal Signal Sources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for processing step-like output signals generated by non-ideal, nominally single-pole ("N-1P") devices responding to possibly time-varying, pulse-like input signals of finite duration, wherein the goal is to recover the integrated areas of the input signals. Particular applications include processing step-like signals generated by detector systems in response to absorbed radiation or particles and, more particularly, to digitally processing such step-like signals in high resolution, high rate gamma ray (.gamma.-ray) spectrometers with resistive feedback preamplifiers connected to large volume germanium detectors. Superconducting bolometers can be similarly treated. The method comprises attaching a set of one or more filters to the device's (e.g., preamplifier's) output, capturing a correlated multiple output sample from the filter set in response to a detected event, and forming a weighted sum of the sample values to accurately recover the total area (e.g., charge) of the detected event.

Warburton, William K. (1300 Mills St., Menlo Park, CA 94025); Momayezi, Michael (San Francisco, CA)

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Efficiency issues related to probability density function comparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CANDID project (Comparison Algorithm for Navigating Digital Image Databases) employs probability density functions (PDFs) of localized feature information to represent the content of an image for search and retrieval purposes. A similarity measure between PDFs is used to identify database images that are similar to a user-provided query image. Unfortunately, signature comparison involving PDFs is a very time-consuming operation. In this paper, we look into some efficiency considerations when working with PDFS. Since PDFs can take on many forms, we look into tradeoffs between accurate representation and efficiency of manipulation for several data sets. In particular, we typically represent each PDF as a Gaussian mixture (e.g. as a weighted sum of Gaussian kernels) in the feature space. We find that by constraining all Gaussian kernels to have principal axes that are aligned to the natural axes of the feature space, computations involving these PDFs are simplified. We can also constrain the Gaussian kernels to be hyperspherical rather than hyperellipsoidal, simplifying computations even further, and yielding an order of magnitude speedup in signature comparison. This paper illustrates the tradeoffs encountered when using these constraints.

Kelly, P.M.; Cannon, M.; Barros, J.E.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Measurement of event shapes in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

A study of event-shape observables in proton-antiproton collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV is presented. The data for this analysis were recorded by the CDF II Detector at the Tevatron Collider. The variables studied are the transverse thrust and thrust minor, both defined in the plane perpendicular to the beam direction. The observables are measured using energies from unclustered calorimeter cells. In addition to studies of the differential distributions, we present the dependence of event-shape mean values on the leading-jet transverse energy. Data are compared with pythia Tune A and to resummed parton-level predictions that were matched to fixed-order results at next-to-leading-order (NLO) accuracy (NLO+NLL). Predictions from pythia Tune A agree fairly well with the data. However, the underlying event contributes significantly to these observables, making it difficult to make direct comparisons to the NLO+NLL predictions, which do not account for the underlying event. To overcome this difficulty, we introduce a new observable, a weighted difference of the mean values of the thrust and thrust minor, which is less sensitive to the underlying event, allowing for a comparison with NLO+NLL. Both pythia Tune A and the NLO+NLL calculations agree well within the 20% theoretical uncertainty with the data for this observable, indicating that perturbative QCD successfully describes shapes of the hadronic final states.

Aaltonen, T.; lvarez Gonzlez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; dAscenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; De Cecco, S.; De Lorenzo, G.; DellOrso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; dErrico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; DOnofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzlez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martnez, M.; Martnez-Ballarn, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

A comparison of fracture properties of selected geosynthetic products using pseudo strain damage theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tel it C40/17 PetroGrid 4582 Control Beam StarGrid G+PF GlasGrid 8501 Sample Identification B PD3 HC PG2 Recommended Tack Coat Rate (al ers) 0. 25 0. 20 0. 10 0. 23 None 0. 25 N/A Weight otTack Coat ( rams) 87. 6 701 35. 1 80.../12/00 7/14/00 7/12/00 7/14/00 7/21/00 7/24/00 77 5 C-9 0. 05 77 6 7/13/00 S-10 0. 25 7/20/00 7/21/00 7/31/00 77. 5 7/31/00 G-11 N/A N/A 8/03/00 8/08/00 77, 6 C-12 8/07/00 7/15/00 None N/A 8/08/00 7/18/00 8/11/00 8/01/00 77. 3 B-25 0. 25 7...

Cleveland, Gregory Scott

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Appraisal of the use of geothermal energy in state-owned buildings in Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An appraisal of the use of geothermal energy for space heating requirements for selected state-owned buildings in six communities in Colorado is presented. The appraisal addresses several components of a feasibility study for geothermal applications, including resource assessment, pipeline rights-of-way, well design and drilling program, conceptual engineering designs for retrofits of building heating systems, evaluations of economic feasibility, institutional requirements, and environmental considerations. Economic feasibility is determined from evaluation of four economic measures: a simple payback period in years; twenty-year annualized system costs (geothermal system versus conventional system); total twenty-year undiscounted energy savings; and total twenty-year present value energy savings. The results of the analyses of each feasibility component are finally ranked, using a weighting system, to arrive at an order ranking of the eleven state-owned buildings for overall feasibility. The relative total feasibility rankings and the absolute evaluations of economic competitiveness with the existing conventional-fuel heating systems show that several of the state facilities are likely candidates for conversion to geothermal hot water heating systems. The best candidate by far is the Colorado State Reformatory at Buena Vista. The geothermal resource at Buena Vista (Cottonwood Canyon and Chalk Creek) is a high quality resource with high water temperatures and a water quality adequate for direct flow through the building heating units.

Meyer, R.T.; Coe, B.A.; Dick, J.D.

1981-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

398

A computational model for viscous fluid flow, heat transfer, and melting in in situ vitrification melt pools  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MAGMA is a FORTRAN computer code designed to viscous flow in in situ vitrification melt pools. It models three-dimensional, incompressible, viscous flow and heat transfer. The momentum equation is coupled to the temperature field through the buoyancy force terms arising from the Boussinesq approximation. All fluid properties, except density, are assumed variable. Density is assumed constant except in the buoyancy force terms in the momentum equation. A simple melting model based on the enthalpy method allows the study of the melt front progression and latent heat effects. An indirect addressing scheme used in the numerical solution of the momentum equation voids unnecessary calculations in cells devoid of liquid. Two-dimensional calculations can be performed using either rectangular or cylindrical coordinates, while three-dimensional calculations use rectangular coordinates. All derivatives are approximated by finite differences. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a new fully implicit iterative technique, while the energy equation is differenced explicitly in time. Spatial derivatives are written in conservative form using a uniform, rectangular, staggered mesh based on the marker and cell placement of variables. Convective terms are differenced using a weighted average of centered and donor cell differencing to ensure numerical stability. Complete descriptions of MAGMA governing equations, numerics, code structure, and code verification are provided. 14 refs.

McHugh, P.R.; Ramshaw, J.D.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Trial-Run of a Junction-Box Attachment Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Engineering robust adhesion of the junction box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic module manufacturers during product development and manufacturing process control. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp-heat,' 'thermal-cycle,' or 'creep' tests within the IEC qualification protocol is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to a trial-run of the test procedure. The described experiments examine four moisture-cured silicones, four foam tapes, and a hot-melt adhesive used in conjunction with glass, KPE, THV, and TPE substrates. For the purpose of validating the experiment, j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then subjected to aging. The replicate mock-modules were aged in an environmental chamber (at 85 degrees C/85% relative humidity for 1000 hours; then 100 degrees C/<10% relative humidity for 200 hours) or fielded in Golden (CO), Miami (FL), and Phoenix (AZ) for one year. Attachment strength tests, including pluck and shear test geometries, were also performed on smaller component specimens.

Miller, D. C.; Deibert, S. L.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Avoidable waste management costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Using phase information to enhance speckle noise reduction in the ultrasonic NDE of coarse grain materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Materials with a coarse grain structure are becoming increasingly prevalent in industry due to their resilience to stress and corrosion. These materials are difficult to inspect with ultrasound because reflections from the grains lead to high noise levels which hinder the echoes of interest. Spatially Averaged Sub-Aperture Correlation Imaging (SASACI) is an advanced array beamforming technique that uses the cross-correlation between images from array sub-apertures to generate an image weighting matrix, in order to reduce noise levels. This paper presents a method inspired by SASACI to further improve imaging using phase information to refine focusing and reduce noise. A-scans from adjacent array elements are cross-correlated using both signal amplitude and phase to refine delay laws and minimize phase aberration. The phase-based and amplitude-based corrected images are used as inputs to a two-dimensional cross-correlation algorithm that will output a weighting matrix that can be applied to any conventional image. This approach was validated experimentally using a 5MHz array a coarse grained Inconel 625 step wedge, and compared to the Total Focusing Method (TFM). Initial results have seen SNR improvements of over 20dB compared to TFM, and a resolution that is much higher.

Lardner, Timothy; Gachagan, Anthony [Centre for Ultrasonic Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, G1 1XW (United Kingdom); Li, Minghui [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

402

Variational and Shape Prior-based Level Set Model for Image Segmentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new image segmentation model based on level sets approach is presented herein. We deal with radiographic medical images where boundaries are not salient, and objects of interest have the same gray level as other structures in the image. Thus, an a priori information about the shape we look for is integrated in the level set evolution for good segmentation results. The proposed model also accounts a penalization term that forces the level set to be close to a signed distance function (SDF), which then avoids the re-initialization procedure. In addition, a variant and complete Mumford-Shah model is used in our functional; the added Hausdorff measure helps to better handle zones where boundaries are occluded or not salient. Finally, a weighted area term is added to the functional to make the level set drive rapidly to object's boundaries. The segmentation model is formulated in a variational framework, which, thanks to calculus of variations, yields to partial differential equations (PDEs) to guide the level set evolution. Results obtained on both synthetic and digital radiographs reconstruction (DRR) show that the proposed model improves on existing prior and non-prior shape based image segmentation.

Diop, El Hadji S.; Jerbi, Taha; Burdin, Valerie [Image and Information Department, Telecom Bretagne / INSERM U650, Brest (France); Ba, Sileye O. [Signal and Communications Department, Telecom Bretagne / Lab-STICC, Brest (France)

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

403

Proton Therapy At Siteman Cancer Center: The State Of The Art  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Barnes-Jewish Hospital is on the verge of offering proton radiation therapy to its patients. Those treatments will be delivered from the first Monarch 250, a state-of-the-art cyclotron produced by Still River Systems, Inc., Littleton, MA. The accelerator is the world's first superconducting synchrocyclotron, with a field-strength of 10 tesla, providing the smallest accelerator for high-energy protons currently available. On May 14, 2010 it was announced that the first production unit had successfully extracted 250 MeV protons. That unit is scheduled for delivery to the Siteman Cancer Center, an NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center at Washington University School of Medicine. At a weight of 20 tons and with a diameter of less than 2 meters the compact cyclotron will be mounted on a gantry, another first for proton therapy systems. The single-energy system includes 3 contoured scatterers and 14 different range modulators to provide 24 distinct beam delivery configurations. This allows proton fields up to 25 cm in diameter, with a maximum range from 5.5 to 32 cm and spread-out-Bragg-peak extent up to 20 cm. Monte Carlo simulations have been run using MCNPX to simulate the clinical beam properties. Those calculations have been used to commission a commercial treatment planning system prior to final clinical measurements. MCNPX was also used to calculate the neutron background generated by protons in the scattering system and patient. Additional details of the facility and current status will be presented.

Bloch, Charles [Washington University School of Medicine, 4921 Parkview Place, St. Louis MO 63110 (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Using the Standard Solar Model to Constrain Composition and S-Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While standard solar model (SSM) predictions depend on approximately 20 input parameters, SSM neutrino flux predictions are strongly correlated with a single model output parameter, the core temperature $T_c$. Consequently, one can extract physics from solar neutrino flux measurements while minimizing the consequences of SSM uncertainties, by studying flux ratios with appropriate power-law weightings tuned to cancel this $T_c$ dependence. We re-examine an idea for constraining the primordial C+N content of the solar core from a ratio of CN-cycle $^{15}$O to pp-chain $^8$B neutrino fluxes, showing that nonnuclear SSM uncertainties in the ratio are small and effectively governed by a single parameter, the diffusion coefficient. We point out that measurements of both CN-I cycle neutrino branches -- $^{15}$O and $^{13}$N $\\beta$-decay -- could in principle lead to separate determinations of the core C and N abundances, due to out-of-equilibrium CN-cycle burning in the cooler outer layers of the solar core. Finally, we show that the strategy of constructing "minimum uncertainty" neutrino flux ratios can also test other properties of the SSM. In particular, we demonstrate that a weighted ratio of $^7$Be and $^8$B fluxes constrains a product of S-factors to the same precision currently possible with laboratory data.

Aldo Serenelli; Carlos Pena-Garay; W. C. Haxton

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

405

A New Methodology to Select the Preferred Solutions from the Pareto-optimal Set: Application to Polymer Extrusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the real world optimization problems involve multiple, usually conflicting, optimization criteria. Generating Pareto optimal solutions plays an important role in multi-objective optimization, and the problem is considered to be solved when the Pareto optimal set is found, i.e., the set of non-dominated solutions. Multi-Objective Evolutionary Algorithms based on the principle of Pareto optimality are designed to produce the complete set of non-dominated solutions. However, this is not allays enough since the aim is not only to know the Pareto set but, also, to obtain one solution from this Pareto set. Thus, the definition of a methodology able to select a single solution from the set of non-dominated solutions (or a region of the Pareto frontier), and taking into account the preferences of a Decision Maker (DM), is necessary. A different method, based on a weighted stress function, is proposed. It is able to integrate the user's preferences in order to find the best region of the Pareto frontier accordingly with these preferences. This method was tested on some benchmark test problems, with two and three criteria, and on a polymer extrusion problem. This methodology is able to select efficiently the best Pareto-frontier region for the specified relative importance of the criteria.

Ferreira, Jose C.; Gaspar-Cunha, Antonio [IPC - Institute for Polymer and Composites, University of Minho, Guimaraes (Portugal); Fonseca, Carlos M. [Centre for Intelligent Systems, University of Algarve, Faro (Portugal)

2007-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

406

The JLO Character for The Noncommutative Space of Connections of Aastrup-Grimstrup-Nest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In attempts to combine non-commutative geometry and quantum gravity, Aastrup-Grimstrup-Nest construct a semi-finite spectral triple, modeling the space of G-connections for G=U(1) or SU(2). AGN show that the interaction between the algebra of holonomy loops and the Dirac-type operator D reproduces the Poisson structure of General Relativity in Ashtekar's loop variables. This article generalizes AGN's construction to any connected compact Lie group G. A construction of AGN's semi-finite spectral triple in terms of an inductive limit of spectral triples is formulated. The refined construction permits the semi-finite spectral triple to be even when G is even dimensional. The Dirac-type operator D in AGN's semi-finite spectral triple is a weighted sum of a basic Dirac operator on G. The weight assignment is a diverging sequence that governs the "volume" associated to each copy of G. The JLO cocycle of AGN's triple is examined in terms of the weight assignment. An explicit condition on the weight assignment perturbations is given, so that the associated JLO class remains invariant. Such a condition leads to a functoriality property of AGN's construction.

Alan Lai

2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

407

Measurement of the charged kaon mass with the MIPP RICH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The currently accepted value of the charged kaon mass is 493.677 {+-} 0.013 MeV (26 ppm). It is a weighted average of six measurements, most of which use kaonic atom X-ray energy techniques. The two most recent and precise results dominate the average but differ by 122 ppm. Inconsistency in the data set needs to be resolved, preferably using independent techniques. One possibility uses the Cherenkov effect. A measurement of the charged kaon mass using this technique is presented. The data was taken with the Main Injector Particle Production experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory using a tagged beam of protons, kaons, and pions ranging in momentum from 37 GeV/c to 63 GeV/c. The measured value is 491.3 {+-} 1.7 MeV. This is within 1.4{sigma} of the current value. An improvement in precision by a factor of 35 would make this technique competitive for resolving the ambiguity in the X-ray data.

Graf, Nicholas J.; /Indiana U.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Examination of a Junction-Box Adhesion Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of its adhesion system. The details of the proposed test will be described, in addition to the preliminary results obtained using representative materials and components. The described discovery experiments examine moisture-cured silicone, foam tape, and hot-melt adhesives used in conjunction with PET or glass module 'substrates.' To be able to interpret the results, a set of material-level characterizations was performed, including thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. PV j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then placed inside an environmental chamber (at 85C, 85% relative humidity). Some systems did not remain attached through the discovery experiments. Observed failure modes include delamination (at the j-box/adhesive or adhesive/substrate interface) and phase change/creep. The results are discussed in the context of the application requirements, in addition to the plan for the formal experiment supporting the proposed modification to the qualification test.

Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Graph representation of protein free energy landscape  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermodynamics and kinetics of protein folding and protein conformational changes are governed by the underlying free energy landscape. However, the multidimensional nature of the free energy landscape makes it difficult to describe. We propose to use a weighted-graph approach to depict the free energy landscape with the nodes on the graph representing the conformational states and the edge weights reflecting the free energy barriers between the states. Our graph is constructed from a molecular dynamics trajectory and does not involve projecting the multi-dimensional free energy landscape onto a low-dimensional space defined by a few order parameters. The calculation of free energy barriers was based on transition-path theory using the MSMBuilder2 package. We compare our graph with the widely used transition disconnectivity graph (TRDG) which is constructed from the same trajectory and show that our approach gives more accurate description of the free energy landscape than the TRDG approach even though the latter can be organized into a simple tree representation. The weighted-graph is a general approach and can be used on any complex system.

Li, Minghai; Duan, Mojie; Fan, Jue; Huo, Shuanghong, E-mail: shuo@clarku.edu [Gustaf H. Carlson School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Clark University, 950 Main Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 01610 (United States)] [Gustaf H. Carlson School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Clark University, 950 Main Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 01610 (United States); Han, Li [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Clark University, 950 Main Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 01610 (United States)] [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Clark University, 950 Main Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 01610 (United States)

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

410

A hybrid approach for predicting the distribution of vibro-acoustic energy in complex built-up structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Finding the distribution of vibro-acoustic energy in complex built-up structures in the mid-to-high frequency regime is a difficult task. In particular, structures with large variation of local wavelengths and/or characteristic scales pose a challenge referred to as the mid-frequency problem. Standard numerical methods such as the finite element method (FEM) scale with the local wavelength and quickly become too large even for modern computer architectures. High frequency techniques, such as statistical energy analysis (SEA), often miss important information such as dominant resonance behaviour due to stiff or small scale parts of the structure. Hybrid methods circumvent this problem by coupling FEM/BEM and SEA models in a given built-up structure. In the approach adopted here, the whole system is split into a number of subsystems which are treated by either FEM or SEA depending on the local wavelength. Subsystems with relative long wavelengths are modelled using FEM. Making a diffuse field assumption for the wave fields in the short wave length components, the coupling between subsystems can be reduced to a weighted random field correlation function. The approach presented results in an SEA-like set of linear equations which can be solved for the mean energies in the short wavelength subsystems.

Dmitrii N Maksimov; Gregor Tanner

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

411

Connecting section and associated systems concept for the spray calciner/in-can melter process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For a number of years, researchers at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory have been developing processes and equipment for converting high-level liquid wastes to solid forms. One of these processes is the Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter system. To immobilize high-level liquid wastes, this system must be operated remotely, and the calcine must be reliably conveyed from the calciner to the melting furnace. A concept for such a remote conveyance system was developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and equipment was tested under full-scale, nonradioactive conditions. This concept and the design of demonstration equipment are described, and the results of equipment operation during experimental runs of 7 d are presented. The design includes a connecting section and its associated systems - a canister sypport and alignment concept and a weight-monitoring system for the melting furnace. Overall, the runs demonstrated that the concept design is an acceptable method of connecting the two pieces of process equipment together. Although the connecting section has not been optimized in all areas of concern, it provides a first-generation design of a production-oriented system.

Petkus, L.L.; Gorton, P.S.; Blair, H.T.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

The $^7$Be Solar Neutrino Line: A Reflection of the Central Temperature Distribution of the Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A precise test of the theory of stellar evolution can be performed by measuring the average difference in energy between the neutrino line produced by ${\\rm ^7Be}$ electron capture in the solar interior and the corresponding neutrino line produced in a terrestrial laboratory. This energy shift is calculated to be 1.29~keV (to an accuracy of a few percent) for the dominant ground-state to ground-state transition. The energy shift is approximately equal to the average temperature of the solar core, computed by integrating the temperature over the solar interior with a weighting factor equal to the locally-produced $^7$Be neutrino emission. The characteristic modulation of the ${\\rm ^7Be}$ line shape that would be caused by either vacuum neutrino oscillations or by matter-enhanced (MSW) neutrino oscillations is shown to be small. Other frequently-discussed weak interaction solutions to the solar neutrino problem are also not expected to change significantly the line profile. Therefore, a measurement of the energy shift is a measurement of the central temperature distribution of the sun.

John N. Bahcall

1994-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

413

All-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S4 data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on an all-sky search with the LIGO detectors for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range 50-1000 Hz and with the frequency's time derivative in the range -1.0E-8 Hz/s to zero. Data from the fourth LIGO science run (S4) have been used in this search. Three different semi-coherent methods of transforming and summing strain power from Short Fourier Transforms (SFTs) of the calibrated data have been used. The first, known as "StackSlide", averages normalized power from each SFT. A "weighted Hough" scheme is also developed and used, and which also allows for a multi-interferometer search. The third method, known as "PowerFlux", is a variant of the StackSlide method in which the power is weighted before summing. In both the weighted Hough and PowerFlux methods, the weights are chosen according to the noise and detector antenna-pattern to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. The respective advantages and disadvantages of these methods are discussed. Observing no evidence of periodic gravitationa...

Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Agresti, J; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Belczynski, K; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bogenstahl, J; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burmeister, O; Busby, D; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cantley, C A; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Casey, M M; Castaldi, G; Cepeda, C; Chalkey, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chiadini, F; Chin, D; Chin, E; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Clark, J; Cochrane, P; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coward, D; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Croce, R P; Crooks, D R M; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Dalrymple, J; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; De Bra, D; Degallaix, J; Degree, M; Demma, T; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Daz, M; Dickson, J; Di Credico, A; Diederichs, G; Dietz, A; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Dumas, J C; Dupuis, R J; Dwyer, J G; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Fiumara, V; Fotopoulos, N; Franzen, A; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Galdi, V; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; Gonzlez, G; Gossler, S; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, a C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, J; Gretarsson, A M; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grnewald, S; Gnther, M; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hammer, D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Howell, E; Hoyland, D; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Innerhofer, E; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jackrel, D; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, Peter Ignaz Paul; Kalogera, V; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalili, F Ya; Kim, C; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R K; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lee, B; Lei, M; Leiner, J; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Longo, M; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Marano, S; Marka, S; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matone, L; Matta, V; Mavalvala, a N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McKenzie, K; McNabb, J W C; McWilliams, S; Meier, T; Melissinos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Mikhailov, E; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow Lowry, C; Moylan, A; Mudge, D; Mller, G; Mukherjee, S; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nash, T; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pierro, V; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ramsunder, M; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ribichini, L; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rodrguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Route, R; Rowan, S; Rdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; Sancho de la Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Schediwy, S; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Sidles, J A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Somiya, K; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H; Tanner, D B; Tarallo, M; Taylor, R; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D; Ungarelli, C; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vallisneri, M; Van Den Broeck, C; Varvella, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P; Villar, A; Vorvick, C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Trial Run of a Junction-Box Attachment Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development and manufacturing process control. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires), caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp-heat', 'thermal-cycle', or 'creep' tests within the IEC qualification protocol is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to a trial run of the test procedure. The described experiments examine 4 moisture-cured silicones, 4 foam tapes, and a hot-melt adhesive used in conjunction with glass, KPE, THV, and TPE substrates. For the purpose of validating the experiment, j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then subjected to aging. The replicate mock-modules were aged in an environmental chamber (at 85 deg C/85% relative humidity for 1000 hours; then 100 degrees C/<10% relative humidity for 200 hours) or fielded in Golden, Miami, and Phoenix for 1 year. Attachment strength tests, including pluck and shear test geometries, were also performed on smaller component specimens.

Miller, D.; Deibert, S.; Wohlgemuth, J.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Precision electronic speed controller for an alternating-current  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high precision controller for an alternating-current multi-phase electrical motor that is subject to a large inertial load. The controller was developed for and is particularly suitable for controlling, in a neutron chopper system, a heavy spinning rotor that must be rotated in phase-locked synchronism with a reference pulse train that is representative of an ac power supply signal having a meandering line frequency. The controller includes a shaft revolution sensor which provides a feedback pulse train representative of the actual speed of the motor. An internal digital timing signal generator provides a reference signal which is compared with the feedback signal in a computing unit to provide a motor control signal. In the preferred embodiment, the motor control signal is a weighted linear sum of a speed error voltage, a phase error voltage, and a drift error voltage, each of which is computed anew with each revolution of the motor shaft. The stator windings of the motor are driven by two amplifiers which are provided with input signals having the proper quadrature relationship by an exciter unit consisting of a voltage controlled oscillator, a binary counter, a pair of readonly memories, and a pair of digital-to-analog converters.

Bolie, Victor W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Conformal perturbation theory and higher spin entanglement entropy on the torus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the free fermion theory in 1+1 dimensions deformed by chemical potentials for holomorphic, conserved currents at finite temperature and on a spatial circle. For a spin-three chemical potential \\mu, the deformation is related at high temperatures to a higher spin black hole in hs[0] theory on AdS_3 spacetime. We calculate the order \\mu^2 corrections to the single interval Renyi and entanglement entropies on the torus using the bosonized formulation. A consistent result, satisfying all checks, emerges upon carefully accounting for both perturbative and winding mode contributions in the bosonized language. The order \\mu^2 corrections involve integrals that are finite but potentially sensitive to contact term singularities. We propose and apply a prescription for defining such integrals which matches the Hamiltonian picture and passes several non-trivial checks for both thermal corrections and the Renyi entropies at this order. The thermal corrections are given by a weight six quasi-modular form, whilst the Renyi entropies are controlled by quasi-elliptic functions of the interval length with modular weight six. We also point out the well known connection between the perturbative expansion of the partition function in powers of the spin-three chemical potential and the Gross-Taylor genus expansion of large-N Yang-Mills theory on the torus. We note the absence of winding mode contributions in this connection, which suggests qualitatively different entanglement entropies for the two systems.

Shouvik Datta; Justin R. David; S. Prem Kumar

2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

417

Deployment, release and recovery of ocean riser pipes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ocean thermal energy conversion facility includes a long pipe assembly which is supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. Cold water flows to the facility from deep in the ocean. The pipe assembly comprises an elongate pipe construction and a weight connected to the lower end of the construction by a line of selected length. A floatation collar is connected to the construction at its upper end to cause the construction to have positive buoyancy and a center of buoyancy closer to the upper end of the construction than its center of mass. The weight renders the entire pipe assembly negatively buoyant. In the event that support of the pipe assembly should be lost, as by release of the assembly from the facility hull in an emergency, the assembly sinks to the ocean floor where it is moored by the weight. The pipe construction floats submerged above the ocean floor in a substantially vertical attitude which facilitates recovery of the assembly.

Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA); Wetmore, Sherman B. (Westminster, CA); McNary, James F. (Santa Ana, CA)

1980-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

418

Aggregation in solvent extraction systems containing a malonamide, a dialklphosphoric acid and their mixtures.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aggregation phenomena in n-alkane solutions of di-n-hexylphosphoric acid (HDHP), N,N{prime}-dimethyl-N,N{prime}-dioctylhexylethoxymalonamide (DMDOHEMA), and their mixtures, were investigated by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), vapor pressure osmometry (VPO), and small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (SAXS and SANS). The objective of the study was to probe the formation of mixed HDHP-DMDOHEMA species before and after extraction of trivalent lanthanide and actinide (M{sup 3+}) nitrates. The most important species formed by HDHP upon metal extraction has the composition M(DHP){sub 3}(HDHP){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O). These species exist as spherical aggregates of the reverse micelle type with a polar core diameter of -7 {angstrom} and total diameter of -11 to -15 {angstrom}. The aggregation of DMDOHEMA is a progressive phenomenon, with an average aggregation number of -2 in the 0.2 to 0.6 M range and larger aggregates forming at higher concentrations. The metal loaded DMDOHEMA aggregates can be considered as interacting spheres with a polar core diameter between -11 and -16 {angstrom}, depending on composition, a total diameter of up to -25 {angstrom}, and a weight-average aggregation number of -9. The results obtained in this work provide strong evidence for the formation of mixed aggregates when mixtures of HDHP and DMDOHEMA are used for the extraction of trivalent Ln and An cations. These mixed reverse micelles have a diameter between 19 and 24 {angstrom} with a polar core diameter of 10 and to 14 {angstrom}. The most recurrent micellar composition is 2 HDHP and either 4 or 5 DMDOHEMA molecules.

Antonio, M. R.; Chiarizia, R.; Gannaz, B.; Berthon, L.; Zorz, N.; Hill, C.; Cote, G.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; CEA-Valrho; Univ. Pierre et Marie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

A computational study of an HCCI engine with direct injection during gas exchange  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a new probability density function (PDF)-based computational model to simulate a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine with direct injection (DI) during gas exchange. This stochastic reactor model (SRM) accounts for the engine breathing process in addition to the closed-volume HCCI engine operation. A weighted-particle Monte Carlo method is used to solve the resulting PDF transport equation. While simulating the gas exchange, it is necessary to add a large number of stochastic particles to the ensemble due to the intake air and EGR streams as well as fuel injection, resulting in increased computational expense. Therefore, in this work we apply a down-sampling technique to reduce the number of stochastic particles, while conserving the statistical properties of the ensemble. In this method some of the most important statistical moments (e.g., concentration of the main chemical species and enthalpy) are conserved exactly, while other moments are conserved in a statistical sense. Detailed analysis demonstrates that the statistical error associated with the down-sampling algorithm is more sensitive to the number of particles than to the number of conserved species for the given operating conditions. For a full-cycle simulation this down-sampling procedure was observed to reduce the computational time by a factor of 8 as compared to the simulation without this strategy, while still maintaining the error within an acceptable limit. Following the detailed numerical investigation, the model, intended for volatile fuels only, is applied to simulate a two-stroke, naturally aspirated HCCI engine fueled with isooctane. The in-cylinder pressure and CO emissions predicted by the model agree reasonably well with the measured profiles. In addition, the new model is applied to estimate the influence of engine operating parameters such as the relative air-fuel ratio and early direct injection timing on HCCI combustion and emissions. The qualitative trends observed in the parametric variation study match well with experimental data in literature. (author)

Su, Haiyun; Vikhansky, Alexander; Mosbach, Sebastian; Kraft, Markus [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); Bhave, Amit [Reaction Engineering Solutions Ltd., 61 Canterbury Street, Cambridge CB4 3QG (United Kingdom); Kim, Kyoung-Oh; Kobayashi, Tatsuo [Higashifuji Technical Center, Toyota Motor Corporation, Mishuku 1200, Susono, Shizuoka 480-1193 (Japan); Mauss, Fabian [Division of Combustion Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, Box 118, S-22100 Lund (Sweden)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has launched the commercial building initiative (CBI) in pursuit of its research goal of achieving zero-net-energy commercial buildings (ZNEB), i.e. ones that produce as much energy as they use. Its objective is to make these buildings marketable by 2025 such that they minimize their energy use through cutting-edge, energy-efficiency technologies and meet their remaining energy needs through on-site renewable energy generation. This paper examines how such buildings may be implemented within the context of a cost- or CO2-minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various technologies: photovoltaic modules (PV) and other on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and passive/demand-response technologies. A mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has a multi-criteria objective function is used. The objective is minimization of a weighted average of the building's annual energy costs and CO2 emissions. The MILP's constraints ensure energy balance and capacity limits. In addition, constraining the building's energy consumed to equal its energy exports enables us to explore how energy sales and demand-response measures may enable compliance with the ZNEB objective. Using a commercial test site in northernCalifornia with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find that a ZNEB requires ample PV capacity installed to ensure electricity sales during the day. This is complemented by investment in energy-efficient combined heat and power (CHP) equipment, while occasional demand response shaves energy consumption. A large amount of storage is also adopted, which may be impractical. Nevertheless, it shows the nature of the solutions and costs necessary to achieve a ZNEB. Additionally, the ZNEB approach does not necessary lead to zero-carbon (ZC) buildings as is frequently argued. We also show a multi-objective frontier for the CA example, whichallows us to estimate the needed technologies and costs for achieving a ZC building or microgrid.

Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Aki, Hirohisa; Lai, Judy

2009-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

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421

A combinatorial method for tracing objects using semantics of their shape.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a shape-first approach to finding automobiles and trucks in overhead images and include results from our analysis of an image from the Overhead Imaging Research Dataset [1]. For the OIRDS, our shape-first approach traces candidate vehicle outlines by exploiting knowledge about an overhead image of a vehicle: a vehicle's outline fits into a rectangle, this rectangle is sized to allow vehicles to use local roads, and rectangles from two different vehicles are disjoint. Our shape-first approach can efficiently process high-resolution overhead imaging over wide areas to provide tips and cues for human analysts, or for subsequent automatic processing using machine learning or other analysis based on color, tone, pattern, texture, size, and/or location (shape first). In fact, computationally-intensive complex structural, syntactic, and statistical analysis may be possible when a shape-first work flow sends a list of specific tips and cues down a processing pipeline rather than sending the whole of wide area imaging information. This data flow may fit well when bandwidth is limited between computers delivering ad hoc image exploitation and an imaging sensor. As expected, our early computational experiments find that the shape-first processing stage appears to reliably detect rectangular shapes from vehicles. More intriguing is that our computational experiments with six-inch GSD OIRDS benchmark images show that the shape-first stage can be efficient, and that candidate vehicle locations corresponding to features that do not include vehicles are unlikely to trigger tips and cues. We found that stopping with just the shape-first list of candidate vehicle locations, and then solving a weighted, maximal independent vertex set problem to resolve conflicts among candidate vehicle locations, often correctly traces the vehicles in an OIRDS scene.

Diegert, Carl F.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Methodological and Practical Considerations for DevelopingMultiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects inCentral America  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) andthe Center for Sustainable Development in the Americas (CSDA) conductedtechnical studies and organized two training workshops to developcapacity in Central America for the evaluation of climate changeprojects. This paper describes the results of two baseline case studiesconducted for these workshops, one for the power sector and one for thecement industry, that were devised to illustrate certain approaches tobaseline setting. Multiproject baseline emission rates (BERs) for themain Guatemalan electricity grid were calculated from 2001 data. Inrecent years, the Guatemalan power sector has experienced rapid growth;thus, a sufficient number of new plants have been built to estimateviable BERs. We found that BERs for baseload plants offsetting additionalbaseload capacity ranged from 0.702 kgCO2/kWh (using a weighted averagestringency) to 0.507 kgCO2/kWh (using a 10th percentile stringency),while the baseline for plants offsetting load-followingcapacity is lowerat 0.567 kgCO2/kWh. For power displaced from existing load-followingplants, the rate is higher, 0.735 kgCO2/kWh, as a result of the age ofsome plants used for meeting peak loads and the infrequency of their use.The approved consolidated methodology for the Clean Development Mechanismyields a single rate of 0.753 kgCO2/kWh. Due to the relatively smallnumber of cement plants in the region and the regional nature of thecement market, all of Central America was chosen as the geographicboundary for setting cement industry BERs. Unfortunately, actualoperations and output data were unobtainable for most of the plants inthe region, and many data were estimated. Cement industry BERs rangedfrom 205 kgCO2 to 225 kgCO2 per metric ton of cement.

Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion,Kristel

2004-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

423

Turbulence radiation interaction in Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations of nonpremixed piloted turbulent laboratory-scale flames  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical simulation results are presented for two axisymmetric, nonluminous turbulent piloted jet diffusion flames: Sandia Flame D (SFD) and Delft Flame III (DFIII). Turbulence is represented by a Reynolds stress transport model, while chemistry is modeled by means of steady laminar flamelets. We use the preassumed PDF approach for turbulence-chemistry interaction. A weighted sum of gray gases model is used for the gas radiative properties. The radiative transfer equation is solved using the discrete ordinates method in the conservative finite-volume formulation. The radiative loss leads to a decrease in mean temperature, but does not significantly influence the flow and mixing fields, in terms either of mean values or of rms values of fluctuations. A systematic analysis of turbulence-radiation interaction (TRI) is carried out. By considering five different TRI formulations, and comparing also with a simple optically thin model, individual TRI contributions are isolated and quantified. For both flames, effects are demonstrated of (1) influence of temperature fluctuations on the mean Planck function, (2) temperature and composition fluctuations on the mean absorption coefficient, and (3) correlation between absorption coefficient and Planck function. The strength of the last effect is stronger in DFIII than in SFD, because of stronger turbulence-chemistry interaction and lower mean temperature in DFIII. The impact of the choice of TRI model on the prediction of the temperature-sensitive minor species NO is determined in a postprocessing step with fixed flow and mixing fields. Best agreement for NO is obtained using the most complete representation of TRI. (author)

Habibi, A.; Merci, B. [Department of Flow, Heat and Combustion Mechanics, Ghent University, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Roekaerts, D. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Fermions in the Ashtekar-Barbero connection formalism for arbitrary values of the Immirzi parameter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ashtekar-Barbero-Immirzi formulation of general relativity is extended to include spinor matter fields. Our formulation applies to generic values of the Immirzi parameter and reduces to the Ashtekar-Romano-Tate approach when the Immirzi parameter is taken equal to the imaginary unit. The dynamics of the gravity-fermions coupled system is described by the Holst plus Dirac action with a nonminimal coupling term. The nonminimal interaction together with the Holst modification to the Hilbert-Palatini action reconstruct the Nieh-Yan invariant, so that the effective action coming out is the one of Einstein-Cartan theory with a typical Fermi-like interaction term: in spite of the presence of spinor matter fields, the Immirzi parameter plays no role in the classical effective dynamics and results to be only a multiplicative factor in front of a total divergence. We reduce the total action of the theory to the sum of dynamically independent Ashtekar-Romano-Tate actions for self and anti-self-dual connections, with different weights depending on the Immirzi parameter. This allows to calculate the constraints of the complete theory in a simple way, it is only necessary to realize that the Barbero-Immirzi connection is a weighted sum of the self and anti-self-dual Ashtekar connections. Finally the obtained constraints for the separated action result to be polynomial in terms of the self and anti-self-dual connections, this could have implications in the inclusion of spinor matter in the framework of nonperturbative quantum gravity.

Mercuri, Simone [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza', Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, I-00185, Rome (Italy); ICRA-International Center for Relativistic Astrophysics (Italy)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Heavy and Overweight Vehicle Defects Interim Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), along with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), has an interest in overweight commercial motor vehicles, how they affect infrastructure, and their impact on safety on the nation s highways. To assist both FHWA and FMCSA in obtaining more information related to this interest, data was collected and analyzed from two separate sources. A large scale nationwide data collection effort was facilitated by the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance as part of a special study on overweight vehicles and an additional, smaller set, of data was collected from the state of Tennessee which included a much more detailed set of data. Over a six-month period, 1,873 Level I inspections were performed in 18 different states that volunteered to be a part of this study. Of the 1,873 inspections, a vehicle out-of-service (OOS) violation was found on 44.79% of the vehicles, a rate significantly higher than the national OOS rate of 27.23%. The main cause of a vehicle being placed OOS was brake-related defects, with approximately 30% of all vehicles having an OOS brake violation. Only about 4% of vehicles had an OOS tire violation, and even fewer had suspension and wheel violations. Vehicle weight violations were most common on an axle group as opposed to a gross vehicle weight violation. About two thirds of the vehicles cited with a weight violation were overweight on an axle group with an average amount of weight over the legal limit of about 2,000 lbs. Data collection is scheduled to continue through January 2014, with more potentially more states volunteering to collect data. More detailed data collections similar to the Tennessee data collection will also be performed in multiple states.

Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Traction Drive Inverter Cooling with Submerged Liquid Jet Impingement on Microfinned Enhanced Surfaces (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Jet impingement is one means to improve thermal management for power electronics in electric-drive traction vehicles. Jet impingement on microfin-enhanced surfaces further augments heat transfer and thermal performance. A channel flow heat exchanger from a commercial inverter was characterized as a baseline system for comparison with two new prototype designs using liquid jet impingement on plain and microfinned enhanced surfaces. The submerged jets can target areas with the highest heat flux to provide local cooling, such as areas under insulated-gate bipolar transistors and diode devices. Low power experiments, where four diodes were powered, dissipated 105 W of heat and were used to validate computational fluid dynamics modeling of the baseline and prototype designs. Experiments and modeling used typical automotive flow rates using water-ethylene glycol as a coolant (50%-50% by volume). The computational fluid dynamics model was used to predict full inverter power heat dissipation. The channel flow and jet impingement configurations were tested at full inverter power of 40 to 100 kW (output power) on a dynamometer, translating to an approximate heat dissipation of 1 to 2 kW. With jet impingement, the cold plate material is not critical for the thermal pathway. A high-temperature plastic was used that could eventually be injection molded or formed, with the jets formed from a basic aluminum plate with orifices acting as nozzles. Long-term reliability of the jet nozzles and impingement on enhanced surfaces was examined. For jet impingement on microfinned surfaces, thermal performance increased 17%. Along with a weight reduction of approximately 3 kg, the specific power (kW/kg) increased by 36%, with an increase in power density (kW/L) of 12% compared with the baseline channel flow configuration.

Waye, S.; Narumanchi, S.; Moreno, G.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Air bottoming cycle: Use of gas turbine waste heat for power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a thermodynamic analysis of the Air Bottoming Cycle (ABC) as well as the results of a feasibility study for using the Air Bottoming Cycle for gas turbine waste heat recovery/power generation on oil/gas platforms in the North Sea. The basis for the feasibility study was to utilize the exhaust gas heat from an LM2500PE gas turbine. Installation of the ABC on both a new and an existing platform have been considered. A design reference case is presented, and the recommended ABC is a two-shaft engine with two compressor intercoolers. The compression pressure ratio was found optimal at 8:1. The combined gas turbine and ABC shaft efficiency wa/s calculated to 46.6 percent. The LM2500PE gas turbine contributes with 36.1 percent while the ABC adds 10.5 percent points to the gas turbine efficiency. The ABC shaft power output is 6.6 MW when utilizing the waste heat of an LM2500PE gas turbine. A preliminary thermal and hydraulic design of the ABC main components (compressor, turbine, intercoolers, and recuperator) was carried out. The recuperator is the largest and heaviest component (45 tons). A weight and cost breakdown of the ABC is presented. The total weight of the ABC package was calculated to 154 metric tons, and the ABC package cost to 9.4 million US$. An economical examination for three different cases was carried out. The results show that the ABC alternative (LM2500PE + ABC) is economical, with a rather good margin, compared to the other alternatives. The conclusion is that the Air Bottoming Cycle is an economical alternative for power generation on both new platforms and on existing platforms with demand for more power.

Bolland, O.; Foerde, M. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway). Div. of Thermal Energy and Hydropower; Haande, B. [Oil Engineering Consultants, Sandvika (Norway)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Clinical Assessment of Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation for Painful Metastatic Bone Tumors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose. To investigate the pain-alleviating effects of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) on metastatic bone tumors in relation to tumor size, combined therapy, and percent tumor necrosis rate following RFA. Methods. Subjects comprised 24 patients with 28 painful metastatic bone tumors. A 17G internally cooled electrode was inserted into the tumor for CT guidance and ablation was performed. Bone cement was injected following RFA for 4 tumors involving a weight-bearing bone, while 5 tumors were treated using combined RFA and external irradiation. Percent necrosis rate of the tumor was measured using contrast-enhanced computed tomography 1 week after RFA. Results. Improvement in the visual analog scale (VAS) score was 4.6 {+-} 2.2 for large tumors (>5 cm, n = 12), 3.7 {+-} 1.8 for medium-sized tumors (3.1-5.0 cm, n = 11), and 3.5 {+-} 1.7 for small tumors ({<=}3 cm, n = 4), with no significant differences noted among tumor sizes. Improvement in the VAS score was 3.5 {+-} 1.3 for the 4 tumors in the RFA + bone cement group, 3.2 {+-} 1.9 for the 5 tumors in the RFA + radiation therapy group, and 4.8 {+-} 2.2 for the 18 tumors in the RFA group. No significant differences were identified between groups. The improvement in the VAS score was 3.8 {+-} 2.3, 4.0 {+-} 1.9, and 4.7 {+-} 2.6 in patients with tumor necrosis rates of 0-49%, 50-74%, and 75-100%, respectively. No significant association was observed among these three groups. Conclusion. Percutaneous RFA therapy was effective in relieving pain due to metastatic bone tumors. No relationships appear to exist between initial response and tumor size, combined therapy, and percent tumor necrosis.

Kojima, Hiroyuki, E-mail: kojimah@takii.kmu.ac.jp; Tanigawa, Noboru; Kariya, Shuji; Komemushi, Atsushi; Shomura, Yuzo; Sawada, Satoshi [Kansai Medical University Takii Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Construction of energy-stable Galerkin reduced order models.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report aims to unify several approaches for building stable projection-based reduced order models (ROMs). Attention is focused on linear time-invariant (LTI) systems. The model reduction procedure consists of two steps: the computation of a reduced basis, and the projection of the governing partial differential equations (PDEs) onto this reduced basis. Two kinds of reduced bases are considered: the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) basis and the balanced truncation basis. The projection step of the model reduction can be done in two ways: via continuous projection or via discrete projection. First, an approach for building energy-stable Galerkin ROMs for linear hyperbolic or incompletely parabolic systems of PDEs using continuous projection is proposed. The idea is to apply to the set of PDEs a transformation induced by the Lyapunov function for the system, and to build the ROM in the transformed variables. The resulting ROM will be energy-stable for any choice of reduced basis. It is shown that, for many PDE systems, the desired transformation is induced by a special weighted L2 inner product, termed the %E2%80%9Csymmetry inner product%E2%80%9D. Attention is then turned to building energy-stable ROMs via discrete projection. A discrete counterpart of the continuous symmetry inner product, a weighted L2 inner product termed the %E2%80%9CLyapunov inner product%E2%80%9D, is derived. The weighting matrix that defines the Lyapunov inner product can be computed in a black-box fashion for a stable LTI system arising from the discretization of a system of PDEs in space. It is shown that a ROM constructed via discrete projection using the Lyapunov inner product will be energy-stable for any choice of reduced basis. Connections between the Lyapunov inner product and the inner product induced by the balanced truncation algorithm are made. Comparisons are also made between the symmetry inner product and the Lyapunov inner product. The performance of ROMs constructed using these inner products is evaluated on several benchmark test cases.

Kalashnikova, Irina; Barone, Matthew Franklin; Arunajatesan, Srinivasan; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

New Constraints on Dark Energy from Chandra X-rayObservations of the Largest Relaxed Galaxy Clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present constraints on the mean matter density, {Omega}{sub m}, dark energy density, {Omega}{sub DE}, and the dark energy equation of state parameter, w, using Chandra measurements of the X-ray gas mass fraction (fgas) in 42 hot (kT > 5keV), X-ray luminous, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters spanning the redshift range 0.05 < z < 1.1. Using only the fgas data for the 6 lowest redshift clusters at z < 0.15, for which dark energy has a negligible effect on the measurements, we measure {Omega}{sub m}=0.28{+-}0.06 (68% confidence, using standard priors on the Hubble Constant, H{sub 0}, and mean baryon density, {Omega}{sub b}h{sup 2}). Analyzing the data for all 42 clusters, employing only weak priors on H{sub 0} and {Omega}{sub b}h{sup 2}, we obtain a similar result on {Omega}{sub m} and detect the effects of dark energy on the distances to the clusters at {approx}99.99% confidence, with {Omega}{sub DE}=0.86{+-}0.21 for a non-flat LCDM model. The detection of dark energy is comparable in significance to recent SNIa studies and represents strong, independent evidence for cosmic acceleration. Systematic scatter remains undetected in the f{sub gas} data, despite a weighted mean statistical scatter in the distance measurements of only {approx}5%. For a flat cosmology with constant w, we measure {Omega}{sub m}=0.28{+-}0.06 and w=-1.14{+-}0.31. Combining the fgas data with independent constraints from CMB and SNIa studies removes the need for priors on {Omega}{sub b}h{sup 2} and H{sub 0} and leads to tighter constraints: {Omega}{sub m}=0.253{+-}0.021 and w=-0.98{+-}0.07 for the same constant-w model. More general analyses in which we relax the assumption of flatness and/or allow evolution in w remain consistent with the cosmological constant paradigm. Our analysis includes conservative allowances for systematic uncertainties. The small systematic scatter and tight constraints bode well for future dark energy studies using the f{sub gas} method.

Allen, S.W.; Rapetti, D.A.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Schmidt, R.W.; /Heidelberg, Astron. Rechen Inst.; Ebeling, H.; /Inst. Astron., Honolulu; Morris, G.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Fabian, A.C.; /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron.

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

431

Optimal Technology Investment and Operation in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings with Demand Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy has launched the Zero-Net-Energy (ZNE) Commercial Building Initiative (CBI) in order to develop commercial buildings that produce as much energy as they use. Its objective is to make these buildings marketable by 2025 such that they minimize their energy use through cutting-edge energy-efficient technologies and meet their remaining energy needs through on-site renewable energy generation. We examine how such buildings may be implemented within the context of a cost- or carbon-minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various technologies, such as photovoltaic (PV) on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and passive / demand-response technologies. We use a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has a multi-criteria objective function: the minimization of a weighted average of the building's annual energy costs and carbon / CO2 emissions. The MILP's constraints ensure energy balance and capacity limits. In addition, constraining the building's energy consumed to equal its energy exports enables us to explore how energy sales and demand-response measures may enable compliance with the CBI. Using a nursing home in northern California and New York with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find that a ZNE building requires ample PV capacity installed to ensure electricity sales during the day. This is complemented by investment in energy-efficient combined heat and power equipment, while occasional demand response shaves energy consumption. A large amount of storage is also adopted, which may be impractical. Nevertheless, it shows the nature of the solutions and costs necessary to achieve ZNE. For comparison, we analyze a nursing home facility in New York to examine the effects of a flatter tariff structure and different load profiles. It has trouble reaching ZNE status and its load reductions as well as efficiency measures need to be more effective than those in the CA case. Finally, we illustrate that the multi-criteria frontier that considers costs and carbon emissions in the presence of demand response dominates the one without it.

Stadler , Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; ,, Hirohisa Aki; Lai, Judy

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

432

SU-E-I-78: Improving Prostatic Delineation Using Dual-Energy CT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Visual prostatic definition is difficult using conventional CT. This is because the prostate is surrounded closely with tissue of similar electron density. Definition is further hindered when the region contains high-Z material (such as fiducial markers). Dual-energy CT (DECT) is a technique where images are rendered using two tube voltages during a single scan session. This study evaluates DECT as a means of improving prostatic volume delineation for radiation oncology. Methods: The patients were scanned using a Definition AS20 (Siemens Healthcare, Malvern, PA). This device uses a single-tube configuration, where two scans of differing energies are performed in serial. The scans are acquired with tube voltage of 80kVp and 140kVp. Following acquisition, these scan data were used to generate effective monoenergetic scans ranging from 40keV to 190keV. In the current study, the data were presented to observers using a novel program, which allows real-time adjustment of window, level, and effective keV; all while scrolling through volumetric slices. Three patients were scanned, each with a different high-contrast material in or around the prostate: I-125 seeds, gold fiducial markers, and prostatic calcifications. These images are compared to a weighted average of the 80kVp and 140kVP scans, which yield a scan similar to that of a 120 kVp scan, which is a common tube voltage in radiation oncology. Results: Prostatic definition improved in each case. Differentiation of soft tissue from surrounding adipose improved with lower keV, while higher keV provided a reduction of high-z artifacts. Furthermore, the dynamic adjustment of the keV allowed observers to better recognize regions of differing tissue composition within this relatively homogeneous area. Conclusion: By simultaneously providing the observer with the benefits of high-energy images and low-energy images, and allowing adjustment in real-time, improved imaging in highly homogeneous regions such as the male pelvis is achievable.

Gersh, J; Fried, D [Gibbs Cancer Center ' Research Institute - Pelham, Greer, SC (United States)

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Stability of Bulk Metallic Glass Structure. Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fundamental origins of the stability of the (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), a prototype for a whole class of BMG formers, were explored. While much of the properties of their BMGs have been characterized, their glass-stability have not been explained in terms of the atomic and electronic structure. The local structure around all three constituent atoms was obtained, in a complementary way, using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), to probe the nearest neighbor environment of the metals, and extended energy loss fine structure (EXELFS), to investigate the environment around P. The occupied electronic structure was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} BMGs receive their stability from cumulative, and interrelated, effects of both atomic and electronic origin. The stability of the (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} BMGs can be explained in terms of the stability of Pd{sub 60}Ni{sub 20}P{sub 20} and Pd{sub 30}Ni{sub 50}P{sub 20}, glasses at the end of BMG formation. The atomic structure in these alloys is very similar to those of the binary phosphide crystals near x=0 and x=80, which are trigonal prisms of Pd or Ni atoms surrounding P atoms. Such structures are known to exist in dense, randomly-packed systems. The structure of the best glass former in this series, Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} is further described by a weighted average of those of Pd{sub 30}Ni{sub 50}P{sub 20} and Pd{sub 60}Ni{sub 20}P{sub 20}. Bonding states present only in the ternary alloys were found and point to a further stabilization of the system through a negative heat of mixing between Pd and Ni atoms. The Nagel and Tauc criterion, correlating a decrease in the density of states at the Fermi level with an increase in the glass stability, was consistent with greater stability of the Pd{sub x}Ni{sub 80-x}P{sub 20} glasses with respect to the binary alloys of P. A valence electron concentration of 1.8 e/a, which ensures the superpositioning of the first peak in the structure factor with twice the Fermi momentum, was used to calculate the interatomic potential of these alloys. The importance of Pd to the stability of the alloys is evidenced by the fact that replacing Ni and Pd places the nearest neighbor distances at more attractive positions in this potential.

Jain, H.; Williams, D. B.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Environmental quality indexing of large industrial development alternatives using AHP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two industrial development alternatives have been proposed for the East Coast of Iceland in order to strengthen its socio-economic basis. The favoured option is to build a large aluminium smelter, which requires massive hydropower development in the nearby highlands. Another viable option is the construction of a 6-million-ton oil refinery, following the planned exploitation of the Timan Pechora oil reserves in the Russian Arctic. A third 'fictitious' alternative could be general development of existing regional industry and new knowledge-based industries, development of ecotourism, establishment of national parks, accompanied by infrastructure improvement (roads, tunnels, communications, schools, etc.). The three alternatives will have different environmental consequences. The controversial hydropower plant for the smelter requires a large water reservoir as well as considerable land disturbance in this unique mountain territory, considered to be the largest uninhabited wilderness in Western Europe. The aluminium smelter and the oil refinery will give rise to substantial increase of the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of the country (about 20%). Then there is potential environmental risk associated with the refinery regarding oil spills at sea, which could have disastrous impact on the fisheries industry. However, the oil refinery does not require any hydropower development, which is a positive factor. Finally, the third alternative could be defined as a ''green'' solution whereby the detrimental environmental consequences of the two industrial solutions are mostly avoided. In order to compare the three alternatives in an orderly manner, the analytic hierarchy process methodology of Saaty was applied to calculate the environmental quality index of each alternative, which is defined as a weighted sum of selected environmental and socio-economic factors. These factors are evaluated on a comparison basis, applying the AHP methodology, and the weights in the quality index summation are estimated in the same manner. Six persons with different backgrounds were asked to fill in the comparison matrices in order to reduce bias in the evaluation. The final results show that the two industrial alternatives come out poorly, i.e. with low quality indices, whereas the third pseudo-alternative, i.e. general development, with a considerably higher quality index, is certainly worth a further study.

Solnes, Julius

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

THE FIRST SYSTEMATIC SURVEY FOR Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT z = 7.3 WITH RED-SENSITIVE SUBARU/SUPRIME-CAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have performed deep imaging surveys for Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) at redshift {approx}7.3 in two blank fields, the Subaru Deep Field (SDF) and the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep survey Field (SXDF), using the Subaru/Suprime-Cam equipped with new red-sensitive CCDs and a new narrowband filter, NB1006 ({lambda}{sub c} = 10052 Angstrom-Sign , FWHM {Delta}{lambda} = 214 A). We identified four objects as LAE candidates that exhibit luminosity excess in NB1006. By carrying out deep follow-up spectroscopy for three of them using Subaru/FOCAS and Keck/DEIMOS, a definitively asymmetric emission line is detected for one of them, SXDF-NB1006-2. Assuming this line is Ly{alpha}, this object is an LAE at z = 7.215 which has a luminosity of 1.2{sup +1.5}{sub -0.6} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1} and a weighted skewness S{sub {omega}} = 4.90 {+-} 0.86. Another object, SDF-NB1006-2, shows variable photometry and is thus probably a quasar (QSO) or an active galactic nucleus. It shows an asymmetric emission line at 10076 A which may be due to either Ly{alpha} at z = 7.288 or [O II] at z = 1.703. The third object, SDF-NB1006-1, is likely a galaxy with temporal luminosity enhancement associated with a supernova explosion, as the brightness of this object varies between the observed epochs. Its spectrum does not show any emission lines. The inferred decrease in the number density of LAEs toward higher redshift is n{sup z={sup {sup 7.3}{sub Ly{alpha}}}}/n{sub Ly{alpha}}{sup z={sup {sup 5.7}}} = 0.05{sup +0.11}{sub -0.05} from z = 5.7 to 7.3 down to L{sup Ly{alpha}} = 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}. The present result is consistent with the interpretation in previous studies that the neutral hydrogen fraction is rapidly increasing from z = 5.7 to 7.3.

Shibuya, Takatoshi; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Iye, Masanori [Department of Astronomical Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Ota, Kazuaki [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Ouchi, Masami [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8582 (Japan); Furusawa, Hisanori [Optical and Infrared Astronomy Division, National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Shimasaku, Kazuhiro [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Hattori, Takashi, E-mail: takatoshi.shibuya@nao.ac.jp [Subaru Telescope, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

436

Reduced order modeling for prediction and control of large-scale systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work performed from June 2012 through May 2014 as a part of a Sandia Early Career Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project led by the first author. The objective of the project is to investigate methods for building stable and efficient proper orthogonal decomposition (POD)/Galerkin reduced order models (ROMs): models derived from a sequence of high-fidelity simulations but having a much lower computational cost. Since they are, by construction, small and fast, ROMs can enable real-time simulations of complex systems for onthe- spot analysis, control and decision-making in the presence of uncertainty. Of particular interest to Sandia is the use of ROMs for the quantification of the compressible captive-carry environment, simulated for the design and qualification of nuclear weapons systems. It is an unfortunate reality that many ROM techniques are computationally intractable or lack an a priori stability guarantee for compressible flows. For this reason, this LDRD project focuses on the development of techniques for building provably stable projection-based ROMs. Model reduction approaches based on continuous as well as discrete projection are considered. In the first part of this report, an approach for building energy-stable Galerkin ROMs for linear hyperbolic or incompletely parabolic systems of partial differential equations (PDEs) using continuous projection is developed. The key idea is to apply a transformation induced by the Lyapunov function for the system, and to build the ROM in the transformed variables. It is shown that, for many PDE systems including the linearized compressible Euler and linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations, the desired transformation is induced by a special inner product, termed the symmetry inner product. Attention is then turned to nonlinear conservation laws. A new transformation and corresponding energy-based inner product for the full nonlinear compressible Navier-Stokes equations is derived, and it is demonstrated that if a Galerkin ROM is constructed in this inner product, the ROM system energy will be bounded in a way that is consistent with the behavior of the exact solution to these PDEs, i.e., the ROM will be energy-stable. The viability of the linear as well as nonlinear continuous projection model reduction approaches developed as a part of this project is evaluated on several test cases, including the cavity configuration of interest in the targeted application area. In the second part of this report, some POD/Galerkin approaches for building stable ROMs using discrete projection are explored. It is shown that, for generic linear time-invariant (LTI) systems, a discrete counterpart of the continuous symmetry inner product is a weighted L2 inner product obtained by solving a Lyapunov equation. This inner product was first proposed by Rowley et al., and is termed herein the Lyapunov inner product. Comparisons between the symmetry inner product and the Lyapunov inner product are made, and the performance of ROMs constructed using these inner products is evaluated on several benchmark test cases. Also in the second part of this report, a new ROM stabilization approach, termed ROM stabilization via optimization-based eigenvalue reassignment, is developed for generic LTI systems. At the heart of this method is a constrained nonlinear least-squares optimization problem that is formulated and solved numerically to ensure accuracy of the stabilized ROM. Numerical studies reveal that the optimization problem is computationally inexpensive to solve, and that the new stabilization approach delivers ROMs that are stable as well as accurate. Summaries of lessons learned and perspectives for future work motivated by this LDRD project are provided at the end of each of the two main chapters.

Kalashnikova, Irina; Arunajatesan, Srinivasan; Barone, Matthew Franklin; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Fike, Jeffrey A.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Separation of flue-gas scrubber sludge into marketable products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A tremendous amount of wet flue-gas desulfurization scrubber sludge (estimated 20 million metric tons per year in the US) is currently being landfilled at a huge cost to utility companies. Scrubber sludge is the solid precipitate produced during desulfurization of flue-gas from burning high sulfur coal. The amount of this sludge is expected to increase in the near future due to ever increasing governmental regulation concerning the amount of sulfur emissions. Scrubber sludge is a fine, grey colored powder that contains calcium sulfite hemihydrate (CaSO{sub 3} {center_dot} 1/2H{sub 2}), calcium sulfate dihydrate (CaSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O), limestone (CaCO{sub 3}), silicates, and iron oxides. This material can continue to be landfilled at a steadily increasing cost, or an alternative for utilizing this material can be developed. This study explores the characteristics of a naturally oxidized wet flue-gas desulfurization scrubber sludge and uses these characteristics to develop alternatives for recycling this material. In order for scrubber sludge to be used as a feed material for various markets, it was necessary to process it to meet the specifications of these markets. A physical separation process was therefore needed to separate the components of this sludge into useful products at a low cost. There are several physical separation techniques available to separate fine particulates. These techniques can be divided into four major groups: magnetic separation, electrostatic separation, physico-chemical separation, and density-based separation. The properties of this material indicated that two methods of separation were feasible: water-only cycloning (density-based separation), and froth flotation (physico-chemical separation). These processes could be used either separately, or in combination. The goal of this study was to reduce the limestone impurity in this scrubber sludge from 5.6% by weight to below 2.0% by weight. The resulting clean calcium sulfite/sulfate material can be oxidized into a synthetic gypsum that can be used in several markets which include: wallboard manufacturing, plaster, portland cement, and as a soil conditioner. Single stage water-only cycloning removed nearly 50% of the limestone by weight from the scrubber sludge and maintained a weight recovery of 76%. Froth flotation produced a calcium sulfite/sulfate that contained 4.30% limestone by weight with a 71% weight recovery. These methods were successful in removing some of the limestone impurity, but were not able to meet the specifications needed. However, the combination of water-only cycloning and froth flotation provided a clean, useful calcium sulfite/sulfate material with a limestone grade of 1.70% by weight and a total weight recovery of nearly 66%.

Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

1997-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

438

PMU Data Integrity Evaluation through Analytics on a Virtual Test-Bed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power systems are rapidly becoming populated by phasor measurement units (PMUs) in ever increasing numbers. PMUs are critical components of today s energy management systems, designed to enable near real-time wide area monitoring and control of the electric power system. They are able to measure highly accurate bus voltage phasors as well as branch current phasors incident to the buses at which PMUs are equipped. Synchrophasor data is used for applications varying from state estimation, islanding control, identifying outages, voltage stability detection and correction, disturbance recording, and others. However, PMU-measured readings may suffer from errors due to meter biases or drifts, incorrect configurations, or even cyber-attacks. Furthermore, the testing of early PMUs showed a large disparity between the reported values from PMUs provided by different manufacturers, particularly when frequency was off-nominal, during dynamic events, and when harmonic/inter-harmonic content was present. Detection and identification of PMU gross measurement errors are thus crucial in maintaining highly accurate phasor readings throughout the system. In this paper, we present our work in conducting analytics to determine the trustworthiness and worth of the PMU readings collected across an electric network system. By implementing the IEEE 118 bus test case on a virtual test bed (VTB) , we are able to emulate PMU readings (bus voltage and branch current phasors in addition to bus frequencies) under normal and abnormal conditions using (virtual) PMU sensors deployed across major substations in the network. We emulate a variety of failures such as bus, line, transformer, generator, and/or load failures. Data analytics on the voltage phase angles and frequencies collected from the PMUs show that specious (or compromised) PMU device(s) can be identified through abnormal behaviour by comparing the trend of its frequency and phase angle reading with the ensemble of all other PMU readings in the network. If the reading trend of a particular PMU deviates from the weighted average of the reading trends of other PMUs at nearby substations, then it is likely that the PMU is malfunctioning. We assign a weight to each PMU denoting how electric-topology-wise close it is from where the PMU under consideration is located. The closer a PMU is, the higher the weight it has. To compute the closeness between two nodes in the power network, we employ a form of the resistance distance metric. It computes the electrical distance by taking into consideration the underlying topology as well as the physical laws that govern the electrical connections or flows between the network components. The detection accuracy of erroneous PMUs should be improved by employing this metric. We present results to validate the proposed approach. We also discuss the effectiveness of using an end-to-end VTB approach that allows us to investigate different types of failures and their responses as seen by the ensemble of PMUs. The collected data on certain types of events may be amenable to certain types of analysis (e.g., alerting for sudden changes can be done on a small window of data) and hence determine the data analytics architectures is required to evaluate the streaming PMU data.

Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL; Shankar, Mallikarjun [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

A support vector machine (SVM) for predicting preferred treatment position in radiotherapy of patients with breast cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: NYU 05-181 protocol compared the CT simulation in both supine and prone positions for 400 patients with breast cancer (200 left-breast and 200 right-breast) to identify which setup is better at sparing heart and lung involvement in the treatment process. The results demonstrated that all right-breast patients benefited from the prone treatment position, while for left-breast patients, 85% were better treated prone and 15% were better treated supine. Using the clinical data collected from this protocol, the authors aimed at developing an automated tool capable of identifying which of the left-breast cancer patients are better treated supine without obtaining a second CT scan in the supine position. Methods: Prone CT scans from 198 of the 200 left-breast cancer patients enrolled in NYU 05-181 protocol were deidentified and exported to a dedicated research planning workstation. Three-dimensional geometric features of the organs at risk and tumor bed were extracted. A two-stage classifier was used to classify patients into the prone class or the supine class. In the first stage, the authors use simple thresholding to divide the patients into two groups based on their in-field heart volume. For patients with in-field heart volume {<=}0.1 cc, the prone position was chosen as the preferred treatment position. Patients with in-field heart volume >0.1 cc will be further classified in the second stage by a weighted support vector machine (SVM). The weight parameters of the SVM were adjusted to maximize the specificity [true-supine/(true-supine+false-prone)] at the cost of lowering but still maintaining reasonable sensitivity [true-prone/(true-prone+false-supine)]. The authors used K-fold cross validations to test the performance of the SVM classifier. A feature selection algorithm was also used to identify features that give the best classification performance. Results: After the first stage, 49 of the 198 left-breast cancer patients were found to have >0.1 cc of in-field heart volume. The three geometric features of heart orientation, distance between heart and tumor, and in-field lung were selected by the feature selection algorithm in the second stage of the two-stage classifier to give the best predefined weighted accuracy. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the proposed method were found to be 90.4% and 99.3%, respectively. Using two-stage classification, the authors reduced the proportion of prone-treated patients that need a second supine CT scan down to 16.3/170 or 9.6%, as compared to 21/170 or 12.4% when the authors use only the first stage (thresholding) for classification. Conclusions: The authors' study showed that a feature-based classifier is feasible for predicting the preferred treatment position, based on features extracted from prone CT scans. The two-stage classifier achieved very high specificity at an acceptable expense of sensitivity.

Zhao Xuan; Wong, Edward K.; Wang Yao; Lymberis, Stella; Wen Bixiu; Formenti, Silvia; Chang Jenghwa [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Polytechnic Institute of New York University, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States); Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Polytechnic Institute of New York University, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Polytechnic Institute of New York University, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

Water Extraction from Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program was to develop a liquid disiccant-based flue gas dehydration process technology to reduce water consumption in coal-fired power plants. The specific objective of the program was to generate sufficient subscale test data and conceptual commercial power plant evaluations to assess process feasibility and merits for commercialization. Currently, coal-fired power plants require access to water sources outside the power plant for several aspects of their operation in addition to steam cycle condensation and process cooling needs. At the present time, there is no practiced method of extracting the usually abundant water found in the power plant stack gas. This project demonstrated the feasibility and merits of a liquid desiccant-based process that can efficiently and economically remove water vapor from the flue gas of fossil fuel-fired power plants to be recycled for in-plant use or exported for clean water conservation. After an extensive literature review, a survey of the available physical and chemical property information on desiccants in conjunction with a weighting scheme developed for this application, three desiccants were selected and tested in a bench-scale system at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). System performance at the bench scale aided in determining which desiccant was best suited for further evaluation. The results of the bench-scale tests along with further review of the available property data for each of the desiccants resulted in the selection of calcium chloride as the desiccant for testing at the pilot-scale level. Two weeks of testing utilizing natural gas in Test Series I and coal in Test Series II for production of flue gas was conducted with the liquid desiccant dehumidification system (LDDS) designed and built for this study. In general, it was found that the LDDS operated well and could be placed in an automode in which the process would operate with no operator intervention or adjustment. Water produced from this process should require little processing for use, depending on the end application. Test Series II water quality was not as good as that obtained in Test Series I; however, this was believed to be due to a system upset that contaminated the product water system during Test Series II. The amount of water that can be recovered from flue gas with the LDDS is a function of several variables, including desiccant temperature, L/G in the absorber, flash drum pressure, liquid-gas contact method, and desiccant concentration. Corrosion will be an issue with the use of calcium chloride as expected but can be largely mitigated through proper material selection. Integration of the LDDS with either low-grade waste heat and or ground-source heating and cooling can affect the parasitic power draw the LDDS will have on a power plant. Depending on the amount of water to be removed from the flue gas, the system can be designed with no parasitic power draw on the power plant other than pumping loads. This can be accomplished in one scenario by taking advantage of the heat of absorption and the heat of vaporization to provide the necessary temperature changes in the desiccant with the flue gas and precipitates that may form and how to handle them. These questions must be addressed in subsequent testing before scale-up of the process can be confidently completed.

Bruce C. Folkedahl; Greg F. Weber; Michael E. Collings

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Well-to-wheels energy use and greenhouse gas emissions analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory expanded the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model and incorporated the fuel economy and electricity use of alternative fuel/vehicle systems simulated by the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) to conduct a well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis of energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The WTW results were separately calculated for the blended charge-depleting (CD) and charge-sustaining (CS) modes of PHEV operation and then combined by using a weighting factor that represented the CD vehicle-miles-traveled (VMT) share. As indicated by PSAT simulations of the CD operation, grid electricity accounted for a share of the vehicle's total energy use, ranging from 6% for a PHEV 10 to 24% for a PHEV 40, based on CD VMT shares of 23% and 63%, respectively. In addition to the PHEV's fuel economy and type of on-board fuel, the marginal electricity generation mix used to charge the vehicle impacted the WTW results, especially GHG emissions. Three North American Electric Reliability Corporation regions (4, 6, and 13) were selected for this analysis, because they encompassed large metropolitan areas (Illinois, New York, and California, respectively) and provided a significant variation of marginal generation mixes. The WTW results were also reported for the U.S. generation mix and renewable electricity to examine cases of average and clean mixes, respectively. For an all-electric range (AER) between 10 mi and 40 mi, PHEVs that employed petroleum fuels (gasoline and diesel), a blend of 85% ethanol and 15% gasoline (E85), and hydrogen were shown to offer a 40-60%, 70-90%, and more than 90% reduction in petroleum energy use and a 30-60%, 40-80%, and 10-100% reduction in GHG emissions, respectively, relative to an internal combustion engine vehicle that used gasoline. The spread of WTW GHG emissions among the different fuel production technologies and grid generation mixes was wider than the spread of petroleum energy use, mainly due to the diverse fuel production technologies and feedstock sources for the fuels considered in this analysis. The PHEVs offered reductions in petroleum energy use as compared with regular hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). More petroleum energy savings were realized as the AER increased, except when the marginal grid mix was dominated by oil-fired power generation. Similarly, more GHG emissions reductions were realized at higher AERs, except when the marginal grid generation mix was dominated by oil or coal. Electricity from renewable sources realized the largest reductions in petroleum energy use and GHG emissions for all PHEVs as the AER increased. The PHEVs that employ biomass-based fuels (e.g., biomass-E85 and -hydrogen) may not realize GHG emissions benefits over regular HEVs if the marginal generation mix is dominated by fossil sources. Uncertainties are associated with the adopted PHEV fuel consumption and marginal generation mix simulation results, which impact the WTW results and require further research. More disaggregate marginal generation data within control areas (where the actual dispatching occurs) and an improved dispatch modeling are needed to accurately assess the impact of PHEV electrification. The market penetration of the PHEVs, their total electric load, and their role as complements rather than replacements of regular HEVs are also uncertain. The effects of the number of daily charges, the time of charging, and the charging capacity have not been evaluated in this study. A more robust analysis of the VMT share of the CD operation is also needed.

Elgowainy, A.; Burnham, A.; Wang, M.; Molburg, J.; Rousseau, A.; Energy Systems

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

Hydrogen from biomass: state of the art and research challenges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report was prepared for the International Energy Agency (IEA) Agreement on the Production and Utilization of Hydrogen, Task 16, Hydrogen from Carbon-Containing Materials. Hydrogen's share in the energy market is increasing with the implementation of fuel cell systems and the growing demand for zero-emission fuels. Hydrogen production will need to keep pace with this growing market. In the near term, increased production will likely be met by conventional technologies, such as natural gas reforming. In these processes, the carbon is converted to CO2 and released to the atmosphere. However, with the growing concern about global climate change, alternatives to the atmospheric release of CO2 are being investigated. Sequestration of the CO2 is an option that could provide a viable near-term solution. Reducing the demand on fossil resources remains a significant concern for many nations. Renewable-based processes like solar- or wind-driven electrolysis and photobiological water splitting hold great promise for clean hydrogen production; however, advances must still be made before these technologies can be economically competitive. For the near-and mid-term, generating hydrogen from biomass may be the more practical and viable, renewable and potentially carbon-neutral (or even carbon-negative in conjunction with sequestration) option. Recently, the IEA Hydrogen Agreement launched a new task to bring together international experts to investigate some of these near- and mid-term options for producing hydrogen with reduced environmental impacts. This review of the state of the art of hydrogen production from biomass was prepared to facilitate in the planning of work that should be done to achieve the goal of near-term hydrogen energy systems. The relevant technologies that convert biomass to hydrogen, with emphasis on thermochemical routes are described. In evaluating the viability of the conversion routes, each must be put in the context of the availability of appropriate feedstocks and deployment scenarios that match hydrogen to the local markets. Co-production opportunities are of particular interest for near-term deployment since multiple products improve the economics; however, co-product development is not covered in this report. Biomass has the potential to accelerate the realization of hydrogen as a major fuel of the future. Since biomass is renewable and consumes atmospheric CO2 during growth, it can have a small net CO2 impact compared to fossil fuels. However, hydrogen from biomass has major challenges. There are no completed technology demonstrations. The yield of hydrogen is low from biomass since the hydrogen content in biomass is low to being with (approximately 6% versus 25% for methane) and the energy content is low due to the 40% oxygen content of biomass. Since over half of the hydrogen from biomass comes from splitting water in the steam reforming reaction, the energy content of the feedstock is an inherent limitation of the process . The low yield of hydrogen on a weight basis is misleading since the energy conversion efficiency is high. However, the cost for growing, harvesting, and transporting biomass is high. Thus even with reasonable energy efficiencies, it is not presently economically competitive with natural gas steam reforming for stand-alone hydrogen without the advantage of high-value co-products. Additionally, as with all sources of hydrogen, production from biomass will require appropriate hydrogen storage and utilization systems to be developed and deployed. The report also looked at promising areas for further research and development. The major areas for R,D and D are: feedstock preparation and feeding; gasification gas conditioning; system integration; modular systems development; valuable co-product integration; and larger-scale demonstrations. These are in addition to the challenges for any hydrogen process in storage and utilization technologies.

Milne, Thomas A.; Elam, Carolyn C.; Evans, Robert J.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

NOVEL DENSE MEMBRANE FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION FOR ENERGY APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objectives of this project are: (1) Characterization of the thermo mechanical properties of the novel dense HTM bulk sample; (2) Development of a correlation among the intrinsic factors (such as grain size and phase distribution), and the extrinsic factors (such as temperature and atmosphere) and the thermo-mechanical properties (such as strengths and stress) to predict the performance of a HTM system (HTM membrane and porous substrate) ; and (3) Evaluation of the stability of the novel HTM membrane and its property correlations after thermal cycling. Based on all results and analysis of the thermo mechanical properties for the HTM cermet bulk samples, several important conclusions were made. The mean ?fs at room temperature is approximately 356 MPa for the HTM cermet. The mean ?fs value decreases to 284 MPa as the temperature increases to 850?C. The Difference difference in atmosphere, such as air or N2, had an insignificant effect on the flexural strength values at 850?C for the HTM cermet. The HTM cermet samples at room temperature and at 500?C fractured without any significant plastic deformation. Whereas, at 850?C, the HTM cermet samples fractured, preceded by an extensive plastic deformation. It seems that the HTM cermet behaves more like an elastic material such as a nonmetal ceramic at the room temperature, and more like a ductile material at increased temperature (850?C). The exothermic peak during the TG/DTA tests centered at 600?C is most likely associated with both the enthalpy change of transformation from the amorphous phase into crystalline zirconia and the oxidation of Pd phase in HTM cermet in air. The endothermic peak centered at 800?C is associated with the dissociation of PdO to Pd for the HTM cermet sample in both inert N2 environment and air. There is a corresponding weight gain as oxidation occurs for palladium (Pd) phase to form palladium oxide (PdO) and there is a weight loss as the unstable PdO is dissociated back to Pd and oxygen. The normal stress and shear stresses from the Mohr?s circle indicate that the residual stress in the HTM cermet sample is mainly as compressive residual stress in the magnitude of -135 to -155 MP, and with very little shear stress (in the magnitude of 10 MPa). The magnitude of change in the normal stress and the shear stress is insignificant in the HTM after 120 thermal cycles. However, the principle normal stress changes from compressive to tensile residual stress and there is a significant increase in the shear stress after 500 thermal cycles. The calculated value based on the equation and the Mohr?s circle is found to be consistent with the experimental value for the as-received HTM cermet samples. At some rotation (?) angle, the residual stress was found to be as tensile stress. Most ceramic material is weak in tension, and develops microscopic cracks. With treatment of 120 thermal cycles between 50?850?C, the HTM- sample exhibited thermally-induced cracks on the surface. Visually observable cracks appeared on the surface of HTM cermet with continuous thermal cycling, after 500 thermal cycles. The XRD powder diffraction analysis indicated an increased amount of crystalline PdO crystalline in HTM cermet after 120 and 500 thermal cycles as compare to the as-received samples. The Pd crystalline peaks were found to significantly decrease in peak intensity with thermal cycling. Higher peak intensity for PdO phase was observed with increased number of thermal cycles. A Monoclinic monoclinic zirconia phase was first identified in the as-received HTM as-received sample. However, with thermal cycling treatment of both 120 and 500 thermal cycles, the M-ZrO2 phase is transformed to the tetragonal YSZ, which is consistent with the thermal analysis results by TG/DTA. Correlations of the microstructural and thermo-mechanical properties of both selected reference material and ANL-3e HTM cermet bulk sample are affected mainly by porosity and microstructural features, such as grain size and pore size/distribution. The Young?s Modulus (E-value), especially, is positivel

Bandopadhyay, Sukumar [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Balu) [ANL; Nag, Nagendra [SURMET CORP.

2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

444

Epsilon Metal Summary Report FY 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Epsilon-metal ({var_epsilon}-metal) phase was selected in FY 2009 as a potential waste form to for immobilizing the noble metals found in the undissolved solids + aqueous stream, and the soluble Tc from ion-exchange process, each resulting from proposed aqueous reprocessing. {var_epsilon}-metal phase is observed in used nuclear fuel and the natural reactors of Oklobono in Gabon, where the long-term corrosion behavior was demonstrated. This makes {var_epsilon}-metal a very attractive waste form. Last fiscal year, {var_epsilon}-metal was successfully fabricated by combining the five-metals, Mo, Ru, Rh, Pd and Re (surrogate for Tc), into pellets followed by consolidation with an arc melter. The arc melter produced fully dense samples with the epsilon structure. However, some chemistry differences were observed in the microstructure that resulted in regions rich in Re and Mo, and others rich in Pd, while Ru and Rh remained fairly constant throughout. This year, thermal stability (air), and corrosion testing of the samples fabricated by arc melting were the main focus for experimental work. Thermal stability was measured with a differential scanning calorimeter - thermogravimetric analyzer, by both ramp heating as well as step heating. There is clear evidence during the ramp heating experiment of an exothermic event + a weight loss peak both beginning at {approx}700 C. Step heating showed an oxidation event at {approx}690 C with minimal weight gain that occurs just before the weight loss event at 700 C. The conclusion being that the e-metal begins to oxidize and then become volatile. These findings are useful for considering the effects of voloxidation process. Three different pellets were subjected to electrochemical testing to study the corrosion behavior of the epsilon-metal phase in various conditions, namely acidic, basic, saline, and inert. Test was done according to an interim procedure developed for the alloy metal waste form. First an open circuit potential was measured, followed by linear polarization sweeps. The linear polarization sweep range was the Tafel equation was fit to the linear polarization sweep data to determine the corrosion rate of each pellet in each test solution. The average calculated corrosion rates of the three pellets according to solution conditions were: -1.91 x 10{sup -4} mm/yr (0.001 M NaOH), -1.48 x 10{sup -3} mm/yr (0.01 M NaCl), -8.77 x 10{sup -4} mm/yr (0.001 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), -2.09 x 10{sup -3} mm/yr (0.001 M NaOH + 0.01 M NaCl), and -1.54 x 10{sup -3} mm/yr (0.001 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 0.01 M NaCl). Three single-pass flow through (SPFT) test were conducted at a flow rate of 10 ml/day, at 90 C, and pH of 2.5, 7.0, and 9.0 for up to 322 days. Results of the tests indicate that dissolution rates were 5 x 10{sup -4} g m{sup 2} d{sup -1} at pH 9.0, 1.2 x 10{sup -4} g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} at pH 7.0, and 2 x 10{sup -4} g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} at pH 2.5. The sample used for the pH 7.0 SPFT test contains extra Re compared to samples used for the other two SPFT test, which came from a single pellet. The corrosion data measured this year indicate that the {var_epsilon}-metal phase is chemically durable. The two chemically different phases, but structurally the same, behave differently during dissolution according to the microstructure changes observed in both the electrochemical and in SPFT test. Characterization of the test specimens after testing suggests that the dissolution is complex and involves oxidative dissolution followed by precipitation of both oxide and metallic phases. These data suggest that the dissolution in the electrochemical and SPFT tests is different; a process that needs further investigation.

Strachan, Denis M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Zumhoff, Mac R.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Windisch, Charles F.; Riley, Brian J.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

445

Mississippi State Biodiesel Production Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biodiesel is a renewable fuel conventionally generated from vegetable oils and animal fats that conforms to ASTM D6751. Depending on the free fatty acid content of the feedstock, biodiesel is produced via transesterification, esterification, or a combination of these processes. Currently the cost of the feedstock accounts for more than 80% of biodiesel production cost. The main goal of this project was to evaluate and develop non-conventional feedstocks and novel processes for producing biodiesel. One of the most novel and promising feedstocks evaluated involves the use of readily available microorganisms as a lipid source. Municipal wastewater treatment facilities (MWWTF) in the USA produce (dry basis) of microbial sludge annually. This sludge is composed of a variety of organisms, which consume organic matter in wastewater. The content of phospholipids in these cells have been estimated at 24% to 25% of dry mass. Since phospholipids can be transesterified they could serve as a ready source of biodiesel. Examination of the various transesterification methods shows that in situ conversion of lipids to FAMEs provides the highest overall yield of biodiesel. If one assumes a 7.0% overall yield of FAMEs from dry sewage sludge on a weight basis, the cost per gallon of extracted lipid would be $3.11. Since the lipid is converted to FAMEs, also known as biodiesel, in the in Situ extraction process, the product can be used as is for renewable fuel. As transesterification efficiency increases the cost per gallon drops quickly, hitting $2.01 at 15.0% overall yield. An overall yield of 10.0% is required to obtain biodiesel at $2.50 per gallon, allowing it to compete with soybean oil in the marketplace. Twelve plant species with potential for oil production were tested at Mississippi State, MS. Of the species tested, canola, rapeseed and birdseed rape appear to have potential in Mississippi as winter annual crops because of yield. Two perennial crops were investigated, Chinese tallow tree and tung tree. High seed yields from these species are possible because, there stature allows for a third dimension in yield (up). Harvest regimes have already been worked out with tung, and the large seed makes shedding of the seed with tree shakers possible. While tallow tree seed yields can be mind boggling (12,000 kg seed/ha at 40% oil), genotypes that shed seed easily are currently not known. Efficient methods were developed to isolate polyunsaturated fatty acid methyl esters from bio-diesel. The hypothesis to isolate this class of fatty acids, which are used as popular dietary supplements and prescription medicine (OMACOR), was that they bind transition metal ions much stronger than their harmful saturated analogs. AgBF4 has the highest extraction ability among all the metal ions tested. Glycerol is a key product from the production of biodiesel. It is produced during the transesterification process by cleaving the fatty acids from the glycerol backbone (the fatty acids are used as part of the biodiesel, which is a fatty acid methyl ester). Glycerol is a non-toxic compound with many uses; however, if a surplus exists in the future, more uses for the produced glycerol needs to be found. Another phase of the project was to find an add-on process to the biodiesel production process that will convert the glycerol by-product into more valuable substances for end uses other than food or cosmetics, focusing at present on 1,3-propanediol and lactic acid.All three MSU cultures produced products at concentrations below that of the benchmark microorganisms. There was one notable isolate the caught the eye of the investigators and that was culture J6 due to the ability of this microorganism to co-produce both products and one in particularly high concentrations. This culture with more understanding of its metabolic pathways could prove a useful biological agent for the conversion of glycerol. Heterogeneous catalysis was examined as an alternative to overcome the disadvantages of homogeneous transesterification, such as the presence of salts in the glycer

Rafael Hernandez; Todd French; Sandun Fernando; Tingyu Li; Dwane Braasch; Juan Silva; Brian Baldwin

2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z