Sample records for decibel dba a-weighted

  1. ORNL: Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates (Agreement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ORNL: Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates (Agreement ID:23278) ORNL: Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates (Agreement ID:23278) 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  2. Microsoft Word - NEPA18_Final.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    River Exhibition of History, Science and Technology CRITFC Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission CWA Clean Water Act dB Decibels dBA A-weighted sound level DCG Derived...

  3. ORNL: Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates (Agreement...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ORNL) 4 Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy FY13 - 1: Complete optimization of fabrication processing parameters for DBA substrates with alumina (Al 2 O 3 )...

  4. Ultra Soy of America DBA USA Biofuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtle Airships JumpTypeforUSDOIin Developing andUlster,DBA

  5. Legal Business Name and DBA Name (as applicable) Permanent Business Address (number & street or P.O. Box) (Required)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Legal Business Name and DBA Name (as applicable) Permanent Business Address (number & street or P) Permanent Remittance (Address (if different from Business Address) (Required) City, State and Zip code Email, Santa Cruz Payee Setup Request (204) Required in lieu of IRS W-9 when doing business with the State

  6. Pressure vs. decibel modulation in spectrotemporal representations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Jonathan Z.

    by the inverse-repeat method) relative to the that of the linearized response. Nominal Stimulus Modulation-Inverted

  7. LEGAL BUSINESS NAME AND DBA NAME (as applicable) PERSON OR SOLE PROPRIETOR -ENTER FULL NAME HERE (Last, First) (REQUIRED) PERMANENT BUSINESS Address-(number & Street or P.O. Box) (REQUIRED) PERMANENT REMITTANCE Address (if different from Business Address)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    LEGAL BUSINESS NAME AND DBA NAME (as applicable) PERSON OR SOLE PROPRIETOR -ENTER FULL NAME HERE (Last, First) (REQUIRED) PERMANENT BUSINESS Address- (number & Street or P.O. Box) (REQUIRED) PERMANENT REMITTANCE Address (if different from Business Address) (OPTIONAL) CAMPUS MAIL STOP (Complete ONLY after

  8. MUSIC GENRE CLASSIFICATION USING NOVEL FEATURES AND A WEIGHTED VOTING Dalwon Jang, Minho Jin, and Chang D. Yoo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, Chang D.

    MUSIC GENRE CLASSIFICATION USING NOVEL FEATURES AND A WEIGHTED VOTING METHOD Dalwon Jang, Minho Jin classification system based on two novel features and a weighted voting method. The proposed features, modulation classification system. 1. INTRODUCTION With the recent proliferation of digital music, there is increas- ing

  9. Lithuanian Mathematical Journal, Vol. 44, No. 1, 2004 A WEIGHTED GOODNESS-OF-FIT TEST FOR GARCH(1, 1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kokoszka, Piotr

    Lithuanian Mathematical Journal, Vol. 44, No. 1, 2004 A WEIGHTED GOODNESS-OF-FIT TEST FOR GARCH(1 that the observations follow a GARCH(1, 1) model. We study the asymptotic distribution of the statistics of the form Qn lead to and provide a rigorous justification for Portmanteau goodness-of-fit tests for GARCH(1, 1

  10. Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy andTerms LoanLosCombustionTimTextile Precursors

  11. Vision Industries dba Vision Motor Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planningFlowmeterUtah: Energydba Vision Motor Corp Jump to:

  12. A weighted iterative algorithm for neuromagnetic imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorodnitsky, I. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States) California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)); George, J.S.; Schlitt, H.A.; Lewis, P.S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of neuromagnetic source reconstruction is high resolution 3-D mapping of the current distribution within the brain. However, the neuromagnetic inverse problem is ill-posed and typically underdetermined. The Moore-Penrose pseudoinverse provides a linear algebraic inverse calculation that simultaneously minimizes chisquare and the Euclidean norm of the component currents. Such minimum norm'' reconstructions tend to produce diffuse and superficial current distributions because voxels nearer the sensor array can account for more power in the data with less current than deeper voxels. We describe an algorithm that overcomes the bias of minimum norm procedures toward superficial solutions by using weights chosen to compensate for the distance dependence of magnetic signal strength. We also apply a Bayesian weighting strategy in an iterative pseudoinverse computation, to address the bias of the linear estimator procedure toward diffuse solutions. This strategy produces a progressively more focal current distribution while accomodating distributed current sources, and appears to effectively reduce the problems associated with the under-determined linear system.

  13. A weighted iterative algorithm for neuromagnetic imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorodnitsky, I. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); George, J.S.; Schlitt, H.A.; Lewis, P.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of neuromagnetic source reconstruction is high resolution 3-D mapping of the current distribution within the brain. However, the neuromagnetic inverse problem is ill-posed and typically underdetermined. The Moore-Penrose pseudoinverse provides a linear algebraic inverse calculation that simultaneously minimizes chisquare and the Euclidean norm of the component currents. Such ``minimum norm`` reconstructions tend to produce diffuse and superficial current distributions because voxels nearer the sensor array can account for more power in the data with less current than deeper voxels. We describe an algorithm that overcomes the bias of minimum norm procedures toward superficial solutions by using weights chosen to compensate for the distance dependence of magnetic signal strength. We also apply a Bayesian weighting strategy in an iterative pseudoinverse computation, to address the bias of the linear estimator procedure toward diffuse solutions. This strategy produces a progressively more focal current distribution while accomodating distributed current sources, and appears to effectively reduce the problems associated with the under-determined linear system.

  14. Denton County Electric Cooperative d/b/a CoServ Electric Smart...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CoServ Electric's service territory and explores the application of distribution automation and customer systems. The project is aimed at improving customer understanding of...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Indicates Decreased Choroidal and Retinal Blood Flow in the DBA/2J Mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duong, Timothy Q.

    proteins: tyrosinase-related protein 1 (Tyrp1), which causes iris stromal atrophy,6 and glycoprotein

  16. Chapeau Inc dba BluePoint Energy Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest,CEI JumpChandradeep Solar PvtChannelChapeau

  17. ORNL: Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates (Agreement ID:23278)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Order No.of Energy251 Assessment of the|

  18. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORT FOR LNG DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, LLC (d/b/a OREGON LNG -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-EnergySEAB_Minutes_1_20_11.pdfSEBDepartmentNFTA*) FE DKT. NO.

  19. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR LNG DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, LLC (D/B/A Oregon LNG) -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG - ORDER 2913 | Department ofORDER 3324 |FE DKT.

  20. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR WALLER LNG SERVICES, LLC D/B/A WALLER POINT LNG -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG - ORDER 2913 | Department ofORDERORDERFE DKT. NO.

  1. ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 WindtheEnergySulfonate asAEEOpenOpenALD VacuumALDACOR Jump

  2. Denton County Electric Cooperative d/b/a CoServ Electric Smart Grid Project

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential Microhydro SiteDayton Power &Denker Wulf AG Jump to:Denton|

  3. Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas »ofMarketing |Prepare for| DepartmentRyan Paul,

  4. Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy andTerms LoanLosCombustionTimTextile

  5. IBM Research Report Nonlinear Optimization over a Weighted ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 11, 2008 ... In view of the difficulty of the problem already for d = 2 , in this article we take a ... a bound on the approximation quality r(a) , and provides the ...

  6. Tradespace exploration for space system architectures : a weighted graph framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davison, Peter Leslie

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many systems undergo significant architecture-level change during their lifecycles as a result of exogenous system disturbances (e.g. budget reduction or changes in stakeholder requirements), failure to develop critical ...

  7. A weighted Mirror Descent algorithm for nonsmooth convex ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    problem. A single iteration cost of an interior point method grows nonlinearly ...... for decomposing the LP problem (23) is to make copies ?t (data cost) and ?t.

  8. AR Ins. Lic. #245544 CA Ins. Lic. #0633005 d/b/a in CA Seabury & Smith Insurance Program Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    services · Emergency services · Hospitalization · Maternity and newborn care · Mental health Management 68186A (8/13) ©Seabury & Smith, Inc. 2013 · 877-249-7868 Healthcare reform is in full-swing with the heftiest legislation set for 2014 -- when health insurance will become available to millions of Americans

  9. Identification of limiting case between DBA and SBDBA (CL break area sensitivity): A new model for the boron injection system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez Gonzalez, R.; Petruzzi, A.; D'Auria, F. [San Piero A Grado Nuclear Research Group GRNSPG, Univ. of Pisa, Via Livornese 1291-56122, San Piero a Grado - Pisa (Italy); Mazzantini, O. [Nucleo-electrica Argentina Sociedad Anonima (NA-SA), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atucha-2 is a Siemens-designed PHWR reactor under construction in the Republic of Argentina. Its geometrical complexity and (e.g., oblique Control Rods, Positive Void coefficient) required a developed and validated complex three dimensional (3D) neutron kinetics (NK) coupled thermal hydraulic (TH) model. Reactor shut-down is obtained by oblique CRs and, during accidental conditions, by an emergency shut-down system (JDJ) injecting a highly concentrated boron solution (boron clouds) in the moderator tank, the boron clouds reconstruction is obtained using a CFD (CFX) code calculation. A complete LBLOCA calculation implies the application of the RELAP5-3D{sup C} system code. Within the framework of the third Agreement 'NA-SA - Univ. of Pisa' a new RELAP5-3D control system for the boron injection system was developed and implemented in the validated coupled RELAP5-3D/NESTLE model of the Atucha 2 NPP. The aim of this activity is to find out the limiting case (maximum break area size) for the Peak Cladding Temperature for LOCAs under fixed boundary conditions. (authors)

  10. Data:67639909-6467-41c1-a2fc-8dba36d02da5 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in addition to charges in Option 2, there is a charge of .333% per month for return on investment (plant original cost). Source or reference: http:www.subutil.comfiles...

  11. Data:07ebea2b-96a0-4c1d-ba40-44aa6205e84a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and multiple family dwellings. Source or reference: www.mytpu.orgcustomer-serviceratespower-ratespower-rates-schedules.htm Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand...

  12. Data:D51bf497-5b5e-47d4-bdde-ab5fc8dba8d4 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Platte-Clay Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 20130101 End date if known: Rate name: SL - 400...

  13. Data:1e1dba06-f5bd-4860-b42a-dd3781dd577e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    date if known: Rate name: Rate F2: Water Pump 2 Service, Contracted Rate, up to 50 HP Motor(s) Sector: Commercial Description: "AVAILABILITY: This rate is available throughout...

  14. Data:Dcabad47-7dba-4cc5-8ac4-5e15a5621f44 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Blue Earth, Minnesota (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Industrial...

  15. Data:A60c81d4-dba7-4901-b1fe-f79ec6bda696 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    name: Richland Electric Coop Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Controlled Water Heater Credit Sector: Residential Description: A 3.00 per month credit will be...

  16. Data:3f66dba2-4d5c-4340-88a9-eee287a12674 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    date: 20120217 End date if known: Rate name: Optional Large Power And Lighting Time of Use Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable to commercial, industrial and...

  17. Data:72053874-37f3-4221-b92d-ba7f30301a4b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and of Regulatory Authorities. Source or reference: http:psc.state.wy.ushtdocstariffswywhe10001a.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW):...

  18. Data:47dba9df-429b-4171-8a20-aae2ebcd6de3 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to the Power Cost Adjustment Clause. Source or reference: http:psc.wi.govapps40tariffsviewfile.aspx?typeelectric&id6490 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand...

  19. Data:B9d1e634-097c-4dba-9491-2cf368c35db3 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1-2cf368c35db3 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information...

  20. Data:4b818dba-a1cd-41e8-8f1b-36b2c342bc83 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Description: Class C: Mercury Vapor Lamps or Sodium Vapor Lamps on standard overhead concrete pole construction or on existing metal pole construction, owned and operated by...

  1. Data:A53eaad1-da7d-489d-ba10-8e45c193259b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Tri-County Electric Coop, Inc (New Mexico) Effective date: 20131101 End date if known: Rate name: Oil Well Service...

  2. Record 1 of 40 Author(s): Parrington, M (Parrington, M.); Jones, DBA (Jones, D. B. A.); Bowman, KW (Bowman, K.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anne

    .); Francis, G (Francis, Gene); Froidevaux, L (Froidevaux, Lucien); Halvorson, C (Halvorson, Chris); Hannigan, Lang-Ping); Hudman, RC (Hudman, Rynda C.); Froidevaux, L (Froidevaux, Lucien); Livesey, N (Livesey

  3. Data:E269f569-335e-49db-a972-ed615f31eefb | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    streets. Source or reference: https:www.burlingtonelectric.comELBOassetsTariff%20Sheets%20June%20262009%20revised-1.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand...

  4. Data:8c31dba9-331f-4d72-8d9b-7d63193fb4e8 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    B3PI Sector: Commercial Description: Note: 10.00 added to Fixed monthly charge if Remote Read Device is used. Source or reference: Rates Binder 1, Illinois State University...

  5. Data:65c87f52-3325-4d8d-ba4d-2b958cf0ccce | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Otter Tail Power Co Effective date: 20111001 End date if known: Rate name: Municipal Pumping Service - Secondary Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: https:...

  6. Data:Dba74d36-87bb-4a6d-a55b-67d341da9431 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision has been approved

  7. HAP FINS/BUDGET Janet Backe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HAP FINS/BUDGET Jay Black CIO Janet Backe Director Marie Rutledge Functional Lead Steven Freed and FINS/BUDGET Nick Oliver Technical (50%) A&T Vincent Wong DBA Ken Zhu DBA Luis Fernandes DBA PS Admin

  8. A Weighted Residual Framework for Formulation and Analysis of Direct Transcription Methods for Optimal Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Baljeet

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    for Example 2. : : : : : : : : : : : : : 91 21 Convergence of LSMoc solution for Example 3. : : : : : : : : : : : : : 92 22 Convergence of LSMoc solution for Example 4. : : : : : : : : : : : : : 93 23 Convergence of s-LSMoc solution for Example 1... but not the least, my wife Kamaljeet. This dissertation would have not been possible without their love, support and encouragement. vii TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER Page I INTRODUCTION : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 1 A. History...

  9. A Weighted Residual Framework for Formulation and Analysis of Direct Transcription Methods for Optimal Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Baljeet

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past three decades, numerous methods have been proposed to transcribe optimal control problems (OCP) into nonlinear programming problems (NLP). In this dissertation work, a unifying weighted residual framework is developed under which most...

  10. Fiber optic inclination detector system having a weighted sphere with reference points

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cwalinski, Jeffrey P. (Ballston Lake, NY)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic inclination detector system for determining the angular displacement of an object from a reference surface includes a simple mechanical transducer which requires a minimum number of parts and no electrical components. The system employs a single light beam which is split into two light beams and provided to the transducer. Each light beam is amplitude modulated upon reflecting off the transducer to detect inclination. The power values associated with each of the reflected light beams are converted by a pair of photodetectors into voltage signals, and a microprocessor manipulates the voltage signals to provide a measure of the angular displacement between the object and the reference surface.

  11. A weighted ?{sub 1}-minimization approach for sparse polynomial chaos expansions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, Ji [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Hampton, Jerrad [Aerospace Engineering Sciences Department, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Doostan, Alireza, E-mail: alireza.doostan@colorado.edu [Aerospace Engineering Sciences Department, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This work proposes a method for sparse polynomial chaos (PC) approximation of high-dimensional stochastic functions based on non-adapted random sampling. We modify the standard ?{sub 1}-minimization algorithm, originally proposed in the context of compressive sampling, using a priori information about the decay of the PC coefficients, when available, and refer to the resulting algorithm as weighted?{sub 1}-minimization. We provide conditions under which we may guarantee recovery using this weighted scheme. Numerical tests are used to compare the weighted and non-weighted methods for the recovery of solutions to two differential equations with high-dimensional random inputs: a boundary value problem with a random elliptic operator and a 2-D thermally driven cavity flow with random boundary condition.

  12. Moving Forward: A Weight Lossg g Intervention of African-American

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    . Poor diet, lack of regular physical activity and obesity contribute to breast cancer progressionobesity-binding protein (IGFBP-3) ­ Contributes to chronic inflammation #12;Diet, Physical Activity and B t CBreast Cancer of insulin-like growth factors (IGF-1) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP 3)factor

  13. The Modular Degree and the Congruence Number of a Weight 2 Cusp Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kani, Ernst

    is equivalent to the Asymptotic Fermat Conjecture; cf. [Fr2], p. 547. Notation In addition to the above is a subring, then SRP denotes the submodule of S2( 0(N)) consisting of the forms g(z) = 2ssinz

  14. THE SMALL QUANTUM COHOMOLOGY OF A WEIGHTED PROJECTIVE SPACE, A MIRROR D-MODULE AND THEIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mann, Etienne

    for weighted projective spaces 12 4. B-model 16 4.1. The setting 16 4.2. Gauss-Manin systems and Brieskorn 22 5.2. The small quantum product and the Jacobian ring 24 6. Limits 25 6.1. Canonical limits

  15. A DESK GUIDE TO THE DAVIS-BACON ACT

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Some localities also have separate DBA wage determinations for projects involving dredging, water and sewer line construction, dams, major bridges, or flood control. 15 DOE DBA...

  16. INTERNATIONAL UNION OF OPERATING ENGINEERS NATIONAL HAZMAT PROGRAM - MILWAUKEE WORM DRIVE CIRCULAR SAW OENHP{number_sign}: 2001-02, VERSION A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Florida International University's (FIU) Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) evaluated five saws for their effectiveness in cutting specially prepared fiberglass-reinforced plywood crates. These crates were built as surrogates for crates that presently hold radioactively contaminated glove boxes at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Los Alamos facility. The Milwaukee worm drive circular saw was assessed on August 14, 2001. During the FIU test of efficacy, a team from the Operating Engineers National Hazmat Program (OENHP) evaluated the occupational safety and health issues associated with this technology. The Milwaukee worm drive circular saw is a hand-held tool with a 7 1/4-inch diameter circular blade for cutting wood. The saw contains a fixed upper and a retractable lower blade guard to prevent access to the blade during use. The unit is operated with an on/off guarded trigger switch; and is supported with a handgrip mounted on top of the saw. An adjustable lever sets the depth of cut. The retractable blade guard permits blind or plunge cuts and protects from blade access during shutdown and blade coast. Kickback, the sudden reaction to a pinched blade, is possible when using this saw and could cause the saw to lift up and out of the work piece toward the operator. Proper work position and firm control of the saw minimizes the potential for a sprain or strain. Care needs to be exercised to support the work piece properly and to not force the tool. Personal noise sampling indicated that one worker was near the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Action Level of 85 decibels (dBA) while the other was at the Action Level with time-weighted averages (TWA's) of 82.7 and 84.6 dBA, respectively. These data are not entirely representative as they were gathered during a simulation and not at the actual worksite. Additional sampling should be conducted on-site, but the workers should wear hearing protection until it is determined that it is no longer necessary. Air sampling was performed while the workers dismantled the fiberglass-reinforced crates. The total nuisance dust sample for the Milwaukee circular saw was 36.07 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m{sup 3}), which is much higher than the OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 15 mg/m{sup 3} and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV) of 10 mg/m{sup 3}. Galson Laboratories considered the fiber analysis void due to the overloading of the filter. The PEL for fiberglass is 1 fiber per cubic centimeter (f/cc).

  17. RESEARCH AREA SPACE REGISTRATION USING HASP DATA ENTRY FORM Please fill in this form, using one form for each individual room.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Refrigerant containing equipment Sonicator Sources generating noise > 85 decibels Storage tank Welding Magnetic Fields (Magnetic Fields (> 10 Gauss Magnetic Fields (5 ­ 10 Gauss) RF / Microwave

  18. INTERNATIONAL UNION OF OPERATING ENGINEERS NATIONAL HAZMAT PROGRAM - PORTER-CABLE CIRCULAR SAW OENHP: 2001-04, VERSION A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Florida International University's (FIU) Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) evaluated five saws for their effectiveness in cutting specially prepared fiberglass-reinforced plywood crates. These crates were built as surrogates for crates that presently hold radioactively contaminated glove boxes at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Los Alamos facility. The Porter-Cable circular saw was assessed on August 15-16, 2001 (Porter-Cable No.1 and Porter-Cable No.2, respectively). During the FIU test of efficacy, a team from the Operating Engineers National Hazmat Program (OENHP) evaluated the occupational safety and health issues associated with this technology. The Porter-Cable saw is a straightforward machine for cutting wood of varying thickness. The blade is fully guarded with a fixed upper and a lower retractable guard. The lower guard retracts as the blade engages the work piece. The unit is operated with an on/off guarded trigger switch and is supported with a handgrip mounted near the front of the saw. The saw is equipped with a directional nozzle, which aims sawdust away from the operator and the line of cut. An optional vacuum system, attached to the directional nozzle, is used to remove and collect dust. During the demonstration of Porter-Cable No.1, personal noise sampling indicated that one worker was under and one was at the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Action Level of 85 decibels (dBA) with time-weighted averages (TWA's) of 82.7 and 84.6 dBA, respectively. During the demonstration of Porter-Cable No.2, however, both workers did exceed the Action Level with TWA's of 89.7 and 90.0 dBA. These data are not entirely representative as they were gathered during a simulation and not at the actual worksite. Additional sampling should be conducted on-site, but the workers should wear hearing protection until it is determined that it is no longer necessary. The total nuisance dust sample for Porter-Cable No.1 was 3.53 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m{sup 3}), which is lower than the OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 15 mg/m{sup 3} and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV) of 10 mg/m{sup 3}. Porter-Cable No.2's nuisance dust results yielded a value of 22.05 mg/m{sup 3}, which is over the PEL and TLV. The fiber analysis for the first demonstration yielded 12.9 fibers per cubic centimeter (f/cc), which is much higher than the PEL of 1 f/cc. Galson Laboratories considered the fiber analysis for the second demonstration void due to the overloading of dust on the filter. Kickback, the sudden reaction to a pinched blade, is possible with this saw and could cause the saw to lift up and out of the work piece and toward the operator. Proper work position and firm control of the saw minimizes the potential for a sprain or strain. Care needs to be exercised to support the work piece properly and to not force the tool.

  19. INTERNATIONAL UNION OF OPERATING ENGINEERS NATIONAL HAZMAT PROGRAM - EVOLUTION 180 CIRCULAR SAW OENHP: 2001-03, VERSION A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Florida International University's (FIU) Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) evaluated five saws for their effectiveness in cutting specially prepared fiberglass-reinforced plywood crates. These crates were built as surrogates for crates that presently hold radioactively contaminated gloveboxes at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Los Alamos facility. The Evolution 180 circular saw was assessed on August 14, 2001. During the FIU test of efficacy, a team from the Operating Engineers National Hazmat Program (OENHP) evaluated the occupational safety and health issues associated with this technology. The Evolution 180 is a portable, metal cutting circular saw with a 7-inch diameter blade. The blade is contained within the main housing and has a retractable lower blade guard to prevent operator access to the blade during operation and shutdown. The saw is equipped with a chip collector. The maximum cutting thickness for metal is one-quarter inch and can cut steel tubing and pipe 2 inches in diameter. The unit is operated with an on/off guarded trigger switch and is supported with the hand guide mounted to the side of the saw. An adjustable lever sets the depth of the cut. The machine's circuitry will automatically shut the saw motor off if excessive overload is detected during operation. The one-half hour demonstration involved vertical and horizontal cuts and blade changes. During this process, operators experienced binding of the saw. This caused the blade to become hot, causing the sawdust collected in the chip collector to smoke. Care should be exercised to use the appropriate blade for the application, operator training, and personal protective equipment (PPE). Personal noise sampling indicated that neither worker was over the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Action Level of 85 decibels (dBA) with time-weighted averages (TWA's) of 69.1 and 68.8 dBA. The personal noise sample taken during the special demonstration with the stainless steel plate had a TWA of 69.8 dBA. These data are not entirely representative as they were gathered during a simulation and not at the actual worksite. Additional sampling should be conducted on-site, but the workers should wear hearing protection until it is determined that it is no longer necessary. The total nuisance dust sample for the Evolution 180 circular saw was 3.5 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m{sup 3}), which is lower than the OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 15 mg/m{sup 3} and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV) of 10 mg/m{sup 3}. The fiber analysis yielded 1.74 fibers per cubic centimeter (f/cc), which is above the PEL of 1 f/cc. Although the nuisance dust levels were low, fiberglass dust levels were higher than the PEL. Since fiberglass dust is known to be a strong skin irritant and a possible human carcinogen, the workers should continue to wear appropriate suits and gloves, as well as a full-face air-purifying respirator. The respirator should be equipped with a combination organic vapor and acid gas cartridge in combination with a High Particulate Air (HEPA) filter, since particulate filter, since during the demonstration, the workers complained of an odd smell, which may have been from the breakdown of the fiberglass.

  20. An assessment of the impact of a weight management program on adolescents' food choices and self-esteem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhl, Kathleen Marie

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . No significant changes were noted in the control group after the 12-week period. Nutrient analysis of the Menu Selection Test showed that after the intervention subjects indicated lower intakes of energy, protein, carbohydrate, total fat, saturated fat... theaters, and concession stands at sporting events to make food choices. Convenience foods are another source of energy for adolescents. Nearly all of these food sources are high in total and saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium. Snacking between...

  1. An evaluation of a weight-lifting belt and back injury prevention training class for fleet service clerks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddell, Cheryl Renee?

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or sneeze. If you are seated and cannot stand. lean back in your chair. Always avoid leaning forward at the waist. RECURRENCE: The next time you feel the warning signs of impending back pain: Use the first aid techniques ? ice massage, anti..., or leg pain, see your doctor and follow his advice. 40 FIRST AID- A-I-M- ANTI-INFLAMMATORIES, ICE MASSAGE, MOVEMENT ANTI-INFLAMMATORIESt Aspirin or ibuprofen will decrease the inflammation present in the nerves. You might try taking 3 aspirin...

  2. Experimental Studies of Ilmenite as a Weighting Material in Oil-based Drilling Fluids for HPHT Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jie

    2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Ilmenite (FeTiO_(3)), with a mean particle size of 30 - 45 µm, was first introduced into the oil industry as weighting material in 1976. However, its use was limited mainly because of its abrasiveness to drilling equipment. Recently, a superfine...

  3. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FOR REDUCING BIODIESEL FACILITY WATER CONSUMPTION AND WASTEWATER DISCHARGE JULY 2013 CEC5002013018 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: American Biodiesel, Inc. dba Community Fuels #12; Prepared by: Primary Authors: Lisa Mortenson Christopher Young American Biodiesel, Inc. dba

  4. OMB Approval: 1205-0508 Expiration Date: 03/31/2016

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    No 3. Is the employer requesting consideration of Davis-Bacon (DBA) or McNamara Service Contract (SCA

  5. USACE Defense Base Act Insurance Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    .305) BUILDING STRONG®3 #12;Which Contracts Require DBA Insurance?q All construction and service contract

  6. INTERNATIONAL UNION OF OPERATING ENGINEERS NATIONAL HAZMAT PROGRAM - DEWALT RECIPROCATING SAW OENHP{number_sign}: 2001-01, VERSION A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Florida International University's (FIU) Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) evaluated five saws for their effectiveness in cutting specially prepared fiberglass-reinforced plywood crates. These crates were built as surrogates for crates that presently hold radioactively contaminated glove boxes at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Los Alamos facility. The DeWalt reciprocating saw was assessed on August 13, 2001. During the FIU test of efficacy, a team from the Operating Engineers National Hazmat Program (OENHP) evaluated the occupational safety and health issues associated with this technology. The DeWalt reciprocating saw is a hand-held industrial tool used for cutting numerous materials, including wood and various types of metals depending upon the chosen blade. Its design allows for cutting close to floors, corners, and other difficult areas. An adjustable shoe sets the cut at three separate depths. During the demonstration for the dismantling of the fiberglass-reinforced plywood crate, the saw was used for extended continuous cutting, over a period of approximately two hours. The dismantling operation involved vertical and horizontal cuts, saw blade changes, and material handling. During this process, operators experienced vibration to the hand and arm in addition to a temperature rise on the handgrip. The blade of the saw is partially exposed during handling and fully exposed during blade changes. Administrative controls, such as duty time of the operators and the machine, operator training, and personal protective equipment (PPE), such as gloves, should be considered when using the saw in this application. Personal noise sampling indicated that both workers were exposed to noise levels exceeding the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Action Level of 85 decibels (dBA) with time-weighted averages (TWA's) of 88.3 and 90.6 dBA. Normally, a worker would be placed in a hearing conservation program if his TWA was greater than the Action Level. In this case, however, monitoring was conducted during a simulation, not during the actual work conducted at the worksite. Additional sampling should be conducted at the worksite to determine the actual noise levels for the workers. Until it is determined that the actual TWA's are less than the Action Level, the workers should use PPE. A training program on the proper use and wearing of the selected PPE should be provided to each worker. Nuisance dust monitoring yielded a concentration of 10.69 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m{sup 3}). Although this is less than the OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 15 mg/m{sup 3}, it is above the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV) of 10 mg/m{sup 3}. Fiberglass dust monitoring yielded a fiber count of 1.7 fibers per cubic centimeter (f/cc). This is above the PEL and the TLV of 1.0 f/cc. Therefore, controls should be implemented (engineering or PPE) to reduce the workers' exposure to the dust. Respirators should be used if engineering controls do not sufficiently control the dust or fiberglass generated. Respirators should be equipped with an organic vapor and acid gas cartridge with a High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter, since during the demonstration, the workers complained of an odd smell, which may have been from the breakdown of the fiberglass.

  7. Development of a weighted-average estimator from a maximum-likelihood estimator and an instrumental-variable estimator in a structural model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruben, David Christopher

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , is written as mx y Ab Sou 1hl zz mx x ? Ab?' S?? (3. 2) and we will now spend some time explaining its form. Write a = (1, ? P&) and assume an independent estimator of Z, S?, is avail- able. Fuller (1981) shows that maximizing the likelihood equations... ? z, + u? t = 1, 2, . . . , a?s' = 1, 2, 3, . . . , b? (2. 1c) The total number of observations, n, is equal to a?b?. The experimenter has available an instrumental variable for the unobservable ze =&a+sr&W, +re, t=1, 2, . . . , a?. (2. 1d...

  8. arXiv:0909.4063v1[math.AG]22Sep2009 THE SMALL QUANTUM COHOMOLOGY OF A WEIGHTED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mann, Etienne

    .1. The setting 16 4.2. Gauss-Manin systems and Brieskorn lattices 17 4.3. The canonical Saito structure 17 4 a canonical mirror partner (B-model) of the small quantum orbifold cohomology of weighted projective spaces (A.4. The pairing 21 4.5. R´esum´e (the canonical Saito structure) 22 5. The mirror partner of the small quantum

  9. Microsoft Word - o350.1Final2-23-10

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reviewed to determine the applicability of the Davis-Bacon Act (DBA) andor the Service Contract Act (SCA); work shall be accomplished in accordance with such determinations. c....

  10. american power military: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Horstmann John Dayton Power & Light Company (The) Transmission Owner Issermoyer John PPL Electric Utilities Corp. dba PPL Utilities Transmission Owner Pjm Interconnection Llc;...

  11. american public power: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Horstmann John Dayton Power & Light Company (The) Transmission Owner Issermoyer John PPL Electric Utilities Corp. dba PPL Utilities Transmission Owner Pjm Interconnection Llc;...

  12. americans land electricity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Horstmann John Dayton Power & Light Company (The) Transmission Owner Issermoyer John PPL Electric Utilities Corp. dba PPL Utilities Transmission Owner Pjm Interconnection Llc;...

  13. Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 Internation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of PJM Interconnection, L.L.C. to Answer of International Transmission Company dba ITC Transmission and Supplemental Comments on Behalf of the Midwest Independent...

  14. Information Technology and Clinical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derisi, Joseph

    Operations Manager: TBD Systems, Storage, DBA · Network & Voice · Production Control · Data Center, Incident, Request Management · Process design and deployment · Business Continuity and DR planning

  15. Microstructural Contol of the Porous Si3N4 Ceramics Consisted...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX-011282: Categorical Exclusion Determination ORNL: Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates (Agreement ID:23278) Mechanical Characterization of Fuel Injector...

  16. Mechanistic studies on palladium-catalyzed carbon-nitrogen bond forming reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klingensmith, Liane M. (Liane May)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Precatalyst species present in a solution of Pd?(dba)? and Xantphos were identified as Pd(Xantphos)(dba) and Pd(Xantphos)? by use of ³¹p NMR and independent syntheses. Pd(Xantphos)? was found to form at high ligand ...

  17. RESEARCH AREA SPACE REGISTRATION USING HASP DATA ENTRY FORM Please fill in this form, using one form for each individual room.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Sturt

    Chemical Storage Aggregate storage of any one chemical > 5 gal or > 40 lb Chemical Storage Cabinet Battery Charging Area Centrifuge Chainsaw Drains Equipment ­ Etching (like the water jet system) Equipment > 85 decibels Storage tank Welding #12;2 Hazard Sources Specific Hazard Sources Present Risk Level

  18. Lec. No. Topic Textbook Dates Lab Experiment of the Week 1 Units, Current, Voltage, Power, 1.2; 1.3; Wed Sep 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Division Linear vs. Nonlinear Circuits 3.3 Superposition 3 V-I Equation of Thevenin Circuit,Thevenin 3.6 Mon Nov 28 Spectrum Analysis* 22 Filter Circuits; LPF, HPF Chapter 12 Wed Nov 30 Bode Plots/ Decibel.3; Wed Sep 7 Circuit Topologies: Branch, Node, Series, Kirchoff's Laws 2.1; 2.2; KVL/KCL Examples 2

  19. George Mason University Licensed as of 03/2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /27/2013 2:07:58PM Standard License 4imprint Inc. (49210) PO Box 320 Oshkosh, WI 54903-0320 Mr. John Lord Non-Wool Headwear) Product Categories Advanced Graphic Products dba Advanced-Online (58410) 750

  20. 2 Subcontractor 3 Dual Role

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oracle DBA R. Stewart1 Technical Staff L. Anderson1 Technical Staff NRPD Assignment Radiological Control ­ Katie Smith Admin Support ­ Annetta Hendricks SNS Facility Operations Office Sam McKenzie, Site Accelerator/Facility Buildings #12;

  1. CNA: Compromise Agreement (2013-SE-1430)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE and CNA International, Inc., d/b/a MC Appliance Corp. entered into a Compromise Agreement to resolve a case involving the distribution in commerce of noncompliant freezers.

  2. Versonel: Proposed Penalty (2014-CE-21009)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Smart Surplus, Inc. d/b/a Versonel failed to certify refrigerators and residential clothes dryers as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  3. Marinescu, Nishimata, Mohr, and Stoltz: Homogeneous Pd-Catalyzed Enantioselective Decarboxylative Protonation SI 1 Supporting Information for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoltz, Brian M.

    from Acros and used as received. Meldrum's acid was recrystallized from ethyl acetate prior to use (Table 1) The reactions were carried out using the following sample procedure. O CO2allyl Pd2(dba)3 (5

  4. Intramolecular Heck couplings of unactivated alkyl electrophiles : synthetic and mechanistic studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firmansjah, Luke

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the palladium-catalyzed intramolecular Heck coupling of unactivated alkyl bromides and chlorides is described. The optimal catalyst system was composed of Pd2(MeO-dba)3 as the metal source and N-heterocyclic ...

  5. STATE ENERGY PROGRAM NOTICE 10-003A

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    provision in Section 1606, see AAM No. 207 page 2, and Advisory Letter page 2. 8 Apprentice and trainees may be paid at less than the DBA prevailing wage rate if the...

  6. PAST HAA AWARD RECIPIENTS 1990 Harriet B. Belin, R '43

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Robert

    , ABE '66 Alan H, Hammerman '55 M. Carolyn Hughes '54 Suzanne S. Labiner, MAT '55 Stanley Miller '52/MBA '72 2009 Jonathan Byrnes DBA '80 Michael Holland AB '66 Barbara Meyer AB '62 Roland Smith EdD '88

  7. PAST RECIPIENTS OF THE HAA AWARD 1990 Harriet B. Belin, AB '43

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, ABE '66 Alan H. Hammerman AB '55 M. Carolyn Hughes AB '54 Suzanne S. Labiner, MAT '55 Stanley Jonathan Byrnes DBA '80 Michael Holland AB '66 Barbara Meyer AB '62 Roland Smith EdD '88 Beverly Sullivan

  8. An analysis of the data collection modes of a digital weather radar system with respect to significant severe weather features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neyland, Michael Arthur

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS. Conclusions Recommendations Page 109 109 111 REFERENCES. APPENDIX A. APPENDIX B. 113 115 131 143 viii LIST OF TABLES Table Page WSR/TAM-2 Weather Radar Technical Characteristics. . . 20 Antenna Scan Rates (rpm... reduction techniques can be applied. The usual pracr. ice is to measure the returned power in terms of decibels with respect to a standard reference power level, normally 1 mw. Power levels are then expressed in units of dBm, either above (+) or below...

  9. Quantum Clock Synchronization with a Single Qudit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armin Tavakoli; Adán Cabello; Marek ?ukowski; Mohamed Bourennane

    2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Clock synchronization for nonfaulty processes in multiprocess networks is indispensable for a variety of technologies. A reliable system must be able to resynchronize the nonfaulty processes upon some components failing causing the distribution of incorrect or conflicting information in the network. The task of synchronizing such networks is related to detectable Byzantine agreement (DBA), which can classically be solved using recursive algorithms if and only if less than one-third of the processes are faulty. Here we introduce a nonrecursive quantum algorithm that solves the DBA and achieves clock synchronization in the presence of arbitrary many faulty processes by using only a single quantum system.

  10. FIESTA, software package for the design, synthesis, and integrated circuit layout of continuous-time OTA-C filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobe, Michael Robert

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    signals; thus the buss routing of the standard cell was also modified. In the MOSIS process, a standard pad frame must be used for the circuit. With the current AIDE2 software, a standard cell with this pad frame cannot be incorporated; therefore... max and A . are entered in decibels and are actually negative min values, the equations which result are as follows (A is max evaluated at fl = 1 rad/s): A = 10 LOG(1 + 4 ) 2 max 2 2N A ~ = 10 LOG(1 + 6 F ) (29) (30) 27 2 (29) can now be used...

  11. CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT For On-going Construction Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT For On-going Construction Project TO: Deans, Directors, Chairpersons Alarm System UHM 05-537A CONTRACTOR: Biven's Electric, Inc. Dba West Coast Construction SCOPE OF WORK OF CONSTRUCTION FROM 7:30 AM TO 4:30 PM ACCESSIBLE ROUTES: No accessible routes will be affected by this test

  12. Accelerator Chapter 4: Storage Ring System 4-1 NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    and BPMs, are listed in Section 6.1.1 and in Table 6.1.4. 4.1.2 Preliminary Magnet Design 4.1.2.1 Storage Ring Lattice Magnet Considerations The magnet lattice is designed with a 30-cell DBA (double bend, the required magnetic field quality and alignment tolerances are the two primary considerations in the design

  13. Grant Title: KAUFFMAN DISSERTATION FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM Funding Opportunity Number: N/A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Grant Title: KAUFFMAN DISSERTATION FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM Funding Opportunity Number: N/A Agency: The Kauffman Dissertation Fellowship Program is an annual competitive program that awards up to fifteen Dissertation Fellowship grants of $20,000 each to Ph.D., D.B.A., or other doctoral students at accredited U

  14. R. D. Bennett, 2006 Safety Topic Personal Protective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    (MEK), nitrobenzene, benzene, toluene, styrene, or THF) ­ For high levels of contamination and glove resistant suit may be appropriate ­ Be aware of loose clothing which could inadvertently be exposed Protective Equipment · Hearing protection ­ People exposed to time weighted average of 85 dbA threshold

  15. Immuno-Isolation of Pancreatic Islet Allografts Using Pegylated Nanotherapy Leads to Long-Term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fahmy, Tarek

    if creation of ``stealth'' islets encapsulated within a thin cage of pegylated material of 100­200 nanometers of the created ``stealth'' DBA/2 (H-2d ) islets in vivo by comparing glycemic profiles across 4 groups, construction of ``stealth'' islets by pegylation-based nanotherapeutics not only supports islet structure

  16. A Bayesian Approach to Online Performance Modeling for Database Appliances using Gaussian Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterloo, University of

    agreements (SLAs) and to maintain peak performance for database management systems (DBMS), database, and resource provisioning. Accurately predicting response times of DBMS queries is necessary for a DBA an efficient and highly ac- curate online DBMS performance model that is robust in the face of changing

  17. A Bayesian Approach to Online Performance Modeling for Database Appliances using Gaussian Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aboulnaga, Ashraf

    - tain peak performance for database management systems (DBMS), database administrators (DBAs) need. Accurately predicting response times of DBMS queries is necessary for a DBA to effectively achieve and highly accurate online DBMS performance model that is robust in the face of changing workloads, data

  18. MC Appliance: Order (2012-CE-1508)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered CNA International Inc. d/b/a MC Appliance Corporation to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding MC Appliance had failed to certify that certain models of room air conditioners comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  19. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Professor Presents Unique Theory of Evolution in New Book

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flegr, Jaroslav

    are formed during a short period of evolutionary plasticity in which the species can change its properties, Czech Republic. About BookSurge BookSurge Publishing is a DBA of On-Demand Publishing LLC, a subsidiary of Amazon.com Inc., (NASDAQ AMZN). BookSurge is a pioneer in self-publishing and print-on-demand services

  20. CX-011736: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lutheran University Association, Inc. dba Valparaiso University - Solar Thermal Electrolytic Production of Magnesium from Magnesium Oxide CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/21/2013 Location(s): Indiana Offices(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy

  1. Certification Status Search Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Certification Status Search Tool (SB/DVBE) Illustrated User Manual #12;2 Certification Status Search Tool (SB/DVBE) Rev. 5/14/09 Copyright © 2008 RFP Depot, LLC dba BidSync All Rights Reserved://www.bidsync.com #12;3 Certification Status Search Tool (SB/DVBE) Rev. 5/14/09 Introduction BidSync is a powerful e

  2. Role of Vaccination in the Control of Turkey Coccidiosis: Vaccine Associated Oocyst Shedding, Lesions, and Mucosal Gene Expression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behl, Michelle 1983-

    2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    possible without the concerted effort of several groups and individuals. I would like to acknowledge Willmar Poultry Company d.b.a. Ag Forte for financially supporting my education and research. The Life Science Innovations ? Research Group offered... coccidiosis vaccination, Willmar Poultry Farms (WPF) (Willmar, MN) conducted a series of trials to determine the efficacy of Coccivac-T? in their commercial system. For a three month period, Coccivac-T? vaccination replaced the traditionally used ionophore...

  3. RELAP5/MOD3.2 analysis of a VVER-1000 reactor with UO[2] fuel and MOX fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Chun

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Secondary System Parameters and Calculated Values. . 38 Vl The Sequence of Events during LBLOCA. 46 VII Experimental Design and Calculated Temperatures. . . 57 NOMENCLATURE ATWS BOL CR DBA ECCS FLC HA HP HPIS IAEA I&C Anticipated Transient... postulated accidents such as loss of coolant accident (LOCA) and operational transients such as anticipated transients without scram (ATWS), loss of off-site power, loss of feedwater, loss of flow, and turbine trip. RELAP5 is a one-dimensional code which...

  4. High SO{sub 2} removal efficiency testing. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blythe, G.

    1994-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The project involves testing at six full-scale utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, to evaluate low capital cost upgrades that may allow these systems to achieve up to 98% SO{sub 2} removal efficiency. The upgrades to be evaluated mostly involve using additives in the FGD systems. On the base program, testing was completed at the Tampa Electric Big Bend Station in November 1992. The upgrade option tested was DBA additive. For Option 1, at the Hoosier Energy Merom Station, three upgrade options have been tested: DBA additive, sodium formate additive, and high pH set point operation. Option 2 has involved testing at the Southwestern Electric Power Company Pirkey Station. Both sodium formate and DBA additives were tested as potential upgrade options at Pirkey. On Option 3, for testing at the PSI Energy Gibson Station, a DBA additive performance and consumption test was conducted in late February through mid-March 1994. Preliminary results from these tests are discussed in Section 3 of this progress report. Option 4 is for testing at the Duquesne Light Elrama Station. The FGD system employs magnesium-enhanced lime reagent and venturi absorber modules. An EPRI-funded model evaluation of potential upgrade options for this FGD system, along with a preliminary economic evaluation, determined that the most attractive upgrade options for this site were to increase thiosulfate ion concentrations in the FGD system liquor to lower oxidation percentages and increase liquid-phase sulfite alkalinity, and to increase the venturi absorber pressure drop to improve gas/liquid contacting. Parametric testing of these upgrade options was conducted in late March 1994. Preliminary results from these tests are also discussed in Section 3 of this progress report.

  5. High SO(2) Removal Efficiency Testing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blythe, G.

    1997-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    On the base program, testing was completed at the Tampa Electric Company`s (TECo`s) Big Bend Station in November 1992. The upgrade option tested was DBA additive. Additional testing was conducted at this site during the previous quarter (April through June 1997). Results from that testing were presented in the Technical Progress Report dated July 1997. For Option I, at the Hoosier Energy Merom Station, results from another program co-funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association have been combined with results from DOE-funded testing. Three upgrade options have been tested: DBA additive, sodium formate additive, and high pH set-point operation. All testing was completed by November 1992. There were no activities for this site during the current quarter. Option II involved testing at the Southwestern Electric Power Company Pirkey Station. Both sodium formate and DBA additives were tested as potential upgrade options. All of the testing at this site was completed by May 1993. On Option III, for testing at the PSI Energy Gibson Station, testing with sodium formate additive was completed in early October 1993, and a DBA additive performance and consumption test was completed in March of 1994. There were no efforts for this site during the current quarter. Option IV is for testing at the Duquesne Light Elrama Station. The FGD system employs magnesium-enhanced lime reagent and venturi absorber modules. An EPRI-funded model evaluation of potential upgrade options for this FGD system, along with a preliminary economic evaluation, determined that the most attractive upgrade options for this site were to increase thiosulfate ion concentrations in the FGD system liquor to lower oxidation percentages.

  6. Steroselective metabolism of dizen(a,h)anthracene to trans-dihydrodiols and their activation to bacterial mutagens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, K.L.; Schollmeier, M.; Frank, H.; Oesch, F. (Univ. of Mainz (West Germany))

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dibenz(a,h)anthracene (DBA), a carcinogenic, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ubiquitous in the environment, is metabolized by the hepatic microsomal fraction of immature Sprague-Dawley rats pretreated with Aroclor 1254 to 27 ethyl acetate-extractable metabolites. More than half of these metabolites (51%) consisted of trans-1,2-; -3,4-; and -5,6-dihydrodiols including their identified secondary metabolites. The three trans-dihydrodiols were highly enriched in their R,R enantiomers as determined by high performance liquid chromatography on suitable chiral stationary phases. Determination of the bacterial mutagenicity by measuring the reversion rate of histidine-dependent Salmonella typhimurium TA100 to histidine prototrophy revealed marked differences in the mutagenicity of the enantiomers of the trans-dihydrodiols of DBA when activated by the same metabolizing system as used in the metabolism studies. In the case of trans-1,2- and -5,6-dihydrodiol, the S,S enantiomers were converted to more mutagenic metabolites than their corresponding optical antipodes, whereas in the case of trans-3,4-dihydrodiol it was the R,R enantiomer that produced the stronger mutagens. Therefore, both regio- and stereoselectivity of the metabolizing enzymes attribute to the dominant role of trans-3,4-dihydrodiol in the mutagenicity of DBA.

  7. Effects of non-latching blast valves on the source term and consequences of the design-basis accidents in the Device Assembly Facility (DAF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, D.H.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of the Design-Basis Accidents (DBA) involving high explosives (HE) and Plutonium (Pu) in the assembly cell of the Device Assembly Facility (DAF), which was completed earlier, assumed latching blast valves in the ventilation system of the assembly cell. Latching valves effectively sealed a release path through the ventilation duct system. However, the blast valves in the assembly cell, as constructed are actually non-latching valves, and would reopen when the gas pressure drops to 0.5 psi above one atmosphere. Because the reopening of the blast valves provides an additional release path to the environment, and affects the material transport from the assembly cell to other DAF buildings, the DOE/NV DAF management has decided to support an additional analysis of the DAF`s DBA to account for the effects of non-latching valves. Three cases were considered in the DAF`s DBA, depending on the amount of HE and Pu involved, as follows: Case 1 -- 423 {number_sign}HE, 16 kg Pu; Case 2 -- 150 {number_sign}HE 10 kg Pu; Case 3 -- 55 {number_sign}HE 5 kg Pu. The results of the analysis with non-latching valves are summarized.

  8. The effect of topography on SAR calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zyl, J.J. van; Chapman, B.D.; Dubois, P. (California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.); Shi, Jiancheng (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During normal synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processing, a flat earth is assumed when performing radiometric corrections such as antenna pattern and scattering area removal. Here the authors examine the effects of topographic variations on these corrections. Local slopes will cause the actual scattering area to be different from that calculated using the flat earth assumption. It is shown that this effect, which is present for both airborne and spaceborne SAR data, may easily cause calibration errors larger than a decibel. Ignoring the topography during antenna pattern removal is expected to be negligible for spaceborne SAR's. In this paper they show how these effects can be taken into account if a digital elevation model is available for the imaged area. It is also shown that not taking the topography into account during antenna pattern removal introduces polarimetric calibration errors.

  9. Performance Guarantees for the TSP with a Parameterized Triangle Inequality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bender, Michael

    of the problem is a weighted graph G consisting of n vertices (representing cities). Distances between vertices

  10. Genetic Regulation of Intrinsic Endurance Exercise Capacity in Mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courtney, Sean M.

    2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    /J, C58/J, CAST/EiJ, CBA/J, CE/J, DBA/2J, FVB/NJ, KK/HlJ, I/LnJ, LP/J, MA/MyJ, MRL/MpJ, NOD/ShiLtJ, NON/ShiLtJ, NZB/BINJ, NZO/HlLtJ, NZW/LacJ, PL/J, PWD/PhJ, PWK/PhJ, RIIIS/J, SJL/J, SM/J, SWR/J and WSB/EiJ) (n = 6 per strain) were purchased from...

  11. Centrifuges Replacement Study Proposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iqbal, Muhammad

    2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    characteristics, features of equipment, auxiliaries furnished, overall dims., mat?ls. of constr., est. wt. and complete motor data. 3 3 8 2 NOISE LEVEL DATA for all equipment generating a sound level of 80 DBA or higher, at 3 feet distance... power unit. Meets all requirements 1.3.17 Vibration monitor. Meets all requirements 1.3.18 Transport lock. Meets all requirements 1.3.19 Variable frequency drive system with drive motor and v-belt drive with guard. Meets all requirements 1...

  12. Names and Titles in Early Tibetan Records

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Hugh Edward

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the Myang Btsun Khri Bo, the head of a Myang principality which may have been the heritage of the great minister Myang Mang Po Rje Zhang Snang who was all­ powerful in the early d:1YS of Srong Brtsan Sgam Po and was disgraced an,1 executed in about 636... -father in power, is called Myang Mang Po Rje Zhang Snang. His family may have been awarded the status of rgyal phran for this service. Mang Po Rje is also found as part of the names of persons of special distinction from the Mgar Khu, Dba's and Cog Ro rus...

  13. Bulletin of Tibetology: Volume 21 Number 3 : Full issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namgyal Institute of Tibetology

    and the Myang Btsun Khri Bo, the head of a Myang principality which may have been the heritage of the great minister Myang Mang Po Rje Zhang Snang who was all­ powerful in the early d:1YS of Srong Brtsan Sgam Po and was disgraced an,1 executed in about 636... -father in power, is called Myang Mang Po Rje Zhang Snang. His family may have been awarded the status of rgyal phran for this service. Mang Po Rje is also found as part of the names of persons of special distinction from the Mgar Khu, Dba's and Cog Ro rus...

  14. A Desk Guide To The Davis-Bacon Act | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy:Whether you're a16-17, 2015 |7 Energy Literacy5.1 (MarchPotawatomiDBA

  15. Occupational exposures during routine activities in coal-fueled power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, M.J.; MacIntosh, D.L.; Williams, P.L. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Health Science

    2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Limited information is available on occupational exposures during routine, nonoutage work activities in coal-fueled power plants. This study evaluated occupational exposures to the principal contaminants in the facilities, including respirable dust (coal dust), arsenic, noise, asbestos, and heat stress. The data were collected over a 3-month period, during the summer of 2001. Each of the 5 facilities was divided into 5 similar exposure groups based on previous exposure assessments and job tasks performed. Of the nearly 400 air samples collected, only 1 exceeded the allowable occupational exposure value. For the noise samples, 55 (about 18%) were equal to or greater than the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 8-hour hearing conservation program level of 85 dBA, and 12 (about 4%) were equal to or greater than the OSHA 8-hour permissible exposure level of 90 dBA. Heat stress monitoring at the facilities indicates that 26% of the 1-hour TWAs were exceeded for one or all of the recommended heat stress limits. The data also concluded that some work sites were above the heat stress ceiling values recommended by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Four of the 20 employees personally monitored exceeded the recommended limits for heart rate or body core temperature. This suggests there is a potential for heat strain if signs and symptoms are ignored. Recommendations are made to better control the heat stress exposure.

  16. Application of the MELCOR code to design basis PWR large dry containment analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Jesse; Notafrancesco, Allen (USNRC, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, Rockville, MD); Tills, Jack Lee (Jack Tills & Associates, Inc., Sandia Park, NM)

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MELCOR computer code has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories under USNRC sponsorship to provide capability for independently auditing analyses submitted by reactor manufactures and utilities. MELCOR is a fully integrated code (encompassing the reactor coolant system and the containment building) that models the progression of postulated accidents in light water reactor power plants. To assess the adequacy of containment thermal-hydraulic modeling incorporated in the MELCOR code for application to PWR large dry containments, several selected demonstration designs were analyzed. This report documents MELCOR code demonstration calculations performed for postulated design basis accident (DBA) analysis (LOCA and MSLB) inside containment, which are compared to other code results. The key processes when analyzing the containment loads inside PWR large dry containments are (1) expansion and transport of high mass/energy releases, (2) heat and mass transfer to structural passive heat sinks, and (3) containment pressure reduction due to engineered safety features. A code-to-code benchmarking for DBA events showed that MELCOR predictions of maximum containment loads were equivalent to similar predictions using a qualified containment code known as CONTAIN. This equivalency was found to apply for both single- and multi-cell containment models.

  17. Analysis of an Earthquake-Initiated-Transient in a PBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. M. Ougouag; J. Ortensi; H. Hiruta

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the Design Basis Accidents (DBA) for a Pebble Bed Reactor has been identified as the “Safe shutdown earthquake with core conduction cooling to passive mode of Reactor Cavity Cooling System.” A new methodology to analyze this particular DBA has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During the seismic event the reactor core experiences the densification of the pebbles, which produce small reactivity insertions due to the effective fuel densification. In addition, a decrease in the active core height results in the relative withdrawal of the control rods, which are assumed to remain stationary during the transient. The methodology relies on the dynamic re-meshing of the core during the transient to capture the local packing fraction changes and their corresponding effects on temperature and reactivity. The core re-meshing methodology is based on the velocity profiles of the pebbles in the core, which were obtained with the INL’s pebble mechanics code PEBBLES. The methodology has been added to the coupled code system CYNOD-THERMIX-KONVEK. The reactor power calculation is further improved with the use of the new advanced TRISO fuel model to better approximate the temperatures in the fuel kernels. During the transient the core is brought back to a safe condition by the strong Doppler feedback from local temperature increases.

  18. Polarization-dependent all-optical modulator with ultra-high modulation depth based on a stereo graphene-microfiber structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Fei; Zheng, Bi-cai; Shao, Guang-hao; Ge, Shi-jun; Lu, Yan-qing

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an in-line polarization-dependent all-optical fiber modulator based on a stereo graphene-microfiber structure (GMF) by utilizing the lab-on-rod technique. Owing to the unique spring-like geometry, an ultra-long GMF interaction length can be achieved, and an ultra-high modulation depth (MD) of ~7.5 dB and a high modulation efficiency (ME) of ~0.2 dB/mW were demonstrated for one polarization state. The MD and ME are more than one order larger than those of other graphene-waveguide hybrid all-optical modulators. By further optimizing the transferring and cleaning process, the modulator can quickly switch between transparent and opaque states for both the two polarization states with a maximized MD of tens of decibels. This modulator is compatible with current fiber-optic communication systems and may be applied in the near future to meet the impending need for ultrafast optical signal processing.

  19. Position Paper: Automotive CPS Workshop Oct. 2010 Fault-Tolerant Discrete Control Logic in Automotive Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajkumar, Ragunathan "Raj"

    , a safety property could be: "do not deploy an airbag if the output of a weight sensor is within some range

  20. Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bojda, Nicholas

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Consumption Survey (EIA, 2003), linear fluorescentEnergy Consumption Survey (EIA 2003) to derive a weightedEnergy Consumption Survey 2005 (EIA 2005). Since U.S.

  1. Final Scientific/Technical Report Carbon Capture and Storage Training Northwest - CCSTNW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Workman, James

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the activities of the Carbon Capture and Storage Training Northwest (CCSTNW) program 2009 to 2013. The CCSTNW created, implemented, and provided Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) training over the period of the program. With the assistance of an expert advisory board, CCSTNW created curriculum and conducted three short courses, more than three lectures, two symposiums, and a final conference. The program was conducted in five phases; 1) organization, gap analysis, and form advisory board; 2) develop list serves, website, and tech alerts; 3) training needs survey; 4) conduct lectures, courses, symposiums, and a conference; 5) evaluation surveys and course evaluations. This program was conducted jointly by Environmental Outreach and Stewardship Alliance (dba. Northwest Environmental Training Center – NWETC) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL).

  2. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental control technology. Final technical monthly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Trace Element Removal (TER) test block. A second phase of the lime Forced Oxidation process with DBA addition (LDG) was also conducted simultaneously on the Pilot System this month. This month the ECTC was off-line from 6/9 through 6/19 to complete a Facility retrofit project. During this brief outage, modifications were made to the ECTC Flue Gas Handling System to enhance the facility capabilities, and to prepare for future High Velocity Wet FGD Testing. On the Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the low temperature performance testing resumed this month as measurements were taken for NO{sub x} removal efficiency, residual ammonia slip, and SO{sub 3} generation across the new SCR catalysts.

  3. Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center report to the Steering Committee. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Trace Element Removal (TER) test block, and a simultaneous testing of the Lime Forced Oxidation process with DBA addition (LDG). At the end of the month, a series of Duct Injection tests began in a study to determine the efficiencies of alkaline injection for removing trace elements (mercury). On the Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, low temperature performance testing continued this month as measurements were taken for NO{sub x} removal efficiency, residual ammonia slip, and SO{sub 3} generation across the catalysts installed in the SCR reactor. This report describes the status of the facilities and test activities at the pilot and mini-pilot plants.

  4. Degradation and failure characteristics of NPP containment protective coating systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sindelar, R.L.

    2000-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A research program to investigate the performance and potential for failure of Service Level 1 coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is in progress. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause failure as identified by the industry coatings expert panel. The period of interest for performance covers the time from application of the coating through 40 years of service, followed by a medium-to-large break loss-of-coolant accident scenario, which is a design basis accident (DBA) scenario. The interactive program elements are discussed in this report and the application of these elements to the System 5 coating system (polyamide epoxy primer, carbon steel substrate) is used to evaluate performance.

  5. Degradation and Failure Characteristics of NPP Containment Protective Coating Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sindelar, R.L.

    2001-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A research program to investigate the performance and potential for debris formation of Service Level I coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is being performed at the Savannah River Technology Center. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause coating disbondment as identified by the Industry Coatings Expert Panel. The period of interest for performance covers the time from application of the coating through 40 years of service, followed by a medium-to-large break loss-of-coolant accident scenario, which is a design basis accident (DBA) scenario. The interactive program elements are described in this report and the application of these elements to evaluate the performance of the specific coating system of Phenoline 305 epoxy-phenolic topcoat over Carbozinc 11 primer on a steel substrate. This system is one of the predominant coating systems present on steel substrates in NPP containment.

  6. 2011 Hyundai Sonata 4932 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid HEV (VIN KMHEC4A43BA004932). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the AVTA for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the DOE.

  7. 2011 Chevrolet Volt VIN 0815 Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), including testing the PHEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 12,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Chevrolet Volt PHEV (VIN 1G1RD6E48BU100815). The battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation (eTec) dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the AVTA for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the DOE.

  8. 2010 Honda Civic Hybrid UltraBattery Conversion 5577 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Honda Civic HEV UltraBattery Conversion (VIN JHMFA3F24AS005577). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the AVTA for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the DOE.

  9. 2010 Toyota Prius VIN 6063 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Toyota Prius HEV (VIN JTDKN3DU5A0006063). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  10. 2010 Honda Insight VIN 1748 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Honda Insight HEV (VIN: JHMZE2H59AS011748). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  11. 2010 Toyota Prius VIN 0462 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Toyota Prius HEV (VIN: JTDKN3DU2A5010462). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  12. 2010 Honda Insight VIN 0141 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler Gray

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Honda Insight HEV (VIN: JHMZE2H78AS010141). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  13. 2010 Ford Fusion VIN 4757 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Ford Fusion HEV (VIN: 3FADP0L34AR144757). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  14. Analysis of main steam isolation valve leakage in design basis accidents using MELCOR 1.8.6 and RADTRAD.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salay, Michael (United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, D.C.); Kalinich, Donald A.; Gauntt, Randall O.; Radel, Tracy E.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyses were performed using MELCOR and RADTRAD to investigate main steam isolation valve (MSIV) leakage behavior under design basis accident (DBA) loss-of-coolant (LOCA) conditions that are presumed to have led to a significant core melt accident. Dose to the control room, site boundary and LPZ are examined using both approaches described in current regulatory guidelines as well as analyses based on best estimate source term and system response. At issue is the current practice of using containment airborne aerosol concentrations as a surrogate for the in-vessel aerosol concentration that exists in the near vicinity of the MSIVs. This study finds current practice using the AST-based containment aerosol concentrations for assessing MSIV leakage is non-conservative and conceptually in error. A methodology is proposed that scales the containment aerosol concentration to the expected vessel concentration in order to preserve the simplified use of the AST in assessing containment performance under assumed DBA conditions. This correction is required during the first two hours of the accident while the gap and early in-vessel source terms are present. It is general practice to assume that at {approx}2hrs, recovery actions to reflood the core will have been successful and that further core damage can be avoided. The analyses performed in this study determine that, after two hours, assuming vessel reflooding has taken place, the containment aerosol concentration can then conservatively be used as the effective source to the leaking MSIV's. Recommendations are provided concerning typical aerosol removal coefficients that can be used in the RADTRAD code to predict source attenuation in the steam lines, and on robust methods of predicting MSIV leakage flows based on measured MSIV leakage performance.

  15. A COMPREHENSIVE SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSIS OF DB WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergeron, P.; Wesemael, F.; Dufour, Pierre; Beauchamp, A.; Hunter, C.; Gianninas, A.; Limoges, M.-M.; Dufour, Patrick; Fontaine, G. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Saffer, Rex A. [Strayer University, 234 Mall Boulevard, Suite G-50, King of Prussia, PA 19406 (United States); Ruiz, M. T. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Liebert, James, E-mail: bergeron@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: wesemael@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: gianninas@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: limoges@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: dufourpa@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: fontaine@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: alain.beauchamp@fti-ibis.com, E-mail: chris.hunter@yale.edu, E-mail: rex.saffer@strayer.edu, E-mail: mtruiz@das.uchile.cl [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed analysis of 108 helium-line (DB) white dwarfs based on model atmosphere fits to high signal-to-noise optical spectroscopy. We derive a mean mass of 0.67 M{sub sun} for our sample, with a dispersion of only 0.09 M{sub sun}. White dwarfs also showing hydrogen lines, the DBA stars, comprise 44% of our sample, and their mass distribution appears similar to that of DB stars. As in our previous investigation, we find no evidence for the existence of low-mass (M < 0.5 M{sub sun}) DB white dwarfs. We derive a luminosity function based on a subset of DB white dwarfs identified in the Palomar-Green Survey. We show that 20% of all white dwarfs in the temperature range of interest are DB stars, although the fraction drops to half this value above T{sub eff} {approx} 20,000 K. We also show that the persistence of DB stars with no hydrogen features at low temperatures is difficult to reconcile with a scenario involving accretion from the interstellar medium, often invoked to account for the observed hydrogen abundances in DBA stars. We present evidence for the existence of two different evolutionary channels that produce DB white dwarfs: the standard model where DA stars are transformed into DB stars through the convective dilution of a thin hydrogen layer and a second channel where DB stars retain a helium atmosphere throughout their evolution. We finally demonstrate that the instability strip of pulsating V777 Her white dwarfs contains no non-variables, if the hydrogen content of these stars is properly accounted for.

  16. STATE OF CALIFORNIA AREA WEIGHTED AVERAGE CALCULATION WORKSHEET: RESIDENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a building feature, material, or construction assembly occur in a building, a weighted average there is more than one level of floor, wall, or ceiling insulation in a building, or more than one type

  17. An evaluation of gender-based weighting factors for internal dosimetry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiars, Joanna Hamilton

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assesses gender effects on radiation dose weighting factors used in internal dosimetry. A weighting factor represents the relative contribution of a particular organ or tissue to the total detriment due to the effects from uniform whole...

  18. Water adsorption on aggregates of spherical aerosol nano particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nie, Chu

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A three dimensional integral equation is developed in order to compute water adsorption onto aggregates of spherical aerosol nano particles. The integral equation is derived from molecular density functional theory, with a weighted density...

  19. air-treatment system hepa: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ( ) which has a total of 10 digits (0 to the more familiar decimal system In this lesson, you will learn: What is meant by a weighted number system. Basic features of weighted...

  20. Adapting an LCD for weight generation in an electro-optic neural processor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamson, Andrew Charles

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis discusses adapting and testing an LCD as a weight image display for use in the Hybrid Electro-optical Neural Network (HENN). The HENN project is a proof of concept prototype hybrid neural network that will be ...

  1. High schools that bridge the achievement gap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hargrove, Michael S.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    majority of the API is based on California Standards Tests (the California state standards. API is largely derived fromAPI is calculated by a weighted averaging of students’ scores on subject area California Standards

  2. The Role of Demand Response in Default Service Pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen; Goldman, Chuck; Neenan, Bernie

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Pennsylvania use the PJM real-time spot market price tosince the hourly real-time PJM prices are not known untilfive minutes. The hourly PJM price is a weighted average of

  3. A Polyhedral Approach to the Single Row Facility Layout Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    problem of arranging facilities on a line, while minimizing a weighted sum of the ... Facility Layout Problem (SRFLP) asks for a layout of the facilities, i.e., a.

  4. Solitary lift : redesigning the base and tilter modules to meet customer needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Elliot B. (Elliot Benjamin), 1982-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A theoretical investigation towards the redesign of the base and the tilting module of the Solitary Lift prototype improved the machine with a weight reduction of 5.731bs. Besides lighter weight, the other criteria used ...

  5. Optimal multi-robot path planning with temporal logic constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulusoy, Alphan

    In this paper we present a method for automatically planning optimal paths for a group of robots that satisfy a common high level mission specification. Each robot's motion in the environment is modeled as a weighted ...

  6. Coordinated Vehicle Platoon Control: Weighted and Constrained Consensus and Communication Network Topologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hongwei

    Coordinated Vehicle Platoon Control: Weighted and Constrained Consensus and Communication Network a new method for enhancing highway safety and efficiency by coordinated control of vehicle platoons. One performance. Vehicle deployment is formulated as a weighted and constrained consensus control problem

  7. INVESTIGATION OF HALO FORMATION IN CONTINUOUS BEAMS USING WEIGHTED POLYNOMIAL EXPANSIONS AND PERTURBATIONAL ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. ALLEN

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider halo formation in continuous beams oscillating at natural modes by inspecting particle trajectories. Trajectory equations containing field nonlinearities are derived from a weighted polynomial expansion. We then use perturbational techniques to further analyze particle motion.

  8. Refrigerator Efficiency in Ghana: Tailoring an appliance market transformation program design for Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben Hagan, Essel; Van Buskirk, Robert; Ofosu-Ahenkorah, Alfred; McNeil, Michael A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    households fall into which rate category, and on this based calculated a weighted average marginal price of electricityhousehold in 2001 (EIA, 2005a). Recent data from Ghana indicates that the average marginal price of electricity (

  9. Exposure Evaluation for Benzene, Lead and Noise in Vehicle and Equipment Repair Shops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, Lynn C.

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An exposure assessment was performed at the equipment and vehicle maintenance repair shops operating at the U. S. Department of Energy Hanford site, in Richland, Washington. The maintenance shops repair and maintain vehicles and equipment used in support of the Hanford cleanup mission. There are three general mechanic shops and one auto body repair shop. The mechanics work on heavy equipment used in construction, cranes, commercial motor vehicles, passenger-type vehicles in addition to air compressors, generators, and farm equipment. Services include part fabrication, installation of equipment, repair and maintenance work in the engine compartment, and tire and brake services. Work performed at the auto body shop includes painting and surface preparation which involves applying body filler and sanding. 8-hour time-weighted-average samples were collected for benzene and noise exposure and task-based samples were collected for lead dust work activities involving painted metal surfaces. Benzene samples were obtained using 3M™ 3520 sampling badges and were analyzed for additional volatile organic compounds. These compounds were selected based on material safety data sheet information for the aerosol products used by the mechanics for each day of sampling. The compounds included acetone, ethyl ether, toluene, xylene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone, and trichloroethylene. Laboratory data for benzene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone and trichloroethylene were all below the reporting detection limit. Airborne concentrations for acetone, ethyl ether, toluene and xylene were all less than 10% of their occupational exposure limit. The task-based samples obtained for lead dusts were submitted for a metal scan analysis to identify other metals that might be present. Laboratory results for lead dusts were all below the reporting detection limit and airborne concentration for the other metals observed in the samples were less than 10% of the occupational exposure limit. Noise dosimetry sampling was performed on a random basis and was representative of the different work activities within the four shops. Twenty three percent of the noise samples exceeded the occupational exposure limit of 85 decibels for an 8-hour time-weightedaverage. Work activities where noise levels were higher included use of impact wrenches and grinding wheels.

  10. Clonal deletion of self-reactive T cells in irradiation bone marrow chimeras and neonatally tolerant mice. Evidence for intercellular transfer of Mlsa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speiser, D.E.; Schneider, R.; Hengartner, H.; MacDonald, H.R.; Zinkernagel, R.M. (Univ. Hospital, Zuerich (Switzerland))

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tolerance to Mlsa has been shown to be associated with clonal deletion of cells carrying TCR beta chain variable regions V beta 6 or V beta 8.1 in mice possessing I-E antigens. To evaluate the rules of tolerance induction to Mlsa we prepared irradiation bone marrow chimeras expressing Mlsa or Mlsb and I-E by different cell types. Deletion of V beta 6+, Mlsa-reactive T cells required the presence of Mlsa and I-E products either on bone marrow-derived cells or on irradiated recipient cells. Tolerance was induced when Mlsa and I-E were expressed by distinct cells of the chimera. Also neonatally tolerized mice exhibited depletion of V beta 6+ cells after injection of I-E- Mlsa spleen cells (DBA/1) into newborn I-E+ Mlsb mice (BALB/c x B10.G)F1. These results suggest that the product of the Mlsa locus is soluble and/or may be transferred from cell to cell and bound to I-E antigens. The chimera experiments also showed that tolerance to Mlsa is H-2 allele independent, i.e., is apparently unrestricted. Differentiation of chimeric (H-2d/Mlsa x H-2q/Mlsb)F1 stem cells in either an H-2d or an H-2q thymus revealed that tolerance assessed by absence of V beta 6+ T cells is not dependent on the thymically determined restriction specificity of T cells.

  11. Assessment of the chloracnegenic response induced by 3,4,3',4'-tetrachloroazoxybenzene in mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horton, V.L.; Yeary, R.A.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chloracne is a follicular hyperkeratosis produced by exposure to certain halogenated aromatic compounds. The rabbit ear bioassay has been used successfully for testing the acnegenic activity of compounds, but the lack of reference data in this species limits its usefulness in correlating chloracne to other toxic effects such as skin carcinogenesis. In this study, a prototype chloracnegen, 3,4,3',4'-tetrachloroazoxybenzene (TCAOB), was used. Five strains of mice (hairless, rhino, rhino+, DBA/2J, and C57BL/6) were treated topically with 100 ..mu..l of 0.001, 0.01, or 0.1% TCAOB daily for 3-9 wk. Skin and liver histology were performed and hepatic enzyme activities measured. At the 0.001% TCAOB level, induction of hepatic aniline hydroxylase and cytochrome P-450 occurred in the C57BL/6 mice and induction of cytochrome c reductase occurred in the rhino mice. Dose-dependent gross and histologic skin lesions, characteristic of follicular hyperkeratosis, were observed in the rhino and hairless strains at the 0.01% and 0.1% levels. These two strains also had induction of hepatic cytochrome c reductase, cytochrome P-450, and aniline hydroxylase at TCAOB concentrations of 0.01 or 0.1%. These results suggest that the rhino and hairless strains of mice may be useful in the study of chloracne.

  12. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center final monthly technical report, August 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit this month involved the Trace Element Removal (TER) test block, and the simultaneous testing of the Lime Forced Oxidation process with DBA addition (LDG). Additionally, the second phase of the 1995 Carbon Injection test block began this month with the SDA/PJFF test configuration. At the end of the LDG testing this month, a one-week baseline test was conducted to generate approximately 200 lbs. of magnesium-lime FGD solids for analysis. On the 1.0 MW Post-FGD Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, performance testing was continued this month as measurements were taken for NO{sub x} removal efficiency, residual ammonia slip, and S0{sub 3} generation across the catalysts installed in the reactor. As a result of new directions received from EPRI, this will be the last scheduled month of testing for the SCR unit in 1995. At the completion of this month, the unit will be isolated from the flue gas path and placed in a cold-standby mode for future test activities. This report describes the status of facilities and test facilities at the pilot and mini-pilot plants.

  13. A comparison of rodent caging systems based on microenvironmental parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corning, B.F.; Lipman, N.S. (Division of Comparative Medicine, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States))

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four different mouse caging systems were evaluated for microenvironmental temperature, carbon dioxide, relative humidity (RH) and ammonia levels during a 7-day testing period. All caging systems evaluated had polycarbonate bases and consisted of either a molded polyester (MP) filter lid, one of two different polycarbonate filter lids, or no filter lid which served as a control. At 50% macroenvironmental RH (study I), all systems maintained an intracage temperature of 75.5 degrees F +/- 0.5 degrees. Both polycarbonate systems averaged greater than 2200 ppm of carbon dioxide more than the MP system and the controls. When compared with RH in the control cages, RH levels averaged over 20% and 5 to 8% RH greater in the polycarbonate filter lid systems and the MP system, respectively. There were no appreciable ammonia levels in either the MP or control systems. In the polycarbonate filter lid systems, ammonia levels were detectable on day 4 and were greater than 200 ppm by day 6. At 20% macroenvironmental RH (study II), there was a proportional 15 to 30% RH decrease from study I levels. Ammonia levels were undetectable in any system until day 7 and averaged only 17 ppm in one of the polycarbonate systems. Minimal differences were observed in studies III, IV and V when pine shavings were used instead of hardwood chips, a CD-1 stock instead of a DBA/2J strain, and different grades of filter inserts in the polycarbonate systems, respectively.

  14. Application of the DG-1199 methodology to the ESBWR and ABWR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalinich, Donald A.; Gauntt, Randall O.; Walton, Fotini

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Appendix A-5 of Draft Regulatory Guide DG-1199 'Alternative Radiological Source Term for Evaluating Design Basis Accidents at Nuclear Power Reactors' provides guidance - applicable to RADTRAD MSIV leakage models - for scaling containment aerosol concentration to the expected steam dome concentration in order to preserve the simplified use of the Accident Source Term (AST) in assessing containment performance under assumed design basis accident (DBA) conditions. In this study Economic and Safe Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) RADTRAD models are developed using the DG-1199, Appendix A-5 guidance. The models were run using RADTRAD v3.03. Low Population Zone (LPZ), control room (CR), and worst-case 2-hr Exclusion Area Boundary (EAB) doses were calculated and compared to the relevant accident dose criteria in 10 CFR 50.67. For the ESBWR, the dose results were all lower than the MSIV leakage doses calculated by General Electric/Hitachi (GEH) in their licensing technical report. There are no comparable ABWR MSIV leakage doses, however, it should be noted that the ABWR doses are lower than the ESBWR doses. In addition, sensitivity cases were evaluated to ascertain the influence/importance of key input parameters/features of the models.

  15. Savannah River Reactor Operation: Indices of risk for emergency planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Kula, K.R.; East, J.M.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Periodically it is necessary to re-examine the implications of new source terms for neighboring offsite populations as Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and Severe Accident studies mature, and lead to a better understanding of the progression of hypothetical core melt accidents in the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors. In this application multiple-system failure, low-frequency events, and consequently higher radiological source terms than from normal operation or design basis accidents (DBAs) are considered. Measures of consequence such as constant dose vs distance, boundary doses, and health effects to close-in populations are usually examined in this context. A set of source terms developed for the Safety Information Document (SID) for support of the Reactor Operation Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) forms the basis for the revised risk evaluation discussed herein. The intent of this review is not to completely substantiate the sufficiency of the current Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ). However, the two principal measures (200-rem red-bone marrow dose vs distance and 300-rem thyroid dose vs distance) for setting an EPZ are considered. Additional dose-at-distance calculations and consideration of DBA doses would be needed to complete a re-evaluation of the current EPZ. These subject areas are not addressed in the current document. Also, this report evaluates the sensitivity of individual risk estimates to the extent of offsite evacuation assumed from a K reactor severe accident and compares these risks to the Draft DOE Safety Guidelines. 14 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. HIGH SO2 REMOVAL EFFICIENCY TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe; James L. Phillips

    1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report describes the results of performance tests at six full-scale wet lime- and limestone-reagent flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The objective of these tests was to evaluate the effectiveness of low capital cost sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal upgrades for existing FGD systems as an option for complying with the provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The upgrade options tested at the limestone-reagent systems included the use of organic acid additives (dibasic acid (DBA) and/or sodium formate) as well as increased reagent ratio (higher excess limestone levels in the recirculating slurry solids) and absorber liquid-to-gas ratio. One system also tested operating at higher flue gas velocities to allow the existing FGD system to treat flue gas from an adjacent, unscrubbed unit. Upgrade options for the one lime-based system tested included increased absorber venturi pressure drop and increased sulfite concentration in the recirculating slurry liquor.

  17. A Spatio-Temporal Model of House Prices in the US

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holly, Sean; Pesaran, M Hashem; Yamagata, Takashi

    . In the literature on spatial econometrics the degree of cross section dependence is calibrated by means of a weighting matrix. For example the (i; j) elements of a weighting matrix, wij, could take a value of 1 if the ith and jth areas... of xit and ft. How- ever, we allow "0its to be weakly dependent across i. This, for example, allows the idiosyn- cratic errors to follow the Spatial Autoregressive (SAR), or the Spatial Moving Average (SMA) processes introduced by Whittle (1954), Cli...

  18. Mechanical-biological waste treatment and the associated occupational hygiene in Finland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolvanen, Outi K. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, P.O. Box 35, 40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)]. E-mail: outolvan@bytl.jyu.fi; Haenninen, Kari I. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, P.O. Box 35, 40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A special feature of waste management in Finland has been the emphasis on the source separation of kitchen biowaste (catering waste); more than two-thirds of the Finnish population participates in this separation. Source-separated biowaste is usually treated by composting. The biowaste of about 5% of the population is handled by mechanical-biological treatment. A waste treatment plant at Mustasaari is the only plant in Finland using digestion for kitchen biowaste. For the protection of their employees, the plant owners commissioned a study on environmental factors and occupational hygiene in the plant area. During 1998-2000 the concentrations of dust, microbes and endotoxins and noise levels were investigated to identify possible problems at the plant. Three different work areas were investigated: the pre-processing and crushing hall, the bioreactor hall and the drying hall. Employees were asked about work-related health problems. Some problems with occupational hygiene were identified: concentrations of microbes and endotoxins may increase to levels harmful to health during waste crushing and in the bioreactor hall. Because employees complained of symptoms such as dry cough and rash or itching appearing once or twice a month, it is advisable to use respirator masks (class P3) during dusty working phases. The noise level in the drying hall exceeded the Finnish threshold value of 85 dBA. Qualitatively harmful factors for the health of employees are similar in all closed waste treatment plants in Finland. Quantitatively, however, the situation at the Mustasaari treatment plant is better than at some Finnish dry waste treatment plants. Therefore is reasonable to conclude that mechanical sorting, which produces a dry waste fraction for combustion and a biowaste fraction for anaerobic treatment, is in terms of occupational hygiene better for employees than combined aerobic treatment and dry waste treatment.

  19. Sodium fast reactor gaps analysis of computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbajo, Juan (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Ludewig, Hans (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki-ken, Japan); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki-ken, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d'%C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache %3CU%2B2013%3E CEA, France)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of an expert-opinion elicitation activity designed to qualitatively assess the status and capabilities of currently available computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety calculations of advanced sodium fast reactors, and identify important gaps. The twelve-member panel consisted of representatives from five U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, and BNL), the University of Wisconsin, the KAERI, the JAEA, and the CEA. The major portion of this elicitation activity occurred during a two-day meeting held on Aug. 10-11, 2010 at Argonne National Laboratory. There were two primary objectives of this work: (1) Identify computer codes currently available for SFR accident analysis and reactor safety calculations; and (2) Assess the status and capability of current US computer codes to adequately model the required accident scenarios and associated phenomena, and identify important gaps. During the review, panel members identified over 60 computer codes that are currently available in the international community to perform different aspects of SFR safety analysis for various event scenarios and accident categories. A brief description of each of these codes together with references (when available) is provided. An adaptation of the Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) for computational modeling and simulation is described for use in this work. The panel's assessment of the available US codes is presented in the form of nine tables, organized into groups of three for each of three risk categories considered: anticipated operational occurrences (AOOs), design basis accidents (DBA), and beyond design basis accidents (BDBA). A set of summary conclusions are drawn from the results obtained. At the highest level, the panel judged that current US code capabilities are adequate for licensing given reasonable margins, but expressed concern that US code development activities had stagnated and that the experienced user-base and the experimental validation base was decaying away quickly.

  20. Porphyrin dimers as photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandey, R.K.; Smith, K.M.; Dougherty, T.J. (Oncologic Foundation of Buffalo, NY (USA))

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Porphyrin dimers 9 with either linkages and possible isomers bis(1-(6,7-bis(2-(methoxycarbonyl)ethyl)-1,3,5,8-tetramethyl-2- vinylporphin-4-yl)ethyl) ether (10) bis(1-(6,7-bis(2-(methoxycarbonyl)ethyl)-1,3,5,8-tetramethyl-4- vinylporphin-2-yl)ethyl) ether (11), and 1-(6,7-bis(2-(methoxycarbonyl)ethyl)-1,3,5,8-tetramethyl-2-vinylporph in- 4-yl)ethyl 1-(6,7-bis(2-(methoxycarbonyl)ethyl)-1,3,5,8-tetramethyl-4-vinylporph in- 2-yl)ethyl ether (12) were synthesized from the corresponding (1-hydroxyethyl)vinyldeuteroporphyrin IX dimethyl esters (Hvd). The pure Hvd isomers 2-(1-hydroxyethyl)-4-vinyldeuteroporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (7) and 4-(1-hydroxyethyl)-2-vinyldeuteroporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (8) were obtained from 2-acetyl-4-(1-hydroxyethyl) deuteroporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (3) and 4-acetyl-2-(1-hydroxyethyl)deuteroporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (4). Porphyrins 3 and 4 were prepared either by partial reduction of 2,4-diacetyldeuteroporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (2) or by oxidation of hematoporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (1) by using tetra-n-propylammonium perruthenate (Prn4N)(RuO4) with N-methylmorpholine N-oxide as an oxidizing agent. The in vivo photosensitizing ability and therapeutic ratios of dimers 9-12 were compared with that of Photofrin II in the SMT-F tumor growing subcutaneously in DBA/2 Ha mice. These dimers were found to have better tumoricidal activity than Photofrin II with reduced skin phototoxicity.

  1. On Orbits of Operators on Hilbert Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Lidia

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    of the norms is not a sufficient condition to imply hypercyclicity by constructing a weighted bilateral shift that, on one hand, satisfies the orbit-density property (in the sense defined above), but, on the other hand, fails to be hypercyclic. The second major...

  2. Manufacturing & Service Operations Management Vol. 1, No. 1, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graves, Stephen C.

    50 Manufacturing & Service Operations Management Vol. 1, No. 1, 1999 1523 policy we characterize the inventory random variable and use this to find the safety stock requirements, inventory managers often rely on forecasts based on a time series of prior demand, such as a weighted moving

  3. Source and Listener Directivity for Interactive Wave-based Sound Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    Source and Listener Directivity for Interactive Wave-based Sound Propagation Ravish Mehra, Lakulish realistic acoustic effects produced by wave-based sound propagation for directional sources and listeners at the listener position as a weighted sum of precomputed SH sound fields. We propose a novel plane-wave

  4. A PCT funding formula for England based on faith may be wasting billions1 Mervyn Stone and Jane Galbraith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillas, Serge

    A PCT funding formula for England based on faith may be wasting billions1 Mervyn Stone and Jane by slicing a Treasury cake of £44B. The division was guided by targets given by a weighted capitation formula/science divide will not block future attempts to devise a funding formula based on direct measurement of health

  5. 8. Neural Networks Over the years, linear regression models have attempted to characterise the 0.2% proof stress and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    30 8. Neural Networks Over the years, linear regression models have attempted to characterise the 0 interact. A more powerful alternative is the use of neural networks [40,42], a non-linear modelling prediction uncertainties. #12;31 In linear regression, the sum of each input xi multiplied with a weight wi

  6. Weighted Marshall-Olkin Bivariate Exponential Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Debasis

    Weighted Marshall-Olkin Bivariate Exponential Distribution Ahad Jamalizadeh§ & Debasis Kundu of weighted Marshall-Olkin bivariate exponential distribu- tions. This new singular distribution has of this paper is to introduce a weighted Marshall-Olkin bivariate exponential (WMOBE) distribution, using

  7. 204 BULLETIN OF TRE UNITEII sfrxrnsFISTI coxaiissIoN. red flesh and are delicious eating. The growth of lhis ish in a place

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    it passes from a weight of S gmms to S kilograms [$ ounce to 153 pouurls: about], jucreasing a tliousaucl Rhiiid carp and those of Montreuil-sur-lder are highly esteemccl, viliile those of the Lot River pass in big boxes for f'i.01~two to tliree weeks in running river mfer, so as to be rid of` the muddy taste

  8. Weight and volume changing device with liquid metal transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niiyama, Ryuma

    This paper presents a weight-changing device based on the transfer of mass. We chose liquid metal (Ga-In-Tin eutectic) and a bi-directional pump to control the mass that is injected into or removed from a target object. ...

  9. "To sense" or "not to sense" in energy-efficient power control games

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    "To sense" or "not to sense" in energy-efficient power control games Maël Le Treust Laboratoire des corresponds to a compact power control game). The sensing game is shown to be a weighted potential game, and then playing the power control game. This is an interesting Braess-type paradox to be aware of for energy

  10. OASIS4OASIS4 User defined interpolation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 08/06/2011 OASIS4OASIS4 User ­ defined interpolation with a weight-and-address file Developer/06/2011 For each component of OASIS4, the user defines the grids, the coupling fields (transients), ... i.e. all of elements and attributes. These informations are gathered in OASIS4 internal structures, described

  11. Electro-chemo-mechanical response of a free-standing polypyrrole strip.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otero, Toribio Fernández

    , some researchers called them artificial muscles [6-7], due to their resemblance with natural muscles and efficiently, is the way of working under an external force, for example, when we must lift a weight. In this setting, our main concern in to know how a free standing polypyrrole strip (the heart of any artificial

  12. STAMP: SMTP server Topological Analysis by Message headers Parsing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    STAMP: SMTP server Topological Analysis by Message headers Parsing Emmanuel Lochin1,2 1 CNRS ; LAAS to analyse SMTP servers overlay topology. STAMP builds a weighted and oriented graph from an email database of these information for the end-user, their analysis can reveal problems (such as servers path that cause message

  13. Attention and biased competition in multi-voxel object representations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VanRullen, Rufin

    . In a multidimensional voxel space, the response to simultaneously-presented categories was well described as a weighted.e., univariate) fMRI methods (13­15), these recently discov- ered multivariate pattern analysis techniques have to understand attentional influences in large-scale multivariate representations of simultaneously

  14. 1 Copyright 2010 by ASME Proceedings of the ASME 2010 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    Global Positioning System (GPS) data from vehicles in actual use. A National Renewable Energy Laboratory.S. Environmental Protection Agency drive cycles, from the high-speed US-06 cycle to the low-speed New York City typically use either a single federal drive cycle such as the Federal Test Procedure (FTP-75) or a weighted

  15. Minimum Mean Squared Error Interference Alignment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanovic, Aleksandar

    maximize sum utility, due to the associated loss in degrees of freedom. One approach to distributed¨unchen, 80290 Munich, Germany Email: {dschmidt,utschick}@tum.de Department of Electrical Engineering utility, where the utility depends on rate or SINR, a weighted sum MSE objective is used to compute

  16. Asymptotic normalization coefficients and the Be-7(p, gamma)B-8 astrophysical S factor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azhari, A.; Burjan, V.; Carstoiu, F.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Kroha, V.; Mukhamedzhanov, AM; Nunes, FM; Tang, X.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the results of two proton transfer reactions, B-10(Be-7, B-8)Be-9 and N-14(Be-7, B-8)C-13, to obtain a weighted average of the measured asymptotic normalization coefficients for the virtual transition 7Be +pB-8. ...

  17. The Wirewalker: A Vertically Profiling Instrument Carrier Powered by Ocean Waves R. PINKEL, M. A. GOLDIN, J. A. SMITH, O. M. SUN, A. A. AJA, M. N. BUI, AND T. HUGHEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jerome A.

    The Wirewalker: A Vertically Profiling Instrument Carrier Powered by Ocean Waves R. PINKEL, M. A­time record. The elements of the WW system in- clude a surface buoy, a wire suspended from the buoy, a weight at the end of the wire, and the profiler itself. The wire and weight follow the surface motion of the buoy

  18. Published: December 22, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 782 dx.doi.org/10.1021/cr200274s |Chem. Rev. 2012, 112, 782835

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paik Suh, Myunghyun

    Myunghyun Paik Suh,* Hye Jeong Park, Thazhe Kootteri Prasad, and Dae-Woon Lim Department of Chemistry, Seoul. Hydrogen has an energy density much greater than gasoline and emits no carbon dioxide after burning. On a weight basis, hydrogen has nearly three times higher energy content than gasoline: lower heating values

  19. PDF file

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SIAM (#1) 1035 2001 Apr 10 12:32:38

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    order of the equation—and often exhibit unstable modes if the collocation ... the trial (and test) spaces form a sequence of orthogonal polynomials in a weighted ... Korteweg–de Vries (KDV) equation on a finite interval in section 4. ..... Nonzero elements of M, P, Q can be easily determined from the properties of Legendre.

  20. Welding an LHC bending magnet held in place by CERN?s hydraulic press

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A powerful hydraulic press has been installed at CERN. Rated at 27 000 tonnes, it has enough force to lift a weight equivalent to almost four Eiffel towers. The press is used to hold magnets in place as their casings are welded together or opened up.

  1. A DISCRETE APPROACH TO CONSTRUCTIVE NEURAL NETWORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obradovic, Zoran

    and the Paragon supercomputer using p4 are in agreement with analytical speed-up estimates and the architecture is a weighted graph of simple processing units (or neurons). The interconnection graph of a feed-forward network)) involves modi cation of the interconnection weights between neurons on a pre-speci ed network. Determining

  2. 10/31/2011 1 Eco-Region Protection Indicator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    10/31/2011 1 Eco-Region Protection Indicator for the 2011 release of the Natural Resource in the protected area points layer for the 2010 version of the World Database of Protected Areas (WDPA) after to a weighted average of 17% of biome area protected, which is based on a revised target established

  3. Image Processing Apr. 16, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erdem, Erkut

    - The Discrete Fourier transform Log power spectrum #12;Review - The Convolution Theorem · The Fourier frequency components · Fourier (1807): Periodic functions could be represented as a weighted sum of sines and cosines Image courtesy of Technology Review #12;Review - Fourier Transform We want

  4. Fundamentals of Image Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erdem, Erkut

    Fourier transform Log power spectrum #12;Review - The Convolution Theorem · The Fourier transform components · Fourier (1807): Periodic functions could be represented as a weighted sum of sines and cosines Image courtesy of Technology Review #12;Review - Fourier Transform We want to understand

  5. Maximum Likelihood Sub-band Weighting for Robust Speech Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , bins of log filter-band energy (FBE) in each sub-band are multiplied with a weighting factor depending on the reliability of the sub-band. For each sub-band, zero padding is performed on the log FBE vector lengthening. For the DCT has the size of full-band FBE vector, the feature vector consists of the correlations across

  6. Dynamic Generation of Discrete Random Variates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matias, Yossi; Vitter, Jeffrey Scott; Ni, Wen-Chun

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and updates a weight in O(2log N) expected time in the worst case. We then show how to reduce the update time to O(log N) amortized expected time. We nally show how to apply our techniques to a lookup-table technique in order to obtain expected constant...

  7. Apprenticeship Learning Using Linear Programming Umar Syed USYED@CS.PRINCETON.EDU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowling, Michael

    existing methods for apprentice- ship learning output policies that are "mixed", i.e. randomized function is un- known to the apprentice, but is assumed to be a weighted combination of several known functions. The apprentice is also assumed to have access to demonstrations from an- other agent, called

  8. 1 INTRODUCTION 1 Predicting drug-target interactions for new drug compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchiori, Elena

    1 INTRODUCTION 1 Predicting drug-target interactions for new drug compounds using a weighted@cs.ru.nl,elenam@cs.ru.nl Abstract In silico discovery of interactions between drug compounds and target proteins is of core importance for improving the efficiency of the laborious and costly experimental determination of drug

  9. 0 20 40 60 80 100 Miles 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Kilometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    a specific amount of water. AE express- es how well an irrigation system can potential- ly distributes 1 shows the AE values used for different irrigation systems (Canessa et al. 2011). Re- gional AE estimates in Table 2 were esti- mated using a weighted average of AE and irrigation system's crop acreage

  10. 0 20 40 60 80 100 Miles 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Kilometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    - liver a specific amount of water. AE express- es how well an irrigation system can potential- ly depth. Table 1 shows the AE values used for different irrigation systems (Canessa et al. 2011). Re- gional AE estimates in Table 2 were esti- mated using a weighted average of AE and irrigation system

  11. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 0, NO. 0, MONTH YEAR 1 On-line Dynamic Security Assessment with Missing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisslein, Martin

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 0, NO. 0, MONTH YEAR 1 On-line Dynamic Security Assessment is proposed for on-line dynamic security assessment (DSA), with the objective of mitigating the impact of viable small DTs. The security classification decision for on-line DSA is obtained via a weighted voting

  12. EE-MAC: Energy Efficient Sensor MAC layer Protocol Afraa Attiah, Mustafa Ilhan Akbas, Mainak Chatterjee, Damla Turgut

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turgut, Damla

    Chatterjee, Damla Turgut Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science University of Central access control (MAC) protocol for distributed wireless sensor networks. EE-MAC achieves a low-duty-cycle and active states. We consider a weighted linear combination of delay and energy saving as the performance

  13. 3818 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 28, NO. 4, NOVEMBER 2013 Short-Term Load Forecasting: The Similar Shape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapatinas, Theofanis

    to electricity authorities worldwide to use as far as possible the low functionality cost machines for covering is performed by means of a weighted average of past daily load segments, the shape of which is similar is an integrable process in the design of power systems faced by electricity authorities world- wide. It involves

  14. Noname manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasnogor, Natalio

    Noname manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor) GP challenge: evolving the energy function by estimation of the structure energy. The energy function used in the best state-of-the-art automatic Prediction) experi- ment is defined as a weighted sum of a set of energy terms designed by experts. We

  15. ORIGINAL PAPER GP challenge: evolving energy function for protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    ORIGINAL PAPER GP challenge: evolving energy function for protein structure prediction Pawel Widera structures. This distinction is made by estimation of the structure energy. The energy function used of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction) experiment is defined as a weighted sum of a set of energy terms

  16. Computation and Uses of the Semidiscrete Matrix Decomposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolda, T.G.; O'Leary, D.P.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive algorithms for computing a semidiscrete approximation to a matrix in the Frobenius and weighted norms. The approximation is formed as a weighted sum of outer products of vectors whose elements are +/=1 or 0, so the storage required by the approximation is quite small.

  17. Lyapunov stability of a singularly perturbed system of two conservation laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Lyapunov stability of a singularly perturbed system of two conservation laws Ying TANG Christophe stability of the complete system is investigated via Lyapunov techniques. A Lyapunov function for the singularly perturbed system is obtained as a weighted sum of two Lyapunov functions of the subsystems

  18. www.goviks.com For additional information about

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Idaho State, Montana, Sacramento State, Montana State and Northern Colorado. Viking Home Events take-725-8585 Cheerleading & Dance (M/W), Darlene Brady, 503-725-5604 Scholarships Scholarships are determined by each coach quarterly fee. Personal Fitness Students may use the Stott Center exercise facilities including a weight

  19. MODULAR AND FULL SIZE SIMPLIFIED BOILING WATER REACTOR DESIGN WITH FULLY PASSIVE SAFETY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Ishii; S. T. Revankar; T. Downar; Y. Xu, H. J. Yoon; D. Tinkler; U. S. Rohatgi

    2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK B204 The overall goal of this three-year research project was to develop a new scientific design of a compact modular 200 MWe and a full size 1200 MWe simplified boiling water reactors (SBWR). Specific objectives of this research were: (1) to perform scientific designs of the core neutronics and core thermal-hydraulics for a small capacity and full size simplified boiling water reactor, (2) to develop a passive safety system design, (3) improve and validate safety analysis code, (4) demonstrate experimentally and analytically all design functions of the safety systems for the design basis accidents (DBA) and (5) to develop the final scientific design of both SBWR systems, 200 MWe (SBWR-200) and 1200 MWe (SBWR-1200). The SBWR combines the advantages of design simplicity and completely passive safety systems. These advantages fit well within the objectives of NERI and the Department of Energy's focus on the development of Generation III and IV nuclear power. The 3-year research program was structured around seven tasks. Task 1 was to perform the preliminary thermal-hydraulic design. Task 2 was to perform the core neutronic design analysis. Task 3 was to perform a detailed scaling study and obtain corresponding PUMA conditions from an integral test. Task 4 was to perform integral tests and code evaluation for the DBA. Task 5 was to perform a safety analysis for the DBA. Task 6 was to perform a BWR stability analysis. Task 7 was to perform a final scientific design of the compact modular SBWR-200 and the full size SBWR-1200. A no cost extension for the third year was requested and the request was granted and all the project tasks were completed by April 2003. The design activities in tasks 1, 2, and 3 were completed as planned. The existing thermal-hydraulic information, core physics, and fuel lattice information was collected on the existing design of the simplified boiling water reactor. The thermal-hydraulic design were developed. Based on a detailed integral system scaling analysis, design parameters were obtained and designs of the compact modular 200 MWe SBWR and the full size 1200 MWe SBWR were developed. These reactors are provided with passive safety systems. A new passive vacuum breaker check valve was designed to replace the mechanical vacuum beaker check valve. The new vacuum breaker check valve was based on a hydrostatic head, and was fail safe. The performance of this new valve was evaluated both by the thermal-hydraulic code RELAP5 and by the experiments in a scaled SBWR facility, PUMA. In the core neutronic design a core depletion model was implemented to PARCS code. A lattice design for the SBWR fuel assemblies was performed. Design improvements were made to the neutronics/thermal-hydraulics models of SBWR-200 and SBWR-1200, and design analyses of these reactors were performed. The design base accident analysis and evaluation of all the passive safety systems were completed as scheduled in tasks 4 and 5. Initial conditions for the small break loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) and large break LOCA using REALP5 code were obtained. Small and large break LOCA tests were performed and the data was analyzed. An anticipated transient with scram was simulated using the RELAP5 code for SBWR-200. The transient considered was an accidental closure of the main steam isolation valve (MSIV), which was considered to be the most significant transient. The evaluation of the RELAP5 code against experimental data for SBWR-1200 was completed. In task 6, the instability analysis for the three SBWR designs (SBWR-1200, SBWR-600 and SBWR-200) were simulated for start-up transients and the results were similar. Neither the geysering instability, nor the loop type instability was predicted by RAMONA-4B in the startup simulation following the recommended procedure by GE. The density wave oscillation was not observed at all because the power level used in the simulation was not high enough. A study was made of the potential instabilities by imposing an unrealistically high power ramp in a short time period, as suggested by GE. RAMON

  20. Technique for information retrieval using enhanced latent semantic analysis generating rank approximation matrix by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chew, Peter A; Bader, Brett W

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique for information retrieval includes parsing a corpus to identify a number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. A weighted morpheme-by-document matrix is generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus and based at least in part on a weighting function. The weighted morpheme-by-document matrix separately enumerates instances of stems and affixes. Additionally or alternatively, a term-by-term alignment matrix may be generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. At least one lower rank approximation matrix is generated by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix and/or the term-by-term alignment matrix.

  1. Method of multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenan, Michael R.; Kotula, Paul G.

    2004-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of determining the properties of a sample from measured spectral data collected from the sample by performing a multivariate spectral analysis. The method can include: generating a two-dimensional matrix A containing measured spectral data; providing a weighted spectral data matrix D by performing a weighting operation on matrix A; factoring D into the product of two matrices, C and S.sup.T, by performing a constrained alternating least-squares analysis of D=CS.sup.T, where C is a concentration intensity matrix and S is a spectral shapes matrix; unweighting C and S by applying the inverse of the weighting used previously; and determining the properties of the sample by inspecting C and S. This method can be used to analyze X-ray spectral data generated by operating a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an attached Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS).

  2. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daniels, Michael A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Heaps, Ronald J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Steffler, Eric D (Idaho Falls, ID); Swank, William D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  3. Methods of producing armor systems, and armor systems produced using such methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, Henry S; Lillo, Thomas M; McHugh, Kevin M

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

  4. Chemical production processes and systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holladay, Johnathan E.; Muzatko, Danielle S.; White, James F.; Zacher, Alan H.

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogenolysis systems are provided that can include a reactor housing an Ru-comprising hydrogenolysis catalyst and wherein the contents of the reactor is maintained at a neutral or acidic pH. Reactant reservoirs within the system can include a polyhydric alcohol compound and a base, wherein a weight ratio of the base to the compound is less than 0.05. Systems also include the product reservoir comprising a hydrogenolyzed polyhydric alcohol compound and salts of organic acids, and wherein the moles of base are substantially equivalent to the moles of salts or organic acids. Processes are provided that can include an Ru-comprising catalyst within a mixture having a neutral or acidic pH. A weight ratio of the base to the compound can be between 0.01 and 0.05 during exposing.

  5. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Steffler, Eric D.; Swank, W. David

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  6. Gravity Control produced by a Thermoionic Current through the Air at Very Low Pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fran De Aquino

    2006-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    It was observed that samples hung above a thermoionic current exhibit a weight decrease directly proportional to the intensity of the current. The observed phenomenon appears to be absolutely new and unprecedented in the literature and can not be understood in the framework of the general relativity. It is pointed out the possibility that this unexpected effect is connected with a possible correlation between gravity and electromagnetism.

  7. Automated Eukaryotic Gene Structure Annotation Using EVidenceModeler and the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, B J; Salzberg, S L; Zhu, W; Pertea, M; Allen, J E; Orvis, J; White, O; Buell, C R; Wortman, J R

    2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    EVidenceModeler (EVM) is presented as an automated eukaryotic gene structure annotation tool that reports eukaryotic gene structures as a weighted consensus of all available evidence. EVM, when combined with the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments (PASA), yields a comprehensive, configurable annotation system that predicts protein-coding genes and alternatively spliced isoforms. Our experiments on both rice and human genome sequences demonstrate that EVM produces automated gene structure annotation approaching the quality of manual curation.

  8. The smallest possible heat engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noah Linden; Sandu Popescu; Paul Skrzypczyk

    2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct the smallest possible self contained heat engines; one composed of only two qubits, the other of only a single qutrit. The engines are self-contained as they do not require external sources of work and/or control. They are able to produce work which is used to continuously lift a weight. Despite the dimension of the engine being small, it is still able to operate at the Carnot efficiency.

  9. A Brief Introduction to Perceptrons Perceptrons are a form of supervised learning from examples.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bylander, Tom

    .e., the vector and its label. Let W = (W1, W2, . . . , Wn) be a weight vector of n values. Let W · I = n j=1 WjIj be the dot product of W and I. Then W can be used represent a linear threshold function f in the following way: f(I) = +1 if W · I 0 -1 if W · I

  10. Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leitnaker, James M. (Kingston, TN)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 0.015-0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in the alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the Mo content.

  11. Theoretical and numerical studies of chaotic mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ho Jun

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    defined using the same quadrature/collocation points [12]. SEM combines geometrical flexibility of the finite element method (FEM) with spectral convergence and low phase/dissipation error of the spectral method. For SEM it is assumed that the solution... of computational efficiency this basis is typically chosen to be orthogonal in a weighted inner-product. Convergence to the exact solution is achieved by increasing the order of the elements or the number of elements. If the boundary condition and 3 solution...

  12. Nonlinear optical and conductive polymeric material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, T.J.; Ijadi-Maghsooodi, S; Yi Pang.

    1993-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A polymeric material is described which exhibits nonlinear optical properties if undoped and conductive properties if doped. The polymer is prepared by polymerizing diethynylsilane compositions, the resulting polymeric material having a weight average molecular weight between about 20,000 and about 200,000 grams per mole. The polymer is prepared and catalytically polymerized by exposure to a catalyst, such as MoCl[sub 5] or W(CO)[sub 6].

  13. An evaluation of the Texas Livestock Market News and an estimation of the requirements of the Texas livestock and meat industry for livestock market news

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Ernest Edwin

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Therefore, to get an overall indication of the sampled population's preferences, a weighting procedur'e was necessary. Those sampled persons returning the mailed questionnaire were considered as the responding stratum. Those sampled persons not returning... in the report, and determining what information should be presented in the interpretation column of the report. The data was collected by the use of a mail questionnaire sent to a random sample of 5, 112 readers of tbe Texas Livestock Narket News. Telephone...

  14. Control of bed height in a fluidized bed gasification system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mehta, Gautam I. (Greensburg, PA); Rogers, Lynn M. (Export, PA)

    1983-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In a fluidized bed apparatus a method for controlling the height of the fdized bed, taking into account variations in the density of the bed. The method comprises taking simultaneous differential pressure measurements at different vertical elevations within the vessel, averaging the differential pressures, determining an average fluidized bed density, then periodically calculating a weighting factor. The weighting factor is used in the determination of the actual bed height which is used in controlling the fluidizing means.

  15. EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR PARTICLE PHYSICS CERN--PPE/93--38

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    observables relating to global event shapes, energy correlations and jet rates. The data have been compared to about 10%, and the final result, based on a weighted average, is: ff s (M Z 0) = 0:120 \\Sigma 0 2 , S. Dado 22 , G.M.Dallavalle 2 , S. De Jong 13 , L.A. del Pozo 5 , H.Deng 17 , A. Dieckmann 11

  16. Pacific Northwest residential energy survey. Volume 3. Question-by-question results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tabulations are presented of responses to approximately 105 questions. Results are tabulated by 9 geographic regions: the four states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington; four climate zones in the region; and a weighted Pacific Northwest total. A description of the tabulated data is given in the Introduction. Tabulated data deal with questions on dwelling characteristics; heating and air-conditioning systems; water heating; appliances; demographic and swelling characteristics; and insulation.

  17. The Application of Integrated Logistic Support Concepts in Energy Project Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meher-Homji, C. B.; Polad, F. S.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compressed Air Energy Storage Nuclear Fisioo - LWR, LMFBR Open Cycle MHO Steam Systems Trash Energy Conversion EVALUATION CRITERIA Geothermal: Liquid dominated Vapor Dominated HDR ? Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Steam System Advanced Steam Sys tern... of the system is evaluated. Each cri terion is assigned a weight (ai)' Parameters (Yk) which are directly measurable from the candidate systems are also analyzed here. Several times ILS considerations enter into criteria definitions. The output...

  18. Enterectomy, vagal deafferentation and nutrient utilization in the pig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    starvation (in controls too), pigs were fed 3 times a day one part meal with two parts water added (on a weight basis), and received additional water ad libitum. The feed constituents were (as per cent) : barley 34.8, wheat 15.0, maize 15.0, wheat bran 10.0, soya bean meal 18.0, minerals premix 3.0, vitamins

  19. On Assessing Robustness in Transportation Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaroliagis, Christos D.

    that commodity. Also, for each commodity i, a weight wti : E R+ 0 is dened that quanties the provided quality of service (QoS), when this com- modity is routed along an edge e or a path p, where wti(p) = ep wti(e). Smaller weight means better QoS. When a commodity is not routed along its shortest w.r.t. wti (optimal w

  20. Essential requirement of I-A region-identical host bone marrow or bone marrow-derived cells for tumor neutralization by primed L3T4+ T cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozawa, H.; Iwaguchi, T.; Kataoka, T.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The antitumor activity of Meth A-hyperimmunized BALB/c mouse spleen cells (Meth A-Im-SPL) was assayed by the Winn test in H-2 incompatible bone marrow chimeras in closed colony CD-1 (nu/nu), inbred DDD/1(nu/nu) (H-2s), or inbred BALB/c(nu/nu) (H-2d) mice as recipients. We found that Meth A-Im-SPL suppressed Meth A growth in the chimera nude mice which were reconstituted with bone marrow cells of the H-2d haplotype (i.e., BALB/c, DBA/2 and B10.D2), but not in the chimeras which were reconstituted with bone marrow cells of the H-2a, H-2b, or H-2k haplotype (i.e., B10.A, B10, and B10.BR). These results suggested that H-2 restriction occurred between Meth A-Im-SPL and bone marrow or bone marrow-derived cells in tumor neutralization. Furthermore, Meth A-Im-SPL did not suppress Meth 1 tumors (antigenically distinct from Meth A tumors) in the presence or absence of mitomycin C-treated Meth A in a Winn assay. These results suggested that there is tumor specificity in the effector phase as well as in the induction phase. The phenotype of the effectors in the Meth A-Im-SPL was Thy-1.2+ and L3T4+, because Meth A-Im-SPL lost their antitumor activity with pretreatment with anti-Thy-1.2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) and complement or anti-L3T4 mAb and complement, but not with anti-Lyt-2.2 mAb and complement or complement alone. Positively purified L3T4+ T cells from Meth A-Im-SPL (Meth A-Im-L3T4), obtained by the panning method, suppressed the tumor growth in the chimera nude mice which were reconstituted with bone marrow cells of B10.KEA2 mice (that were I-A region-identical with Meth A-Im-L3T4 cells but not others in H-2) as well as B10.D2 cells (that were fully identical with Meth A-Im-L3T4 cells in H-2). We conclude that Meth A-Im-SPL (L3T4+) neutralized the tumors in collaboration with I-A region-identical host bone marrow or bone marrow-derived cells, and the neutralization was not accompanied by the bystander effect.

  1. National K-12 Educator Conference; "Earth Then, Earth Now: Our Changing Climate" (July 23-24, 2008)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flammer, Karen; O'Shaughnessy, Tam

    2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    With the support of the Department of Energy, the National Science Teachers Association and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Imaginary Lines Inc. (dba Sally Ride Science) delivered a highly successful 2-day conference to 165 K-12 educators on climate change. The event took place on July 23rd and 24th, 2008 at the NOAA facility in Silver Spring, MD. The conference celebrated the 25th anniversary of Dr. Sally Ride’s first flight into space in 1983 and examined how our understanding of Earth has changed in those 25 years. One the first day of the conference, participants heard a keynote talk delivered by Dr. Sally Ride, followed by presentations by well-known climate change scientists: Dr. Richard Somerville, Dr. Inez Fung and Dr. Susan Solomon. These sessions were concurrently webcast and made available to educators who were unable to attend the conference. On the second day of the conference, participants attended breakout sessions where they performed climate change activities (e.g. “Neato Albedo!”, “Greenhouse in a Bottle”, “Shell-Shocked”) that they could take back to their classrooms. Additional break-out sessions on using remote sensing images to illustrate climate change effects on Earth’s surface and how to address the climate change debate, were also offered. During lunch, participants attended an Educator Street Fair and had the opportunity to interact with representatives from NOAA, NASA, the EPA, NEEF and the JASON project. A follow-up evaluation survey was administered to all conference attendees immediately following the conference to evaluate its effectiveness. The results of this survey were overwhelmingly positive. The conference materials: presentation Power Points, workshop handouts and activities were available for teachers to download after the conference from the Sally Ride Science website. In summary, the approximately $55K support for the Department of Energy was used to help plan, deliver and evaluate the “Earth Then, Earth Now: Our Changing Climate”, conference which took place on July 23rd and 24th, 2008 at the NOAA facility in Silver Spring, MD.

  2. Eating behaviors, food preferences and health locus of control in obese and overweight women before and after participation in an obesity treatment program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebner, Elizabeth

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    appropriate changes to lose and ultimately control their weight. Objectives of this study were to assess the influence of participation in a weight reduction program on (1) food selection and (2) perception of control over health (weight) . Obese...(LE OF CONTENTS Y1 LIST OF CHAPTER TABLES Y 1 1. I INTRODUCTIOI'! LITERATURE RFVILW Dc mini ti. n and Epidemic logy c f Clbesity Et i lc gy - f Clbesit:y Fa( tc ii"s Af fee ting Fc d Preference and l&e 1 e c t ion E&eha Yic ral Ef fee ts of Obesity Hea'1...

  3. Measurement of Delta G/G from high transverse momentum hadron pairs in COMPASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcin Stolarski

    2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The new COMPASS Delta G/G result obtained from high transverse momentum hadron pairs in the Q^2>1 GeV^2 region is presented. Comparing to the previous analysis in this region the statistical error of Delta G/G is reduced by a factor 3 to 0.10. A weighted method of the Delta G/G measurement based on neural network approach is used. In addition, the formula for the Delta G/G extraction used in the analysis has been updated. The contributions coming from the leading order and QCD Compton processes are no longer neglected.

  4. Environmental (season) effects on the maintenance requirements and body composition of two diverse biological types of cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurenz, Jamie Colin

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Angus, 40. 7 and 10. 2% higher than Herefords and 55. 1 and 21. 4% higher than Brahman cows on a weight basis (152 and 119 vs 100, 108 and 98 kcal ME/kg. ~S for Jersey, Holstein, Angus, Hereford and Brahman cows, respectively). These differences were... also apparent when expressed on an energy basis (140. 4, 115. 7, 95. 3, 93. 8 and 91. 6 kcal ME/kg 7S for Jersey, Holstein, Hereford, Brahman and Angus cows, respectively). Although not as large a difference, Jenkins and Ferrell (1985) indicated...

  5. Proposed Junction-Box Stress Test (Using an Added Weight) for Use During the Module Qualification (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. Furthermore, there are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the j-box adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to the preliminary results conducted using representative materials and components.

  6. A Graph Bottleneck Inequality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chebotarev, Pavel

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For a weighted multidigraph, let $f_{ij}$ be the total weight of spanning converging forests that have vertex $i$ in a tree converging to $j$. We prove that $f_{ij}f_{jk}=f_{ik}f_{jj}$ if and only if every directed path from $i$ to $k$ contains $j$ (a graph bottleneck equality). Otherwise, $f_{ij}f_{jk}inequality). In a companion paper, this inequality provides the foundation for the construction of a new family of graph distances by ensuring the fulfillment of the triangle inequality. This stems from the fact that the graph bottleneck inequality is a multiplicative analogue of the triangle inequality for proximities.

  7. Design of an automatic marine corer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Grayum Lloyd

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Cuttings are washed to the outside of the drill bit to keep from washing the sample. The automatic coring unit is octagonal in shape with a six foot side to side distance and an overall height of twelve feet two inches. It has a weight of approximately... long cores is by rotary drilling (1). This requires a stable platform, necessitating the use ef a barge or large vessel and at least a four point anchor- ing spread (two each on bow and stern). The time consumed in deployment and retriveal...

  8. Estimation of 6 groups of effective delayed neutron fraction based on continuous energy Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nauchi, Y.; Kameyama, T. [Central Research Inst., Electric Power Industry, 2-11-1 Iwado-Kita, Komae-shi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New method is proposed to estimate effective fraction of delayed neutrons radiated from precursors categorized into 6 groups of decay constant. Instead of adjoint flux {Phi}*, an expected number of fission neutrons in next generations, M, is applied as a weight function [1]. Introduction of M enables us to calculate the fraction based on continuous energy Monte Carlo method. For the calculation of the fraction, an algorithm is established and implemented into the MCNP-5 code. The method is verified using reactor period data obtained in reactivity measurements. (authors)

  9. Optimal open-loop and feedback control of spacecraft using single gimbal control moment gyroscopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoelscher, Brian Ray

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The development employs an integrated model of the spacecraft dynamics with the control moment gyroscope dynamics. Open-loop control profiles are found which optimize a performance index that is a weighted function of maneuver time, magnitude of control effort... ? [tt ? T?]) / Tap t & t, ? T? (g) where TR is the control rise arne and tf is the maneuver time. In order to simplify the notation for the derivation of the optimal control theory in the next two sections, equations (I) to (8), which define...

  10. Electrodeposition of amorphous ternary nickel-chromium-phosphorus alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guilinger, T.R.

    1990-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a method of forming amorphous ternary nickel-phosphorus-chromium alloy deposits by electrodeposition on an electrically conductive substrate. It comprises: subjecting the substrate to an applied current density between about 20 and 40 A/dm{sup 2} at a temperature from the range of about 20{degrees} to 30{degrees} C. in a bath comprising: a chromium salt and a nickel salt in a weight ratio of about 3:1, a phosphorus source of about 0.3 M P concentration; about 0.3 M of a complexing agent; about 0.1 M of a supporting salt; and about 0.1 M of buffer.

  11. Amplitude modulation of wind turbine noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makarewicz, Rufin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to swish and thump amplitude modulation, the noise of wind turbines cause more annoyance than other environmental noise of the same average level. The wind shear accounts for the thump modulation (van den Berg effect). Making use of the wind speed measurements at the hub height, as well as at the top and the bottom of the rotor disc (Fig.1), the non-standard wind profile is applied. It causes variations in the A-weighted sound pressure level, LpA. The difference between the maximum and minimum of LpA characterizes thump modulation (Fig.2).

  12. Continuous-Estimator Representation for Monte Carlo Criticality Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiedrowski, Brian C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An alternate means of computing diagnostics for Monte Carlo criticality calculations is proposed. Overlapping spherical regions or estimators are placed covering the fissile material with a minimum center-to-center separation of the 'fission distance', which is defined herein, and a radius that is some multiple thereof. Fission neutron production is recorded based upon a weighted average of proximities to centers for all the spherical estimators. These scores are used to compute the Shannon entropy, and shown to reproduce the value, to within an additive constant, determined from a well-placed mesh by a user. The spherical estimators are also used to assess statistical coverage.

  13. Weighted Guidelines | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong, Smart,Department of EnergyEnergyA>Weighted

  14. Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Michael G.; Norman, Bourassa; Faulkner, David; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Hotchi, Toshfumi; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Wang, Duo

    2008-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved HVAC system for portable classrooms was specified to address key problems in existing units. These included low energy efficiency, poor control of and provision for adequate ventilation, and excessive acoustic noise. Working with industry, a prototype improved heat pump air conditioner was developed to meet the specification. A one-year measurement-intensive field-test of ten of these IHPAC systems was conducted in occupied classrooms in two distinct California climates. These measurements are compared to those made in parallel in side by side portable classrooms equipped with standard 10 SEER heat pump air conditioner equipment. The IHPAC units were found to work as designed, providing predicted annual energy efficiency improvements of about 36 percent to 42 percent across California's climate zones, relative to 10 SEER units. Classroom ventilation was vastly improved as evidenced by far lower indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations. TheIHPAC units were found to provide ventilation that meets both California State energy and occupational codes and the ASHRAE minimum ventilation requirements; the classrooms equipped with the 10 SEER equipment universally did not meet these targets. The IHPAC system provided a major improvement in indoor acoustic conditions. HVAC system generated background noise was reduced in fan-only and fan and compressor modes, reducing the nose levels to better than the design objective of 45 dB(A), and acceptable for additional design points by the Collaborative on High Performance Schools. The IHPAC provided superior ventilation, with indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations that showed that the Title 24 minimum ventilation requirement of 15 CFM per occupant was nearly always being met. The opposite was found in the classrooms utilizing the 10 SEER system, where the indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations frequently exceeded levels that reflect inadequate ventilation. Improved ventilation conditions in the IHPAC lead to effective removal of volatile organic compounds and aldehydes, on average lowering the concentrations by 57 percent relative to the levels in the 10 SEER classrooms. The average IHPAC to 10 SEER formaldehyde ratio was about 67 percent, indicating only a 33 percent reduction of this compound in indoor air. The IHPAC thermal control system provided less variability in occupied classroom temperature than the 10 SEER thermostats. The average room temperatures in all seasons tended to be slightly lower in the IHPAC classrooms, often below the lower limit of the ASHRAE 55 thermal comfort band. State-wide and national energy modeling provided conservative estimates of potential energy savings by use of the IHPAC system that would provide payback a the range of time far lower than the lifetime of the equipment. Assuming electricity costs of $0.15/kWh, the perclassroom range of savings is from about $85 to $195 per year in California, and about $89 to $250 per year in the U.S., depending upon the city. These modelsdid not include the non-energy benefits to the classrooms including better air quality and acoustic conditions that could lead to improved health and learning in school. Market connection efforts that were part of the study give all indication that this has been a very successful project. The successes include the specification of the IHPAC equipment in the CHPS portable classroom standards, the release of a commercial product based on the standards that is now being installed in schools around the U.S., and the fact that a public utility company is currently considering the addition of the technology to its customer incentive program. These successes indicate that the IHPAC may reach its potential to improve ventilation and save energy in classrooms.

  15. Rotation-Enabled 7-Degree of Freedom Seismometer for Geothermal Resource Development Phase 1 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierson, Bob; Laughlin, Darren

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Under this Department of Energy (DOE) grant, A-Tech Corporation d.b.a. Applied Technology Associates (ATA), seeks to develop a seven-degree-of-freedom (7-DOF) seismic measurement tool for high-temperature geothermal applications. The Rotational-Enabled 7-DOF Seismometer includes a conventional tri-axial accelerometer, a conventional pressure sensor or hydrophone, and a tri-axial rotational sensor. The rotational sensing capability is novel, based upon ATA?s innovative research in rotational sensing technologies. The geothermal industry requires tools for high-precision seismic monitoring of crack formation associated with Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) stimulation activity. Currently, microseismic monitoring is conducted by deploying many seismic tools at different depth levels along a ?string? within drilled observation wells. Costs per string can be hundreds of thousands of dollars. Processing data from the spatial arrays of linear seismometers allows back-projection of seismic wave states. In contrast, a Rotational-Enabled 7-DOF Seismometer would simultaneously measure p-wave velocity, s-wave velocity, and incident seismic wave direction all from a single point measurement. In addition, the Rotational-Enabled 7-DOF Seismometer will, by its nature, separate p- and s-waves into different data streams, simplifying signal processing and facilitating analysis of seismic source signatures and geological characterization. By adding measurements of three additional degrees-of-freedom at each level and leveraging the information from this new seismic observable, it is likely that an equally accurate picture of subsurface seismic activity could be garnered with fewer levels per hole. The key cost savings would come from better siting of the well due to increased information content and a decrease in the number of confirmation wells drilled, also due to the increase in information per well. Improved seismic tools may also increase knowledge, understanding, and confidence, thus removing some current blocks to feasibility and significantly increasing access to potential geothermal sites. During the Phase 1 effort summarized in this final report, the ATA Team modeled and built two TRL 3 proof-of-concept test units for two competing rotational sensor technologies. The two competing technologies were based on ATA?s angular rate and angular displacement measurement technologies: ? Angular rate: ATA?s Magnetohydrodynamic Angular Rate Sensor (Seismic MHD) ? Angular displacement: ATA?s Low Frequency Improved Torsional Seismometer (LFITS) In order to down-select between these two technologies and formulate a go / no go decision, the ATA Team analyzed and traded scientific performance requirements and market constraints against sensor characteristics and components, acquiring field data where possible to validate the approach and publishing results from these studies of rotational technology capability. Based on the results of Phase 1, the ATA Team finds that the Seismic MHD (SMHD) technology is the best choice for enabling rotational seismometry and significant technical potential exists for micro-seismic monitoring using a downhole 7-DOF device based on the SMHD. Recent technical papers and field data confirm the potential of rotational sensing for seismic mapping, increasing confidence that cost-reduction benefits are achievable for EGS. However, the market for geothermal rotational sensing is small and undeveloped. As a result, this report recommends modifying the Phase 2 plan to focus on prototype development aimed at partnering with early adopters within the geothermal industry and the scientific research community. The highest public benefit will come from development and deployment of a science-grade SMHD rotational seismometer engineered for geothermal downhole conditions and an integrated test tool for downhole measurements at active geothermal test sites.

  16. Tools and Methods for Hardening Communication Security of Energy Delivery Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gadgil, Shrirang; Lin, Yow-Jian; Ghosh, Abhrajit; Samtani, Sunil; Kang, Jaewon; Siegell, Bruce; Kaul, Vikram; Unger, John; De Bruet, Andre; Martinez, Catherine; Vermeulen, Gerald; Rasche, Galen; Sternfeld, Scott; Berthier, Robin; Bobba, Rakesh; Campbell, Roy; Sanders, Williams; Lin, Yow-Jian

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the research and development work the TT Government Solutions (TTGS), d.b.a. Applied Communication Sciences (ACS), team performed for the Department of Energy Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems (CEDS) program. It addresses the challenges in protecting critical grid control and data communication, including the identification of vulnerabilities and deficiencies of communication protocols commonly used in energy delivery systems (e.g., ICCP, DNP3, C37.118, C12.22), as well as the development of effective means to detect and prevent the exploitation of such vulnerabilities and deficiencies. The team consists of • TT Government Solutions (TTGS), a leading provider of communications solutions that has extensive experience in commercializing communications solutions. TTGS also has deep cyber security research and development expertise supporting a variety of customers. • University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), a leader in the cyber security research for the power grid. UIUC brings unique experience in designing secure communication protocols to this project. • Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), an independent nonprofit that conducts research and development relating to the generation, delivery and use of electricity for the benefit of the public. EPRI brings to this effort its extensive technical expertise and its utility connections, with members representing more than 90 percent of the electricity generated and delivered in the United States. • DTE Energy, the 10th largest electric utility in the US, which helps ensure that this project focuses on the needs of utilities and is rightly positioned to address the needs of the market place. We designed, developed, and demonstrated a modular and extensible ADEC-G (Agent-based, Distributed, Extensible Cybersecurity for the Grid) system for monitoring/detecting abnormal energy delivery systems (EDS) protocol usage and ensuring security coverage. Our approach consists of i. An online system with stateful model based checkers (SMBCs) that helps utilities monitor EDS protocol communication contexts and flag abnormal session behaviors; ii. An offline framework that security tool developers, operators, and auditors can use to verify security properties (leverages formal methods). The modular design of the ADEC-G online system enables its easy extension to cover added protocol features, to introduce new monitoring capabilities, and to apply to additional communication protocols. Its monitoring capabilities and user interface features also facilitate visibilities into ongoing communication patterns and quick grasps of suspicious communication activities. The offline framework provides a platform not only for rigorous validation of security coverage, but also for systematic refinement of checker design leveraging the counter traces generated by the model checking tool. The ADEC-G online monitoring/detection system and the offline validation framework are both operational and have been demonstrated in various settings. The ADEC-G online system has also been integrated into TTGS SecureSmart Managed Security Services offering and been employed to perform security assessment in a section of a utility’s operational network as well as in other Smart Grid security pilot project offerings. TTGS is also in discussions with several system integrators for incorporating the integrated SecureSmart Managed Security Services offering as the cyber security solution for the nce of Operations Technology (OT) and Information Technology (IT).

  17. Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Lai, Judy

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We take the perspective of a microgrid that has installed distribution energy resources (DER) in the form of distributed generation with combined heat and power applications. Given uncertain electricity and fuel prices, the microgrid minimizes its expected annual energy bill for various capacity sizes. In almost all cases, there is an economic and environmental advantage to using DER in conjunction with demand response (DR): the expected annualized energy bill is reduced by 9percent while CO2 emissions decline by 25percent. Furthermore, the microgrid's risk is diminished as DER may be deployed depending on prevailing market conditions and local demand. In order to test a policy measure that would place a weight on CO2 emissions, we use a multi-criteria objective function that minimizes a weighted average of expected costs and emissions. We find that greater emphasis on CO2 emissions has a beneficial environmental impact only if DR is available and enough reserve generation capacity exists. Finally, greater uncertainty results in higher expected costs and risk exposure, the effects of which may be mitigated by selecting a larger capacity.

  18. Apparatus and system for multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenan, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Kotula, Paul G. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and system for determining the properties of a sample from measured spectral data collected from the sample by performing a method of multivariate spectral analysis. The method can include: generating a two-dimensional matrix A containing measured spectral data; providing a weighted spectral data matrix D by performing a weighting operation on matrix A; factoring D into the product of two matrices, C and S.sup.T, by performing a constrained alternating least-squares analysis of D=CS.sup.T, where C is a concentration intensity matrix and S is a spectral shapes matrix; unweighting C and S by applying the inverse of the weighting used previously; and determining the properties of the sample by inspecting C and S. This method can be used by a spectrum analyzer to process X-ray spectral data generated by a spectral analysis system that can include a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an Energy Dispersive Detector and Pulse Height Analyzer.

  19. Nonparametric Estimation of Derivative Functions with Data-Driven Optimally Selected Smoothing Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Shuang

    2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    (x) = h 2B(x) + ? V (x) nh3 Zn + op(h 2 + (nh3)?1/2), (2.4) where B(x) = ( µ4?µ22 2µ2 ) g??(x)f ?(x) f(x) + µ4g???(x) 6µ2 , V (x) = ?2?2(x)/[µ22f(x)], Zn is a mean zero, unit variance random variable (Zn d? N(0, 1) under some standard regularity conditions... of ?ˆLL(x), and choose the smoothing parameter h to minimize a weighted version of the integrated (leading) squared bias and variance of ?ˆLL(x). This approach requires one to obtain initial estimates of g(x) and f(x) and their derivative functions up...

  20. SAGEWASP. Optimal Electric Utility Expansion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, P.D.II; Ullrich, C.J. [Lakeland Electric and Water, FL (United States)

    1989-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    SAGE-WASP is designed to find the optimal generation expansion policy for an electrical utility system. New units can be automatically selected from a user-supplied list of expansion candidates which can include hydroelectric and pumped storage projects. The existing system is modeled. The calculational procedure takes into account user restrictions to limit generation configurations to an area of economic interest. The optimization program reports whether the restrictions acted as a constraint on the solution. All expansion configurations considered are required to pass a user supplied reliability criterion. The discount rate and escalation rate are treated separately for each expansion candidate and for each fuel type. All expenditures are separated into local and foreign accounts, and a weighting factor can be applied to foreign expenditures.

  1. Peelle's pertinent puzzle using the Monte Carlo technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawano, Toshihiko [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Talou, Patrick [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burr, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pan, Feng [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We try to understand the long-standing problem of the Peelle's Pertinent Puzzle (PPP) using the Monte Carlo technique. We allow the probability density functions to be any kind of form to assume the impact of distribution, and obtain the least-squares solution directly from numerical simulations. We found that the standard least squares method gives the correct answer if a weighting function is properly provided. Results from numerical simulations show that the correct answer of PPP is 1.1 {+-} 0.25 if the common error is multiplicative. The thought-provoking answer of 0.88 is also correct, if the common error is additive, and if the error is proportional to the measured values. The least squares method correctly gives us the most probable case, where the additive component has a negative value. Finally, the standard method fails for PPP due to a distorted (non Gaussian) joint distribution.

  2. Alcohol-free alkoxide process for containing nuclear waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pope, James M. (Monroeville, PA); Lahoda, Edward J. (Edgewood, PA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method of containing nuclear waste. A composition is first prepared of about 25 to about 80%, calculated as SiO.sub.2, of a partially hydrolyzed silicon compound, up to about 30%, calculated as metal oxide, of a partially hydrolyzed aluminum or calcium compound, about 5 to about 20%, calculated as metal oxide, of a partially hydrolyzed boron or calcium compound, about 3 to about 25%, calculated as metal oxide, of a partially hydrolyzed sodium, potassium or lithium compound, an alcohol in a weight ratio to hydrolyzed alkoxide of about 1.5 to about 3% and sufficient water to remove at least 99% of the alcohol as an azeotrope. The azeotrope is boiled off and up to about 40%, based on solids in the product, of the nuclear waste, is mixed into the composition. The mixture is evaporated to about 25 to about 45% solids and is melted and cooled.

  3. Work extraction and thermodynamics for individual quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Skrzypczyk; Anthony J. Short; Sandu Popescu

    2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermodynamics is traditionally concerned with systems comprised of a large number of particles. Here we present a framework for extending thermodynamics to individual quantum systems, including explicitly a thermal bath and work-storage device (essentially a `weight' that can be raised or lowered). We prove that the second law of thermodynamics holds in our framework, and give a simple protocol to extract the optimal amount of work from the system, equal to its change in free energy. Our results apply to any quantum system in an arbitrary initial state, in particular including non-equilibrium situations. The optimal protocol is essentially reversible, similar to classical Carnot cycles, and indeed, we show that it can be used it to construct a quantum Carnot engine.

  4. Interpreting scattering wave functions in the presence of energy-dependent interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Pratt

    2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In scattering theory, the squared relative wave function $|\\phi({\\bf q},{\\bf r})|^2$ is often interpreted as a weight, due to final-state interactions, describing the probability enhancement for emission with asymptotic relative momentum $q$. An equivalence relation also links the integral of the squared wave function over all coordinate space to the density of states. This relation, which plays an important role in understanding two-particle correlation phenomenology, is altered for the case where the potential is energy dependent, as is assumed in various forms of reaction theory. Here, the modification to the equivalence relation is derived, and it is shown that the squared wave function should be augmented by a additional factor if it is to represent the emission enhancement for final-state interactions. Examples with relativistic vector interactions, e.g., the Coulomb interaction, are presented.

  5. Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Volume I.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomquist, R. Gordon

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective was to consolidate and evaluate all geologic, environmental, and legal and institutional information in existing records and files, and to apply a uniform methodology to the evaluation and ranking of sites to allow the making of creditable forecasts of the supply of geothermal energy which could be available in the region over a 20 year planning horizon. A total of 1265 potential geothermal resource sites were identified from existing literature. Site selection was based upon the presence of thermal and mineral springs or wells and/or areas of recent volcanic activity and high heat flow. 250 sites were selected for detailed analysis. A methodology to rank the sites by energy potential, degree of developability, and cost of energy was developed. Resource developability was ranked by a method based on a weighted variable evaluation of resource favorability. Sites were ranked using an integration of values determined through the cost and developability analysis. 75 figs., 63 tabs.

  6. The Neutrino Mass Hierarchy from Nuclear Reactor Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emilio Ciuffoli; Jarah Evslin; Xinmin Zhang

    2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    10 years from now reactor neutrino experiments will attempt to determine which neutrino mass eigenstate is the most massive. In this letter we present the results of more than seven million detailed simulations of such experiments, studying the dependence of the probability of successfully determining the mass hierarchy upon the analysis method, the neutrino mass matrix parameters, reactor flux models, geoneutrinos and, in particular, combinations of baselines. We show that a recently reported spurious dependence of the data analysis upon the high energy tail of the reactor spectrum can be removed by using a weighted Fourier transform. We determine the optimal baselines and corresponding detector locations. For most values of the CP-violating, leptonic Dirac phase delta, a degeneracy prevents NOvA and T2K from determining either delta or the hierarchy. We determine the confidence with which a reactor experiment can determine the hierarchy, breaking the degeneracy.

  7. Gravity Control by means of Electromagnetic Field through Gas or Plasma at Ultra-Low Pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fran De Aquino

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the gravity acceleration just above a chamber filled with gas or plasma at ultra-low pressure can be strongly reduced by applying an Extra Low-Frequency (ELF) electromagnetic field across the gas or the plasma. This Gravitational Shielding Effect is related to recent discovery of quantum correlation between gravitational mass and inertial mass. According to the theory samples hung above the gas or the plasma should exhibit a weight decrease when the frequency of the electromagnetic field is decreased or when the intensity of the electromagnetic field is increased. This Gravitational Shielding Effect is unprecedented in the literature and can not be understood in the framework of the General Relativity. From the technical point of view, there are several applications for this discovery; possibly it will change the paradigms of energy generation, transportation and telecommunications.

  8. Opcode counting for performance measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gara, Alan; Satterfield, David L; Walkup, Robert E

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, systems and computer program products are disclosed for measuring a performance of a program running on a processing unit of a processing system. In one embodiment, the method comprises informing a logic unit of each instruction in the program that is executed by the processing unit, assigning a weight to each instruction, assigning the instructions to a plurality of groups, and analyzing the plurality of groups to measure one or more metrics. In one embodiment, each instruction includes an operating code portion, and the assigning includes assigning the instructions to the groups based on the operating code portions of the instructions. In an embodiment, each type of instruction is assigned to a respective one of the plurality of groups. These groups may be combined into a plurality of sets of the groups.

  9. Derivation of Equivalent Continuous Dilution for Cyclic, Unsteady Driving Forces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Technical University of Denmark, Department of Civil Engineering; Mortensen, Dorthe K.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article uses an analytical approach to determine the dilution of an unsteadily-generated solute in an unsteady solvent stream, under cyclic temporal boundary conditions. The goal is to find a simplified way of showing equivalence of such a process to a reference case where equivalent dilution is defined as a weighted average concentration. This derivation has direct applications to the ventilation of indoor spaces where indoor air quality and energy consumption cannot in general be simultaneously optimized. By solving the equation we can specify how much air we need to use in one ventilation pattern compared to another to obtain same indoor air quality. Because energy consumption is related to the amount of air exchanged by a ventilation system, the equation can be used as a first step to evaluate different ventilation patterns effect on the energy consumption. The use of the derived equation is demonstrated by representative cases of interest in both residential and non-residential buildings.

  10. System and method employing a self-organizing map load feature database to identify electric load types of different electric loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Bin; Harley, Ronald G.; Du, Liang; Yang, Yi; Sharma, Santosh K.; Zambare, Prachi; Madane, Mayura A.

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method identifies electric load types of a plurality of different electric loads. The method includes providing a self-organizing map load feature database of a plurality of different electric load types and a plurality of neurons, each of the load types corresponding to a number of the neurons; employing a weight vector for each of the neurons; sensing a voltage signal and a current signal for each of the loads; determining a load feature vector including at least four different load features from the sensed voltage signal and the sensed current signal for a corresponding one of the loads; and identifying by a processor one of the load types by relating the load feature vector to the neurons of the database by identifying the weight vector of one of the neurons corresponding to the one of the load types that is a minimal distance to the load feature vector.

  11. Heavy-duty truck population, activity and usage patterns. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, M.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the study was to update the heavy-duty truck (HDT) population, activity (e.g., vehicle miles traveled (VMT), numbers of starts and trips, trip duration, etc.), and usage patterns type of service/business (e.g., delivery, construction, etc.), area of operation (i.e., local, short-haul, long-haul) for HDT`s registered and/or operated in California. The population and activity estimates were done on a weight-class-specific basis light-heavy-duty, medium-heavy-duty and heavy-heavy-duty. Population, activity and usage estimates were based primarily on Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) registration data and Truck Inventory and Usage Survey (TIUS) data. In addition to the analysis of existing data (i.e., DMV and TIUS), 42 HDTs were fitted with on-board data loggers that recorded numbers of trips and starts, daily VMT and travel by time-of-day.

  12. Alignment of RNA molecules: Binding energy and statistical properties of random sequences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valba, O. V., E-mail: valbaolga@gmail.com [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University) (Russian Federation); Nechaev, S. K., E-mail: sergei.nechaev@gmail.com [Universite Paris Sud, LPTMS (France); Tamm, M. V., E-mail: thumm.m@gmail.com [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new statistical approach to the problem of pairwise alignment of RNA sequences is proposed. The problem is analyzed for a pair of interacting polymers forming an RNA-like hierarchical cloverleaf structures. An alignment is characterized by the numbers of matches, mismatches, and gaps. A weight function is assigned to each alignment; this function is interpreted as a free energy taking into account both direct monomer-monomer interactions and a combinatorial contribution due to formation of various cloverleaf secondary structures. The binding free energy is determined for a pair of RNA molecules. Statistical properties are discussed, including fluctuations of the binding energy between a pair of RNA molecules and loop length distribution in a complex. Based on an analysis of the free energy per nucleotide pair complexes of random RNAs as a function of the number of nucleotide types c, a hypothesis is put forward about the exclusivity of the alphabet c = 4 used by nature.

  13. The stimulation of heavy oil reservoirs with electrical resistance heating 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baylor, Blake Allen

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    btu/lb- F Other Properties: r e r?= pe = pod T o Th 15. 0 640. 0 0. 25 75. 0 psi 14. 7 psi 90. 0 F 190. 0 F 17 TABLE 2- PARAMETER STUDY CASES AND RESULTS Case b ~feet re Af P ~fe t ~oP ~stC d Poser ~kH 1 2 S 4 5 6 7 8 9 10... for calculating the steady-state heated production rate, as developed by McDougal"', uses a weighted average viscosity approach, as follows: 0. 00708 k h (p. p r) B, P, ln (r, /r?) (6) where I)o = Voc Pan (7) and p = 0. 04 + 0. 0223 In(S, . ) + 0. 0621 In...

  14. Electrodeposition of amorphous ternary nickel-chromium-phosphorus alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guilinger, T.R.

    1990-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a method of forming amorphous ternary nickel-phosphorus-chromium alloy deposits by electrodeposition on an electrically conductive substrate. It comprises: subjecting the substrate to an applied current density between about 20 and 40 A/dm{sup 2} at a temperature from the range of about 20{degrees} to 30{degrees}C in a bath. The bath comprising: a chromium salt and a nickel salt in a weight ratio of about 3:1, a phosphorus source at about 0.3 MP concentration; about 0.3 M of a complexing agent; about 0.1 M of a supporting salt; and about 1.0 M of buffer.

  15. Influence of refraction on wind turbine noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makarewicz, Rufin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A semi-empirical method is applied to calculate the time-average sound level of wind turbine noise generation and propagation. Both are affected by wind shear refraction. Under upwind conditions the partially ensonified zone separates the fully ensonified zone (close to the turbine) and the shadow zone (far away from the turbine). Refraction is described in terms of the wind speed linear profile fitted to the power law profile. The rotating blades are treated as a two-dimensional circular source in the vertical plane. Inside the partially ensonified zone the effective A-weighted sound power decreases to zero when the receiver moves from the turbine toward the shadow zone. The presented results would be useful in practical applications to give a quick estimate of the effect of refraction on wind turbine noise.

  16. A Fit to the Galactic Cosmic Ray Hydrogen and Helium Spectra at Voyager 1 at Low Energies and Earth Based Measurements at Much Higher Energies with Identical Rigidity Independent Source Spectra for the Hydrogen and Helium Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, W R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Voyager 1 data from beyond the heliopause provide the first direct measurements of the interstellar cosmic ray spectra below 1 GeVnuc. In this paper we combine these Voyager measurements of H and He nuclei from 3-600 MeVnuc with higher energy measurements at 1 AU from the BESS and PAMELA experiments up to 100 GeVnuc. Using a Weighted Leaky Box Model for propagation in the galaxy, we obtain an excellent fit to these new Voyager observations and the much higher energy spectra up to 100 GeVnuc by using source spectra which are P-2.28, with the exponent independent of rigidity from low to high rigidities; along with a rigidity dependence of the diffusion path length which is P-0.5 at rigidities 1.00 GV, and possibly changing to P1.0 at lower rigidities.

  17. Ballasted photovoltaic module and module arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Botkin, Jonathan (El Cerrito, CA); Graves, Simon (Berkeley, CA); Danning, Matt (Oakland, CA)

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic (PV) module assembly including a PV module and a ballast tray. The PV module includes a PV device and a frame. A PV laminate is assembled to the frame, and the frame includes an arm. The ballast tray is adapted for containing ballast and is removably associated with the PV module in a ballasting state where the tray is vertically under the PV laminate and vertically over the arm to impede overt displacement of the PV module. The PV module assembly can be installed to a flat commercial rooftop, with the PV module and the ballast tray both resting upon the rooftop. In some embodiments, the ballasting state includes corresponding surfaces of the arm and the tray being spaced from one another under normal (low or no wind) conditions, such that the frame is not continuously subjected to a weight of the tray.

  18. Double-beta-decay mass constraints on 17-keV neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haxton, W.C. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (USA))

    1991-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Attempts to reconcile a 17-keV neutrino with constraints from astrophysics and double beta decay have led to model Majorana neutrino mass matrices with vanishing (or nearly vanishing) electron-electron components. A simple parametrization is presented of the higher-order mass effects on the intermediate-state propagator through which 0{nu} {beta}{beta} decay can still occur. For light-mass eigenstates, the 0{nu} and 2{nu} rates are proportional, with the ratio depending on a weighted sum over mass eigenstates {l angle}{ital m}{sub {nu}}{sup 3}{r angle}{sub {ital L}{ital L}}{sup Maj}. Thus, model 0{nu} {beta}{beta} decay rates can be predicted with confidence.

  19. Effective range from tetramer dissociation data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadizadeh, M R; Tomio, Lauro; Delfino, A; Frederico, T

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shifts in the four-body recombination peaks, due to lowest order range corrections in the zero range results close to the unitary limit, are obtained and used to extract the corresponding effective range of a given atomic system. From the experimental values of the tetramer dissociation positions of an ultracold gas of cesium atoms close to broad Feshbach resonances, the effective ranges are extracted, with a weighted average given by 3.9$\\pm 0.8 R_{{vdW}}$, where $R_{{vdW}}$ is the van der Waals length scale. This result is consistent with the van der Waals potential tail for the $Cs_2$ system. The method can be generally applied to other cold atom experimental setups to determine the corresponding effective range.

  20. Three-dimensional gravity modeling and focusing inversion using rectangular meshes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Commer, M.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rectangular grid cells are commonly used for the geophysical modeling of gravity anomalies, owing to their flexibility in constructing complex models. The straightforward handling of cubic cells in gravity inversion algorithms allows for a flexible imposition of model regularization constraints, which are generally essential in the inversion of static potential field data. The first part of this paper provides a review of commonly used expressions for calculating the gravity of a right polygonal prism, both for gravity and gradiometry, where the formulas of Plouff and Forsberg are adapted. The formulas can be cast into general forms practical for implementation. In the second part, a weighting scheme for resolution enhancement at depth is presented. Modelling the earth using highly digitized meshes, depth weighting schemes are typically applied to the model objective functional, subject to minimizing the data misfit. The scheme proposed here involves a non-linear conjugate gradient inversion scheme with a weighting function applied to the non-linear conjugate gradient scheme's gradient vector of the objective functional. The low depth resolution due to the quick decay of the gravity kernel functions is counteracted by suppressing the search directions in the parameter space that would lead to near-surface concentrations of gravity anomalies. Further, a density parameter transformation function enabling the imposition of lower and upper bounding constraints is employed. Using synthetic data from models of varying complexity and a field data set, it is demonstrated that, given an adequate depth weighting function, the gravity inversion in the transform space can recover geologically meaningful models requiring a minimum of prior information and user interaction.

  1. Low-complexity atlas-based prostate segmentation by combining global, regional, and local metrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Qiuliang; Ruan, Dan, E-mail: druan@mednet.ucla.edu [The Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)] [The Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To improve the efficiency of atlas-based segmentation without compromising accuracy, and to demonstrate the validity of the proposed method on MRI-based prostate segmentation application. Methods: Accurate and efficient automatic structure segmentation is an important task in medical image processing. Atlas-based methods, as the state-of-the-art, provide good segmentation at the cost of a large number of computationally intensive nonrigid registrations, for anatomical sites/structures that are subject to deformation. In this study, the authors propose to utilize a combination of global, regional, and local metrics to improve the accuracy yet significantly reduce the number of required nonrigid registrations. The authors first perform an affine registration to minimize the global mean squared error (gMSE) to coarsely align each atlas image to the target. Subsequently, atarget-specific regional MSE (rMSE), demonstrated to be a good surrogate for dice similarity coefficient (DSC), is used to select a relevant subset from the training atlas. Only within this subset are nonrigid registrations performed between the training images and the target image, to minimize a weighted combination of gMSE and rMSE. Finally, structure labels are propagated from the selected training samples to the target via the estimated deformation fields, and label fusion is performed based on a weighted combination of rMSE and local MSE (lMSE) discrepancy, with proper total-variation-based spatial regularization. Results: The proposed method was applied to a public database of 30 prostate MR images with expert-segmented structures. The authors’ method, utilizing only eight nonrigid registrations, achieved a performance with a median/mean DSC of over 0.87/0.86, outperforming the state-of-the-art full-fledged atlas-based segmentation approach of which the median/mean DSC was 0.84/0.82 when applying to their data set. Conclusions: The proposed method requires a fixed number of nonrigid registrations, independent of atlas size, providing desirable scalability especially important for a large or growing atlas. When applied to prostate segmentation, the method achieved better performance to the state-of-the-art atlas-based approaches, with significant improvement in computation efficiency. The proposed rationale of utilizing jointly global, regional, and local metrics, based on the information characteristic and surrogate behavior for registration and fusion subtasks, can be extended naturally to similarity metrics beyond MSE, such as correlation or mutual information types.

  2. Development and Application of a Habitat Suitability Ranking Model for the New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Biggs; Mary Mullen; Kathryn Bennett

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus) is currently listed as a state threatened species in New Mexico and has been identified as potentially occurring within the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) boundary. We describe the development of a model to identify and rank habitat at LANL that may be suitable for occupation by this species. The model calculates a habitat suitability ranking (HSR) based on total plant cover, plant species composition, total number of plant species, and plant height. Input data for the model is based on the measurement of these variables at known locations where this species has been found within the Jemez Mountains. Model development included the selection of habitat variables, developing a probability distribution for each variable, and applying weights to each variable based on their overall importance in defining the suitability of the habitat. The habitat variables (HV) include plant cover (HV1), grass/forb cover (HV2), plant height (HV3), number of forbs (HV4), number of grasses (HV5), and sedge/rush cover (HV6). Once the HVs were selected, probability values were calculated for each. Each variable was then assigned a ''weighting factor'' to reflect the variables' importance relative to one another with respect to contribution to quality of habitat. The least important variable, sedge/rush cover, was assigned a weight factor of ''1'' with increasing values assigned to each remaining variable as follows: number of forbs = 3, number of grasses = 3, plant height = 5, grass/forb cover = 6, and total plant cover = 7. Based on the probability values and weighting factors, a HSR is calculated as follows: HSR = (P{sub HV1}(7) + P{sub HV2}(6) + P{sub HV3}(5) + P{sub HV4}(3) + P{sub HV5}(3) + P{sub HV6}(1)). Once calculated, the HSR values are placed into one of four habitat categorical groupings by which management strategies are applied.

  3. Variational and Shape Prior-based Level Set Model for Image Segmentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diop, El Hadji S.; Jerbi, Taha; Burdin, Valerie [Image and Information Department, Telecom Bretagne / INSERM U650, Brest (France); Ba, Sileye O. [Signal and Communications Department, Telecom Bretagne / Lab-STICC, Brest (France)

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A new image segmentation model based on level sets approach is presented herein. We deal with radiographic medical images where boundaries are not salient, and objects of interest have the same gray level as other structures in the image. Thus, an a priori information about the shape we look for is integrated in the level set evolution for good segmentation results. The proposed model also accounts a penalization term that forces the level set to be close to a signed distance function (SDF), which then avoids the re-initialization procedure. In addition, a variant and complete Mumford-Shah model is used in our functional; the added Hausdorff measure helps to better handle zones where boundaries are occluded or not salient. Finally, a weighted area term is added to the functional to make the level set drive rapidly to object's boundaries. The segmentation model is formulated in a variational framework, which, thanks to calculus of variations, yields to partial differential equations (PDEs) to guide the level set evolution. Results obtained on both synthetic and digital radiographs reconstruction (DRR) show that the proposed model improves on existing prior and non-prior shape based image segmentation.

  4. Proton Therapy At Siteman Cancer Center: The State Of The Art

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloch, Charles [Washington University School of Medicine, 4921 Parkview Place, St. Louis MO 63110 (United States)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Barnes-Jewish Hospital is on the verge of offering proton radiation therapy to its patients. Those treatments will be delivered from the first Monarch 250, a state-of-the-art cyclotron produced by Still River Systems, Inc., Littleton, MA. The accelerator is the world's first superconducting synchrocyclotron, with a field-strength of 10 tesla, providing the smallest accelerator for high-energy protons currently available. On May 14, 2010 it was announced that the first production unit had successfully extracted 250 MeV protons. That unit is scheduled for delivery to the Siteman Cancer Center, an NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center at Washington University School of Medicine. At a weight of 20 tons and with a diameter of less than 2 meters the compact cyclotron will be mounted on a gantry, another first for proton therapy systems. The single-energy system includes 3 contoured scatterers and 14 different range modulators to provide 24 distinct beam delivery configurations. This allows proton fields up to 25 cm in diameter, with a maximum range from 5.5 to 32 cm and spread-out-Bragg-peak extent up to 20 cm. Monte Carlo simulations have been run using MCNPX to simulate the clinical beam properties. Those calculations have been used to commission a commercial treatment planning system prior to final clinical measurements. MCNPX was also used to calculate the neutron background generated by protons in the scattering system and patient. Additional details of the facility and current status will be presented.

  5. Physico-chemical fracturing and cleaning of coal. [Treatment with CO/sub 2/ in water at high pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.R.

    1983-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method of producing a crushable coal and reducing the metallic values in coal represented by Si, Al, Ca, Na, K, and Mg, which comprises contacting a coal/water mix in a weight ratio of from about 4:1 to 1:6 in the presence of CO/sub 2/ at pressures of about 100 to 1400 psi and a minimum temperature of about 15/sup 0/C for a period of about one or more hours to produce a treated coal/water mix. In the process the treated coal/water mix has reduced values for Ca and Mg of up to 78% over the starting mix and the advantageous CO/sub 2/ concentration is in the range of about 3 to 30 g/L. Below 5 g/L CO/sub 2/ only small effects are observed and above 30 g/L no further special advantages are achieved. The coal/water ratios in the range 1:2 to 2:1 are particularly desirable and such ratios are compatible with coal water slurry applications.

  6. Precision electronic speed controller for an alternating-current

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolie, Victor W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high precision controller for an alternating-current multi-phase electrical motor that is subject to a large inertial load. The controller was developed for and is particularly suitable for controlling, in a neutron chopper system, a heavy spinning rotor that must be rotated in phase-locked synchronism with a reference pulse train that is representative of an ac power supply signal having a meandering line frequency. The controller includes a shaft revolution sensor which provides a feedback pulse train representative of the actual speed of the motor. An internal digital timing signal generator provides a reference signal which is compared with the feedback signal in a computing unit to provide a motor control signal. In the preferred embodiment, the motor control signal is a weighted linear sum of a speed error voltage, a phase error voltage, and a drift error voltage, each of which is computed anew with each revolution of the motor shaft. The stator windings of the motor are driven by two amplifiers which are provided with input signals having the proper quadrature relationship by an exciter unit consisting of a voltage controlled oscillator, a binary counter, a pair of readonly memories, and a pair of digital-to-analog converters.

  7. A comparison of fracture properties of selected geosynthetic products using pseudo strain damage theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cleveland, Gregory Scott

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tel it C40/17 PetroGrid 4582 Control Beam StarGrid G+PF GlasGrid 8501 Sample Identification B PD3 HC PG2 Recommended Tack Coat Rate (al ers) 0. 25 0. 20 0. 10 0. 23 None 0. 25 N/A Weight otTack Coat ( rams) 87. 6 701 35. 1 80.../12/00 7/14/00 7/12/00 7/14/00 7/21/00 7/24/00 77 5 C-9 0. 05 77 6 7/13/00 S-10 0. 25 7/20/00 7/21/00 7/31/00 77. 5 7/31/00 G-11 N/A N/A 8/03/00 8/08/00 77, 6 C-12 8/07/00 7/15/00 None N/A 8/08/00 7/18/00 8/11/00 8/01/00 77. 3 B-25 0. 25 7...

  8. Appraisal of the use of geothermal energy in state-owned buildings in Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, R.T.; Coe, B.A.; Dick, J.D.

    1981-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An appraisal of the use of geothermal energy for space heating requirements for selected state-owned buildings in six communities in Colorado is presented. The appraisal addresses several components of a feasibility study for geothermal applications, including resource assessment, pipeline rights-of-way, well design and drilling program, conceptual engineering designs for retrofits of building heating systems, evaluations of economic feasibility, institutional requirements, and environmental considerations. Economic feasibility is determined from evaluation of four economic measures: a simple payback period in years; twenty-year annualized system costs (geothermal system versus conventional system); total twenty-year undiscounted energy savings; and total twenty-year present value energy savings. The results of the analyses of each feasibility component are finally ranked, using a weighting system, to arrive at an order ranking of the eleven state-owned buildings for overall feasibility. The relative total feasibility rankings and the absolute evaluations of economic competitiveness with the existing conventional-fuel heating systems show that several of the state facilities are likely candidates for conversion to geothermal hot water heating systems. The best candidate by far is the Colorado State Reformatory at Buena Vista. The geothermal resource at Buena Vista (Cottonwood Canyon and Chalk Creek) is a high quality resource with high water temperatures and a water quality adequate for direct flow through the building heating units.

  9. A computational model for viscous fluid flow, heat transfer, and melting in in situ vitrification melt pools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McHugh, P.R.; Ramshaw, J.D.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MAGMA is a FORTRAN computer code designed to viscous flow in in situ vitrification melt pools. It models three-dimensional, incompressible, viscous flow and heat transfer. The momentum equation is coupled to the temperature field through the buoyancy force terms arising from the Boussinesq approximation. All fluid properties, except density, are assumed variable. Density is assumed constant except in the buoyancy force terms in the momentum equation. A simple melting model based on the enthalpy method allows the study of the melt front progression and latent heat effects. An indirect addressing scheme used in the numerical solution of the momentum equation voids unnecessary calculations in cells devoid of liquid. Two-dimensional calculations can be performed using either rectangular or cylindrical coordinates, while three-dimensional calculations use rectangular coordinates. All derivatives are approximated by finite differences. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a new fully implicit iterative technique, while the energy equation is differenced explicitly in time. Spatial derivatives are written in conservative form using a uniform, rectangular, staggered mesh based on the marker and cell placement of variables. Convective terms are differenced using a weighted average of centered and donor cell differencing to ensure numerical stability. Complete descriptions of MAGMA governing equations, numerics, code structure, and code verification are provided. 14 refs.

  10. A simple model based magnet sorting algorithm for planar hybrid undulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowsky, G.

    2010-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Various magnet sorting strategies have been used to optimize undulator performance, ranging from intuitive pairing of high- and low-strength magnets, to full 3D FEM simulation with 3-axis Helmholtz coil magnet data. In the extreme, swapping magnets in a full field model to minimize trajectory wander and rms phase error can be time consuming. This paper presents a simpler approach, extending the field error signature concept to obtain trajectory displacement, kick angle and phase error signatures for each component of magnetization error from a Radia model of a short hybrid-PM undulator. We demonstrate that steering errors and phase errors are essentially decoupled and scalable from measured X, Y and Z components of magnetization. Then, for any given sequence of magnets, rms trajectory and phase errors are obtained from simple cumulative sums of the scaled displacements and phase errors. The cost function (a weighted sum of these errors) is then minimized by swapping magnets, using one's favorite optimization algorithm. This approach was applied recently at NSLS to a short in-vacuum undulator, which required no subsequent trajectory or phase shimming. Trajectory and phase signatures are also obtained for some mechanical errors, to guide 'virtual shimming' and specifying mechanical tolerances. Some simple inhomogeneities are modeled to assess their error contributions.

  11. Conversion of Ethanol to Hydrocarbons on Hierarchical HZSM-5 Zeolites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Zhang, He; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study reports synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity of the nano-size hierarchical HZSM-5 zeolite with high mesoporosity produced via a solvent evaporation procedure. Further, this study compares hierarchical zeolites with conventional HZSM-5 zeolite with similar Si/Al ratios for the ethanol-to-hydrocarbon conversion process. The catalytic performance of the hierarchical and conventional zeolites was evaluated using a fixed-bed reactor at 360 °C, 300 psig, and a weight hourly space velocity of 7.9 h-1. For the low Si/Al ratio zeolite (~40), the catalytic life-time for the hierarchical HZSM-5 was approximately 2 times greater than the conventional HZSM-5 despite its coking amount deposited 1.6 times higher than conventional HZSM-5. For the high Si/Al ratio zeolite (~140), the catalytic life-time for the hierarchical zeolite was approximately 5 times greater than the conventional zeolite and the amount of coking deposited was 2.1 times higher. Correlation was observed between catalyst life time, porosity, and the crystal size of the zeolite. The nano-size hierarchical HZSM-5 zeolites containing mesoporosity demonstrated improved catalyst life-time compared to the conventional catalyst due to faster removal of products, shorter diffusion path length, and the migration of the coke deposits to the external surface from the pore structure.

  12. Examination of a Junction-Box Adhesion Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of its adhesion system. The details of the proposed test will be described, in addition to the preliminary results obtained using representative materials and components. The described discovery experiments examine moisture-cured silicone, foam tape, and hot-melt adhesives used in conjunction with PET or glass module 'substrates.' To be able to interpret the results, a set of material-level characterizations was performed, including thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. PV j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then placed inside an environmental chamber (at 85C, 85% relative humidity). Some systems did not remain attached through the discovery experiments. Observed failure modes include delamination (at the j-box/adhesive or adhesive/substrate interface) and phase change/creep. The results are discussed in the context of the application requirements, in addition to the plan for the formal experiment supporting the proposed modification to the qualification test.

  13. Examination of a Junction-Box Adhesion Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of its adhesion system. The details of the proposed test will be described, in addition to the preliminary results obtained using representative materials and components. The described discovery experiments examine moisture-cured silicone, foam tape, and hot-melt adhesives used in conjunction with PET or glass module 'substrates.' To be able to interpret the results, a set of material-level characterizations was performed, including thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. PV j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then placed inside an environmental chamber (at 85C, 85% relative humidity). Some systems did not remain attached through the discovery experiments. Observed failure modes include delamination (at the j-box/adhesive or adhesive/substrate interface) and phase change/creep. The results are discussed in the context of the application requirements, in addition to the plan for the formal experiment supporting the proposed modification to the qualification test.

  14. Construction of an unyielding target for large horizontal impacts.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, Douglas James; Davie, Neil Thomas; Kalan, Robert J.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories has constructed an unyielding target at the end of its 2000-foot rocket sled track. This target is made up of approximately 5 million pounds of concrete, an embedded steel load spreading structure, and a steel armor plate face that varies from 10 inches thick at the center to 4 inches thick at the left and right edges. The target/track combination will allow horizontal impacts at regulatory speeds of very large objects, such as a full-scale rail cask, or high-speed impacts of smaller packages. The load-spreading mechanism in the target is based upon the proven design that has been in use for over 20 years at Sandia's aerial cable facility. That target, with a weight of 2 million pounds, has successfully withstood impact forces of up to 25 million pounds. It is expected that the new target will be capable of withstanding impact forces of more than 70 million pounds. During construction various instrumentation was placed in the target so that the response of the target during severe impacts can be monitored. This paper will discuss the construction of the target and provide insights on the testing capabilities at the sled track with this new target.

  15. Pileup Per Particle Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Bertolini; Philip Harris; Matthew Low; Nhan Tran

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new method for pileup mitigation by implementing "pileup per particle identification" (PUPPI). For each particle we first define a local shape $\\alpha$ which probes the collinear versus soft diffuse structure in the neighborhood of the particle. The former is indicative of particles originating from the hard scatter and the latter of particles originating from pileup interactions. The distribution of $\\alpha$ for charged pileup, assumed as a proxy for all pileup, is used on an event-by-event basis to calculate a weight for each particle. The weights describe the degree to which particles are pileup-like and are used to rescale their four-momenta, superseding the need for jet-based corrections. Furthermore, the algorithm flexibly allows combination with other, possibly experimental, probabilistic information associated with particles such as vertexing and timing performance. We demonstrate the algorithm improves over existing methods by looking at jet $p_T$ and jet mass. We also find an improvement on non-jet quantities like missing transverse energy.

  16. Development of computer program ENAUDIBL for computation of the sensation levels of multiple, complex, intrusive sounds in the presence of residual environmental masking noise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liebich, R. E.; Chang, Y.-S.; Chun, K. C.

    2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative audibility of multiple sounds occurs in separate, independent channels (frequency bands) termed critical bands or equivalent rectangular (filter-response) bandwidths (ERBs) of frequency. The true nature of human hearing is a function of a complex combination of subjective factors, both auditory and nonauditory. Assessment of the probability of individual annoyance, community-complaint reaction levels, speech intelligibility, and the most cost-effective mitigation actions requires sensation-level data; these data are one of the most important auditory factors. However, sensation levels cannot be calculated by using single-number, A-weighted sound level values. This paper describes specific steps to compute sensation levels. A unique, newly developed procedure is used, which simplifies and improves the accuracy of such computations by the use of maximum sensation levels that occur, for each intrusive-sound spectrum, within each ERB. The newly developed program ENAUDIBL makes use of ERB sensation-level values generated with some computational subroutines developed for the formerly documented program SPECTRAN.

  17. JV Task 75 - Lignite Fuel Enhancement via Air-Jigging Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason Lamb; Steven Benson; Joshua Stanislowski

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several North Dakota lignite coals from the Falkirk Mine were processed in a 5-ton-per-hour dry coal-cleaning plant. The plant uses air-jigging technology to separate undesirable ash constituents as well as sulfur and mercury. The results of this study indicate average ash, sulfur, and mercury reductions on a weight basis of 15%, 22%, and 28%, respectively. The average heating value was increased by 2% on a Btu/lb basis. Two computer models were used to understand the impact of a cleaned fuel on boiler performance: PCQUEST{reg_sign} and Vista. The PCQUEST model indicated improvements in slagging and fouling potential when cleaned coals are used over feed coals. The Vista model was set up to simulate coal performance and economics at Great River Energy's Coal Creek Station. In all cases, the cleaned fuel performed better than the original feed coal, with economic benefits being realized for all fuels tested. The model also indicated that one fuel considered to be unusable before cleaning was transformed into a potentially salable product. While these data indicate full-scale implementation of air-jigging technology may be beneficial to the mine and the plant, complete economic analysis, including payback period, is needed to make the final decision to implement.

  18. Technical assessment of three layered cement-bonded boards produced from wastepaper and sawdust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuwape, Joseph Adeola [Department of Forestry and Wood Tech, Federal University of Technology, PMB 704 Akure (Nigeria); Fabiyi, James Sunday [Department of Forest Products, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-1132 (United States)], E-mail: jamesreb2004@yahoo.com; Osuntuyi, Edward Olusola [Department of Wood Units, School of Vocational Studies, College of Education, Ikere Ekiti (Nigeria)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical properties of three layered cement-bonded boards (CBBs) made from wastepaper and sawdust were investigated. The CBBs were produced at three density levels of 1000, 1200 and 1300 kg/m{sup 3} and at four cement/particle ratios of 2.0:1, 2.5:1, 3.0:1 and 3.5:1 on a weight to weight basis. The technical properties evaluated were modulus of rupture (MOR), modulus of elasticity (MOE), water absorption (WA) and thickness swelling (TS). The MOR values ranged from 4.85 to 11.69 MPa and MOE values ranged from 2.80 to 5.57 GPa. The mean values of WA and TS after 24 h of water soaking of the CBBs ranged from 18.18% to 40.49% and 3.55% to 12.13%, respectively. MOR and MOE of the CBBs increased with increase in board density, but MOR decreased with the increase in cement/particle ratio. On the other hand, WA and TS decreased with increase in board density and cement/particle ratio. CBBs produced from wastepaper and sawdust at cement/particle ratios of 3.0:1 and 3.5:1 are suitable for building construction such as paneling, ceiling and partitioning.

  19. The $^7$Be Solar Neutrino Line: A Reflection of the Central Temperature Distribution of the Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John N. Bahcall

    1994-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A precise test of the theory of stellar evolution can be performed by measuring the average difference in energy between the neutrino line produced by ${\\rm ^7Be}$ electron capture in the solar interior and the corresponding neutrino line produced in a terrestrial laboratory. This energy shift is calculated to be 1.29~keV (to an accuracy of a few percent) for the dominant ground-state to ground-state transition. The energy shift is approximately equal to the average temperature of the solar core, computed by integrating the temperature over the solar interior with a weighting factor equal to the locally-produced $^7$Be neutrino emission. The characteristic modulation of the ${\\rm ^7Be}$ line shape that would be caused by either vacuum neutrino oscillations or by matter-enhanced (MSW) neutrino oscillations is shown to be small. Other frequently-discussed weak interaction solutions to the solar neutrino problem are also not expected to change significantly the line profile. Therefore, a measurement of the energy shift is a measurement of the central temperature distribution of the sun.

  20. Biological Sampling and Analysis in Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Washington: Chemical Analyses for 2007 Puget Sound Biota Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Suslick, Carolynn R.; Johnston, Robert K.

    2008-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluating spatial and temporal trends in contaminant residues in Puget Sound fish and macroinvertebrates are the objectives of the Puget Sound Ambient Monitoring Program (PSAMP). In a cooperative effort between the ENVironmental inVESTment group (ENVVEST) and Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife, additional biota samples were collected during the 2007 PSAMP biota survey and analyzed for chemical residues and stable isotopes of carbon (?13C) and nitrogen (?15N). Approximately three specimens of each species collected from Sinclair Inlet, Georgia Basin, and reference locations in Puget Sound were selected for whole body chemical analysis. The muscle tissue of specimens selected for chemical analyses were also analyzed for ?13C and ?15N to provide information on relative trophic level and food sources. This data report summarizes the chemical residues for the 2007 PSAMP fish and macro-invertebrate samples. In addition, six Spiny Dogfish (Squalus acanthias) samples were necropsied to evaluate chemical residue of various parts of the fish (digestive tract, liver, embryo, muscle tissue), as well as, a weight proportional whole body composite (WBWC). Whole organisms were homogenized and analyzed for silver, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, lead, zinc, mercury, 19 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, PCB homologues, percent moisture, percent lipids, ?13C, and ?15N.

  1. THE EFFECTS OF HALIDE MODIFIERS ON THE SORPTION KINETICS OF THE LI-MG-N-H SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anton, D.; Gray, J.; Price, C.; Lascola, R.

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of different transition metal halides (TiCl{sub 3}, VCl{sub 3}, ScCl{sub 3} and NiCl{sub 2}) on the sorption properties of the 1:1 molar ratio of LiNH{sub 2} to MgH{sub 2} are investigated. The modified mixtures were found to contain LiNH{sub 2}, MgH{sub 2} and LiCl. TGA results showed that the hydrogen desorption temperature was reduced with the modifier addition in this order: TiCl{sub 3} > ScCl{sub 3} > VCl{sub 3} > NiCL{sub 2}. Ammonia release was not significantly reduced resulting in a weight loss greater than the theoretical hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The isothermal sorption kinetics of the modified systems showed little improvement after the first dehydrogenation cycle over the unmodified system but showed drastic improvement in rehydrogenation cycles. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy identified the cycled material to be composed of LiH, MgH{sub 2}, Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} and Mg{sub 3}N{sub 2}.

  2. Trial Run of a Junction-Box Attachment Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.; Deibert, S.; Wohlgemuth, J.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development and manufacturing process control. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires), caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp-heat', 'thermal-cycle', or 'creep' tests within the IEC qualification protocol is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to a trial run of the test procedure. The described experiments examine 4 moisture-cured silicones, 4 foam tapes, and a hot-melt adhesive used in conjunction with glass, KPE, THV, and TPE substrates. For the purpose of validating the experiment, j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then subjected to aging. The replicate mock-modules were aged in an environmental chamber (at 85 deg C/85% relative humidity for 1000 hours; then 100 degrees C/<10% relative humidity for 200 hours) or fielded in Golden, Miami, and Phoenix for 1 year. Attachment strength tests, including pluck and shear test geometries, were also performed on smaller component specimens.

  3. High Precision Astrometry with VLBI: from the Triangle 1803+784/1928+738/2007+777 to the Complete S5 Polar Cap Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Ros; J. M. Marcaide; J. C. Guirado; M. A. Perez-Torres

    1999-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The VLBI technique can image compact radio sources with resolutions of the order of the milliarcsecond and can determine astrometrically relative positions with submilliarcsecond precisions. We determined the angular separations among the radio sources in the triangle 1803+784/1928+738/2007+777 with submilliarcsecond accuracy from a weighted least squares analysis of the differential phases. The comparison of the estimated separation of the pair 1928+738/2007+777 with previous such estimates obtained from data at different epochs allowed us to align the maps of 1928+738 at diferent epochs relative to those of 2007+777, showing that the jet components of 1928+738 display proper motions, and suggesting an identification for the position of the core of this radio source. We have also observed astrometrically the complete S5 polar cap sample, that among the 13 sources within 20 degrees to the celestial North Pole includes the above 3. These observations are carried out in the framework of a long-term astrometric program to determine the absolute kinematics of radio sources in the S5 complete sample.

  4. U.S. Residential Photovoltaic (PV) System Prices, Q4 2013 Benchmarks: Cash Purchase, Fair Market Value, and Prepaid Lease Transaction Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, C.; James, T. L.; Margolis, R.; Fu, R.; Feldman, D.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The price of photovoltaic (PV) systems in the United States (i.e., the cost to the system owner) has dropped precipitously in recent years, led by substantial reductions in global PV module prices. This report provides a Q4 2013 update for residential PV systems, based on an objective methodology that closely approximates the book value of a PV system. Several cases are benchmarked to represent common variation in business models, labor rates, and module choice. We estimate a weighted-average cash purchase price of $3.29/W for modeled standard-efficiency, polycrystalline-silicon residential PV systems installed in the United States. This is a 46% decline from the 2013-dollar-adjusted price reported in the Q4 2010 benchmark report. In addition, this report frames the cash purchase price in the context of key price metrics relevant to the continually evolving landscape of third-party-owned PV systems by benchmarking the minimum sustainable lease price and the fair market value of residential PV systems.

  5. Measurement of event shapes in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; De Cecco, S.; De Lorenzo, G.; Dell’Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of event-shape observables in proton-antiproton collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV is presented. The data for this analysis were recorded by the CDF II Detector at the Tevatron Collider. The variables studied are the transverse thrust and thrust minor, both defined in the plane perpendicular to the beam direction. The observables are measured using energies from unclustered calorimeter cells. In addition to studies of the differential distributions, we present the dependence of event-shape mean values on the leading-jet transverse energy. Data are compared with pythia Tune A and to resummed parton-level predictions that were matched to fixed-order results at next-to-leading-order (NLO) accuracy (NLO+NLL). Predictions from pythia Tune A agree fairly well with the data. However, the underlying event contributes significantly to these observables, making it difficult to make direct comparisons to the NLO+NLL predictions, which do not account for the underlying event. To overcome this difficulty, we introduce a new observable, a weighted difference of the mean values of the thrust and thrust minor, which is less sensitive to the underlying event, allowing for a comparison with NLO+NLL. Both pythia Tune A and the NLO+NLL calculations agree well within the 20% theoretical uncertainty with the data for this observable, indicating that perturbative QCD successfully describes shapes of the hadronic final states.

  6. ASSESS (Analytic System and Software for Evaluating Safeguards and Security) update: Current status and future developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Ayat, R.A. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Cousins, T.D. (USDOE, Washington, DC (USA)); Hoover, E.R. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Analytic System and Software for Evaluating Safeguards and Security (ASSESS) has been released for use by DOE field offices and their contractors. In October, 1989, we offered a prototype workshop to selected representatives of the DOE community. Based on the prototype results, we held the first training workshop at the Central Training Academy in January, 1990. Four additional workshops are scheduled for FY 1990. ASSESS is a state-of-the-art analytical tool for management to conduct integrated evaluation of safeguards systems at facilities handling facilities. Currently, ASSESS focuses on the threat of theft/diversion of special nuclear material by insiders, outsiders, and a special form of insider/outsider collusion. ASSESS also includes a neutralization module. Development of the tool is continuing. Plans are underway to expand the capabilities of ASSESS to evaluate against violent insiders, to validate the databases, to expand the neutralization module, and to assist in demonstrating compliance with DOE Material Control and Accountability (MC A) Order 5633.3. These new capabilities include the ability to: compute a weighted average for performance capability against a spectrum of insider adversaries; conduct defense-in-depth analyses; and analyze against protracted theft scenarios. As they become available, these capabilities will be incorporated in our training program. ASSESS is being developed jointly by Lawrence Livermore and Sandia National Laboratories under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Safeguards and Security.

  7. A conservative spectral method for the Boltzmann equation with anisotropic scattering and the grazing collisions limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamba, Irene M. [Department of Mathematics, The University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); ICES, The University of Texas at Austin, 201 E. 24th St., Stop C0200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Haack, Jeffrey R. [Department of Mathematics, The University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the formulation of a conservative spectral method for the Boltzmann collision operator with anisotropic scattering cross-sections. The method is an extension of the conservative spectral method of Gamba and Tharkabhushanam [17,18], which uses the weak form of the collision operator to represent the collisional term as a weighted convolution in Fourier space. The method is tested by computing the collision operator with a suitably cut-off angular cross section and comparing the results with the solution of the Landau equation. We analytically study the convergence rate of the Fourier transformed Boltzmann collision operator in the grazing collisions limit to the Fourier transformed Landau collision operator under the assumption of some regularity and decay conditions of the solution to the Boltzmann equation. Our results show that the angular singularity which corresponds to the Rutherford scattering cross section is the critical singularity for which a grazing collision limit exists for the Boltzmann operator. Additionally, we numerically study the differences between homogeneous solutions of the Boltzmann equation with the Rutherford scattering cross section and an artificial cross section, which give convergence to solutions of the Landau equation at different asymptotic rates. We numerically show the rate of the approximation as well as the consequences for the rate of entropy decay for homogeneous solutions of the Boltzmann equation and Landau equation.

  8. SU-E-J-256: Dual Energy Planar Image Based Localization in the Absence of On-Board CT Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadagopan, R; Yang, J; Li, H [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop a tool enabling soft tissue based image guidance using dual energy radiographs for cases when on-board CT is not available. Method: Dual energy planar radiographs can be applied to image guidance for targeting lung lesions because the bone based alignment only may not be sufficient as the lesions move. We acquired images of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom at 120 and 60 KVp respectively. Using a weighted logarithmic subtraction of these dual energy images, a soft tissue enhanced and a bone enhanced image were generated and they could be used for the image guidance purpose. Similar processing was also applied to a dual energy image set acquired for a patient undergoing a proton therapy. Results: The soft tissue enhanced images suppressed bones (ribs and scapula) overlying on lung, thus enabling a better visualization of soft tissue and lesion, while the bone enhanced image suppressed the soft tissue. These enhanced effects were visually apparent without further processing for display enhancements, such as using histogram or edge enhancement technique. Conclusions: The phantom image processing was encouraging. The initial test on the patient image set showed that other post processing might still be able to add value in visualizing soft tissues in addition to the dual energy soft tissue enhancement. More evaluations are needed to determine the potential benefit of this technique in the clinic.

  9. Optical modular arithmetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitri S. Pavlichin; Hideo Mabuchi

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoscale integrated photonic devices and circuits offer a path to ultra-low power computation at the few-photon level. Here we propose an optical circuit that performs a ubiquitous operation: the controlled, random-access readout of a collection of stored memory phases or, equivalently, the computation of the inner product of a vector of phases with a binary "selector" vector, where the arithmetic is done modulo 2pi and the result is encoded in the phase of a coherent field. This circuit, a collection of cascaded interferometers driven by a coherent input field, demonstrates the use of coherence as a computational resource, and of the use of recently-developed mathematical tools for modeling optical circuits with many coupled parts. The construction extends in a straightforward way to the computation of matrix-vector and matrix-matrix products, and, with the inclusion of an optical feedback loop, to the computation of a "weighted" readout of stored memory phases. We note some applications of these circuits for error correction and for computing tasks requiring fast vector inner products, e.g. statistical classification and some machine learning algorithms.

  10. Jet Charge at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Krohn; Tongyan Lin; Matthew D. Schwartz; Wouter J. Waalewijn

    2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowing the charge of the parton initiating a light-quark jet could be extremely useful both for testing aspects of the Standard Model and for characterizing potential beyond-the-Standard-Model signals. We show that despite the complications of hadronization and out-of-jet radiation such as pile-up, a weighted sum of the charges of a jet's constituents can be used at the LHC to distinguish among jets with different charges. Potential applications include measuring electroweak quantum numbers of hadronically decaying resonances or supersymmetric particles, as well as Standard Model tests, such as jet charge in dijet events or in hadronically-decaying W bosons in t-tbar events. We develop a systematically improvable method to calculate moments of these charge distributions by combining multi-hadron fragmentation functions with perturbative jet functions and pertubative evolution equations. We show that the dependence on energy and jet size for the average and width of the jet charge can be calculated despite the large experimental uncertainty on fragmentation functions. These calculations can provide a validation tool for data independent of Monte-Carlo fragmentation models.

  11. A hybrid approach for predicting the distribution of vibro-acoustic energy in complex built-up structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitrii N Maksimov; Gregor Tanner

    2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Finding the distribution of vibro-acoustic energy in complex built-up structures in the mid-to-high frequency regime is a difficult task. In particular, structures with large variation of local wavelengths and/or characteristic scales pose a challenge referred to as the mid-frequency problem. Standard numerical methods such as the finite element method (FEM) scale with the local wavelength and quickly become too large even for modern computer architectures. High frequency techniques, such as statistical energy analysis (SEA), often miss important information such as dominant resonance behaviour due to stiff or small scale parts of the structure. Hybrid methods circumvent this problem by coupling FEM/BEM and SEA models in a given built-up structure. In the approach adopted here, the whole system is split into a number of subsystems which are treated by either FEM or SEA depending on the local wavelength. Subsystems with relative long wavelengths are modelled using FEM. Making a diffuse field assumption for the wave fields in the short wave length components, the coupling between subsystems can be reduced to a weighted random field correlation function. The approach presented results in an SEA-like set of linear equations which can be solved for the mean energies in the short wavelength subsystems.

  12. Convergence of Weighted Min-Sum Decoding Via Dynamic Programming on Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian, Yung-Yih

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applying the max-product (and belief-propagation) algorithms to loopy graphs is now quite popular for best assignment problems. This is largely due to their low computational complexity and impressive performance in practice. Still, there is no general understanding of the conditions required for convergence and/or the optimality of converged solutions. This paper presents an analysis of both attenuated max-product (AMP) decoding and weighted min-sum (WMS) decoding for LDPC codes which guarantees convergence to a fixed point when a weight parameter, {\\beta}, is sufficiently small. It also shows that, if the fixed point satisfies some consistency conditions, then it must be both the linear-programming (LP) and maximum-likelihood (ML) solution. For (dv,dc)-regular LDPC codes, the weight must satisfy {\\beta}(dv-1) \\leq 1 whereas the results proposed by Frey and Koetter require instead that {\\beta}(dv-1)(dc-1) 1 is also given. Finally, connections are explored with recent work by Arora et al. on the threshold of...

  13. Use of dMLC for implementation of dynamic respiratory-gated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pepin, Eric W.; Wu, Huanmei [Purdue School of Engineering Technology, IUPUI, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States)] [Purdue School of Engineering Technology, IUPUI, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States); Shirato, Hiroki [Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan)] [Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To simulate and evaluate the use of dynamic multileaf collimators (dMLC) in respiratory gating to compensate for baseline drift.Methods: Tumor motion tracking data from 30 lung tumors over 322 treatment fractions was analyzed with the finite state model. A dynamic respiratory gating window was established in real-time by determining the average positions during the previous two end-of-expiration breathing phases and centering the dMLC aperture on a weighted average of these positions. A simulated dMLC with physical motion constraints was used in dynamic gating treatment simulations. Fluence maps were created to provide a statistical description of radiation delivery for each fraction. Duty cycle was also calculated for each fraction.Results: The average duty cycle was 2.3% greater under dynamic gating conditions. Dynamic gating also showed higher fluences and less tumor obstruction. Additionally, dynamic gating required fewer beam toggles and each delivery period was longer on average than with static gating.Conclusions: The use of dynamic gating showed better performance than static gating and the physical constraints of a dMLC were shown to not be an impediment to dynamic gating.

  14. Semiclassical (SC) Description of Electronically Non-AdiabaticDynamics via the Initial Value Representation (IVR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ananth, V.; Venkataraman, C.; Miller, W.H.

    2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial value representation (IVR) of semiclassical (SC) theory is used in conjunction with the Meyer-Miller/Stock-Thoss description of electronic degrees of freedom in order to treat electronically non-adiabatic processes. It is emphasized that the classical equations of motion for the nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom that emerge in this description are precisely the Ehrenfest equations of motion (the force on the nuclei is the force averaged over the electronic wavefunction), but that the trajectories given by these equations of motion do not have the usual shortcomings of the traditional Ehrenfest model when they are used within the SC-IVR framework. For example, in the traditional Ehrenfest model (a mixed quantum-classical approach) the nuclear motion emerges from a non-adiabatic encounter on an average potential energy surface (a weighted average according to the population in the various electronic states), while the SC-IVR describes the correct correlation between electronic and nuclear dynamics, i.e., the nuclear motion is on one potential energy surface or the other depending on the electronic state. Calculations using forward-backward versions of SC-IVR theory (FB-IVR) are presented to illustrate this behavior. An even more approximate version of the SC-IVR, the linearized approximation (LSC-IVR), is slightly better than the traditional Ehrenfest model, but since it cannot describe quantum coherence effects, the LSC-IVR is also not able to describe the correct correlation between nuclear and electronic dynamics.

  15. Scalable tensor factorizations with incomplete data.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morup, Morten (Technical University of Denmark); Dunlavy, Daniel M. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Acar, Evrim (Information Technologies Institute, Turkey); Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of incomplete data - i.e., data with missing or unknown values - in multi-way arrays is ubiquitous in biomedical signal processing, network traffic analysis, bibliometrics, social network analysis, chemometrics, computer vision, communication networks, etc. We consider the problem of how to factorize data sets with missing values with the goal of capturing the underlying latent structure of the data and possibly reconstructing missing values (i.e., tensor completion). We focus on one of the most well-known tensor factorizations that captures multi-linear structure, CANDECOMP/PARAFAC (CP). In the presence of missing data, CP can be formulated as a weighted least squares problem that models only the known entries. We develop an algorithm called CP-WOPT (CP Weighted OPTimization) that uses a first-order optimization approach to solve the weighted least squares problem. Based on extensive numerical experiments, our algorithm is shown to successfully factorize tensors with noise and up to 99% missing data. A unique aspect of our approach is that it scales to sparse large-scale data, e.g., 1000 x 1000 x 1000 with five million known entries (0.5% dense). We further demonstrate the usefulness of CP-WOPT on two real-world applications: a novel EEG (electroencephalogram) application where missing data is frequently encountered due to disconnections of electrodes and the problem of modeling computer network traffic where data may be absent due to the expense of the data collection process.

  16. Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singer, Brett C.; Delp, William W.; Apte, Michael G.; Price, Philip N.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance metrics of airflow, sound, and combustion product capture efficiency (CE) were measured for a convenience sample of fifteen cooking exhaust devices, as installed in residences. Results were analyzed to quantify the impact of various device- and installation-dependent parameters on CE. Measured maximum airflows were 70% or lower than values noted on product literature for 10 of the devices. Above-the-cooktop devices with flat bottom surfaces (no capture hood) – including exhaust fan/microwave combination appliances – were found to have much lower CE at similar flow rates, compared to devices with capture hoods. For almost all exhaust devices and especially for rear-mounted downdraft exhaust and microwaves, CE was substantially higher for back compared with front burner use. Flow rate, and the extent to which the exhaust device extends over the burners that are in use, also had a large effect on CE. A flow rate of 95 liters per second (200 cubic feet per minute) was necessary, but not sufficient, to attain capture efficiency in excess of 75% for the front burners. A-weighted sound levels in kitchens exceeded 57 dB when operating at the highest fan setting for all 14 devices evaluated for sound performance.

  17. Measurement of event shapes in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; et al

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of event-shape observables in proton-antiproton collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV is presented. The data for this analysis were recorded by the CDF II Detector at the Tevatron Collider. The variables studied are the transverse thrust and thrust minor, both defined in the plane perpendicular to the beam direction. The observables are measured using energies from unclustered calorimeter cells. In addition to studies of the differential distributions, we present the dependence of event-shape mean values on the leading-jet transverse energy. Data are compared with pythia Tune A and to resummed parton-level predictions that were matched to fixed-order results at next-to-leading-order (NLO)more »accuracy (NLO+NLL). Predictions from pythia Tune A agree fairly well with the data. However, the underlying event contributes significantly to these observables, making it difficult to make direct comparisons to the NLO+NLL predictions, which do not account for the underlying event. To overcome this difficulty, we introduce a new observable, a weighted difference of the mean values of the thrust and thrust minor, which is less sensitive to the underlying event, allowing for a comparison with NLO+NLL. Both pythia Tune A and the NLO+NLL calculations agree well within the 20% theoretical uncertainty with the data for this observable, indicating that perturbative QCD successfully describes shapes of the hadronic final states.« less

  18. The Hamiltonian Mean Field model: effect of network structure on synchronization dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yogesh S. Virkar; Juan G. Restrepo; James D. Meiss

    2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hamiltonian Mean Field (HMF) model of coupled inertial, Hamiltonian rotors is a prototype for conservative dynamics in systems with long-range interactions. We consider the case where the interactions between the rotors are governed by a network described by a weighted adjacency matrix. By studying the linear stability of the incoherent state, we find that the transition to synchrony occurs at a coupling constant $K$ inversely proportional to the largest eigenvalue of the adjacency matrix. We derive a closed system of equations for a set of local order parameters and use these equations to study the effect of network heterogeneity on the synchronization of the rotors. We find that for values of $K$ just beyond the transition to synchronization the degree of synchronization is highly dependent on the network's heterogeneity, but that for large values of $K$ the degree of synchronization is robust to changes in the heterogeneity of the network's degree distribution. Our results are illustrated with numerical simulations on Erd\\"os-Renyi networks and networks with power-law degree distributions.

  19. THE HARPS-TERRA PROJECT. I. DESCRIPTION OF THE ALGORITHMS, PERFORMANCE, AND NEW MEASUREMENTS ON A FEW REMARKABLE STARS OBSERVED BY HARPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Butler, R. Paul, E-mail: anglada@dtm.ciw.edu [Carnegie Institution of Washington, Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, 5241 Broad Branch Rd. NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Doppler spectroscopy has uncovered or confirmed all the known planets orbiting nearby stars. Two main techniques are used to obtain precision Doppler measurements at optical wavelengths. The first approach is the gas cell method, which consists of least-squares matching of the spectrum of iodine imprinted on the spectrum of the star. The second method relies on the construction of a stabilized spectrograph externally calibrated in wavelength. The most precise stabilized spectrometer in operation is the High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS), operated by the European Southern Observatory in La Silla Observatory, Chile. The Doppler measurements obtained with HARPS are typically obtained using the cross-correlation function (CCF) technique. This technique consists of multiplying the stellar spectrum by a weighted binary mask and finding the minimum of the product as a function of the Doppler shift. It is known that CCF is suboptimal in exploiting the Doppler information in the stellar spectrum. Here we describe an algorithm to obtain precision radial velocity measurements using least-squares matching of each observed spectrum to a high signal-to-noise ratio template derived from the same observations. This algorithm is implemented in our software HARPS-TERRA (Template-Enhanced Radial velocity Re-analysis Application). New radial velocity measurements on a representative sample of stars observed by HARPS are used to illustrate the benefits of the proposed method. We show that, compared with CCF, template matching provides a significant improvement in accuracy, especially when applied to M dwarfs.

  20. NGC 5548 in a Low-Luminosity State: Implications for the Broad-Line Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misty C. Bentz; Kelly D. Denney; Edward M. Cackett; Matthias Dietrich; Jeffrey K. J. Fogel; Himel Ghosh; Keith D. Horne; Charles Kuehn; Takeo Minezaki; Christopher A. Onken; Bradley M. Peterson; Richard W. Pogge; Vladimir I. Pronik; Douglas O. Richstone; Sergey G. Sergeev; Marianne Vestergaard; Matthew G. Walker; Yuzuru Yoshii

    2007-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe results from a new ground-based monitoring campaign on NGC 5548, the best studied reverberation-mapped AGN. We find that it was in the lowest luminosity state yet recorded during a monitoring program, namely L(5100) = 4.7 x 10^42 ergs s^-1. We determine a rest-frame time lag between flux variations in the continuum and the Hbeta line of 6.3 (+2.6/-2.3) days. Combining our measurements with those of previous campaigns, we determine a weighted black hole mass of M_BH = 6.54 (+0.26/-0.25) x 10^7 M_sun based on all broad emission lines with suitable variability data. We confirm the previously-discovered virial relationship between the time lag of emission lines relative to the continuum and the width of the emission lines in NGC 5548, which is the expected signature of a gravity-dominated broad-line region. Using this lowest luminosity state, we extend the range of the relationship between the luminosity and the time lag in NGC 5548 and measure a slope that is consistent with alpha = 0.5, the naive expectation for the broad line region for an assumed form of r ~ L^alpha. This value is also consistent with the slope recently determined by Bentz et al. for the population of reverberation-mapped AGNs as a whole.

  1. A Reverberation-Based Mass for the Central Black Hole in NGC 4151

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, M C; Cackett, E M; Dietrich, M; Fogel, J K J; Ghosh, H; Horne, K; Kuehn, C; Minezaki, T; Onken, C A; Peterson, B M; Pogge, R W; Pronik, V I; Richstone, D O; Sergeev, S G; Vestergaard, M; Walker, M G; Yoshii, Y; Bentz, Misty C.; Denney, Kelly D.; Cackett, Edward M.; Dietrich, Matthias; Fogel, Jeffrey K. J.; Ghosh, Himel; Horne, Keith; Kuehn, Charles; Minezaki, Takeo; Onken, Christopher A.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Pogge, Richard W.; Pronik, Vladimir I.; Richstone, Douglas O.; Sergeev, Sergey G.; Vestergaard, Marianne; Walker, Matthew G.; Yoshii, Yuzuru

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have undertaken a new ground-based monitoring campaign to improve the estimates of the mass of the central black hole in NGC 4151. We measure the lag time of the broad H beta line response compared to the optical continuum at 5100 A and find a lag of 6.6 (+1.1/-0.8) days. We combine our data with the recent reanalysis of UV emission lines by Metzroth et al. to calculate a weighted mean of the black hole mass, M_BH = 4.57 (+0.57/-0.47) x 10^7 M_sun. The absolute calibration of the black hole mass is based on normalization of the AGN black hole mass - stellar velocity dispersion (M_BH - sigma_*) relationship to that of quiescent galaxies by Onken et al. The scatter in the M_BH - sigma_* relationship suggests that reverberation-mapping based mass measurements are typically uncertain by a factor of 3-4.

  2. A Reverberation-Based Mass for the Central Black Hole in NGC 4151

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misty C. Bentz; Kelly D. Denney; Edward M. Cackett; Matthias Dietrich; Jeffrey K. J. Fogel; Himel Ghosh; Keith Horne; Charles Kuehn; Takeo Minezaki; Christopher A. Onken; Bradley M. Peterson; Richard W. Pogge; Vladimir I. Pronik; Douglas O. Richstone; Sergey G. Sergeev; Marianne Vestergaard; Matthew G. Walker; Yuzuru Yoshii

    2006-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We have undertaken a new ground-based monitoring campaign to improve the estimates of the mass of the central black hole in NGC 4151. We measure the lag time of the broad H beta line response compared to the optical continuum at 5100 A and find a lag of 6.6 (+1.1/-0.8) days. We combine our data with the recent reanalysis of UV emission lines by Metzroth et al. to calculate a weighted mean of the black hole mass, M_BH = 4.57 (+0.57/-0.47) x 10^7 M_sun. The absolute calibration of the black hole mass is based on normalization of the AGN black hole mass - stellar velocity dispersion (M_BH - sigma_*) relationship to that of quiescent galaxies by Onken et al. The scatter in the M_BH - sigma_* relationship suggests that reverberation-mapping based mass measurements are typically uncertain by a factor of 3-4.

  3. NGC 5548 in a Low-Luminosity State: Implications for the Broad-Line Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, M C; Cackett, E M; Dietrich, M; Fogel, J K J; Ghosh, H; Horne, K D; Kuehn, C; Minezaki, T; Onken, C A; Peterson, B M; Pogge, R W; Pronik, V I; Richstone, D O; Sergeev, S G; Vestergaard, M; Walker, M G; Yoshii, Y; Bentz, Misty C.; Denney, Kelly D.; Cackett, Edward M.; Dietrich, Matthias; Fogel, Jeffrey K. J.; Ghosh, Himel; Horne, Keith D.; Kuehn, Charles; Minezaki, Takeo; Onken, Christopher A.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Pogge, Richard W.; Pronik, Vladimir I.; Richstone, Douglas O.; Sergeev, Sergey G.; Vestergaard, Marianne; Walker, Matthew G.; Yoshii, Yuzuru

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe results from a new ground-based monitoring campaign on NGC 5548, the best studied reverberation-mapped AGN. We find that it was in the lowest luminosity state yet recorded during a monitoring program, namely L(5100) = 4.7 x 10^42 ergs s^-1. We determine a rest-frame time lag between flux variations in the continuum and the Hbeta line of 6.3 (+2.6/-2.3) days. Combining our measurements with those of previous campaigns, we determine a weighted black hole mass of M_BH = 6.54 (+0.26/-0.25) x 10^7 M_sun based on all broad emission lines with suitable variability data. We confirm the previously-discovered virial relationship between the time lag of emission lines relative to the continuum and the width of the emission lines in NGC 5548, which is the expected signature of a gravity-dominated broad-line region. Using this lowest luminosity state, we extend the range of the relationship between the luminosity and the time lag in NGC 5548 and measure a slope that is consistent with alpha = 0.5, the naive ex...

  4. Graph representation of protein free energy landscape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Minghai; Duan, Mojie; Fan, Jue; Huo, Shuanghong, E-mail: shuo@clarku.edu [Gustaf H. Carlson School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Clark University, 950 Main Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 01610 (United States)] [Gustaf H. Carlson School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Clark University, 950 Main Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 01610 (United States); Han, Li [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Clark University, 950 Main Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 01610 (United States)] [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Clark University, 950 Main Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 01610 (United States)

    2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of protein folding and protein conformational changes are governed by the underlying free energy landscape. However, the multidimensional nature of the free energy landscape makes it difficult to describe. We propose to use a weighted-graph approach to depict the free energy landscape with the nodes on the graph representing the conformational states and the edge weights reflecting the free energy barriers between the states. Our graph is constructed from a molecular dynamics trajectory and does not involve projecting the multi-dimensional free energy landscape onto a low-dimensional space defined by a few order parameters. The calculation of free energy barriers was based on transition-path theory using the MSMBuilder2 package. We compare our graph with the widely used transition disconnectivity graph (TRDG) which is constructed from the same trajectory and show that our approach gives more accurate description of the free energy landscape than the TRDG approach even though the latter can be organized into a simple tree representation. The weighted-graph is a general approach and can be used on any complex system.

  5. Interband Coherence Induced Correction to Adiabatic Pumping in Periodically Driven Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hailong Wang; Longwen Zhou; Jiangbin Gong

    2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Periodic driving can create topological phases of matter absent in static systems. In terms of the displacement of the position expectation value of a time-evolving wavepacket in a closed system, a type of adiabatic dynamics in periodically driven systems is studied for general initial states possessing coherence between different Floquet bands. Under one symmetry assumption, the displacement of the wavepacket center over one adiabatic cycle is found to be comprised by two components independent of the time scale of the adiabatic cycle: a weighted integral of the Berry curvature summed over all Floquet bands, plus an interband coherence induced correction. The found correction is beyond a naive application of the quantum adiabatic theorem but survives in the adiabatic limit due to interband coherence. Our theoretical results are hence of general interest towards an improved understanding of the quantum adiabatic theorem. Our theory is checked using a periodically driven superlattice model with nontrivial topological phases. In addition to probing topological phase transitions, the adiabatic dynamics studied in this work is now also anticipated to be useful in manifesting coherence and decoherence effects in the representation of Floquet bands.

  6. NON-DESTRUCTIVE RADIOCARBON DATING: NATURALLY MUMMIFIED INFANT BUNDLE FROM SW TEXAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steelman, K L; Rowe, M W; Turpin, S A; Guilderson, T P; Nightengale, L

    2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma oxidation was used to obtain radiocarbon dates on six different materials from a naturally mummified baby bundle from the Lower Pecos River region of southwest Texas. This bundle was selected because it was thought to represent a single event and would illustrate the accuracy and precision of the plasma oxidation method. Five of the materials were clearly components of the original bundle with 13 dates combined to yield a weighted average of 2135 {+-} 11 B.P. Six dates from a wooden stick of Desert Ash averaged 939 {+-} 14 B.P., indicating that this artifact was not part of the original burial. Plasma oxidation is shown to be a virtually non-destructive alternative to combustion. Because only sub-milligram amounts of material are removed from an artifact over its exposed surface, no visible change in fragile materials has been observed, even under magnification. The method is best applied when natural organic contamination is unlikely and serious consideration of this issue is needed in all cases. If organic contamination is present, it will have to be removed before plasma oxidation to obtain accurate radiocarbon dates.

  7. Life cycle assessment of a national policy proposal - The case of a Swedish waste incineration tax

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjoerklund, Anna E. [Division of Environmental Strategies Research - fms, Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas vaeg 30 III, SE-100 44, Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: annab@infra.kth.se; Finnveden, Goeran [Division of Environmental Strategies Research - fms, Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas vaeg 30 III, SE-100 44, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the core of EU and Swedish waste policy is the so-called waste hierarchy, according to which waste should first be prevented, but should otherwise be treated in the following order of prioritisation: reuse, recycling when environmentally motivated, energy recovery, and last landfilling. Some recent policy decisions in Sweden aim to influence waste management in the direction of the waste hierarchy. In 2001 a governmental commission assessed the economic and environmental impacts of introducing a weight-based tax on waste incineration, the purpose of which would be to encourage waste reduction and increase materials recycling and biological treatment. This paper presents the results of a life cycle assessment (LCA) of the waste incineration tax proposal. It was done in the context of a larger research project concerning the development and testing of a framework for Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA). The aim of this paper is to assess the life cycle environmental impacts of the waste incineration tax proposal, and to investigate whether there are any possibilities of more optimal design of such a tax. The proposed design of the waste incineration tax results in increased recycling, but only in small environmental improvements. A more elaborate tax design is suggested, in which the tax level would partly be related to the fossil carbon content of the waste.

  8. Efficiency at optimal work from finite reservoirs: a probabilistic perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramandeep S. Johal

    2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the classic thermodynamic problem of maximum work extraction from two arbitrary sized hot and cold reservoirs, modelled as perfect gases. Assuming ignorance about the extent to which the process has advanced, which implies an ignorance about the final temperatures, we quantify the prior information about the process and assign a prior distribution to the unknown temperature(s). This requires that we also take into account the temperature values which are regarded to be unphysical in the standard theory, as they lead to a contradiction with the physical laws. Instead in our formulation, such values appear to be consistent with the given prior information and hence are included in the inference. We derive estimates of the efficiency at optimal work from the expected values of the final temperatures, and show that these values match with the exact expressions in the limit when any one of the reservoirs is very large compared to the other. For other relative sizes of the reservoirs, we suggest a weighting procedure over the estimates from two valid inference procedures, that generalizes the procedure suggested earlier in [J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. {\\bf 46}, 365002 (2013)]. Thus a mean estimate for efficiency is obtained which agrees with the optimal performance to a high accuracy.

  9. Method And Aparatus For Improving Resolution In Spectrometers Processing Output Steps From Non-Ideal Signal Sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warburton, William K. (1300 Mills St., Menlo Park, CA 94025); Momayezi, Michael (San Francisco, CA)

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for processing step-like output signals generated by non-ideal, nominally single-pole ("N-1P") devices responding to possibly time-varying, pulse-like input signals of finite duration, wherein the goal is to recover the integrated areas of the input signals. Particular applications include processing step-like signals generated by detector systems in response to absorbed radiation or particles and, more particularly, to digitally processing such step-like signals in high resolution, high rate gamma ray (.gamma.-ray) spectrometers with resistive feedback preamplifiers connected to large volume germanium detectors. Superconducting bolometers can be similarly treated. The method comprises attaching a set of one or more filters to the device's (e.g., preamplifier's) output, capturing a correlated multiple output sample from the filter set in response to a detected event, and forming a weighted sum of the sample values to accurately recover the total area (e.g., charge) of the detected event.

  10. The Hubble Space Telescope Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale XXIV: The Calibration of Tully-Fisher Relations and the Value of the Hubble Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoko Sakai; Jeremy R. Mould; Shaun M. G. Hughes; John P. Huchra; Lucas M. Macri; Robert C. Kennicutt; Brad K. Gibson; Laura Ferrarese; Wendy L. Freedman; Mingsheng Han; Holland C. Ford; John A. Graham; Garth D. Illingworth; Daniel D. Kelson; Barry F. Madore; Kim Sebo; Nancy A. Silbermann; Peter B. Stetson

    1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the calibration of BVRIH$ Tully-Fisher relations based on Cepheid distances to 21 galaxies within 25 Mpc, and 23 clusters within 10,000 km/s. These relations have been applied to several distant cluster surveys in order to derive a value for the Hubble constant, H0, mainly concentrating on an I-band all-sky survey by Giovanelli and collaborators which consisted of total I magnitudes and 50% linewidth data for ~550 galaxies in 16 clusters. For comparison, we also derive the values of H0 using surveys in B-band and V-band by Bothun and collaborators, and in H-band by Aaronson and collaborators. Careful comparisons with various other databases from literature suggest that the H-band data, whose magnitudes are isophotal magnitudes extrapolated from aperture magnitudes rather than total magnitudes, are subject to systematic uncertainties. Taking a weighted average of the estimates of Hubble constants from four surveys, we obtain H0 = 71 +- 4 (random) +- 7 (systematic) km/s/Mpc. We have also investigated how various systematic uncertainties affect the value of H0 such as the internal extinction correction method used, Tully-Fisher slopes and shapes, a possible metallicity dependence of the Cepheid period-luminosity relation and cluster population incompleteness bias.

  11. Using the Standard Solar Model to Constrain Composition and S-Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldo Serenelli; Carlos Pena-Garay; W. C. Haxton

    2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    While standard solar model (SSM) predictions depend on approximately 20 input parameters, SSM neutrino flux predictions are strongly correlated with a single model output parameter, the core temperature $T_c$. Consequently, one can extract physics from solar neutrino flux measurements while minimizing the consequences of SSM uncertainties, by studying flux ratios with appropriate power-law weightings tuned to cancel this $T_c$ dependence. We re-examine an idea for constraining the primordial C+N content of the solar core from a ratio of CN-cycle $^{15}$O to pp-chain $^8$B neutrino fluxes, showing that nonnuclear SSM uncertainties in the ratio are small and effectively governed by a single parameter, the diffusion coefficient. We point out that measurements of both CN-I cycle neutrino branches -- $^{15}$O and $^{13}$N $\\beta$-decay -- could in principle lead to separate determinations of the core C and N abundances, due to out-of-equilibrium CN-cycle burning in the cooler outer layers of the solar core. Finally, we show that the strategy of constructing "minimum uncertainty" neutrino flux ratios can also test other properties of the SSM. In particular, we demonstrate that a weighted ratio of $^7$Be and $^8$B fluxes constrains a product of S-factors to the same precision currently possible with laboratory data.

  12. Trial-Run of a Junction-Box Attachment Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. C.; Deibert, S. L.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic module manufacturers during product development and manufacturing process control. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp-heat,' 'thermal-cycle,' or 'creep' tests within the IEC qualification protocol is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to a trial-run of the test procedure. The described experiments examine four moisture-cured silicones, four foam tapes, and a hot-melt adhesive used in conjunction with glass, KPE, THV, and TPE substrates. For the purpose of validating the experiment, j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then subjected to aging. The replicate mock-modules were aged in an environmental chamber (at 85 degrees C/85% relative humidity for 1000 hours; then 100 degrees C/<10% relative humidity for 200 hours) or fielded in Golden (CO), Miami (FL), and Phoenix (AZ) for one year. Attachment strength tests, including pluck and shear test geometries, were also performed on smaller component specimens.

  13. Standard practice for preparation and dissolution of plutonium materials for analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This practice is a compilation of dissolution techniques for plutonium materials that are applicable to the test methods used for characterizing these materials. Dissolution treatments for the major plutonium materials assayed for plutonium or analyzed for other components are listed. Aliquants of the dissolved samples are dispensed on a weight basis when one of the analyses must be highly reliable, such as plutonium assay; otherwise they are dispensed on a volume basis. 1.2 The treatments, in order of presentation, are as follows: Procedure Title Section Dissolution of Plutonium Metal with Hydrochloric Acid 9.1 Dissolution of Plutonium Metal with Sulfuric Acid 9.2 Dissolution of Plutonium Oxide and Uranium-Plutonium Mixed Oxide by the Sealed-Reflux Technique 9.3 Dissolution of Plutonium Oxide and Uranium-Plutonium Mixed Oxides by Sodium Bisulfate Fusion 9.4 Dissolution of Uranium-Plutonium Mixed Oxides and Low-Fired Plutonium Oxide in Beakers 9.5 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be re...

  14. Conformal perturbation theory and higher spin entanglement entropy on the torus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shouvik Datta; Justin R. David; S. Prem Kumar

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the free fermion theory in 1+1 dimensions deformed by chemical potentials for holomorphic, conserved currents at finite temperature and on a spatial circle. For a spin-three chemical potential \\mu, the deformation is related at high temperatures to a higher spin black hole in hs[0] theory on AdS_3 spacetime. We calculate the order \\mu^2 corrections to the single interval Renyi and entanglement entropies on the torus using the bosonized formulation. A consistent result, satisfying all checks, emerges upon carefully accounting for both perturbative and winding mode contributions in the bosonized language. The order \\mu^2 corrections involve integrals that are finite but potentially sensitive to contact term singularities. We propose and apply a prescription for defining such integrals which matches the Hamiltonian picture and passes several non-trivial checks for both thermal corrections and the Renyi entropies at this order. The thermal corrections are given by a weight six quasi-modular form, whilst the Renyi entropies are controlled by quasi-elliptic functions of the interval length with modular weight six. We also point out the well known connection between the perturbative expansion of the partition function in powers of the spin-three chemical potential and the Gross-Taylor genus expansion of large-N Yang-Mills theory on the torus. We note the absence of winding mode contributions in this connection, which suggests qualitatively different entanglement entropies for the two systems.

  15. Deployment, release and recovery of ocean riser pipes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA); Wetmore, Sherman B. (Westminster, CA); McNary, James F. (Santa Ana, CA)

    1980-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An ocean thermal energy conversion facility includes a long pipe assembly which is supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. Cold water flows to the facility from deep in the ocean. The pipe assembly comprises an elongate pipe construction and a weight connected to the lower end of the construction by a line of selected length. A floatation collar is connected to the construction at its upper end to cause the construction to have positive buoyancy and a center of buoyancy closer to the upper end of the construction than its center of mass. The weight renders the entire pipe assembly negatively buoyant. In the event that support of the pipe assembly should be lost, as by release of the assembly from the facility hull in an emergency, the assembly sinks to the ocean floor where it is moored by the weight. The pipe construction floats submerged above the ocean floor in a substantially vertical attitude which facilitates recovery of the assembly.

  16. Flexible ocean upwelling pipe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

  17. Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Aki, Hirohisa; Lai, Judy

    2009-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy has launched the commercial building initiative (CBI) in pursuit of its research goal of achieving zero-net-energy commercial buildings (ZNEB), i.e. ones that produce as much energy as they use. Its objective is to make these buildings marketable by 2025 such that they minimize their energy use through cutting-edge, energy-efficiency technologies and meet their remaining energy needs through on-site renewable energy generation. This paper examines how such buildings may be implemented within the context of a cost- or CO2-minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various technologies: photovoltaic modules (PV) and other on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and passive/demand-response technologies. A mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has a multi-criteria objective function is used. The objective is minimization of a weighted average of the building's annual energy costs and CO2 emissions. The MILP's constraints ensure energy balance and capacity limits. In addition, constraining the building's energy consumed to equal its energy exports enables us to explore how energy sales and demand-response measures may enable compliance with the ZNEB objective. Using a commercial test site in northernCalifornia with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find that a ZNEB requires ample PV capacity installed to ensure electricity sales during the day. This is complemented by investment in energy-efficient combined heat and power (CHP) equipment, while occasional demand response shaves energy consumption. A large amount of storage is also adopted, which may be impractical. Nevertheless, it shows the nature of the solutions and costs necessary to achieve a ZNEB. Additionally, the ZNEB approach does not necessary lead to zero-carbon (ZC) buildings as is frequently argued. We also show a multi-objective frontier for the CA example, whichallows us to estimate the needed technologies and costs for achieving a ZC building or microgrid.

  18. Benefits analysis for the production of fuels and chemicals using solar thermal energy. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous possibilities exist for using high temperature solar thermal energy in the production of various chemicals and fuels (Sun Fuels). Research and development activities have focused on the use of feedstocks such as coal and biomass to provide synthesis gas, hydrogen, and a variety of other end-products. A Decision Analysis technique geared to the analysis of Sun Fuels options was developed. Conventional scoring methods were combined with multi-attribute utility analysis in a new approach called the Multi-Attribute Preference Scoring (MAPS) system. MAPS calls for the designation of major categories of attributes which describe critical elements of concern for the processes being examined. The six major categories include: Process Demonstration; Full-Scale Process, Feedstock; End-Product Market; National/Social Considerations; and Economics. MAPS calls for each attribute to be weighted on a simple scale for all of the candidate processes. Next, a weight is assigned to each attribute, thus creating a multiplier to be used with each individual value to derive a comparative weighting. Last, each of the categories of attributes themselves are weighted, thus creating another multiplier, for use in developing an overall score. With sufficient information and industry input, each process can be ultimately compared using a single figure of merit. After careful examination of available information, it was decided that only six of the 20 candidate processes were adequately described to allow a complete MAPS analysis which would allow direct comparisons for illustrative purposes. These six processes include three synthesis gas processes, two hydrogen and one ammonia. The remaining fourteen processes were subjected to only a partial MAPS assessment.

  19. Continuous production of granular or powder Ti, Zr and Hf or their alloy products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, Jack C. (Albany, OR); Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A continuous process for producing a granular metal selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr or Hf under conditions that provide orderly growth of the metal free of halide inclusions comprising: a) dissolving a reducing metal selected from the group consisting of Na, Mg, Li or K in their respective halide salts to produce a reducing molten salt stream; b) preparing a second molten salt stream containing the halide salt of Ti, Zr or Hf; c) mixing and reacting the two molten streams of steps a) and b) in a continuous stirred tank reactor; d) wherein steps a) through c) are conducted at a temperature range of from about 800.degree. C. to about 1100.degree. C. so that a weight percent of equilibrium solubility of the reducing metal in its respective halide salt varies from about 1.6 weight percent at about 900.degree. C. to about 14.4 weight percent at about 1062.degree. C.; and wherein a range of concentration of the halide salt of Ti, Zn or Hf in molten halides of Na, Mg, Li or K is from about 1 to about 5 times the concentration of Na, Mg, Li or K; e) placing the reacted molten stream from step c) in a solid-liquid separator to recover an impure granular metal product by decantation, centrifugation, or filtration; and f) removing residual halide salt impurity by vacuum evaporator or inert gas sweep at temperatures from about 850.degree. C. to 1000.degree. C. or cooling the impure granular metal product to ambient temperature and water leaching off the residual metal halide salt.

  20. Knowledge based ranking algorithm for comparative assessment of post-closure care needs of closed landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sizirici, Banu, E-mail: bsy3@case.edu [Case Western Reserve University, Civil Engineering Department, 2104 Adelbert Road, Bingham Bld. Room: 216, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Tansel, Berrin; Kumar, Vivek [Florida International University, Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Miami, FL (United States)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Post-closure care (PCC) activities at landfills include cap maintenance; water quality monitoring; maintenance and monitoring of the gas collection/control system, leachate collection system, groundwater monitoring wells, and surface water management system; and general site maintenance. The objective of this study was to develop an integrated data and knowledge based decision making tool for preliminary estimation of PCC needs at closed landfills. To develop the decision making tool, 11 categories of parameters were identified as critical areas which could affect future PCC needs. Each category was further analyzed by detailed questions which could be answered with limited data and knowledge about the site, its history, location, and site specific characteristics. Depending on the existing knowledge base, a score was assigned to each question (on a scale 1-10, as 1 being the best and 10 being the worst). Each category was also assigned a weight based on its relative importance on the site conditions and PCC needs. The overall landfill score was obtained from the total weighted sum attained. Based on the overall score, landfill conditions could be categorized as critical, acceptable, or good. Critical condition indicates that the landfill may be a threat to the human health and the environment and necessary steps should be taken. Acceptable condition indicates that the landfill is currently stable and the monitoring should be continued. Good condition indicates that the landfill is stable and the monitoring activities can be reduced in the future. The knowledge base algorithm was applied to two case study landfills for preliminary assessment of PCC performance.

  1. From single-shot towards general work extraction in a quantum thermodynamic framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J Gemmer; J Anders

    2015-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper considers work extraction from a quantum system to a work storage system (or weight) following reference [1]. An alternative approach is here developed that relies on the comparison of subspace dimensions without a need to introduce thermo-majorisation used previously. Optimal single shot work for processes where a weight transfers from (a) a single energy level to another single energy level is then re-derived. In addition we discuss the final state of the system after work extraction and show that the system typically ends in its thermal state, while there are cases where the system is only close to it. The work of formation in the single level transfer setting [1] is also re-derived. The approach presented now allows the extension of the single shot work concept to work extraction (b) involving multiple final levels of the weight. A key conclusion here is that the single shot work for case (a) is appropriate only when a \\emph{resonance} of a particular energy is required. When wishing to identify "work extraction" with finding the weight in a specific available energy or any higher energy a broadening of the single shot work concept is required. As a final contribution we consider transformations of the system that (c) result in general weight state transfers for which we introduce a transfer-quantity, given by the weight's free energy change. The transfer-quantity enables one to capture minimum requirements that transformations of a system's state have to fulfil in a thermodynamic framework.

  2. Prioritizing material recovery for end-of-life printed circuit boards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Xue, E-mail: xxw6590@rit.edu [Golisano Institute for Sustainability, Rochester Institute of Technology, 111 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Gaustad, Gabrielle, E-mail: gabrielle.gaustad@rit.edu [Golisano Institute for Sustainability, Rochester Institute of Technology, 111 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Material recovery driven by composition, choice of ranking, and weighting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Economic potential for new recycling technologies quantified for several metrics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Indicators developed for materials incurring high eco-toxicity costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Methodology useful for a variety of stakeholders, particularly policy-makers. - Abstract: The increasing growth in generation of electronic waste (e-waste) motivates a variety of waste reduction research. Printed circuit boards (PCBs) are an important sub-set of the overall e-waste stream due to the high value of the materials contained within them and potential toxicity. This work explores several environmental and economic metrics for prioritizing the recovery of materials from end-of-life PCBs. A weighted sum model is used to investigate the trade-offs among economic value, energy saving potentials, and eco-toxicity. Results show that given equal weights for these three sustainability criteria gold has the highest recovery priority, followed by copper, palladium, aluminum, tin, lead, platinum, nickel, zinc, and silver. However, recovery priority will change significantly due to variation in the composition of PCBs, choice of ranking metrics, and weighting factors when scoring multiple metrics. These results can be used by waste management decision-makers to quantify the value and environmental savings potential for recycling technology development and infrastructure. They can also be extended by policy-makers to inform possible penalties for land-filling PCBs or exporting to the informal recycling sector. The importance of weighting factors when examining recovery trade-offs, particularly for policies regarding PCB collection and recycling are explored further.

  3. Methodological and Practical Considerations for DevelopingMultiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects inCentral America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion,Kristel

    2004-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) andthe Center for Sustainable Development in the Americas (CSDA) conductedtechnical studies and organized two training workshops to developcapacity in Central America for the evaluation of climate changeprojects. This paper describes the results of two baseline case studiesconducted for these workshops, one for the power sector and one for thecement industry, that were devised to illustrate certain approaches tobaseline setting. Multiproject baseline emission rates (BERs) for themain Guatemalan electricity grid were calculated from 2001 data. Inrecent years, the Guatemalan power sector has experienced rapid growth;thus, a sufficient number of new plants have been built to estimateviable BERs. We found that BERs for baseload plants offsetting additionalbaseload capacity ranged from 0.702 kgCO2/kWh (using a weighted averagestringency) to 0.507 kgCO2/kWh (using a 10th percentile stringency),while the baseline for plants offsetting load-followingcapacity is lowerat 0.567 kgCO2/kWh. For power displaced from existing load-followingplants, the rate is higher, 0.735 kgCO2/kWh, as a result of the age ofsome plants used for meeting peak loads and the infrequency of their use.The approved consolidated methodology for the Clean Development Mechanismyields a single rate of 0.753 kgCO2/kWh. Due to the relatively smallnumber of cement plants in the region and the regional nature of thecement market, all of Central America was chosen as the geographicboundary for setting cement industry BERs. Unfortunately, actualoperations and output data were unobtainable for most of the plants inthe region, and many data were estimated. Cement industry BERs rangedfrom 205 kgCO2 to 225 kgCO2 per metric ton of cement.

  4. SU-E-I-76: Matching Primary and Scattered X-Ray Spectra for Use in Calculating the Diagnostic Radiation Index of Protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasciak, A [University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville, TN (United States); Jones, A [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Wagner, L [UT Medical School, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Lightweight lead-free or lead-composite protective garments exploit k-edge interactions to attenuate scattered X-rays. Manufacturers specify the protective value of garments in terms of lead equivalence at a single kVp. This is inadequate, as the protection provided by such garments varies with radiation quality in different use conditions. We present a method for matching scattered X-ray spectra to primary X-ray spectra. The resulting primary spectra can be used to measure penetration through protective garments, and such measurements can be weighted and summed to determine a Diagnostic Radiation Index for Protection (DRIP). Methods: Scattered X-ray spectra from fluoroscopic procedures were modeled using Monte Carlo techniques in MCNP-X 2.7. Data on imaging geometry, operator position, patient size, and primary beam spectra were gathered from clinical fluoroscopy procedures. These data were used to generate scattered X-ray spectra resulting from procedural conditions. Technical factors, including kV and added filtration, that yielded primary X-ray spectra that optimally matched the generated scattered X-ray spectra were identified through numerical optimization using a sequential quadratic programming (SQP) algorithm. Results: The primary spectra generated with shape functions matched the relative flux in each bin of the scattered spectra within 5%, and half and quarter-value layers matched within 0.1%. The DRIP for protective garments can be determined by measuring the penetration through protective garments using the matched primary spectra, then calculating a weighted average according to the expected clinical use of the garment. The matched primary spectra are specified in terms of first and second half-value layers in aluminum and acrylic. Conclusion: Lead equivalence is inadequate for completely specifying the protective value of garments. Measuring penetration through a garment using full scatter conditions is very difficult. The primary spectra determined in this work allow for practical primary penetration measurements to be made with equipment readily available to clinical medical physicists.

  5. Traction Drive Inverter Cooling with Submerged Liquid Jet Impingement on Microfinned Enhanced Surfaces (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waye, S.; Narumanchi, S.; Moreno, G.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jet impingement is one means to improve thermal management for power electronics in electric-drive traction vehicles. Jet impingement on microfin-enhanced surfaces further augments heat transfer and thermal performance. A channel flow heat exchanger from a commercial inverter was characterized as a baseline system for comparison with two new prototype designs using liquid jet impingement on plain and microfinned enhanced surfaces. The submerged jets can target areas with the highest heat flux to provide local cooling, such as areas under insulated-gate bipolar transistors and diode devices. Low power experiments, where four diodes were powered, dissipated 105 W of heat and were used to validate computational fluid dynamics modeling of the baseline and prototype designs. Experiments and modeling used typical automotive flow rates using water-ethylene glycol as a coolant (50%-50% by volume). The computational fluid dynamics model was used to predict full inverter power heat dissipation. The channel flow and jet impingement configurations were tested at full inverter power of 40 to 100 kW (output power) on a dynamometer, translating to an approximate heat dissipation of 1 to 2 kW. With jet impingement, the cold plate material is not critical for the thermal pathway. A high-temperature plastic was used that could eventually be injection molded or formed, with the jets formed from a basic aluminum plate with orifices acting as nozzles. Long-term reliability of the jet nozzles and impingement on enhanced surfaces was examined. For jet impingement on microfinned surfaces, thermal performance increased 17%. Along with a weight reduction of approximately 3 kg, the specific power (kW/kg) increased by 36%, with an increase in power density (kW/L) of 12% compared with the baseline channel flow configuration.

  6. CRITICALITY SAFETY CONTROL OF LEGACY FUEL FOUND AT 105-K WEST FUEL STORAGE BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JENSEN, M.A.

    2005-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In August 2004, two sealed canisters containing spent nuclear fuel were opened for processing at the Hanford Site's K West fuel storage basin. The fuel was to be processed through cleaning and sorting stations, repackaged into special baskets, placed into a cask, and removed from the basin for further processing and eventual dry storage. The canisters were expected to contain fuel from the old Hanford C Reactor, a graphite-moderated reactor fueled by very low-enriched uranium metal. The expected fuel type was an aluminum-clad slug about eight inches in length and with a weight of about eight pounds. Instead of the expected fuel, the two canisters contained several pieces of thin tubes, some with wire wraps. The material was placed into unsealed canisters for storage and to await further evaluation. Videotapes and still photographs of the items were examined in consultation with available retired Hanford employees. It was determined that the items had a fair probability of being cut-up pieces of fuel rods from the retired Hanford Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR). Because the items had been safely handled several times, it was apparent that a criticality safety hazard did not exist when handling the material by itself, but it was necessary to determine if a hazard existed when combining the material with other known types of spent nuclear fuel. Because the PRTR operated more than 40 years ago, investigators had to rely on a combination of researching archived documents, and utilizing common-sense estimates coupled with bounding assumptions, to determine that the fuel items could be handled safely with other spent nuclear fuel in the storage basin. As older DOE facilities across the nation are shut down and cleaned out, the potential for more discoveries of this nature is increasing. As in this case, it is likely that only incomplete records will exist and that it will be increasingly difficult to immediately characterize the nature of the suspect fissionable material and its criticality hazards.

  7. Indexing contamination surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, R.L.

    1998-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The responsibility for safely managing the Tank Farms at Hanford belongs to Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation which is part of the six company Project Hanford Management Team led by Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc.. These Tank Farm Facilities contain numerous outdoor contamination areas which are surveyed at a periodicity consistent with the potential radiological conditions, occupancy, and risk of changes in radiological conditions. This document describes the survey documentation and data tracking method devised to track the results of contamination surveys this process is referred to as indexing. The indexing process takes a representative data set as an indicator for the contamination status of the facility. The data are further manipulated into a single value that can be tracked and trended using standard statistical methodology. To report meaningful data, the routine contamination surveys must be performed in a manner that allows the survey method and the data collection process to be recreated. Three key criteria are necessary to accomplish this goal: Accurate maps, consistent documentation, and consistent consolidation of data meeting these criteria provides data of sufficient quality to be tracked. Tracking of survey data is accomplished by converting the individual survey results into a weighted value, corrected for the actual number of survey points. This information can be compared over time using standard statistical analysis to identify trends. At the Tank Farms, the need to track and trend the facility`s radiological status presents unique challenges. Many of these Tank Farm facilities date back to the second world war. The Tank Farm Facilities are exposed to weather extremes, plant and animal intrusion, as well as all of the normal challenges associated with handling radiological waste streams. Routine radiological surveys did not provide a radiological status adequate for continuing comparisons.

  8. Map-likelihood phasing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Bioscience Division, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A map-likelihood function is described that can yield phase probabilities with very low model bias. The recently developed technique of maximum-likelihood density modification [Terwilliger (2000 ?), Acta Cryst. D56, 965–972] allows a calculation of phase probabilities based on the likelihood of the electron-density map to be carried out separately from the calculation of any prior phase probabilities. Here, it is shown that phase-probability distributions calculated from the map-likelihood function alone can be highly accurate and that they show minimal bias towards the phases used to initiate the calculation. Map-likelihood phase probabilities depend upon expected characteristics of the electron-density map, such as a defined solvent region and expected electron-density distributions within the solvent region and the region occupied by a macromolecule. In the simplest case, map-likelihood phase-probability distributions are largely based on the flatness of the solvent region. Though map-likelihood phases can be calculated without prior phase information, they are greatly enhanced by high-quality starting phases. This leads to the technique of prime-and-switch phasing for removing model bias. In prime-and-switch phasing, biased phases such as those from a model are used to prime or initiate map-likelihood phasing, then final phases are obtained from map-likelihood phasing alone. Map-likelihood phasing can be applied in cases with solvent content as low as 30%. Potential applications of map-likelihood phasing include unbiased phase calculation from molecular-replacement models, iterative model building, unbiased electron-density maps for cases where 2F{sub o} ? F{sub c} or ?{sub A}-weighted maps would currently be used, structure validation and ab initio phase determination from solvent masks, non-crystallographic symmetry or other knowledge about expected electron density.

  9. A computational study of an HCCI engine with direct injection during gas exchange

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Haiyun; Vikhansky, Alexander; Mosbach, Sebastian; Kraft, Markus [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); Bhave, Amit [Reaction Engineering Solutions Ltd., 61 Canterbury Street, Cambridge CB4 3QG (United Kingdom); Kim, Kyoung-Oh; Kobayashi, Tatsuo [Higashifuji Technical Center, Toyota Motor Corporation, Mishuku 1200, Susono, Shizuoka 480-1193 (Japan); Mauss, Fabian [Division of Combustion Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, Box 118, S-22100 Lund (Sweden)

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new probability density function (PDF)-based computational model to simulate a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine with direct injection (DI) during gas exchange. This stochastic reactor model (SRM) accounts for the engine breathing process in addition to the closed-volume HCCI engine operation. A weighted-particle Monte Carlo method is used to solve the resulting PDF transport equation. While simulating the gas exchange, it is necessary to add a large number of stochastic particles to the ensemble due to the intake air and EGR streams as well as fuel injection, resulting in increased computational expense. Therefore, in this work we apply a down-sampling technique to reduce the number of stochastic particles, while conserving the statistical properties of the ensemble. In this method some of the most important statistical moments (e.g., concentration of the main chemical species and enthalpy) are conserved exactly, while other moments are conserved in a statistical sense. Detailed analysis demonstrates that the statistical error associated with the down-sampling algorithm is more sensitive to the number of particles than to the number of conserved species for the given operating conditions. For a full-cycle simulation this down-sampling procedure was observed to reduce the computational time by a factor of 8 as compared to the simulation without this strategy, while still maintaining the error within an acceptable limit. Following the detailed numerical investigation, the model, intended for volatile fuels only, is applied to simulate a two-stroke, naturally aspirated HCCI engine fueled with isooctane. The in-cylinder pressure and CO emissions predicted by the model agree reasonably well with the measured profiles. In addition, the new model is applied to estimate the influence of engine operating parameters such as the relative air-fuel ratio and early direct injection timing on HCCI combustion and emissions. The qualitative trends observed in the parametric variation study match well with experimental data in literature. (author)

  10. Exploring Interstellar Titanium and Deuterium Abundances and Other Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Lallement; G. Hebrard; B. Y. Welsh

    2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin of the observed variability of the gas-phase D/H ratio in the local interstellar medium is still debated, and in particular the role of deuterium depletion onto dust grains. Here we extend the study of the relationship between deuterium and titanium, a refractory species and tracer of elemental depletion, and explore other relationships. We have acquired high resolution spectra for nine early-type stars using the VLT/UVES spectrograph, and detected the absorption lines of interstellar TiII. Using a weighted orthogonal distance regression (ODR) code and a special method to treat non symmetric errors, we compare the TiII columns with the corresponding HI, DI and also OI columns. We perform in parallel the same comparisons for available FeII data. We find a significant correlation between TiII/HI and D/H in our data set, and, when combined with published results, we confirm and better constrain a previously published trend and extend it to low HI columns. We exclude uncertainties in HI and OI columns as the main contributor to the derived metals-deuterium correlations by showing that the TiII/HI ratio is positively correlated with DI/OI. We find a similar correlation between FeII/HI and DI/OI.The TiII gradients are similar or slightly smaller than for FeII, while one would expect larger variations on the basis of the higher condensation temperature of titanium. However we argue that ionisation effects introduce biases that affect iron and not titanium and may explain the gradient similarity. We find a less significant negative correlation between the TiII/DI ratio and the hydrogen column, possibly a sign of different evaporation of D and metals according to the cloud properties.

  11. Fermions in the Ashtekar-Barbero connection formalism for arbitrary values of the Immirzi parameter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mercuri, Simone [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza', Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, I-00185, Rome (Italy); ICRA-International Center for Relativistic Astrophysics (Italy)

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ashtekar-Barbero-Immirzi formulation of general relativity is extended to include spinor matter fields. Our formulation applies to generic values of the Immirzi parameter and reduces to the Ashtekar-Romano-Tate approach when the Immirzi parameter is taken equal to the imaginary unit. The dynamics of the gravity-fermions coupled system is described by the Holst plus Dirac action with a nonminimal coupling term. The nonminimal interaction together with the Holst modification to the Hilbert-Palatini action reconstruct the Nieh-Yan invariant, so that the effective action coming out is the one of Einstein-Cartan theory with a typical Fermi-like interaction term: in spite of the presence of spinor matter fields, the Immirzi parameter plays no role in the classical effective dynamics and results to be only a multiplicative factor in front of a total divergence. We reduce the total action of the theory to the sum of dynamically independent Ashtekar-Romano-Tate actions for self and anti-self-dual connections, with different weights depending on the Immirzi parameter. This allows to calculate the constraints of the complete theory in a simple way, it is only necessary to realize that the Barbero-Immirzi connection is a weighted sum of the self and anti-self-dual Ashtekar connections. Finally the obtained constraints for the separated action result to be polynomial in terms of the self and anti-self-dual connections, this could have implications in the inclusion of spinor matter in the framework of nonperturbative quantum gravity.

  12. Scalable tensor factorizations with missing data.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morup, Morten (Technical University of Denmark); Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Acar, Evrim (Turkish National Research Institute of Electronics and Cryptology); Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of missing data is ubiquitous in domains such as biomedical signal processing, network traffic analysis, bibliometrics, social network analysis, chemometrics, computer vision, and communication networks|all domains in which data collection is subject to occasional errors. Moreover, these data sets can be quite large and have more than two axes of variation, e.g., sender, receiver, time. Many applications in those domains aim to capture the underlying latent structure of the data; in other words, they need to factorize data sets with missing entries. If we cannot address the problem of missing data, many important data sets will be discarded or improperly analyzed. Therefore, we need a robust and scalable approach for factorizing multi-way arrays (i.e., tensors) in the presence of missing data. We focus on one of the most well-known tensor factorizations, CANDECOMP/PARAFAC (CP), and formulate the CP model as a weighted least squares problem that models only the known entries. We develop an algorithm called CP-WOPT (CP Weighted OPTimization) using a first-order optimization approach to solve the weighted least squares problem. Based on extensive numerical experiments, our algorithm is shown to successfully factor tensors with noise and up to 70% missing data. Moreover, our approach is significantly faster than the leading alternative and scales to larger problems. To show the real-world usefulness of CP-WOPT, we illustrate its applicability on a novel EEG (electroencephalogram) application where missing data is frequently encountered due to disconnections of electrodes.

  13. SU-E-I-43: Pediatric CT Dose and Image Quality Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, G; Singh, R [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To design an approach to optimize radiation dose and image quality for pediatric CT imaging, and to evaluate expected performance. Methods: A methodology was designed to quantify relative image quality as a function of CT image acquisition parameters. Image contrast and image noise were used to indicate expected conspicuity of objects, and a wide-cone system was used to minimize scan time for motion avoidance. A decision framework was designed to select acquisition parameters as a weighted combination of image quality and dose. Phantom tests were used to acquire images at multiple techniques to demonstrate expected contrast, noise and dose. Anthropomorphic phantoms with contrast inserts were imaged on a 160mm CT system with tube voltage capabilities as low as 70kVp. Previously acquired clinical images were used in conjunction with simulation tools to emulate images at different tube voltages and currents to assess human observer preferences. Results: Examination of image contrast, noise, dose and tube/generator capabilities indicates a clinical task and object-size dependent optimization. Phantom experiments confirm that system modeling can be used to achieve the desired image quality and noise performance. Observer studies indicate that clinical utilization of this optimization requires a modified approach to achieve the desired performance. Conclusion: This work indicates the potential to optimize radiation dose and image quality for pediatric CT imaging. In addition, the methodology can be used in an automated parameter selection feature that can suggest techniques given a limited number of user inputs. G Stevens and R Singh are employees of GE Healthcare.

  14. Heavy and Overweight Vehicle Defects Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), along with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), has an interest in overweight commercial motor vehicles, how they affect infrastructure, and their impact on safety on the nation s highways. To assist both FHWA and FMCSA in obtaining more information related to this interest, data was collected and analyzed from two separate sources. A large scale nationwide data collection effort was facilitated by the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance as part of a special study on overweight vehicles and an additional, smaller set, of data was collected from the state of Tennessee which included a much more detailed set of data. Over a six-month period, 1,873 Level I inspections were performed in 18 different states that volunteered to be a part of this study. Of the 1,873 inspections, a vehicle out-of-service (OOS) violation was found on 44.79% of the vehicles, a rate significantly higher than the national OOS rate of 27.23%. The main cause of a vehicle being placed OOS was brake-related defects, with approximately 30% of all vehicles having an OOS brake violation. Only about 4% of vehicles had an OOS tire violation, and even fewer had suspension and wheel violations. Vehicle weight violations were most common on an axle group as opposed to a gross vehicle weight violation. About two thirds of the vehicles cited with a weight violation were overweight on an axle group with an average amount of weight over the legal limit of about 2,000 lbs. Data collection is scheduled to continue through January 2014, with more potentially more states volunteering to collect data. More detailed data collections similar to the Tennessee data collection will also be performed in multiple states.

  15. Search For the Rare Decay K(L) ---> pi0 pi0 gamma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, David Edward; /Virginia U.

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes a search for the rare decay K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} using data from the KTeV experiment, using the topology K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sub D}{sup 0}{gamma} (where {pi}{sub D}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}e{sup +}e{sup -}). Due to Bose statistics and the real nature of the photon, the K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} decay can proceed at lowest order only by the Cp conserving direct emission of an E2 photon. The decay vanishes to O(p{sup 4}) in chiral perturbation theory and is a probe of the theory to the sixth order. The primary background to this decay consists of K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sub D}{sup 0} events with one lost photon. The upper limit for the decay K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} presented in this thesis is 2.32 x 10{sup -7} at the 90% confidence level. This upper limit was derived from both 1997 and 1999 data, using a blind analysis. The upper limit was derived from a Feldman-Cousins method, based on a weighted total of 0.53 data events in the signal region with an expected K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sub D}{sup 0} background of 0.37 {+-} 0.28 events. The previous upper limit for this decay was 5.6 x 10{sup -6} at the 90% confidence level.

  16. Growth, characterization and modeling of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}P stripes by selective-area MOCVD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kluender, J.F.; Jones, A.M.; Lammert, R.M.; Baker, J.E.; Coleman, J.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computational diffusion model is used to predict the lateral thickness and composition profiles of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}P stripes grown by selective-area, atmospheric pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. Standard profilometry is used to measure the thickness profiles of InP and GaAs stripes grown on SiO{sub 2} patterned InP and GaAs substrates, respectively. the model is used to find self-consistent empirical diffusion parameters for the In and Ga components which yield fits to the measured thickness data. The InP and GaAs data is then used to predict the growth thickness profile of InGaP by a weighted sum of the predicted profiles of the InP and GaP binary constituents. InGaP composition profiles are calculated by taking the ratio of the InP deposited volume to the InGaP deposited volume predicted by the model at each of the simulation points. Predicted thickness profiles are verified by standard profilometry, and composition profiles are verified by secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging using a fast resistive anode encoding detector. It is found that the measured thickness and composition profiles agree well with the profiles predicted by the model, thus verifying that the model can be used for the InGaP material system. The derived empirical parameters are used to predict the thickness and compositions of selectively grown InGaP quantum wells as a function of oxide width. 11 refs., 10 figs.

  17. Bracketing to speed convergence illustrated on the von Newmann algorithm for finding a feasible solution to a linear program with a convexity contraint. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dantzig, G.B.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analogous to gunners firing trial shots to bracket a target in order to adjust direction and distance, we demonstate that it is sometimes faster not to apply an algorithm directly, but to roughly approximately solve several perturbations of the problem and then combine these rough approximations to get an exact solution. To find a feasible solution to an m-equation linear program with a convexity constraint, the von Neumann Algorithm generates a sequence of approximate solutions which converge very slowly to the right hand side b{sup 0}. However, it can be redirected so that in the first few iterations it is guaranteed to move rapidly towards the neighborhood of one of m + 1 perturbed right hand sides {cflx b}{sup i}, then redirected in turn to the next {cflx b}{sup i}. Once within the neighborhood of each {cflx b}{sup i}, a weighted sum of the approximate solutions. {bar x}{sup i} yields the exact solution of the unperturbed problem where the weights are found by solving a system of m + 1 equations in m + 1 unknowns. It is assumed an r > 0 is given for which the problem is feasible for all right hand sides b whose distance {parallel}b - b{sup 0}{parallel}{sub 2} {le} r. The feasible solution is found in less than 4(m+ 1){sup 3}/r{sup 2} iterations. The work per iteration is {delta}mn + 2m + n + 9 multiplications plus {delta}mn + m + n + 9 additions or comparisons where {delta} is the density of nonzero coeffients in the matrix.

  18. Bracketing to speed convergence illustrated on the von Newmann algorithm for finding a feasible solution to a linear program with a convexity contraint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dantzig, G.B.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analogous to gunners firing trial shots to bracket a target in order to adjust direction and distance, we demonstate that it is sometimes faster not to apply an algorithm directly, but to roughly approximately solve several perturbations of the problem and then combine these rough approximations to get an exact solution. To find a feasible solution to an m-equation linear program with a convexity constraint, the von Neumann Algorithm generates a sequence of approximate solutions which converge very slowly to the right hand side b[sup 0]. However, it can be redirected so that in the first few iterations it is guaranteed to move rapidly towards the neighborhood of one of m + 1 perturbed right hand sides [cflx b][sup i], then redirected in turn to the next [cflx b][sup i]. Once within the neighborhood of each [cflx b][sup i], a weighted sum of the approximate solutions. [bar x][sup i] yields the exact solution of the unperturbed problem where the weights are found by solving a system of m + 1 equations in m + 1 unknowns. It is assumed an r > 0 is given for which the problem is feasible for all right hand sides b whose distance [parallel]b - b[sup 0][parallel][sub 2] [le] r. The feasible solution is found in less than 4(m+ 1)[sup 3]/r[sup 2] iterations. The work per iteration is [delta]mn + 2m + n + 9 multiplications plus [delta]mn + m + n + 9 additions or comparisons where [delta] is the density of nonzero coeffients in the matrix.

  19. Clinical Assessment of Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation for Painful Metastatic Bone Tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kojima, Hiroyuki, E-mail: kojimah@takii.kmu.ac.jp; Tanigawa, Noboru; Kariya, Shuji; Komemushi, Atsushi; Shomura, Yuzo; Sawada, Satoshi [Kansai Medical University Takii Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose. To investigate the pain-alleviating effects of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) on metastatic bone tumors in relation to tumor size, combined therapy, and percent tumor necrosis rate following RFA. Methods. Subjects comprised 24 patients with 28 painful metastatic bone tumors. A 17G internally cooled electrode was inserted into the tumor for CT guidance and ablation was performed. Bone cement was injected following RFA for 4 tumors involving a weight-bearing bone, while 5 tumors were treated using combined RFA and external irradiation. Percent necrosis rate of the tumor was measured using contrast-enhanced computed tomography 1 week after RFA. Results. Improvement in the visual analog scale (VAS) score was 4.6 {+-} 2.2 for large tumors (>5 cm, n = 12), 3.7 {+-} 1.8 for medium-sized tumors (3.1-5.0 cm, n = 11), and 3.5 {+-} 1.7 for small tumors ({<=}3 cm, n = 4), with no significant differences noted among tumor sizes. Improvement in the VAS score was 3.5 {+-} 1.3 for the 4 tumors in the RFA + bone cement group, 3.2 {+-} 1.9 for the 5 tumors in the RFA + radiation therapy group, and 4.8 {+-} 2.2 for the 18 tumors in the RFA group. No significant differences were identified between groups. The improvement in the VAS score was 3.8 {+-} 2.3, 4.0 {+-} 1.9, and 4.7 {+-} 2.6 in patients with tumor necrosis rates of 0-49%, 50-74%, and 75-100%, respectively. No significant association was observed among these three groups. Conclusion. Percutaneous RFA therapy was effective in relieving pain due to metastatic bone tumors. No relationships appear to exist between initial response and tumor size, combined therapy, and percent tumor necrosis.

  20. THE FIRST SYSTEMATIC SURVEY FOR Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT z = 7.3 WITH RED-SENSITIVE SUBARU/SUPRIME-CAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shibuya, Takatoshi; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Iye, Masanori [Department of Astronomical Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Ota, Kazuaki [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Ouchi, Masami [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8582 (Japan); Furusawa, Hisanori [Optical and Infrared Astronomy Division, National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Shimasaku, Kazuhiro [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Hattori, Takashi, E-mail: takatoshi.shibuya@nao.ac.jp [Subaru Telescope, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

    2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed deep imaging surveys for Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) at redshift {approx}7.3 in two blank fields, the Subaru Deep Field (SDF) and the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep survey Field (SXDF), using the Subaru/Suprime-Cam equipped with new red-sensitive CCDs and a new narrowband filter, NB1006 ({lambda}{sub c} = 10052 Angstrom-Sign , FWHM {Delta}{lambda} = 214 A). We identified four objects as LAE candidates that exhibit luminosity excess in NB1006. By carrying out deep follow-up spectroscopy for three of them using Subaru/FOCAS and Keck/DEIMOS, a definitively asymmetric emission line is detected for one of them, SXDF-NB1006-2. Assuming this line is Ly{alpha}, this object is an LAE at z = 7.215 which has a luminosity of 1.2{sup +1.5}{sub -0.6} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1} and a weighted skewness S{sub {omega}} = 4.90 {+-} 0.86. Another object, SDF-NB1006-2, shows variable photometry and is thus probably a quasar (QSO) or an active galactic nucleus. It shows an asymmetric emission line at 10076 A which may be due to either Ly{alpha} at z = 7.288 or [O II] at z = 1.703. The third object, SDF-NB1006-1, is likely a galaxy with temporal luminosity enhancement associated with a supernova explosion, as the brightness of this object varies between the observed epochs. Its spectrum does not show any emission lines. The inferred decrease in the number density of LAEs toward higher redshift is n{sup z={sup {sup 7.3}{sub Ly{alpha}}}}/n{sub Ly{alpha}}{sup z={sup {sup 5.7}}} = 0.05{sup +0.11}{sub -0.05} from z = 5.7 to 7.3 down to L{sup Ly{alpha}} = 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}. The present result is consistent with the interpretation in previous studies that the neutral hydrogen fraction is rapidly increasing from z = 5.7 to 7.3.

  1. Optimal Technology Investment and Operation in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings with Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler , Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; ,, Hirohisa Aki; Lai, Judy

    2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy has launched the Zero-Net-Energy (ZNE) Commercial Building Initiative (CBI) in order to develop commercial buildings that produce as much energy as they use. Its objective is to make these buildings marketable by 2025 such that they minimize their energy use through cutting-edge energy-efficient technologies and meet their remaining energy needs through on-site renewable energy generation. We examine how such buildings may be implemented within the context of a cost- or carbon-minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various technologies, such as photovoltaic (PV) on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and passive / demand-response technologies. We use a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has a multi-criteria objective function: the minimization of a weighted average of the building's annual energy costs and carbon / CO2 emissions. The MILP's constraints ensure energy balance and capacity limits. In addition, constraining the building's energy consumed to equal its energy exports enables us to explore how energy sales and demand-response measures may enable compliance with the CBI. Using a nursing home in northern California and New York with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find that a ZNE building requires ample PV capacity installed to ensure electricity sales during the day. This is complemented by investment in energy-efficient combined heat and power equipment, while occasional demand response shaves energy consumption. A large amount of storage is also adopted, which may be impractical. Nevertheless, it shows the nature of the solutions and costs necessary to achieve ZNE. For comparison, we analyze a nursing home facility in New York to examine the effects of a flatter tariff structure and different load profiles. It has trouble reaching ZNE status and its load reductions as well as efficiency measures need to be more effective than those in the CA case. Finally, we illustrate that the multi-criteria frontier that considers costs and carbon emissions in the presence of demand response dominates the one without it.

  2. SU-E-I-78: Improving Prostatic Delineation Using Dual-Energy CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gersh, J; Fried, D [Gibbs Cancer Center ' Research Institute - Pelham, Greer, SC (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Visual prostatic definition is difficult using conventional CT. This is because the prostate is surrounded closely with tissue of similar electron density. Definition is further hindered when the region contains high-Z material (such as fiducial markers). Dual-energy CT (DECT) is a technique where images are rendered using two tube voltages during a single scan session. This study evaluates DECT as a means of improving prostatic volume delineation for radiation oncology. Methods: The patients were scanned using a Definition AS20 (Siemens Healthcare, Malvern, PA). This device uses a single-tube configuration, where two scans of differing energies are performed in serial. The scans are acquired with tube voltage of 80kVp and 140kVp. Following acquisition, these scan data were used to generate effective monoenergetic scans ranging from 40keV to 190keV. In the current study, the data were presented to observers using a novel program, which allows real-time adjustment of window, level, and effective keV; all while scrolling through volumetric slices. Three patients were scanned, each with a different high-contrast material in or around the prostate: I-125 seeds, gold fiducial markers, and prostatic calcifications. These images are compared to a weighted average of the 80kVp and 140kVP scans, which yield a scan similar to that of a 120 kVp scan, which is a common tube voltage in radiation oncology. Results: Prostatic definition improved in each case. Differentiation of soft tissue from surrounding adipose improved with lower keV, while higher keV provided a reduction of high-z artifacts. Furthermore, the dynamic adjustment of the keV allowed observers to better recognize regions of differing tissue composition within this relatively homogeneous area. Conclusion: By simultaneously providing the observer with the benefits of high-energy images and low-energy images, and allowing adjustment in real-time, improved imaging in highly homogeneous regions such as the male pelvis is achievable.

  3. Thermal Behavior of Mixtures of Perlite and Phase Change Materials in a Simulated Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, K.W.; Childs, P.W.; Christian, J.E.; Petrie, T.W.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carefully controlled and well documented experiments have been done for two candidate configurations to control the heat load on a conditioned space. The 2:1 PCM/perlite mixture and the 6:1 PCM/perlite mixture, both on a weight basis, accomplished thermal control. The 2:1 system seemed to have enough PCM to be effective and involve a much larger fraction of its PCM in diurnal freezing and melting than the 6:1 system. It is a good starting point for engineering design of an optimum thermal control system. The results from the 2:1 system were reproduced with the computer program HEATING to prove that we know the relevant mechanisms and thermophysical properties of the PCM used in the system. Even without a model for the supersaturation and hysteresis that this material exhibited, HEATING reproduced the heat fluxes to the conditioned space in the experiments accurately enough to mirror the good thermal control performance of the system. The modified sensible heat capacity that was used in HEATING is a handy way to account for phase change effects and could be used in a subroutine to compute hourly phase change effects for whole building models like DOE-2. The experiments were done with PCM/perlite mixtures sealed in small methylmethacrylate boxes and covered top and bottom by XPS. The boxes allowed precise placement of the instrumentation used to follow the phase change effects. The XPS gave high R-value per unit thickness. A more practical prototype configuration such as PCM/perlite hermetically sealed in plastic pouches between layers of batts or blown-in insulation should be tested over a larger cross section. A good candidate is the whole attic cavity of the manufactured home test section used in the present work. Use of a PCM that does not exhibit supersaturation and hysteresis would make interpretation of the results easier. If the results of the larger scale test areas are as encouraging as the test cell results, a whole house model with a phase change algorithm should be constructed to optimize the configuration for the climate in which it will perform.

  4. Construction of energy-stable Galerkin reduced order models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalashnikova, Irina; Barone, Matthew Franklin; Arunajatesan, Srinivasan; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report aims to unify several approaches for building stable projection-based reduced order models (ROMs). Attention is focused on linear time-invariant (LTI) systems. The model reduction procedure consists of two steps: the computation of a reduced basis, and the projection of the governing partial differential equations (PDEs) onto this reduced basis. Two kinds of reduced bases are considered: the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) basis and the balanced truncation basis. The projection step of the model reduction can be done in two ways: via continuous projection or via discrete projection. First, an approach for building energy-stable Galerkin ROMs for linear hyperbolic or incompletely parabolic systems of PDEs using continuous projection is proposed. The idea is to apply to the set of PDEs a transformation induced by the Lyapunov function for the system, and to build the ROM in the transformed variables. The resulting ROM will be energy-stable for any choice of reduced basis. It is shown that, for many PDE systems, the desired transformation is induced by a special weighted L2 inner product, termed the %E2%80%9Csymmetry inner product%E2%80%9D. Attention is then turned to building energy-stable ROMs via discrete projection. A discrete counterpart of the continuous symmetry inner product, a weighted L2 inner product termed the %E2%80%9CLyapunov inner product%E2%80%9D, is derived. The weighting matrix that defines the Lyapunov inner product can be computed in a black-box fashion for a stable LTI system arising from the discretization of a system of PDEs in space. It is shown that a ROM constructed via discrete projection using the Lyapunov inner product will be energy-stable for any choice of reduced basis. Connections between the Lyapunov inner product and the inner product induced by the balanced truncation algorithm are made. Comparisons are also made between the symmetry inner product and the Lyapunov inner product. The performance of ROMs constructed using these inner products is evaluated on several benchmark test cases.

  5. Use of genomic data in risk assessment case study: II. Evaluation of the dibutyl phthalate toxicogenomic data set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Euling, Susan Y., E-mail: euling.susan@epa.gov [National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); White, Lori D. [National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Kim, Andrea S. [National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); Sen, Banalata [National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Wilson, Vickie S. [National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Keshava, Channa; Keshava, Nagalakshmi [National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); Hester, Susan [National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Ovacik, Meric A.; Ierapetritou, Marianthi G.; Androulakis, Ioannis P. [National Center for Environmental Research Science to Achieve Results (STAR) Bioinformatics Center, Environmental Bioinformatics and Computational Toxicology Center (ebCTC), Rutgers University and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Gaido, Kevin W. [Center for Veterinary Medicine, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Rockville, MD 20855 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation of the toxicogenomic data set for dibutyl phthalate (DBP) and male reproductive developmental effects was performed as part of a larger case study to test an approach for incorporating genomic data in risk assessment. The DBP toxicogenomic data set is composed of nine in vivo studies from the published literature that exposed rats to DBP during gestation and evaluated gene expression changes in testes or Wolffian ducts of male fetuses. The exercise focused on qualitative evaluation, based on a lack of available dose–response data, of the DBP toxicogenomic data set to postulate modes and mechanisms of action for the male reproductive developmental outcomes, which occur in the lower dose range. A weight-of-evidence evaluation was performed on the eight DBP toxicogenomic studies of the rat testis at the gene and pathway levels. The results showed relatively strong evidence of DBP-induced downregulation of genes in the steroidogenesis pathway and lipid/sterol/cholesterol transport pathway as well as effects on immediate early gene/growth/differentiation, transcription, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling and apoptosis pathways in the testis. Since two established modes of action (MOAs), reduced fetal testicular testosterone production and Insl3 gene expression, explain some but not all of the testis effects observed in rats after in utero DBP exposure, other MOAs are likely to be operative. A reanalysis of one DBP microarray study identified additional pathways within cell signaling, metabolism, hormone, disease, and cell adhesion biological processes. These putative new pathways may be associated with DBP effects on the testes that are currently unexplained. This case study on DBP identified data gaps and research needs for the use of toxicogenomic data in risk assessment. Furthermore, this study demonstrated an approach for evaluating toxicogenomic data in human health risk assessment that could be applied to future chemicals. - Highlights: ? We evaluate the dibutyl phthalate toxicogenomic data for use in risk assessment. ? We focus on information about the mechanism of action for the developing testis. ? Multiple studies report effects on testosterone and insl3-related pathways. ? We identify additional affected pathways that may explain some testis effects. ? The case study is a template for evaluating toxicogenomic data in risk assessment.

  6. Predicting objective function weights from patient anatomy in prostate IMRT treatment planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Taewoo, E-mail: taewoo.lee@utoronto.ca; Hammad, Muhannad [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King's College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8 (Canada)] [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King's College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8 (Canada); Chan, Timothy C. Y. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King's College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8, Canada and Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, 124-100 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada)] [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King's College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8, Canada and Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, 124-100 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada); Craig, Tim [Radiation Medicine Program, UHN Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 148-150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3S2 (Canada)] [Radiation Medicine Program, UHN Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 148-150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3S2 (Canada); Sharpe, Michael B. [Radiation Medicine Program, UHN Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2M9 (Canada) [Radiation Medicine Program, UHN Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 148-150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3S2 (Canada); Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, 124-100 College Street Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning typically combines multiple criteria into a single objective function by taking a weighted sum. The authors propose a statistical model that predicts objective function weights from patient anatomy for prostate IMRT treatment planning. This study provides a proof of concept for geometry-driven weight determination. Methods: A previously developed inverse optimization method (IOM) was used to generate optimal objective function weights for 24 patients using their historical treatment plans (i.e., dose distributions). These IOM weights were around 1% for each of the femoral heads, while bladder and rectum weights varied greatly between patients. A regression model was developed to predict a patient's rectum weight using the ratio of the overlap volume of the rectum and bladder with the planning target volume at a 1 cm expansion as the independent variable. The femoral head weights were fixed to 1% each and the bladder weight was calculated as one minus the rectum and femoral head weights. The model was validated using leave-one-out cross validation. Objective values and dose distributions generated through inverse planning using the predicted weights were compared to those generated using the original IOM weights, as well as an average of the IOM weights across all patients. Results: The IOM weight vectors were on average six times closer to the predicted weight vectors than to the average weight vector, usingl{sub 2} distance. Likewise, the bladder and rectum objective values achieved by the predicted weights were more similar to the objective values achieved by the IOM weights. The difference in objective value performance between the predicted and average weights was statistically significant according to a one-sided sign test. For all patients, the difference in rectum V54.3 Gy, rectum V70.0 Gy, bladder V54.3 Gy, and bladder V70.0 Gy values between the dose distributions generated by the predicted weights and IOM weights was less than 5 percentage points. Similarly, the difference in femoral head V54.3 Gy values between the two dose distributions was less than 5 percentage points for all but one patient. Conclusions: This study demonstrates a proof of concept that patient anatomy can be used to predict appropriate objective function weights for treatment planning. In the long term, such geometry-driven weights may serve as a starting point for iterative treatment plan design or may provide information about the most clinically relevant region of the Pareto surface to explore.

  7. Dosimetric characterization of the GammaClip™{sup 169}Yb low dose rate permanent implant brachytherapy source for the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer postwedge resection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currier, Blake [Medical Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, 1 University Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States)] [Medical Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, 1 University Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Munro, John J. III [Source Production and Equipment Co., Inc., 113 Teal Street, St. Rose, Louisiana 70087 (United States)] [Source Production and Equipment Co., Inc., 113 Teal Street, St. Rose, Louisiana 70087 (United States); Medich, David C. [Department of Physics, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 100 Institute Road, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 100 Institute Road, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: A novel {sup 169}Yb low dose rate permanent implant brachytherapy source, the GammaClip™, was developed by Source Production and Equipment Co. (New Orleans, LA) which is designed similar to a surgical staple while delivering therapeutic radiation. In this report, the brachytherapy source was characterized in terms of “Dose calculation for photon-emitting brachytherapy sources with average energy higher than 50 keV: Report of the AAPM and ESTRO” by Perez-Calatayud et al. [Med. Phys. 39, 2904–2929 (2012)] using the updated AAPM Task Group Report No. 43 formalism.Methods: Monte Carlo calculations were performed using Monte Carlo N-Particle 5, version 1.6 in water and air, the in-air photon spectrum filtered to remove photon energies below 10 keV in accordance with TG-43U1 recommendations and previously reviewed {sup 169}Yb energy cutoff levels [D. C. Medich, M. A. Tries, and J. M. Munro, “Monte Carlo characterization of an Ytterbium-169 high dose rate brachytherapy source with analysis of statistical uncertainty,” Med. Phys. 33, 163–172 (2006)]. TG-43U1 dosimetric data, including S{sub K}, D-dot (r,?), ?, g{sub L}(r), F(r, ?), ?{sub an}(r), and ?{sub an} were calculated along with their statistical uncertainties. Since the source is not axially symmetric, an additional set of calculations were performed to assess the resulting axial anisotropy.Results: The brachytherapy source's dose rate constant was calculated to be (1.22 ± 0.03) cGy h{sup ?1} U{sup ?1}. The uncertainty in the dose to water calculations, D-dot (r,?), was determined to be 2.5%, dominated by the uncertainties in the cross sections. The anisotropy constant, ?{sub an}, was calculated to be 0.960 ± 0.011 and was obtained by integrating the anisotropy factor between 1 and 10 cm using a weighting factor proportional to r{sup ?2}. The radial dose function was calculated at distances between 0.5 and 12 cm, with a maximum value of 1.20 at 5.15 ± 0.03 cm. Radial dose values were fit to a fifth order polynomial and dual exponential regression. Since the source is not axially symmetric, angular Monte Carlo calculations were performed at 1 cm which determined that the maximum azimuthal anisotropy was less than 8%.Conclusions: With a higher photon energy, shorter half-life and higher initial dose rate {sup 169}Yb is an interesting alternative to {sup 125}I for the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer.

  8. Microstructural Stability and Oxidation Resistance of 9-12 Chromium Steels at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dogan, O.N.; Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.; Hawk, J.A.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various martensitic 9-12 Cr steels are utilized currently in fossil fuel powered energy plants for their good elevated temperature properties such as creep strength, steam side oxidation resistance, fire side corrosion resistance, and thermal fatigue resistance. Need for further improvements on the properties of 9-12 Cr steels for higher temperature (>600oC) use is driven by the environmental concerns (i.e., improve efficiency to reduce emissions and fossil fuel consumption). In this paper, we will discuss the results of the research done to explore new subsitutional solute solution and precipitate hardening mechanisms for improved strength of 9-12 Cr martensitic steels. Stability of the phases present in the steels will be evaluated for various temperature and time exposures. A comparison of microstructural properties of the experimental steels and commercial steels will also be presented.

    The influence of a Ce surface treatment on oxidation behavior of a commercial (P91) and several experimental steels containing 9 to 12 weight percent Cr was examined at 650ºC in flowing dry and moist air. The oxidation behavior of all the alloys without the Ce modification was significantly degraded by the presence of moisture in the air during testing. For instance the weight gain for P91 was two orders of magnitude greater in moist air than in dry air. This was accompanied by a change in oxide scale from the formation of Cr-based scales in dry air to the formation of Fe-based scales in moist air. The Ce surface treatment was very effective in improving the oxidation resistance of the experimental steels in both moist and dry air. For instance, after exposure to moist air at 650ºC for 2000 hours, an experimental alloy with the cerium surface modification had a weight gain three orders of magnitude lower than the alloy without the Ce modification and two orders of magnitude lower than P91. The Ce surface treatment suppressed the formation of Fe-based scales and promoted the formation of more protective Cr-based scales. However, the Ce surface treatment was not effective in improving the resistance of P91. The results are discussed in terms of synergistic effects of constituent alloying elements.

  9. Environmental quality indexing of large industrial development alternatives using AHP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solnes, Julius

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two industrial development alternatives have been proposed for the East Coast of Iceland in order to strengthen its socio-economic basis. The favoured option is to build a large aluminium smelter, which requires massive hydropower development in the nearby highlands. Another viable option is the construction of a 6-million-ton oil refinery, following the planned exploitation of the Timan Pechora oil reserves in the Russian Arctic. A third 'fictitious' alternative could be general development of existing regional industry and new knowledge-based industries, development of ecotourism, establishment of national parks, accompanied by infrastructure improvement (roads, tunnels, communications, schools, etc.). The three alternatives will have different environmental consequences. The controversial hydropower plant for the smelter requires a large water reservoir as well as considerable land disturbance in this unique mountain territory, considered to be the largest uninhabited wilderness in Western Europe. The aluminium smelter and the oil refinery will give rise to substantial increase of the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of the country (about 20%). Then there is potential environmental risk associated with the refinery regarding oil spills at sea, which could have disastrous impact on the fisheries industry. However, the oil refinery does not require any hydropower development, which is a positive factor. Finally, the third alternative could be defined as a ''green'' solution whereby the detrimental environmental consequences of the two industrial solutions are mostly avoided. In order to compare the three alternatives in an orderly manner, the analytic hierarchy process methodology of Saaty was applied to calculate the environmental quality index of each alternative, which is defined as a weighted sum of selected environmental and socio-economic factors. These factors are evaluated on a comparison basis, applying the AHP methodology, and the weights in the quality index summation are estimated in the same manner. Six persons with different backgrounds were asked to fill in the comparison matrices in order to reduce bias in the evaluation. The final results show that the two industrial alternatives come out poorly, i.e. with low quality indices, whereas the third pseudo-alternative, i.e. general development, with a considerably higher quality index, is certainly worth a further study.

  10. Energy-consumption and carbon-emission analysis of vehicle and component manufacturing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, J. L.; Burnham, A.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A model is presented for calculating the environmental burdens of the part manufacturing and vehicle assembly (VMA) stage of the vehicle life cycle. The approach is bottom-up, with a special focus on energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions. The model is applied to both conventional and advanced vehicles, the latter of which include aluminum-intensive, hybrid electric, plug-in hybrid electric and all-electric vehicles. An important component of the model, a weight-based distribution function of materials and associated transformation processes (casting, stamping, etc.), is developed from the United States Council for Automotive Research Generic Vehicle Life Cycle Inventory Study. As the approach is bottom-up, numerous transformation process data and plant operational data were extracted from the literature for use in representing the many operations included in the model. When the model was applied to conventional vehicles, reliable estimates of cumulative energy consumption (34 GJ/vehicle) and CO{sub 2} emission (2 tonnes/vehicle) were computed for the VMA life-cycle stage. The numerous data sets taken from the literature permitted the development of some statistics on model results. Because the model explicitly includes a greater coverage of relevant manufacturing processes than many earlier studies, our energy estimates are on the higher end of previously published values. Limitations of the model are also discussed. Because the material compositions of conventional vehicles within specific classes (cars, light duty trucks, etc.) are sensibly constant on a percent-by-weight basis, the model can be reduced to a simple linear form for each class dependent only on vehicle weight. For advanced vehicles, the material/transformation process distribution developed above needs to be adjusted for different materials and components. This is particularly so for aluminum-intensive and electric-drive vehicles. In fact, because of their comparatively high manufacturing energy, batteries required for an electric vehicle can significantly add to the energy burden of the VMA stage. Overall, for conventional vehicles, energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions from the VMA stage are about 4% of their total life-cycle values. They are expected to be somewhat higher for advanced vehicles.

  11. PMU Data Integrity Evaluation through Analytics on a Virtual Test-Bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL; Shankar, Mallikarjun [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power systems are rapidly becoming populated by phasor measurement units (PMUs) in ever increasing numbers. PMUs are critical components of today s energy management systems, designed to enable near real-time wide area monitoring and control of the electric power system. They are able to measure highly accurate bus voltage phasors as well as branch current phasors incident to the buses at which PMUs are equipped. Synchrophasor data is used for applications varying from state estimation, islanding control, identifying outages, voltage stability detection and correction, disturbance recording, and others. However, PMU-measured readings may suffer from errors due to meter biases or drifts, incorrect configurations, or even cyber-attacks. Furthermore, the testing of early PMUs showed a large disparity between the reported values from PMUs provided by different manufacturers, particularly when frequency was off-nominal, during dynamic events, and when harmonic/inter-harmonic content was present. Detection and identification of PMU gross measurement errors are thus crucial in maintaining highly accurate phasor readings throughout the system. In this paper, we present our work in conducting analytics to determine the trustworthiness and worth of the PMU readings collected across an electric network system. By implementing the IEEE 118 bus test case on a virtual test bed (VTB) , we are able to emulate PMU readings (bus voltage and branch current phasors in addition to bus frequencies) under normal and abnormal conditions using (virtual) PMU sensors deployed across major substations in the network. We emulate a variety of failures such as bus, line, transformer, generator, and/or load failures. Data analytics on the voltage phase angles and frequencies collected from the PMUs show that specious (or compromised) PMU device(s) can be identified through abnormal behaviour by comparing the trend of its frequency and phase angle reading with the ensemble of all other PMU readings in the network. If the reading trend of a particular PMU deviates from the weighted average of the reading trends of other PMUs at nearby substations, then it is likely that the PMU is malfunctioning. We assign a weight to each PMU denoting how electric-topology-wise close it is from where the PMU under consideration is located. The closer a PMU is, the higher the weight it has. To compute the closeness between two nodes in the power network, we employ a form of the resistance distance metric. It computes the electrical distance by taking into consideration the underlying topology as well as the physical laws that govern the electrical connections or flows between the network components. The detection accuracy of erroneous PMUs should be improved by employing this metric. We present results to validate the proposed approach. We also discuss the effectiveness of using an end-to-end VTB approach that allows us to investigate different types of failures and their responses as seen by the ensemble of PMUs. The collected data on certain types of events may be amenable to certain types of analysis (e.g., alerting for sudden changes can be done on a small window of data) and hence determine the data analytics architectures is required to evaluate the streaming PMU data.

  12. Water Extraction from Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce C. Folkedahl; Greg F. Weber; Michael E. Collings

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this program was to develop a liquid disiccant-based flue gas dehydration process technology to reduce water consumption in coal-fired power plants. The specific objective of the program was to generate sufficient subscale test data and conceptual commercial power plant evaluations to assess process feasibility and merits for commercialization. Currently, coal-fired power plants require access to water sources outside the power plant for several aspects of their operation in addition to steam cycle condensation and process cooling needs. At the present time, there is no practiced method of extracting the usually abundant water found in the power plant stack gas. This project demonstrated the feasibility and merits of a liquid desiccant-based process that can efficiently and economically remove water vapor from the flue gas of fossil fuel-fired power plants to be recycled for in-plant use or exported for clean water conservation. After an extensive literature review, a survey of the available physical and chemical property information on desiccants in conjunction with a weighting scheme developed for this application, three desiccants were selected and tested in a bench-scale system at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). System performance at the bench scale aided in determining which desiccant was best suited for further evaluation. The results of the bench-scale tests along with further review of the available property data for each of the desiccants resulted in the selection of calcium chloride as the desiccant for testing at the pilot-scale level. Two weeks of testing utilizing natural gas in Test Series I and coal in Test Series II for production of flue gas was conducted with the liquid desiccant dehumidification system (LDDS) designed and built for this study. In general, it was found that the LDDS operated well and could be placed in an automode in which the process would operate with no operator intervention or adjustment. Water produced from this process should require little processing for use, depending on the end application. Test Series II water quality was not as good as that obtained in Test Series I; however, this was believed to be due to a system upset that contaminated the product water system during Test Series II. The amount of water that can be recovered from flue gas with the LDDS is a function of several variables, including desiccant temperature, L/G in the absorber, flash drum pressure, liquid-gas contact method, and desiccant concentration. Corrosion will be an issue with the use of calcium chloride as expected but can be largely mitigated through proper material selection. Integration of the LDDS with either low-grade waste heat and or ground-source heating and cooling can affect the parasitic power draw the LDDS will have on a power plant. Depending on the amount of water to be removed from the flue gas, the system can be designed with no parasitic power draw on the power plant other than pumping loads. This can be accomplished in one scenario by taking advantage of the heat of absorption and the heat of vaporization to provide the necessary temperature changes in the desiccant with the flue gas and precipitates that may form and how to handle them. These questions must be addressed in subsequent testing before scale-up of the process can be confidently completed.

  13. Reduced order modeling for prediction and control of large-scale systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalashnikova, Irina; Arunajatesan, Srinivasan; Barone, Matthew Franklin; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Fike, Jeffrey A.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work performed from June 2012 through May 2014 as a part of a Sandia Early Career Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project led by the first author. The objective of the project is to investigate methods for building stable and efficient proper orthogonal decomposition (POD)/Galerkin reduced order models (ROMs): models derived from a sequence of high-fidelity simulations but having a much lower computational cost. Since they are, by construction, small and fast, ROMs can enable real-time simulations of complex systems for onthe- spot analysis, control and decision-making in the presence of uncertainty. Of particular interest to Sandia is the use of ROMs for the quantification of the compressible captive-carry environment, simulated for the design and qualification of nuclear weapons systems. It is an unfortunate reality that many ROM techniques are computationally intractable or lack an a priori stability guarantee for compressible flows. For this reason, this LDRD project focuses on the development of techniques for building provably stable projection-based ROMs. Model reduction approaches based on continuous as well as discrete projection are considered. In the first part of this report, an approach for building energy-stable Galerkin ROMs for linear hyperbolic or incompletely parabolic systems of partial differential equations (PDEs) using continuous projection is developed. The key idea is to apply a transformation induced by the Lyapunov function for the system, and to build the ROM in the transformed variables. It is shown that, for many PDE systems including the linearized compressible Euler and linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations, the desired transformation is induced by a special inner product, termed the “symmetry inner product”. Attention is then turned to nonlinear conservation laws. A new transformation and corresponding energy-based inner product for the full nonlinear compressible Navier-Stokes equations is derived, and it is demonstrated that if a Galerkin ROM is constructed in this inner product, the ROM system energy will be bounded in a way that is consistent with the behavior of the exact solution to these PDEs, i.e., the ROM will be energy-stable. The viability of the linear as well as nonlinear continuous projection model reduction approaches developed as a part of this project is evaluated on several test cases, including the cavity configuration of interest in the targeted application area. In the second part of this report, some POD/Galerkin approaches for building stable ROMs using discrete projection are explored. It is shown that, for generic linear time-invariant (LTI) systems, a discrete counterpart of the continuous symmetry inner product is a weighted L2 inner product obtained by solving a Lyapunov equation. This inner product was first proposed by Rowley et al., and is termed herein the “Lyapunov inner product“. Comparisons between the symmetry inner product and the Lyapunov inner product are made, and the performance of ROMs constructed using these inner products is evaluated on several benchmark test cases. Also in the second part of this report, a new ROM stabilization approach, termed “ROM stabilization via optimization-based eigenvalue reassignment“, is developed for generic LTI systems. At the heart of this method is a constrained nonlinear least-squares optimization problem that is formulated and solved numerically to ensure accuracy of the stabilized ROM. Numerical studies reveal that the optimization problem is computationally inexpensive to solve, and that the new stabilization approach delivers ROMs that are stable as well as accurate. Summaries of “lessons learned“ and perspectives for future work motivated by this LDRD project are provided at the end of each of the two main chapters.

  14. The image quality of ion computed tomography at clinical imaging dose levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, David C., E-mail: dch@oncology.au.dk [Department of Experimental Clinical Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Bassler, Niels [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Sørensen, Thomas Sangild [Department of Computer Science, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus, Denmark and Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Seco, Joao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School,Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Accurately predicting the range of radiotherapy ions in vivo is important for the precise delivery of dose in particle therapy. Range uncertainty is currently the single largest contribution to the dose margins used in planning and leads to a higher dose to normal tissue. The use of ion CT has been proposed as a method to improve the range uncertainty and thereby reduce dose to normal tissue of the patient. A wide variety of ions have been proposed and studied for this purpose, but no studies evaluate the image quality obtained with different ions in a consistent manner. However, imaging doses ion CT is a concern which may limit the obtainable image quality. In addition, the imaging doses reported have not been directly comparable with x-ray CT doses due to the different biological impacts of ion radiation. The purpose of this work is to develop a robust methodology for comparing the image quality of ion CT with respect to particle therapy, taking into account different reconstruction methods and ion species. Methods: A comparison of different ions and energies was made. Ion CT projections were simulated for five different scenarios: Protons at 230 and 330 MeV, helium ions at 230 MeV/u, and carbon ions at 430 MeV/u. Maps of the water equivalent stopping power were reconstructed using a weighted least squares method. The dose was evaluated via a quality factor weighted CT dose index called the CT dose equivalent index (CTDEI). Spatial resolution was measured by the modulation transfer function. This was done by a noise-robust fit to the edge spread function. Second, the image quality as a function of the number of scanning angles was evaluated for protons at 230 MeV. In the resolution study, the CTDEI was fixed to 10 mSv, similar to a typical x-ray CT scan. Finally, scans at a range of CTDEI’s were done, to evaluate dose influence on reconstruction error. Results: All ions yielded accurate stopping power estimates, none of which were statistically different from the ground truth image. Resolution (as defined by the modulation transfer function = 10% point) was the best for the helium ions (18.21 line pairs/cm) and worst for the lower energy protons (9.37 line pairs/cm). The weighted quality factor for the different ions ranged from 1.23 for helium to 2.35 for carbon ions. For the angle study, a sharp increase in absolute error was observed below 45 distinct angles, giving the impression of a threshold, rather than smooth, limit to the number of angles. Conclusions: The method presented for comparing various ion CT modalities is feasible for practical use. While all studied ions would improve upon x-ray CT for particle range estimation, helium appears to give the best results and deserves further study for imaging.

  15. Hydrogen from biomass: state of the art and research challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milne, Thomas A.; Elam, Carolyn C.; Evans, Robert J.

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report was prepared for the International Energy Agency (IEA) Agreement on the Production and Utilization of Hydrogen, Task 16, Hydrogen from Carbon-Containing Materials. Hydrogen's share in the energy market is increasing with the implementation of fuel cell systems and the growing demand for zero-emission fuels. Hydrogen production will need to keep pace with this growing market. In the near term, increased production will likely be met by conventional technologies, such as natural gas reforming. In these processes, the carbon is converted to CO2 and released to the atmosphere. However, with the growing concern about global climate change, alternatives to the atmospheric release of CO2 are being investigated. Sequestration of the CO2 is an option that could provide a viable near-term solution. Reducing the demand on fossil resources remains a significant concern for many nations. Renewable-based processes like solar- or wind-driven electrolysis and photobiological water splitting hold great promise for clean hydrogen production; however, advances must still be made before these technologies can be economically competitive. For the near-and mid-term, generating hydrogen from biomass may be the more practical and viable, renewable and potentially carbon-neutral (or even carbon-negative in conjunction with sequestration) option. Recently, the IEA Hydrogen Agreement launched a new task to bring together international experts to investigate some of these near- and mid-term options for producing hydrogen with reduced environmental impacts. This review of the state of the art of hydrogen production from biomass was prepared to facilitate in the planning of work that should be done to achieve the goal of near-term hydrogen energy systems. The relevant technologies that convert biomass to hydrogen, with emphasis on thermochemical routes are described. In evaluating the viability of the conversion routes, each must be put in the context of the availability of appropriate feedstocks and deployment scenarios that match hydrogen to the local markets. Co-production opportunities are of particular interest for near-term deployment since multiple products improve the economics; however, co-product development is not covered in this report. Biomass has the potential to accelerate the realization of hydrogen as a major fuel of the future. Since biomass is renewable and consumes atmospheric CO2 during growth, it can have a small net CO2 impact compared to fossil fuels. However, hydrogen from biomass has major challenges. There are no completed technology demonstrations. The yield of hydrogen is low from biomass since the hydrogen content in biomass is low to being with (approximately 6% versus 25% for methane) and the energy content is low due to the 40% oxygen content of biomass. Since over half of the hydrogen from biomass comes from splitting water in the steam reforming reaction, the energy content of the feedstock is an inherent limitation of the process . The low yield of hydrogen on a weight basis is misleading since the energy conversion efficiency is high. However, the cost for growing, harvesting, and transporting biomass is high. Thus even with reasonable energy efficiencies, it is not presently economically competitive with natural gas steam reforming for stand-alone hydrogen without the advantage of high-value co-products. Additionally, as with all sources of hydrogen, production from biomass will require appropriate hydrogen storage and utilization systems to be developed and deployed. The report also looked at promising areas for further research and development. The major areas for R,D and D are: feedstock preparation and feeding; gasification gas conditioning; system integration; modular systems development; valuable co-product integration; and larger-scale demonstrations. These are in addition to the challenges for any hydrogen process in storage and utilization technologies.

  16. Well-to-wheels energy use and greenhouse gas emissions analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elgowainy, A.; Burnham, A.; Wang, M.; Molburg, J.; Rousseau, A.; Energy Systems

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory expanded the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model and incorporated the fuel economy and electricity use of alternative fuel/vehicle systems simulated by the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) to conduct a well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis of energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The WTW results were separately calculated for the blended charge-depleting (CD) and charge-sustaining (CS) modes of PHEV operation and then combined by using a weighting factor that represented the CD vehicle-miles-traveled (VMT) share. As indicated by PSAT simulations of the CD operation, grid electricity accounted for a share of the vehicle's total energy use, ranging from 6% for a PHEV 10 to 24% for a PHEV 40, based on CD VMT shares of 23% and 63%, respectively. In addition to the PHEV's fuel economy and type of on-board fuel, the marginal electricity generation mix used to charge the vehicle impacted the WTW results, especially GHG emissions. Three North American Electric Reliability Corporation regions (4, 6, and 13) were selected for this analysis, because they encompassed large metropolitan areas (Illinois, New York, and California, respectively) and provided a significant variation of marginal generation mixes. The WTW results were also reported for the U.S. generation mix and renewable electricity to examine cases of average and clean mixes, respectively. For an all-electric range (AER) between 10 mi and 40 mi, PHEVs that employed petroleum fuels (gasoline and diesel), a blend of 85% ethanol and 15% gasoline (E85), and hydrogen were shown to offer a 40-60%, 70-90%, and more than 90% reduction in petroleum energy use and a 30-60%, 40-80%, and 10-100% reduction in GHG emissions, respectively, relative to an internal combustion engine vehicle that used gasoline. The spread of WTW GHG emissions among the different fuel production technologies and grid generation mixes was wider than the spread of petroleum energy use, mainly due to the diverse fuel production technologies and feedstock sources for the fuels considered in this analysis. The PHEVs offered reductions in petroleum energy use as compared with regular hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). More petroleum energy savings were realized as the AER increased, except when the marginal grid mix was dominated by oil-fired power generation. Similarly, more GHG emissions reductions were realized at higher AERs, except when the marginal grid generation mix was dominated by oil or coal. Electricity from renewable sources realized the largest reductions in petroleum energy use and GHG emissions for all PHEVs as the AER increased. The PHEVs that employ biomass-based fuels (e.g., biomass-E85 and -hydrogen) may not realize GHG emissions benefits over regular HEVs if the marginal generation mix is dominated by fossil sources. Uncertainties are associated with the adopted PHEV fuel consumption and marginal generation mix simulation results, which impact the WTW results and require further research. More disaggregate marginal generation data within control areas (where the actual dispatching occurs) and an improved dispatch modeling are needed to accurately assess the impact of PHEV electrification. The market penetration of the PHEVs, their total electric load, and their role as complements rather than replacements of regular HEVs are also uncertain. The effects of the number of daily charges, the time of charging, and the charging capacity have not been evaluated in this study. A more robust analysis of the VMT share of the CD operation is also needed.

  17. Epsilon Metal Summary Report FY 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Zumhoff, Mac R.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Windisch, Charles F.; Riley, Brian J.

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Epsilon-metal ({var_epsilon}-metal) phase was selected in FY 2009 as a potential waste form to for immobilizing the noble metals found in the undissolved solids + aqueous stream, and the soluble Tc from ion-exchange process, each resulting from proposed aqueous reprocessing. {var_epsilon}-metal phase is observed in used nuclear fuel and the natural reactors of Oklobono in Gabon, where the long-term corrosion behavior was demonstrated. This makes {var_epsilon}-metal a very attractive waste form. Last fiscal year, {var_epsilon}-metal was successfully fabricated by combining the five-metals, Mo, Ru, Rh, Pd and Re (surrogate for Tc), into pellets followed by consolidation with an arc melter. The arc melter produced fully dense samples with the epsilon structure. However, some chemistry differences were observed in the microstructure that resulted in regions rich in Re and Mo, and others rich in Pd, while Ru and Rh remained fairly constant throughout. This year, thermal stability (air), and corrosion testing of the samples fabricated by arc melting were the main focus for experimental work. Thermal stability was measured with a differential scanning calorimeter - thermogravimetric analyzer, by both ramp heating as well as step heating. There is clear evidence during the ramp heating experiment of an exothermic event + a weight loss peak both beginning at {approx}700 C. Step heating showed an oxidation event at {approx}690 C with minimal weight gain that occurs just before the weight loss event at 700 C. The conclusion being that the e-metal begins to oxidize and then become volatile. These findings are useful for considering the effects of voloxidation process. Three different pellets were subjected to electrochemical testing to study the corrosion behavior of the epsilon-metal phase in various conditions, namely acidic, basic, saline, and inert. Test was done according to an interim procedure developed for the alloy metal waste form. First an open circuit potential was measured, followed by linear polarization sweeps. The linear polarization sweep range was the Tafel equation was fit to the linear polarization sweep data to determine the corrosion rate of each pellet in each test solution. The average calculated corrosion rates of the three pellets according to solution conditions were: -1.91 x 10{sup -4} mm/yr (0.001 M NaOH), -1.48 x 10{sup -3} mm/yr (0.01 M NaCl), -8.77 x 10{sup -4} mm/yr (0.001 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), -2.09 x 10{sup -3} mm/yr (0.001 M NaOH + 0.01 M NaCl), and -1.54 x 10{sup -3} mm/yr (0.001 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 0.01 M NaCl). Three single-pass flow through (SPFT) test were conducted at a flow rate of 10 ml/day, at 90 C, and pH of 2.5, 7.0, and 9.0 for up to 322 days. Results of the tests indicate that dissolution rates were 5 x 10{sup -4} g m{sup 2} d{sup -1} at pH 9.0, 1.2 x 10{sup -4} g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} at pH 7.0, and 2 x 10{sup -4} g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} at pH 2.5. The sample used for the pH 7.0 SPFT test contains extra Re compared to samples used for the other two SPFT test, which came from a single pellet. The corrosion data measured this year indicate that the {var_epsilon}-metal phase is chemically durable. The two chemically different phases, but structurally the same, behave differently during dissolution according to the microstructure changes observed in both the electrochemical and in SPFT test. Characterization of the test specimens after testing suggests that the dissolution is complex and involves oxidative dissolution followed by precipitation of both oxide and metallic phases. These data suggest that the dissolution in the electrochemical and SPFT tests is different; a process that needs further investigation.

  18. Mississippi State Biodiesel Production Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rafael Hernandez; Todd French; Sandun Fernando; Tingyu Li; Dwane Braasch; Juan Silva; Brian Baldwin

    2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Biodiesel is a renewable fuel conventionally generated from vegetable oils and animal fats that conforms to ASTM D6751. Depending on the free fatty acid content of the feedstock, biodiesel is produced via transesterification, esterification, or a combination of these processes. Currently the cost of the feedstock accounts for more than 80% of biodiesel production cost. The main goal of this project was to evaluate and develop non-conventional feedstocks and novel processes for producing biodiesel. One of the most novel and promising feedstocks evaluated involves the use of readily available microorganisms as a lipid source. Municipal wastewater treatment facilities (MWWTF) in the USA produce (dry basis) of microbial sludge annually. This sludge is composed of a variety of organisms, which consume organic matter in wastewater. The content of phospholipids in these cells have been estimated at 24% to 25% of dry mass. Since phospholipids can be transesterified they could serve as a ready source of biodiesel. Examination of the various transesterification methods shows that in situ conversion of lipids to FAMEs provides the highest overall yield of biodiesel. If one assumes a 7.0% overall yield of FAMEs from dry sewage sludge on a weight basis, the cost per gallon of extracted lipid would be $3.11. Since the lipid is converted to FAMEs, also known as biodiesel, in the in Situ extraction process, the product can be used as is for renewable fuel. As transesterification efficiency increases the cost per gallon drops quickly, hitting $2.01 at 15.0% overall yield. An overall yield of 10.0% is required to obtain biodiesel at $2.50 per gallon, allowing it to compete with soybean oil in the marketplace. Twelve plant species with potential for oil production were tested at Mississippi State, MS. Of the species tested, canola, rapeseed and birdseed rape appear to have potential in Mississippi as winter annual crops because of yield. Two perennial crops were investigated, Chinese tallow tree and tung tree. High seed yields from these species are possible because, there stature allows for a third dimension in yield (up). Harvest regimes have already been worked out with tung, and the large seed makes shedding of the seed with tree shakers possible. While tallow tree seed yields can be mind boggling (12,000 kg seed/ha at 40% oil), genotypes that shed seed easily are currently not known. Efficient methods were developed to isolate polyunsaturated fatty acid methyl esters from bio-diesel. The hypothesis to isolate this class of fatty acids, which are used as popular dietary supplements and prescription medicine (OMACOR), was that they bind transition metal ions much stronger than their harmful saturated analogs. AgBF4 has the highest extraction ability among all the metal ions tested. Glycerol is a key product from the production of biodiesel. It is produced during the transesterification process by cleaving the fatty acids from the glycerol backbone (the fatty acids are used as part of the biodiesel, which is a fatty acid methyl ester). Glycerol is a non-toxic compound with many uses; however, if a surplus exists in the future, more uses for the produced glycerol needs to be found. Another phase of the project was to find an add-on process to the biodiesel production process that will convert the glycerol by-product into more valuable substances for end uses other than food or cosmetics, focusing at present on 1,3-propanediol and lactic acid.All three MSU cultures produced products at concentrations below that of the benchmark microorganisms. There was one notable isolate the caught the eye of the investigators and that was culture J6 due to the ability of this microorganism to co-produce both products and one in particularly high concentrations. This culture with more understanding of its metabolic pathways could prove a useful biological agent for the conversion of glycerol. Heterogeneous catalysis was examined as an alternative to overcome the disadvantages of homogeneous transesterification, such as the presence of salts in the glycer

  19. NOVEL DENSE MEMBRANE FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION FOR ENERGY APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandopadhyay, Sukumar [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Balu) [ANL; Nag, Nagendra [SURMET CORP.

    2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objectives of this project are: (1) Characterization of the thermo mechanical properties of the novel dense HTM bulk sample; (2) Development of a correlation among the intrinsic factors (such as grain size and phase distribution), and the extrinsic factors (such as temperature and atmosphere) and the thermo-mechanical properties (such as strengths and stress) to predict the performance of a HTM system (HTM membrane and porous substrate) ; and (3) Evaluation of the stability of the novel HTM membrane and its property correlations after thermal cycling. Based on all results and analysis of the thermo mechanical properties for the HTM cermet bulk samples, several important conclusions were made. The mean ?fs at room temperature is approximately 356 MPa for the HTM cermet. The mean ?fs value decreases to 284 MPa as the temperature increases to 850?C. The Difference difference in atmosphere, such as air or N2, had an insignificant effect on the flexural strength values at 850?C for the HTM cermet. The HTM cermet samples at room temperature and at 500?C fractured without any significant plastic deformation. Whereas, at 850?C, the HTM cermet samples fractured, preceded by an extensive plastic deformation. It seems that the HTM cermet behaves more like an elastic material such as a nonmetal ceramic at the room temperature, and more like a ductile material at increased temperature (850?C). The exothermic peak during the TG/DTA tests centered at 600?C is most likely associated with both the enthalpy change of transformation from the amorphous phase into crystalline zirconia and the oxidation of Pd phase in HTM cermet in air. The endothermic peak centered at 800?C is associated with the dissociation of PdO to Pd for the HTM cermet sample in both inert N2 environment and air. There is a corresponding weight gain as oxidation occurs for palladium (Pd) phase to form palladium oxide (PdO) and there is a weight loss as the unstable PdO is dissociated back to Pd and oxygen. The normal stress and shear stresses from the Mohr?s circle indicate that the residual stress in the HTM cermet sample is mainly as compressive residual stress in the magnitude of -135 to -155 MP, and with very little shear stress (in the magnitude of 10 MPa). The magnitude of change in the normal stress and the shear stress is insignificant in the HTM after 120 thermal cycles. However, the principle normal stress changes from compressive to tensile residual stress and there is a significant increase in the shear stress after 500 thermal cycles. The calculated value based on the equation and the Mohr?s circle is found to be consistent with the experimental value for the as-received HTM cermet samples. At some rotation (?) angle, the residual stress was found to be as tensile stress. Most ceramic material is weak in tension, and develops microscopic cracks. With treatment of 120 thermal cycles between 50?850?C, the HTM- sample exhibited thermally-induced cracks on the surface. Visually observable cracks appeared on the surface of HTM cermet with continuous thermal cycling, after 500 thermal cycles. The XRD powder diffraction analysis indicated an increased amount of crystalline PdO crystalline in HTM cermet after 120 and 500 thermal cycles as compare to the as-received samples. The Pd crystalline peaks were found to significantly decrease in peak intensity with thermal cycling. Higher peak intensity for PdO phase was observed with increased number of thermal cycles. A Monoclinic monoclinic zirconia phase was first identified in the as-received HTM as-received sample. However, with thermal cycling treatment of both 120 and 500 thermal cycles, the M-ZrO2 phase is transformed to the tetragonal YSZ, which is consistent with the thermal analysis results by TG/DTA. Correlations of the microstructural and thermo-mechanical properties of both selected reference material and ANL-3e HTM cermet bulk sample are affected mainly by porosity and microstructural features, such as grain size and pore size/distribution. The Young?s Modulus (E-value), especially, is positivel