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1

PRACE DECI (distributed european computing initiative) minisymposium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article gives an overview of the DECI (Distributed European Computing Initiative) Minisymposium held within the PARA 2012 conference taking the form of a short set of articles for each of the talks presented. The work presented here was carried ...

Chris Johnson; Adam Carter; Iain Bethune; Kevin Statford; Mikko Alava; Vitor Cardoso; Muhammad Asif; Bernhard S.A. Schuberth; Tobias Weinzierl

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

So How Do THey DeciDe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

So How Do So How Do THey DeciDe wHaT To Do aT THe iNL? nuclear energy Nuclear energy is a clean, safe, vital part of this country's energy mix. S takeholders frequently tell us they're impressed by all the nuclear research we do at the idaho National Laboratory, but they wonder why we don't do more work on renewable energy, like wind, solar and hydro. well, the answer is, we do research in those

3

Laboratory Equipment - Milli-Q Water System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Milli-Q Water System. Description: Location: E134. Please refer to the manufacturers website for more information. Contact. ...

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Millis, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Millis, Massachusetts: Energy Resources Millis, Massachusetts: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.1675975°, -71.3578357° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.1675975,"lon":-71.3578357,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

5

Future Roles of Milli-, Micro-, and Nano- Grids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Future Roles of Milli-, Micro-, and Nano- Grids Future Roles of Milli-, Micro-, and Nano- Grids Chris Marnay, Bruce Nordman, and Judy Lai Environmental Energy Technologies Division presented at the CIGRÉ International Symposium The electric power system of the future - Integrating supergrids and microgrids Bologna, Italy, 13-15 September 2011 http://eetd.lbl.gov/EA/EMP/emp-pubs.html The work described in this paper was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability's Smart Grids Program in the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY LBNL-4927E Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither

6

Millis-Clicquot, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Millis-Clicquot, Massachusetts: Energy Resources Millis-Clicquot, Massachusetts: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.1688591°, -71.3527473° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.1688591,"lon":-71.3527473,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

7

Future Roles of Milli-, Micro-, and Nano- Grids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Future Roles of Milli-, Micro-, and Nano- Grids Future Roles of Milli-, Micro-, and Nano- Grids Title Future Roles of Milli-, Micro-, and Nano- Grids Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication 2011 Authors Marnay, Chris, Bruce Nordman, and Judy Lai Conference Name CIGRÉ International Symposium The electric power system of the future - Integrating supergrids and microgrids Date Published 09/2011 Publisher LBNL Conference Location Bologna, Italy Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract Although it has slowed considerably, consumption of electricity continues to grow in developed economies. Further, there are some unknowns which might accelerate this growth, such as electrification of vehicle fleets and geothermal heat pump space and water heating. Most analysts anticipate that distributed energy resources (DER) will provide a large share of the expanded generation capacity required to meet this seemingly inexorably increasing electricity demand. Further, given the urgency of tackling the climate change problem, most of the added assets must be carbon free renewables or nuclear, end-use efficiency improvements, or highly efficient fossil-fired technologies. In developed economies worldwide, the current power delivery paradigm has been in place for more than a century, i.e. since the emergence of polyphase AC systems around the turn of the last century. A key feature of this structure is that, in principle, universal service is delivered at a consistent level of power quality and reliability (PQR) throughout large regions. This paper describes a future possible structure for the electricity generation and delivery system that leaves the existing high voltage meshed grid paradigm in place, but involves radical reorganization of parts of the distribution network and customer sites. Managing a much more diverse dispersed system poses major challenges to the current centralized grid paradigm, particularly since many of these assets are small to tiny by macrogrid standards and they may ultimately number in the millions. They are also not ones that centralized control can rely upon to function in traditionally dependable ways, e.g. renewable generation can be highly variable and changes in output of generators are not independent. Although most involved in the industry agree that a paradigm shift is both necessary and desirable to manage the new system, the nature of the future system remains quite unclear. In the possible structure described here, the traditional grid, or macrogrid, remains similar at the high voltage meshed level. Three new entities are added more locally: community grids or milligrids that operate a segment of the existing distribution system, microgrids which are akin to current customer sites but which have automonous control, and nanogrids, such as telecom or Ethernet networks that currently distribute power to many low-power devices. The latter exist currently in the local electrical systems but are not typically considered a part of the traditional electricity supply system. Because all these new entities exhibit some localized control, providing appropriate local heterogeneous PQR becomes a possibility. These new grid concepts enable a more "bottom-up" approach to electricity distribution, in contrast to the historic "top-down" model. The future will almost certainly include a mix of the two, but the balance among them and the interface (if any) between them is unclear.

8

Mildred (Millie) Dresselhaus and Her Impacts on Science and Women in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mildred (Millie) Dresselhaus and Mildred (Millie) Dresselhaus and Her Impacts on Science and Women in Science Mildred Dresselhaus is a recipient of the Enrico Fermi Award "for her scientific leadership, her major contributions to science and energy policy, her selfless work in science education and the advancement of diversity in the scientific workplace, and her highly original and impactful research." Resources with Additional Information · Patents · Honors · Interviews Mildred Dresselhaus Courtesy of Ed Quinn Mildred (Millie) Dresselhaus is 'one of the nation's foremost experts in the multifaceted field of carbon science. Her investigations into superconductivity, the electronic properties of carbon, thermoelectricity and the new physics at the nanometer scale have helped yield numerous scientific discoveries.'1

9

GammeV: A gamma to milli-eV particle search at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

GammeV is an experiment conducted at Fermilab that employs the light shining through a wall technique to search for axion-like particles and employs a particle in a jar technique to search for dilaton-like chameleon particles. We obtain limits on the coupling of photons to an axion-like particle that extend previous limits for both scalars and pseudoscalars in the milli-eV mass range. We are able to exclude the axion-like particle interpretation of the anomalous PVLAS 2006 result by more than 5 standard deviations. We also present results on a search for chameleons and set limits on their possible coupling to photons.

Wester, William Carl, III; /Fermilab

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

GammeV: a milli-eV particle search at Fermilab  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GammeV is an experiment conducted at Fermilab that employs the light shining through a wall technique to search for axion-like particles and employs a particle in a jar technique to search for dilaton-like chameleon particles. We obtain limits on the coupling of photons to an axion-like particle that extend previous limits for both scalars and pseudoscalars in the milli-eV mass range. We are able to exclude the axion-like particle interpretation of the anomalous PVLAS 2006 result by more than 5 standard deviations. We also present results on a search for chameleons and set limits on their possible coupling to photons.

Wester, W

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

GammeV: a milli-eV particle search at Fermilab  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GammeV is an experiment conducted at Fermilab that employs the light shining through a wall technique to search for axion-like particles and employs a particle in a jar technique to search for dilaton-like chameleon particles. We obtain limits on the coupling of photons to an axion-like particle that extend previous limits for both scalars and pseudoscalars in the milli-eV mass range. We are able to exclude the axion-like particle interpretation of the anomalous PVLAS 2006 result by more than 5 standard deviations. We also present results on a search for chameleons and set limits on their possible coupling to photons.

W. Wester; for the GammeV Collaboration

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

12

unitsmetricrpp.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International International system of units (SI) 1 3. INTERNATIONAL SYSTEM OF UNITS (SI) See "The International System of Units (SI)," NIST Special Publication 330, B.N. Taylor, ed. (USGPO, Washington, DC, 1991); and "Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI)," NIST Special Publication 811, 1995 edition, B.N. Taylor (USGPO, Washington, DC, 1995). SI prefixes 10 24 yotta (Y) 10 21 zetta (Z) 10 18 exa (E) 10 15 peta (P) 10 12 tera (T) 10 9 giga (G) 10 6 mega (M) 10 3 kilo (k) 10 2 hecto (h) 10 deca (da) 10 -1 deci (d) 10 -2 centi (c) 10 -3 milli (m) 10 -6 micro (µ) 10 -9 nano (n) 10 -12 pico (p) 10 -15 femto (f) 10 -18 atto (a) 10 -21 zepto (z) 10 -24 yocto (y) J. Beringer et al.(PDG), PR D86, 010001 (2012) and 2013 update for the 2014 edition (http://pdg.lbl.gov) December 18, 2013 12:01 2 3. International system of units (SI) Physical quantity Name of unit Symbol Base units length meter

13

Milli-Biology Programmable Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

moteins to smaller sizes led to the invention of electropermanent actuators, in which a hard magnet biases a softer magnet, so that its hysteresis loop passes through the origin. A conventional electromechanical motor is maximally inefficient at low RPM because power is wasted as heat in the coils, requiring

Ishii, Hiroshi

14

Future Roles of Milli-, Micro-, and Nano- Grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrating supergrids and microgrids Bologna, Italy, 13-15distribution system, microgrids which are akin to currentA possible definition for microgrids is: Microgrids are

Marnay, Chris

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Physics and Cosmology : the Milli-Electron-Volt Scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A short review about vacuum energy and the cosmological constant is presented. The observed acceleration of the universe introduces a new meV energy scale. The problem is that, theoretically, the predicted vacuum energy is many orders of magnitude larger than $10^{-3}$ eV. The problem is a link between two Standard Models, namely the Standard Model of Particles and their Interactions (where the vacuum energy appears) and the Standard Cosmological Model (where a cosmological constant is a good fit to data), and perhaps it is a clue in our search for new physics.

Eduard Masso

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

16

Future Roles of Milli-, Micro-, and Nano- Grids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although it has slowed considerably, consumption of electricity continues to grow in developed economies. Further, there are some unknowns which might accelerate this growth, such as electrification of vehicle fleets and geothermal heat pump space and water heating. Most analysts anticipate that distributed energy resources (DER) will provide a large share of the expanded generation capacity required to meet this seemingly inexorably increasing electricity demand. Further, given the urgency of tackling the climate change problem, most of the added assets must be carbonfree renewables or nuclear, end-use efficiency improvements, or highly efficient fossil-fired technologies. In developed economies worldwide, the current power delivery paradigm has been in place for more than a century, i.e. since the emergence of polyphase AC systems around the turn of the last century. A key feature of this structure is that, in principle, universal service is delivered at a consistent level of power quality and reliability (PQR) throughout large regions. This paper describes a future possible structure for the electricity generation and delivery system that leaves the existing high voltage meshed grid paradigm in place, but involves radical reorganization of parts of the distribution network and customer sites. Managing a much more diverse dispersed system poses major challenges to the current centralized grid paradigm, particularly since many of these assets are small to tiny by macrogrid standards and they may ultimately number in the millions. They are also not ones that centralized control can rely upon to function in traditionally dependable ways, e.g. renewable generation can be highly variable and changes in output of generators are not independent. Although most involved in the industry agree that a paradigm shift is both necessary and desirable to manage the new system, the nature of the future system remains quite unclear. In the possible structure described here, the traditional grid, or macrogrid, remains similar at the high voltage meshed level. Three new entities are added more locally: community grids or milligrids that operate a segment of the existing distribution system, microgrids which are akin to current customer sites but which have automonous control, and nanogrids, such as telecom or Ethernet networks that currently distribute power to many low-power devices. The latter exist currently in the local electrical systems but are not typically considered a part of the traditional electricity supply system. Because all these new entities exhibit some localized control, providing appropriate local heterogeneous PQR becomes a possibility. These new grid concepts enable a more"bottom-up" approach to electricity distribution, in contrast to the historic 'top-down' model. The future will almost certainly include a mix of the two, but the balance among them and the interface (if any) between them is unclear.

Marnay, Chris; Nordman, Bruce; Lai, Judy

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Conversion Tables  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center - Conversion Tables Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center - Conversion Tables Contents taken from Glossary: Carbon Dioxide and Climate, 1990. ORNL/CDIAC-39, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Third Edition. Edited by: Fred O'Hara Jr. 1 - International System of Units (SI) Prefixes 2 - Useful Quantities in CO2 3 - Common Conversion Factors 4 - Common Energy Unit Conversion Factors 5 - Geologic Time Scales 6 - Factors and Units for Calculating Annual CO2 Emissions Using Global Fuel Production Data Table 1. International System of Units (SI) Prefixes Prefix SI Symbol Multiplication Factor exa E 1018 peta P 1015 tera T 1012 giga G 109 mega M 106 kilo k 103 hecto h 102 deka da 10 deci d 10-1 centi c 10-2

18

Design of Minimally Actuated Legged Milli-Robots Using Compliant Mechanisms and Folding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and R. S. Fearing, Carbon fiber components with integratingtwo cured sheets of carbon fiber provide a large range-of-using pre-impregnated carbon fiber con- sists of a multi-

Hoover, Aaron Murdock

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Design of Minimally Actuated Legged Milli-Robots Using Compliant Mechanisms and Folding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and analysis software can be helpful in the kinematic design process, and finite element software is useful for ensuring that structural loads

Hoover, Aaron Murdock

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Design of Minimally Actuated Legged Milli-Robots Using Compliant Mechanisms and Folding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

limits for high energy piezoelectric bending actuators, inR. Fearing, Optimal energy density piezoelectric bending

Hoover, Aaron Murdock

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deci centi milli" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Future Roles of Milli-, Micro-, and Nano-Grids Chris Marnay, Bruce Nordman, and Judy Lai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, there are some unknowns which might accelerate this growth, such as electrification of vehicle fleets (POE+) at ~50-57 VDC to networked devices, USB-powered devices, vehicle networks, and others

22

Hard x-ray monochromator with milli-electron volt bandwidth for high-resolution diffraction studies of diamond crystals  

SciTech Connect

We report on design and performance of a high-resolution x-ray monochromator with a spectral bandwidth of {Delta}E{sub X}{approx_equal} 1.5 meV, which operates at x-ray energies in the vicinity of the backscattering (Bragg) energy E{sub H} = 13.903 keV of the (008) reflection in diamond. The monochromator is utilized for high-energy-resolution diffraction characterization of diamond crystals as elements of advanced x-ray crystal optics for synchrotrons and x-ray free-electron lasers. The monochromator and the related controls are made portable such that they can be installed and operated at any appropriate synchrotron beamline equipped with a pre-monochromator.

Stoupin, Stanislav; Shvyd'ko, Yuri; Shu Deming; Khachatryan, Ruben; Xiao, Xianghui; DeCarlo, Francesco; Goetze, Kurt; Roberts, Timothy; Roehrig, Christian; Deriy, Alexey [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

Hard x-ray monochromator with milli-electron volt bandwidth for high-resolution diffraction studies of diamond crystals.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on design and performance of a high-resolution x-ray monochromator with a spectral bandwidth of {Delta}E{sub x} {approx_equal} 1.5 meV, which operates at x-ray energies in the vicinity of the backscattering (Bragg) energy E{sub H} = 13.903 keV of the (008) reflection in diamond. The monochromator is utilized for high-energy-resolution diffraction characterization of diamond crystals as elements of advanced x-ray crystal optics for synchrotrons and x-ray free-electron lasers. The monochromator and the related controls are made portable such that they can be installed and operated at any appropriate synchrotron beamline equipped with a pre-monochromator.

Stoupin, S.; Shvydko, Y.; Shu, D.; Khachatryan, R.; Xiao, X. (X-Ray Science Division)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Environmental Information Sources: Books and websites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Centi, Gabriele. Green Energy for the Chemical Industry.Energy and Architecture: Case Studies in Realizing Green

Mittrach, Michelle

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Changes in well-being across the lifespan: a cross-sectional survey of young, middle-age, and older adults.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of this study is to better understand age differences in well-being using Ryan, Huta, and Decis (2008) theory. According to this theory, four (more)

Karaoylas, Eric Charilaos

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Basic Psychological Needs as mediators: An examination of the relationship between exercise and well-being.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Grounded in Basic Psychological Needs Theory (Deci & Ryan, 2002), the present investigation examined whether psychological need satisfaction mediated the relationship between moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (more)

Meldrum, Lindsay S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Download EIS-0200: Amendment to the Record of Decision Treatment and Storage of Transuranic Waste http:energy.govnepadownloadseis-0200-amendment-record-decis...

28

TMS2013 Programming Highlights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

How the markets (and deci- sions) have changed over .... For the most current information, and to register for ... analysis (FEA), including basics of fluid flow and .... use in such areas as sensors and energy materials in both North. America and

29

Sartrean Existentialism and Ethical Decision-Making in ... - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

presented and is followed by its application to a brief ... Checklists and tests typically require consideration ... affected parties before you make your deci- ..... job. (4) He can start looking for alternative employment with a view to leaving as soon.

30

The design and feasibility of a 10 mN chemical space propulsion thruster.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis discusses the design of a ten milli Newton chemical propulsion system for providing approximately 200 m/s delta velocity to a five kg satellite. (more)

Bruccoleri, Alexander Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

like to acknowledge and thank the regional emergency managers, pubic health and medical services- tial economic implications, the possible impacts on public health and medical services, and the deci those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY

32

Celebrating Women in Clean Energy Careers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Women in Clean Energy Careers Women in Clean Energy Careers Celebrating Women in Clean Energy Careers October 3, 2012 - 12:23pm Addthis David Sandalow, Acting Under Secretary of the U.S. Energy Department 1 of 17 David Sandalow, Acting Under Secretary of the U.S. Energy Department Acting Under Secretary David Sandalow giving closing Remarks at the Women in Clean Energy Symposium. Image: Justin Knight Date taken: 2012-09-28 18:08 Millie Dresselhaus 2 of 17 Millie Dresselhaus Dresselhaus accepting a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Women in Clean Energy Symposium. Image: Justin Knight Date taken: 2012-09-28 15:28 Millie Dresselhaus 3 of 17 Millie Dresselhaus MIT President L. Rafael Reif presented the award to Dresselhaus, citing her significant accomplishments in developing thermoelectric devices.

33

Women in Clean Energy Symposium | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Women in Clean Energy Symposium Women in Clean Energy Symposium Women in Clean Energy Symposium Addthis David Sandalow, Acting Under Secretary of the U.S. Energy Department 1 of 17 David Sandalow, Acting Under Secretary of the U.S. Energy Department Acting Under Secretary David Sandalow giving closing Remarks at the Women in Clean Energy Symposium. Image: Justin Knight Date taken: 2012-09-28 18:08 Millie Dresselhaus 2 of 17 Millie Dresselhaus Dresselhaus accepting a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Women in Clean Energy Symposium. Image: Justin Knight Date taken: 2012-09-28 15:28 Millie Dresselhaus 3 of 17 Millie Dresselhaus MIT President L. Rafael Reif presented the award to Dresselhaus, citing her significant accomplishments in developing thermoelectric devices. "Everyone who spends a few minutes with her," he said, "knows the

34

The design and feasibility of a 10 mN chemical space propulsion thruster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis discusses the design of a ten milli Newton chemical propulsion system for providing approximately 200 m/s delta velocity to a five kg satellite. The nozzle is the focus of the experimental work, which involves ...

Bruccoleri, Alexander Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Biology Department - Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

dry on a grid. To obtain residue-free water, we start with distilled water from the Biology Bldg. and pass it through a Millipore Milli Q system to remove ions (18M...

36

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brian Odom, Northwestern University Title: MilliKelvin Trapped Molecular Ions: A New Tool for New Physics 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. All...

37

Demagnified gravitational waves from cosmological double neutron stars and gravitational wave foreground cleaning around 1 Hz  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gravitational waves (GWs) from cosmological double neutron star binaries (NS+NS) can be significantly demagnified by the strong gravitational lensing effect, and the proposed future missions such as the Big Bang Observer or Deci-hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory might miss some of the demagnified GW signals below a detection threshold. The undetectable binaries would form a GW foreground, which might hamper detection of a very weak primordial GW signal. We discuss the outlook of this potential problem, using a simple model based on the singular isothermal sphere lens profile. Fortunately, it is expected that, for a presumable merger rate of NS+NSs, the residual foreground would be below the detection limit {omega}{sub GW,lim}{approx}10{sup -16} realized with the Big Bang Observer/Deci-hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory by correlation analysis.

Seto, Naoki [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Development of Power System Restoration Tool Based on Generic Restoration Milestones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The importance of power system restoration is well recognized by the power industry. System reliability depends heavily on the efficiency of system restoration. EPRI has been working on developing a prototype decision support tool, the System Restoration Navigator (SRN), for evaluating system restoration strategies, based on the concept of Generic Restoration Milestones (GRMs). This tool is intended to be used for offline planning at the current stage and later on for dispatcher training and online decis...

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

39

Impact of an informed choice invitation on uptake of screening for diabetes in primary care (DICISION): trial protocol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between two fundamental moral principles guiding health care practice and policy: on the one hand, patient-centered practice, which privi- leges the principle of respect for individual autonomy; and on the other, the promotion of public health benefits... about Health Threats and Treatments. The SAGE Handbook of Health Psychology 2004:270-298. 22. Ryan RM, Deci EL: Self-determination theory and the facilita- tion of intrinsic motivation, social development, and well- being. American Psychologist 2000...

Mann, Eleanor; Prevost, A Toby; Griffin, Simon J; Kellar, Ian; Sutton, Stephen; Parker, Michael; Sanderson, Simon; Kinmonth, Ann Louise; Marteau, Theresa M

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

40

Quantification Of Margins And Uncertainties: A Bayesian Approach (full Paper)  

SciTech Connect

Quantification of Margins and Uncertainties (QMU) is 'a formalism for dealing with the reliability of complex technical systems, and the confidence which can be placed in estimates of that reliability.' (Eardleyet al, 2005). In this paper, we show how QMU may be interpreted in the framework of Bayesian statistical inference, using a probabilistic network. The Bayesian approach clarifies the probabilistic underpinnings of the formalism, and shows how the formalism can be used for deciSion-making.

Wallstrom, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deci centi milli" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Sustainable Water Resources Management, Volume 2: Green Building Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates how well green building rating systems address sustainable water management practices at the community level by applying three widely used rating systems to three diverse commercial green building projects. The case studies provide insight into the efficacy of green building water management practices and the relative strengths and limitations of rating systems with respect to achieving water sustainability at the community level. The intended audience for this report includes decis...

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Investigating the molecular mechanisms of the metabolic syndrome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water miRNA micro RNA ml milli litre mM milli molar mRNA messenger ribonucleic acid g micro gram l micro litre MgCl2 magnesium chloride Na2 sodium NaCl sodium chloride NCBI National Centre for Biotechnology Information ng nanograms xii nm wavelength... for insulin secretion would not be detrimental; however, increased food intake and decreased energy expenditure trigger glucose intol- erance and lead to obesity [20]. The offspring can be said to have been programmed 6 for the environment that the mother...

Morris, Tiffany J

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

43

High energy resolution inelastic x-ray scattering at the SRI-CAT  

SciTech Connect

This report is a combination of vugraphs and two papers. The vugraphs give information on the beamline at the APS for IXS and the science addressable by IXS. They also cover the 10 milli-eV resolution spectrometer and the 200 milli-eV resolution spectrometer. The first paper covers the performance of the focusing Ge(444) backscattering analyzers for the inelastic x-ray scattering. The second paper discusses inelastic x-ray scattering from TiC and Ti single crystals.

Macrander, A.T.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

This collection of activities is based on a weekly series of space science problems distributed to thousands of teachers during 2006-2007 school year. They were  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's Guide and Answer Key as a second page. This compact form was deemed very popular by participating in this population? Space Math http://spacemath.gsfc.nasa.gov #12;Answer Key 1- During an accident, a 70 kg person Math http://spacemath.gsfc.nasa.gov #12;1Unit Conversion Exercises Answer Key 1 . 360 milliRem per year

45

Presented at the 2003 USSD Annual Lecture, Charleston, South Carolina. April 2003. SPILLWAY GATE RELIABILITY IN THE CONTEXT OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that affects surface gravity measurements. Van Dam et al. (2001) showed that at the GGP stations their models, EGS02-A-00860, 2002. Van Dam, T., Wahr, J. M., Milly, P. C. D., and Francis, O.: Gravity changes due The potential of ground gravity measurements to validate GRACE data D. Crossley1, J. Hinderer2, M. Llubes3

Bowles, David S.

46

Chapter 4: The Building Architectural Design  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: The Building : The Building Architectural Design Schematic Design Designing Using Computer Simulations Design of High Performance Features and Systems Designing for Daylighting Passive and Active Solar Systems Accommodating Recycling Activities LANL | Chapter 4 The Building Architectural Design Schematic Design Achieving a sustainable building requires a commitment from developing the initial F&OR documents through construction detailing and commissioning. Initial deci- sions, such as the building's location, general massing, and configuration profoundly affect the building's envi- ronmental impact and energy performance. Well- defined sustainable goals will guide the entire spectrum of decision-making throughout the design and con- struction process (see Chapter 2).

47

SRNL - News Room  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coveted R&D 100 Award Coveted R&D 100 Award ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) SRNL Wins Coveted R&D 100 Award AIKEN, S.C. (Sept. 12, 2006) - Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory, along with team members from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, have been named winners of an R&D 100 Award for their invention, the MilliWave Thermal Analyzer. The R&D 100 awards, considered the "Oscars of research and development," are presented each year by R&D magazine to the 100 most technologically significant inventions of the year. The MilliWave Thermal Analyzer, developed by SRNL's Gene Daniel and Don Miller and their colleagues, uses millimeter-wave electromagnetic radiation for non-contact, real-time measurements of temperature, amount of energy emitted, and physical changes of materials under extreme temperatures or corrosive environments.

48

Frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A frequency-doubled semiconductor vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (VECSEL) is disclosed for generating light at a wavelength in the range of 300-550 nanometers. The VECSEL includes a semiconductor multi-quantum-well active region that is electrically or optically pumped to generate lasing at a fundamental wavelength in the range of 600-1100 nanometers. An intracavity nonlinear frequency-doubling crystal then converts the fundamental lasing into a second-harmonic output beam. With optical pumping with 330 milliWatts from a semiconductor diode pump laser, about 5 milliWatts or more of blue light can be generated at 490 nm. The device has applications for high-density optical data storage and retrieval, laser printing, optical image projection, chemical-sensing, materials processing and optical metrology.

Raymond, Thomas D. (Edgewood, NM); Alford, William J. (Albuquerque, NM); Crawford, Mary H. (Albuquerque, NM); Allerman, Andrew A. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

MODEL STORAGE RING FOR 6 GEV OPERATION AS A SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

advance per half cell (degree.) Vertical phaae advance per half cell (degrees) Maximum horizontal bet.a {m} Maximum vertical bet.a (m) Maximum dispersion {m} Momentum compact.ion Synchrotron damping t.ime (milliV) Est.imat.ed total power demand (MW) 'Ie 1.0 (6.6 GeV) QUADRUPOLES Number 320 Lengths (m) 0.5 (256) 0

Kemner, Ken

50

SUPPORTING INFORMATION Peptide-Mediated Constructs of Quantum Dot Nanocomposites for Enzymatic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 0.8 g Al2Te3 was dissolved using 10 mL of 0.5 M H2SO4 solution slowly under argon gas flow as the carrier gas. After the final solution became reddish, Ar gas was turned off. The solution was kept at 100 and centrifuged at 4,500 rpm for 5 minutes. The precipitate was dissolved in Milli-Q water and centrifuged

Demir, Hilmi Volkan

51

9 Fermi 10/20/00  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20, 2000 20, 2000 Number 18 f Photo by Reidar Hahn I N S I D E : 4 S a v i n g t h e D a y 6 K e e p i n g i t C o o l 1 0 C o n t i n u i n g E d u c a t i o n i n t h e M a i n C o n t r o l R o o m 1 2 F a m o u s i n S i c i l y 1 4 F e r m i l a b Aw a r d W i n n e r s Millie Comes to Fermilab 2 Millie f Comes to Fermilab 2 FERMINEWS October 20, 2000 by Judy Jackson It was a special pleasure, Millie Dresselhaus said, to visit the physics laboratory named in honor of her former teacher at the University of Chicago, Enrico Fermi. During her September 27-28 visit to Fermilab for an onsite DOE review of the laboratory, Dresselhaus, director of the Department of EnergyÕs Office of Science, spoke with respect and affection of the professor she knew during her years as a University of Chicago graduate student, She referred often to FermiÕs legendary concern for graduate students and young physicists.

52

Readiness Review RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Readiness Review Module Readiness Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Readin Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan ness Rev view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) view e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-

53

Preliminary Safety Design RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Preliminary Safety Design Review Module Preliminary Safety Design Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF Pr C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R reliminar Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan ry Safety view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) y Design e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

54

Facility Disposition Safety Strategy RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Disposition Safety Strategy Review Module Facility Disposition Safety Strategy Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF Facilit C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R ty Dispos Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan sition Saf view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) fety Strat e pplicability D-3 EMENT tegy CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

55

Quality Assurance for Critical Decision Reviews RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quality Assurance for Quality Assurance for Critical Decision Reviews Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF Q C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Quality A Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan Assuranc view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) e (QA) e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

56

Earned Value Management System RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Earned Value Management System Review Module Earned Value Management System Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O Ea 0 OFFICE OF arned Va C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R alue Man Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan agement view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) t System e pplicability D-3 EMENT (EVMS) CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

57

National Environmental Policy Act RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Environmental Policy Act Review Module National Environmental Policy Act Review Module March 2010 CD- N -0 OFFICE O National E C CD-1 OF ENVIRO Standa Environm Rev Critical Deci CD-2 M ONMENTA ard Review mental P view Modul ision (CD) A C March 2010 AL MANAG Plan olicy Act le Applicability D-3 GEMENT t (NEPA) CD-4 ) Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

58

Commissioning Plan RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Checkout, Testing, and Checkout, Testing, and Commissioning Plan Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O Ch 0 OFFICE OF heckout, T C CD-1 F ENVIRON Standard R Testing, a Revi Critical Decis CD-2 Ma NMENTAL Review Plan and Com iew Module sion (CD) Ap CD arch 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) mmissioni e pplicability D-3 EMENT ing Plan CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

59

Seismic Design Expectations Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seismic Design Expectations Report Seismic Design Expectations Report March 2010 CD- This Rev of th Se -0 view Module w he overall Cons OFFICE O eismic De C CD-1 was used to dev struction Projec inco OF ENVIRO Standard esign Exp Critical Deci CD-2 M velop the Revie ct Review cond orporated in the ONMENTA Review Pla pectation ision (CD) A C March 2010 ew Plan for the ducted in 2009 e current versio AL MANAG an (SRP) ns Report Applicability D-3 e Oak Ridge Bl 9. Lessons lear on of the Modu GEMENT t (SDER) CD-4 ldg. 3019 60% rned from this r ule. ) Post Ope design review review have be eration w as part een Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental

60

Final Design RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Design Review Module Final Design Review Module March 2010 CD-0 [This Rev Design Re O 0 view Module w eview of the OR OFFICE OF C CD-1 was used to dev R U 233 Dispo F ENVIRO Standard R Fin Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M velop the Revie osition Project ONMENTAL Review Plan al Design view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 ew Plan for 90% in 2009. Lesso Module.] L MANAGE n (SRP) n e pplicability D-3 % Design Revi ons learned hav EMENT CD-4 iew of SWPF i ve been incorpo Post Ope in 2008 and for orated in the R eration r 60% Review Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively.

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61

Integrated Project Team RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Project Team (IPT) Review Module Integrated Project Team (IPT) Review Module March 2010 CD-0 This R O 0 Review Modul OFFICE OF Inte C CD-1 le was piloted F ENVIRO Standard R grated P Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M at the OR U 23 incorporated ONMENTAL Review Plan Project Te view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 33 Disposition in the Review L MANAGE n (SRP) eam (IPT e pplicability D-3 Project in 200 Module. EMENT T) CD-4 09. Lessons lea Post Ope arned have been eration n Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM

62

Conceptual Safety Design RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conceptual Safety Design Review Module Conceptual Safety Design Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF C C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Conceptua Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan al Safety view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) y Design e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital

63

Conceptual Design RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conceptual Design Review Module Conceptual Design Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Concep Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan ptual De view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) sign e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

64

Acquisition Strategy RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Acquisition Strategy Review Module Acquisition Strategy Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Acquisi Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan ition Stra view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) ategy e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,

65

VOLUME I A HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

I I A HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION THE NEW WORLD, 1939 /1946 RICHARD G. HEWLETT AND OSCAR E. ANDERSON, JR. 1962 UNIVERSITY PARK, PENNSYLVANIA THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY PRESS Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 62-14633 Designed by Marilyn Shobaken CONTENTS FOREWORD BY THE CHAIRMAN, v HISTORICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE ix PREFACE 1 THE INHERITANCE Historical setting, January, 1947; summary of AEC inheritance. 2 IN THE BEGINNING Discovery of fission; first efforts to gain federal sup- port for nuclear research; growing interest in military potential; authority for an all-out investigation of atomic weapons. 3 EXPLORING THE ROUTES TO THE WEAPON OSRD efforts to select best production process; deci- sion to expand project, June, 1942; transfer of re-

66

Project Execution Plan RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Execution Plan (PEP) Review Module Project Execution Plan (PEP) Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF P C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Project E Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan Execution view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) n Plan e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

67

Risk Management RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Risk Management Review Module Risk Management Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Risk M Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan Managem view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE (SRP) ment e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008, Integration of Safety into the Design Process, and EM's internal

68

What is Clean Cities?; Clean Cities Fact Sheet (September 2008 Update)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP), Clean Cities con- tributes to the energy, environmental, and economic security of the United States by supporting local deci- sions to reduce our dependence on imported petroleum. Established in 1993 in response to the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 1992, the partnership provides tools and resources for voluntary, community-centered programs to reduce consumption of petroleum-based fuels. In almost 90 coalitions, government agencies and private companies voluntarily come together under the umbrella of Clean Cities. The partnership helps all parties identify mutual interests and meet the objectives of reducing the use of imported oil, developing regional economic opportunities, and improving air quality.

69

Prelminary Design RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Preliminary Design Review Module Preliminary Design Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Prelim Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan inary De view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) esign e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

70

Right-Handed Neutrinos as the Dark Radiation: Status and Forecasts for the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Precision data from cosmology (probing the CMB decoupling epoch) and light-element abundances (probing the BBN epoch) have hinted at the presence of extra relativistic degrees of freedom, the so-called "dark radiation." We present a model independent study to account for the dark radiation by means of the right-handed partners of the three, left-handed, standard model neutrinos. We show that milli-weak interactions of these Dirac states (through their coupling to a TeV-scale Z' gauge boson) may allow the \

Luis A. Anchordoqui; Haim Goldberg; Gary Steigman

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Reconciling the CAST and PVLAS Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The PVLAS experiment has recently claimed evidence for an axion-like particle in the milli-electron-Volt mass range with a coupling to two photons that appears to be in contradiction with the negative results of the CAST experiment searching for solar axions. The simple axion interpretation of these two experimental results is therefore untenable and it has posed a challenge for theory. We propose a possible way to reconcile these two results by postulating the existence of an ultralight pseudo-scalar particle interacting with two photons and a scalar boson and the existence of a low scale phase transition in the theory.

R. N. Mohapatra; Salah Nasri

2006-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

72

New Experimental limit on Optical Photon Coupling to Neutral, Scalar Bosons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the first results of a sensitive search for scalar coupling of photons to a light neutral boson in the mass range of approximately 1.0 milli-electron volts and coupling strength greater than 10$^-6$ GeV$^-1$ using optical photons. This was a photon regeneration experiment using the "light shining through a wall" technique in which laser light was passed through a strong magnetic field upstream of an optical beam dump; regenerated laser light was then searched for downstream of a second magnetic field region optically shielded from the former. Our results show no evidence for scalar coupling in this region of parameter space.

A. Afanasev; O. K. Baker; K. B. Beard; G. Biallas; J. Boyce; M. Minarni; R. Ramdon; M. Shinn; P. Slocum

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

73

Reconciling the CAST and PVLAS Results  

SciTech Connect

The PVLAS experiment has recently claimed evidence for an axionlike particle in the milli-electron-volt mass range with a coupling to two photons that appears to be in contradiction with the negative results of the CAST experiment searching for solar axions. The simple axion interpretation of these two experimental results is therefore untenable and it has posed a challenge for theory. We propose a possible way to reconcile these two results by postulating the existence of an ultralight pseudoscalar particle interacting with two photons and a scalar boson and the existence of a low scale phase transition in the theory.

Mohapatra, R. N. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Nasri, Salah [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

74

Discovery of ZIP transporters that participate in cadmium damage to testis and kidney  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been known for decades that cadmium (Cd) must enter the cell to cause damage, but there was no mechanism to explain genetic differences in response to Cd toxicity until 2005. Starting with the mouse Cdm locus associated with differences in Cd-induced testicular necrosis between inbred strains, a 24.6-centiMorgan region on chromosome 3 was reduced ultimately to 880 kb; in this segment is the Slc39a8 gene encoding the ZIP8 Zn{sup 2+}/HCO{sub 3}{sup -} symporter. In endothelial cells of the testis vasculature, Cd-sensitive mice exhibit high ZIP8 expression, Cd-resistant mice exhibit very low expression. A 168.7-kb bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) from a 129S6 (Cd-sensitive) BAC library containing the Slc39a8 gene was inserted into the Cd-resistant C57BL/6J genome: Cd treatment produced testicular necrosis in BAC-transgenic BTZIP8-3 mice but not in non-transgenic littermates, thereby proving that the Slc39a8 gene is indeed the Cdm locus. Cd-induced renal failure also occurred in these BTZIP8-3 mice. Immunohistochemistry showed highly expressed ZIP8 protein in the renal proximal tubular epithelial apical surface, suggesting that ZIP8 participates in Cd-induced renal failure. Slc39a14, most closely evolutionarily related to Slc39a8, encodes differentially-spliced products ZIP14A and ZIP14B that display properties similar to ZIP8. ZIP8 in alveolar cells brings environmental Cd into the organism and ZIP14 in intestinal enterocytes carries Cd into the organism and into the hepatocyte. We believe these two transporters function endogenously as Zn{sup 2+}/HCO{sub 3}{sup -} symporters important in combating inflammation and carrying out other physiological functions; Cd is able to displace the endogenous cation, enter the cell, and produce tissue damage and disease.

He Lei; Wang Bin; Hay, Everett B. [Department of Environmental Health, and Center for Environmental Genetics (CEG), University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0056 (United States); Nebert, Daniel W. [Department of Environmental Health, and Center for Environmental Genetics (CEG), University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0056 (United States)], E-mail: dan.nebert@uc.edu

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Beamline 4.0.3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Print 3 Print High-resolution spectroscopy of complex materials (MERLIN) Endstations: MERIXS: High-resolution inelastic scattering ARPES: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational 2011 Source characteristics 9.0-cm-period quasiperiodic elliptical polarization undulator (EPU9) Energy range 9eV-120eV with current gratings Monochromator Variable-included-angle spherical grating monochromator (SGM) Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1012 photons/s/0.01%BW at 100 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) High flux 1200 lines/mm; ~1/25,000 Endstations High-resolution inelastic scattering (MERIXS) and ARPES Characteristics Milli-Electron-volt Resolution beamLINe (MERLIN): Ultrahigh-resolution inelastic scattering and angle-resolved photoemission

76

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scanned probe microscope(s) will be used in Lab 156 for surface and materials analysis. Additionally, sample preparation techniques such as surface Scanned probe microscope(s) will be used in Lab 156 for surface and materials analysis. Additionally, sample preparation techniques such as surface and sample modification/deposition and self assembled monolayer formation will be performed. Sample modification/deposition, self-assembled monolayer, and organic thin film formation will involve the generation of chemical solutions of mM (milliMolar) concentrations of organic materials in various organic solvents. Scanned Probe Microscopy Surface Analysis and Sample Preparation Savannah River Site Aiken South Carolina TC-W-2010-219, Rev.0 Dec 17, 2010 Andrew R. Grainger Digitally signed by Andrew R. Grainger DN: cn=Andrew R. Grainger, o=DOE-SR, ou=EQMD, email=drew.grainger@srs.gov, c=US Date: 2010.12.20 13:51:20

77

Beamline 4.0.3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Print 3 Print High-resolution spectroscopy of complex materials (MERLIN) Endstations: MERIXS: High-resolution inelastic scattering ARPES: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational 2011 Source characteristics 9.0-cm-period quasiperiodic elliptical polarization undulator (EPU9) Energy range 9eV-120eV with current gratings Monochromator Variable-included-angle spherical grating monochromator (SGM) Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1012 photons/s/0.01%BW at 100 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) High flux 1200 lines/mm; ~1/25,000 Endstations High-resolution inelastic scattering (MERIXS) and ARPES Characteristics Milli-Electron-volt Resolution beamLINe (MERLIN): Ultrahigh-resolution inelastic scattering and angle-resolved photoemission

78

Microsoft PowerPoint - Boice NEAC Dec 6 2012 rev4 [Compatibility Mode]  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee 6 December 2012 - Washington, D.C. NCRP d th Milli W k St d NCRP and the Million Worker Study John D Boice Jr National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) ( ) Vanderbilt University, Dept of Medicine John.Boice@ncrponline.org http://NCRPonline.org Outline NCRP Million U.S. Radiation Worker and Veteran Study  DOE Manhattan Project Workers  NRC Nuclear Utility Workers  DOD Atomic Veteran  Medical Workers Opportunities National Council on Radiation P t ti & M t Protection & Measurements 1929: U.S. Advisory Committee on X-ray and Committee on X ray and Radium Protection 1946 U S N ti l C itt 1946: U.S. National Committee on Radiation Protection 1964: National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements chartered by Measurements chartered by

79

Beamline 4.0.3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Print 3 Print High-resolution spectroscopy of complex materials (MERLIN) Endstations: MERIXS: High-resolution inelastic scattering ARPES: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational 2011 Source characteristics 9.0-cm-period quasiperiodic elliptical polarization undulator (EPU9) Energy range 9eV-120eV with current gratings Monochromator Variable-included-angle spherical grating monochromator (SGM) Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1012 photons/s/0.01%BW at 100 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) High flux 1200 lines/mm; ~1/25,000 Endstations High-resolution inelastic scattering (MERIXS) and ARPES Characteristics Milli-Electron-volt Resolution beamLINe (MERLIN): Ultrahigh-resolution inelastic scattering and angle-resolved photoemission

80

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Scanned probe microscope(s) will be used in Lab 156 for surface and materials analysis. Additionally, sample preparation techniques such as surface Scanned probe microscope(s) will be used in Lab 156 for surface and materials analysis. Additionally, sample preparation techniques such as surface and sample modification/deposition and self assembled monolayer formation will be performed. Sample modification/deposition, self-assembled monolayer, and organic thin film formation will involve the generation of chemical solutions of mM (milliMolar) concentrations of organic materials in various organic solvents. Scanned Probe Microscopy Surface Analysis and Sample Preparation Savannah River Site Aiken South Carolina TC-W-2010-219, Rev.0 Dec 17, 2010 Andrew R. Grainger Digitally signed by Andrew R. Grainger DN: cn=Andrew R. Grainger, o=DOE-SR, ou=EQMD, email=drew.grainger@srs.gov, c=US Date: 2010.12.20 13:51:20

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deci centi milli" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Los Alamos Lab: MPA: Material Matters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Matter Matter October 2013 In this issue: Millie Firestone: Merging soft and hard nanomaterials to create energy solutions From Toni's Desk NNSA minority education project brings students to Los Alamos for fuel cell studies Los Alamos fuel cell research lands on ScienceWatch top 10 list Gaining creative control over semiconductor nanowires Strongly enhanced flux pinning in one-step deposition of BaFe2(As0.66P0.33)2 superconductor films with uniformly dispersed BaZrO3 nanoparticles Ultrafast optical spectroscopy sheds light on electronic structure of antiferromagnetic USB2 MPA students gain valuable experience; earn recognition for distinguished performance Heads Up! Service anniversaries LA-UR-13-28281 August 2013 In this issue: Supporting scientific diversity: MPA office administrators describe the juggling act behind the science

82

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-13-073 South Carolina EC B3-6.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 SECTION A. Project Title: U 3 Si 2 Fabrication and Testing for Implementation into the BISON Fuel Performance Code - University of South Carolina SECTION B. Project Description The University of South Carolina proposes to fabricate, test, and model a high uranium density, advanced nuclear fuel (U 3 Si 2 ). Tasks include fabrications of samples, characterizing to understand their microstructure, creep testing, and design, fabrication, and usage of four-point bend testing fixture and high temperature flexure creep testing rig. SECTION C. Environmental Aspects / Potential Sources of Impact Radioactive Material Use - Approximately 1milliCurie of samples of U 3 Si 2 will be used during experiments to test material creep. Radioactive Waste Generation - Approximately 2 microCurie of radioactive waste will be generated through the handling and testing

83

Beamline 4.0.3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Print 3 Print High-resolution spectroscopy of complex materials (MERLIN) Endstations: MERIXS: High-resolution inelastic scattering ARPES: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational 2011 Source characteristics 9.0-cm-period quasiperiodic elliptical polarization undulator (EPU9) Energy range 9eV-120eV with current gratings Monochromator Variable-included-angle spherical grating monochromator (SGM) Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1012 photons/s/0.01%BW at 100 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) High flux 1200 lines/mm; ~1/25,000 Endstations High-resolution inelastic scattering (MERIXS) and ARPES Characteristics Milli-Electron-volt Resolution beamLINe (MERLIN): Ultrahigh-resolution inelastic scattering and angle-resolved photoemission

84

Beamline 4.0.3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Print 3 Print High-resolution spectroscopy of complex materials (MERLIN) Endstations: MERIXS: High-resolution inelastic scattering ARPES: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational 2011 Source characteristics 9.0-cm-period quasiperiodic elliptical polarization undulator (EPU9) Energy range 9eV-120eV with current gratings Monochromator Variable-included-angle spherical grating monochromator (SGM) Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1012 photons/s/0.01%BW at 100 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) High flux 1200 lines/mm; ~1/25,000 Endstations High-resolution inelastic scattering (MERIXS) and ARPES Characteristics Milli-Electron-volt Resolution beamLINe (MERLIN): Ultrahigh-resolution inelastic scattering and angle-resolved photoemission

85

Beamline 4.0.3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Print 3 Print High-resolution spectroscopy of complex materials (MERLIN) Endstations: MERIXS: High-resolution inelastic scattering ARPES: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational 2011 Source characteristics 9.0-cm-period quasiperiodic elliptical polarization undulator (EPU9) Energy range 9eV-120eV with current gratings Monochromator Variable-included-angle spherical grating monochromator (SGM) Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1012 photons/s/0.01%BW at 100 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) High flux 1200 lines/mm; ~1/25,000 Endstations High-resolution inelastic scattering (MERIXS) and ARPES Characteristics Milli-Electron-volt Resolution beamLINe (MERLIN): Ultrahigh-resolution inelastic scattering and angle-resolved photoemission

86

Radioactivities in Solution by Particle Radiation can Increase Sister  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactivities in Solution by Particle Radiation can Increase Sister Radioactivities in Solution by Particle Radiation can Increase Sister Chromatid Exchanges Junko Maeda Colorado State University Abstract Introduction Non-radioactive atoms can become radioactive from a nuclear reaction when atoms are hit by other high energy particles. These radioactivations are observed in nuclear facilities and may result in health effects in humans. Protons, carbon-ions, and iron-ions are tested to verify this hypothesis. Materials and Methods Protons were accelerated to 70MeV in cyclotron (NIRS-930) at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). Carbon-ions and iron-ions were accelerated to 290MeV/n and 500MeV/n respectively, in HIMAC (Heavy ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba) at NIRS. 60ml of sterilized Milli-Q ultra pure water or PBS were filled in Falcon T25 flasks and exposed to ionizing

87

Beamline 4.0.3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Print 3 Print High-resolution spectroscopy of complex materials (MERLIN) Endstations: MERIXS: High-resolution inelastic scattering ARPES: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational 2011 Source characteristics 9.0-cm-period quasiperiodic elliptical polarization undulator (EPU9) Energy range 9eV-120eV with current gratings Monochromator Variable-included-angle spherical grating monochromator (SGM) Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1012 photons/s/0.01%BW at 100 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) High flux 1200 lines/mm; ~1/25,000 Endstations High-resolution inelastic scattering (MERIXS) and ARPES Characteristics Milli-Electron-volt Resolution beamLINe (MERLIN): Ultrahigh-resolution inelastic scattering and angle-resolved photoemission

88

CX-004841: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

841: Categorical Exclusion Determination 841: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004841: Categorical Exclusion Determination Scanned Probe Microscopy Surface Analysis and Sample Preparation CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/17/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office Scanned probe microscope(s) will be used in Lab 156 for surface and materials analysis. Additionally, sample preparation techniques such as surface and sample modification/deposition and self assembled monolayer formation will be performed. Sample modification/deposition, self-assembled monolayer, and organic thin film formation will involve the generation of chemical solutions of mM (milliMolar) concentrations of organic materials in various organic solvents. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

89

A high sensitivity ultralow temperature RF conductance and noise measurement setup  

SciTech Connect

We report on the realization of a high sensitivity RF noise measurement scheme to study small current fluctuations of mesoscopic systems at milli-Kelvin temperatures. The setup relies on the combination of an interferometric amplification scheme and a quarter-wave impedance transformer, allowing the measurement of noise power spectral densities with gigahertz bandwidth up to five orders of magnitude below the amplifier noise floor. We simultaneously measure the high frequency conductance of the sample by derivating a portion of the signal to a microwave homodyne detection. We describe the principle of the setup, as well as its implementation and calibration. Finally, we show that our setup allows to fully characterize a subnanosecond on-demand single electron source. More generally, its sensitivity and bandwidth make it suitable for applications manipulating single charges at GHz frequencies.

Parmentier, F. D.; Mahe, A.; Denis, A.; Berroir, J.-M.; Glattli, D. C.; Placais, B.; Feve, G. [Laboratoire Pierre Aigrain, Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS UMR 8551, Universite P. et M. Curie, Universite D. Diderot 24, rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

A Hierarchy of Timescales in Protein Dynamics is Linked to Enzyme Catalysis  

SciTech Connect

The synergy between structure and dynamics is essential to the function of biological macromolecules. Thermally driven dynamics on different timescales have been experimentally observed or simulated, and a direct link between micro- to milli-second domain motions and enzymatic function has been established. However, very little is understood about the connection of these functionally relevant, collective movements with local atomic fluctuations, which are much faster. Here we show that pico- to nano-second timescale atomic fluctuations in hinge regions of adenylate kinase facilitate the large-scale, slower lid motions that produce a catalytically competent state. The fast, local mobilities differ between a mesophilic and hyperthermophilic adenylate kinase, but are strikingly similar at temperatures at which enzymatic activity and free energy of folding are matched. The connection between different timescales and the corresponding amplitudes of motions in adenylate kinase and their linkage to catalytic function is likely to be a general characteristic of protein energy landscapes.

Henzler-Wildman,K.; Lei, M.; Thai, V.; Jordan Kerns, S.; Karplus, M.; Kern, D.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Terahertz Radiation from a Pipe with Small Corrugations  

SciTech Connect

We have studied through analytical and numerical methods the use of a relativistic electron bunch to drive a metallic beam pipe with small corrugations for the purpose of generating terahertz radiation. For the case of a pipe with dimensions that do not change along its length, we have shown that - with reasonable parameters - one can generate a narrow-band radiation pulse with frequency {approx}1 THz, and total energy of a few milli-Joules. The pulse length tends to be on the order of tens of picoseconds. We have also shown that, if the pipe radius is tapered along its length, the generated pulse will end up with a frequency chirp; if the pulse is then made to pass through a compressor, its final length can be reduced to a few picoseconds and its peak power increased to 1 GW. We have also shown that wall losses tend to be significant and need to be included in the structure design.

Bane, K.L.F.; Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

92

Universal quantum control of two-electron spin quantum bits using dynamic nuclear polarization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One fundamental requirement for quantum computation is to perform universal manipulations of quantum bits at rates much faster than the qubit's rate of decoherence. Recently, fast gate operations have been demonstrated in logical spin qubits composed of two electron spins where the rapid exchange of the two electrons permits electrically controllable rotations around one axis of the qubit. However, universal control of the qubit requires arbitrary rotations around at least two axes. Here we show that by subjecting each electron spin to a magnetic field of different magnitude we achieve full quantum control of the two-electron logical spin qubit with nanosecond operation times. Using a single device, a magnetic field gradient of several hundred milliTesla is generated and sustained using dynamic nuclear polarization of the underlying Ga and As nuclei. Universal control of the two-electron qubit is then demonstrated using quantum state tomography. The presented technique provides the basis for single and potent...

Foletti, Sandra; Mahalu, Diana; Umansky, Vladimir; Yacoby, Amir; 10.1038/nphys1424

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Terrestrial and solar limits on long-lived particles in a dark sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dark matter charged under a new gauge sector, as motivated by recent data, suggests a rich GeV-scale 'dark sector' weakly coupled to the standard model by gauge kinetic mixing. The new gauge bosons can decay to standard model leptons, but this mode is suppressed if decays into lighter 'dark sector' particles are kinematically allowed. These particles in turn typically have macroscopic decay lifetimes that are constrained by two classes of experiments, which we discuss. Lifetimes of 10 cm solar observations. These bounds span 14 orders of magnitude in lifetime, but they are not exhaustive. Accordingly, we identify promising new directions for experiments including searches for displaced di-muons in B factories, studies at high-energy and -intensity proton beam dumps, precision gamma-ray and electronic measurements of the Sun, and milli-charge searches reanalyzed in this new context.

Schuster, Philip [Theory Group, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Toro, Natalia [Theory Group, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Yavin, Itay [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, New York, New York 10003 (United States)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Terrestrial and Solar Limits on Long-Lived Particles in a Dark Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dark matter charged under a new gauge sector, as motivated by recent data, suggests a rich GeV-scale 'dark sector' weakly coupled to the Standard Model by gauge kinetic mixing. The new gauge bosons can decay to Standard Model leptons, but this mode is suppressed if decays into lighter 'dark sector' particles are kinematically allowed. These particles in turn typically have macroscopic decay lifetimes that are constrained by two classes of experiments, which we discuss. Lifetimes of 10 cm {approx}solar observations. These bounds span fourteen orders of magnitude in lifetime, but they are not exhaustive. Accordingly, we identify promising new directions for experiments including searches for displaced di-muons in B-factories, studies at high-energy and -intensity proton beam dumps, precision gamma-ray and electronic measurements of the Sun, and milli-charge searches re-analyzed in this new context.

Schuster, Philip; /SLAC; Toro, Natalia; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Yavin, Itay; /CCPP, New York U.

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

95

New Electron Beam-Dump Experiments to Search for MeV to few-GeV Dark Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a broad class of consistent models, MeV to few-GeV dark matter interacts with ordinary matter through weakly coupled GeV-scale mediators. We show that a suitable meter-scale (or smaller) detector situated downstream of an electron beam-dump can sensitively probe dark matter interacting via sub-GeV mediators, while B-factory searches cover the 1-5 GeV range. Combined, such experiments explore a well-motivated and otherwise inaccessible region of dark matter parameter space with sensitivity several orders of magnitude beyond existing direct detection constraints. These experiments would also probe invisibly decaying new gauge bosons ("dark photons") down to kinetic mixing of \\epsilon ~ 10^{-4}, including the range of parameters relevant for explaining the (g-2)_{\\mu} discrepancy. Sensitivity to other long-lived dark sector states and to new milli-charge particles would also be improved.

Eder Izaguirre; Gordan Krnjaic; Philip Schuster; Natalia Toro

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

96

Machining, Assembly, and Characterization of a Meso-Scale Double Shell Target  

SciTech Connect

Several issues related to the manufacture of precision meso-scale assemblies have been identified as part of an effort to fabricate an assembly consisting of machined polymer hemispherical shells and machined aerogel. The assembly, a double shell laser target, is composed of concentric spherical layers that were machined on a lathe and then assembled. This production effort revealed several meso-scale manufacturing techniques that worked well, such as the machining of aerogel with cutting tools to form low density structures, and the development of an assembly manipulator that allows control of the assembly forces to within a few milliNewtons. Limitations on the use of vacuum chucks for meso-scale components were also identified. Many of the lessons learned in this effort are not specific to double shell targets and may be relevant to the production of other meso-scale devices.

Bono, M J; Hibbard, R L

2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

97

The First Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has validated and made publicly available its First Data Release. This consists of 2099 square degrees of five-band (u, g, r, i, z) imaging data, 186,240 spectra of galaxies, quasars, stars and calibrating blank sky patches selected over 1360 square degrees of this area, and tables of measured parameters from these data. The imaging data go to a depth of r ~ 22.6 and are photometrically and astrometrically calibrated to 2% rms and 100 milli-arcsec rms per coordinate, respectively. The spectra cover the range 3800--9200 A, with a resolution of 1800--2100. Further characteristics of the data are described, as are the data products themselves.

Abazajian, Kevork N; Ageros, Marcel A; Allam, Sahar S; Anderson, Scott F; Annis, James; Bahcall, Neta A; Baldry, Ivan K; Bastian, Steven; Berlind, Andreas A; Bernardi, Mariangela; Blanton, Michael R; Blythe, Norman; Bochanski, John J; Boroski, William N; Brewington, Howard; Briggs, John W; Brinkmann, J; Brunner, Robert J; Budavari, Tamas; Carey, Larry N; Carr, Michael A; Castander, F J; Chiu, Kuenley; Collinge, Matthew J; Connolly, A J; Covey, Kevin R; Csabai, Istvan; Dodelson, Scott; Doi, Mamoru; Dong, Feng; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Evans, Michael L; Fan, Xiaohui; Feldman, Paul D; Finkbeiner, Douglas P; Friedman, Scott D; Frieman, Joshua A; Fukugita, Masataka; Gal, Roy R; Gillespie, Bruce; Glazebrook, Karl; Gonzalez, Carlos F; Gray, Jim; Grebel, Eva K; Grodnicki, Lauren; Gunn, James E; Gurbani, Vijay K; Hall, Patrick B; Hao, Lei; Harbeck, Daniel; Harris, Frederick H; Harris, Hugh C; Harvanek, Michael J; Hawley, Suzanne L; Heckman, Timothy M; Helmboldt, J F; Hendry, John S; Hennessy, Gregory S; Hindsley, Robert B; Hogg, David W; Holmgren, Donald; Holtzman, Jon A; Homer, Lee; Hui, Lam; Ichikawa, Shin-ichi; Ichikawa, Takashi; Inkmann, John P; Ivezic, Z; Jester, Sebastian; Johnston, David E; Jordan, Beatrice; Jordan, Wendell P; Jorgensen, Anders M; Juric, Mario; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Kent, Stephen M; Kleinman, S J; Knapp, G R; Kniazev, Alexei Yu; Kron, Richard G; Krzesinski, Jurek; Kunszt, Peter Z; Kuropatkin, Nickolai; Lamb, Donald Q; Lampeitl, Hubert; Laubscher, Bryan E; Lee, Brian C; Leger, R French; Li No Lan; Lidz, Adam; Lin, Huan; Loh Yeong Shang; Long, Daniel C; Loveday, Jon; Lupton, Robert H; Malik, Tanu; Margon, Bruce; McGehee, Peregrine M; McKay, Timothy A; Meiksin, Avery; Miknaitis, Gajus A; Moorthy, Bhasker K; Munn, Jeffrey A; Murphy, Tara; Nakajima, Reiko; Narayanan, Vijay K; Nash, Thomas; Neilsen, Erich; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Newman, Peter R; Nichol, Robert C; Nicinski, Tom; Nieto-Santisteban, Maria; Nitta, Atsuko; Odenkirchen, Michael; Okamura, Sadanori; Ostriker, Jeremiah P; Owen, Russell; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Peoples, John; Pier, Jeffrey R; Pindor, Bartosz; Pope, Adrian C; Quinn, Thomas R; Rafikov, R R; Raymond, Sean N; Richards, Gordon T; Richmond, Michael W; Rix, Hans-Walter; Rockosi, Constance M; Schaye, Joop; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, D P; Schroeder, Joshua; Scranton, Ryan; Sekiguchi, Maki; Seljak, Uros; Sergey, Gary; Sesar, Branimir; Sheldon, E S; Shimasaku, Kazu; Siegmund, Walter A; Silvestri, Nicole M; Sinisgalli, Allan J; Sirko, Edwin; Smith, Allyn J; Smolcic, Vernesa; Snedden, Stephanie A; Stebbins, Albert; Steinhardt, Charles; Stinson, Gregory M; Stoughton, Chris; Strateva, Iskra V; Strauss, Michael A; SubbaRao, Mark; Szalay, Alexander S; Istvan Szapudi; Szkody, Paula; Tasca, Lidia; Tegmark, Max; Thakar, Aniruddha R; Tremonti, Christy A; Tucker, Douglas L; Uomoto, Alan; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Vandenberg, Jan; Vogeley, Michael S; Voges, Wolfgang; Vogt, Nicole P; Walkowicz, Lucianne M; Weinberg, David H; West, Andrew A; White, Simon D M; Wilhite, Brian C; Willman, Beth; Xu Yong Hong; Yanny, Brian; Yarger, Jean; Yasuda, Naoki; Yip, Ching-Wa; Yocum, D R; York, Donald G; Zakamska, Nadia L; Zheng, Wei; Zibetti, Stefano; Zucker, Daniel B

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

The Wide Angular-Range Chopper Spectrometer at SNS | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Wide Angular-Range Chopper Spectrometer at SNS The Wide Angular-Range Chopper Spectrometer at SNS and Doug Abernathy at ARCS Materials researcher Judy Pang and instrument scientist Doug Abernathy at ARCS. ARCS is optimized to provide a high neutron flux at the sample and a large solid angle of detector coverage. This spectrometer is capable of selecting incident energies over the full energy spectrum of neutrons, making it useful for studies of excitations from a few to several hundred milli-electron volts. An elliptically shaped supermirror guide in the incident flight path boosts the performance at the lower end of this range. The sample and detector vacuum chambers provide a window-free final flight path and incorporate a large gate valve to allow rapid sample changeout. A T0 neutron chopper not only blocks the prompt radiation from the source

99

Beamline 4.0.3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Print 3 Print High-resolution spectroscopy of complex materials (MERLIN) Endstations: MERIXS: High-resolution inelastic scattering ARPES: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational 2011 Source characteristics 9.0-cm-period quasiperiodic elliptical polarization undulator (EPU9) Energy range 9eV-120eV with current gratings Monochromator Variable-included-angle spherical grating monochromator (SGM) Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1012 photons/s/0.01%BW at 100 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) High flux 1200 lines/mm; ~1/25,000 Endstations High-resolution inelastic scattering (MERIXS) and ARPES Characteristics Milli-Electron-volt Resolution beamLINe (MERLIN): Ultrahigh-resolution inelastic scattering and angle-resolved photoemission

100

Polyamide 66 as a Cryogenic Dielectric  

SciTech Connect

Improvements in superconductor and cryogenic technologies enable novel power apparatus, \\eg, cables, transformers, fault current limiters, generators, \\etc, with better device characteristics than their conventional counterparts. In these applications electrical insulation materials play an important role in system weight, footprint (size), and voltage level. The trend in the electrical insulation material selection has been to adapt or to employ conventional insulation materials to these new systems. However, at low temperatures, thermal contraction and loss of mechanical strength in many materials make them unsuitable for superconducting power applications. In this paper, a widely used commercial material was characterized as a potential cryogenic dielectric. The material is used in ``oven bag'' a heat-resistant polyamide (nylon) used in cooking (produced by Reynolds\\textregistered, Richmond, VA, USA). It is first characterized by Fourier transform infrared and x-ray diffraction techniques and determined to be composed of polyamide 66 (PA66) polymer. Secondly the complex dielectric permittivity and dielectric breakdown strength of the PA66 films are investigated. The dielectric data are then compared with data reported in the literature. A comparison of dielectric strength with a widely used high-temperature superconductor electrical insulation material, polypropylene-laminated paper (PPLP\\texttrademark\\ a product of Sumitomo Electric Industries, Japan), is provided. It is observed that the statistical analysis of the PA66 films yields 1\\% failure probability at $127\\ \\kilo\\volt\\milli\\meter^{-1}$; this value is approximately $46\\ \\kilo\\volt\\milli\\meter^{-1}$ higher than PPLP\\texttrademark. It is concluded that PA66 may be a good candidate for cryogenic applications. Finally, a summary of dielectric properties of some of the commercial tape insulation materials and various polymers is also provided.

Tuncer, Enis [ORNL; Polyzos, Georgios [ORNL; Sauers, Isidor [ORNL; James, David Randy [ORNL; Ellis, Alvin R [ORNL; Messman, Jamie M [ORNL; Aytug, Tolga [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deci centi milli" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Method for bonding thin film thermocouples to ceramics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for adhering a thin film metal thermocouple to a ceramic substrate used in an environment up to 700 degrees Centigrade, such as at a cylinder of an internal combustion engine. The method includes the steps of: depositing a thin layer of a reactive metal on a clean ceramic substrate; and depositing thin layers of platinum and a platinum-10% rhodium alloy forming the respective legs of the thermocouple on the reactive metal layer. The reactive metal layer serves as a bond coat between the thin noble metal thermocouple layers and the ceramic substrate. The thin layers of noble metal are in the range of 1-4 micrometers thick. Preferably, the ceramic substrate is selected from the group consisting of alumina and partially stabilized zirconia. Preferably, the thin layer of reactive metal is in the range of 0.015-0.030 micrometers (15-30 nanometers) thick. The preferred reactive metal is chromium. Other reactive metals may be titanium or zirconium. The thin layer of reactive metal may be deposited by sputtering in ultra high purity argon in a vacuum of approximately 2 milliTorr (0.3 Pascals).

Kreider, Kenneth G. (Potomac, MD)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Gravity survey of Dixie Valley, west-central Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dixie Valley, a northeast-trending structural trough typical of valleys in the Basin and Range Province, is filled with a maximum of about 10,000 feet of alluvial and lacustrine deposits, as estimated from residual-gravity measurements obtained in this study. On the basis of gravity measurements at 300 stations on nine east-west profiles, the gravity residuals reach a maximum of 30 milliGals near the south-central part of the valley. Results from a three-dimensional inversion model indicate that the central depression of the valley is offset to the west of the geographic axis. This offset is probably due to major faulting along the west side of the valley adjacent to the Stillwater Range. Comparison of depths to bedrock obtained during this study and depths obtained from a previous seismic-refraction study indicates a reasonably good correlation. A heterogeneous distribution of densities within the valley-fill deposits would account for differing depths determined by the two methods. 17 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Schaefer, D.H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Converting acoustic energy into useful other energy forms  

SciTech Connect

Sonoluminescence is an off-equilibrium phenomenon in which the energy of a resonant sound wave in a liquid is highly concentrated so as to generate flashes of light. The conversion of sound to light represents an energy amplification of eleven orders of magnitude. The flashes which occur once per cycle of the audible or ultrasonic sound fields can be comprised of over one million photons and last for less 100 picoseconds. The emission displays a clocklike synchronicity; the jitter in time between consecutive flashes is less than fifty picoseconds. The emission is blue to the eye and has a broadband spectrum increasing from 700 nanometers to 200 nanometers. The peak power is about 100 milliWatts. The initial stage of the energy focusing is effected by the nonlinear oscillations of a gas bubble trapped in the liquid. For sufficiently high drive pressures an imploding shock wave is launched into the gas by the collapsing bubble. The reflection of the shock from its focal point results in high temperatures and pressures. The sonoluminescence light emission can be sustained by sensing a characteristic of the emission and feeding back changes into the driving mechanism. The liquid is in a sealed container and the seeding of the gas bubble is effected by locally heating the liquid after sealing the container. Different energy forms than light can be obtained from the converted acoustic energy. When the gas contains deuterium and tritium there is the feasibility of the other energy form being fusion, namely including the generation of neutrons.

Putterman, Seth J. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Barber, Bradley Paul (Northridge, CA); Hiller, Robert Anthony (Los Angeles, CA); Lofstedt, Ritva Maire Johanna (Los Angeles, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Occultation Evidence for a Satellite of the Trojan Asteroid (911) Agamemnon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On 2012 January 19, observers in the northeastern United States of America observed an occultation of 8.0-mag HIP 41337 star by the Jupiter-Trojan (911) Agamemnon, including one video recorded with a 36cm telescope that shows a deep brief secondary occultation that is likely due to a satellite, of about 5 km (most likely 3 to 10 km) across, at 278 km $\\pm$ 5 km (0.0931 arcsec) from the asteroid's center as projected in the plane of the sky. A satellite this small and this close to the asteroid could not be resolved in the available VLT adaptive optics observations of Agamemnon recorded in 2003. The outline of Agamemnon is fit well by an ellipse with dimensions 190.6 $\\pm$ 0.9 km by 143.8 $\\pm$ 1.5 km. The angular diameter of HIP 41337 was found to be 0.5 $\\pm$ 0.1 milli-arcsec. After (624) Hektor, this could be the second Jupiter Trojan asteroid known to possess a small satellite.

Timerson, Bradley; Conard, Steven; Dunham, David W; Herald, David; Tolea, Alin; Marchis, Franck

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Universal quantum control of two-electron spin quantum bits using dynamic nuclear polarization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One fundamental requirement for quantum computation is to perform universal manipulations of quantum bits at rates much faster than the qubit's rate of decoherence. Recently, fast gate operations have been demonstrated in logical spin qubits composed of two electron spins where the rapid exchange of the two electrons permits electrically controllable rotations around one axis of the qubit. However, universal control of the qubit requires arbitrary rotations around at least two axes. Here we show that by subjecting each electron spin to a magnetic field of different magnitude we achieve full quantum control of the two-electron logical spin qubit with nanosecond operation times. Using a single device, a magnetic field gradient of several hundred milliTesla is generated and sustained using dynamic nuclear polarization of the underlying Ga and As nuclei. Universal control of the two-electron qubit is then demonstrated using quantum state tomography. The presented technique provides the basis for single and potentially multiple qubit operations with gate times that approach the threshold required for quantum error correction.

Sandra Foletti; Hendrik Bluhm; Diana Mahalu; Vladimir Umansky; Amir Yacoby

2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

106

LIPSS Free-Electron Laser Searches for Dark Matter  

SciTech Connect

A variety of Dark Matter particle candidates have been hypothesized by physics Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) in the very light (10{sup -6} - 10{sup -3} eV) range. In the past decade several international groups have conducted laboratory experiments designed to either produce such particles or extend the boundaries in parameter space. The LIght Pseudo-scalar and Scalar Search (LIPSS) Collaboration, using the 'Light Shining through a Wall' (LSW) technique, passes the high average power photon beam from Jefferson Lab's Free-Electron Laser through a magnetic field upstream from a mirror and optical beam dump. Light Neutral Bosons (LNBs), generated by coupling of photons with the magnetic field, pass through the mirror ('the Wall') into an identical magnetic field where they revert to detectable photons by the same coupling process. While no evidence of LNBs was evident, new scalar coupling boundaries were established. New constraints were also determined for hypothetical para-photons and for millicharged fermions. We will describe our experimental setup and results for LNBs, para-photons, and milli-charged fermions. Plans for chameleon particle searches are underway.

Afanaciev, Andrei; Beard, Kevin; Biallas, George; Boyce, James R; Minarni, M; Ramdon, R; Robinson, Taylor; Shinn, Michelle D

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Quantum Control of Atomic and Molecular Translational Motion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our research program focuses on the development of a method to cool atoms and molecules of any choice as long as they have a stable gaseous phase. Our approach starts with a very cold supersonic beam of He seeded with the molecules of choice. The internal temperature can reach 1 milliKelvin or less. The high center of mass velocity of the particles forming the beam will be reduced by elastically scattering the atoms/molecules from a very cold single crystal surface (20-40K), which moves in the beam direction. This will enable the continuous control of the mean velocity over a large range, after scattering, down to a few tens of m/s or even below as the crystal surface's velocity approaches v/2 of the impacting particles. We will use the decelerated particles as a source for a white-fringe matter-wave interferometer, where one reflector is a very cold surface of interest. The interference pattern will reveal the real part (via integral intensities) and the imaginary part (via phase shifts) of the scattering cross sections. This is particularly interesting for H{sub 2} and resonance structures. This interferometer set-up follows closely Prichard's arrangement.

Raizen, M.G.; Fink, M.

2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

108

Micro-Kelvin cold molecules.  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a novel experimental technique for direct production of cold molecules using a combination of techniques from atomic optical and molecular physics and physical chemistry. The ability to produce samples of cold molecules has application in a broad spectrum of technical fields high-resolution spectroscopy, remote sensing, quantum computing, materials simulation, and understanding fundamental chemical dynamics. Researchers around the world are currently exploring many techniques for producing samples of cold molecules, but to-date these attempts have offered only limited success achieving milli-Kelvin temperatures with low densities. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development project is to develops a new experimental technique for producing micro-Kelvin temperature molecules via collisions with laser cooled samples of trapped atoms. The technique relies on near mass degenerate collisions between the molecule of interest and a laser cooled (micro-Kelvin) atom. A subset of collisions will transfer all (nearly all) of the kinetic energy from the 'hot' molecule, cooling the molecule at the expense of heating the atom. Further collisions with the remaining laser cooled atoms will thermally equilibrate the molecules to the micro-Kelvin temperature of the laser-cooled atoms.

Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Silicon Oxynitride Thin Film Barriers for PV Packaging (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dielectric, adhesion-promoting, moisture barriers comprised of silicon oxynitride thin film materials (SiOxNy with various material stoichiometric compositions x,y) were applied to: 1) bare and pre-coated soda-lime silicate glass (coated with transparent conductive oxide SnO2:F and/or aluminum), and polymer substrates (polyethylene terephthalate, PET, or polyethylene napthalate, PEN); plus 2) pre- deposited photovoltaic (PV) cells and mini-modules consisting of amorphous silicon (a-Si) and copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) thin-film PV technologies. We used plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process with dilute silane, nitrogen, and nitrous oxide/oxygen gas mixtures in a low-power (< or = 10 milliW per cm2) RF discharge at ~ 0.2 Torr pressure, and low substrate temperatures < or = 100(degrees)C, over deposition areas ~ 1000 cm2. Barrier properties of the resulting PV cells and coated-glass packaging structures were studied with subsequent stressing in damp-heat exposure at 85(degrees)C/85% RH. Preliminary results on PV cells and coated glass indicate the palpable benefits of the barriers in mitigating moisture intrusion and degradation of the underlying structures using SiOxNy coatings with thicknesses in the range of 100-200 nm.

del Cueto, J. A.; Glick, S. H.; Terwilliger, K. M.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Pankow, J. W.; Keyes, B. M.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Pern, F. J.

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

110

A return to strong radio flaring by Circinus X-1 observed with the Karoo Array Telescope test array KAT-7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Circinus X-1 is a bright and highly variable X-ray binary which displays strong and rapid evolution in all wavebands. Radio flaring, associated with the production of a relativistic jet, occurs periodically on a ~17-day timescale. A longer-term envelope modulates the peak radio fluxes in flares, ranging from peaks in excess of a Jansky in the 1970s to an historic low of milliJanskys during the years 1994 to 2007. Here we report first observations of this source with the MeerKAT test array, KAT-7, part of the pathfinder development for the African dish component of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), demonstrating successful scientific operation for variable and transient sources with the test array. The KAT-7 observations at 1.9 GHz during the period 13 December 2011 to 16 January 2012 reveal in temporal detail the return to the Jansky-level events observed in the 1970s. We compare these data to contemporaneous single-dish measurements at 4.8 and 8.5 GHz with the HartRAO 26-m telescope and X-ray monitoring from...

Armstrong, R P; Nicolson, G D; Ratcliffe, S; Linares, M; Horrell, J; Richter, L; Schurch, M P E; Coriat, M; Woudt, P; Jonas, J; Booth, R; Fanaroff, B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

e-MERLIN resolves Betelgeuse at wavelength 5 cm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Convection, pulsation and magnetic fields have all been suggested as mechanisms for the transport of mass and energy from the optical photosphere of red supergiants, out to the region where the stellar wind is launched. We imaged the red supergiant Betelgeuse at 0.06-0.18 arcsec resolution, using e-MERLIN at 5.5--6.0 GHz, with a sensitivity of ~0.01 mJy/beam. Most of the radio emission comes from within an ellipse (0.235x0.218) arcsec^2 (~5x the optical radius), with a flux density of 1.62 mJy, giving an average brightness temperature ~1250 K. This radio photosphere contains two hotspots of 0.53 and 0.79 mJy/beam, separated by 90 milli-arcsec, with brightness temperatures 5400+/-600 K and 3800+/-500 K. Similar hotspots, at more than double the distance from the photosphere of those seen in any other regime, were detected by the less-sensitive `old' MERLIN in 1992, 1995 and 1996 and many exceed the photospheric temperature of 3600 K. Such brightness temperatures are high enough to emanate from pockets of chrom...

Richards, A M S; Decin, L; Etoka, S; Harper, G M; Lim, J J; Garrington, S T; Gray, M D; McDonald, I; O'Gorman, E; Wittkowski, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Rapid Orbital Decay in the 12.75-minute WD+WD Binary J0651+2844  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the detection of orbital decay in the 12.75-min, detached binary white dwarf (WD) SDSS J065133.338+284423.37 (hereafter J0651). Our photometric observations over a 13-month baseline constrain the orbital period to 765.206543(55) s and indicate the orbit is decreasing as a rate of (-9.8 +/- 2.8) x 10^(-12) s/s (or -0.31 +/- 0.09 ms/yr). We revise the system parameters based on our new photometric and spectroscopic observations: J0651 contains two WDs with M1 = 0.26 +/- 0.04 Msun and M2 = 0.50 +/- 0.04 Msun. General relativity predicts orbital decay due to gravitational wave radiation of (-8.2 +/- 1.7) x 10^(-12) s/s (or -0.26 +/- 0.05 ms/yr). Our observed rate of orbital decay is consistent with this expectation. J0651 is currently the second-loudest gravitational wave source known in the milli-Hertz range and the loudest non-interacting binary, which makes it an excellent verification source for future missions aimed at directly detecting gravitational waves. Our work establishes the feasibility of ...

Hermes, J J; Brown, Warren R; Winget, D E; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Gianninas, A; Mukadam, Anjum S; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio; Kenyon, Scott J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Germanium: From Its Discovery to SiGe Devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Germanium, element No.32, was discovered in 1886 by Clemens Winkler. Its first broad application was in the form of point contact Schottky diodes for radar reception during WWII. The addition of a closely spaced second contact led to the first all-solid-state electronic amplifier device, the transistor. The relatively low bandgap, the lack of a stable oxide and large surface state densities relegated germanium to the number 2 position behind silicon. The discovery of the lithium drift process, which made possible the formation of p-i-n diodes with fully depletable i-regions several centimeters thick, led germanium to new prominence as the premier gamma-ray detector. The development of ultra-pure germanium yielded highly stable detectors which have remained unsurpassed in their performance. New acceptors and donors were discovered and the electrically active role of hydrogen was clearly established several years before similar findings in silicon. Lightly doped germanium has found applications as far infrared detectors and heavily Neutron Transmutation Doped (NTD) germanium is used in thermistor devices operating at a few milliKelvin. Recently germanium has been rediscovered by the silicon device community because of its superior electron and hole mobility and its ability to induce strains when alloyed with silicon. Germanium is again a mainstream electronic material.

Haller, E.E.

2006-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

114

Microwave measurements of electron density in a spherical inertial- electrostatic confinement system using six ion guns  

SciTech Connect

The electron density in a spherical inertial-electrostatic confinement device using six ion beams was studied with microwave techniques involving the fundamental and higher order cavity resonances. Thermal expansion problems were circumvented by switched operation of the device. The deuterium background pressure was found to be a dominant factor in determining n/sub e/ throughout the entire range of 0.4 to 10 milliTorr. With 1 m Torr pressure and 10 mA total ion current (at 20 to 40 keV) central electron densities of the order of 10$sup 9$ electrons/ cm$sup 3$ were estimated, with total population of approximately 10$sup 10$ electrons. No evidence of shell structure of the electron density was found, although the use of higher order modes to obtain better spatial resolution was precluded by the low magnitude of n/sub e/. Indirect indication of weak ion trapping was obtained by measurement of the enhancement of neutron flux that resulted when the guns were operated simultaneously. (auth)

Chan, A.I.Y.

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

CLASS B0631+519: Last of the CLASS lenses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the discovery of a new gravitational lens system from the CLASS survey, CLASS B0631+519. VLA, MERLIN and VLBA observations show a doubly-imaged radio core, a doubly-imaged lobe and a second lobe that is probably quadruply-imaged. The maximum image separation is 1.16 arcseconds. The VLBA resolves the most magnified image of the flat-spectrum radio core into a number of sub-components spread across approximately 20 milli-arcseconds. Optical and near-infrared imaging with the ACS and NICMOS cameras on the HST show that there are two galaxies along the line of sight to the lensed source, as was previously discovered by optical spectroscopy. The nearer galaxy at z=0.0896 is a small blue irregular, while the more distant galaxy at z=0.6196 is an elliptical type and appears to contribute most of the lensing effect. The host galaxy of the lensed source is visible in NICMOS imaging as a set of arcs that form an almost complete Einstein ring. Mass modelling using non-parametric techniques can reproduce the ring and indicates that the irregular galaxy has a (localised) effect on the flux density distribution in the Einstein ring at the 5-10% level.

T. York; N. Jackson; I. W. A. Browne; L. V. E. Koopmans; J. P. McKean; M. A. Norbury; A. D. Biggs; R. D. Blandford; A. G. de Bruyn; C. D. Fassnacht; S. T. Myers; T. J. Pearson; P. M. Phillips; A. C. S. Readhead; D. Rusin; P. N. Wilkinson

2005-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

116

Antihydrogen production and precision experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study of CPT invariance with the highest achievable precision in all particle sectors is of fundamental importance for physics. Equally important is the question of the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. In recent years, impressive progress has been achieved in capturing antiprotons in specially designed Penning traps, in cooling them to energies of a few milli-electron volts, and in storing them for hours in a small volume of space. Positrons have been accumulated in large numbers in similar traps, and low energy positron or positronium beams have been generated. Finally, steady progress has been made in trapping and cooling neutral atoms. Thus the ingredients to form antihydrogen at rest are at hand. Once antihydrogen atoms have been captured at low energy, spectroscopic methods can be applied to interrogate their atomic structure with extremely high precision and compare it to its normal matter counterpart, the hydrogen atom. Especially the 1S-2S transition, with a lifetime of the excited state of 122 msec and thereby a natural linewidth of 5 parts in 10{sup 16}, offers in principle the possibility to directly compare matter and antimatter properties at a level of 1 part in 10{sup 16}.

Nieto, M.M.; Goldman, T.; Holzscheiter, M.H. [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

117

New Variable Stars in the Globular Cluster NGC 6584  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy 0.6 meter telescope located at Cerro Tololo, we searched for variable stars in the southern globular cluster NGC 6584. We obtained images during 8 nights between 28 May and 6 July of 2011. After processing the images, we used the image subtraction package ISIS developed by Alard (2000)to search for the variable stars. We identified a total of 69 variable stars in our 10x10 arcmin^2 field, including 43 variables cataloged by Millis & Liller (1980) and 26 hereto unknown variables. In total, we classified 46 of the variables as type RRab, with a mean period of 0.56776 days, 15 as type RRc with a mean period of 0.30886 days, perhaps one lower amplitude type RRe, with a period of 0.26482 days, 4 eclipsing binaries, and 3 long period (P > 2 days) variable stars. As many as 15 of the RRab Lyrae stars exhibited the Blazhko Effect. Furthermore, the mean periods of the RR Lyrae types, the exhibited period/amplitude relationship, and the ratio of N_c/(N_ab...

Toddy, Joseph M; Darragh, Andrew N; Murphy, Brian W

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Beyond the Standard Model Searches Using a Free Electron Laser  

SciTech Connect

Much of the focus of Beyond the Standard Model physics searches is on the TeV scale, making use of hadron and lepton colliders. Additionally, however, there is the means to make these searches in different regions of parameter space using sub-electron volt photons from a Free Electron Laser, for example. We report on the experimental results of searches for optical-wavelength photons mixing with hypothetical hidden-sector paraphotons in the mass range between 10{sup -5} and 10{sup -2} electron volts for a mixing parameter greater than 10{sup -7}. We also report on the results of a sensitive search for scalar coupling of photons to light neutral bosons in the mass range of approximately 1.0 milli-electron volts and coupling strength greater than 10{sup -6} GeV{sup -1}. These were generation-regeneration experiments using the 'light shining through a wall' technique in which regenerated photons are searched for downstream of an optical barrier that separates it from an upstream generation region. The present results indicate no evidence for photon-paraphoton mixing or for scalar couplings of bosons to photons for the range of parameters investigated.

Afanasev, A.; Ramdon, R. [Department of Physics, Hampton University, Hampton, VA 23668 (United States); Baker, O. K.; Slocum, P. [Department of Physics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208120, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Beard, K. B. [Muons, Inc., 552 N. Batavia Avenue, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Biallas, G.; Boyce, J.; Shinn, M. [Free Electron Laser Division, Jefferson Laboratory, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Minarni, M. [Department of Physics, Universitas Riau (UNRI), Pekanbaru, Riau 28293 (Indonesia)

2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

119

Use beam steering dipoles to minimize aberrations associated with off-centered transit through the induction bunching module. Design an improved NDCX-I drift compression section to make best use of the new bunching module to optimize planned initial NDCX-I target experiments  

SciTech Connect

This milestone has been met by: (1) calculating steering solutions and implementing them in the experiment using the three pairs of crossed magnetic dipoles installed in between the matching solenoids, S1-S4. We have demonstrated the ability to center the beam position and angle to<1 mm and<1 mrad upstream of the induction bunching module (IBM) gap, compared to uncorrected beam offsets of several millimeters and milli-radians. (2) Based on LSP and analytic study, the new IBM, which has twice the volt-seconds of our first IBM, should be accompanied by a longer drift compression section in order to achieve a predicted doubling of the energy deposition on future warm-dense matter targets. This will be accomplished by constructing a longer ferro-electric plasma source. (3) Because the bunched current is a function of the longitudinal phase space and emittance of the beam entering the IBM we have characterized the longitudinal phase space with a high-resolution energy analyzer.

HIFS-VNL; Seidl, Peter; Seidl, P.; Barnard, J.; Bieniosek, F.; Coleman, J.; Grote, D.; Leitner, M.; Gilson, E.; Logan, B.G.; Lund, S.; Lidia, S.; Ni, P.; Ogata, D.; Roy, P.; Waldron, W.; Welch, D.; Wooton, C.

2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

120

Beyond the Standard Model Searches with a Free-Electron Laser  

SciTech Connect

Much of the focus of Beyond the Standard Model physics searches is on the TeV scale, making use of hadron and lepton colliders. Additionally, however, there is the means to make these searches in different regions of parameter space using sub-electron volt photons from a Free Electron Laser, for example. We report on the experimental results of searches for opticalwavelength photons mixing with hypothetical hidden-sector paraphotons in the mass range between 10^-5 and 10^-2 electron volts for a mixing parameter greater than 10-7. We also report on the results of a sensitive search for scalar coupling of photons to light neutral bosons in the mass range of approximately 1.0 milli-electron volts and coupling strength greater than 10-6 GeV-1. These were generation-regeneration experiments using the light shining through a wall technique in which regenerated photons are searched for downstream of an optical barrier that separates it from an upstream generation region. The present results indicate no evidence for photon-paraphoton mixing or for scalar couplings of bosons to photons for the range of parameters investigated.

A. Afanasev, O.K. Baker, K.B. Beard, G. Biallas, J. Boyce, M. Minarni, R. Ramdon, Michelle D. Shinn, P. Slocumb

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

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121

Exploring interests: are there relationships among general interests, reading interests, and personality dimensions?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study explored the relationships among high school students general interests, reading interests, and personality dimensions. Two hundred and fifty one 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th grade students in a rural school district in east central Texas completed three questionnaires. General interests were determined by the Strong Interest Explorer, personality dimensions were determined by the Big Five Inventory, and book reading interests were determined by the Reading Interest Rating Scale. The reading interest scores were adjusted for reading ability based on Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) English/Language Arts scale scores. A factor analysis including six general interest variables, five personality variables, and four reading interest variables was conducted. The analysis yielded five factors. Factor 1 had the highest loadings from Hollands general interest types. Factor 2 was dominated by the book categories (Contemporary Fiction, Fact-based Literature, Poetry, and Modern Fantasy). Factors 3, 4, and 5 had the highest loadings from the personality dimensions. Factor 3 included Openness, Factor 4 included Conscientiousness, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism, and Factor 5 included Extraversion. Factor 3, which accounted for 11.67% of the variance, was the only factor where a personality variable (Openness), a general interest variable (Artistic), and a reading interest variable (Modern Fantasy) loaded moderately to highly together. In this particular case alone, teachers may help students select materials that match their personal needs and personalities (Lau & Cheung, 1988) by recommending texts in the modern fantasy genre to those who exhibit openness and value artistic expression. With the exception of Openness, none of the Big Five Personality Dimensions loaded with a book category. There was also only one strong book category and general interest loading. Reading interests appear to be exclusive of general life interests and personality dimensions. Based on the findings, it appears that text-based situational interest is evoked by topics or ideas that are universally appealing (Hidi & Anderson, 1992). Since text-based interest can be controlled by teachers to some degree (Krapp, Hidi, & Renninger, 1992; Schraw, Flowerday, & Lehman, 2001), promoting student independence and choice should broaden students interests and help increase intrinsic motivation to read (Deci, 1992).

West, Courtney Ann

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Neutron scattered dose equivalent to a fetus from proton radiotherapy of the mother  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scattered neutron dose equivalent to a representative point for a fetus is evaluated in an anthropomorphic phantom of the mother undergoing proton radiotherapy. The effect on scattered neutron dose equivalent to the fetus of changing the incident proton beam energy, aperture size, beam location, and air gap between the beam delivery snout and skin was studied for both a small field snout and a large field snout. Measurements of the fetus scattered neutron dose equivalent were made by placing a neutron bubble detector 10 cm below the umbilicus of an anthropomorphic Rando[reg] phantom enhanced by a wax bolus to simulate a second trimester pregnancy. The neutron dose equivalent in milliSieverts (mSv) per proton treatment Gray increased with incident proton energy and decreased with aperture size, distance of the fetus representative point from the field edge, and increasing air gap. Neutron dose equivalent to the fetus varied from 0.025 to 0.450 mSv per proton Gray for the small field snout and from 0.097 to 0.871 mSv per proton Gray for the large field snout. There is likely to be no excess risk to the fetus of severe mental retardation for a typical proton treatment of 80 Gray to the mother since the scattered neutron dose to the fetus of 69.7 mSv is well below the lower confidence limit for the threshold of 300 mGy observed for the occurrence of severe mental retardation in prenatally exposed Japanese atomic bomb survivors. However, based on the linear no threshold hypothesis, and this same typical treatment for the mother, the excess risk to the fetus of radiation induced cancer death in the first 10 years of life is 17.4 per 10 000 children.

Mesoloras, Geraldine; Sandison, George A.; Stewart, Robert D.; Farr, Jonathan B.; Hsi, Wen C. [School of Health Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906 (United States); Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute (MPRI), Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Received; accepted To be published in The Astrophysical Journal 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used the NRAO Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) to image OH(1720 MHz) masers in the supernova remnants W28 and W44 at a resolution of 40 mas. We also used MERLIN to observe the same OH(1720 MHz) masers in W44 at a resolution of 290 165 mas. All the masers are resolved by these VLBA and MERLIN observations. The measured sizes range from 50 to 180 mas and yield brightness temperature estimates from 0.3-20108 K. We investigate whether these measured angular sizes are intrinsic and hence originate as a result of the physical conditions in the supernova remnant shock, or whether they are scatter broadened sizes produced by the turbulent ionized gas along the line of sight. While the current data on the temporal and angular broadening of pulsars, masers and extragalactic sources toward W44 and W28 can be understood in terms of scattering, we cannot rule out that these large sizes are intrinsic. Recent theoretical modeling by Lockett et al. suggests that the physical parameters in the shocked region are indicative of densities and OH abundances which lead to estimates of sizes as large as what we measure. If the sizes and structure are intrinsic, then the OH(1720 MHz) masers may be more like the OH(1612 MHz) masers in circumstellar shells than OH masers associated with H II regions. At two locations in W28 we observe the classical S-shapes in the Stokes V profiles caused by Zeeman splitting and use it to infer magnetic fields of order 2 milliGauss. Subject headings: masers ISM: supernova remnants scattering 3 1.

M. J Claussen; W. M. Goss; D. A. Frail; K. Desai

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Science up to 100 tesla  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

100 Tesla is the highest attainable field that can be held for milli-sec in a non-destructive magnet. The strongest steels turn soft under stresses of 4GPa, which is the magnetic pressure of 100 T. Until there is a breakthrough in materials, magnets having all the low temperature and high pressure trimmings will be limited to about 100 T. Within the field range 1-100 T far more resources are now devoted to producing the highest possible continuous fields (40+5 T) than to producing longer pulsed fields above 50 T. This illustrates that the utility of the field can be more important than the strength of the field to researchers in condensed matter. Discoveries are typically made in new territory, but this can be new combinations of pressure, temperature, and magnetic field, or new probes and new materials. If any activity has kept up with the proliferation of new experiments and new facilities in high magnetic field research it is the listing of experiments that could and should be done in high fields. Part of the reason for the vitality of high field research is that high fields provide a generic environment. Compared to particle accelerators and plasma machines a high field laboratory is a setting for generic science, like synchrotron light sources or neutron scattering centers. Although the latter two installations probes states, while a magnetic field creates a state. Because it is unrealistic to try to list all the science opportunities at high fields, the author list sources for lists in the public domain and gives a few examples.

Campbell, L.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). National High Magnetic Field Lab.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Compact And Robust Laser Impulse Measurement Device, With Ultrashort Pulse Laser Ablation Results  

SciTech Connect

An impulse measurement device and analysis package was conceived, designed, constructed, tested, and demonstrated to be capable of: measuring nanoNewton-seconds to milliNewton-seconds of impulse due to laser-ablation; being transported as carry-on baggage; set-up and tear-down times of less than an hour; target exchange times of less than two minutes (targets can be ablated at multiple positions for thousands of shots); measurements in air and in vacuum; error of just a few percent; repeatability over a wide range of potential systematic error sources; and time between measurements, including ring-down and analysis, of less than 30 seconds. The instrument consists of a cantilever (i.e. leaf spring), whose time-dependent displacement/oscillation is measured and analyzed to determine the impulse imparted by a laser pulse to a target. These shapes are readily/commercially available, and any target material can be used, provided it can be fashioned in the form of a cantilever, or as a coating/film/tape, suitable for mounting on a cantilever of known geometry. The instrument was calibrated both statically and dynamically, and measurements were performed on brass, steel, and Aluminum, using laser pulses of {approx}7 ns, {approx}500 ps, and {approx}500 fs. The results agree well with those published in the literature, with surface effects, atmosphere, and pre-/post-pulses demonstrating interesting effects and indicating areas for further study. These parameters should be carefully controlled and held constant during a series of measurements. The impulse imparted by ablation due to laser filaments in air was also explored.

Kremeyer, Kevin; Lapeyre, John; Hamann, Steven [Physics, Materials, and Applied Mathematics Research, L.L.C. PM and AM Research in Collaboration with AFRL 1665 E. 18th Street, Suite 112 Tucson, AZ, 85719 (United States)

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

126

Epistemic Uncertainty in Evalustion of Evapotranspiration and Net Infiltration Using Analogue Meteorological Data  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainty is typically defined as a potential deficiency in the modeling of a physical process, owing to a lack of knowledge. Uncertainty can be categorized as aleatoric (inherent uncertainty caused by the intrinsic randomness of the system) or epistemic (uncertainty caused by using various model simplifications and their parameters). One of the main reasons for model simplifications is a limited amount of meteorological data. This paper is devoted to the epistemic uncertainty quantification involved in two components of the hydrologic balance-evapotranspiration and net infiltration for interglacial (present day), and future monsoon, glacial transition, and glacial climates at Yucca Mountain, using the data from analogue meteorological stations. In particular, the author analyzes semi-empirical models used for evaluating (1) reference-surface potential evapotranspiration, including temperature-based models (Hargreaves-Samani, Thornthwaite, Hamon, Jensen-Haise, and Turc) and radiation-based models (Priestly-Taylor and Penman), and (2) surface-dependent potential evapotranspiration (Penman-Monteith and Shuttleworth-Wallace models). Evapotranspiration predictions are then used as inputs for the evaluation of net infiltration using the semi-empirical models of Budyko, Fu, Milly, Turc-Pike, and Zhang. Results show that net infiltration ranges are expected to generally increase from the present-day climate to monsoon climate, to glacial transition climate, and then to the glacial climate. The propagation of uncertainties through model predictions for different climates is characterized using statistical measures. Predicted evapotranspiration ranges are reasonably corroborated against the data from Class A pan evaporometers (taking into account evaporation-pan adjustment coefficients), and ranges of net infiltration predictions are corroborated against the geochemical and temperature-based estimates of groundwater recharge and percolation rates through the unsaturated zone obtained at Yucca Mountain.

B. Faybishenko

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Home composting as an alternative treatment option for organic household waste in Denmark: An environmental assessment using life cycle assessment-modelling  

SciTech Connect

An environmental assessment of the management of organic household waste (OHW) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the waste-life cycle assessment (LCA) model EASEWASTE. The focus was on home composting of OHW in Denmark and six different home composting units (with different input and different mixing frequencies) were modelled. In addition, incineration and landfilling was modelled as alternatives to home composting. The most important processes contributing to the environmental impact of home composting were identified as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (load) and the avoided emissions in relation to the substitution of fertiliser and peat when compost was used in hobby gardening (saving). The replacement of fertiliser and peat was also identified as one of the most sensible parameters, which could potentially have a significant environmental benefit. Many of the impact categories (especially human toxicity via water (HTw) and soil (HTs)) were affected by the heavy metal contents of the incoming OHW. The concentrations of heavy metals in the compost were below the threshold values for compost used on land and were thus not considered to constitute a problem. The GHG emissions were, on the other hand, dependent on the management of the composting units. The frequently mixed composting units had the highest GHG emissions. The environmental profiles of the home composting scenarios were in the order of -2 to 16 milli person equivalents (mPE) Mg{sup -1} wet waste (ww) for the non-toxic categories and -0.9 to 28 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the toxic categories. Home composting performed better than or as good as incineration and landfilling in several of the potential impact categories. One exception was the global warming (GW) category, in which incineration performed better due to the substitution of heat and electricity based on fossil fuels.

Andersen, J.K.; Boldrin, A.; Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Scheutz, C., E-mail: chas@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Models for the lens and source of B0218+357 - A LensClean approach to determine H0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B0218+357 is one of the most promising systems to determine the Hubble constant from gravitational lenses. Consisting of two bright resolved images plus an Einstein ring, it provides better constraints for the mass model than other systems. The main problem left until now was the poorly determined position of the lensing galaxy. After presenting results from classical lens modelling, we apply our improved version of LensClean which utilizes the Einstein ring for lens modelling purposes. The primary result using isothermal models is a well defined lens position which allows the first reliable measurement of the Hubble constant from this system. The result of H0=(78+-6) km/s/Mpc (2 sigma) is high compared with other lenses but compatible with the HST key project and WMAP results. We furthermore discuss effects of different radial mass profiles. The power-law exponent of the potential is constrained by VLBI data to be beta=1.04+-0.02, very close to isothermal. The effect on H0 is expected to be very small. We also present a composite map (lensed and unlensed) which shows the rich structure of B0218+357 on scales from milli-arcseconds to arcseconds. Finally we use a comparison of observations at different frequencies to investigate the question of possible weakening of one of the images by propagation effects and/or source shifts with frequency. The data clearly favour the model of significant extinction without noticeable source position shifts. The technical details of our variant of the LensClean method are presented in the accompanying Paper I.

O. Wucknitz; A. D. Biggs; I. W. A. Browne

2003-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

129

Distributed Sensor Coordination for Advanced Energy Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to collect key system level information is critical to the safe, efficient and reli- able operation of advanced energy systems. With recent advances in sensor development, it is now possible to push some level of decision making directly to computationally sophisticated sensors, rather than wait for data to arrive to a massive centralized location before a decision is made. This type of approach relies on networked sensors (called agents from here on) to actively collect and process data, and provide key control deci- sions to significantly improve both the quality/relevance of the collected data and the as- sociating decision making. The technological bottlenecks for such sensor networks stem from a lack of mathematics and algorithms to manage the systems, rather than difficulties associated with building and deploying them. Indeed, traditional sensor coordination strategies do not provide adequate solutions for this problem. Passive data collection methods (e.g., large sensor webs) can scale to large systems, but are generally not suited to highly dynamic environments, such as ad- vanced energy systems, where crucial decisions may need to be reached quickly and lo- cally. Approaches based on local decisions on the other hand cannot guarantee that each agent performing its task (maximize an agent objective) will lead to good network wide solution (maximize a network objective) without invoking cumbersome coordination rou- tines. There is currently a lack of algorithms that will enable self-organization and blend the efficiency of local decision making with the system level guarantees of global decision making, particularly when the systems operate in dynamic and stochastic environments. In this work we addressed this critical gap and provided a comprehensive solution to the problem of sensor coordination to ensure the safe, reliable, and robust operation of advanced energy systems. The differentiating aspect of the proposed work is in shift- ing the focus towards what to observe rather than how to observe in large sensor networks, allowing the agents to actively determine both the structure of the network and the relevance of the information they are seeking to collect. In addition to providing an implicit coordination mechanism, this approach allows the system to be reconfigured in response to changing needs (e.g., sudden external events requiring new responses) or changing sensor network characteristics (e.g., sudden changes to plant condition). Outcome Summary: All milestones associated with this project have been completed. In particular, private sensor objective functions were developed which are aligned with the global objective function, sensor effectiveness has been improved by using sensor teams, system efficiency has been improved by 30% using difference evaluation func- tions, we have demonstrated system reconfigurability for 20% changes in system con- ditions, we have demonstrated extreme scalability of our proposed algorithm, we have demonstrated that sensor networks can overcome disruptions of up to 20% in network conditions, and have demonstrated system reconfigurability to 20% changes in system conditions in hardware-based simulations. This final report summarizes how each of these milestones was achieved, and gives insight into future research possibilities past the work which has been completed. The following publications support these milestones [6, 8, 9, 10, 16, 18, 19].

Tumer, Kagan

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

130

A Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 191 Evaluation of Buried Transuranic Waste at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

In 1986, 21 m{sup 3} of transuranic (TRU) waste was inadvertently buried in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is considered five options for management of the buried TRU waste. One option is to leave the waste in-place if the disposal can meet the requirements of Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, 'Environmental Radiation Protection Standard for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes'. This paper describes analyses that assess the likelihood that TRU waste in shallow land burial can meet the 40 CFR 191 standards for a geologic repository. The simulated probability of the cumulative release exceeding 1 and 10 times the 40 CFR 191.13 containment requirements is estimated to be 0.009 and less than 0.0001, respectively. The cumulative release is most sensitive to the number of groundwater withdrawal wells drilled through the disposal trench. The mean total effective dose equivalent for a member of the public is estimated to reach a maximum of 0.014 milliSievert (mSv) at 10,000 years, or approximately 10 percent of the 0.15 mSv 40 CFR 191.15 individual protection requirement. The dose is predominantly from inhalation of short-lived Rn-222 progeny in air produced by low-level waste disposed in the same trench. The transuranic radionuclide released in greatest amounts, Pu-239, contributes only 0.4 percent of the dose. The member of public dose is most sensitive to the U-234 inventory and the radon emanation coefficient. Reasonable assurance of compliance with the Subpart C groundwater protection standard is provided by site characterization data and hydrologic processes modeling which support a conclusion of no groundwater pathway within 10,000 years. Limited quantities of transuranic waste in a shallow land burial trench at the NTS can meet the requirements of 40 CFR 191.

G. J. Shott, V. Yucel, L. Desotell

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Corrosion-resistant Foamed Cements for Carbon Steels  

SciTech Connect

The cementitious material consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate designed as an alternative thermal-shock resistant cement for the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) wells was treated with cocamidopropyl dimethylamine oxide-based compound as foaming agent (FA) to prepare numerous air bubble-dispersed low density cement slurries of and #61603;1.3 g/cm3. Then, the foamed slurry was modified with acrylic emulsion (AE) as corrosion inhibitor. We detailed the positive effects of the acrylic polymer (AP) in this emulsion on the five different properties of the foamed cement: 1) The hydrothermal stability of the AP in 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cements; 2) the hydrolysis-hydration reactions of the slurry at 85 and #61616;C; 3) the composition of crystalline phases assembled and the microstructure developed in autoclaved cements; 4) the mechanical behaviors of the autoclaved cements; and, 5) the corrosion mitigation of carbon steel (CS) by the polymer. For the first property, the hydrothermal-catalyzed acid-base interactions between the AP and cement resulted in Ca-or Na-complexed carboxylate derivatives, which led to the improvement of thermal stability of the AP. This interaction also stimulated the cement hydration reactions, enhancing the total heat evolved during cements curing. Addition of AP did not alter any of the crystalline phase compositions responsible for the strength of the cement. Furthermore, the AP-modified cement developed the porous microstructure with numerous defect-free cavities of disconnected voids. These effects together contributed to the improvement of compressive-strength and toughness of the cured cement. AP modification of the cement also offered an improved protection of CS against brine-caused corrosion. There were three major factors governing the corrosion protection: 1) Reducing the extents of infiltration and transportation of corrosive electrolytes through the cement layer deposited on the underlying CS surfaces; 2) inhibiting the cathodic reactions at the corrosion site of CS; 3) extending the coverage of cement over CS surfaces; and, 4) improving the adherence of the cement to CS surfaces. Thus, the CSs corrosion rate of 176 milli inch/per year (mpy) for 1 wt% FA-foamed cement without AP was considerably reduced to 69 mpy by adding only 2 wt% AP. Addition of AP at 10 wt% further reduced this rate to less than 10 mpy.

Sugama T.; Gill, S.; Pyatina, T., Muraca, A.; Keese, R.; Khan, A.; Bour, D.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

A Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 191 Evaluation of Buried Transuranic Waste at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

In 1986, 21 m{sup 3} of transuranic (TRU) waste was inadvertently buried in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is considered five options for management of the buried TRU waste. One option is to leave the waste in-place if the disposal can meet the requirements of Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, 'Environmental Radiation Protection Standard for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes'. This paper describes analyses that assess the likelihood that TRU waste in shallow land burial can meet the 40 CFR 191 standards for a geologic repository. The simulated probability of the cumulative release exceeding 1 and 10 times the 40 CFR 191.13 containment requirements is estimated to be 0.009 and less than 0.0001, respectively. The cumulative release is most sensitive to the number of groundwater withdrawal wells drilled through the disposal trench. The mean total effective dose equivalent for a member of the public is estimated to reach a maximum of 0.014 milli-Sievert (mSv) at 10,000 years, or approximately 10 percent of the 0.15 mSv 40 CFR 191.15 individual protection requirement. The dose is predominantly from inhalation of short-lived Rn-222 progeny in air produced by low-level waste disposed in the same trench. The transuranic radionuclide released in greatest amounts, Pu-239, contributes only 0.4 percent of the dose. The member of public dose is most sensitive to the U-234 inventory and the radon emanation coefficient. Reasonable assurance of compliance with the Subpart C groundwater protection standard is provided by site characterization data and hydrologic processes modeling which support a conclusion of no groundwater pathway within 10,000 years. Limited quantities of transuranic waste in a shallow land burial trench at the NTS can meet the requirements of 40 CFR 191. (authors)

Shott, G.J.; Yucel, V.; Desotell, L. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Pyles, G.; Carilli, J. [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Real-time Molecular Study of Bystander Effects of Low dose Low LET radiation Using Living Cell Imaging and Nanoparticale Optics  

SciTech Connect

In this study two novel approaches are proposed to investigate precisely the low dose low LET radiation damage and its effect on bystander cells in real time. First, a flow shear model system, which would provide us a near in vivo situation where endothelial cells in the presence of extra cellular matrix experiencing continuous flow shear stress, will be used. Endothelial cells on matri-gel (simulated extra cellular matrix) will be subjected to physiological flow shear (that occurs in normal blood vessels). Second, a unique tool (Single nano particle/single live cell/single molecule microscopy and spectroscopy; Figure A) will be used to track the molecular trafficking by single live cell imaging. Single molecule chemical microscopy allows one to single out and study rare events that otherwise might be lost in assembled average measurement, and monitor many target single molecules simultaneously in real-time. Multi color single novel metal nanoparticle probes allow one to prepare multicolor probes (Figure B) to monitor many single components (events) simultaneously and perform multi-complex analysis in real-time. These nano-particles resist to photo bleaching and hence serve as probes for unlimited timeframe of analysis. Single live cell microscopy allows one to image many single cells simultaneously in real-time. With the combination of these unique tools, we will be able to study under near-physiological conditions the cellular and sub-cellular responses (even subtle changes at one molecule level) to low and very low doses of low LET radiation in real time (milli-second or nano-second) at sub-10 nanometer spatial resolution. This would allow us to precisely identify, at least in part, the molecular mediators that are responsible of radiation damage in the irradiated cells and the mediators that are responsible for initiating the signaling in the neighboring cells. Endothelial cells subjected to flow shear (2 dynes/cm2 or 16 dynes/cm2) and exposed to 0.1, 1 and 10 cGy on coverslips will be examined for (a) low LET radiation-induced alterations of cellular function and its physiological relevance in real time; and (b) radiation damage triggered bystander effect on the neighboring unirradiated cells. First, to determine the low LET radiation induced alteration of cellular function we will examine: (i) the real time transformation of single membrane transporters in single living cells; (ii) the pump efficiency of membrane efflux pump of live cells in real time at the molecular level; (iii) the kinetics of single-ligand receptor interaction on single live cell surface (Figure C); and (iv) alteration in chromosome replication in living cell. Second, to study the radiation triggered bystander responses, we will examine one of the key signaling pathway i.e. TNF- alpha/NF-kappa B mediated signaling. TNF-alpha specific nano particle sensors (green) will be developed to detect the releasing dynamics, transport mechanisms and ligand-receptor binding on live cell surface in real time. A second sensor (blue) will be developed to simultaneously monitor the track of NF-kB inside the cell. The proposed nano-particle optics approach would complement our DOE funded study on biochemical mechanisms of TNF-alpha- NF-kappa B-mediated bystander effect.

Natarajan, Mohan [UT Health Science Center at San Antonio; Xu, Nancy R [Old Dominion University; Mohan, Sumathy [UT Health Science Center at San Antonio

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

134

Reaching site closure for groundwater under multiple regulatory agencies  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater at the Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company (CYAPCO) Haddam Neck Plant (HNP) has been impacted by both radionuclides and chemical constituents. Furthermore, the cleanup standards and closure requirements for HNP are regulated both by federal and state agencies. The only consistent requirement is the development of a site conceptual model and an understanding of the hydrogeologic conditions that will govern contaminant transport and identify potential receptors. The cleanup criteria to reach site closure for radionuclides is regulated by both the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CTDEP) Bureau of Air Management, Radiological Division. For license termination under the NRC, the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) for all media can not exceed 25 milli-Rem per year (mRem/yr) plus As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). The CTDEP has a similar requirement with the TEDE not to exceed 19 mRem/yr plus ALARA. To reach these criteria, derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs) were developed for radiological exposures from three (3) media components; soil, existing groundwater and future groundwater from left-in place foundations or footings. Based on current conditions, the target dose contribution from existing and future groundwater is not to exceed 2 mRem/yr TEDE. After source (soil) remediation is complete, the NRC requires two (2) years of quarterly monitoring to demonstrate that groundwater quality meets the DCGLs and does not show an upward trend. CYAPCO's NRC License Termination Plan (LTP) specifies a minimum 18-month period of groundwater monitoring, as long as samples are collected during two spring/high water seasons, to verify the efficacy of remedial actions at HNP. In addition to the 19 mRem/yr criteria, the CTDEP also requires groundwater to be in compliance with the Remediation Standards Regulation (RSRs). There are no published criteria for radionuclides in the RSRs, however CTDEP has approved the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA's) Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) as the clean up standards for individual constituents. After remediation of an identified contamination source, the RSRs require that at least one groundwater monitoring well, hydraulically down-gradient of the remediation area, be sampled to confirm that the remediation has not impacted groundwater quality. After four quarters of groundwater monitoring with results below the MCLs, additional groundwater sampling must continue for up to three years to reach site closure in accordance with the RSRs. The cleanup criteria for chemical constituents, including boron, are regulated by the USEPA under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the CTDEP Bureau of Water Protection and Land Reuse. The USEPA, however, has accepted the CTDEP RSRs as the cleanup criteria for RCRA. Therefore attainment of the CTDEP RSRs is the only set of criteria needed to reach closure, but both agencies retain oversight, interpretation, and closure authority. As stated above, under the RSRs, groundwater must be monitored following a source remediation for a minimum of four quarters. After demonstrating that the remediation was successful, then additional groundwater sampling is required for up to three additional years. However, the number of monitoring wells and frequency of sampling are not defined in the RSRs and must be negotiated with CTDEP. To successfully reach closure, the conceptual site model, groundwater transport mechanisms, and potential receptors must be defined. Once the hydrogeology is understood, a long term groundwater monitoring program can then be coordinated to meet each agencies requirement to both terminate the NRC license and reach site closure under RCRA. (authors)

Glucksberg, N. [MACTEC, Inc., Portland, ME (United States); Couture, B. [Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, East Ham (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Understanding Contaminant Transport Pathways at Rocky Flats - A Basis for the Remediation Strategy  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is a Department of Energy facility located approximately 16 miles northwest of Denver, Colorado. Processing and fabrication of nuclear weapons components occurred at Rocky Flats from 1952 through 1989. Operations at the Site included the use of several radionuclides, including plutonium-239/240 (Pu), americium-241 (Am), and various uranium (U) isotopes, as well as several types of chlorinated solvents. The historic operations resulted in legacy contamination, including contaminated facilities, process waste lines, buried wastes and surface soil contamination. Decontamination and removal of buildings at the site was completed in late 2005, culminating more than ten years of active environmental remediation work. The Corrective Action Decision/Record of Decision was subsequently approved in 2006, signifying regulatory approval and closure of the site. The use of RFETS as a National Wildlife Refuge is scheduled to be in full operation by 2012. To develop a plan for remediating different types of radionuclide contaminants present in the RFETS environment required understanding the different environmental transport pathways for the various actinides. Developing this understanding was the primary objective of the Actinide Migration Evaluation (AME) project. Findings from the AME studies were used in the development of RFETS remediation strategies. The AME project focused on issues of actinide behavior and mobility in surface water, groundwater, air, soil and biota at RFETS. For the purposes of the AME studies, actinide elements addressed included Pu, Am, and U. The AME program, funded by DOE, brought together personnel with a broad range of relevant expertise in technical investigations. The AME advisory panel identified research investigations and approaches that could be used to solve issues related to actinide migration at the Site. An initial step of the AME was to develop a conceptual model to provide a qualitative description of the relationships among potential actinide sources and transport pathways at RFETS. One conceptual model was developed specifically for plutonium and americium, because of their similar geochemical and transport properties. A separate model was developed for uranium because of its different properties and mobility in the environment. These conceptual models were guidelines for quantitative analyses described in the RFETS Pathway Analysis Report, which used existing data from the literature as well as site-specific analyses, including field, laboratory and modeling studies to provide quantitative estimates of actinide migration in the RFETS environment. For pathways where more than one method was used to estimate offsite loads for a specific pathway, the method yielding the highest estimated off-site was used for comparison purposes. For all actinides studied, for pre-remediation conditions, air and surface water were identified to be the dominant transport mechanisms. The estimated annual airborne plutonium-239/240 load transported off site exceeded the surface water load by roughly a factor of 40. However, despite being the largest transport pathway, airborne radionuclide concentrations at the monitoring location with the highest measurements during the period studied were less than two percent of the allowable 10 milli-rem standard governing DOE facilities. Estimated actinide loads for other pathways were much less. Shallow groundwater was approximately two orders of magnitude lower, or 1/100 of the load conveyed in surface water. The estimated biological pathway load for plutonium was approximately five orders of magnitude less, or 1/100,000, of the load estimated for surface-water. The pathway analysis results were taken into consideration during subsequent remediation activities that occurred at the site. For example, when the 903 Pad area was remediated to address elevated concentrations of Pu and Am in the surface soil, portable tent structures were constructed to prevent wind and water erosion from occurring while remediation activitie

Paton, Ian [Wright Water Engineers, Inc.: 2490 W. 26th Avenue, Suite 100A, Denver, CO 80211 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

It Just Keeps Getting Better-Tru Waste Inventory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) opened on March 26, 1999, becoming the nation's first deep geologic repository for the permanent disposal of defense-generated transuranic (TRU) waste. In May 1998, the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified WIPP and re-certified WIPP in March 2006. The knowledge of TRU waste inventory is fundamental to packaging, transportation, disposal strategies, resource allocation, and is also imperative when working in a regulatory framework. TRU waste inventory data are used to define the waste that will fill the WIPP repository in terms of volume, radionuclides, waste material parameters, other chemical components, and to model the impact of the waste on the performance of the WIPP over a 10,000-year evolution. The data that pertain to TRU waste is defined in the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA), as '..waste containing more that 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste, with half-lives greater than 20 years..' Defining TRU waste further, the wastes are classified as either contact-handled (CH) or remote-handled (RH) TRU waste, depending on the dose rate at the surface of the waste container. CH TRU wastes are packaged with an external surface dose rate not greater than 200 milli-rem (mrem) per hour, while RH TRU wastes are packaged with an external surface dose rate of 200 mrem per hour or greater. The Los Alamos National Laboratory-Carlsbad Operations (LANL-CO) Inventory Team has developed a powerful new database, the Comprehensive Inventory Database (CID), to maintain the TRU waste inventory information. The CID is intended to replace the Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory Database (TWBID), Revision 2.1, as the central inventory information repository for tracking all existing and potential (TRU) waste generated across the Department of Energy (DOE) TRU waste complex. It is also the source for information submitted for the Annual TRU Waste Inventory Reports some of which will be used in future Compliance Re-certification Applications (CRAs) for the WIPP. Currently, the DOE is preparing for the second re-certification, CRA-2009. The CID contains comprehensive TRU waste inventory that is consistent, relevant, and easily accessible to support DOE needs, not only the CRAs and performance assessments, but also waste management planning activities and other regulatory needs (e.g., National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analyses). The comprehensive inventory contains information obtained via inventory updates and approved acceptable knowledge (AK) characterization information to ensure inventory data integrity is maintained and the inventory is current. The TRU waste inventory is maintained in the CID under configuration management as defined in the LANL-CO Quality Assurance Program. The CID was developed using Microsoft{sup TM} Access Data Project{sup TM} (ADP) technology with a Microsoft SQL Server{sup TM} back end. The CID is user friendly, contains more fields, provides for easy upload of data, and has the capability to generate fully qualified data reports. To go along with the new database, the LANL-CO Inventory Team has developed an improved data collection/screening process and has excellent communications with the TRU waste site personnel. WIPP has now received over 6,000 shipments, emplaced over 50,000 cubic meters of CH waste, and successfully completed one re-certification. With a new robust qualified database, the CID, to maintain the inventory information, the TRU waste inventory information is continuously improving in quality, accuracy, and usability (better). (authors)

Lott, S.; Crawford, B.; McInroy, W.; Van Soest, G.; McTaggart, J.; Guerin, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory-Carlsbad Operations, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Patterson, R. [U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad, Field Office, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Raman Investigation of The Uranium Compounds U3O8, UF4, UH3 and UO3 under Pressure at Room Temperature  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our current state-of-the-art X-ray diffraction experiments are primarily sensitive to the position of the uranium atom. While the uranium - low-Z element bond (such as U-H or U-F) changes under pressure and temperature the X-ray diffraction investigations do not reveal information about the bonding or the stoichiometry. Questions that can be answered by Raman spectroscopy are (i) whether the bonding strength changes under pressure, as observed by either blue- or red-shifted peaks of the Raman active bands in the spectrum and (ii) whether the low-Z element will eventually be liberated and leave the host lattice, i.e. do the fluorine, oxygen, or hydrogen atoms form dimers after breaking the bond to the uranium atom. Therefore Raman spectra were also collected in the range where those decomposition products would appear. Raman is particularly well suited to these types of investigations due to its sensitivity to trace amounts of materials. One challenge for Raman investigations of the uranium compounds is that they are opaque to visible light. They absorb the incoming radiation and quickly heat up to the point of decomposition. This has been dealt with in the past by keeping the incoming laser power to very low levels on the tens of milliWatt range consequently affecting signal to noise. Recent modern investigations also used very small laser spot sizes (micrometer range) but ran again into the problem of heating and chemical sensitivity to the environment. In the studies presented here (in contrast to all other studies that were performed at ambient conditions only) we employ micro-Raman spectroscopy of samples situated in a diamond anvil cell. This increases the trustworthiness of the obtained data in several key-aspects: (a) We surrounded the samples in the DAC with neon as a pressure transmitting medium, a noble gas that is absolutely chemically inert. (b) Through the medium the sample is thermally heat sunk to the diamond anvils, diamond of course possessing the very best heat conductivity of any material. Therefore local heating and decomposition are avoided, a big challenge with other approaches casting doubts on their results. (c) This in turn benefits the signal/noise ratio tremendously since the Raman features of uranium-compounds are very small. The placement of the samples in DACs allows for higher laser powers to impinge on the sample spot while keeping the spot-size larger than in previous studies and keep the samples from heating up. Raman spectroscopy is a very sensitive non-invasive technique and we will show that it is even possible to distinguish the materials by their origin / manufacturer as we have studied samples from Cameco (Canada) and IBI-Labs (US-Florida) and can compare with ambient literature data for samples from Strem (US-MA) and Areva (Pierrelatte, France).

Lipp, M J; Jenei, Z; Park-Klepeis, J; Evans, W J

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Elucidating the organic-OMS interface and its implications for heterogeneous catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organic ordered mesoporous silica (OMS) hybrid materials have attracted great interest due to their potential applications for gas separations, and heterogeneous catalysis. Amine-functionalized OMS materials are active in a variety of base-catalyzed reactions. The key to successfully achieving the desired reactivity is the ability to rationally tether the targeted organic functionality onto the OMS surface. Understanding the organic-inorganic interface is crucial for rational design of heterogeneous catalysts, because the local structure and molecule dynamics are paramount in determining the reactivity of the organic groups attached to the OMS surface. This dissertation focuses on three goals that will lead to a description of the organic-OMS interface and designing hybrid catalysts: 1) Determining the dynamics of organic groups attached to the OMS surface, 2) Catalytic testing to understand how the local structure and dynamics of the organic moiety influence the catalytic properties of organic-OMS catalysts, 3) Designing more active hybrid catalysts by introducing higher loadings of organic group using dendrimer structures. Solid-state NMR is uniquely suited for quantifying dynamics in the milli- to nano-second time scale. Deuterium (2H) NMR is a powerful tool to obtain detailed information about the dynamics or organic molecules. In this study, several simple functional groups isotopically labeled with deuterium have been attached to MCM-41 and SBA-15. The spectra display different molecular motions for different organic moieties. The results have indicated that the interactions between the functional groups and silanol groups on the surface influence the mobility of the organic fragments. Also, the porosity of the solid supports effects dynamics via confinement. The catalytic properties of simple amine groups attached to MCM-41, containing primary, secondary, and tertiary amines have been compared in the Nitroaldol (Henry) reaction. The effects of amine identity, structure, loading, presence of surface silanols, and the substrate topology on the catalytic properties have been investigated. The dramatic decrease of the activity of amine-functionalized MCM-41 by capping the residual silanol groups with hexamethyldisilazane was ascribed to the decrease of the interactions of hydrogen bonding between the amine functional groups and surface silanols. The result was consistent with the changes of the molecular motions shown by 2H NMR measurements. Fabricating OMS hybrid materials with high densities of organic functional groups leads to challenges in realizing uniform, catalytically active sites. Our group has immobilized melamine-based dendrimers on the surfaces of amine-functionalized SBA-15 materials by iterative synthesis procedures. The current studies in this dissertation mainly describe the catalytic properties of these dendrimers on SBA-15 and MCM-41 in the Nitroaldol (Henry) reaction, the transesterification reaction of triglycerides and methanol to synthesize methyl esters, and the cross aldol reaction between acetone and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural. The results indicate that the OMS-dendron materials have potential as solid base catalysts for a range of reactions.

Wang, Qingqing

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z