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1

So How Do THey DeciDe  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

So How Do So How Do THey DeciDe wHaT To Do aT THe iNL? nuclear energy Nuclear energy is a clean, safe, vital part of this country's energy mix. S takeholders frequently tell us they're impressed by all the nuclear research we do at the idaho National Laboratory, but they wonder why we don't do more work on renewable energy, like wind, solar and hydro. well, the answer is, we do research in those

2

NSCU, September 2004 Duke's Milly Watt Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 NSCU, September 2004 Duke's Milly Watt Project Carla Ellis Faculty · Alvin Lebeck · Amin Vahdat-power hardware? Milly Watt Motivation #12;2 NSCU, September 2004 Energy should be a "first class" resource energy goals Milly Watt Vision NSCU, September 2004 Energy Management Spectrum · Re-examine interactions

Ellis, Carla

3

User Manual Milli-Q Reference System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is intended for use with a Milli-Q® Reference Water Purification System. This User Manual is a guide for use during the installation, normal operation and maintenance of a Milli-Q Reference Water Purification before attempting installation, normal operation or maintenance of the Water Purification System

Woodall, Jerry M.

4

Milli-Q Reference Water Purification System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Milli-Q® Reference Water Purification System The reference for ultrapure water systems EMD the requirements of the most demanding norms. We've achieved all this with a new purification strategy. Water. This water is sent through a small recirculation loop to the POD pak, where a final purification step

Woodall, Jerry M.

5

Millis, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Millis, Massachusetts: Energy Resources Millis, Massachusetts: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.1675975°, -71.3578357° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.1675975,"lon":-71.3578357,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

6

Search milli-charged particles at SLAC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Particles with electric charge q {triple_bond} Qe {le} 10{sup -3} e and masses in the range 1-1000 MeV/c{sup 2} are not excluded by present experiments or by astrophysical or cosmological arguments. A beam dump experiment uniquely suited to the detection of such {open_quotes}milli-charged{close_quotes} particles has been carried out at SLAC, utilizing the short-duration pulses of the SLC electron beam to establish a tight coincidence window for the signal. The detector, a large scintillation counter sensitive to very small energy depositions, provided much greater sensitivity than previous searches. Analysis of the data leads to the exclusion of a substantial portion of the charge-mass plane. In this report, a preliminary mass-dependent upper limit is presented for the charge of milli-charged particles, ranging from Q = 1.7 x 10{sup -5} at milli-charged particle mass 0.1 MeV/c{sup 2} to Q = 9.5 x 10{sup -4} at 100 MeV/c{sup 2}.

Langeveld, W.G.J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 52, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2005 1271 Measurement of Centi-Gray X-Ray Dose  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 52, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2005 1271 Measurement of Centi-Gray X- bination of single sheet higher film sensitivity to low energy X-rays along with a layered film dosimetryGy if required. Index Terms--Absorption spectra, gafchromic XR type T, low dose, radiation dosimetry

Yu, K.N.

8

Research Article Milli-free flow electrophoresis: I. Fast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but has not yet been implemented due to an incompatibility of scale. Continuous purification, in FFE a term of milli-free flow electrophoresis (mFFE) to describe mid-scale FFE with flow rates intermediate reactors with product flow rates of $5 to 2000 mL/min, too small for macro-FFE but too large for m

Krylov, Sergey

9

Future Roles of Milli-, Micro-, and Nano- Grids  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Future Roles of Milli-, Micro-, and Nano- Grids Future Roles of Milli-, Micro-, and Nano- Grids Chris Marnay, Bruce Nordman, and Judy Lai Environmental Energy Technologies Division presented at the CIGRÉ International Symposium The electric power system of the future - Integrating supergrids and microgrids Bologna, Italy, 13-15 September 2011 http://eetd.lbl.gov/EA/EMP/emp-pubs.html The work described in this paper was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability's Smart Grids Program in the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY LBNL-4927E Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither

10

Millis-Clicquot, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Millis-Clicquot, Massachusetts: Energy Resources Millis-Clicquot, Massachusetts: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.1688591°, -71.3527473° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.1688591,"lon":-71.3527473,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

11

rillEdge is a software system that provides real-time deci-sion support when drilling oil wells. Decisions are sup-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D rillEdge is a software system that provides real-time deci- sion support when drilling oil wells developed DrillEdge to reduce the cost and decrease the probability of fail- ures in oil well drilling. Currently, DrillEdge continuously mon- itors around 30 oil well drilling operations in parallel for sever

Aamodt, Agnar

12

Future Roles of Milli-, Micro-, and Nano- Grids  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Future Roles of Milli-, Micro-, and Nano- Grids Future Roles of Milli-, Micro-, and Nano- Grids Title Future Roles of Milli-, Micro-, and Nano- Grids Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication 2011 Authors Marnay, Chris, Bruce Nordman, and Judy Lai Conference Name CIGRÉ International Symposium The electric power system of the future - Integrating supergrids and microgrids Date Published 09/2011 Publisher LBNL Conference Location Bologna, Italy Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract Although it has slowed considerably, consumption of electricity continues to grow in developed economies. Further, there are some unknowns which might accelerate this growth, such as electrification of vehicle fleets and geothermal heat pump space and water heating. Most analysts anticipate that distributed energy resources (DER) will provide a large share of the expanded generation capacity required to meet this seemingly inexorably increasing electricity demand. Further, given the urgency of tackling the climate change problem, most of the added assets must be carbon free renewables or nuclear, end-use efficiency improvements, or highly efficient fossil-fired technologies. In developed economies worldwide, the current power delivery paradigm has been in place for more than a century, i.e. since the emergence of polyphase AC systems around the turn of the last century. A key feature of this structure is that, in principle, universal service is delivered at a consistent level of power quality and reliability (PQR) throughout large regions. This paper describes a future possible structure for the electricity generation and delivery system that leaves the existing high voltage meshed grid paradigm in place, but involves radical reorganization of parts of the distribution network and customer sites. Managing a much more diverse dispersed system poses major challenges to the current centralized grid paradigm, particularly since many of these assets are small to tiny by macrogrid standards and they may ultimately number in the millions. They are also not ones that centralized control can rely upon to function in traditionally dependable ways, e.g. renewable generation can be highly variable and changes in output of generators are not independent. Although most involved in the industry agree that a paradigm shift is both necessary and desirable to manage the new system, the nature of the future system remains quite unclear. In the possible structure described here, the traditional grid, or macrogrid, remains similar at the high voltage meshed level. Three new entities are added more locally: community grids or milligrids that operate a segment of the existing distribution system, microgrids which are akin to current customer sites but which have automonous control, and nanogrids, such as telecom or Ethernet networks that currently distribute power to many low-power devices. The latter exist currently in the local electrical systems but are not typically considered a part of the traditional electricity supply system. Because all these new entities exhibit some localized control, providing appropriate local heterogeneous PQR becomes a possibility. These new grid concepts enable a more "bottom-up" approach to electricity distribution, in contrast to the historic "top-down" model. The future will almost certainly include a mix of the two, but the balance among them and the interface (if any) between them is unclear.

13

Mildred (Millie) Dresselhaus and Her Impacts on Science and Women in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mildred (Millie) Dresselhaus and Mildred (Millie) Dresselhaus and Her Impacts on Science and Women in Science Mildred Dresselhaus is a recipient of the Enrico Fermi Award "for her scientific leadership, her major contributions to science and energy policy, her selfless work in science education and the advancement of diversity in the scientific workplace, and her highly original and impactful research." Resources with Additional Information · Patents · Honors · Interviews Mildred Dresselhaus Courtesy of Ed Quinn Mildred (Millie) Dresselhaus is 'one of the nation's foremost experts in the multifaceted field of carbon science. Her investigations into superconductivity, the electronic properties of carbon, thermoelectricity and the new physics at the nanometer scale have helped yield numerous scientific discoveries.'1

14

The Milli-Motein: A self-folding chain of programmable matter with a one centimeter module pitch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Milli-Motein (Millimeter-Scale Motorized Protein) is ca chain of programmable matter with a 1 cm pitch. It can fold itself into digitized approximations of arbitrary three-dimensional shapes. The small size of the ...

Knaian, Ara N.

15

A large-scale magnetic shield with 10^6 damping at milli-Hertz frequencies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A magnetically shielded environment with a damping factor larger than one million at the milli-Hertz frequency regime and an extremely low field and gradient over an extended volume is presented. This extraordinary shielding perfomance is to our knowledge unprecedented and represents an improvement of the state of the art in damping the difficult regime of very low-frequency distortions by more than an order of magnitude. Thus, a new generation of high precision measurements in fundamental physics and metrology is enabled with this technology, particularly suitable to find traces of new physics far beyond the reach of accelerator based physics. The technical realization of the shield with its improvements in design is discussed.

Altarev, I; Beck, D H; Chupp, T; Fierlinger, K; Fierlinger, P; Kuchler, F; Lins, T; Marino, M G; Niessen, B; Petzoldt, G; Singh, J T; Schlpfer, U; Schnabel, A; Stoepler, R; Stuiber, S; Strum, M; Taubenheim, B; Voigt, J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Buoyancy driven bubble rise and deformation in milli/micro channels filled with shear-thinning nanofluids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The motion and deformation characteristics of buoyancy driven air bubbles in milli- and micro- channels filled with nanofluids have been numerically investigated over wide range of Eotvos number using COMSOL Multiphysics 4.3a. The two dimensional unsteady simulations are carried out by adopting a level set method available in the solver. Experimental rheological properties of water based alumina nanofluids are adopted from the literature and these nanofluids obey shear-thinning power-law type non-Newtonian behavior. The range of volume fraction of nanoparticles considered in this work is ?=0.0150.035 which correspond to the power-law behavior index of shear-thinning nanofluid in the range n=0.780.58 respectively. The motion and deformation characteristics of bubbles in nanofluids are elucidated by presenting volume fraction images, streamline patterns and viscosity distributions around the rising bubbles. The volume fractions of nanoparticles present in the nanofluids play different roles on the deformation of mono-size bubbles in milli- and micro- channels. The deformation and breakup of bubbles are realized early in the case of milli-channels as compared to the case of micro-channels for a fixed Eotvos number. Further the Eotvos number at which bubble breakup occurs in both milli- and micro- channels is very different.

K. Dilleswara Rao; M. Vasukiran; A.R.K. Gollakota; Nanda Kishore

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Waveguide integrated low noise NbTiN nanowire single-photon detectors with milli-Hz dark count rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors are an ideal match for integrated quantum photonic circuits due to their high detection efficiency for telecom wavelength photons. Quantum optical technology also requires single-photon detection with low dark count rate and high timing accuracy. Here we present very low noise superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors based on NbTiN thin films patterned directly on top of Si3N4 waveguides. We systematically investigate a large variety of detector designs and characterize their detection noise performance. Milli-Hz dark count rates are demonstrated over the entire operating range of the nanowire detectors which also feature low timing jitter. The ultra-low dark count rate, in combination with the high detection efficiency inherent to our traveling wave detector geometry, gives rise to a measured noise equivalent power at the 10^(-20) W/Hz^(1/2) level.

Carsten Schuck; Wolfram H. P. Pernice; Hong X. Tang

2013-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

18

unitsmetricrpp.dvi  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

International International system of units (SI) 1 3. INTERNATIONAL SYSTEM OF UNITS (SI) See "The International System of Units (SI)," NIST Special Publication 330, B.N. Taylor, ed. (USGPO, Washington, DC, 1991); and "Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI)," NIST Special Publication 811, 1995 edition, B.N. Taylor (USGPO, Washington, DC, 1995). SI prefixes 10 24 yotta (Y) 10 21 zetta (Z) 10 18 exa (E) 10 15 peta (P) 10 12 tera (T) 10 9 giga (G) 10 6 mega (M) 10 3 kilo (k) 10 2 hecto (h) 10 deca (da) 10 -1 deci (d) 10 -2 centi (c) 10 -3 milli (m) 10 -6 micro (µ) 10 -9 nano (n) 10 -12 pico (p) 10 -15 femto (f) 10 -18 atto (a) 10 -21 zepto (z) 10 -24 yocto (y) J. Beringer et al.(PDG), PR D86, 010001 (2012) and 2013 update for the 2014 edition (http://pdg.lbl.gov) December 18, 2013 12:01 2 3. International system of units (SI) Physical quantity Name of unit Symbol Base units length meter

19

bectcom-milli | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PDF-579KB Appendix I, Sonic Cleaner Specifications PDF-97KB Appendix J, Air Heater Heat Loss to Stack Calculations PDF-772KB Appendix K, Remote Monitoring PDF-290KB...

20

Surgical Applications of Milli-Robots. Michael B. Cohny  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

instruments create diculties for the surgeon. In this paper, we present a design for an improved polypectomy averages are shown as horizontal lines. For wrist: at=solid, relaxed=dashed, exed=dotted. For index- gical instruments which are inserted into the body through a pre-existing ori#12;c

Wendlandt, Jeff

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deci centi milli" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Cooling down MiniGRAIL to milli-Kelvin temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The latest developments in the construction of the ultra-cryogenic spherical detector MiniGRAIL are presented. The room temperature part of the vibration isolation system was improved and provided with an attenuation of about 60 dB around 3 kHz. The transfer function of the cryogenic stages gave about 20 dB per stage, at the resonant frequency of the sphere. The latest results of three cryogenic tests at ultra-low temperature of the spherical detector MiniGRAIL, using several thermal anchorings, are presented. Minimum temperatures of 20 mK on the mixing chamber of the dilution refrigerator and 79 mK on the surface of the sphere were reached. During the last cool down, two capacitive transducers were mounted on the sphere. The first was coupled to a room temperature FET amplifier and the second to a transformer and a double stage SQUID amplifier. Unfortunately the SQUID did not work, so only the first resonator could be used. An equivalent temperature of about 20 K was measured during an acquisition run of 7 h, using the first transducer corresponding to the FET white noise.

A de Waard; L Gottardi; M Bassan; E Coccia; V Fafone; J Flokstra; A Karbalai-Sadegh; Y Minenkov; A Moleti; G V Pallottino; M Podt; B J Pors; W Reincke; A Rocchi; A Shumack; S Srinivas; M Visco; G Frossati

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Special dilution refrigerator systems of Milli-Kelvin detector experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several hundred ultra low temperature systems have been designed and built for a variety of applications. One common application is the refrigeration of low temperature detectors. Although many of the requirements are satisfied by standard designs, Oxford Instruments has often built special refrigerators to suit specific detector requirements. A few of the most interesting of these systems will be discussed. (1) dilution refrigerators to cool gravitational wave antennae to 65 mK; (2) rotating dilution refrigerator for cosmic ray detector experiments; (3) compact dilution refrigerator to cool large bolometer arrays within the SCUBA telescope; (4) side access systems for beam line experiments

Batey, G.; Balshaw, N. (Oxford Instruments Ltd., Old Station Way (United Kingdom))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Copyright A. J. Millis 2013 Columbia University Transition Metal Oxides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protactinium Uranium Neptunium Plutonium Americium Curium Berkelium 2 P°1/2 ? 1.1 1.3 1.5 1.38 1.36 1.28 1.3 1

Millis, Andrew

24

Conversion Tables  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center - Conversion Tables Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center - Conversion Tables Contents taken from Glossary: Carbon Dioxide and Climate, 1990. ORNL/CDIAC-39, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Third Edition. Edited by: Fred O'Hara Jr. 1 - International System of Units (SI) Prefixes 2 - Useful Quantities in CO2 3 - Common Conversion Factors 4 - Common Energy Unit Conversion Factors 5 - Geologic Time Scales 6 - Factors and Units for Calculating Annual CO2 Emissions Using Global Fuel Production Data Table 1. International System of Units (SI) Prefixes Prefix SI Symbol Multiplication Factor exa E 1018 peta P 1015 tera T 1012 giga G 109 mega M 106 kilo k 103 hecto h 102 deka da 10 deci d 10-1 centi c 10-2

25

Project TRACS: Empirically Investigating Transformation through Relatedness, Autonomy, and Competence Support Logic Model Rooted in Self-Determination Theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project TRACS: Empirically Investigating Transformation through Relatedness, Autonomy appointments toolkit (R, A , C) Project TRACS PI/Director Co-Director & Manager Project Leads & Team MSU&T and hiring procedures -Modern sexism is reduced -Women faculty feel improved job satisfaction -Women intend

Dyer, Bill

26

Design of Minimally Actuated Legged Milli-Robots Using Compliant Mechanisms and Folding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

selection of lightweight batteries at this scale is limited,Since the htweight batteries at this scale is limited, l be23]) and potentially even batteries into the robot structure

Hoover, Aaron Murdock

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

The circumstellar envelope of IRC+10216 from milli-arcsecond to arcmin scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aims.Analysis of the innermost regions of the carbon-rich star IRC+10216 and of the outer layers of its circumstellar envelope have been performed in order to constrain its mass-loss history. Methods: .We analyzed the high dynamic range of near-infrared adaptive optics and the deep V-band images of the circumstellar envelope of IRC+10216 using high angular resolution, collected with the VLT/NACO and FORS1 instruments. Results: .From the near-infrared observations, we present maps of the sub-arcsecond structures, or clumps, in the innermost regions. The morphology of these clumps is found to strongly vary from J- to L-band. Their relative motion appears to be more complex than proposed in earlier works: they can be weakly accelerated, have a constant velocity, or even be motionless with respect to one another. From V-band imaging, we present a high spatial resolution map of the shell distribution in the outer layers of IRC+10216. Shells are resolved well up to a distance of about 90'' to the core of the nebula and most of them appear to be composed of thinner elongated shells. Finally, by combining the NACO and FORS1 images, a global view is present to show both the extended layers and the bipolar core of the nebula together with the real size of the inner clumps. Conclusions: .This study confirms the rather complex nature of the IRC+10216 circumstellar environment. In particular, the coexistence at different spatial scales of structures with very different morphologies (clumps, bipolarity, and almost spherical external layers) is very puzzling. This confirms that the formation of AGB winds is far more complex than usually assumed in current models.

I. C. Leao; Patrick De Laverny; D. Mekarnia; J. R. De Medeiros; Benoit Vandame

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

A Scanning Tunneling Microscope at the Milli-Kelvin, High Magnetic Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

preparation in ultra-high vac- uum (UHV) and spectroscopic mapping with an electronic temperature of 240 mK.3 K) directly leverage the resulting combination of ultra-low temperature and atomic resolution

Petta, Jason

29

Integrated electronic transport and thermometry at milliKelvin temperatures and in strong magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We fabricated a He-3 immersion cell for transport measurements of semiconductor nanostructures at ultra low temperatures and in strong magnetic fields. We have a new scheme of field-independent thermometry based on quartz tuning fork Helium-3 viscometry which monitors the local temperature of the sample's environment in real time. The operation and measurement circuitry of the quartz viscometer is described in detail. We provide evidence that the temperature of two-dimensional electron gas confined to a GaAs quantum well follows the temperature of the quartz viscometer down to 4 mK.

Samkharadze, N.; Kumar, A.; Csathy, G. A. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Manfra, M. J. [Department of Physics, Birck Nanotechnology Center, School of Materials Engineering, and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W. [Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

MINT-MIS2007 / TSMMW2007 / MilliLab Workshop February 26-27, 2007, Seoul, Korea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulator (Silvaco). The insertion loss and isolation characteristics on the single pole single throw (SPST and Silvaco simulation result. 183 #12;(a) (b) Fig. 2. (a) Schematic cross-sectional view and (b) SEM image

Yang, Kyounghoon

31

REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS 82, 053902 (2011) Integrated electronic transport and thermometry at milliKelvin temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of semiconductor nanostructures at ultra low temperatures and in strong magnetic fields. We have a new scheme to 4 mK. © 2011 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3586766] I. INTRODUCTION One of the most excitations obeying non-Abelian statistics.3 Extending transport experiments to ultra low temperatures

Manfra, Michael J.

32

Profit Maximization of Cognitive Virtual Network Operator in A Dynamic Wireless Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the transmission price (deci- sion variable) and market state (exogenous stochastics). · Realistic cognitive radio

Huang, Jianwei

33

Nanoscale Biosensors for Environmental Monitoring and Biological Detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the Milli-Q water purification system from Millipore (by the Milli-Q water purification system from Millipore (

Yao, Jingjing

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Millie-Christine McKoy and the American Freak Show: Race, Gender, and Freedom in the Postbellum Era, 1851 - 1912  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

depicting Chang and Eng Bunker. The dress and scenerySiamese Twins Chang and Eng Bunker, in order to understandand financial success as the Bunker twins, they have not

Gold, Sarah E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Increased flexibility in the delivery of ultrapure water The Milli-Q Advantage system offers flexibility in the quality and delivery of various ultrapure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organic pollutants and microbiology.As these laboratory environments change, a broader range of techniques= 30 mM, t20= 30 mM, t21= 10 mM, t30= 10 mM). ADVERTISING FEATURE NATURE METHODS | DECEMBER 2006 | v

Cai, Long

36

Linking Perceptions of School Belonging to Academic Motivation and Academic Achievement Amongst Student Athletes: A Comparative Study Between High-Revenue Student Athletes and Non-Revenue Student Athletes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

60, 49-66. Ryan, R. , Stiller, J. , & Lynch, J. (1994).Powelson, 1991; Ryan, Stiller, & Lynch, 1994). Deci et al.

Anderson, Christine Marie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Capillary Electrophoresis-based Methodology Development for Biomolecule Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

18 M?) from a Milli?Q water purification system (Millipore,water from a Milli?Q water purification system (Millipore,by the Milli Q water purification system (Billerica, MA).

Li, Ni

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Capillary Electrophoresis-based Methodology Development for Biomolecule Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a Milli?Q water purification system (Millipore, Billerica,from a Milli?Q water purification system (Millipore, MA)by the Milli Q water purification system (Billerica, MA).

Li, Ni

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Nanoscale Biosensors for Environmental Monitoring and Biological Detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the Milli-Q water purification system from Millipore (by the Milli-Q water purification system from Millipore (The water samples were tested without further purification

Yao, Jingjing

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Lakes in General Circulation Models Primary Investigator: Brent Lofgren -NOAA GLERL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Investigators: Chris Milly, Isaac Held, Bruce Wyman - NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Overview The use

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deci centi milli" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

E-Print Network 3.0 - affects life history Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

41 Animal personalities and the divergence of life histories Summary: how life- history decisions that have already been made affect the costs and benefits of deci- sions......

42

4 Planning January 2007 100 MilliBv A r d i u r C. N e l s o n . ! A K P . a n d K o b e i t E.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between now and 2040, while Germany, Italy, and Japan will lose population. Only India--with a current suspect that the housing preferences of older, childless households will he different from those of other households. Second, household types are becoming more diverse, ln 1970, just after the population reached 200

Handy, Susan L.

43

Department of Pharmacology Shared Equipment Centrifugation & Accessories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-481) Autoclaves and Water Purification Systems 2 Stand alone Autoclaves (2-502) 1 MilliQ Water Purification System

44

Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part II. Recovery of Ammonia from Sour Waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a MiIli-Q water purification system (Millipore Corp. ).a Milli-Q water purification system ( Millipore Corp. ) was

Poole, L.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Genetic manipulation of the obligate chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water (18-?M? resistance) obtained from a Milli-?Q Biocel system (Millipore, Bedford, MA) or similar purification system

Beller, H.R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Wastren-EnergX Mission Support LLC Contract Number: DE-CI0000004 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee 128,879,762 Contract Period: December 2009 - July 2015 Fee Information...

47

Environmental Health Policy Decisions: The Role of Uncertainty in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1998 Abstract Regulatory reform will increasingly call for more economic analysis in deci- sions about of environmental health. The present article follows this train of thought while noting that regulatory reform

Washington at Seattle, University of

48

Security decision-making among interdependent organizations R. Ann Miura-Ko, Benjamin Yolken, John Mitchell, and Nicholas Bambos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the same passwords at several independent web sites, security deci- sions by one organization may have- ments of others. We apply this framework to investigate three examples: web site security with shared

Mitchell, John C.

49

PUBLISHED OCCASIONALLY BY THE FRIENDS OF THE BANCROFT LIBRARY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94720  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, cases and procedures in the office of the District Attorney of Alameda County, state finance, executive, with the Governor under pressure of deci- sion-making and their ensuing cabbages- and-kings conversations, that mark

California at Berkeley, University of

50

Outside Review of the Doctoral Program of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry of Texas Technical University (TTU)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

observed no desire to remain static. There is also a deci- sion-making process in place to support with the internal and external reviewers present and again on February 6 among internal reviewers. The review team

Rock, Chris

51

UK emissions of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...other land use, (v) waste, and (vi) other sources...forestry (LULUCF) and waste are similarly proportioned...8 per cent and manure storage systems for 6 per cent...is reported here from long-term monitoring of greenhouse...are still not enough long-term datasets to provide the...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

TEMPERATURE-GRADIENT INCUBATOR FOR DETERMINING THE TEMPERATURE RANGE OF GROWTH OF MICROORGANISMS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...temperatures at each end, and with insulation to prevent heat transfer...of compressed glass fiber. Insulation for the sides is rigid polyure...Centi- meter scale. thane foam poured in situ and permanently...sterilization, the top and side insulation, as well as heaters, thermoregula...

R. Paul Elliott

1963-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

The RD114/simian type D retrovirus receptor is a neutral amino acid transporter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...predicted 196-bp product (details are provided at http://www-shgc.stanford.edu/Mapping/rh/procedure/rhassaynew.html...hybrid mapping localized RDR to within 13 centiRay of marker SHGC-57346 (logarithm of odds score 12.10) located on the long...

John E. J. Rasko; Jean-Luc Battini; Rebecca J. Gottschalk; Ilya Mazo; A. Dusty Miller

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

MSU Extension Publication Archive Archive copy of publication, do not use for current recommendations. Up-to-date  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pan, to hold the sample under the oil. (Provide a hole in screen for the thermometer if one is used.) 4. Optional- A thermometer reading to 200° centi- grade (292°F). Procedure A. Collect one to one and one-half cups of oil (and thermometer if used). Turn the dial to read "0." Leave

55

The Acculturation of Chinese-American Adolescents in Negotiating Autonomy and Connectedness: Comparison between Chinese- and European-Americans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Hauser, Bell, & O?Connor, 1994; Collins & Repinski; Deci & Ryan, 1995; Grotevant & Cooper, 1986, 1998; Harter, 1999; Neff & Harter, 2002a; Ryan & Solky, 1996), families? ethnic backgrounds and cultural values play a role in defining the optimal..., Hauser, Bell, & O?Connor, 1994; Collins & Repinski; Deci & Ryan, 1995; Grotevant & Cooper, 1986, 1998; Harter, 1999; Neff & Harter, 2002a; Ryan & Solky, 1996), families? ethnic backgrounds and cultural values play a role in defining the optimal...

Chang, Tzu-Fen

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

56

Limnol. Oceanogr., 44(7), 1999, 18021809 - American Society of ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

amide gels were prepared in Leeds, UK, transported to Israel in watertight plastic containers with Milli-Q ..... Geological Survey of Canada. 601 Booth St., Ottawa.

1999-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

57

Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part II. Recovery of Ammonia from Sour Waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

October, 1984). 38. Water Purification Associates, "Waterthrough a MiIli-Q water purification system (Milliporethrough a Milli-Q water purification system ( Millipore

Poole, L.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Jeff Dozier ESM 203 Syllabus Fall 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Nov Tu How Earth System models work Jeff Crowley 2000; Milly 2008 20 1-Dec Th The end of Earth System

California at Santa Barbara, University of

59

Vehicular Thermoelectrics: A New Green Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Performance: Figure of Merit (ZT) Oregon State Vehicle Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Nanoscale Effects for Thermoelectrics (courtesy Millie Dresselhaus, MIT)...

60

Identification of a Xylogalacturonan Xylosyltransferase Involved in Pectin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...acetic acid:water, saponified in...against MilliQ water and freeze-dried...against MilliQ water followed by dialysis overnight against...5, prior to treatment by XGH. XGA hydrolase...each construct by electroporation and was selected...

Jacob Krüger Jensen; Susanne Oxenbøll Sørensen; Jesper Harholt; Naomi Geshi; Yumiko Sakuragi; Isabel Møller; Joris Zandleven; Adriana J. Bernal; Niels Bjerg Jensen; Charlotte Sørensen; Markus Pauly; Gerrit Beldman; William G.T. Willats; Henrik Vibe Scheller

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deci centi milli" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The catalytic oxidation of propylene: investigation of the effects of composition on activities of Fe?O?, K?O promoted chromia-alumina catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with silver ox!r}e. -'thylenc oxi 'e and car}&en dioxide were the piochzcts. T'ne oitinum temperature ?as found to bc n the vicinity of 260 to 270 degrees Centi};rude for a neiz catalyst. It i&as found that a ?dgh air-eth?ilens ratio i~s most favorable... with silver ox!r}e. -'thylenc oxi 'e and car}&en dioxide were the piochzcts. T'ne oitinum temperature ?as found to bc n the vicinity of 260 to 270 degrees Centi};rude for a neiz catalyst. It i&as found that a ?dgh air-eth?ilens ratio i~s most favorable...

Perkins, Thomas Keeble

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

62

On Hilbert's Tenth Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using an iterated Horner schema for evaluation of diophantine polynomials, we define a partial $\\mu$-recursive "decision" algorithm decis as a "race" for a first nullstelle versus a first (internal) proof of non-nullity for such a polynomial -- within a given theory T extending Peano Arithmetique PA. If T is diophantine sound, i.e., if (internal) provability implies truth -- for diophantine formulae --, then the T-map decis gives correct results when applied to the codes of polynomial inequalities $D(x_1,...,x_m) \

Michael Pfender

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

63

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 12, 42454258, 2012 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/12/4245/2012/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that previously the occurrence of INES 7 major accidents and the risks of radioactive contamination have been removal processes of 137Cs and 131I are quite dif- ferent, the radioactive contamination patterns over reactor accident can subject around 30 million people to radioactive contamination. The recent deci- sion

Meskhidze, Nicholas

64

Modeling the Relations Between Flow Regime Components, Species Traits, and Spawning Success of Fishes in Warmwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of warmwater stream fishes and may guide deci- sions related to stream regulation and management. Keywords impoundment and regulation can reduce peak and low discharge events in terms of both frequency and magnitude (Petts 1986). Peaking hydro- electric power generation often releases discrete surges of water from

Kwak, Thomas J.

65

25 Years of MCDA in nuclear emergency management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......with high chemical/nuclear accident risk perceptions...involved, public policy deliberative processes...analysis to guide public policy deliberations. Decis...public debate on nuclear power. Eur. J...multi-criteria analysis in nuclear emergency management...Intelligent Decision and Policy Making Support Systems......

K. Nadia Papamichail; Simon French

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

A Real-Time Decision Support System for High Cost Oil-Well Drilling Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Real-Time Decision Support System for High Cost Oil-Well Drilling Operations Odd Erik Gundersen In this paper we present DrillEdge - a commercial and award winning software system that monitors oil that provides real-time deci- sion support when drilling oil wells. Decisions are supported through analyzing

Aamodt, Agnar

67

Estimating the Weight of Evidence in Forensic Speaker Verification Beat Pfister and Rene Beutler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

speech database is used to calibrate the valuation scale for an individual case. 1. Introduction. Since even the best SV systems are not able to make this deci- sion 100 % correctly, the trade properties (e.g. sex, age, mental and health state, language). In order to use SV in foren- sic casework, we

68

T-Negative Issue 22  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

program. To substitute for the lower level, the dialogue was incredibly pyrotechnic. In all, the show was probably the best of the new Saturday morning offerings. However, STAR TREK was deci mated in the 70 market Neilson ratings, finishing a poor third...

Multiple Contributors

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

On the Complexity of Computing Generators of Closed Sets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Complexity of Computing Generators of Closed Sets Miki Hermann1 and Bari¸s Sertkaya2 1 LIX investigate the computational complexity of some deci- sion and counting problems related to generators the problem of checking the existence of a generator with a specified cardinality, and about the problem

Baader, Franz

70

Automated Meta-Level Control Reasoning in Complex Agents Anita Raja and Victor Lesser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-time control decisions on schedul- ing and planning of domain actions. These deci- sions are made actions, interact with other agents, plan a course of action and carry it out. All these have to be done or replanning. This requires an agent's de- liberation to be interleaved with execution. The planning

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

71

48 CINCIA HOJE vol. 31 n 183 Bases biolgicas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sustentabilidade ambiental. A decisão sobre essa questão, porém, também precisa levar em conta aspectos científicos- nômicos (expansão das ativida- des agrícolas), por um lado, e de sustentabilidade ambiental, por outro

Metzger, Jean Paul Walter

72

he Northwest Power and Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into account in deci- Fifth Northwest Power Plan Recommends Conservation, Wind Power to Reduce Risk of Future Adopts 23 Subbasin 8 Plans to Guide Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Success Stories: Flathead River 9 Flow on the Natural Resources; Fish, Wildlife and Parks; and Judiciary committees. Whiting, a member of the Confeder

73

Differentiability properties of Rank Linear Utilities G. Carlier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Differentiability properties of Rank Linear Utilities G. Carlier April 8, 2006 Abstract We study generalize the rank dependent expected utility and are called rank-linear utilities in deci- sion theory results generalize those obtained for the rank dependent expected utility in [1]. The author wishes

Carlier, Guillaume

74

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was chosen and thus noise on the BCD data lines causes only a temporary error. General Binary Coded Decimal Standard Identification Data is recorded as Binary Coded Decimal numbers. A standard frequency could location and the Binary-Coded Deci- mal Time Signals transmitted to the scopes. The second system

Groppi, Christopher

75

Sweden Beyond Oil: Nuclear Commitments and Solar Options  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...based on national deci-sions...re-quires more integration between end...and wind energy have to be...planning on the national level and...Energy of renewable energy plantations...transport (the grid above, say...Moreover, the challenge to policy-makers...open-ended energy policy can...control by the national government...

M. Lnnroth; T. B. Johansson; P. Steen

1980-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

76

Celebrating Women in Clean Energy Careers | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Women in Clean Energy Careers Women in Clean Energy Careers Celebrating Women in Clean Energy Careers October 3, 2012 - 12:23pm Addthis David Sandalow, Acting Under Secretary of the U.S. Energy Department 1 of 17 David Sandalow, Acting Under Secretary of the U.S. Energy Department Acting Under Secretary David Sandalow giving closing Remarks at the Women in Clean Energy Symposium. Image: Justin Knight Date taken: 2012-09-28 18:08 Millie Dresselhaus 2 of 17 Millie Dresselhaus Dresselhaus accepting a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Women in Clean Energy Symposium. Image: Justin Knight Date taken: 2012-09-28 15:28 Millie Dresselhaus 3 of 17 Millie Dresselhaus MIT President L. Rafael Reif presented the award to Dresselhaus, citing her significant accomplishments in developing thermoelectric devices.

77

Dental Institute Report  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Manager; Debbie Cummings, Millie Munoz-Cumming, Angela Wheeler, Sales Marketing Associate: Allison Pritchard Reprints Manager...what I have sadly come to call the "dumbing of America." Katherine H. Lowe 3300 Bluett Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48105 Response...

Michael Katz

1993-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

78

Solvent eects on the charge storage ability in polypyrrole T.F. Otero, I. Cantero, H. Grande  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Jansen) was distilled under vacuum before use. Methanol (Lab Scan, HPLC grade), ethanol ab- solute (Panreac, for analysis), propylene carbonate (Merck, >99% content), water (obtained from Milli Q Reagent

Otero, Toribio Fernández

79

A study on carbon dioxide emissions from bituminous coal in Korea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Consumption of primary energy in Korea increased 5.25% per year over a 10years span starting in 1990. Korea ranked 8th in primary energy consumption in 2011; coal consumption increased 35% from 87,827 milli...

Jeongwoo Lee; Chang-Sang Cho; Ki-hyup Hong; Jae-Hak Jeong

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Women in Clean Energy Symposium | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Women in Clean Energy Symposium Women in Clean Energy Symposium Women in Clean Energy Symposium Addthis David Sandalow, Acting Under Secretary of the U.S. Energy Department 1 of 17 David Sandalow, Acting Under Secretary of the U.S. Energy Department Acting Under Secretary David Sandalow giving closing Remarks at the Women in Clean Energy Symposium. Image: Justin Knight Date taken: 2012-09-28 18:08 Millie Dresselhaus 2 of 17 Millie Dresselhaus Dresselhaus accepting a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Women in Clean Energy Symposium. Image: Justin Knight Date taken: 2012-09-28 15:28 Millie Dresselhaus 3 of 17 Millie Dresselhaus MIT President L. Rafael Reif presented the award to Dresselhaus, citing her significant accomplishments in developing thermoelectric devices. "Everyone who spends a few minutes with her," he said, "knows the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deci centi milli" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Identification of a mutation in COL4A5 causative for X-linked Alport syndrome in the domestic dog and analysis of gene expression in the kidneys of affected and nonaffected siblings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

matrix and basement membranes (Table 1). Types I-IV represent fibrous collagens while __________________ *Reprinted with permission from Lowe JK, Guyon R, Cox ML, Mitchell DC, Lonkar AL et al. (2003) Radiation hybrid mapping of the canine type I.../doggy.html and http://www.fhcrc.org/science/dog_genome/dog.html. 20 Results The COL1A1 gene mapped to CFA9, 7.65 centiRay (cR) from GNGT2 and 27.8 cR from Ren126A15, as previously stated (Breen et al. 2001). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH...

Cox, Melissa Luanne

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

82

Potential vorticity in the thermocline of the Yucatan current  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-H-6 19 7. The acceleration potential and geostrophic velocity, on the specific volume anomaly surface of Z50 centiliters per ton, at section II as a function of distance along the section. The location of section II is given in Figure 12 23 8.... Isopleths of acceleration potential in dynamic centimeters on the surface where the specific volume anomaly is equal to 200 centiliters per ton 25 9, Isopleths of acceleration potential in dynamic centi- meters on the surface where the specific volume...

Ahrens, John

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Ferruginous layers in sediments from the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/2 to 2 cm) bands in seven cores from the continental slope, continental rise, and Sigsbee abyssal plain, Iron, manganese, cobalt, and nickel content were determined in 132 samples from the yellow layers and surrounding sediments by Atomic... in the cores (Fig- ure 3). Often, two zones occur together, separated by only a few centi- meters of gray lutite. The enrichment of the iron-rich zones appears to be a function of dilution effects by non-ferruginous gray clays; the darker yellow, thin zones...

Watson, Jerry Allan

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Climax vegetation and soils of the Blackland Prairie of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for tie I iree, inte -e. , ts and h. rpful 'ugi, s!"intra prov'deci by my . nmraitt *r members, Drs, C. i, . Ccclf ray, J, D. R)odd and M. F, Sweet- Special I ha?!cs . re exrr. rr!cd tn 'r;:, V. r'I, Mo"!ruing, Pore. t Sci . . nc r. ?! or r. :r. ol a...

Collins, Odell Brown

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Cell, Vol. 122, 169182, July 29, 2005, Copyright 2005 by Elsevier Inc. DOI 10.1016/j.cell.2005.06.006 Stochastic Gene Expression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.06.006 Stochastic Gene Expression in a Lentiviral Positive-Feedback Loop: HIV-1 Tat Fluctuations Drive Phenotypic that the phage's lysis/lysogeny life-cycle deci- sion is a paradigmatic example of how stochastic ther-HIV-1 Tat/computational study of an HIV-1 model vector promoters is critical in controlling the switch and can (LTR-GFP-IRES-Tat

Schaffer, David V.

86

PAHs, PCBs, PCNs, Organochlorine Pesticides, Synthetic Musks, and Polychlorinated n-Alkanes in U.K. Sewage Sludge:? Survey Results and Implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A 5-L sample of digested sludge was collected at each works from either the digester holding tank or the consolidation tank. ... A large glass chromatography column, fitted with a Teflon stopcock, was packed consecutively with DCM-extracted cotton wool, 5 g of deactivated Sigma F-20 alumina (80?200 mesh, activated at 400 C for 4 h and deactivated with 1% Milli-Q water), 10 g of deactivated Aldrich 923 silica (100?200 mesh, activated at 120 C overnight and deactivated with 5% Milli-Q water), and 1 cm of sodium sulfate. ...

Joanna L. Stevens; Grant L. Northcott; Gary A. Stern; Gregg T. Tomy; Kevin C. Jones

2002-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

87

High energy resolution inelastic x-ray scattering at the SRI-CAT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a combination of vugraphs and two papers. The vugraphs give information on the beamline at the APS for IXS and the science addressable by IXS. They also cover the 10 milli-eV resolution spectrometer and the 200 milli-eV resolution spectrometer. The first paper covers the performance of the focusing Ge(444) backscattering analyzers for the inelastic x-ray scattering. The second paper discusses inelastic x-ray scattering from TiC and Ti single crystals.

Macrander, A.T.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Noncontact deep level photo-thermal spectroscopy: Technique and application to semi-insulating GaAs Wafers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to high resistivity materials, since the Debye-Huckel length is too large several milli- meters for semi materials. In DLPTS, the thermal recovery of carriers after excita- tion is monitored by a subNoncontact deep level photo-thermal spectroscopy: Technique and application to semi-insulating Ga

Mandelis, Andreas

89

Quantum Monte Carlo Simulations of Solid 4 P.A. Whitlock1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Instituto de F´isica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083 Campinas -- SP, Brazil vitiello]. Interest has been recently renewed by the torsional oscillator experiments of Kim and Chan [20]. Ultrahigh below 230 milliKelvin. These observations have lead to renewed interest in the measurements of the Bose

Whitlock, Paula

90

Inclusion Body Isolation Maxi Kit Product Insert Product # 17700  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. coli. The kit includes reagents specially formulated to achieve rapid and high-quality purification in solid form 2. Solubilization of purified inclusion bodies 3. Purification of the recombinant protein · Vortex · Micropipettors · Sterile, deionized water or Milli-Q® water Procedure This section describes

Lebendiker, Mario

91

ESSES 2003 2003, Carla Schlatter Ellis Energy Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ESSES 2003© 2003, Carla Schlatter Ellis Energy Management at Upper Levels of System Design Carla Schlatter Ellis Systems & Architecture Milly Watt Project 2ESSES 2003© 2003, Carla Schlatter Ellis Energy Watt Project #12;2 3ESSES 2003© 2003, Carla Schlatter Ellis Energy should be a "first class" resource

Ellis, Carla

92

Phet. Spwe Sd.. Vol. 43. No. 12, pp. 1485--1516.1995 Copyright ic, 1995 Elsevier Science Ltd  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their lifetimes. Both transport (diffusion. convection, escape, and winds) and physico-chemical effects in the milli- meter and submilIimeter range has made significant contributions to the study of chemical devoted to the exploration of the far-infrared and submillimeter range. Acompilation of guidelines

Atreya, Sushil

93

Oxidation-Induced Self-Assembly of Ag Nanoshells into Transparent and Opaque Ag Hydrogels and Aerogels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The water used in all syntheses was 18 M? milli-Q filtered. ... For the preparation of concentrated Ag sols, two techniques were employed; centrifuge filtration (CF) and rotatory evaporation (RE). ... With CF technique, Sartorius Vivaspin centrifuge filters (MWCO 30,000) were employed. ...

Xiaonan Gao; Richard J Esteves; Thi Thu Hien Luong; Rajendra Jaini; Indika U. Arachchige

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

94

Fast and Easy Sample Dialysis When downstream quality matters,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with Milli-Q water and equilibrate for 10 minutes 2. Remove water and weigh dialysis device 3. Add the sampleFast and Easy Sample Dialysis When downstream quality matters, make sure your upstream tools are the best #12;Fast and Easy Sample Dialysis for Buffer Exchange, Sample Desalting or Sample Concentration

Lebendiker, Mario

95

Repression of Essential Chloroplast Genes Reveals New Signaling Pathways and Regulatory Feedback Loops in Chlamydomonas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a small bag of dialysis tubing (SpectrumLabs...005% SDS). Electroelution of the proteins...of total RNA was electrophoresed in a 1.2 to 1...rinsed with MilliQ water and the RNA was...nuclease-free water (not DEPC treated...subsequent DNase I treatments (Roche) in presence...

Silvia Ramundo; Michèle Rahire; Olivier Schaad; Jean-David Rochaix

2013-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

96

Fish Slaughter, Killing, and Euthanasia: A Review of Major Published U.S. Guidance Documents and General  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CIR1525 Fish Slaughter, Killing, and Euthanasia: A Review of Major Published U.S. Guidance of County Commissioners Cooperating. Millie Ferrer-Chancy, Interim Dean Introduction Fish are important. However, non-native fish illegally released into the environment pose a nuisance. In each case, death

Watson, Craig A.

97

Evidence of magnetic isotope effects during thermochemical sulfate reduction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...4). The acid/water would come from...nitrogen flow. Water lost to evaporation...mL of Milli-Q water through a septum...in ref. 38). Recovery was incomplete because...through radical condensation reactions. 1 Farquhar...Thiemens MH ( 2000 ) Atmospheric influence of Earths earliest...

Harry Oduro; Brian Harms; Herman O. Sintim; Alan J. Kaufman; George Cody; James Farquhar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Simultaneous Determination of Sulfonamides, Penicillins and Coccidiostats in Pork by High-Performance Liquid ChromatographyTandem Mass Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......technique such as atmospheric pressure ionization...employed: one with water and a one with solid-phase...Spain). Ultrapure water was made in-house with a Milli-Q water system (Millipore...in-house nitrogen generator from Peak Scientific......

C. Nebot; P. Regal; J. Miranda; A. Cepeda; C. Fente

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

System Level Signal and Power Integrity Analysis Methodology for System-In-Package Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The in the system, and 3) efficiently handle large sized problems so as paper briefly outlines some new modeling for these package using a range of technologies from new materials and effects accurately and hence, compromises systems, where milli-volt amplitude schematic diagram of a SiP with integrated RF / Digital, levels matter

Swaminathan, Madhavan

100

Electromagnetic Generators for Portable Power Applications Matthew Kurt Senesky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or turbines paired with electrical generators. Producing such a system to run efficiently on the milli to power tools to electric vehicle drives to wind power generation -- that would benefit from highElectromagnetic Generators for Portable Power Applications by Matthew Kurt Senesky B.A. (Dartmouth

Sanders, Seth

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deci centi milli" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Identification and Quantification of Several Contaminated Compounds in Replacement Liquids of Electronic Cigarettes by Gas ChromatographyMass Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......sodium sulfate as a water scavenger were added...0 mL of Milli-Q water containing ascorbic...finally dried in a nitrogen stream. The residue...injected into the gas chromatography...are miscible with water, acetone, diethyl...to the high water solubility of TEG, TeED, PEG......

Jin-Aa Oh; Ho-Sang Shin

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Supporting Information Interaction-Dependent PCR: Identification of Ligand-Target Pairs from Libraries of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sigma-Aldrich, unless otherwise noted. Water was purified with a Milli-Q purification system. DNA; reverse-phase separation was performed on an Alliance 2695 (Waters) HPLC system using a UPLC BEH C18. Synthesis and Purification of Oligonucleotide Conjugates SI-5 D. IDPCR Methods i. Primer Extension and q

Liu, David R.

103

Supporting Information Unexpected Role of Activated Carbon in Promoting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from a Millipore (Billerica, MA) Milli-Q® water purification system and used to prepare reaction, MA). All reagents were used without further purification. High purity deionized water was generated-Aldrich and Fisher Scientific, and in the form of 40% solution in water) from Sigma-Aldrich. The isotopes NDMA-d6

Huang, Ching-Hua

104

Procedure for Cleaning Bottles for Trace Metal Analysis Initial cleaning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Procedure for Cleaning Bottles for Trace Metal Analysis Initial cleaning: Supplies LDPE 60ml bottles (nalgene) ACS grade Hydrochloric acid Trace metal grade nitric acid Day 1 1. Submerge 60ml bottles for up to three uses) 2. Rinse 3x in milli-q (DI) water 3. Fill bottles with 2% trace metal grade nitric

Paytan, Adina

105

Equipment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...polarized d-c or a-c voltage, or insulation resistance. Range of voltage measurement...Milli-microsecond Time Interval measuring device. SPECIFICATIONS INPUT PULSE RANGE: 5 105v COUNT STORAGE...its use in any convenient location. (Thermal Dynamic Products Inc., Dept. 247...

JOSHUA STERN

1958-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

106

Power Aware Page Allocation Alvin R. Lebeck  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Aware Page Allocation Alvin R. Lebeck Department of Computer Science Duke University alvy@cs.duke.edu http://www.cs.duke.edu/~alvy Milly Watt #12;Power Aware Page Allocation 2© Alvin R. Lebeck, 2001, NSF Research Instrumentation, Intel, Microsoft #12;Power Aware Page Allocation 3© Alvin R. Lebeck

Ellis, Carla

107

Power Aware Page Allocation Alvin R. Lebeck, Xiaobo Fan, Heng Zeng, Carla Ellis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Aware Page Allocation Alvin R. Lebeck, Xiaobo Fan, Heng Zeng, Carla Ellis Department of Computer Science Duke University alvy@cs.duke.edu http://www.cs.duke.edu/~alvy Milly Watt #12;Power Aware Page Allocation 2© Alvin R. Lebeck, 2000 Power Aware System Design ?Traditional system design targets

Ellis, Carla

108

The effects of chronic gamma radiation on the peripheral blood of Spanish goats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Ihaaua Ma?hey. Ie belonged te tha ~ grump unposed to ?antrum Nldiatiamy de%turn?ad fram ~ po ge lggmarmn aeu?e? at a desa level st N. R milli?up/hr, f'em 34 hours evemy fourth day over a three-year period (total dossi 608 rsp. ), During th? three...

Leidy, Ross Bennett

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

109

SHORT COMMUNICATION Ned A. Stephenson Alexis T. Bell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spectroscopy has been developed to measure the concentration of hydro- gen peroxide from 10?3 to 10 M. Hydrogen, hydrometallurgy, and metal finishing [1]. A number of biological processes also produce and consume hydro- gen peroxide in the micro- to milli-molar range [13, 14]. Spectroscopic techniques involving chemilumi

Bell, Alexis T.

110

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanotechnology 15 (2004) S504S511 PII: S0957-4484(04)77586-8  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the industrial revolution at the milli-inch length scale and in the semiconductor revolution at the micrometre components. However, at the beginning of the first industrial revolution in the middle of the 18th century. cost, industrial mass production for the final phase of the sec- ond industrial revolution

111

Kanan, Liu et al. Supplementary Information page 1 "Reaction Discovery Enabled by DNA-Templated Synthesis and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. For purification and characterization of small-molecule products arising from non-DNA- templated reactions.075% of expected masses. All H2O used in the manipulations below was obtained from a Milli-Q purification system with a Varian Pursuit C18 1.0 gram-scale preparative reverse-phase column. Proton magnetic resonance (1 H

Liu, David R.

112

Chapter 4: The Building Architectural Design  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

: The Building : The Building Architectural Design Schematic Design Designing Using Computer Simulations Design of High Performance Features and Systems Designing for Daylighting Passive and Active Solar Systems Accommodating Recycling Activities LANL | Chapter 4 The Building Architectural Design Schematic Design Achieving a sustainable building requires a commitment from developing the initial F&OR documents through construction detailing and commissioning. Initial deci- sions, such as the building's location, general massing, and configuration profoundly affect the building's envi- ronmental impact and energy performance. Well- defined sustainable goals will guide the entire spectrum of decision-making throughout the design and con- struction process (see Chapter 2).

113

SRNL - News Room  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coveted R&D 100 Award Coveted R&D 100 Award ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) SRNL Wins Coveted R&D 100 Award AIKEN, S.C. (Sept. 12, 2006) - Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory, along with team members from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, have been named winners of an R&D 100 Award for their invention, the MilliWave Thermal Analyzer. The R&D 100 awards, considered the "Oscars of research and development," are presented each year by R&D magazine to the 100 most technologically significant inventions of the year. The MilliWave Thermal Analyzer, developed by SRNL's Gene Daniel and Don Miller and their colleagues, uses millimeter-wave electromagnetic radiation for non-contact, real-time measurements of temperature, amount of energy emitted, and physical changes of materials under extreme temperatures or corrosive environments.

114

Weakly interacting sub-eV particle searches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We make use of the generation-regeneration or "light shining through a wall" technique in searches for optical-wavelength photons mixing with hypothetical hidden-sector paraphotons in the mass range between 10^-5 and 10^-2 electron volts for a mixing parameter greater than 10^-7 and in sensitive searches for scalar and pseudoscalar coupling of photons to light neutral bosons in the mass range of approximately 1.0 milli-electron volts and coupling strength greater than 10^-6 GeV-1. Additionally, there is an effort underway to use photons in the microwave region using this same technique to make a more sensitive measurement in the mass range of approximately 0.1 milli-electron volts. The equipment in the latter effort will be used to search for galactic halo axions in this same mass range.

Afanasev, A; Beard, K B; Biallas, G; Boyce, J; Hirshfield, J L; Jiang, Y; Kazakevitch, G; LaPointe, M A; Martin, A; Minarni, M; Ramdon, R; Shinn, Michelle D; Slocum, P

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

How Bilayer Graphene Got a Bandgap  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Graphene is the two-dimensional crystalline form of carbon, whose extraordinary electron mobility and other unique features hold great promise for nanoscale electronics and photonics. But theres a catch: graphene has no bandgap. Now Feng Wang and his colleagues at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley have engineered a bandgap in bilayer graphene that can be precisely controlled from 0 to 250 milli-electron volts, which is the energy of infrared radiation.

Feng Wang

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

116

How Bilayer Graphene Got a Bandgap  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphene is the two-dimensional crystalline form of carbon, whose extraordinary electron mobility and other unique features hold great promise for nanoscale electronics and photonics. But theres a catch: graphene has no bandgap. Now Feng Wang and his colleagues at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley have engineered a bandgap in bilayer graphene that can be precisely controlled from 0 to 250 milli-electron volts, which is the energy of infrared radiation.

Feng Wang

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

117

How Bilayer Graphene Got a Bandgap  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Graphene is the two-dimensional crystalline form of carbon, whose extraordinary electron mobility and other unique features hold great promise for nanoscale electronics and photonics. But theres a catch: graphene has no bandgap. Now Feng Wang and his colleagues at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley have engineered a bandgap in bilayer graphene that can be precisely controlled from 0 to 250 milli-electron volts, which is the energy of infrared radiation.

Wang, Feng

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

118

APPAREILLAGE HAUTE PRESSION HYDROSTATIQUE 0 P 40 kbar BASSE TEMPRATURE 500 K > T > 1,4 K  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contraintes anisotropes, prouvent les bonnes qualités d'hydro- staticité de la pression. Un volume utile de 1 micro fours placés à l'intérieur de la cellule sous pression. On a réalisé ainsi la synthèse du diamant quelques milli-degré K avec des micro bombes et réaliser, par exemple, des expériences d

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

119

9 Fermi 10/20/00  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

20, 2000 20, 2000 Number 18 f Photo by Reidar Hahn I N S I D E : 4 S a v i n g t h e D a y 6 K e e p i n g i t C o o l 1 0 C o n t i n u i n g E d u c a t i o n i n t h e M a i n C o n t r o l R o o m 1 2 F a m o u s i n S i c i l y 1 4 F e r m i l a b Aw a r d W i n n e r s Millie Comes to Fermilab 2 Millie f Comes to Fermilab 2 FERMINEWS October 20, 2000 by Judy Jackson It was a special pleasure, Millie Dresselhaus said, to visit the physics laboratory named in honor of her former teacher at the University of Chicago, Enrico Fermi. During her September 27-28 visit to Fermilab for an onsite DOE review of the laboratory, Dresselhaus, director of the Department of EnergyÕs Office of Science, spoke with respect and affection of the professor she knew during her years as a University of Chicago graduate student, She referred often to FermiÕs legendary concern for graduate students and young physicists.

120

Readiness Review RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Readiness Review Module Readiness Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Readin Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan ness Rev view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) view e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-

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121

Preliminary Safety Design RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Preliminary Safety Design Review Module Preliminary Safety Design Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF Pr C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R reliminar Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan ry Safety view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) y Design e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

122

Facility Disposition Safety Strategy RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Facility Disposition Safety Strategy Review Module Facility Disposition Safety Strategy Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF Facilit C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R ty Dispos Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan sition Saf view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) fety Strat e pplicability D-3 EMENT tegy CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

123

Quality Assurance for Critical Decision Reviews RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Quality Assurance for Quality Assurance for Critical Decision Reviews Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF Q C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Quality A Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan Assuranc view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) e (QA) e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

124

Earned Value Management System RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Earned Value Management System Review Module Earned Value Management System Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O Ea 0 OFFICE OF arned Va C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R alue Man Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan agement view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) t System e pplicability D-3 EMENT (EVMS) CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

125

National Environmental Policy Act RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Environmental Policy Act Review Module National Environmental Policy Act Review Module March 2010 CD- N -0 OFFICE O National E C CD-1 OF ENVIRO Standa Environm Rev Critical Deci CD-2 M ONMENTA ard Review mental P view Modul ision (CD) A C March 2010 AL MANAG Plan olicy Act le Applicability D-3 GEMENT t (NEPA) CD-4 ) Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

126

Commissioning Plan RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Checkout, Testing, and Checkout, Testing, and Commissioning Plan Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O Ch 0 OFFICE OF heckout, T C CD-1 F ENVIRON Standard R Testing, a Revi Critical Decis CD-2 Ma NMENTAL Review Plan and Com iew Module sion (CD) Ap CD arch 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) mmissioni e pplicability D-3 EMENT ing Plan CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

127

Seismic Design Expectations Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Seismic Design Expectations Report Seismic Design Expectations Report March 2010 CD- This Rev of th Se -0 view Module w he overall Cons OFFICE O eismic De C CD-1 was used to dev struction Projec inco OF ENVIRO Standard esign Exp Critical Deci CD-2 M velop the Revie ct Review cond orporated in the ONMENTA Review Pla pectation ision (CD) A C March 2010 ew Plan for the ducted in 2009 e current versio AL MANAG an (SRP) ns Report Applicability D-3 e Oak Ridge Bl 9. Lessons lear on of the Modu GEMENT t (SDER) CD-4 ldg. 3019 60% rned from this r ule. ) Post Ope design review review have be eration w as part een Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental

128

Final Design RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Final Design Review Module Final Design Review Module March 2010 CD-0 [This Rev Design Re O 0 view Module w eview of the OR OFFICE OF C CD-1 was used to dev R U 233 Dispo F ENVIRO Standard R Fin Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M velop the Revie osition Project ONMENTAL Review Plan al Design view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 ew Plan for 90% in 2009. Lesso Module.] L MANAGE n (SRP) n e pplicability D-3 % Design Revi ons learned hav EMENT CD-4 iew of SWPF i ve been incorpo Post Ope in 2008 and for orated in the R eration r 60% Review Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively.

129

Integrated Project Team RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Integrated Project Team (IPT) Review Module Integrated Project Team (IPT) Review Module March 2010 CD-0 This R O 0 Review Modul OFFICE OF Inte C CD-1 le was piloted F ENVIRO Standard R grated P Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M at the OR U 23 incorporated ONMENTAL Review Plan Project Te view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 33 Disposition in the Review L MANAGE n (SRP) eam (IPT e pplicability D-3 Project in 200 Module. EMENT T) CD-4 09. Lessons lea Post Ope arned have been eration n Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM

130

Conceptual Safety Design RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conceptual Safety Design Review Module Conceptual Safety Design Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF C C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Conceptua Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan al Safety view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) y Design e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital

131

Conceptual Design RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conceptual Design Review Module Conceptual Design Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Concep Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan ptual De view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) sign e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

132

Acquisition Strategy RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Acquisition Strategy Review Module Acquisition Strategy Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Acquisi Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan ition Stra view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) ategy e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,

133

VOLUME I A HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

I I A HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION THE NEW WORLD, 1939 /1946 RICHARD G. HEWLETT AND OSCAR E. ANDERSON, JR. 1962 UNIVERSITY PARK, PENNSYLVANIA THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY PRESS Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 62-14633 Designed by Marilyn Shobaken CONTENTS FOREWORD BY THE CHAIRMAN, v HISTORICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE ix PREFACE 1 THE INHERITANCE Historical setting, January, 1947; summary of AEC inheritance. 2 IN THE BEGINNING Discovery of fission; first efforts to gain federal sup- port for nuclear research; growing interest in military potential; authority for an all-out investigation of atomic weapons. 3 EXPLORING THE ROUTES TO THE WEAPON OSRD efforts to select best production process; deci- sion to expand project, June, 1942; transfer of re-

134

Project Execution Plan RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project Execution Plan (PEP) Review Module Project Execution Plan (PEP) Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF P C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Project E Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan Execution view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) n Plan e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

135

Risk Management RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Risk Management Review Module Risk Management Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Risk M Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan Managem view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE (SRP) ment e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008, Integration of Safety into the Design Process, and EM's internal

136

What is Clean Cities?; Clean Cities Fact Sheet (September 2008 Update)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP), Clean Cities con- tributes to the energy, environmental, and economic security of the United States by supporting local deci- sions to reduce our dependence on imported petroleum. Established in 1993 in response to the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 1992, the partnership provides tools and resources for voluntary, community-centered programs to reduce consumption of petroleum-based fuels. In almost 90 coalitions, government agencies and private companies voluntarily come together under the umbrella of Clean Cities. The partnership helps all parties identify mutual interests and meet the objectives of reducing the use of imported oil, developing regional economic opportunities, and improving air quality.

137

Petroleum prospects of a part of the Marfa Basin, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, an 3. les 'ifith F'iarlxeC unconformity on the Pennsyl vaIlxan BnI3 l s ovcr3. af n u~lconformably by ti e Tr3assic Hissett conglomerate. f: 'e slssctt . 11 Xne c&IIi'lIImerate Xs &IIIIIsusl feet t ~c'I~ ~Tosyww 0rc tr, cwo ~s cora% e. ts mrc...:tion in this area, 2 T I;. 6 C 7 U K i'. h I' lc: Tho 1-'. . r 'ciao=, ofo roc!cs 8-". . io-. . es . . -. , ' the . '. . r. ! thon cnd dolit'-rio rapicns:. . re intec!c:ell fou lcd ~id fau. . deci. Lc. Jf. ' 'L'h"= defor'. :c tioF. Ih! t ' hc! Qx; Gs. :I'8- aa...

Seward, Clay Luzenberg

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

138

DECIGO: The Japanese space gravitational wave antenna  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

DECi-hertz Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (DECIGO) is the planned Japanese space gravitational wave antenna, aiming to detect gravitational waves from astrophysically and cosmologically significant sources mainly between 0.1 Hz and 10 Hz and thus to open a new window for gravitational wave astronomy and for the universe. DECIGO will consist of three drag-free spacecraft, 1000 km apart from each other, whose relative displacements are measured by a differential Fabry-Perot interferometer. We plan to launch DECIGO in middle of 2020s, after sequence of two precursor satellite missions, DECIGO pathfinder and Pre-DECIGO, for technology demonstration required to realize DECIGO and hopefully for detection of gravitational waves from our galaxy or nearby galaxies.

Shuichi Sato; Seiji Kawamura; Masaki Ando; Takashi Nakamura; Kimio Tsubono; Akito Araya; Ikkoh Funaki; Kunihito Ioka; Nobuyuki Kanda; Shigenori Moriwaki; Mitsuru Musha; Kazuhiro Nakazawa; Kenji Numata; Shin-ichiro Sakai; Naoki Seto; Takeshi Takashima; Takahiro Tanaka; Kazuhiro Agatsuma; Koh-suke Aoyanagi; Koji Arai; Hideki Asada; Yoichi Aso; Takeshi Chiba; Toshikazu Ebisuzaki; Yumiko Ejiri; Motohiro Enoki; Yoshiharu Eriguchi; Masa-Katsu Fujimoto; Ryuichi Fujita; Mitsuhiro Fukushima; Toshifumi Futamase; Katsuhiko Ganzu; Tomohiro Harada; Tatsuaki Hashimoto; Kazuhiro Hayama; Wataru Hikida; Yoshiaki Himemoto; Hisashi Hirabayashi; Takashi Hiramatsu; Feng-Lei Hong; Hideyuki Horisawa; Mizuhiko Hosokawa; Kiyotomo Ichiki; Takeshi Ikegami; Kaiki T Inoue; Koji Ishidoshiro; Hideki Ishihara; Takehiko Ishikawa; Hideharu Ishizaki; Hiroyuki Ito; Yousuke Itoh; Nobuki Kawashima; Fumiko Kawazoe; Naoko Kishimoto; Kenta Kiuchi; Shiho Kobayashi; Kazunori Kohri; Hiroyuki Koizumi; Yasufumi Kojima; Keiko Kokeyama; Wataru Kokuyama; Kei Kotake; Yoshihide Kozai; Hideaki Kudoh; Hiroo Kunimori; Hitoshi Kuninaka; Kazuaki Kuroda; Kei-ichi Maeda; Hideo Matsuhara; Yasushi Mino; Osamu Miyakawa; Shinji Miyoki; Mutsuko Y Morimoto; Tomoko Morioka; Toshiyuki Morisawa; Shinji Mukohyama; Shigeo Nagano; Isao Naito; Kouji Nakamura; Hiroyuki Nakano; Kenichi Nakao; Shinichi Nakasuka; Yoshinori Nakayama; Erina Nishida; Kazutaka Nishiyama; Atsushi Nishizawa; Yoshito Niwa; Taiga Noumi; Yoshiyuki Obuchi; Masatake Ohashi; Naoko Ohishi; Masashi Ohkawa; Norio Okada; Kouji Onozato; Kenichi Oohara; Norichika Sago; Motoyuki Saijo; Masaaki Sakagami; Shihori Sakata; Misao Sasaki; Takashi Sato; Masaru Shibata; Hisaaki Shinkai; Kentaro Somiya; Hajime Sotani; Naoshi Sugiyama; Yudai Suwa; Rieko Suzuki; Hideyuki Tagoshi; Fuminobu Takahashi; Kakeru Takahashi; Keitaro Takahashi; Ryutaro Takahashi; Ryuichi Takahashi; Tadayuki Takahashi; Hirotaka Takahashi; Takamori Akiteru; Tadashi Takano; Keisuke Taniguchi; Atsushi Taruya; Hiroyuki Tashiro; Yasuo Torii; Morio Toyoshima; Shinji Tsujikawa; Yoshiki Tsunesada; Akitoshi Ueda; Ken-ichi Ueda; Masayoshi Utashima; Yaka Wakabayashi; Hiroshi Yamakawa; Kazuhiro Yamamoto; Toshitaka Yamazaki; Jun'ichi Yokoyama; Chul-Moon Yoo; Shijun Yoshida; Taizoh Yoshino

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Prelminary Design RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Preliminary Design Review Module Preliminary Design Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Prelim Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan inary De view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) esign e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

140

Evaluation of Advanced Heliostat Reflective Facets on Cost and Performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Heliostat reflective facets have traditionally been constructed with glass/silver and metal back support, which may be near reaching its minimum cost point. During the past year, Sandia National Laboratories evaluated alternative low-cost materials and manufacturing methods to construct facets with the goal of reducing current facet cost by at least 25% while maintaining surface slope errors of 1 milli-radians RMS or below. Several companies developed prototype facet samples, which were optically evaluated at Sandia and compared to baseline facet samples using a proposed cost-to-performance metric. A cost-performance metric for comparing facets was developed by modeling and optimizing the hypothetical SunShot 200 \\{MWe\\} power tower plant scenario in DELSOL, a computer code for system-level modeling of power tower systems. We varied the slope error on the facets and adjusted the cost on the facets to maintain a constant plant levelized cost of energy (LCOE). The result of these models provided a chart of the facet optical performance and the allowable facet cost for a constant plant LCOE. The size of the prototype facet samples ranged from 1.4 to 3 m2. The measured optical slope errors were between 1 and 2 milli- radians RMS when compared to a flat mirror design shape. Despite slope errors greater than 1 milli-radians RMS, some of the prototype samples met the cost goals for this project using the cost-performance metric. Next steps are to work with the companies to improve the manufacturing processes and further reduce the cost and improve on the optical performance to reach Department of Energy SunShot goal of $75/m2 for heliostats.

J. Yellowhair; C.E. Andraka

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deci centi milli" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Entanglement detection in hybrid optomechanical systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study a device formed by a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) coupled to the field of a cavity with a moving end mirror and find a working point such that the mirror-light entanglement is reproduced by the BEC-light quantum correlations. This provides an experimentally viable tool for inferring mirror-light entanglement with only a limited set of assumptions. We prove the existence of tripartite entanglement in the hybrid device, persisting up to temperatures of a few milli-Kelvin, and discuss a scheme to detect it.

De Chiara, Gabriele [Fisica Teorica: Informacio i Fenomens Quantics, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Paternostro, Mauro [Centre for Theoretical Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Palma, G. Massimo [NEST, Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, I-90123 Palermo (Italy)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Variation in the aerodynamic drag coefficient due to changes in the shape of an automobile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VARIATION IN THE AERODXMMIC DRAG COEEEICIENT DUE TO CHANGES LN THE SHAPE OF AN AUTOMOBILE A Thesis by JOHN GILBERT MILLI%MS Su'bmitned to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements fo... Air Density C HAFTER I IliiTRODUCTION During the early years of the automobile, little or no effort was made to explore the problem of aerodynamic drag. This situation was the result oi' two factors. First, the passenger cars of shat time were...

Williams, John Gilbert

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

G-quadruplex recognition and isolation with small molecules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dimethyl sulfoxide DNA deoxyribonucleic acid Dr. doctor ds-DNA double-stranded DNA equiv. equivalent(s) EDTA ethylenediaminetetraacetate e.g. exempli gratia EBr ethidium bromide EtOAc ethyl acetate EtOH ethanol FACS fluorescence-activated cell sorting FAM 6... TERT human telomerase reverse transcriptase Hz Hertz i.e. id est K Kelvin K+ potassium cation KCl potassium chloride ? wavelength LC50 half maximal lethal concentration LiCl lithium chloride Ltd. Limited l microliter M molar mAU milli enzyme activity units...

Mller, Sebastian

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

144

Fluid Biomembranes Supported on Nanoporous Aerogel/Xerogel Substrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Figure 2 SEM of a thin gold?palladium coated silica aerogel surface. ... The xerogel synthesis is initiated by the preparation of two solutions:? (a) a solution of 10 mL of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) + 8 mL of ethanol giving a water (MilliQ)/TEOS ratio suitable for spin coating and (b) a solution of 2 mL of water + 8 mL of ethanol + 2?3 drops of HCl as an acid catalyst. ... Complete coverage could be obtained within 10 s, and the thickness was varied by applying one or multiple coatings. ...

Kevin C. Weng; Johan J. R. Stlgren; David J. Duval; Subhash H. Risbud; Curtis W. Frank

2004-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

145

VLBA Multi-frequency Polarimetric imaging of Radio-loud Broad Absorption Line Quasars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We conducted the first multi-frequency polarimetric imaging of four broad absorption line (BAL) quasars using Very Long Baseline Array at milli-arcsecond resolutions to investigate the inclination of the non-thermal jet and test the hypothesis that radio sources in BAL quasars are still young. Among these four sources, J0928+446, J1018+0530, and J1405+4056 show one-sided structures in parsec scales, and polarized emission detected in the core. These characteristics are consistent with those of blazars. We set constraints on viewing angles to $wind.

Hayashi, Takayuki J; Nagai, Hiroshi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Polarized electron beams at milliampere average current  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This contribution describes some of the challenges associated with developing a polarized electron source capable of uninterrupted days-long operation at milliAmpere average beam current with polarization greater than 80%. Challenges will be presented in the context of assessing the required level of extrapolation beyond the performance of today's CEBAF polarized source operating at ~ 200 uA average current. Estimates of performance at higher current will be based on hours-long demonstrations at 1 and 4 mA. Particular attention will be paid to beam-related lifetime-limiting mechanisms, and strategies to construct a photogun that operate reliably at bias voltage > 350kV.

Poelker, Matthew [JLAB

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

A METHOD TO EXTRACT THE ANGULAR POWER SPECTRUM OF THE EPOCH OF REIONIZATION FROM LOW-FREQUENCY RADIO INTERFEROMETERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The redshifted 21 cm signal of neutral hydrogen from the epoch of reionization (EoR) is extremely weak and its first detection is therefore expected to be statistical with first-generation low-frequency radio interferometers. In this Letter, we propose a method to extract the angular power spectrum of the EoR from the visibility correlation coefficients p{sub ij} (u, v), instead of the visibilities V{sub ij} (u, v) measured directly by radio interferometers in conventional algorithm. The visibility correlation coefficients are defined as p{sub ij}(u,v)=V{sub ij}(u,v)/{radical}(|V{sub ii}||V{sub jj}|) by introducing the autocorrelation terms V{sub ii} and V{sub jj} such that the angular power spectrum C{sub l} can be obtained through C{sub l} = T {sup 2}{sub 0}(|p{sub ij} (u, v)|{sup 2}), independently of the primary beams of antennas. This also partially removes the influence of receiver gains in the measurement of C{sub l} because the amplitudes of the gains cancel each other out in the statistical average operation of (|p{sub ij} (u, v)|{sup 2}). We use the average system temperature T{sub 0} as a calibrator of C{sub l}, which is dominated by the Milky Way and extragalactic sources in the frequency range that we are interested in, below 200 MHz. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of this novel method using the simulated sky maps as targets and the 21 CentiMeter Array (21CMA) as interferometer.

Zheng Qian; Wu Xiangping; Gu Junhua [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Wang Jingying; Xu Haiguang [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

148

Beamline 4.0.3  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Print 3 Print High-resolution spectroscopy of complex materials (MERLIN) Endstations: MERIXS: High-resolution inelastic scattering ARPES: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational 2011 Source characteristics 9.0-cm-period quasiperiodic elliptical polarization undulator (EPU9) Energy range 9eV-120eV with current gratings Monochromator Variable-included-angle spherical grating monochromator (SGM) Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1012 photons/s/0.01%BW at 100 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) High flux 1200 lines/mm; ~1/25,000 Endstations High-resolution inelastic scattering (MERIXS) and ARPES Characteristics Milli-Electron-volt Resolution beamLINe (MERLIN): Ultrahigh-resolution inelastic scattering and angle-resolved photoemission

149

 

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scanned probe microscope(s) will be used in Lab 156 for surface and materials analysis. Additionally, sample preparation techniques such as surface Scanned probe microscope(s) will be used in Lab 156 for surface and materials analysis. Additionally, sample preparation techniques such as surface and sample modification/deposition and self assembled monolayer formation will be performed. Sample modification/deposition, self-assembled monolayer, and organic thin film formation will involve the generation of chemical solutions of mM (milliMolar) concentrations of organic materials in various organic solvents. Scanned Probe Microscopy Surface Analysis and Sample Preparation Savannah River Site Aiken South Carolina TC-W-2010-219, Rev.0 Dec 17, 2010 Andrew R. Grainger Digitally signed by Andrew R. Grainger DN: cn=Andrew R. Grainger, o=DOE-SR, ou=EQMD, email=drew.grainger@srs.gov, c=US Date: 2010.12.20 13:51:20

150

Beamline 4.0.3  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Print 3 Print High-resolution spectroscopy of complex materials (MERLIN) Endstations: MERIXS: High-resolution inelastic scattering ARPES: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational 2011 Source characteristics 9.0-cm-period quasiperiodic elliptical polarization undulator (EPU9) Energy range 9eV-120eV with current gratings Monochromator Variable-included-angle spherical grating monochromator (SGM) Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1012 photons/s/0.01%BW at 100 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) High flux 1200 lines/mm; ~1/25,000 Endstations High-resolution inelastic scattering (MERIXS) and ARPES Characteristics Milli-Electron-volt Resolution beamLINe (MERLIN): Ultrahigh-resolution inelastic scattering and angle-resolved photoemission

151

Microsoft PowerPoint - Boice NEAC Dec 6 2012 rev4 [Compatibility Mode]  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee 6 December 2012 - Washington, D.C. NCRP d th Milli W k St d NCRP and the Million Worker Study John D Boice Jr National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) ( ) Vanderbilt University, Dept of Medicine John.Boice@ncrponline.org http://NCRPonline.org Outline NCRP Million U.S. Radiation Worker and Veteran Study  DOE Manhattan Project Workers  NRC Nuclear Utility Workers  DOD Atomic Veteran  Medical Workers Opportunities National Council on Radiation P t ti & M t Protection & Measurements 1929: U.S. Advisory Committee on X-ray and Committee on X ray and Radium Protection 1946 U S N ti l C itt 1946: U.S. National Committee on Radiation Protection 1964: National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements chartered by Measurements chartered by

152

Beamline 4.0.3  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Print 3 Print High-resolution spectroscopy of complex materials (MERLIN) Endstations: MERIXS: High-resolution inelastic scattering ARPES: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational 2011 Source characteristics 9.0-cm-period quasiperiodic elliptical polarization undulator (EPU9) Energy range 9eV-120eV with current gratings Monochromator Variable-included-angle spherical grating monochromator (SGM) Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1012 photons/s/0.01%BW at 100 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) High flux 1200 lines/mm; ~1/25,000 Endstations High-resolution inelastic scattering (MERIXS) and ARPES Characteristics Milli-Electron-volt Resolution beamLINe (MERLIN): Ultrahigh-resolution inelastic scattering and angle-resolved photoemission

153

The Wide Angular-Range Chopper Spectrometer at SNS | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Wide Angular-Range Chopper Spectrometer at SNS The Wide Angular-Range Chopper Spectrometer at SNS and Doug Abernathy at ARCS Materials researcher Judy Pang and instrument scientist Doug Abernathy at ARCS. ARCS is optimized to provide a high neutron flux at the sample and a large solid angle of detector coverage. This spectrometer is capable of selecting incident energies over the full energy spectrum of neutrons, making it useful for studies of excitations from a few to several hundred milli-electron volts. An elliptically shaped supermirror guide in the incident flight path boosts the performance at the lower end of this range. The sample and detector vacuum chambers provide a window-free final flight path and incorporate a large gate valve to allow rapid sample changeout. A T0 neutron chopper not only blocks the prompt radiation from the source

154

Beamline 4.0.3  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Print 3 Print High-resolution spectroscopy of complex materials (MERLIN) Endstations: MERIXS: High-resolution inelastic scattering ARPES: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational 2011 Source characteristics 9.0-cm-period quasiperiodic elliptical polarization undulator (EPU9) Energy range 9eV-120eV with current gratings Monochromator Variable-included-angle spherical grating monochromator (SGM) Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1012 photons/s/0.01%BW at 100 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) High flux 1200 lines/mm; ~1/25,000 Endstations High-resolution inelastic scattering (MERIXS) and ARPES Characteristics Milli-Electron-volt Resolution beamLINe (MERLIN): Ultrahigh-resolution inelastic scattering and angle-resolved photoemission

155

 

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Scanned probe microscope(s) will be used in Lab 156 for surface and materials analysis. Additionally, sample preparation techniques such as surface Scanned probe microscope(s) will be used in Lab 156 for surface and materials analysis. Additionally, sample preparation techniques such as surface and sample modification/deposition and self assembled monolayer formation will be performed. Sample modification/deposition, self-assembled monolayer, and organic thin film formation will involve the generation of chemical solutions of mM (milliMolar) concentrations of organic materials in various organic solvents. Scanned Probe Microscopy Surface Analysis and Sample Preparation Savannah River Site Aiken South Carolina TC-W-2010-219, Rev.0 Dec 17, 2010 Andrew R. Grainger Digitally signed by Andrew R. Grainger DN: cn=Andrew R. Grainger, o=DOE-SR, ou=EQMD, email=drew.grainger@srs.gov, c=US Date: 2010.12.20 13:51:20

156

Los Alamos Lab: MPA: Material Matters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Matter Matter October 2013 In this issue: Millie Firestone: Merging soft and hard nanomaterials to create energy solutions From Toni's Desk NNSA minority education project brings students to Los Alamos for fuel cell studies Los Alamos fuel cell research lands on ScienceWatch top 10 list Gaining creative control over semiconductor nanowires Strongly enhanced flux pinning in one-step deposition of BaFe2(As0.66P0.33)2 superconductor films with uniformly dispersed BaZrO3 nanoparticles Ultrafast optical spectroscopy sheds light on electronic structure of antiferromagnetic USB2 MPA students gain valuable experience; earn recognition for distinguished performance Heads Up! Service anniversaries LA-UR-13-28281 August 2013 In this issue: Supporting scientific diversity: MPA office administrators describe the juggling act behind the science

157

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-13-073 South Carolina EC B3-6.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 SECTION A. Project Title: U 3 Si 2 Fabrication and Testing for Implementation into the BISON Fuel Performance Code - University of South Carolina SECTION B. Project Description The University of South Carolina proposes to fabricate, test, and model a high uranium density, advanced nuclear fuel (U 3 Si 2 ). Tasks include fabrications of samples, characterizing to understand their microstructure, creep testing, and design, fabrication, and usage of four-point bend testing fixture and high temperature flexure creep testing rig. SECTION C. Environmental Aspects / Potential Sources of Impact Radioactive Material Use - Approximately 1milliCurie of samples of U 3 Si 2 will be used during experiments to test material creep. Radioactive Waste Generation - Approximately 2 microCurie of radioactive waste will be generated through the handling and testing

158

Beamline 4.0.3  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Print 3 Print High-resolution spectroscopy of complex materials (MERLIN) Endstations: MERIXS: High-resolution inelastic scattering ARPES: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational 2011 Source characteristics 9.0-cm-period quasiperiodic elliptical polarization undulator (EPU9) Energy range 9eV-120eV with current gratings Monochromator Variable-included-angle spherical grating monochromator (SGM) Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1012 photons/s/0.01%BW at 100 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) High flux 1200 lines/mm; ~1/25,000 Endstations High-resolution inelastic scattering (MERIXS) and ARPES Characteristics Milli-Electron-volt Resolution beamLINe (MERLIN): Ultrahigh-resolution inelastic scattering and angle-resolved photoemission

159

Beamline 4.0.3  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Print 3 Print High-resolution spectroscopy of complex materials (MERLIN) Endstations: MERIXS: High-resolution inelastic scattering ARPES: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational 2011 Source characteristics 9.0-cm-period quasiperiodic elliptical polarization undulator (EPU9) Energy range 9eV-120eV with current gratings Monochromator Variable-included-angle spherical grating monochromator (SGM) Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1012 photons/s/0.01%BW at 100 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) High flux 1200 lines/mm; ~1/25,000 Endstations High-resolution inelastic scattering (MERIXS) and ARPES Characteristics Milli-Electron-volt Resolution beamLINe (MERLIN): Ultrahigh-resolution inelastic scattering and angle-resolved photoemission

160

Beamline 4.0.3  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Print 3 Print High-resolution spectroscopy of complex materials (MERLIN) Endstations: MERIXS: High-resolution inelastic scattering ARPES: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational 2011 Source characteristics 9.0-cm-period quasiperiodic elliptical polarization undulator (EPU9) Energy range 9eV-120eV with current gratings Monochromator Variable-included-angle spherical grating monochromator (SGM) Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1012 photons/s/0.01%BW at 100 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) High flux 1200 lines/mm; ~1/25,000 Endstations High-resolution inelastic scattering (MERIXS) and ARPES Characteristics Milli-Electron-volt Resolution beamLINe (MERLIN): Ultrahigh-resolution inelastic scattering and angle-resolved photoemission

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deci centi milli" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Radioactivities in Solution by Particle Radiation can Increase Sister  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radioactivities in Solution by Particle Radiation can Increase Sister Radioactivities in Solution by Particle Radiation can Increase Sister Chromatid Exchanges Junko Maeda Colorado State University Abstract Introduction Non-radioactive atoms can become radioactive from a nuclear reaction when atoms are hit by other high energy particles. These radioactivations are observed in nuclear facilities and may result in health effects in humans. Protons, carbon-ions, and iron-ions are tested to verify this hypothesis. Materials and Methods Protons were accelerated to 70MeV in cyclotron (NIRS-930) at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). Carbon-ions and iron-ions were accelerated to 290MeV/n and 500MeV/n respectively, in HIMAC (Heavy ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba) at NIRS. 60ml of sterilized Milli-Q ultra pure water or PBS were filled in Falcon T25 flasks and exposed to ionizing

162

Beamline 4.0.3  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Print 3 Print High-resolution spectroscopy of complex materials (MERLIN) Endstations: MERIXS: High-resolution inelastic scattering ARPES: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational 2011 Source characteristics 9.0-cm-period quasiperiodic elliptical polarization undulator (EPU9) Energy range 9eV-120eV with current gratings Monochromator Variable-included-angle spherical grating monochromator (SGM) Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1012 photons/s/0.01%BW at 100 eV Resolving power (E/ΔE) High flux 1200 lines/mm; ~1/25,000 Endstations High-resolution inelastic scattering (MERIXS) and ARPES Characteristics Milli-Electron-volt Resolution beamLINe (MERLIN): Ultrahigh-resolution inelastic scattering and angle-resolved photoemission

163

Drop shaping by laser-pulse impact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the hydrodynamic response of a falling drop hit by a laser pulse. Combining high-speed with stroboscopic imaging we report that a millimeter-sized dyed water drop hit by a milli-Joule nanosecond laser-pulse deforms and propels forward at several meters per second, until it eventually fragments. We show that the drop motion results from the recoil momentum imparted at the drop surface by water vaporization. We measure the propulsion speed and the time-deformation law of the drop, complemented by boundary integral simulations. We explain the drop propulsion and shaping in terms of the laser pulse energy and drop surface tension. These findings are crucial for the generation of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light in lithography machines.

Klein, Alexander L; Visser, Claas Willem; Lhuissier, Henri; Sun, Chao; Snoeijer, Jacco H; Villermaux, Emmanuel; Lohse, Detlef; Gelderblom, Hanneke

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Exciton-assisted optomechanics with suspended carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a framework for inducing strong optomechanical effects in a suspended carbon nanotube based on deformation potential exciton-phonon coupling. The excitons are confined using an inhomogeneous axial electric field which generates optically active quantum dots with a level spacing in the milli-electronvolt range and a characteristic size in the 10-nanometer range. A transverse field induces a tunable parametric coupling between the quantum dot and the flexural modes of the nanotube mediated by electron-phonon interactions. We derive the corresponding excitonic deformation potentials and show that this interaction enables efficient optical ground-state cooling of the fundamental mode and could allow us to realise the strong and ultra-strong coupling regimes of the Jaynes-Cummings and Rabi models.

I. Wilson-Rae; C. Galland; W. Zwerger; A. Imamoglu

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

165

Observation of the Fundamental Nyquist Noise Limit in an Ultra-High $Q$-Factor Cryogenic Bulk Acoustic Wave Cavity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal Nyquist noise fluctuations of high-$Q$ Bulk Acoustic Wave (BAW) cavities have been observed at cryogenic temperatures with a DC Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) amplifier. High $Q$ modes with bandwidths of few tens of milliHz produce thermal fluctuations with a Signal-To-Noise ratio of up to 23dB. The estimated effective temperature from the Nyquist noise is in good agreement with the physical temperature of the device, confirming the validity of the equivalent circuit model and the non-existence of any excess resonator self-noise. The measurements also confirm that the quality factor remains extremely high ($Q>10^8$ at low order overtones) for very weak (thermal) system motion at low temperatures, when compared to values measured with relatively strong external excitation. This result represents an enabling step towards operating such a high-Q acoustic device at the standard quantum limit.

Goryachev, Maxim; van Kann, Frank; Galliou, Serge; Tobar, Michael E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Observation of the Fundamental Nyquist Noise Limit in an Ultra-High $Q$-Factor Cryogenic Bulk Acoustic Wave Cavity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal Nyquist noise fluctuations of high-$Q$ Bulk Acoustic Wave (BAW) cavities have been observed at cryogenic temperatures with a DC Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) amplifier. High $Q$ modes with bandwidths of few tens of milliHz produce thermal fluctuations with a Signal-To-Noise ratio of up to 23dB. The estimated effective temperature from the Nyquist noise is in good agreement with the physical temperature of the device, confirming the validity of the equivalent circuit model and the non-existence of any excess resonator self-noise. The measurements also confirm that the quality factor remains extremely high ($Q>10^8$ at low order overtones) for very weak (thermal) system motion at low temperatures, when compared to values measured with relatively strong external excitation. This result represents an enabling step towards operating such a high-Q acoustic device at the standard quantum limit.

Maxim Goryachev; Eugene N. Ivanov; Frank van Kann; Serge Galliou; Michael E. Tobar

2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

167

Preparation of water soluble carbon nanotubes and assessment of their biological activity in embryonic zebrafish  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are currently one of the most important classes of nanomaterials with unique properties sparking off numerous applications in many fields, including electronics, material science and medicine. However, applications of CNTs in medicine and other biological fields are hampered by their insolubility in aqueous media and concerns regarding toxicity. In this study, seven types of CNTs, including two single-walled, one double-walled, and four multi-walled, were evaluated for possible toxicological effects. Soluble CNTs were prepared by treatment with a mixture of acids (D2SO4 and DNO3), washed with Milli-Q water and oven dried. Transmission electron microscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, and other techniques were used to characterise the prepared CNTs. CNT toxicity was assessed using the embryonic zebrafish. Results showed that none of the CNTs studied caused significant adverse developmental effects. These results support the potential safe use of CNTs as components of indwelling medical devices and drug delivery tools.

Adeniyi A. Adenuga; Lisa Truong; Robert L. Tanguay; Vincent T. Remcho

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

TURBULENT AMPLIFICATION OF A MAGNETIC FIELD DRIVEN BY THE DYNAMO EFFECT AT RIPPLED SHOCKS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analytically derive the vorticity generated downstream of a two-dimensional (2D) rippled hydromagnetic shock neglecting fluid viscosity and resistivity. The growth of the turbulent component of the downstream magnetic field is driven by the motion of vortical eddies. We determine an analytic time evolution of the magnetic field amplification at shocks, so far described only numerically, until saturation occurs due to seed-field reaction to the whirling of field lines. The explicit expression of the amplification growth rate and of the nonlinear field back-reaction in terms of the parameters of shock and interstellar density fluctuation is derived from MHD jump conditions at rippled shocks. A magnetic field saturation up to the order of milli-Gauss and a short-term variability in the X-ray observations of supernova remnants can be obtained by using reasonable parameters for the interstellar turbulence.

Fraschetti, F. [Associated Member of LUTh, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS-UMR8102 and Universite Paris VII, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon Cedex, France. (France)

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

169

Landscape of superconducting membranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The AdS/CFT correspondence may connect the landscape of string vacua and the `atomic landscape' of condensed matter physics. We study the stability of a landscape of IR fixed points of N=2 large N gauge theories in 2+1 dimensions, dual to Sasaki-Einstein compactifications of M theory, towards a superconducting state. By exhibiting instabilities of charged black holes in these compactifications, we show that many of these theories have charged operators that condense when the theory is placed at a finite chemical potential. We compute a statistical distribution of critical superconducting temperatures for a subset of these theories. With a chemical potential of one milliVolt, we find critical temperatures ranging between 0.24 and 165 degrees Kelvin.

Frederik Denef; Sean A. Hartnoll

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

170

Polarized electron beams at milliampere average current  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This contribution describes some of the challenges associated with developing a polarized electron source capable of uninterrupted days-long operation at milliAmpere average beam current with polarization greater than 80%. Challenges will be presented in the context of assessing the required level of extrapolation beyond the performance of todays CEBAF polarized source operating at ? 200 uA average current. Estimates of performance at higher current will be based on hours-long demonstrations at 1 and 4 mA. Particular attention will be paid to beam-related lifetime-limiting mechanisms, and strategies to construct a photogun that operate reliably at bias voltage > 350kV.

Poelker, M. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States)

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

171

CX-004841: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

841: Categorical Exclusion Determination 841: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004841: Categorical Exclusion Determination Scanned Probe Microscopy Surface Analysis and Sample Preparation CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/17/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office Scanned probe microscope(s) will be used in Lab 156 for surface and materials analysis. Additionally, sample preparation techniques such as surface and sample modification/deposition and self assembled monolayer formation will be performed. Sample modification/deposition, self-assembled monolayer, and organic thin film formation will involve the generation of chemical solutions of mM (milliMolar) concentrations of organic materials in various organic solvents. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

172

A study of the relationship between the effect on polarization of iron electrodes and the inhibitor efficiencies for some organic amines in acid solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contact of the slide vire resistor vas connected to the Junction of the tvo upper resistance arms of the bridge. A double 13 F I GURE I THE DUAL CATHODE BRIDGE s, Rl R~ M. A. Sq V, aJ LEGEND Sl- KNIFE BLADE SWITCH M. A-MILLI AMMETER B- 6 VOLT.... 1 86. 9 96. 5 10 30 50 60 70 80 90 100 . 6 1, 0 1. 9 2 1 20 2 4 2. 6 2. 9 3. 1 6. 0 5. 0 6 5o 2 4, 6 4, 0 3 ~ 7 3. 6 3 5 3. 5 10 18. '7 28. 1 30 37. 7 4, 0 4"l 50 56. 3 60 65. 9 70 75. 3 80 84. 6 90 94 100 . 7 7...

Burns, Lawrence Raymond

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

173

Optical frequency standards for gravitational wave detection using satellite Doppler velocimetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravitational waves imprint apparent Doppler shifts on the frequency of photons propagating between an emitter and detector of light. This forms the basis of a method to detect gravitational waves using Doppler velocimetry between pairs of satellites. Such detectors, operating in the milli-hertz gravitational frequency band, could lead to the direct detection of gravitational waves. The crucial component in such a detector is the frequency standard on board the emitting and receiving satellites. We point out that recent developments in atomic frequency standards have led to devices that are approaching the sensitivity required to detect gravitational waves from astrophysically interesting sources. The sensitivity of satellites equipped with optical frequency standards for Doppler velocimetry is examined, and a design for a robust, space-capable optical frequency standard is presented.

Vutha, Amar C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

An Update On Waste Control Specialists' 2004 License Application For Safe Disposal Of Class A, B, and C Low-Level Radioactive Waste In Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On December 10, 2007, Waste Control Specialists LLC (WCS) received notification that the Executive Director of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) had prepared an interim draft license and made a preliminary decision that it met all statutory and regulatory requirements for safe disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at the WCS' site in Texas. Pursuant to this interim draft license, WCS will be authorized to dispose Class A, B, and C LLW in two enhanced near-surface landfills at WCS' 5.4-square-kilometer (1,338-acre) treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) site in Andrews County, Texas (Fig. 1). One landfill will be dedicated to LLW generated within the member/party states of the Texas Compact (Texas and Vermont), while the other will be dedicated to LLW generated by the federal government. The calculated annual peak dose to the maximally exposed member of the general public, i.e., an adjacent resident, from any of the proposed LLW-disposal landfills occurs approximately 36,400 years after closure and is 0.034 milli-sievert (mSv) (3.4 milli-rem (mrem)), which is less than 14 percent of the applicable regulatory limit of 25 mSv (25 mrem). The draft license will be published in February 2008, which will be followed by 12 months of public hearings, and three months for preparation of the final license. Based on this schedule, the final license is due in May 2009. When opened, the WCS site will achieve a national milestone; it will be the first new Compact LLW-disposal site in the USA to open under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980, as amended in 1985. (authors)

Baltzer, R.; Eriksson, L. [Waste Control Specialists LLC, Three Lincoln Centre, Dallas, Texas (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Polyamide 66 as a Cryogenic Dielectric  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improvements in superconductor and cryogenic technologies enable novel power apparatus, \\eg, cables, transformers, fault current limiters, generators, \\etc, with better device characteristics than their conventional counterparts. In these applications electrical insulation materials play an important role in system weight, footprint (size), and voltage level. The trend in the electrical insulation material selection has been to adapt or to employ conventional insulation materials to these new systems. However, at low temperatures, thermal contraction and loss of mechanical strength in many materials make them unsuitable for superconducting power applications. In this paper, a widely used commercial material was characterized as a potential cryogenic dielectric. The material is used in ``oven bag'' a heat-resistant polyamide (nylon) used in cooking (produced by Reynolds\\textregistered, Richmond, VA, USA). It is first characterized by Fourier transform infrared and x-ray diffraction techniques and determined to be composed of polyamide 66 (PA66) polymer. Secondly the complex dielectric permittivity and dielectric breakdown strength of the PA66 films are investigated. The dielectric data are then compared with data reported in the literature. A comparison of dielectric strength with a widely used high-temperature superconductor electrical insulation material, polypropylene-laminated paper (PPLP\\texttrademark\\ a product of Sumitomo Electric Industries, Japan), is provided. It is observed that the statistical analysis of the PA66 films yields 1\\% failure probability at $127\\ \\kilo\\volt\\milli\\meter^{-1}$; this value is approximately $46\\ \\kilo\\volt\\milli\\meter^{-1}$ higher than PPLP\\texttrademark. It is concluded that PA66 may be a good candidate for cryogenic applications. Finally, a summary of dielectric properties of some of the commercial tape insulation materials and various polymers is also provided.

Tuncer, Enis [ORNL; Polyzos, Georgios [ORNL; Sauers, Isidor [ORNL; James, David Randy [ORNL; Ellis, Alvin R [ORNL; Messman, Jamie M [ORNL; Aytug, Tolga [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Sun-as-a-Star Spectrum Variations 1974-2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have observed selected Fraunhofer lines, both integrated over the Full Disk and for a small circular region near the center of the solar disk, on 1,215 days for the past 30 years. Full Disk results: Ca II K 393 nm nicely tracks the 11 year magnetic cycle based on sunspot number with a peak amplitude in central intensity of ~37%. The wavelength of the mid-line core absorption feature, called K3, referenced to nearby photospheric Fe, displays an activity cycle variation with an amplitude of 3 milli-Angstroms. Other chromospheric lines track Ca II K intensity with lower relative amplitudes. Low photosphere: Temperature sensitive CI 5380 nm appears constant in intensity to 0.2%. High photosphere: The cores of strong Fe I lines, Na D1 and D2, and the Mg I b lines, present a puzzling signal perhaps indicating a role for the 22 y Hale cycle. Solar minimum around 1985 was clearly seen, but the following minimum in 1996 was missing. This anomalous behavior is not seen in comparison atmospheric O2. Center Disk results: Both Ca II K and C I 538 nm intensities are constant, indicating that the basal quiet atmosphere is unaffected by cycle magnetism within our observational error. A lower limit to the Ca II K central intensity atmosphere is 0.040. The wavelength of Ca II K3 varies with the cycle by 6 milli-Angstroms, a factor of 2X over the full disk value. This may indicate the predominance of radial motions at Center Disk. This is not an effect of motions in plages since they are absent at Center Disk. This 11 y variation in the center of chromospheric lines could complicate the radial velocity detection of planets around solar-type stars. An appendix provides instructions for URL access to both the raw and reduced data.

W. Livingston; L. Wallace; O. R. White; M. S. Giampapa

2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

177

Precision measurements of the {sup 60}Co {beta}-asymmetry parameter in search for tensor currents in weak interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The {beta}-asymmetry parameter A-tilde for the Gamow-Teller decay of {sup 60}Co was measured by polarizing the radioactive nuclei with the brute-force low-temperature nuclear-orientation method. The {sup 60}Co activity was cooled down to milliKelvin temperatures in a {sup 3}He-{sup 4}He dilution refrigerator in an external 13-T magnetic field. The {beta} particles were observed by a 500-{mu}m-thick Si PIN diode operating at a temperature of about 10 K in a magnetic field of 0.6 T. Extensive geant4 Monte Carlo simulations were performed to gain control over the systematic effects. Our result, A-tilde=-1.014(12){sub stat}(16){sub syst}, is in agreement with the standard-model value of -0.987(9), which includes recoil-order corrections that were addressed for the first time for this isotope. Further, it enables limits to be placed on possible tensor-type charged weak currents, as well as other physics beyond the standard model.

Wauters, F.; Kraev, I.; Beck, M.; Breitenfeldt, M.; De Leebeeck, V.; Golovko, V. V.; Kozlov, V. Yu.; Phalet, T.; Roccia, S.; Soti, G.; Tandecki, M.; Traykov, E.; Van Gorp, S.; Severijns, N. [K. U. Leuven, Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Zakoucky, D. [Nuclear Physics Institute, ASCR, CZ-250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Towner, I. S. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77845 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Recent Developments in Supersymmetric and Hidden Sector Dark Matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New results which correlate SUSY dark matter with LHC signals are presented, and a brief review of recent developments in supersymmetric and hidden sector dark matter is given. It is shown that the direct detection of dark matter is very sensitive to the hierarchical SUSY sparticle spectrum and the spectrum is very useful in distinguishing models. It is shown that the prospects of the discovery of neutralino dark matter are very bright on the 'Chargino Wall' due to a copious number of model points on the Wall, where the NLSP is the Chargino, and the spin independent neutralino-proton cross section is maintained at high values in the 10{sup -44} cm{sup 2} range for neutralino masses up to {approx}850 GeV. It is also shown that the direct detection of dark matter along with lepton plus jet signatures and missing energy provide dual, and often complementary, probes of supersymmetry. Finally, we discuss an out of the box possibility for dark matter, which includes dark matter from the hidden sector, which could either consist of extra weakly interacting dark matter (a Stino XWIMP), or milli-charged dark matter arising from the Stueckelberg extensions of the MSSM or the SM.

Feldman, Daniel; Liu Zuowei [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Nath, Pran [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); TH Division, PH Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

2008-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

179

Recent Developments in Supersymmetric and Hidden Sector Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New results which correlate SUSY dark matter with LHC signals are presented, and a brief review of recent developments in supersymmetric and hidden sector dark matter is given. It is shown that the direct detection of dark matter is very sensitive to the hierarchical SUSY sparticle spectrum and the spectrum is very useful in distinguishing models. It is shown that the prospects of the discovery of neutralino dark matter are very bright on the "Chargino Wall" due to a copious number of model points on the Wall, where the NLSP is the Chargino, and the spin independent neutralino-proton cross section is maintained at high values in the $10^{-44}$cm$^{2}$ range for neutralino masses up to $\\sim 850$ GeV . It is also shown that the direct detection of dark matter along with lepton plus jet signatures and missing energy provide dual, and often complementary, probes of supersymmetry. Finally, we discuss an out of the box possibility for dark matter, which includes dark matter from the hidden sector, which could either consist of extra weakly interacting dark matter (a Stino XWIMP), or milli-charged dark matter arising from the Stueckelberg extensions of the MSSM or the SM.

Daniel Feldman; Zuowei Liu; Pran Nath

2008-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

180

LIPSS Free-Electron Laser Searches for Dark Matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of Dark Matter particle candidates have been hypothesized by physics Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) in the very light (10{sup -6} - 10{sup -3} eV) range. In the past decade several international groups have conducted laboratory experiments designed to either produce such particles or extend the boundaries in parameter space. The LIght Pseudo-scalar and Scalar Search (LIPSS) Collaboration, using the 'Light Shining through a Wall' (LSW) technique, passes the high average power photon beam from Jefferson Lab's Free-Electron Laser through a magnetic field upstream from a mirror and optical beam dump. Light Neutral Bosons (LNBs), generated by coupling of photons with the magnetic field, pass through the mirror ('the Wall') into an identical magnetic field where they revert to detectable photons by the same coupling process. While no evidence of LNBs was evident, new scalar coupling boundaries were established. New constraints were also determined for hypothetical para-photons and for millicharged fermions. We will describe our experimental setup and results for LNBs, para-photons, and milli-charged fermions. Plans for chameleon particle searches are underway.

Afanaciev, Andrei; Beard, Kevin; Biallas, George; Boyce, James R; Minarni, M; Ramdon, R; Robinson, Taylor; Shinn, Michelle D

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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181

ALMA data suggest the presence of a spiral structure in the inner wind of CW Leo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(abbreviated) We aim to study the inner wind of the well-known AGB star CW Leo. Different diagnostics probing different geometrical scales have pointed toward a non-homogeneous mass-loss process: dust clumps are observed at milli-arcsec scale, a bipolar structure is seen at arcsecond-scale and multi-concentric shells are detected beyond 1". We present the first ALMA Cycle 0 band 9 data around 650 GHz. The full-resolution data have a spatial resolution of 0".42x0".24, allowing us to study the morpho-kinematical structure within ~6". Results: We have detected 25 molecular lines. The emission of all but one line is spatially resolved. The dust and molecular lines are centered around the continuum peak position. The dust emission has an asymmetric distribution with a central peak flux density of ~2 Jy. The molecular emission lines trace different regions in the wind acceleration region and suggest that the wind velocity increases rapidly from about 5 R* almost reaching the terminal velocity at ~11 R*. The channel...

Decin, L; Neufeld, D; Steffen, W; Melnick, G; Lombaert, R

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Design and Performance of the ARIANNA Hexagonal Radio Array Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the development, installation and operation of the first three of seven stations deployed at the ARIANNA site's pilot Hexagonal Radio Array in Antarctica. The primary goal of the ARIANNA project is to observe ultra-high energy (>100 PeV) cosmogenic neutrino signatures using a large array of autonomous stations each dispersed 1 km apart on the surface of the Ross Ice Shelf. Sensing radio emissions of 100 MHz to 1 GHz, each station in the array contains RF antennas, amplifiers, 1.92 G-sample/s, 850 MHz bandwidth signal acquisition circuitry, pattern-matching trigger capabilities, an embedded CPU, 32 GB of solid-state data storage, and long-distance wireless and satellite communications. Power is provided by the sun and LiFePO4 storage batteries, and the stations consume an average of 7W of power. Operation on solar power has resulted in >=58% per calendar-year live-time. The station's pattern-trigger capabilities reduce the trigger rates to a few milli-Hertz with 4-sigma thresholds while retaining ...

Barwick, S W; Besson, D Z; Cheim, E; Duffin, T; Hanson, J C; Klein, S R; Kleinfelder, S A; Prakash, T; Piasecki, M; Ratzlaff, K; Reed, C; Roumi, M; Samanta, A; Stezelberger, T; Tatar, J; Walker, J; Young, R; Zou, L

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Terrestrial and Solar Limits on Long-Lived Particles in a Dark Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dark matter charged under a new gauge sector, as motivated by recent data, suggests a rich GeV-scale 'dark sector' weakly coupled to the Standard Model by gauge kinetic mixing. The new gauge bosons can decay to Standard Model leptons, but this mode is suppressed if decays into lighter 'dark sector' particles are kinematically allowed. These particles in turn typically have macroscopic decay lifetimes that are constrained by two classes of experiments, which we discuss. Lifetimes of 10 cm {approx}< c{tau} {approx}< 10{sup 8} cm are constrained by existing terrestrial beam-dump experiments. If, in addition, dark matter captured in the Sun (or Earth) annihilates into these particles, lifetimes up to {approx} 10{sup 15} cm are constrained by solar observations. These bounds span fourteen orders of magnitude in lifetime, but they are not exhaustive. Accordingly, we identify promising new directions for experiments including searches for displaced di-muons in B-factories, studies at high-energy and -intensity proton beam dumps, precision gamma-ray and electronic measurements of the Sun, and milli-charge searches re-analyzed in this new context.

Schuster, Philip; /SLAC; Toro, Natalia; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Yavin, Itay; /CCPP, New York U.

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

184

ADC non-linear errors correction in thermal diagnostics for the LISA mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-noise temperature measurements at frequencies in the milli-Hertz range are needed in the LISA and LISA PathFinder (LPF). The required temperature stability for LISA is around 10 uK/sqrt(Hz) at frequencies down to 0.1 mHz. In this paper we focus on the identification and reduction of a source of excess noise detected when measuring time-varying temperature signals. This is shown to be due to non-idealities in the ADC transfer curve, and degrades the measurement by about one order of magnitude in the measurement bandwidth when the measured temperature exhibits drifts of uK/s. In a suitable measuring system for the LISA mission, this noise needs to be reduced. Two different methods based on the same technique have been implemented, both consisting in the addition of dither signals out of band to mitigate the ADC non-ideality errors. Excess noise of this nature has been satisfactorily reduced by using these methods when measuring temperature ramps up to 10 uK/s .

J. Sanjuan; A. Lobo; J. Ramos-Castro

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

185

Occultation Evidence for a Satellite of the Trojan Asteroid (911) Agamemnon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On 2012 January 19, observers in the northeastern United States of America observed an occultation of 8.0-mag HIP 41337 star by the Jupiter-Trojan (911) Agamemnon, including one video recorded with a 36cm telescope that shows a deep brief secondary occultation that is likely due to a satellite, of about 5 km (most likely 3 to 10 km) across, at 278 km $\\pm$ 5 km (0.0931 arcsec) from the asteroid's center as projected in the plane of the sky. A satellite this small and this close to the asteroid could not be resolved in the available VLT adaptive optics observations of Agamemnon recorded in 2003. The outline of Agamemnon is fit well by an ellipse with dimensions 190.6 $\\pm$ 0.9 km by 143.8 $\\pm$ 1.5 km. The angular diameter of HIP 41337 was found to be 0.5 $\\pm$ 0.1 milli-arcsec. After (624) Hektor, this could be the second Jupiter Trojan asteroid known to possess a small satellite.

Timerson, Bradley; Conard, Steven; Dunham, David W; Herald, David; Tolea, Alin; Marchis, Franck

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

The Radio to Infrared Emission of Very High Redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts: Probing Early Star Formation through Molecular and Atomic Absorption Lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We evaluate the broadband afterglow emission of very high redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) using standard relativistic blastwave models with both forward and reverse shock components. For a broad range of parameters, a generic property for GRBs at redshifts $z \\sim$ 5--30 is that the emission peaks in the millimeter to far-infrared bands with milli-Jansky flux levels, first at a few hours after the burst due to the reverse shock, and then again for several days afterwards with somewhat lower flux due to the forward shock. The radio, submillimeter and infrared continuum emission should be readily detectable out to $z \\ga 30$ by the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), Extended Very Large Array (EVLA), Square Kilometer Array (SKA) and other facilities. For relatively bright bursts, spectroscopic measurements of molecular and atomic absorption lines due to ambient protostellar gas may be possible. Utilizing models of primordial protostellar clouds, we show that under certain conditions, appreciable absorption may be caused by HD rotational transitions even in metal-free environments. After sufficient metal enrichment, absorption from CO rotational transitions and [OI] fine-structure transitions can also become strong. With appropriate observing strategies in combination with optical telescopes, ALMA and/or SKA may be able to detect such lines, offering a unique probe of physical conditions in individual Pop III and early Pop II star forming regions. We also remark on potential near-infrared absorption features due to electronic transitions of H$_2$.

Susumu Inoue; Kazuyuki Omukai; Benedetta Ciardi

2007-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

187

The nuclear cluster of the Milky Way: Our primary testbed for the interaction of a dense star cluster with a massive black hole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article intends to provide a concise overview, from an observational point-of-view, of the current state of our knowledge of the most relevant properties of the Milky Way's nuclear star cluster (MWNSC). The MWNSC appears to be a typical specimen of nuclear star clusters, which are found at the centers of the majority of all types of galaxies. Nuclear clusters represent the densest and most massive stellar systems in the present-day Universe and frequently coexist with central massive black holes. They are therefore of prime interest for studying stellar dynamics and the MWNSC is the only one that allows us to obtain data on milli-parsec scales. After discussing the main observational constraints, we start with a description of the overall structure and kinematics of the MWNSC, then focus on a comparison to extragalactic systems, summarize the properties of the young, massive stars in the immediate environment of the Milky Way's central black hole, Sagittarius\\,A*, and finally focus on the dynamics of sta...

Schdel, R; Neumayer, N; Meyer, L; Yelda, S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Germanium: From Its Discovery to SiGe Devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Germanium, element No.32, was discovered in 1886 by Clemens Winkler. Its first broad application was in the form of point contact Schottky diodes for radar reception during WWII. The addition of a closely spaced second contact led to the first all-solid-state electronic amplifier device, the transistor. The relatively low bandgap, the lack of a stable oxide and large surface state densities relegated germanium to the number 2 position behind silicon. The discovery of the lithium drift process, which made possible the formation of p-i-n diodes with fully depletable i-regions several centimeters thick, led germanium to new prominence as the premier gamma-ray detector. The development of ultra-pure germanium yielded highly stable detectors which have remained unsurpassed in their performance. New acceptors and donors were discovered and the electrically active role of hydrogen was clearly established several years before similar findings in silicon. Lightly doped germanium has found applications as far infrared detectors and heavily Neutron Transmutation Doped (NTD) germanium is used in thermistor devices operating at a few milliKelvin. Recently germanium has been rediscovered by the silicon device community because of its superior electron and hole mobility and its ability to induce strains when alloyed with silicon. Germanium is again a mainstream electronic material.

Haller, E.E.

2006-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

189

Characterization of the liquid sodium spray generated by a pipework hole  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to its advantageous thermodynamic characteristics at high temperature (550 deg. C), liquid sodium is the main candidate to be the cooling fluid for Generation TV nuclear reactors SFR (Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors). Now, sodium reacts very violently, both with the water and the oxygen of the air. Only few data were known about the liquid sodium behaviour when spread in the environment through micro defects. These are often present in a cooling circuit in welded or sealed joints and more rarely in the pipes. Micro defects, on the other hand, can be also generated in a cooling circuit because of the vibrations always present in a circuit into which a fluid runs. A new set-up, named LISOF, was built for testing high temperature liquid sodium when passing through micro defects and generating sprays or jets. Sprays and jets were generated by means of nozzles embedding sub milli-metric holes the diameter of which was: 0.2 mm, 0.4 mm, 0.5 mm. Tests were performed by pressurizing liquid sodium (550 deg. C) at: 3, 6 and 9 barg. Normal and high speed cinematography were used for the direct observation of the liquid sodium sprays while Phase Doppler Interferometry was used for the measurement of the droplets characteristics and velocity. Tests concerning the behaviour of the high temperature liquid sodium firing in air or in contact with the cement cover applied to a scaled down core catcher simulacrum were also performed. The paper presents the built set-up and the collected results. (authors)

Torsello, G.; Parozzi, F.; Nericcio, L. [RSE - Nuclear and Industrial Plant Safety Team, Power Generation System Dept., via Rubattino 54, 20134 Milano (Italy); Araneo, L.; Cozzi, F. [Politecnico di Milano, Energy Dept., via Lambruschini 4, 20156 Milano (Italy); Carcassi, M.; Mattei, N. [Universita di Pisa-Facolta d'Ingegneria DIMNP-Mechanical, Nuclear and Production Dep., Largo L. Lazzarino 2, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Home composting as an alternative treatment option for organic household waste in Denmark: An environmental assessment using life cycle assessment-modelling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An environmental assessment of the management of organic household waste (OHW) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the waste-life cycle assessment (LCA) model EASEWASTE. The focus was on home composting of OHW in Denmark and six different home composting units (with different input and different mixing frequencies) were modelled. In addition, incineration and landfilling was modelled as alternatives to home composting. The most important processes contributing to the environmental impact of home composting were identified as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (load) and the avoided emissions in relation to the substitution of fertiliser and peat when compost was used in hobby gardening (saving). The replacement of fertiliser and peat was also identified as one of the most sensible parameters, which could potentially have a significant environmental benefit. Many of the impact categories (especially human toxicity via water (HTw) and soil (HTs)) were affected by the heavy metal contents of the incoming OHW. The concentrations of heavy metals in the compost were below the threshold values for compost used on land and were thus not considered to constitute a problem. The GHG emissions were, on the other hand, dependent on the management of the composting units. The frequently mixed composting units had the highest GHG emissions. The environmental profiles of the home composting scenarios were in the order of -2 to 16 milli person equivalents (mPE) Mg{sup -1} wet waste (ww) for the non-toxic categories and -0.9 to 28 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the toxic categories. Home composting performed better than or as good as incineration and landfilling in several of the potential impact categories. One exception was the global warming (GW) category, in which incineration performed better due to the substitution of heat and electricity based on fossil fuels.

Andersen, J.K.; Boldrin, A.; Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Scheutz, C., E-mail: chas@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Measurement of the $?$-asymmetry parameter of $^{67}$Cu in search for tensor type currents in the weak interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Precision measurements at low energy search for physics beyond the Standard Model in a way complementary to searches for new particles at colliders. In the weak sector the most general $\\beta$ decay Hamiltonian contains, besides vector and axial-vector terms, also scalar, tensor and pseudoscalar terms. Current limits on the scalar and tensor coupling constants from neutron and nuclear $\\beta$ decay are on the level of several percent. The goal of this paper is extracting new information on tensor coupling constants by measuring the $\\beta$-asymmetry parameter in the pure Gamow-Teller decay of $^{67}$Cu, thereby testing the V-A structure of the weak interaction. An iron sample foil into which the radioactive nuclei were implanted was cooled down to milliKelvin temperatures in a $^3$He-$^4$He dilution refrigerator. An external magnetic field of 0.1 T, in combination with the internal hyperfine magnetic field, oriented the nuclei. The anisotropic $\\beta$ radiation was observed with planar high purity germanium detectors operating at a temperature of about 10\\,K. An on-line measurement of the $\\beta$ asymmetry of $^{68}$Cu was performed as well for normalization purposes. Systematic effects were investigated using Geant4 simulations. The experimental value, $\\tilde{A}$ = 0.587(14), is in agreement with the Standard Model value of 0.5991(2) and is interpreted in terms of physics beyond the Standard Model. The limits obtained on possible tensor type charged currents in the weak interaction hamiltonian are -0.045 $< (C_T+C'_T)/C_A <$ 0.159 (90\\% C.L.). The obtained limits are comparable to limits from other correlation measurements in nuclear $\\beta$ decay and contribute to further constraining tensor coupling constants.

G. Soti; F. Wauters; M. Breitenfeldt; P. Finlay; P. Herzog; A. Knecht; U. Kster; I. S. Kraev; T. Porobic; P. N. Prashanth; I. S. Towner; C. Tramm; D. Zkouck; N. Severijns

2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

192

The Second Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has validated and made publicly available its Second Data Release. This data release consists of 3324 square degrees of five-band (u g r i z) imaging data with photometry for over 88 million unique objects, 367,360 spectra of galaxies, quasars, stars and calibrating blank sky patches selected over 2627 degrees of this area, and tables of measured parameters from these data. The imaging data reach a depth of r ~ 22.2 (95% completeness limit for point sources) and are photometrically and astrometrically calibrated to 2% rms and 100 milli-arcsec rms per coordinate, respectively. The imaging data have all been processed through a new version of the SDSS imaging pipeline, in which the most important improvement since the last data release is fixing an error in the model fits to each object. The result is that model magnitudes are now a good proxy for point spread function (PSF) magnitudes for point sources, and Petrosian magnitudes for extended sources. The spectroscopy extends from 3800 A to 9200 A at a resolution of 2000. The spectroscopic software now repairs a systematic error in the radial velocities of certain types of stars, and has substantially improved spectrophotometry. All data included in the SDSS Early Data Release and First Data Release are reprocessed with the improved pipelines, and included in the Second Data Release. The data are publically available as of 2004 March 15 via the web sites http://www.sdss.org/dr2 and http://skyserver.sdss.org .

K. Abazajian et al.

2004-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

193

High resolution radio observations of the colliding-wind binary WR140  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Milli-arcsecond resolution Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations of the archetype WR+O star colliding-wind binary (CWB) system WR140 are presented for 23 epochs between orbital phases 0.74 and 0.97. At 8.4 GHz, the emission in the wind-collision region (WCR) is clearly resolved as a bow-shaped arc that rotates as the orbit progresses. We interpret this rotation as due to the O star moving from SE to approximately E of the WR star, which leads to solutions for the orbit inclination of 122+/-5 deg, the longitude of the ascending node of 353+/-3 deg, and an orbit semi-major axis of 9.0+/-0.5 mas. The distance to WR140 is determined to be 1.85+/-0.16 kpc, which requires the O star to be a supergiant. The inclination implies the mass of the WR and O star to be 20+/-4 and 54+/-10 solar masses respectively. We determine a wind-momentum ratio of 0.22, with an expected half-opening angle for the WCR of 63 deg, consistent with 65+/-10 deg derived from the VLBA observations. Total flux measurements from Very Large Array (VLA) observations show the radio emission from WR140 is very closely the same from one orbit to the next, pointing strongly toward emission, absorption and cooling mechanism(s) that are controlled largely by the orbital motion. The synchrotron spectra evolve dramatically through the orbital phases observed, exhibiting both optically thin and optically thick emission. We discuss a number of absorption and cooling mechanisms that may determine the evolution of the synchrotron spectrum with orbital phase.

S. M. Dougherty; A. J. Beasley; M. J. Claussen; B. A. Zauderer; N. J. Bolingbroke

2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

194

Distributed Sensor Coordination for Advanced Energy Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability to collect key system level information is critical to the safe, efficient and reli- able operation of advanced energy systems. With recent advances in sensor development, it is now possible to push some level of decision making directly to computationally sophisticated sensors, rather than wait for data to arrive to a massive centralized location before a decision is made. This type of approach relies on networked sensors (called agents from here on) to actively collect and process data, and provide key control deci- sions to significantly improve both the quality/relevance of the collected data and the as- sociating decision making. The technological bottlenecks for such sensor networks stem from a lack of mathematics and algorithms to manage the systems, rather than difficulties associated with building and deploying them. Indeed, traditional sensor coordination strategies do not provide adequate solutions for this problem. Passive data collection methods (e.g., large sensor webs) can scale to large systems, but are generally not suited to highly dynamic environments, such as ad- vanced energy systems, where crucial decisions may need to be reached quickly and lo- cally. Approaches based on local decisions on the other hand cannot guarantee that each agent performing its task (maximize an agent objective) will lead to good network wide solution (maximize a network objective) without invoking cumbersome coordination rou- tines. There is currently a lack of algorithms that will enable self-organization and blend the efficiency of local decision making with the system level guarantees of global decision making, particularly when the systems operate in dynamic and stochastic environments. In this work we addressed this critical gap and provided a comprehensive solution to the problem of sensor coordination to ensure the safe, reliable, and robust operation of advanced energy systems. The differentiating aspect of the proposed work is in shift- ing the focus towards what to observe rather than how to observe in large sensor networks, allowing the agents to actively determine both the structure of the network and the relevance of the information they are seeking to collect. In addition to providing an implicit coordination mechanism, this approach allows the system to be reconfigured in response to changing needs (e.g., sudden external events requiring new responses) or changing sensor network characteristics (e.g., sudden changes to plant condition). Outcome Summary: All milestones associated with this project have been completed. In particular, private sensor objective functions were developed which are aligned with the global objective function, sensor effectiveness has been improved by using sensor teams, system efficiency has been improved by 30% using difference evaluation func- tions, we have demonstrated system reconfigurability for 20% changes in system con- ditions, we have demonstrated extreme scalability of our proposed algorithm, we have demonstrated that sensor networks can overcome disruptions of up to 20% in network conditions, and have demonstrated system reconfigurability to 20% changes in system conditions in hardware-based simulations. This final report summarizes how each of these milestones was achieved, and gives insight into future research possibilities past the work which has been completed. The following publications support these milestones [6, 8, 9, 10, 16, 18, 19].

Tumer, Kagan

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

CaII K observations of QSOs in the line-of-sight to the Magellanic Bridge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe medium-resolution spectroscopic observations taken with the ESO Multi-Mode Instrument in the CaII K line (3933.661 Angstroms) towards 7 QSOs located in the line-of-sight to the Magellanic Bridge. At a spectral resolution R = 6,000, five of the sightlines have a signal-to-noise ratio of 20 or higher. Definite Ca absorption due to Bridge material is detected towards 3 objects, with probable detection towards two other sightlines. Gas-phase CaII K Bridge and Milky Way abundances or lower limits for the all sightlines are estimated by the use of Parkes 21-cm HI emission line data. These data only have a spatial resolution of 14 arcminutes compared with the optical observations which have milli-arcsecond resolution. With this caveat, for the three objects with sound CaII K detections, we find that the ionic abundance of CaII K relative to HI, A=log(N(CaK)/N(HI)) for low-velocity Galactic gas ranges from -8.3 to -8.8 dex, with HI column densities varying from 3-6x10^20 cm^-2. For Magellanic Bridge gas, the values of A are 0.5 dex higher, ranging from -7.8 to -8.2 dex, with N(HI)=1-5x10^20 cm^-2. Higher values of A correspond to lower values of N(HI), although numbers are small. For the sightline towards B0251--675, the Bridge gas has two different velocities, and in only one of these is CaII K tentatively detected, perhaps indicating gas of a different origin or present-day characteristics (such as dust content), although this conclusion is uncertain and there is the possibility that one of the components could be related to the Magellanic Stream. Higher signal-to-noise CaII K data and higher resolution HI data are required to determine whether A changes with N(HI) over the Bridge and if the implied difference in the metalicity of the two Bridge components towards B0251-675 is real.

J. V. Smoker; F. P. Keenan; H. M. A. Thompson; C. Bruns; E. Muller; N. Lehner; J. -K. Lee; I. Hunter

2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

196

A Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 191 Evaluation of Buried Transuranic Waste at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1986, 21 m{sup 3} of transuranic (TRU) waste was inadvertently buried in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is considered five options for management of the buried TRU waste. One option is to leave the waste in-place if the disposal can meet the requirements of Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, 'Environmental Radiation Protection Standard for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes'. This paper describes analyses that assess the likelihood that TRU waste in shallow land burial can meet the 40 CFR 191 standards for a geologic repository. The simulated probability of the cumulative release exceeding 1 and 10 times the 40 CFR 191.13 containment requirements is estimated to be 0.009 and less than 0.0001, respectively. The cumulative release is most sensitive to the number of groundwater withdrawal wells drilled through the disposal trench. The mean total effective dose equivalent for a member of the public is estimated to reach a maximum of 0.014 milliSievert (mSv) at 10,000 years, or approximately 10 percent of the 0.15 mSv 40 CFR 191.15 individual protection requirement. The dose is predominantly from inhalation of short-lived Rn-222 progeny in air produced by low-level waste disposed in the same trench. The transuranic radionuclide released in greatest amounts, Pu-239, contributes only 0.4 percent of the dose. The member of public dose is most sensitive to the U-234 inventory and the radon emanation coefficient. Reasonable assurance of compliance with the Subpart C groundwater protection standard is provided by site characterization data and hydrologic processes modeling which support a conclusion of no groundwater pathway within 10,000 years. Limited quantities of transuranic waste in a shallow land burial trench at the NTS can meet the requirements of 40 CFR 191.

G. J. Shott, V. Yucel, L. Desotell

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Long-Term Assessment of Critical Radionuclides and Associated Environmental Media at the Savannah River Site - 13038  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the operational history of the Savannah River Site (SRS), many different radionuclides have been released from site facilities. However, only a relatively small number of the released radionuclides have been significant contributors to doses and risks to the public. At SRS dose and risk assessments indicate tritium oxide in air and surface water, and Cs-137 in fish and deer have been, and continue to be, the critical radionuclides and pathways. In this assessment, statistical analyses of the long-term trends of tritium oxide in atmospheric and surface water releases and Cs-137 concentrations in fish and deer are provided. Correlations also are provided with 1) operational changes and improvements, 2) geopolitical events (Cold War cessation), and 3) recent environmental remediation projects and decommissioning of excess facilities. For example, environmental remediation of the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins and the Solid Waste Disposal Facility have resulted in a measurable impact on the tritium oxide flux to the onsite Fourmile Branch stream. Airborne releases of tritium oxide have been greatly affected by operational improvements and the end of the Cold War in 1991. However, the effects of SRS environmental remediation activities and ongoing tritium operations on tritium concentrations in the environment are measurable and documented in this assessment. Controlled hunts of deer and feral hogs are conducted at SRS for approximately six weeks each year. Before any harvested animal is released to a hunter, SRS personnel perform a field analysis for Cs-137 concentrations to ensure the Hunter's dose does not exceed the SRS administrative game limit of 0.22 milli-sievert (22 mrem). However, most of the Cs-137 found in SRS onsite deer is not from site operations but is from nuclear weapons testing fallout from the 1950's and early 1960's. This legacy source term is trended in the SRS deer, and an assessment of the 'effective' half-life of Cs-137 in deer (including the physical decay half-life and the environmental dispersion half-life) is provided. The 'creek mouth' fisherman is the next most critical pathway at SRS. On an annual basis, three species of fish (panfish, catfish, and bass) are sampled from the mouths of the five SRS streams. Three composites of up to five fish of each species are analyzed from each sampling location. Long-term trending of the Cs-137 concentrations in fish and the subsequent doses from consumption of SRS fish is provided. (authors)

Jannik, G.T.; Baker, R.A.; Lee, P.L. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Eddy, T.P.; Blount, G.C. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Whitney, G.R. [US Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [US Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

It Just Keeps Getting Better-Tru Waste Inventory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) opened on March 26, 1999, becoming the nation's first deep geologic repository for the permanent disposal of defense-generated transuranic (TRU) waste. In May 1998, the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified WIPP and re-certified WIPP in March 2006. The knowledge of TRU waste inventory is fundamental to packaging, transportation, disposal strategies, resource allocation, and is also imperative when working in a regulatory framework. TRU waste inventory data are used to define the waste that will fill the WIPP repository in terms of volume, radionuclides, waste material parameters, other chemical components, and to model the impact of the waste on the performance of the WIPP over a 10,000-year evolution. The data that pertain to TRU waste is defined in the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA), as '..waste containing more that 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste, with half-lives greater than 20 years..' Defining TRU waste further, the wastes are classified as either contact-handled (CH) or remote-handled (RH) TRU waste, depending on the dose rate at the surface of the waste container. CH TRU wastes are packaged with an external surface dose rate not greater than 200 milli-rem (mrem) per hour, while RH TRU wastes are packaged with an external surface dose rate of 200 mrem per hour or greater. The Los Alamos National Laboratory-Carlsbad Operations (LANL-CO) Inventory Team has developed a powerful new database, the Comprehensive Inventory Database (CID), to maintain the TRU waste inventory information. The CID is intended to replace the Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory Database (TWBID), Revision 2.1, as the central inventory information repository for tracking all existing and potential (TRU) waste generated across the Department of Energy (DOE) TRU waste complex. It is also the source for information submitted for the Annual TRU Waste Inventory Reports some of which will be used in future Compliance Re-certification Applications (CRAs) for the WIPP. Currently, the DOE is preparing for the second re-certification, CRA-2009. The CID contains comprehensive TRU waste inventory that is consistent, relevant, and easily accessible to support DOE needs, not only the CRAs and performance assessments, but also waste management planning activities and other regulatory needs (e.g., National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analyses). The comprehensive inventory contains information obtained via inventory updates and approved acceptable knowledge (AK) characterization information to ensure inventory data integrity is maintained and the inventory is current. The TRU waste inventory is maintained in the CID under configuration management as defined in the LANL-CO Quality Assurance Program. The CID was developed using Microsoft{sup TM} Access Data Project{sup TM} (ADP) technology with a Microsoft SQL Server{sup TM} back end. The CID is user friendly, contains more fields, provides for easy upload of data, and has the capability to generate fully qualified data reports. To go along with the new database, the LANL-CO Inventory Team has developed an improved data collection/screening process and has excellent communications with the TRU waste site personnel. WIPP has now received over 6,000 shipments, emplaced over 50,000 cubic meters of CH waste, and successfully completed one re-certification. With a new robust qualified database, the CID, to maintain the inventory information, the TRU waste inventory information is continuously improving in quality, accuracy, and usability (better). (authors)

Lott, S.; Crawford, B.; McInroy, W.; Van Soest, G.; McTaggart, J.; Guerin, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory-Carlsbad Operations, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Patterson, R. [U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad, Field Office, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Understanding Contaminant Transport Pathways at Rocky Flats - A Basis for the Remediation Strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is a Department of Energy facility located approximately 16 miles northwest of Denver, Colorado. Processing and fabrication of nuclear weapons components occurred at Rocky Flats from 1952 through 1989. Operations at the Site included the use of several radionuclides, including plutonium-239/240 (Pu), americium-241 (Am), and various uranium (U) isotopes, as well as several types of chlorinated solvents. The historic operations resulted in legacy contamination, including contaminated facilities, process waste lines, buried wastes and surface soil contamination. Decontamination and removal of buildings at the site was completed in late 2005, culminating more than ten years of active environmental remediation work. The Corrective Action Decision/Record of Decision was subsequently approved in 2006, signifying regulatory approval and closure of the site. The use of RFETS as a National Wildlife Refuge is scheduled to be in full operation by 2012. To develop a plan for remediating different types of radionuclide contaminants present in the RFETS environment required understanding the different environmental transport pathways for the various actinides. Developing this understanding was the primary objective of the Actinide Migration Evaluation (AME) project. Findings from the AME studies were used in the development of RFETS remediation strategies. The AME project focused on issues of actinide behavior and mobility in surface water, groundwater, air, soil and biota at RFETS. For the purposes of the AME studies, actinide elements addressed included Pu, Am, and U. The AME program, funded by DOE, brought together personnel with a broad range of relevant expertise in technical investigations. The AME advisory panel identified research investigations and approaches that could be used to solve issues related to actinide migration at the Site. An initial step of the AME was to develop a conceptual model to provide a qualitative description of the relationships among potential actinide sources and transport pathways at RFETS. One conceptual model was developed specifically for plutonium and americium, because of their similar geochemical and transport properties. A separate model was developed for uranium because of its different properties and mobility in the environment. These conceptual models were guidelines for quantitative analyses described in the RFETS Pathway Analysis Report, which used existing data from the literature as well as site-specific analyses, including field, laboratory and modeling studies to provide quantitative estimates of actinide migration in the RFETS environment. For pathways where more than one method was used to estimate offsite loads for a specific pathway, the method yielding the highest estimated off-site was used for comparison purposes. For all actinides studied, for pre-remediation conditions, air and surface water were identified to be the dominant transport mechanisms. The estimated annual airborne plutonium-239/240 load transported off site exceeded the surface water load by roughly a factor of 40. However, despite being the largest transport pathway, airborne radionuclide concentrations at the monitoring location with the highest measurements during the period studied were less than two percent of the allowable 10 milli-rem standard governing DOE facilities. Estimated actinide loads for other pathways were much less. Shallow groundwater was approximately two orders of magnitude lower, or 1/100 of the load conveyed in surface water. The estimated biological pathway load for plutonium was approximately five orders of magnitude less, or 1/100,000, of the load estimated for surface-water. The pathway analysis results were taken into consideration during subsequent remediation activities that occurred at the site. For example, when the 903 Pad area was remediated to address elevated concentrations of Pu and Am in the surface soil, portable tent structures were constructed to prevent wind and water erosion from occurring while remediation activitie

Paton, Ian [Wright Water Engineers, Inc.: 2490 W. 26th Avenue, Suite 100A, Denver, CO 80211 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z