National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for decay modes fraction

  1. Measurements of Time-Dependent CP-Asymmetry Parameters in B Meson Decays to \\eta^{\\prime} K^0 and of Branching Fractions of SU(3) Related Modes with BaBar Experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biassoni, Pietro; /Milan U.

    2009-01-22

    In this thesis work we have measured the following upper limits at 90% of confidence level, for B meson decays (in units of 10{sup -6}), using a statistics of 465.0 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0}) < 1.6 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{eta}) < 1.4 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{eta}{prime}) < 2.1 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{phi}) < 0.52 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{omega}) < 1.6 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{phi}) < 1.2 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{omega}) < 1.7 We have no observation of any decay mode, statistical significance for our measurements is in the range 1.3-3.5 standard deviation. We have a 3.5{sigma} evidence for B {yields} {eta}{omega} and a 3.1 {sigma} evidence for B {yields} {eta}{prime}{omega}. The absence of observation of the B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0} open an issue related to the large difference compared to the charged mode B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +} branching fraction, which is measured to be 3.7 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.1 [118]. Our results represent substantial improvements of the previous ones [109, 110, 111] and are consistent with theoretical predictions. All these results were presented at Flavor Physics and CP Violation (FPCP) 2008 Conference, that took place in Taipei, Taiwan. They will be soon included into a paper to be submitted to Physical Review D. For time-dependent analysis, we have reconstructed 1820 {+-} 48 flavor-tagged B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup 0} events, using the final BABAR statistic of 467.4 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs. We use these events to measure the time-dependent asymmetry parameters S and C. We find S = 0.59 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.02, and C = -0.06 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.02. A non-zero value of C would represent a directly CP non-conserving component in B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}, while S would be equal to sin2{beta} measured in B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0} [108], a mixing-decay interference effect, provided the decay is dominated by amplitudes of a single weak phase. The new measured value of S can be considered in agreement with the expectations of the 'Standard Model', inside the experimental and theoretical uncertainties. Inconsistency of our result for S with CP conservation (S = 0) has a significance of 7.1 standard deviations (statistical and systematics included). Our result for the direct-CP violation parameter C is 0.9 standard deviations from zero (statistical and systematics included). Our results are in agreement with the previous ones [18]. Despite the statistics is only 20% larger than the one used in previous measurement, we improved of 20% the error on S and of 14% the error on C. This error is the smaller ever achieved, by both BABAR and Belle, in Time-Dependent CP Violation Parameters measurement is a b {yields} s transition.

  2. Search for the decay modes B±?h±?l

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; et al

    2012-07-16

    We present a search for the lepton flavor violating decay modes B±?h±?l (h=K, ?; l=e, ?) using the BABAR data sample, which corresponds to 472×10? BB¯¯¯ pairs. The search uses events where one B meson is fully reconstructed in one of several hadronic final states. Using the momenta of the reconstructed B, h, and l candidates, we are able to fully determine the ? four-momentum. The resulting ? candidate mass is our main discriminant against combinatorial background. We see no evidence for B±?h±?l decays and set a 90% confidence level upper limit on each branching fraction at the level ofmore »a few times 10??.« less

  3. Search for the decay modes B±?h±?l

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Benitez, J. F.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.

    2012-07-01

    We present a search for the lepton flavor violating decay modes B±?h±?l (h=K, ?; l=e, ?) using the BABAR data sample, which corresponds to 472×10? BB¯¯¯ pairs. The search uses events where one B meson is fully reconstructed in one of several hadronic final states. Using the momenta of the reconstructed B, h, and l candidates, we are able to fully determine the ? four-momentum. The resulting ? candidate mass is our main discriminant against combinatorial background. We see no evidence for B±?h±?l decays and set a 90% confidence level upper limit on each branching fraction at the level of a few times 10??.

  4. The Prediction of the Maximum Modes of Decay of Mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramanna, R

    1999-01-01

    In an earlier work, several properties of fundamental particles were brought together by a simple equation based on continuity and discreteness. It is shown here, that the maximum modes of decay of all fundamental particles can also be predicted without any arbitrary parameters. The method used is to break up the mean lifetimes of particles to obtain the maximum modes of decay. This is done by using a binary expansion of $\\hbar/MT$ where M is the mass of the particle and T is the mean lifetime. The agreements between that obtained from theory and experiment are remarkable. The ordering of the flavours plays an important part in understanding the reasons for this agreement. It is shown that the Zeno effect in Quantum mechanics is connected with use of the binary series.

  5. The Prediction of the Maximum Modes of Decay of Mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raja Ramanna

    1999-04-27

    In an earlier work, several properties of fundamental particles were brought together by a simple equation based on continuity and discreteness. It is shown here, that the maximum modes of decay of all fundamental particles can also be predicted without any arbitrary parameters. The method used is to break up the mean lifetimes of particles to obtain the maximum modes of decay. This is done by using a binary expansion of $\\hbar/MT$ where M is the mass of the particle and T is the mean lifetime. The agreements between that obtained from theory and experiment are remarkable. The ordering of the flavours plays an important part in understanding the reasons for this agreement. It is shown that the Zeno effect in Quantum mechanics is connected with use of the binary series.

  6. Search for the decay modes D??e?e?, D??????, and D??e±??

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; et al

    2012-08-01

    We present searches for the rare decay modes D??e?e?, D0?????, and D??e±?? in continuum e?e??cc¯ events recorded by the BABAR detector in a data sample that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 468 fb?¹. These decays are highly Glashow–Iliopoulos–Maiani suppressed but may be enhanced in several extensions of the standard model. Our observed event yields are consistent with the expected backgrounds. An excess is seen in the D?????? channel, although the observed yield is consistent with an upward background fluctuation at the 5% level. Using the Feldman–Cousins method, we set the following 90% confidence level intervals on the branching fractions:more »B(D??e?e?)±??)« less

  7. Search for the decay modes D??e?e?, D??????, and D??e±??

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Mullin, E.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Zambito, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.

    2012-08-01

    We present searches for the rare decay modes D??e?e?, D0?????, and D??e±?? in continuum e?e??cc¯ events recorded by the BABAR detector in a data sample that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 468 fb?¹. These decays are highly Glashow–Iliopoulos–Maiani suppressed but may be enhanced in several extensions of the standard model. Our observed event yields are consistent with the expected backgrounds. An excess is seen in the D?????? channel, although the observed yield is consistent with an upward background fluctuation at the 5% level. Using the Feldman–Cousins method, we set the following 90% confidence level intervals on the branching fractions: B(D??e?e?)<1.7×10??, B(D??????) within [0.6,8.1]×10??, and B(D??e±??)<3.3×10??.

  8. Search for the decay modes B±?h±?l

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Benitez, J. F.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.

    2012-07-16

    We present a search for the lepton flavor violating decay modes B±?h±?l (h=K, ?; l=e, ?) using the BABAR data sample, which corresponds to 472×10? BB¯¯¯ pairs. The search uses events where one B meson is fully reconstructed in one of several hadronic final states. Using the momenta of the reconstructed B, h, and l candidates, we are able to fully determine the ? four-momentum. The resulting ? candidate mass is our main discriminant against combinatorial background. We see no evidence for B±?h±?l decays and set a 90% confidence level upper limit on each branching fraction at the level of a few times 10??.

  9. Search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons in the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et. al,

    2014-08-01

    A search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons is performed using the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes. In the ZH mode, the Z boson is required to decay to a pair of charged leptons or a b b-bar quark pair. The searches use the 8 TeV pp collision dataset collected by the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 19.7 inverse femtobarns. Certain channels include data from 7 TeV collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 inverse femtobarns. The searches are sensitive to non-standard-model invisible decays of the recently observed Higgs boson, as well as additional Higgs bosons with similar production modes and large invisible branching fractions. In all channels, the observed data are consistent with the expected standard model backgrounds. Limits are set on the production cross section times invisible branching fraction, as a function of the Higgs boson mass, for the vector boson fusion and ZH production modes. By combining all channels, and assuming standard model Higgs boson cross sections and acceptances, the observed (expected) upper limit on the invisible branching fraction at m[H] = 125 GeV is found to be 0.58 (0.44) at 95% confidence level. We interpret this limit in terms of a Higgs-portal model of dark matter interactions.

  10. Atomic nuclei decay modes by spontaneous emission of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poenaru, D.N.; Ivascu, M.; Sndulescu, A.; Greiner, W.

    1985-08-01

    The great majority of the known nuclides with Z>40, including the so-called stable nuclides, are metastable with respect to several modes of spontaneous superasymmetric splitting. A model extended from the fission theory of alpha decay allows one to estimate the lifetimes and the branching ratios relative to the alpha decay for these natural radioactivities. From a huge amount of systematic calculations it is concluded that the process should proceed with maximum intensity in the trans-lead nuclei, where the minimum lifetime is obtained from parent-emitted heavy ion combinations leading to a magic (/sup 208/Pb) or almost magic daughter nucleus. More than 140 nuclides with atomic number smaller than 25 are possible candidates to be emitted from heavy nuclei, with half-lives in the range of 10/sup 10/--10/sup 30/ s: /sup 5/He, /sup 8en-dash10/Be, /sup 11,12/B, /sup 12en-dash16/C, /sup 13en-dash17/N, /sup 15en-dash22/O, /sup 18en-dash23/F, /sup 20en-dash26/Ne, /sup 23en-dash28/Na, /sup 23en-dash30/Mg, /sup 27en-dash32/Al, /sup 28en-dash36/Si, /sup 31en-dash39/P, /sup 32en-dash42/S, /sup 35en-dash45/Cl, /sup 37en-dash47/Ar, /sup 40en-dash49/ K, . .Ca, /sup 44en-dash53/ Sc, /sup 46en-dash53/Ti, /sup 48en-dash54/V, and /sup 49en-dash55/ Cr. The shell structure and the pairing effects are clearly manifested in these new decay modes.

  11. Synchronization of Fractional-order Chaotic Systems with Gaussian fluctuation by Sliding Mode Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yong Xu; Hua Wang

    2013-09-04

    This paper is devoted to the problem of synchronization between fractional-order chaotic systems with Gaussian fluctuation by the method of fractional-order sliding mode control. A fractional integral (FI) sliding surface is proposed for synchronizing the uncertain fractional-order system, and then the sliding mode control technique is carried out to realize the synchronization of the given systems. One theorem about sliding mode controller is presented to prove the proposed controller can make the system synchronize. As a case study, the presented method is applied to the fractional-order Chen-L\\"u system as the drive-response dynamical system. Simulation results show a good performance of the proposed control approach in synchronizing the chaotic systems in presence of Gaussian noise.

  12. Absolute branching fraction measurements of exclusive D-0 semileptonic decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Besson, David Zeke

    2005-10-01

    in further reconstruction. The K 0 Tag mode Yield D .0255 !K 0 S .0025 .0255 2243.000651 D .0255 !K .0135 .0025 .0255 .0025 .0255 15174.0006128 D .0255 !K 0 S .0025 .0255 .0025 0 5188.0006100 D .0255 !K .0135 .0025 .0255 .0025 .0255 .0025 0 4734.000691 D...

  13. Search for the decay Bs0 ? ?? and a measurement of the branching fraction for Bs0 ? ??

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, Deepanwita; Bhuyan, Bipul; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, David M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A. M.; Bansal, Vikas; Bhardwaj, V.; Bobrov, A.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Cervenkov, D.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Dalseno, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, James E.; Frost, O.; Gaur, Vipin; Ganguly, Sudeshna; Garmash, Alexey; Getzkow, D.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Hou, W. S.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, Igal; Joffe, D.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Krokovny, Pavel; Kuhr, Thomas; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, I. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, Dmitri; Matvienko, D.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nayak, Minakshi; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, Galina; Pedlar, Todd K.; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, Marko; Piilonen, Leo E.; Ribezl, Eva; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santelj, Luka; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Semmler, D.; Shebalin, V.; Shibata, T. A.; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y. S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Staric, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Unno, Yuji; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vossen, Anslem G.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Wehle, S.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2015-01-01

    We search for the decay B0s??? and measure the branching fraction for B0s??? using 121.4~fb-1 of data collected at the ?(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The B0s??? branching fraction is measured to be (3.6±0.5(stat.)±0.3(syst.)±0.6(fs))×10-5, where fs is the fraction of Bs(*)B¯s(*) in bb¯ events. Our result is in good agreement with the theoretical predictions as well as with a recent measurement from LHCb. We observe no statistically significant signal for the decay B0s??? and set a 90% confidence-level upper limit on its branching fraction at 3.1×10-6. This constitutes a significant improvement over the previous result.

  14. Branching fractions and CP-violating asymmetries in radiative B decays to eta K gamma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, M.

    We present measurements of the CP-violation parameters S and C for the radiative decay B0-->etaKS0gamma; for B-->etaKgamma we also measure the branching fractions and for B+-->etaK+gamma the time-integrated charge asymmetry ...

  15. Measurements of the branching fractions and CP-asymmetries of B- --> D0_(CP) K- decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The BABAR Collaboration; B. Aubert

    2005-12-25

    We present a study of the decay B- --> D0_(CP) K- and its charge conjugate, where D0_(CP) is reconstructed in CP-even, CP-odd, and non-CP flavor eigenstates, based on a sample of 232 million Y(4S) --> B Bbar decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- storage ring. We measure the partial-rate charge asymmetries A_CP+, A_CP- and the ratios R_CP+, R_CP- of the B --> D0 K decay branching fractions as measured in CP+, CP-, and non-CP D0 decays: A_CP+ = 0.35 +/- 0.13 (stat) +/- 0.04 (syst) A_CP- = -0.06 +/- 0.13 (stat) +/- 0.04 (syst) R_CP+ = 0.90 +/- 0.12 (stat) +/- 0.04 (syst) R_CP- = 0.86 +/- 0.10 (stat) +/- 0.05 (syst)

  16. Measurement of branching fraction and first evidence of CP violation in B??a?±(1260)?? decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dalseno, J.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bay, A.; Belous, K.; Bhuyan, B.; et al

    2012-11-26

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction and time-dependent CP violation parameters in B??a±?(1260)?? decays. The results are obtained from the final data sample containing 772×10? BB¯¯¯ pairs collected at the ?(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e?e? collider. We obtain the product branching fraction B(B??a±?(1260)??)×B(a±?(1260)??±???±)=(11.1±1.0(stat)±1.4(syst))×10?? and an upper limit on the product branching fraction for a possible decay with the same final state B(B??a±?(1320)??)×B(a±?(1320)??±???±)more »respectively. Simultaneously, we also extract the CP-conserving parameters ?C=+0.54±0.11(stat)±0.07(syst), ?S=–0.09±0.14(stat)±0.06(syst), which, respectively, describe a rate difference and strong phase difference between the decay channels where the a±? does not contain the spectator quark and those where it does. We find first evidence of mixing-induced CP violation in B??a±?(1260)?? decays with 3.1? significance. The rate where the a±? does not contain the spectator quark from the B meson is found to dominate the rate where it does at the 4.1? level. However, there is no evidence for either time- and flavor-integrated direct CP violation or flavor-dependent direct CP violation.« less

  17. Branching Fraction and CP Asymmetry Measurements in Inclusive B -> Xs l+l- and B -> Xs gamma Decays from BABAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Eigen; representing the BABAR collaboration

    2015-03-08

    We present an update on total and partial branching fractions and on CP asymmetries in the semi-inclusive decay B -> Xs l+l-. Further, we summarize our results on branching fractions and CP asymmetries for semi-inclusive and fully-inclusive B -> Xs gamma decays. We present the first result on the CP asymmetry difference of charged and neutral B -> Xs gamma$ decays yielding the first constraint on the ratio of Wilson coefficients Im (C8/C7).

  18. Measurement of branching fractions and rate asymmetries in the rare decays B?K(*)l?l?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; et al

    2012-08-24

    In a sample of 471×10? BB¯¯¯ events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e?e? collider we study the rare decays B?K(*)l?l?, where l?l? is either e?e? or ????. We report results on partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries in seven bins of dilepton mass-squared. We further present CP and lepton-flavor asymmetries for dilepton masses below and above the J/? resonance. We find no evidence for CP or lepton-flavor violation. The partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries are consistent with the Standard Model predictions and with results from other experiments.

  19. Measurement of branching fraction and first evidence of CP violation in B??a?±(1260)?? decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dalseno, J.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bay, A.; Belous, K.; Bhuyan, B.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Brovchenko, O.; Browder, T. E.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, I.-S.; Cho, K.; Choi, Y.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Eidelman, S.; Fast, J. E.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Goh, Y. M.; Hayashii, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwabuchi, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Julius, T.; Kang, J. H.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B. R.; Koblitz, S.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kronenbitter, B.; Kuhr, T.; Kumita, T.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Libby, J.; Liu, C.; Liu, Z. Q.; Louvot, R.; MacNaughton, J.; Matvienko, D.; McOnie, S.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohapatra, D.; Moll, A.; Muramatsu, N.; Nakao, M.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nedelkovska, E.; Ng, C.; Nishida, S.; Nishimura, K.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Prim, M.; Prothmann, K.; Ritter, M.; Röhrken, M.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sanuki, T.; Schneider, O.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Solovieva, E.; Stari?, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamashita, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2012-11-01

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction and time-dependent CP violation parameters in B??a±?(1260)?? decays. The results are obtained from the final data sample containing 772×10? BB¯¯¯ pairs collected at the ?(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e?e? collider. We obtain the product branching fraction B(B??a±?(1260)??)×B(a±?(1260)??±???±)=(11.1±1.0(stat)±1.4(syst))×10?? and an upper limit on the product branching fraction for a possible decay with the same final state B(B??a±?(1320)??)×B(a±?(1320)??±???±)±? does not contain the spectator quark and those where it does. We find first evidence of mixing-induced CP violation in B??a±?(1260)?? decays with 3.1? significance. The rate where the a±? does not contain the spectator quark from the B meson is found to dominate the rate where it does at the 4.1? level. However, there is no evidence for either time- and flavor-integrated direct CP violation or flavor-dependent direct CP violation.

  20. Study of two- and three-meson decay modes of tau-lepton with Monte Carlo generator TAUOLA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shekhovtsova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    The study of the $\\tau$-lepton decays into hadrons has contributed to a better understanding of non-perturbative QCD and light-quark meson spectroscopy, as well as to the search of new physics beyond the Standard Model. The two- and three-meson decay modes, considering only those permitted by the Standard Model, are the predominant decays and together with the one-pion mode compose more than $85\\%$ of the hadronic $\\tau$-lepton decay width. In this note we review the theoretical results for these modes implemented in the Monte Carlo event generator TAUOLA and present at the same time a comparison with the Belle Collaboration data for the two-pion decay mode and the BaBar preliminary data for the three-pion decay mode as well for the decay mode into two-kaon and one-pion.

  1. Measurement of the W-boson helicity fractions in top-quark decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chwalek, Thorsten; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2007-05-01

    We present a measurement of the fractions F{sub 0} and F{sub +} of longitudinally polarized and right-handed W bosons in top-quark decays using data collected with the CDF II detector. The data set used in the analysis corresponds to an integrated luminosity of approximately 955 pb{sup -1}. We select t{bar t} candidate events with one lepton, at least four jets, and missing transverse energy. Our helicity measurement uses the decay angle {theta}*, which is defined as the angle between the momentum of the charged lepton in the W boson rest-frame and the W momentum in the top-quark rest-frame. The cos{theta}* distribution in the data is determined by full kinematic reconstruction of the t{bar t} candidates. We find F{sub 0}= 0.59 {+-} 0.12(stat){sup +0.07}{sub -0.06}(syst) and F{sub +}=-0.03 {+-} 0.06(stat){sup +0.04}{sub -0.03}(syst), which is consistent with the standard model prediction. We set an upper limit on the fraction of right-handed W bosons of F{sub +} {le} 0.10 at the 95% confidence level.

  2. Received 21 Jan 2014 | Accepted 7 May 2014 | Published 6 Jun 2014 Proliferation of neutral modes in fractional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heiblum, Mordehai "Moty"

    of fractional statistics. DOI: 10.1038/ncomms5067 1 Braun Center for Submicron Research, Department of Condensed a sensitive heat sensor in a thinly polished substrate14, our group detected the presence of neutral modes

  3. VII. Nuclear Chemistry (Chapter 17) A. Modes of radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, fission, fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    40 VII. Nuclear Chemistry (Chapter 17) A. Modes of radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, fission #12;41 These masses are not exactly integer multiples due to nuclear interactions between the protons differences via the famous formula E = mc2 . Nuclear Fusion! For example, if you combine 2 protons and two

  4. Search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons in the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apyan, Aram

    A search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons is performed using the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes. In the ZH mode, the Z boson is required to decay to a pair of charged leptons or a b[bar over b] ...

  5. Energy-dependence of skin-mode fraction in $E1$ excitations of neutron-rich nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Nakada; T. Inakura; H. Sawai

    2015-02-17

    We have extensively investigated characters of the low-energy $E1$ strengths in $N>Z$ nuclei, by analyzing the transition densities obtained by the HF+RPA calculations with several effective interactions. Crossover behavior has been confirmed, from the skin mode at low energy to the $pn$ mode at higher energy. Decomposing the $E1$ strengths into the skin-mode, $pn$-mode and interference fractions, we show that the ratio of the skin-mode strength to the full strength may be regarded as a generic function of the excitation energy, insensitive to nuclides and effective interactions, particularly beyond Ni.

  6. Measurement of branching fraction and CP asymmetries in B->D0(cp)K decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The BABAR Collaboration; B. Aubert

    2007-08-11

    We present a preliminary study of $B^- \\to D^0_{CP} \\pi^-$ and $B^- \\to D^0_{CP} K^-$ decays, with the $D^0_{CP}$ reconstructed in the CP-odd eigenstates $K_s \\pi^0$, $K_s \\omega$, in the CP-even eigenstates $K^+ K^-$, $\\pi^+ \\pi^-$, and in the (non-CP) flavor eigenstate $K^\\mp \\pi^\\pm$. Using a sample of about 382 million Y(4S) decays into BBbar pairs, collected with the BABAR detector operating at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC, we measure the ratios of the branching fractions R_CP+- and the direct CP asymmetries A_CP+-. The results are: R_CP- = 0.81 \\pm 0.10 (stat) \\pm 0.05 (syst) R_CP+ = 1.07 \\pm 0.10 (stat) \\pm 0.04 (syst) A_CP- = -0.19 \\pm 0.12 (stat) \\pm 0.02 (syst) A_CP+ = 0.35 \\pm 0.09 (stat) \\pm 0.05 (syst)

  7. Measurements of branching fraction ratios and CP-asymmetries in suppressed B-? D(? K+?-)K- and B-? D(? K+?-)?- decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-01

    We report the first reconstruction in hadron collisions of the suppressed decays B-? D(? K+?-)K- and B-? D(? K+?-)?- decays, sensitive to the CKM phase {gamma}, using data from 7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. We reconstruct a signal for the B-? D(? K+?-)K- suppressed mode with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations, and measure the ratios of the suppressed to favored branching fractions R(K) = [22.0 ± 8.6(stat) ± 2.6(syst)] x 10-3, R+(K) = [42.6 ± 13.7(stat) ± 2.8(syst)] x 10-3, R-(K) = [3.8 ± 10.3(stat) ± 2.7(syst)] x 10-3more »as well as the direct CP-violating asymmetry A(K) = -0.82±0.44(stat)±0.09(syst) of this mode. Corresponding quantities for B- ? D(? K+?-)?- decay are also reported.« less

  8. Measurements of branching fraction ratios and CP-asymmetries in suppressed B-? D(? K+?-)K- and B-? D(? K+?-)?- decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T. [Helsinki Inst. of Physics; Gonzalez, Alvarez B. [Oviedo U., Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S. [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D. [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A. [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A. [Frascati; Antos, J [Comenius U.; Apollinari, G. [Fermilab; Appel, J. A [Fermilab; Apresyan, A. [Purdue; Arisawa, T. [Waseda U., Dubna, JINR

    2011-08-01

    We report the first reconstruction in hadron collisions of the suppressed decays B-? D(? K+?-)K- and B-? D(? K+?-)?- decays, sensitive to the CKM phase {gamma}, using data from 7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. We reconstruct a signal for the B-? D(? K+?-)K- suppressed mode with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations, and measure the ratios of the suppressed to favored branching fractions R(K) = [22.0 ± 8.6(stat) ± 2.6(syst)] x 10-3, R+(K) = [42.6 ± 13.7(stat) ± 2.8(syst)] x 10-3, R-(K) = [3.8 ± 10.3(stat) ± 2.7(syst)] x 10-3 as well as the direct CP-violating asymmetry A(K) = -0.82±0.44(stat)±0.09(syst) of this mode. Corresponding quantities for B- ? D(? K+?-)?- decay are also reported.

  9. phi-meson photoproduction on Hydrogen in the neutral decay mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seraydaryan, Helena; Amaryan, Moscov J.; Gavalian, Gagik; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes A.; Weinstein, Larry

    2014-05-01

    We report the first measurement of the photoproduction cross section of the $\\phi$ meson in its neutral decay mode in the reaction $\\gamma p \\to p\\phi(K_SK_L)$. The experiment was performed with a tagged photon beam of energy $1.6 \\le E_\\gamma \\le 3.6$ GeV incident on a liquid hydrogen target of the CLAS spectrometer at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The $p \\phi$ final state is identified via reconstruction of $K_S$ in the invariant mass of two oppositely charged pions and by requiring the missing particle in the reaction $\\gamma p \\to p K_S X$ to be $K_L$. The presented results significantly enlarge the existing data on $\\phi$-photoproduction. These data, combined with the data from the charged decay mode, will help to constrain different mechanisms of $\\phi$ photoproduction.

  10. Abrupt changes in alpha-decay systematics as a manifestation of collective nuclear modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qi, C.; Liotta, R. J.; Wyss, R. A.; Andreyev, A. N.; Huyse, M.; Van Duppen, P.

    2010-06-15

    An abrupt change in alpha-decay systematics around the N=126 neutron shell closure is discussed. It is explained as a sudden hindrance of the clustering of the nucleons that eventually form the alpha particle. This is because the clustering induced by the pairing mode acting upon the four nucleons is inhibited if the configuration space does not allow a proper manifestation of the pairing collectivity.

  11. Search for lepton-flavor and lepton-number-violating ? ? ?hh' decay modes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miyazaki, Y.; Hayasaka, K.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D.M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A.M.; Bay, A.; Bhardwaj, V.; et al

    2013-02-01

    We search for lepton-flavor and lepton-number-violating ? decays into a lepton (? = electron or muon) and two charged mesons (h,h'=?± or K±) using 854 fb?¹of data collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e?e? collider. We obtain 90% confidence level upper limits on the ???hh' branching fractions in the range (2.0–8.4)×10??. These results improve upon our previously published upper limits by factors of about 1.8 on average.

  12. Measurement of branching fractions and rate asymmetries in the rare decays B?K(*)l?l?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.

    2012-08-24

    In a sample of 471×10? BB¯¯¯ events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e?e? collider we study the rare decays B?K(*)l?l?, where l?l? is either e?e? or ????. We report results on partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries in seven bins of dilepton mass-squared. We further present CP and lepton-flavor asymmetries for dilepton masses below and above the J/? resonance. We find no evidence for CP or lepton-flavor violation. The partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries are consistent with the Standard Model predictions and with results from other experiments.

  13. Helicity fractions of W bosons from top quark decays at next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czarnecki, Andrzej; Koerner, Juergen G.; Piclum, Jan H. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7, Canada and CERN Theory Division, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada)

    2010-06-01

    Decay rates of unpolarized top quarks into longitudinally and transversally polarized W bosons are calculated to second order in the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s}. Including the finite bottom quark mass and electroweak effects, the standard model predictions for the W-boson helicity fractions are F{sub L}=0.687(5), F{sub +}=0.0017(1), and F{sub -}=0.311(5).

  14. Measurement of Branching Fractions of B decays to K1(1270)pi and K1(1400)pi and Determination of the CKM angle alpha from B0 --> a1(1260) /- pi-/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G. /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-10-30

    We report measurements of the branching fractions of neutral and charged B meson decays to final states containing a K{sub 1}(1270) or K{sub 1}(1400) meson and a charged pion. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, correspond to 454 million B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. We measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub 1}(1270){sup +}{pi}{sup -} + K{sub 1}(1400){sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = 3.1{sub 0.7}{sup +0.8} x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sub 1}(1270){sup 0}{pi}{sup +} + K{sub 1}(1400){sup 0}{pi}{sup +}) = 2.9{sub -1.7}{sup +2.9} x 10{sup -5} (< 8.2 x 10{sup -5} at 90% confidence level), where the errors are statistical and systematic combined. The B{sup 0} decay mode is observed with a significance of 7.5{sigma}, while a significance of 3.2{sigma} is obtained for the B{sup +} decay mode. Based on these results, we estimate the weak phase {alpha} = (79 {+-} 7 {+-} 11){sup o} from the time dependent CP asymmetries in B{sup 0} {yields} a{sub 1}(1260){sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decays.

  15. Stretched exponential decay of Majorana edge modes in many-body localized Kitaev chains under dissipation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Carmele; Markus Heyl; Christina Kraus; Marcello Dalmonte

    2015-07-22

    We investigate the resilience of symmetry-protected topological edge states at the boundaries of Kitaev chains in the presence of a bath which explicitly introduces symmetry-breaking terms. Specifically, we focus on single-particle losses and gains, violating the protecting parity symmetry, which could generically occur in realistic scenarios. In homogeneous systems, we show that the Majorana mode decays exponentially fast. However, we find that it is possible to substantially increase its life-time by eliminating the dissipative dynamics close to the edges. Most importantly, we demonstrate that the Majorana mode can be further stabilized by the inclusion of disorder where the decay of the Majorana converts into a stretched exponential form implying an exponential gain in stability compared to the homogeneous case. In particular, for pure loss dynamics we find a universal exponent $\\alpha \\simeq 2/3$. We show that this holds both in the Anderson and many-body localized regimes. Our results thus provide a concrete recipe to stabilize edge states even in the presence of symmetry-breaking environments.

  16. Measurement of Branching Fractions of B0 Decays to K1(1270)+ pi- and K1(1400)+ pi-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-08-04

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction of neutral B meson decaying to final states containing a K1 meson, i.e. K{sub 1}(1270) and K{sub 1}(1400), and a charged pion. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represent 454 million B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. We measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub 1}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (31.0 {+-} 2.7 {+-} 6.9) x 10{sup -6}, where the first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic. In the framework of the K-matrix formalism used to describe these decays, we also set limits on the ratio of the production constants for the K{sub 1}(1270){sup +} and K{sub 1}(1400){sup +} mesons in B{sup 0} decays.

  17. Measurement of the B¯?Xs? branching fraction with a sum of exclusive decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Saito, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Yamamoto, H.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D.?M.; Aushev, T.; et al

    2015-03-04

    We use 772 × 106 BB meson pairs collected at the ?(4S) resonance with the Belle detector to measure the branching fraction for B¯ ? Xs?. Our measurement uses a sum-of-exclusives approach in which 38 of the hadronic final states with strangeness equal to +1, denoted by Xs, are reconstructed. The inclusive branching fraction for MXs s?)=(3.51±0.17±0.33) × 10–4, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  18. Search for the proton decay mode p ? [bar over v]K[superscript +] with KamLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asakura, K.

    We present a search for the proton decay mode p ? [bar over ?]K[superscript +] based on an exposure of 8.97 kton-years in the KamLAND experiment. The liquid scintillator detector is sensitive to successive signals from p ...

  19. Measurements of branching fraction ratios and CP-asymmetries in suppressed B-? D(? K+?-)K- and B-? D(? K+?-)?- decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T. [Helsinki Inst. of Physics; Gonzalez, Alvarez B. [Oviedo U., Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S. [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D. [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A. [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A. [Frascati; Antos, J [Comenius U.; Apollinari, G. [Fermilab; Appel, J. A [Fermilab; Apresyan, A. [Purdue; Arisawa, T. [Waseda U., Dubna, JINR

    2011-08-01

    We report the first reconstruction in hadron collisions of the suppressed decays B-? D(? K+?-)K- and B-? D(? K+?-)?- decays, sensitive to the CKM phase {gamma}, using data from 7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. We reconstruct a signal for the B-? D(? K+?-)K- suppressed mode with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations, and measure the ratios of the suppressed to favored branching fractions R(K) = [22.0 ± 8.6(stat) ± 2.6(syst)] x 10-3, R+(K) = [42.6 ± 13.7(stat) ± 2.8(syst)] x 10-3, R-(K) = [3.8 ± 10.3(stat) ± 2.7(syst)] x 10-3 as well as the direct CP-violating asymmetry A(K) = -0.82±0.44(stat)±0.09(syst) of this mode. Corresponding quantities for B- ? D(? K+?-)?- decay are also reported.

  20. Discovery Potential of the Standard Model Higgs Boson Through H -> WW Decay Mode with the ATLAS Detector at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hai-Jun Yang; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2009-10-01

    We report results of a study of the Standard Model Higgs boson discovery potential through the W-pair leptonic decay modes with the ATLAS detector at LHC at 14 TeV center-of-mass energy. We used MC samples with full detector simulation and reconstruction of the ATLAS experiment to estimate the ATLAS detection sensitivity for the reaction of pp -> H -> WW -> e\

  1. Search for the Decay Modes D0 to e+ e-, D0 to mu+ mu-, and D0 to e+/- mu+/-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.

    2012-08-03

    We present searches for the rare decay modes D{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}, D{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, and D{sup 0} {yields} e{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {-+}} in continuum e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} c{bar c} events recorded by the BABAR detector in a data sample that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 468 fb{sup -1}. These decays are highly GIM suppressed but may be enhanced in several extensions of the Standard Model. Our observed event yields are consistent with the expected backgrounds. An excess is seen in the D{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} channel, although the observed yield is consistent with an upward background fluctuation at the 5% level. Using the Feldman-Cousins method, we set the following 90% confidence level intervals on the branching fractions: {Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) < 1.7 x 10{sup -7}, {Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) within [0.6, 8.1] x 10{sup -7}, and {Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} e{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {-+}}) < 3.3 x 10{sup -7}.

  2. PHY357 Assignment 1, Due Feb 2, 2006 The first three questions have to do with decays. As discussed in class, the same decay law applies both

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krieger, Peter

    concentration of 14 6 C in atmospheric CO2 which is the source of biological carbon. Any living organism. The Branching Ratio or Branching Fraction for the ith decay mode is defined as the ratio of the number of decays replenished and the fraction of 14 6 C relative to 12 6 C decreases with the characteristic liftime

  3. Coupled modes analysis of SRS backscattering, with Langmuir decay and possible cascadings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salcedo, Ante, 1969-

    2002-01-01

    Recent experiments aimed at understanding stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in ICF laser-plasma interactions, suggest that SRS is coupled to the Langmuir decay interaction (LDI). The effects of LDI on the saturation of the ...

  4. Observation of B+->omega K+ and search for related B decays modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, L.

    1998-07-01

    We have searched for two-body charmless decays of B mesons to purely hadronic exclusive final states including omega or phi mesons using data collected with the CLEO II detector. With this sample of 6.6 x 10(6) B mesons ...

  5. Results on Dark Matter and beta beta decay modes by DAMA at Gran Sasso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Bernabei

    2007-05-21

    DAMA is an observatory for rare processes and it is operative deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory of the I.N.F.N. (LNGS). Here some arguments will be presented on the investigation on dark matter particles by annual modulation signature and on some of the realized double beta decay searches.

  6. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the decay mode H-> WW-> lnulnu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penning, B.; /Freiburg U.

    2009-09-01

    The question of the nature and principles of the universe and our place in it is the driving force of science since Mesopotamian astronomers glanced for the first time at the starry sky and Greek atomism has been formulated. During the last hundred years modern science was able to extend its knowledge tremendously, answering many questions, opening entirely new fields but as well raising many new questions. Particularly Astronomy, Astroparticle Physics and Particle Physics lead the race to answer these fundamental and ancient questions experimentally. Today it is known that matter consists of fermions, the quarks and leptons. Four fundamental forces are acting between these particles, the electromagnetic, the strong, the weak and the gravitational force. These forces are mediated by particles called bosons. Our confirmed knowledge of particle physics is based on these particles and the theory describing their dynamics, the Standard Model of Particles. Many experimental measurements show an excellent agreement between observation and theory but the origin of the particle masses and therefore the electroweak symmetry breaking remains unexplained. The mechanism proposed to solve this issue involves the introduction of a complex doublet of scalar fields which generates the masses of elementary particles via their mutual interactions. This Higgs mechanism also gives rise to a single neutral scalar boson with an unpredicted mass, the Higgs boson. During the last twenty years several experiments have searched for the Higgs boson but so far it escaped direct observation. Nevertheless these studies allow to further constrain its mass range. The last experimental limits on the Higgs mass have been set in 2001 at the LEP collider, an electron positron machine close to Geneva, Switzerland. The lower limit set on the Higgs boson mass is m{sub H} > 114.4 GeV/c{sup 2} and remained for many years the last experimental constraint on the Standard Model Higgs Boson due to the shutdown of the LEP collider and the experimental challenges at hadron machines as the Tevatron. This thesis was performed using data from the D0 detector located at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, IL. Final states containing two electrons or a muon and a tau in combination with missing transverse energy were studied to search for the Standard Model Higgs boson, utilizing up to 4.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. In 2008 the CDF and D0 experiments in a combined effort were able to reach for the first time at a hadron collider the sensitivity to further constrain the possible Standard Model Higgs boson mass range. The research conducted for this thesis played a pivotal role in this effort. Improved methods for lepton identification, background separation, assessment of systematic uncertainties and new decay channels have been studied, developed and utilized. Along with similar efforts at the CDF experiment these improvements led finally the important result of excluding the presence of a Standard Model Higgs boson in a mass range of m{sub H} = 160-170 GeV/c{sup 2} at 95% Confidence Level. Many of the challenges and methods found in the present analysis will probably in a similar way be ingredients of a Higgs boson evidence or discovery in the near future, either at the Tevatron or more likely at the soon starting Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Continuing to pursue the Higgs boson we are looking forward to many exciting results at the Tevatron and soon at the LHC. In Chapter 2 an introduction to the Standard Model of particle physics and the Higgs mechanism is given, followed by a brief outline of existing theoretical and experimental constraints on the Higgs boson mass before summarizing the Higgs boson production modes. Chapter 3 gives an overview of the experimental setup. This is followed by a description of the reconstruction of the objects produced in proton-antiproton collisions in Chapter 4 and the necessary calorimeter calibrations in Chapter 5. Chapter 6 follows with an explanation of the phenomenology of the proton-antiproton colli

  7. Study of Radiative Decays of Psi(2S) Mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiyan Gao

    2009-09-16

    We studied the decay psi(2S) to gamma eta_c(2S) with 25.9 million psi(2S) events collected with the CLEO-c detector. No psi(2S) to gamma eta_c(2S) decays were observed in any of the eleven exclusive eta_c(2S) decay modes studied. The product branching fraction upper limits were determined for all modes. The 90% confidence level upper limit of branching fraction of psi(2S) to gamma eta_c (2S) was obtained.

  8. Branching fraction and form-factor shape measurements of exclusive charmless semileptonic B decays, and determination of |[subscript Vub]|

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowan, Ray Franklin

    We report the results of a study of the exclusive charmless semileptonic decays, B[superscript 0]??[superscript -]?[superscript +]?, B[superscript +]??[superscript 0]?[superscript +]?, B[superscript +]???[superscript +]?, ...

  9. Measurement of branching fraction ratios and CP asymmetries in B →D0 CPK decays with the BABAR detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchiori, Giovanni; /Pisa U.

    2010-05-05

    The primary goals of the BABAR experiment are the detection of CP violation (CPV) in the B meson system, the precise measurement of some of the elements of the CKM matrix and the measurement of the rates of rare B meson decays. At present, BABAR has achieved major successes: (1) the discovery, in neutral B decays, of direct and mixing-induced CP violation; (2) accurate measurements of the magnitudes of the CKM matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub ub}|; (3) a precise measurement of the CKM parameter {beta} {triple_bond} arg[- V{sub cd}V*{sub cb}/V{sub td}V*{sub tb}]; (4) a first measurement of the CKM parameters {alpha} {triple_bond} arg[- V{sub td}V*{sub tb}/V{sub ud}V*{sub ub}], {gamma} {triple_bond} arg[- V{sub ud}V*{sub ub}/V{sub cd}V*{sub cb}]; and (5) the observation of several rare B decays and the discovery of new particles (in the charmed and charmonium mesons spectroscopy). However, the physics program of BABAR is not yet complete. Two of the key elements of this program that still need to be achieved are: (1) the observation of direct CP violation in charged B decays, which would constitute the first evidence of direct CPV in a charged meson decay; and (2) the precise measurement of {alpha} and {gamma}, which are necessary ingredients for a stringent test of the Standard Model predictions in the quark electroweak sector. A possibility for the discovery of direct CP violation in charged B decays would be the observation of a non-vanishing rate asymmetry in the Cabibbo-suppressed decay B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0} K{sup -}, with the D{sup 0} decaying to either a CP-even or a CP-odd eigenstate. This class of decays can also provide theoretically-clean information on {gamma}.

  10. Measurement of the decay amplitudes and branching fractions of B->J/psi K-* and B->J/psi K decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

    1997-12-01

    Using data taken with the CLEO II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we present the first full angular analysis in the color-suppressed modes B-0 --> J/psi K*(0) and B+ --> J/psi K*(+). This leads to a complete ...

  11. Measurement of the Branching Fractions of the Radiative Leptonic ? Decays ? ? e??[bar over ?] and ? ? ???[bar over ?] at BABAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lees, J.?P.

    We perform a measurement of the ? ? l??[bar over ?] (l = e,?) branching fractions for a minimum photon energy of 10 MeV in the ? rest frame, using 431??fb[superscript -1] of e[superscript +]e[superscript -] collisions ...

  12. D meson hadronic decays at CLEO-c

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Fan; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The recent CLEO-c results on hadronic decays of D and D{sub s} mesons are presented. First the absolute branching fractions for D and D{sub s} mesons using a double tag technique are discussed, then are the Cabibbo suppressed decays and doubly Cabibbo suppressed decays. Finally, I present the inclusive and rare decay modes and other measurements from CLEO-c. These decays illuminate a wide range of physics. A brief theoretical introduction is given before the corresponding discussion on measurement.

  13. Elemental Modes of Occurrence in an Illinois #6 Coal and Fractions Prepared by Physical Separation Techniques at a Coal Preparation Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huggins, F.; Seidu, L; Shah, N; Huffman, G; Honaker, R; Kyger, J; Higgins, B; Robertson, J; Pal, S; Seehra, M

    2009-01-01

    In order to gain better insight into elemental partitioning between clean coal and tailings, modes of occurrence have been determined for a number of major and trace elements (S, K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Zn, As, Se, Pb) in an Illinois No.6 coal and fractions prepared by physical separation methods at a commercial coal preparation plant. Elemental modes of occurrence were largely determined directly by XAFS or Moessbauer spectroscopic methods because the concentrations of major minerals and wt.% ash were found to be highly correlated for this coal and derived fractions, rendering correlations between individual elements and minerals ambiguous for inferring elemental modes of occurrence. Of the major elements investigated, iron and potassium are shown to be entirely inorganic in occurrence. Most (90%) of the iron is present as pyrite, with minor fractions in the form of clays and sulfates. All potassium is present in illitic clays. Calcium in the original coal is 80-90% inorganic and is divided between calcite, gypsum, and illite, with the remainder of the calcium present as carboxyl-bound calcium. In the clean coal fraction, organically associated Ca exceeds 50% of the total calcium. This organically-associated form of Ca explains the poorer separation of Ca relative to both K and ash. Among the trace elements, V and Cr are predominantly inorganically associated with illite, but minor amounts (5-15% Cr, 20-30% V) of these elements are also organically associated. Estimates of the V and Cr contents of illite are 420 ppm and 630 ppm, respectively, whereas these elements average 20 and 8 ppm in the macerals. Arsenic in the coal is almost entirely associated with pyrite, with an average As content of about 150 ppm, but some As ({approx} 10%) is present as arsenate due to minor oxidation of the pyrite. The mode of occurrence of Zn, although entirely inorganic, is more complex than normally noted for Illinois basin coals; about 2/3 is present in sphalerite, with lesser amounts associated with illite and a third form yet to be conclusively identified. The non-sulfide zinc forms are removed predominantly by the first stage of separation (rotary breaker), whereas the sphalerite is removed by the second stage (heavy media). Germanium is the only trace element determined to have a predominantly organic association.

  14. Branching fraction measurements of the color-suppressed decays B[over-bar] 0 to D[superscript (*)0?0, D[superscript (*)0]?, D[superscript (*)0]?, and D[superscript(*)0]?? and measurement of the polarization in the decay B[over-bar] 0-->D[superscript *0]?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowan, Ray Franklin

    We report updated branching fraction measurements of the color-suppressed decays B? 0-->D0?0, D*0?0, D0?, D*0?, D0?, D*0?, D0??, and D*0??. We measure the branching fractions (×10-4): B(B? 0?D0?0)=2.69±0.09±0.13, B(B? ...

  15. Search for Rare and Forbidden Charm Meson Decays at Fermilab E791

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab E791 Collaboration; D. J. Summers

    2000-10-01

    We report the results of a blind search for flavor-changing neutral current, lepton-flavor violating, and lepton-number violating decays of D+, D(s)+, and D0 mesons (and their antiparticles) into modes containing muons and electrons. Using data from Fermilab charm hadroproduction experiment E791, we examine the pi l l and K l l decay modes of D+ and D(s)+ and the l+ l- decay modes of D0. No evidence for any of these decays is found. Therefore, we present branching-fraction upper limits at 90% confidence level for the 24 decay modes examined. Eight of these modes have no previously reported limits, and fourteen are reported with significant improvements over previously published results.

  16. Search for rare and forbidden charm meson decays at Fermilab E791

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald J. Summers et al.

    2000-09-29

    The authors report the results of a blind search for flavor-changing neutral current, lepton-flavor violating, and lepton-number violating decays of D{sup +}, D{sub s}{sup +}, and D{sup 0} mesons (and their antiparticles) into modes containing muons and electrons. Using data from Fermilab charm hadroproduction experiment E791, they examine the {pi}{ell}{ell} and K{ell}{ell} decay modes of D{sup +} and D{sub s}{sup +} and the {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup {minus}} decay modes of D{sup 0}. No evidence for any of these decays is found. Therefore, they present branching-fraction upper limits at 90% confidence level for the 24 decay modes examined. Eight of these modes have no previously reported limits, and fourteen are reported with significant improvements over previously published results.

  17. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snoek, Hella Leonie; /Vrije U., Amsterdam

    2011-11-28

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} a{sub 0}{sup +} decays and the non-resonant B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} {eta}{pi}{sup +} decays in approximately 230 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} a{sub 0}{sup +} decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10{sup -6}. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle {gamma}, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle {gamma} can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} a{sub 0}{sup +} decay is sensitive to the angle {gamma} and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly enhance the measurement of this angle. However, the low expected branching fraction for the B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} a{sub 0}{sup +} decay channels could severely impact the measurement. A prerequisite of the measurement of the CKM angle is the observation of the B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} a{sub 0}{sup +} decay on which this thesis reports. The BABAR experiment consists of the BABAR detector and the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The design of the experiment has been optimized for the study of CP violation in the decays of neutral B mesons but is also highly suitable for the search for rare B decays such as the B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} a{sub 0}{sup +} decay. The PEP-II collider operates at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance and is a clean source of B{bar B} meson pairs.

  18. Analysis of hadronic transitions in ?(3S) decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Ball, S.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

    1994-01-01

    Using the CLEO II detector, we have measured the branching fractions for ?(3S)????(1S), ?(3S)????(2S), and the cascade ?(3S)??(2S)+X, ?(2S)??+???(1S), analyzing the exclusive mode where the daughter ? state decays to a ...

  19. Search for Resonant Top-antitop Production in the Semi-leptonic Decay Mode Using the Full CDF Data Set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaltonen, T; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chokheli, D; Cho, K; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; d'Errico, M; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Eusebi, R; Farrington, S; Fernandez Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Goldin, D; Gold, M; Golossanov, A; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Gomez, G; Goncharov, M; Gonzalez Lopez, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harrington-Taber, T; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Junk, T R; Jun, S Y; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kimura, N; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lysak, R; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martinez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ranjan, N; Redondo Fernandez, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Song, H; Sorin, V; Stancari, M; St. Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vazquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizan, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Wester, W C, III; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2013-01-01

    This Letter reports a search for a narrow resonant state decaying into two $W$ bosons and a bottom-antibottom quark pair where one $W$ boson decays leptonically and the other decays into a quark-antiquark pair. The search is particularly sensitive to top-antitop resonant production. We use the full data sample of proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.45 fb$^{-1}$. No evidence for resonant production is found and upper limits on the production cross section times branching ratio for a narrow resonant state are extracted. Within a specific benchmark model, we exclude a $Z'$ boson with mass below 915 GeV/$c^2$ decaying into a top-antitop pair at the 95% credibility level assuming a $Z'$ boson decay width of $\\Gamma_{Z'} = 0.012 M_{Z'}$. This is the most sensitive search for a narrow $\\ensuremath{q\\bar{q}}$-initiated $\\ensuremath{t\\bar{t}}$ resonance in the mass region below 750 ...

  20. Power Spectrum Analysis of LMSU (Lomonosov Moscow State University) Nuclear Decay-Rate Data: Further Indication of r-Mode Oscillations in an Inner Solar Tachocline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter A. Sturrock; Alexander G. Parkhomov; Ephraim Fischbach; Jere H. Jenkins

    2012-03-21

    This article presents a power-spectrum analysis of 2,350 measurements of the $^{90}$Sr/$^{90}$Y decay process acquired over the interval 4 August 2002 to 6 February 2009 at the Lomonosov Moscow State University (LMSU). As we have found for other long sequences of decay measurements, the power spectrum is dominated by a very strong annual oscillation. However, we also find a set of low-frequency peaks, ranging from 0.26 year$^{-1}$ to 3.98 year$^{-1}$, which are very similar to an array of peaks in a power spectrum formed from Mt Wilson solar diameter measurements. The Mt Wilson measurements have been interpreted in terms of r-mode oscillations in a region where the sidereal rotation frequency is 12.08 year$^{-1}$. We find that the LMSU measurements may also be attributed to the same type of r-mode oscillations in a solar region with the same sidereal rotation frequency. We propose that these oscillations occur in an inner tachocline that separates the radiative zone from a more slowly rotating solar core.

  1. Power Spectrum Analysis of LMSU (Lomonosov Moscow State University) Nuclear Decay-Rate Data: Further Indication of r-Mode Oscillations in an Inner Solar Tachocline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sturrock, Peter A; Fischbach, Ephraim; Jenkins, Jere H

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a power-spectrum analysis of 2,350 measurements of the $^{90}$Sr/$^{90}$Y decay process acquired over the interval 4 August 2002 to 6 February 2009 at the Lomonosov Moscow State University (LMSU). As we have found for other long sequences of decay measurements, the power spectrum is dominated by a very strong annual oscillation. However, we also find a set of low-frequency peaks, ranging from 0.26 year$^{-1}$ to 3.98 year$^{-1}$, which are very similar to an array of peaks in a power spectrum formed from Mt Wilson solar diameter measurements. The Mt Wilson measurements have been interpreted in terms of r-mode oscillations in a region where the sidereal rotation frequency is 12.08 year$^{-1}$. We find that the LMSU measurements may also be attributed to the same type of r-mode oscillations in a solar region with the same sidereal rotation frequency. We propose that these oscillations occur in an inner tachocline that separates the radiative zone from a more slowly rotating solar core.

  2. Measurement of Branching Fractions and CP-Violating Asymmetries in B0 to K0K0bar and B+ to K0barK+ Decays at the BaBar Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biesiada, Jedrzej

    2007-07-10

    Over the last few years, the B factories have established the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mechanism of CP violation in the Standard Model through the study of the decays of B mesons. The focus of Belle and BaBar has now expanded to the search for signatures of new physics beyond the Standard Model, particularly through examination of flavor-changing neutral-current transitions, which proceed through diagrams involving virtual loops. These decays are suppressed in the Standard Model, increasing sensitivity to new-physics effects but decreasing branching fractions. Exploiting large and growing datasets, BaBar and Belle have made many measurements in loop decays where a b quark transitions to an s quark, observing hints of possible deviations from Standard Model expectations in CP-violating measurements.

  3. Combination of Tevatron searches for the standard model Higgs boson in the W+W- decay mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V.M.; Gregores, E.M.; Mercadante, P.G.; Hebbeker, T.; Kirsch, M.; Meyer, A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Avila, C.; Gomez, B.; Mendoza, L.; /Andes U., Bogota /Argonne /Arizona U. /Athens U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /Bonn U. /Boston U. /Brandeis U.

    2010-01-01

    We combine searches by the CDF and D0 collaborations for a Higgs boson decaying to W{sup +}W{sup -}. The data correspond to an integrated total luminosity of 4.8 (CDF) and 5.4 (D0) fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. No excess is observed above background expectation, and resulting limits on Higgs boson production exclude a standard-model Higgs boson in the mass range 162-166 GeV at the 95% C.L.

  4. Determination of W boson helicity fractions in top quark decays in p anti-p collisions at CDF Run II and production of endcap modules for the ATLAS Silicon Tracker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moed, Shulamit; /Geneva U.

    2007-01-01

    The thesis presented here includes two parts. The first part discusses the production of endcap modules for the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker at the University of Geneva. The ATLAS experiment is one of the two multi-purpose experiments being built at the LHC at CERN. The University of Geneva invested extensive efforts to create an excellent and efficient module production site, in which 655 endcap outer modules were constructed. The complexity and extreme requirements for 10 years of LHC operation with a high resolution, high efficiency, low noise tracking system resulted in an extremely careful, time consuming production and quality assurance of every single module. At design luminosity about 1000 particles will pass through the tracking system each 25 ns. In addition to requiring fast tracking techniques, the high particle flux causes significant radiation damage. Therefore, modules have to be constructed within tight and accurate mechanical and electrical specification. A description of the ATLAS experiment and the ATLAS Semiconductor tracker is presented, followed by a detailed overview of the module production at the University of Geneva. My personal contribution to the endcap module production at the University of Geneva was taking part, together with other physicists, in selecting components to be assembled to a module, including hybrid reception tests, measuring the I-V curve of the sensors and the modules at different stages of the production, thermal cycling the modules and performing electrical readout tests as an initial quality assurance of the modules before they were shipped to CERN. An elaborated description of all of these activities is given in this thesis. At the beginning of the production period the author developed a statistics package which enabled us to monitor the rate and quality of the module production. This package was then used widely by the ATLAS SCT institutes that built endcap modules of any type, and kept being improved and updated. The production monitoring and summary using this package is shown in this thesis. The second part of the thesis reports a measurement of the fraction of longitudinal and right-handed helicity states of W bosons in top quark decays. This measurement was done using 955 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF detector at the TEvatron, where protons and anti-protons are collided with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. the helicity fraction measurements take advantage of the fact that the angular distribution of the W boson decay products depends on the helicity state of the W which they originate from. They analyze t{bar t} events in the 'lepton+jets' channel and look at the leptonic side of decay. They construct templates for the distribution of cos{theta}*, the angle between the charged lepton and the W flight direction in the rest frame of the top quark. Using Monte Carlo techniques, they construct probability distributions ('templates') for cos{theta}* in the case of left-handed, longitudinal and right-handed Ws and a template for the background model. They extract the W helicity fractions using an unbinned likelihood fitter based on the information of these templates. The Standard Model predicts the W helicity fractions to be about 70% longitudinal and 30% left-handed, while the fraction of right-handed W bosons in top decays is highly suppressed and vanishes when neglecting the mass of the b quark.

  5. A Search for Neutrinoless Tau Decays to Three Leptons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolb, Jeffrey A.; /Oregon U. /SLAC; ,

    2008-09-24

    Using approximately 350 million {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} pair events recorded with the BaBar detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center between 1999 and 2006, a search has been made for neutrinoless, lepton-flavor violating tau decays to three lighter leptons. All six decay modes consistent with conservation of electric charge and energy have been considered. With signal selection efficiencies of 5-12%, we obtain 90% confidence level upper limits on the branching fraction {Beta}({tau} {yields} {ell}{ell}{ell}) in the range (4-8) x 10{sup -8}.

  6. Observation of B0 (s) ---> K+ K- and Measurements of Branching Fractions of Charmless Two-body Decays of B0 and B0(s) Mesons in anti-p p Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst.

    2006-07-01

    The authors search for decays of the type B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h'{sup -} (where h,h' = K or {pi}) in 180 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. They observe the new mode B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} with a yield of 236 {+-} 32 events, corresponding to (f{sub s}/f{sub d}) x {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -})/{Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = 0.46 {+-} 0.08(stat.) {+-} 0.07(syst.), where f{sub s}/f{sub d} is the ratio of production fractions of B{sub s}{sup 0} and B{sup 0}. They find results in agreement with world averages for the modes B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, and set the following upper limits at 90% CL: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}) < 1.8 x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) < 5.6 x 10{sup -6}, and {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) < 1.7 x 10{sup -6}.

  7. Measurement of branching fractions of B decays to K1(1270)pi and K1(1400)pi and determination of the CKM angle alpha from B0 --> a1(1260) - pi-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stracka, Simone; /Milan U. /SLAC

    2011-02-07

    In the Standard Model, CP violation in weak interactions involving quarks is parameterized by an irreducible complex phase in the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) quark-mixing-matrix. The precise determination of the CKM elements is a necessary ingredient for a stringent test of the Standard Model predictions, and is a crucial input for reducing the theoretical error in many New Physics searches with flavor, e.g., in the kaon sector. The unitarity of the CKM matrix is typically expressed as a triangle relationship among its parameters, where the area of the so-called Unitarity Triangle visually depicts the amount of asymmetry between the decays of B particles and their antimatter counterparts. In the past few years, the BABAR and Belle experiments have been able to measure all three angles of the triangle from CP asymmetry measurements. The first asymmetry measurements in B particle decays, about ten years ago, allowed to determine {beta}, which is now known to better than 5% precision. The angles {alpha} and {gamma}, measured in much rarer processes, required several years of data taking before analyses could yield reliable answers. A remarkable feature is that the direct measurement of the angles of the Unitarity Triangle generates an area that is consistent with the area predicted by measurement of the sides. In this thesis we have presented the branching fraction measurements of charged and neutral B meson decays to K{sub 1}(1270){pi} and K{sub 1}(1400){pi}, obtained from a data sample of 454 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events. This analysis is particularly challenging from the experimental side since the branching fractions involved are very low, at the level of 10{sup -6} - 10{sup -7}, and the signal is characterized by the simultaneous presence of two overlapping resonances, which exhibit sizeable interference effects. The combined K{sub 1}(1270){pi} and K{sub 1}(1400){pi} signal is therefore modeled with a K-matrix formalism, which accounts for the effects of interference between the K{sub 1}(1270) and K{sub 1}(1400) mesons by introducing two effective parameters. The model is derived from the analysis, performed by the ACCMOR Collaboration, of the diffractive production of strange mesons.

  8. Charmless Hadronic B Decays into Vector, Axial Vector and Tensor Final States at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gandini, Paolo; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2012-04-06

    We present experimental measurements of branching fraction and longitudinal polarization fraction in charmless hadronic B decays into vector, axial vector and tensor final states with the final dataset of BABAR. Measurements of such kind of decays are a powerful tool both to test the Standard Model and search possible sources of new physics. In this document we present a short review of the last experimental results at BABAR concerning charmless quasi two-body decays in final states containing particles with spin 1 or spin 2 and different parities. This kind of decays has received considerable theoretical interest in the last few years and this particular attention has led to interesting experimental results at the current b-factories. In fact, the study of longitudinal polarization fraction f{sub L} in charmless B decays to vector vector (VV), vector axial-vector (VA) and axial-vector axial-vector (AA) mesons provides information on the underlying helicity structure of the decay mechanism. Naive helicity conservation arguments predict a dominant longitudinal polarization fraction f{sub L} {approx} 1 for both tree and penguin dominated decays and this pattern seems to be confirmed by tree-dominated B {yields} {rho}{rho} and B{sup +} {yields} {Omega}{rho}{sup +} decays. Other penguin dominated decays, instead, show a different behavior: the measured value of f{sub L} {approx} 0.5 in B {yields} {phi}K* decays is in contrast with naive Standard Model (SM) calculations. Several solutions have been proposed such as the introduction of non-factorizable terms and penguin-annihilation amplitudes, while other explanations invoke new physics. New modes have been investigated to shed more light on the problem.

  9. Search for a Charged Higgs Boson Produced in the Vector-Boson Fusion Mode with Decay H ± ? W ± Z using p p Collisions at s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS Experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    G., Aad

    2015-06-09

    A search for a charged Higgs boson, H±, decaying to a W± boson and a Z boson is presented. The search is based on 20.3 fb?¹ of proton-proton collision data at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The H± boson is assumed to be produced via vector-boson fusion and the decays W±?qq'¯ and Z?e?e?/???? are considered. The search is performed in a range of charged Higgs boson masses from 200 to 1000 GeV. No evidence for the production of an H± boson is observed. Upper limits of 31–1020 fb at 95% C.L.more »are placed on the cross section for vector-boson fusion production of an H± boson times its branching fraction to W±Z. The limits are compared with predictions from the Georgi-Machacek Higgs triplet model.« less

  10. Search for a Charged Higgs Boson Produced in the Vector-Boson Fusion Mode with Decay H ± ? W ± Z using p p Collisions at s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS Experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    G., Aad [Aix-Marseille Universite, Marseille (France). et al.

    2015-06-01

    A search for a charged Higgs boson, H±, decaying to a W± boson and a Z boson is presented. The search is based on 20.3 fb?¹ of proton-proton collision data at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The H± boson is assumed to be produced via vector-boson fusion and the decays W±?qq'¯ and Z?e?e?/???? are considered. The search is performed in a range of charged Higgs boson masses from 200 to 1000 GeV. No evidence for the production of an H± boson is observed. Upper limits of 31–1020 fb at 95% C.L. are placed on the cross section for vector-boson fusion production of an H± boson times its branching fraction to W±Z. The limits are compared with predictions from the Georgi-Machacek Higgs triplet model.

  11. Study of the D0 ---> pi- pi+ pi- pi+ decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; /UC, Davis; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /CINVESTAV, IPN /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U.

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the FOCUS (E831) experiment at Fermilab, they present new measurements for the Cabbibo-suppressed decay mode D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. They measure the branching ratio {Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.0914 {+-} 0.0018 {+-} 0.0022. An amplitude analysis has been performed, a first for this channel, in order to determine the resonant substructure of this decay mode. The dominant component is the decay D{sup 0} {yields} a{sub 1}(1260){sup +}{pi}{sup -}, accounting for 60% of the decay rate. The second most dominant contribution comes from the decay D{sup 0} {yields} {rho}(770){sup 0}{rho}(770){sup 0}, with a fraction of 25%. They also study the a{sub 1}(1260) line shape and resonant substructure. Using the helicity formalism for the angular distribution of the decay D{sup 0} {yields} {rho}(770){sup 0}{rho}(770){sup 0}, they measure a longitudinal polarization of P{sub L} = (71 {+-} 4 {+-} 2)%.

  12. Search for neutrinoless decays of the tau lepton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Ball, S.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

    1994-10-01

    . The upper limits obtained for 22 decay branching fractions are several times more stringent than those set previously....

  13. Charmless 3-body B Decays: Resonant and Nonresonant contributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Hai-Yang

    2007-01-01

    Charmless 3-body decays of $B$ mesons are studied using a simple model based on the framework of the factorization approach. We have identified a large source of the nonresonant signal in the matrix elements of scalar densities, e.g. $$. This explains the dominance of the nonresonant background in $B\\to KKK$ decays, the sizable nonresonant fraction of order $(35\\sim 40)%$ in $K^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $\\bar K^0\\pi^+\\pi^-$ modes and the smallness of nonresonant rates in $B\\to \\pi\\pi\\pi$ decays. We have computed the resonant and nonresonant contributions to charmless 3-body decays and determined the rates for the quasi-two-body decays $B\\to VP$ and $B\\to SP$. Time-dependent CP asymmetries $\\sin2\\beta_{\\rm eff}$ and $A_{CP}$ in $K^+K^-K_S,K_SK_SK_S,K_S\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $K_S\\pi^0\\pi^0$ modes are estimated.

  14. Branching Fraction Measurements of the Color-Suppressed Decays B0bar to D(*)0 pi0, D(*)0 eta, D(*)0 omega, and D(*)0 eta_prime and Measurement of the Polarization in the Decay B0bar to D*0 omega

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; ,

    2012-02-14

    We report updated branching fraction measurements of the color-suppressed decays {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D{sup 0}{eta}, D*{sup 0}{eta}, D{sup 0}{omega}, D*{sup 0}{omega}, D{sup 0}{eta}', and D*{sup 0}{eta}'. We measure the branching fractions (x10{sup -4}): {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.13, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 3.05 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.28, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.53 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.11, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.23, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{omega}) = 2.57 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.14, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{omega}) = 4.55 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.39, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.48 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.07, and {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.49 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.15. We also present the first measurement of the longitudinal polarization fraction of the decay channel D*{sup 0}{omega}, f{sub L} = (66.5 {+-} 4.7 {+-} 1.5)%. In the above, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The results are based on a sample of (454 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings at SLAC. The measurements are the most precise determinations of these quantities from a single experiment. They are compared to theoretical predictions obtained by factorization, Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) and perturbative QCD (pQCD). We find that the presence of final state interactions is favored and the measurements are in better agreement with SCET than with pQCD.

  15. Standard Model Higgs boson production in the decay mode H->bb in association with a W or Z boson for High Luminosity LHC Running

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Almeida Dias, Flavia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A key outstanding observation is the decay of the Higgs boson to b-quarks, motivating a study into the prospects of this channel in future LHC runs. This poster summarises a simulated analysis of Standard Model H->bb decay, produced in association with a vector boson at the ATLAS detector for high-luminosity, 14 TeV proton-proton LHC collisions. Efficiency and resolution smearing functions were applied to generator-level Monte Carlo samples to reproduce the expected performance of the upgraded ATLAS detector, for the foreseen amount of pile-up due to multiple overlapping proton-proton collisions. The expected signal significance and signal strength is presented for 300 fb-1 and 3000 fb-1 with an average pile-up of 60 and 140 respectively.

  16. Standard Model Higgs boson production in the decay mode H->bb in association with a W or Z boson for High Luminosity LHC Running

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dias, Flavia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A key outstanding observation is the decay of the Higgs boson to b-quarks, motivating a study into the prospects of this channel in future LHC runs. This proceeding summarises a simulated analysis of Standard Model H->bb decay, produced in association with a vector boson at the ATLAS detector for 14 TeV proton-proton collisions at the high-luminosity LHC. Efficiency and resolution smearing functions were applied to generator-level Monte Carlo samples to reproduce the expected performance of the upgraded ATLAS detector, for the foreseen amount of pile- up due to multiple overlapping proton-proton collisions. The expected signal significance and signal strength is presented for 300/fb and 3000/fb with an average pile-up of 60 and 140 respectively.

  17. A Search for Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons in the Di-tau Decay Mode in Proton - Anti-proton Collisions at 1.8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Amy Lynn

    2003-09-01

    A search for directly produced Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons has been performed in the di-tau decay channel in 86.3 {+-} 3.5 pb{sup -1} of data collected by CDF during Run1b at the Tevatron. They search for events where one tau decays to an electron and the other tau decays hadronically. They perform a counting experiment and set limits on the cross section for Higgs production in the high tan {beta} region of the m{sub A}-tan {beta} plane. For a benchmark parameter space point where m{sub A} = 100 and tan {beta} = 50, they set a 95% confidence level upper limit at 891 pb compared to the theoretically predicted cross section of 122 pb. For events where the tau candidates are not back-to-back, they utilize a di-tau mass reconstruction technique for the first time on hadron collider data. Limits based on a likelihood binned in di-tau mass from non-back-to-back events alone are weaker than the limits obtained from the counting experiment using the full di-tau sample.

  18. Observable primordial vector modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antony Lewis

    2004-06-04

    Primordial vector modes describe vortical fluid perturbations in the early universe. A regular solution exists with constant non-zero radiation vorticities on super-horizon scales. Baryons are tightly coupled to the photons, and the baryon velocity only decays by an order unity factor by recombination, leading to an observable CMB anisotropy signature via the Doppler effect. There is also a large B-mode CMB polarization signal, with significant power on scales larger than l~2000. This B-mode signature is distinct from that expected from tensor modes or gravitational lensing, and makes a primordial vector to scalar mode power ratio ~10^(-6) detectable. Future observations aimed at detecting large scale B-modes from gravitational waves will also be sensitive to regular vector modes at around this level.

  19. Limits on tau lepton flavor violating decays in three charged leptons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cervelli, Alberto

    2010-04-29

    A search for the neutrinoless, lepton-flavor violating decay of the {tau} lepton into three charged leptons has been performed using an integrated luminosity of 468 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider. In all six decay modes considered, the numbers of events found in data are compatible with the background expectations. Upper limits on the branching fractions are set in the range (1.8-3.3) x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

  20. Search for a Charged Higgs Boson Produced in the Vector-boson Fusion Mode with Decay $H^\\pm \\to W^\\pm Z$ using $pp$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV with the ATLAS Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-07-24

    A search for a charged Higgs boson, $H^\\pm$, decaying to a $W^\\pm$ boson and a $Z$ boson is presented. The search is based on 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collision data at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The $H^\\pm$ boson is assumed to be produced via vector-boson fusion and the decays $W^\\pm \\to q\\bar{q^\\prime}$ and $Z\\rightarrow e^+e^-/\\mu^+\\mu^-$ are considered. The search is performed in a range of charged Higgs boson masses from 200 to 1000 GeV. No evidence for the production of an $H^\\pm$ boson is observed. Upper limits of 31-1020 fb at 95% CL are placed on the cross section for vector-boson fusion production of an $H^\\pm$ boson times its branching fraction to $W^\\pm Z$. The limits are compared with predictions from the Georgi-Machacek Higgs Triplet Model.

  1. Nonleptonic Weak Decays of B to D_s and D mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. E. Thomas

    2006-03-23

    Branching ratios and polarization amplitudes for B decaying to all allowed pseudoscalar, vector, axial-vector, scalar and tensor combinations of D_s and D mesons are calculated in the Isgur Scora Grinstein Wise (ISGW) quark model after assuming factorization. We find good agreement with other models in the literature and the limited experimental data and make predictions for as yet unseen decay modes. Lattice QCD results in this area are very limited. We make phenomenological observations on decays in to D_s(2317) and D_s(2460) and propose tests for determining the status and mixings of the axial mesons. We use the same approach to calculate branching ratios and polarization fraction for decays in to two D type mesons.

  2. Decays of Fourth Generation Bound States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. F. Dmitriev; V. V. Flambaum

    2012-08-28

    We consider the decay modes of the heavy $q^\\prime\\bar{q^\\prime}$ bound states originating from Higgs boson exchange between quark -- anti-quark pair. In case of a small coupling between the fourth and lower generation the main decay mode is $q^\\prime\\bar{q^\\prime}$ annihilation. We show that for a vector state the dominant decay modes are Higgs-gamma and Higgs-Z decays, while for a pseudoscalar state the strong two-gluon decay mode dominates. The bound states are very narrow. The ratio of the total width to the binding energy is less than 1% if we are not extremely close to the critical quark mass where the binding energy is very small. The discussed decay modes exist for any fermion-antifermion bound states including heavy leptons and heavy neutrinos if their masses are high enough to form a bound state due to attractive Higgs boson exchange potential.

  3. Measurement of ?cj decaying into pn??? and pn?????

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Albayrak, O.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Bennett, J. V.; et al

    2012-09-26

    Using a data sample of 1.06×10? ?' events collected with the BESIII detector in 2009, the branching fractions of ?cJ?pn??? and ?cJ?pn????? (J=0, 1, 2) are measured. (Throughout the text, inclusion of charge conjugate modes is implied if not stated otherwise.) The results for ?c??pn??? and ?c²?pn??? are consistent with, but much more precise than, those of previous measurements. The decays of ?c1?pn??? and ?cJ?pn????? are observed for the first time.

  4. Soudan 2 nucleon decay experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thron, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The Soudan 2 nucleon decay experiment consists of a 1.1 Kton fine grained iron tracking calorimeter. It has a very isotropic detection structure which along with its flexible trigger will allow detection of multiparticle and neutrino proton decay modes. The detector has now entered its construction stage.

  5. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Anderson, G.A.

    1994-08-23

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynchronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board. 9 figs.

  6. Search for baryon-number and lepton-number violating decays of $Lambda$ hyperons using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCracken, Michael E.

    2015-10-09

    We present a search for ten baryon-number violating decay modes of $\\Lambda$ hyperons using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Laboratory. Nine of these decay modes result in a single meson and single lepton in the final state ($\\Lambda \\rightarrow m \\ell$) and conserve either the sum or the difference of baryon and lepton number ($B \\pm L$). The tenth decay mode ($\\Lambda \\rightarrow \\bar{p}\\pi^+$) represents a difference in baryon number of two units and no difference in lepton number. We observe no significant signal and set upper limits on the branching fractions of these reactions in the range $(4-200)\\times 10^{-7}$ at the $90\\%$ confidence level.

  7. Search for baryon-number and lepton-number violating decays of $Lambda$ hyperons using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Laboratory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McCracken, Michael E.

    2015-10-09

    We present a search for ten baryon-number violating decay modes of $\\Lambda$ hyperons using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Laboratory. Nine of these decay modes result in a single meson and single lepton in the final state ($\\Lambda \\rightarrow m \\ell$) and conserve either the sum or the difference of baryon and lepton number ($B \\pm L$). The tenth decay mode ($\\Lambda \\rightarrow \\bar{p}\\pi^+$) represents a difference in baryon number of two units and no difference in lepton number. We observe no significant signal and set upper limits on the branching fractions of these reactions in the range $(4-200)\\times 10^{-7}$more »at the $90\\%$ confidence level.« less

  8. Photoproduction and Decay of Light Mesons in CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amaryan, Moskov Jamalovich

    2013-08-01

    We present preliminary experimental results on photoproduction and decay of light mesons measured with CLAS setup at JLAB . This include Dalitz decay of pseudoscalar and vector mesons, radiative decay of pseudoscalar mesons as well hadronic decays of pseudoscalar and vector mesons. The collected high statistics in some of decay channels exceeds the world data by an order of magnitude and some other decay modes are observed for the first time. It is shown how the CLAS data will improve the world data on transition form factors of light mesons, Dalitz plot analyses, branching ratios of rare decay modes and other fundamental properties potentially accessible through the light meson decays.

  9. Study of B Meson Decays to ppbarh Final States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hryn'ova, Tetiana B.; /SLAC

    2006-03-22

    B mesons are unique among well-established non-quarkonium mesons in their ability to decay into baryons. Baryonic B decays offer a wide range of interesting areas of study: they can be used to test our theoretical understanding of rare decay processes involving baryons, search for direct CP violation and study low-energy QCD. This thesis presents measurements of branching fractions and a study of the decay dynamics of the charmless three-body decays of B meson into p{bar p}h final states, where h = {pi}{sup +}, K{sup +}, K{sub S}{sup 0}, K*{sup 0} or K*{sup +}. With a sample of 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events collected with the BaBar detector, we report the first observation of the B {yields} p{bar p}K*{sup 0} decay, and provide improved measurements of branching fractions of the other modes. The distribution of the three final-state particles is of particular interest since it provides dynamical information on the possible presence of exotic intermediate states such as the hypothetical pentaquark states {Theta}*{sup ++} and {Theta}{sup +}in the m{sub pK{sup +}} and m{sub pK{sub S}{sup 0}} spectra, respectively, or glueball states (such as the tensor glueball f{sub J}(2220)) in the m{sub p{bar p}} spectrum. No evidence for exotic states is found and upper limits on the branching fractions are set. An enhancement at low p{bar p} mass is observed in all the B {yields} p{bar p}h modes, and its shape is compared between the decay modes and with the shape of the time-like proton form factor. A Dalitz plot asymmetry in B {yields} p{bar p}K{sup +} mode suggests dominance of the penguin amplitude in this decay and disfavors the possibility that the low mass p{bar p} enhancement originates from the presence of a resonance below threshold (such as the recently seen baryonium candidate at 1835 MeV/c{sup 2}). We also identify decays of the type B {yields} X{sub c{bar c}}h {yields} p{bar p}h, where h = K{sup +}, K{sub S}{sup 0}, K*{sup 0} or K*{sup +}, and X{sub c{bar c}} = {eta}{sub c} or J/{psi}. In particular, we report on the evidence of the B {yields} {eta}{sub c}K*{sup +} decay and provide a measurement of the width of {eta}{sub c}.

  10. Observation and study of the baryonic B-meson decays B?D(*)pp?(?)(?)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; et al

    2012-05-30

    We present results for B-meson decay modes involving a charm meson, protons, and pions using 455×10? BB¯¯¯ pairs recorded by the BaBar detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e?e? collider. The branching fractions are measured for the following ten decays: B¯¯¯??D?pp?, B¯¯¯??D*?pp?, B¯¯¯??D?pp???, B¯¯¯??D*?pp???, B??D?pp???, B??D*?pp???, B¯¯¯??D?pp?????, B¯¯¯??D*?pp?????, B??D?pp?????, and B??D*?pp?????. The four B? and the two five-body B¯¯¯? modes are observed for the first time. The four-body modes are enhanced compared to the three- and the five-body modes. In the three-body modes, the M(pp?) and M(D(*)?p) invariant-mass distributions show enhancements near threshold values. In the four-body mode B¯¯¯??D?pp???, themore »M(p??) distribution shows a narrow structure of unknown origin near 1.5 GeV/c². The distributions for the five-body modes, in contrast to the others, are similar to the expectations from uniform phase-space predictions.« less

  11. Observation and study of the baryonic B-meson decays B?D(*)pp?(?)(?)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Flanigan, J. M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, T. M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Volk, A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Perez, A.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, L.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Anderson, J.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Zhao, M.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.

    2012-05-30

    We present results for B-meson decay modes involving a charm meson, protons, and pions using 455×10? BB¯¯¯ pairs recorded by the BaBar detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e?e? collider. The branching fractions are measured for the following ten decays: B¯¯¯??D?pp?, B¯¯¯??D*?pp?, B¯¯¯??D?pp???, B¯¯¯??D*?pp???, B??D?pp???, B??D*?pp???, B¯¯¯??D?pp?????, B¯¯¯??D*?pp?????, B??D?pp?????, and B??D*?pp?????. The four B? and the two five-body B¯¯¯? modes are observed for the first time. The four-body modes are enhanced compared to the three- and the five-body modes. In the three-body modes, the M(pp?) and M(D(*)?p) invariant-mass distributions show enhancements near threshold values. In the four-body mode B¯¯¯??D?pp???, the M(p??) distribution shows a narrow structure of unknown origin near 1.5 GeV/c². The distributions for the five-body modes, in contrast to the others, are similar to the expectations from uniform phase-space predictions.

  12. Search for B decays to final states with the ?c meson

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vinokurova, A.; Kuzmin, A.; Eidelman, S.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.

    2015-06-18

    We report a search for B decays to selected final states with the ?c meson: B± ? K±?c?+?-, B± ? K±?c?, B± ? K±?c? and B± ? K±?c?0. The analysis is based on 772 × 106 BB-bar pairs collected at the ?(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. We set 90% confidence level upper limits on the branching fractions of the studied B decay modes, independent of intermediate resonances, in the range (0.6–5.3) × 10-4. We also search for molecular-state candidates in the D0D*-bar0 - D-bar0D*0, D0D-bar0 + D-bar0D0 and D*0D*-bar0 + D*-bar0D*0 combinations, neutralmore »partners of the Z(3900)± and Z(4020)±, and a poorly understood state X(3915) as possible intermediate states in the decay chain, and set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product of branching fractions to the mentioned intermediate states and decay branching fractions of these states in the range (0.6–6.9) × 10-5.« less

  13. Search for B decays to final states with the eta_c meson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belle collaboration; A. Vinokurova; A. Kuzmin; S. Eidelman; A. Abdesselam; I. Adachi; H. Aihara; K. Arinstein; D. M. Asner; T. Aushev; R. Ayad; A. M. Bakich; V. Bansal; V. Bhardwaj; B. Bhuyan; A. Bobrov; A. Bondar; A. Bozek; M. Bra?ko; T. E. Browder; V. Chekelian; B. G. Cheon; K. Chilikin; R. Chistov; K. Cho; S. -K. Choi; Y. Choi; D. Cinabro; J. Dingfelder; Z. Doležal; Z. Drásal; A. Drutskoy; D. Dutta; D. Epifanov; H. Farhat; J. E. Fast; T. Ferber; V. Gaur; N. Gabyshev; A. Garmash; R. Gillard; Y. M. Goh; B. Golob; J. Haba; K. Hayasaka; H. Hayashii; X. H. He; W. -S. Hou; K. Inami; A. Ishikawa; R. Itoh; Y. Iwasaki; D. Joffe; T. Julius; K. H. Kang; E. Kato; C. Kiesling; D. Y. Kim; H. J. Kim; J. H. Kim; K. T. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. J. Kim; K. Kinoshita; B. R. Ko; P. Kodyš; S. Korpar; P. Križan; P. Krokovny; T. Kuhr; T. Kumita; Y. -J. Kwon; J. S. Lange; L. Li Gioi; J. Libby; D. Liventsev; P. Lukin; D. Matvienko; K. Miyabayashi; H. Miyake; H. Miyata; G. B. Mohanty; A. Moll; T. Mori; R. Mussa; E. Nakano; M. Nakao; Z. Natkaniec; C. Ng; N. K. Nisar; S. Nishida; S. Ogawa; S. Okuno; S. L. Olsen; P. Pakhlov; G. Pakhlova; C. W. Park; H. Park; T. K. Pedlar; R. Pestotnik; M. Petri?; L. E. Piilonen; E. Ribežl; M. Ritter; A. Rostomyan; Y. Sakai; S. Sandilya; D. Santel; L. Santelj; T. Sanuki; Y. Sato; V. Savinov; O. Schneider; G. Schnell; C. Schwanda; D. Semmler; K. Senyo; O. Seon; M. E. Sevior; V. Shebalin; C. P. Shen; T. -A. Shibata; J. -G. Shiu; B. Shwartz; A. Sibidanov; F. Simon; Y. -S. Sohn; A. Sokolov; E. Solovieva; S. Stani?; M. Stari?; M. Steder; M. Sumihama; T. Sumiyoshi; U. Tamponi; G. Tatishvili; Y. Teramoto; M. Uchida; T. Uglov; Y. Unno; S. Uno; C. Van Hulse; P. Vanhoefer; G. Varner; V. Vorobyev; M. N. Wagner; C. H. Wang; M. -Z. Wang; P. Wang; Y. Watanabe; K. M. Williams; E. Won; J. Yamaoka; S. Yashchenko; Y. Yook; Z. P. Zhang; V. Zhulanov; A. Zupanc

    2015-06-17

    We report a search for $B$ decays to selected final states with the $\\eta_c$ meson: $B^{\\pm}\\to K^{\\pm}\\eta_c\\pi^+\\pi^-$, $B^{\\pm}\\to K^{\\pm}\\eta_c\\omega$, $B^{\\pm}\\to K^{\\pm}\\eta_c\\eta$ and $B^{\\pm}\\to K^{\\pm}\\eta_c\\pi^0$. The analysis is based on $772\\times 10^6$ $B\\bar{B}$ pairs collected at the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy $e^+e^-$ collider. We set 90\\% confidence level upper limits on the branching fractions of the studied $B$ decay modes, independent of intermediate resonances, in the range $(0.6-5.3)\\times 10^{-4}$. We also search for molecular-state candidates in the $D^0\\bar{D}^{*0}-\\bar{D}^0D^{*0}$, $D^0\\bar{D}^0+\\bar{D}^0D^0$ and $D^{*0}\\bar{D}^{*0}+\\bar{D}^{*0}D^{*0}$ combinations, neutral partners of the $Z(3900)^{\\pm}$ and $Z(4020)^{\\pm}$, and a poorly understood state $X(3915)$ as possible intermediate states in the decay chain, and set 90\\% confidence level upper limits on the product of branching fractions to the mentioned intermediate states and decay branching fractions of these states in the range $(0.6-6.9)\\times 10^{-5}$.

  14. TauDecay: a library to simulate polarized tau decays via FeynRules and MadGraph5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaoru Hagiwara; Tong Li; Kentarou Mawatari; Junya Nakamura

    2014-12-15

    TauDecay is a library of helicity amplitudes to simulate polarized tau decays, constructed in the FeynRules and MadGraph5 framework. Together with the leptonic mode, the decay library includes the main hadronic modes, \\tau \\to \

  15. Dark decay of Top quark

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kong, Kyoungchui; Lee, Hye-Sung; Park, Myeonhun

    We suggest top quark decays as a venue to search for light dark force carriers. Top quark is the heaviest particle in the standard model whose decays are relatively poorly measured, allowing sufficient room for exotic decay modes from new physics. A very light (GeV scale) dark gauge boson (Z') is a recently highlighted hypothetical particle that can address some astrophysical anomalies as well as the 3.6 ? deviation in the muon g-2 measurement. We present and study a possible scenario that top quark decays as t ? b W + Z's. This is the same as the dominant topmore »quark decay (t ? b W) accompanied by one or multiple dark force carriers. The Z' can be easily boosted, and it can decay into highly collimated leptons (lepton-jet) with large branching ratio. We discuss the implications for the Large Hadron Collider experiments including the analysis based on the lepton-jets.« less

  16. Dark decay of Top quark

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kong, Kyoungchui [Kansas; Lee, Hye-Sung [W&M, JLAB; Park, Myeonhun [Tokyo

    2014-04-01

    We suggest top quark decays as a venue to search for light dark force carriers. Top quark is the heaviest particle in the standard model whose decays are relatively poorly measured, allowing sufficient room for exotic decay modes from new physics. A very light (GeV scale) dark gauge boson (Z') is a recently highlighted hypothetical particle that can address some astrophysical anomalies as well as the 3.6 ? deviation in the muon g-2 measurement. We present and study a possible scenario that top quark decays as t ? b W + Z's. This is the same as the dominant top quark decay (t ? b W) accompanied by one or multiple dark force carriers. The Z' can be easily boosted, and it can decay into highly collimated leptons (lepton-jet) with large branching ratio. We discuss the implications for the Large Hadron Collider experiments including the analysis based on the lepton-jets.

  17. Measurement of the Forward-Backward Asymmetry in the B?K(*)????Decay and First Observation of the Bs0?????? Decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; De Cecco, S.; De Lorenzo, G.; Dell’Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.

    2011-04-01

    We reconstruct the rare decays B??K?????, B??K*(892)?????, and Bs0??(1020)???? in a data sample corresponding to 4.4 fb?¹ collected in pp¯ collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron Collider. Using 121±16 B??K????? and 101±12 B??K*????? decays we report the branching ratios. In addition, we report the differential branching ratio and the muon forward-backward asymmetry in the B? and B? decay modes, and the K*? longitudinal polarization fraction in the B? decay mode with respect to the squared dimuon mass. These are consistent with the predictions, and most recent determinations from other experiments and of comparable accuracy. We also report the first observation of the Bs0?????? decay and measure its branching ratio BR(Bs0??????)=[1.44±0.33±0.46]×10?? using 27±6 signal events. This is currently the most rare Bs0 decay observed.

  18. Measurement of the D[superscript 0] ? ?[superscript -]e[superscript +]?[subscript e] differential decay branching fraction as a function of q[superscript 2] and study of form factor parametrizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lees, J.?P.

    Based on a sample of 500 million e[superscript +]e[superscript -] ? c[bar over c] events recorded by the BABAR detector at c.m. energies of close to 10.6 GeV, we report on a study of the decay D[superscript 0] ? ?[superscript ...

  19. Parafermionic zero modes in ultracold bosonic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad F. Maghrebi; Sriram Ganeshan; David J. Clarke; Alexey V. Gorshkov; Jay D. Sau

    2015-04-20

    Exotic topologically protected zero modes with parafermionic statistics (also called fractionalized Majorana modes) have been proposed to emerge in devices fabricated from a fractional quantum Hall system and a superconductor. The fractionalized statistics of these modes takes them an important step beyond the simplest non-Abelian anyons, Majorana fermions. Building on recent advances towards the realization of fractional quantum Hall states of bosonic ultracold atoms, we propose a realization of parafermions in a system consisting of Bose-Einstein-condensate trenches within a bosonic fractional quantum Hall state. We show that parafermionic zero modes emerge at the endpoints of the trenches and give rise to a topologically protected degeneracy. We also discuss methods for preparing and detecting these modes.

  20. Measurement of the D+ -> pi+pi0 and D+ -> K+pi0Branching Fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.

    2006-07-21

    We present measurements of the branching fractions for the Cabbibo suppressed decays D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} and D{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 124.3 fb{sup -1}. The data were taken with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory operating on and near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. We find {Beta}(D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}) = (1.25 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.04) x 10{sup -3} and {Beta}(D{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}) = (2.52 {+-} 0.47 {+-} 0.25 {+-} 0.08) x 10{sup -4}, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second systematic and the last error is due to the uncertainties in the absolute branching fraction scale for D{sup +} mesons. This represents the first observation of the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed D{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} decay mode and a new measurement of the D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} branching fraction.

  1. Theory of top quark production and decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuehn, J.H. [Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1997-01-01

    Direct and indirect information on the top quark mass and its decay modes is reviewed. The theory of top production in hadron- and electron-positron-colliders is presented.

  2. Searches for Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Silke; /SLAC

    2012-04-25

    Measurements of the branching fractions of purely leptonic decays of B-mesons translate into constraints in the plane of the charged Higgs mass versus tan {beta} which are relatively insensitive to the particular theoretical model. Using the full BABAR dataset of 450 million B-decays we search for these decays. No significant signal is found in the decays into electrons or muons and we set upper limits on the branching fractions of the order of a 10{sup -6} at 90% confidence level. We measure the branching fraction of B {yields} {tau}{mu} to be (1.7 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -4}.

  3. Study of the decay mechanism for B+ to p pbar K+ and B+ to p pbar pi+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. -T. Wei; M. -Z. Wang

    2007-10-15

    We study the characteristics of the low mass ppbar enhancements near threshold in the three-body decays B+ to p pbar K+ and B+ to p pbar pi+. We observe that the proton polar angle distributions in the ppbar helicity frame in the two decays have the opposite polarity, and measure the forward-backward asymmetries as a function of the ppbar mass for the p pbar K+ mode. We also search for the intermediate two-body decays, B+ to pbar Delta++ and B+ to p Delta0bar, and set upper limits on their branching fractions. These results are obtained from a 414 fb^{-1} data sample that contains 449 times 10^6 BBbar events collected near the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+ e- collider.

  4. Fractional Heisenberg Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasily E. Tarasov

    2008-04-03

    Fractional derivative can be defined as a fractional power of derivative. The commutator (i/h)[H, ], which is used in the Heisenberg equation, is a derivation on a set of observables. A derivation is a map that satisfies the Leibnitz rule. In this paper, we consider a fractional derivative on a set of quantum observables as a fractional power of the commutator (i/h)[H, ]. As a result, we obtain a fractional generalization of the Heisenberg equation. The fractional Heisenberg equation is exactly solved for the Hamiltonians of free particle and harmonic oscillator. The suggested Heisenberg equation generalize a notion of quantum Hamiltonian systems to describe quantum dissipative processes.

  5. Observation of X(3872)?J/?? and Search for X(3872)??'? in B Decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bhardwaj, V.; Trabelsi, K.; Singh, J. B.; Choi, S.-K.; Olsen, S. L.; Adachi, I.; Adamczyk, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; et al

    2011-08-01

    We report a study of B?(J/??)K and B?(?'?)K decay modes using 772×10? BB¯¯ events collected at the ?(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB energy-asymmetric e?e? collider. We observe X(3872)?J/?? and report the first evidence for ?c2?J/?? in B?(Xcc-?)K decays, while in a search for X(3872)??'? no significant signal is found. We measure the branching fractions, B(B±?X(3872)K±)B(X(3872)?J/??)=(1.78+0.48-0.44±0.12)×10??, B(B±??c2K±)=(1.11+0.36-0.34±0.09)×10??, B(B±?X(3872)K±)B(X(3872)??'?)<3.45×10?? (upper limit at 90% C.L.), and also provide upper limits for other searches.

  6. Topological Massive Dirac Edge Modes and Long-Range Superconducting Hamiltonians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Viyuela; D. Vodola; G. Pupillo; M. A. Martin-Delgado

    2015-11-16

    We discover novel topological effects in the one-dimensional Kitaev chain modified by long-range Hamiltonian deformations in the hopping and pairing terms. This class of models display symmetry-protected topological order measured by the Berry phase of the ground state and the winding number of the Hamiltonians. For exponentially-decaying hopping amplitudes, the topological sector can be significantly augmented as the penetration length increases, something experimentally achievable. For power-law decaying superconducting pairings, the massless Majorana modes at the edges get paired together into a massive non-local Dirac fermion localised at both edges of the chain: a new topological quasiparticle that we call topological massive Dirac fermion. This topological phase has fractional topological numbers as a consequence of the long-range couplings. Possible applications to current experimental setups and topological quantum computation are also discussed.

  7. Fractional Classical Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nick Laskin

    2013-02-03

    Fractional classical mechanics has been introduced and developed as a classical counterpart of the fractional quantum mechanics. Lagrange, Hamilton and Hamilton-Jacobi frameworks have been implemented for the fractional classical mechanics. The Lagrangian of fractional classical mechanics has been introduced, and equation of motion has been obtained. Fractional oscillator model has been launched and solved in 1D case. A new equation for the period of oscillations of fractional classical oscillator has been found. The interplay between the energy dependency of the period of classical oscillations and the non-equidistant distribution of the energy levels for fractional quantum oscillator has been discussed. We discuss as well, the relationships between new equations of fractional classical mechanics and the well-known fundamental equations of classical mechanics.

  8. Tensor mesons produced in tau lepton decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez Castro, G.; Munoz, J. H.

    2011-05-01

    Light tensor mesons (T=a{sub 2}, f{sub 2} and K{sub 2}*) can be produced in decays of {tau} leptons. In this paper we compute the branching ratios of {tau}{yields}T{pi}{nu} decays by assuming the dominance of intermediate virtual states to model the form factors involved in the relevant hadronic matrix elements. The exclusive f{sub 2}(1270){pi}{sup -} decay mode turns out to have the largest branching ratio, of O(10{sup -4}). Our results indicate that the contribution of tensor meson intermediate states to the three-pseudoscalar channels of {tau} decays are rather small.

  9. First measurement of ADS parameters using $B^- \\to D^0K^-$ decays in hadron collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garosi, Paola; /Siena U. /INFN, Pisa

    2011-06-01

    Measurements of branching fractions and CP-asymmetries of B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}K{sup -} modes allow a theoretically-clean extraction of the CKM angle {gamma}. The method proposed by Atwood, Dunietz and Soni (ADS) makes use of a decay chain where color and Cabibbo suppression interfere, which produces large CP-violating asymmetries. The CDF experiment reports the first measurement at a hadron collider of branching fractions and CP-asymmetries of suppressed B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}h{sup -} signals, where h is {pi} or K. Using 5.0 fb{sup -1} of data we found a combined significance exceeding 5{sigma} and we determined the ADS parameters with accuracy comparable with B-factories.

  10. First measurement of ADS parameters using B- -> D0K- decays in hadron collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paola Garosi; for the CDF Collaboration

    2011-06-22

    Measurements of branching fractions and CP-asymmetries of B^{-} \\rightarrow D^{0}K^{-} modes allow a theoretically-clean extraction of the CKM angle \\gamma. The method proposed by Atwood, Dunietz and Soni (ADS) makes use of a decay chain where color and Cabibbo suppression interfere, which produces large CP-violating asymmetries. The CDF experiment reports the first measurement at a hadron collider of branching fractions and CP-asymmetries of suppressed B^{-} \\rightarrow D^{0}h^{-} signals, where h is \\pi or K. Using 5.0 fb^{-1} of data we found a combined significance exceeding 5\\sigma and we determined the ADS parameters with accuracy comparable with B-factories.

  11. Power Spectrum Analyses of Nuclear Decay Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javorsek, D; Lasenby, R N; Lasenby, A N; Buncher, J B; Fischbach, E; Gruenwald, J T; Hoft, A W; Horan, T J; Jenkins, J H; Kerford, J L; Lee, R H; Longman, A; Mattes, J J; Morreale, B L; Morris, D B; Mudry, R N; Newport, J R; O'Keefe, D; Petrelli, M A; Silver, M A; Stewart, C A; Terry, B; 10.1016/j.astropartphys.2010.06.011

    2010-01-01

    We provide the results from a spectral analysis of nuclear decay data displaying annually varying periodic fluctuations. The analyzed data were obtained from three distinct data sets: 32Si and 36Cl decays reported by an experiment performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), 56Mn decay reported by the Children's Nutrition Research Center (CNRC), but also performed at BNL, and 226Ra decay reported by an experiment performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany. All three data sets exhibit the same primary frequency mode consisting of an annual period. Additional spectral comparisons of the data to local ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity, Earth-Sun distance, and their reciprocals were performed. No common phases were found between the factors investigated and those exhibited by the nuclear decay data. This suggests that either a combination of factors was responsible, or that, if it was a single factor, its effects on the decay rate experiments are n...

  12. Fractional Electromagnetic Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. F. Gómez; J. J. Rosales; J. J. Bernal; V. I. Tkach; M. Guía

    2011-08-31

    In the present work we consider the electromagnetic wave equation in terms of the fractional derivative of the Caputo type. The order of the derivative being considered is 0 <\\gamma<1. A new parameter \\sigma, is introduced which characterizes the existence of the fractional components in the system. We analyze the fractional derivative with respect to time and space, for \\gamma = 1 and \\gamma = 1/2 cases.

  13. Study of the K0L ???????¯decay

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ogata, R.; Suzuki, S.; Ahn, J. K.; Akune, Y.; Baranov, V.; Chen, K. F.; Comfort, J.; Doroshenko, M.; Fujioka, Y.; Hsiung, Y. B.; et al

    2011-09-21

    The rare decay K0L???????? was studied with the E391a detector at the KEK 12-GeV proton synchrotron. Based on 9.4×10? K0L decays, an upper limit of 8.1×10?? was obtained for the branching fraction at 90% confidence level. We also set a limit on the K0L?????X (X?invisible particles) process; the limit on the branching fraction varied from 7.0×10?? to 4.0×10?? for the mass of X ranging from 50 MeV/c² to 200 MeV/c².

  14. Study of a light Standard Model Higgs Boson in the ttH Channel with ATLAS and LHC Decay Mode Independent Searches for Neutral Higgs Bosons with OPAL at LEP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cammin, Jochen

    2004-01-01

    The production of a light Standard Model Higgs boson in association with a top-quark pair at the LHC is studied in a simulation of the ATLAS detector. The Higgs boson is assumed to decay into bb-bar, and the top-quark pair to decay into l nu b jjb. Tagging of all four b-jets and the full reconstruction of the final state are necessary to minimize the combinatorial background from assigning two jets to the decay of the Higgs boson and to discriminate the signal process from the large background from topquark pairs with additional jets. New methods based on likelihood techniques are investigated in order to improve the reconstruction and the signal-background separation. They lead to substantial enhancement of the expected sensitivity of atlas to the ttH0 channel. Both a fast and the full simulation of the atlas detector are used, and a focus is set on the study of the atlas b-tagging performance and its parameterization in the fast simulation of the detector. Further, topological searches for neutral Higgs bos...

  15. (Carbon isotope fractionation inplants)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  16. components of the droplet stream in the first regime before,during, and after the impact. The energy audit shows thatthe change in trandiameter dropllo theleiee smpo ohat modes (i.e. n [ 2) decay quickly, leaving the dominant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Thomas B.

    . The energy audit shows thatthe change in trandiameter dropllo theleiee smpo ohat #12;#12;modes (i.e. n [ 2 (Rayleigh 1945). Often, rotation is observed in rebounding droplets. The downstream velocity and reflection in #12;interference between the incoming and outgoing streams after they rebound; something that might

  17. Novel Weak Decays in Doubly Strange Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Parreno; A. Ramos; C. Bennhold

    2001-06-22

    The strangeness-changing ($\\Delta S = 1$) weak baryon-baryon interaction is studied through the nonmesonic weak decay of double-$\\Lambda$ hypernuclei. Besides the usual nucleon-induced decay $\\Lambda N \\to N N$ we discuss novel hyperon-induced decay modes $\\Lambda \\Lambda \\to \\Lambda N$ and $\\Lambda \\Lambda \\to \\Sigma N$. These reactions provide unique access to the exotic $\\Lambda \\Lambda$K and $\\Lambda \\Sigma$K vertices which place new constraints on Chiral Pertubation Theory ($\\chi$PT) in the weak SU(3) sector. Within a meson-exchange framework, we use the pseudoscalar $\\pi,\\eta,K$ octet for the long-range part while parametrizing the short-range part through the vector mesons $\\rho, \\omega, K^*$. Realistic baryon-baryon forces for the $S=0,-1$ and -2 sectors account for the strong interaction in the initial and final states. For $^6_{\\Lambda \\Lambda}$He the new hyperon-induced decay modes account for up to 4% of the total nonmesonic decay rate. Predictions are made for all possible nonmesonic decay modes.

  18. Tunable fractional-order Fourier transformer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malyutin, A A [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-01-31

    A fractional two-dimensional Fourier transformer whose orders are tuned by means of optical quadrupoles is described. It is shown that in the optical scheme considered, the Fourier-transform order a element of [0,1] in one of the mutually orthogonal planes corresponds to the transform order (2-a) in another plane, i.e., to inversion and inverse Fourier transform of the order a. (laser modes and beams)

  19. Rare decays of B mesons and baryons at the Tevatron and the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volpi, Guido; /INFN, Pisa /Siena U.

    2008-07-01

    The experimental study of rare decays of hadrons containing the b quark has been a fertile ground for some time, and keeps being one of the most interesting subjects in high energy physics. It has improved our understanding of hadronic processes, and allows investigating various aspects of the Standard Model and searching for hints of physics beyond the Standard Model. Examples are the comparison of branching fractions of charmless modes with predictions of models, the constraints on CKM angles (B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, B {yields} DK, with D in suppressed modes), the observation of purely leptonic modes (B{sup {+-}} {yields} {tau}{sup {+-}}{nu}), the recently established difference in A{sub CP} between B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}, suspected to be a hint new physics. All of them came from a long and successful experimental activity with e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. With hadronic colliders now coming into play, the study of rare decays is reaching new heights. Given the high cross section for production of all kinds of B hadrons, the record luminosities now provided by the Tevatron collider, and the LHC program in view for the next years, there is the potential for a rich program of interesting new measurements, including even rarer modes as the B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, strongly suppressed in the standard model but very sensitive to many NP scenarios. The complexity of the hadronic collision environment, however, requires detectors with high precision and high quality tracking, and a trigger system capable of complex event selections at high rates. The CDF experiment, thanks to a fast trigger on impact parameter, has been able to reconstruct many rare B decays, including previously unobserved modes B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, the latter being particularly interesting for its relationship with the puzzling difference in CP asymmetry between neutral and charged modes. In this thesis we go beyond B mesons, and present the first measurements of Branching fractions and CP asymmetries in charmless b-baryon modes. We study two-body {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} decays into final states with a proton and a charged pion or kaon. Their branching fractions can be significantly affected by New Physics contributions; under supersymmetric models with R-parity violation, they can be increased by two orders of magnitude. Their CP-violating asymmetries are also interesting to measure in search for possible further anomalies: then may reach significant size {Omicron}(30%) in the Standard Model, and are also sensitive to possible new physics sources.

  20. Search for Lepton Flavour Violating Decays Tau -> l Ks with the BABAR Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cenci, Riccardo; /SLAC

    2009-03-20

    We present the search for the lepton flavour violating decay {tau} {yields} lK{sup 0}{sub s} with the BaBar experiment data. This process and many other lepton flavour violating {tau} decays, like {tau} {yields} {mu}{gamma} and {tau} {yields} lll, are one of the most promising channel to search for evidence of new physics. According to the Standard Model and the neutrino mixing parameters, branching fractions are estimated well below 10{sup -14}, but many models of new physics allow for branching fractions values close to the present experimental sensitivity. This analysis is based on a data sample of 469fb{sup -1} collected by BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring from 1999 to 2007, equivalent to 431 millions of {tau} pairs. the BABAR experiment, initially designed for studying CP violation in B mesons, has demonstrated to be one of the most suitable environments for studying {tau} decays. The tracking system, the calorimeter and the particle identification of BABAR, together with the knowledge of the {tau} initial energy, allow an extremely powerful rejection of background events that, for this analysis, is better than 10{sup -9}. Being {tau} {yields} lK{sup 0}{sub s} a decay mode without neutrinos, the signal {tau} decay can be fully reconstructed. Kinematical constraints are used in a fit that provides a decay tree reconstruction with a high resolution. For this analysis MC simulated events play a decisive role for estimating the signal efficiency and study the residual background. High statistics MC sample are produced simulating detector conditions for different periods of data collection, in order to reduce any discrepancies with the data. When discrepancies can not be removed, we perform studies to compute a correction factor or an estimation of systematic errors that need to be included in the final measurement. A significant improvement of the current result can be reached only with a higher statistics and, therefore, with a new collider providing a luminosity from 10 to 100 times more than PEP-II. A new detector, with improved performance and able to collect data in a high background environment, is also requested to fully exploit the capability of such amount of data. In fact, only keeping the efficiency and the background as similar as possible to present ones, we will be able to scale almost linearly the estimated upper limit according to the luminosity. The strong potential of improvement for the search of lepton flavour violation {tau} decays makes the building of such a machine highly desirable.

  1. Mode coupling in solar spicule oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fazel, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    In a real medium which has oscillations, the perturbations can cause the energy transfer between different modes. The perturbation interpreted as an interaction between the modes is inferred as mode coupling. Mode coupling process in an inhomogeneous medium such as solar spicules may lead to the coupling of kink waves to local Alfven waves. This coupling occurs practically in any conditions when there is smooth variation in density in the radial direction. This process is seen as the decay of transverse kink waves in the medium. To study the damping of kink waves due to mode coupling, a 2.5-dimensional numerical simulation of the initial wave is considered in spicules. The initial perturbation is assumed to be in a plane perpendicular to the spicule axis. The considered kink wave is a standing wave which shows an exponential damping in the inhomogeneous layer after occurrence of the mode coupling.

  2. A discrete fractional random transform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhengjun Liu; Haifa Zhao; Shutian Liu

    2006-05-20

    We propose a discrete fractional random transform based on a generalization of the discrete fractional Fourier transform with an intrinsic randomness. Such discrete fractional random transform inheres excellent mathematical properties of the fractional Fourier transform along with some fantastic features of its own. As a primary application, the discrete fractional random transform has been used for image encryption and decryption.

  3. The Observation of the Weak Radiative Hyperon Decay XI0 ---> Lambda0 pi0 gamma at KTeV/E799, Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ping, Huican

    2005-01-01

    The large sample of {Xi}{sup 0} hyperons available at KTeV 799 provides an opportunity to search for the Weak Radiative Hyperon Decay {Xi}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}. They present a branching fraction measurement of {Xi}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} based on the E799-II experiment data-taking in 1999 at KTeV, Fermilab. They used the principal decay of {Xi}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} where {Lambda} decays to a proton and a {pi}{sup -} as the flux normalization mode. This is the first observation of this interesting decay mode. 4 candidate events are found in the data. The branching ratio at 90% confidence level has been measured to be (1.67{sub -0.80}{sup +1.45}(stat.) {+-} 0.50(syst.)) x 10{sup -5} or (1.67{sub -0.69}{sup +1.16}(stat.) {+-} 0.50(syst.)) x 10{sup -5} at 68.27% confidence level.

  4. Decay instability of a whistler in a plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, D.P.; Sharma, R.R.

    1981-08-01

    The parametric instabilities of a high power whistler in a high-density plasma possess large growth rates when the scattered sideband is an electrostatic lower hybrid mode. The efficient channels of decay include oscillating two stream instability, nonlinear Landau damping, and resonant decay involving ion acoustic and ion cyclotron modes. The processes of nonlinear scattering i.e., the ones possessing whistler sidebands are relatively less significant.

  5. Search for W-prime boson decaying to electron-neutrino pairs in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2006-11-01

    The authors present the results of a search for W{prime} boson decaying to electron-neutrino pairs in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV, using a data sample corresponding to 205 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at Fermilab. They observe no evidence for this decay mode and set limits on the production cross section times branching fraction, assuming the neutrinos from W{prime} boson decays to be light. If they assume the manifest left-right symmetric model, they exclude a W{prime} boson with mass less than 788 GeV/c{sup 2} at the 95% confidence level.

  6. Weak decays of 4He-Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. D. Parker; M. J. Athanas; P. D. Barnes; S. Bart; B. Bassalleck; R. Chrien; G. Diebold; G. B. Franklin; K. Johnston; P. Pile; B. Quinn; F. Rozon; R. Sawafta; R. A. Schumacher; R. Stearns; I. Sukaton; R. Sutter; J. J. Szymanski; V. J. Zeps

    2007-09-13

    We measured the lifetime and the mesonic and non-mesonic decay rates of the 4He-Lambda hypernucleus. The hypernuclei were created using a 750 MeV/c momentum K- beam on a liquid 4He target by the reaction 4He(K-,pi-)4He-Lambda. The 4He-Lambda lifetime was directly measured using protons from Lambda p -> n p non-mesonic decay (also referred to as proton-stimulated decay) and was found to have a value of tau = 245 +/- 24 ps. The mesonic decay rates were determined from the observed numbers of pi-'s and pi0's as Gamma_pi-/Gamma_tot = 0.270 +/- 0.024 and Gamma_pi0/Gamma_tot = 0.564 +/- 0.036, respectively, and the values of the proton- and neutron-stimulated decay rates were extracted as Gamma_p/Gamma_tot = 0.169 +/- 0.019 and Gamma_n/Gamma_tot <= 0.032 (95% CL), respectively. The effects of final-state interactions and possible 3-body Lambda N N decay contributions were studied in the context of a simple model of nucleon-stimulated decay. Nucleon-nucleon coincidence events were observed and were used in the determination of the non-mesonic branching fractions. The implications of the results of this analysis were considered for the empirical Delta I = 1/2 rule and the decay rates of the 4H-Lambda hypernucleus.

  7. Mode Analyses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMission Mission Missionof EnergyJennings= a nMode Analyses

  8. Measurement of the branching fractions of ?(+)(c)?pKn(?)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1998-03-01

    ´ and Institute of Par 23Ithaca College, Ith 24University of Kansas, 25University of Minnesota, M ~Received 10 September 1997; Using data recorded by the CLEO-II detector at C fractions for the decays of the charmed baryon L all measured relative to pK2p1. 0.6760.0460.11,0.4660.0260.04,0.5260.0460...

  9. First observation of tau->3 pi eta nu(tau) and tau->f(1)pi nu(tau) decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

    1997-09-01

    We have observed new channels for tau decays with an eta in the final state. We study 3-prong tau decays, using the eta --> gamma gamma and eta --> 3 pi(0) decay modes and 1-prong decays with two pi(0)'s using the eta --> ...

  10. No-neutrino double beta decay: more than one neutrino

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosen, S.P.

    1983-01-01

    Interference effects between light and heavy Majorana neutrinos in the amplitude for no-neutrino double beta decay are discussed. The effects include an upper bound on the heavy neutrino mass, and an A dependence for the effective mass extracted from double beta decay. Thus the search for the no-neutrino decay mode should be pursued in several nuclei, and particularly in Ca/sup 48/, where the effective mass may be quite large.

  11. Neutrinoless double beta decay search with the NEMO 3 experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irina Nasteva; for the NEMO 3 Collaboration

    2008-10-03

    The NEMO 3 experiment searches for neutrinoless double beta decay and makes precision measurements of two-neutrino double beta decay in seven isotopes. The latest two-neutrino half-life results are presented, together with the limits on neutrinoless half-lives and the corresponding effective Majorana neutrino masses. Also given are the limits obtained on neutrinoless double beta decay mediated by Rp-violating SUSY, right-hand currents and different Majoron emission modes.

  12. Neutrinoless double beta decay search with the NEMO 3 experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasteva, Irina [Particle Physics Group, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-23

    The NEMO 3 experiment searches for neutrinoless double beta decay and makes precision measurements of two-neutrino double beta decay in seven isotopes. The latest two-neutrino half-life results are presented, together with the limits on neutrinoless half-lives and the corresponding effective Majorana neutrino masses. Also given are the limits obtained on neutrinoless double beta decay mediated by R{sub p}-violating SUSY, right-hand currents and different Majoron emission modes.

  13. Pathways to Rare Baryonic B Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei-Shu Hou; A. Soni

    2000-08-09

    We point out new ways to search for charmless baryonic B decays: baryon pair production in association with $\\eta^\\prime$ is very likely as large as or even a bit larger than two body $K\\pi/\\pi\\pi$ modes. We extend our argument, in weaker form, to $B\\to \\gamma + X_s$ and $\\ell\

  14. Observation and study of baryonic B decays: B -> D(*) p pbar, D(*) p pbar pi, and D(*) p pbar pi pi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The BABAR Collaboration; B. Aubert

    2009-08-15

    We present a study of ten B-meson decays to a D(*), a proton-antiproton pair, and a system of up to two pions using BaBar's data set of 455x10^6 BBbar pairs. Four of the modes (B0bar -> D0 p anti-p, B0bar -> D*0 p anti-p, B0bar -> D+ p anti-p pi-, B0bar -> D*+ p anti-p pi-) are studied with improved statistics compared to previous measurements; six of the modes (B- -> D0 p anti-p pi-, B- -> D*0 p anti-p pi-, B0bar -> D0 p anti-p pi- pi+, B0bar -> D*0 p anti-p pi- pi+, B- -> D+ p anti-p pi- pi-, B- -> D*+ p anti-p pi- pi-) are first observations. The branching fractions for 3- and 5-body decays are suppressed compared to 4-body decays. Kinematic distributions for 3-body decays show non-overlapping threshold enhancements in m(p anti-p) and m(D(*)0 p) in the Dalitz plots. For 4-body decays, m(p pi-) mass projections show a narrow peak with mass and full width of (1497.4 +- 3.0 +- 0.9) MeV/c2, and (47 +- 12 +- 4) MeV/c2, respectively, where the first (second) errors are statistical (systematic). For 5-body decays, mass projections are similar to phase space expectations. All results are preliminary.

  15. A combination of searches for the invisible decays of the Higgs boson using the CMS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Searches for invisible decays of the Higgs boson using Run 1 proton-proton collision data from the CMS experiment at the LHC are combined. The searches cover a wide range of Higgs boson production modes namely gluon fusion, vector boson fusion and vector boson associated production. The data samples used were collected in 2011 and 2012 and correspond to integrated luminosities of up to 4.9 fb$^{-1}$ at 7 TeV and up to 19.7 fb$^{-1}$ at 8 TeV. Data, in all channels, are consistent with the expected standard model backgrounds. Assuming standard model Higgs boson cross sections and corresponding detector acceptances, limits are set on the invisible branching fraction for each production mode separately and for the full combination of all channels. From the combination of all channels, we set an observed (expected) upper limit on the invisible branching fraction for $m_{H}$ = 125 GeV to be 36\\% (30\\%) at 95\\% confidence level.

  16. Spectroscopy and Decay of $B$ Hadrons at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulini, Manfred

    2007-02-01

    The authors review recent results on heavy quark physics focusing on Run II measurements of B hadron spectroscopy and decay at the Tevatron. A wealth of new B physics measurements from CDF and D0 has been available. These include the spectroscopy of excited B states (B**, B**{sub s}) and the observation of the {Sigma}{sub b} baryon. The discussion of the decays of B hadrons and measurements of branching fractions focuses on charmless two-body decays of B {yields} h{sup +}h{sup -}. They report several new B{sub s}{sup 0} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} decay channels.

  17. ß-delayed ?-proton Decay in 56Zn: Analysis of the Charged-particle Spectrum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Orrigo, S.E.A.; Rubio, B.; Fujita, Y.; Blank, B.; Gelletly, W.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ascher, P.; Bilgier, B.; Cáceres, L.; et al

    2015-01-01

    A study of the ? decay of the proton-rich Tz = -2 nucleus 56Zn has been reported in a recent publication. A rare and exotic decay mode, ?-de-layed ?-proton decay, has been observed there for the first time in the fp shell. Here, we expand on some of the details of the data analysis, focussing on the charged particle spectrum.

  18. ß-delayed ?-proton decay in ??Zn: Analysis of the charged-particle spectrum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Orrigo, S. E.A.; Rubio, B.; Fujita, Y.; Blank, B.; Gelletly, W.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ascher, P.; Bilgier, B.; Cáceres, L.; et al

    2015-01-01

    A study of the ? decay of the proton-rich Tz = –2 nucleus ??Zn has been reported in a recent publication. A rare and exotic decay mode, ?-de-layed ?-proton decay, has been observed there for the first time in the fp shell. Here, we expand on some of the details of the data analysis, focusing on the charged particle spectrum.

  19. Decays of ? leptons to final states containing K(0)S mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

    1996-06-01

    present branching fractions for decays to five final states: t 2!K0h2n t , t 2!K0h2p0n t , t 2!K0K2n t , t 2!K0K2p0n t , and t2!KS0KS0h2nt , where K0h2 de- notes the sum of the processes involving K¯0p2 and K0K2 particle combinations. Substructure and mass... systematic errors. For other modes, selection criteria are less stringent for higher acceptance. A sample of t2!KS0h2nt events is selected by requiring four charged tracks, each with momentum transverse to the beam axis pT.0.05Ebeam and ucosuu,0.8, where u...

  20. Chiral Dynamics and S-wave contributions in Semileptonic $D_s/B_s$ decays into $\\pi^+\\pi^-$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Yu-Ji

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we study the semileptonic decay modes $B_s^0\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\ell^+\\ell^-$ and $D_s^+\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\ell^+ \

  1. Clean fractionation of biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Alternative Feedstocks (AF) program is forging new links between the agricultural community and the chemicals industry through support of research and development (R & D) that uses `green` feedstocks to produce chemicals. The program promotes cost-effective industrial use of renewable biomass as feedstocks to manufacture high-volume chemical building blocks. Industrial commercialization of such processes would stimulate the agricultural sector by increasing the demand of agricultural and forestry commodities. New alternatives for American industry may lie in the nation`s forests and fields. The AF program is conducting ongoing research on a clean fractionation process. This project is designed to convert biomass into materials that can be used for chemical processes and products. Clean fractionation separates a single feedstock into individual components cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin.

  2. Search for New Physics in Rare Top Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratishruti Saha

    2014-11-27

    Top physics provides a fertile ground for new-physics searches. At present, most top observables appear to be in good agreement with the respective Standard Model predictions. However, in the case of decay modes that are suppressed in the Standard Model, new-physics contributions of comparable magnitude may exist and yet go unnoticed because their impact on the total decay width is small. Hence it is interesting to probe rare top decays. This analysis focuses on the decay $t \\to b \\bar b c$. Useful observables are identified and prospects for measuring new-physics parameters are examined.

  3. Study of the $B_c^+ \\to J/\\psi D_s^+$ and $B_c^+ \\to J/\\psi D_s^{*+}$ decays with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; ?lvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis

    2015-01-01

    The decays $B_c^+ \\to J/\\psi D_s^+$ and $B_c^+ \\to J/\\psi D_s^{*+}$ are studied with the ATLAS detector at the LHC using a dataset corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.9 fb$^{-1}$ and 20.6 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions collected at centre-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV and 8 TeV, respectively. Signal candidates are identified through $J/\\psi\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ and $D_s^{(*)+}\\to\\phi\\pi^+(\\gamma/\\pi^0)$ decays. With a two-dimensional likelihood fit involving the $B_c^+$ reconstructed invariant mass and an angle between the $\\mu^+$ and $D_s^+$ candidate momenta in the muon pair rest frame, the yields of $B_c^+ \\to J/\\psi D_s^+$ and $B_c^+ \\to J/\\psi D_s^{*+}$, and the transverse polarisation fraction in $B_c^+ \\to J/\\psi D_s^{*+}$ decay are measured. The transverse polarisation fraction is determined to be $\\Gamma_{\\pm\\pm}(B_c^+ \\to J/\\psi D_s^{*+})/\\Gamma(B_c^+ \\to J/\\psi D_s^{*+}) = 0.38 \\pm 0.23 \\pm 0.07$, and the derived ratio of the branching fractions of the two modes is $\\mathcal{B}_{B_c^+ \\to J/...

  4. Helium-cluster decay widths of molecular states in beryllium and carbon isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Pei; F. R. Xu

    2007-02-01

    The $\\alpha$ particle and $^6$He emissions from possible molecular states in beryllium and carbon isotopes have been studied using a mean-field-type cluster potential. Calculations can reproduce well the $\\alpha$-decay widths of excited states in $^{8}$Be, $^{12}$C and $^{20}$Ne. For the nucleus $^{10}$Be, we discussed the $\\alpha$-decay widths with different shapes or decay modes, in order to understand the very different decay widths of two excited states. The widths of $^{6}$He decay from $^{12}$Be and $\\alpha$ decays from $^{13,14}$C are predicted, which could be useful for future experiments.

  5. Listing Unique Fractional Factorial Designs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrivastava, Abhishek Kumar

    2011-02-22

    Fractional factorial designs are a popular choice in designing experiments for studying the effects of multiple factors simultaneously. The first step in planning an experiment is the selection of an appropriate fractional ...

  6. Clean fractionation of biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    The US DOE Alternative Feedstocks (AF) program is forging new links between the agricultural community and the chemicals industry through support of research and development (R&D) that uses green feedstocks to produce chemicals. The program promotes cost-effective industrial use of renewable biomass as feedstocks to manufacture high-volume chemical building blocks. Industrial commercialization of such processes would stimulate the agricultural sector by increasing the demand of agricultural and forestry commodities. A consortium of five DOE national laboratories has been formed with the objectives of providing industry with a broad range of expertise and helping to lower the risk of new process development through federal cost sharing. The AF program is conducting ongoing research on a clean fractionation process, designed to convert biomass into materials that can be used for chemical processes and products. The focus of the clean fractionation research is to demonstrate to industry that one technology can successfully separate all types of feedstocks into predictable types of chemical intermediates.

  7. Observation of the Decay B??Ds(*)+K?l????l

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; et al

    2011-07-22

    We report the observation of the decay B??Ds(*)+K?l??¯l based on 342fb?¹ of data collected at the ?(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e?e? storage rings at SLAC. A simultaneous fit to three D+s decay chains is performed to extract the signal yield from measurements of the squared missing mass in the B meson decay. We observe the decay B??Ds(*)+K?l??¯l with a significance greater than 5 standard deviations (including systematic uncertainties) and measure its branching fraction to be B(B??Ds(*)+K?l??¯l)=[6.13+1.04-1.03(stat)±0.43(syst)±0.51(B(Ds))]×10??, where the last error reflects the limited knowledge of the Ds branching fractions.

  8. Power Spectrum Analyses of Nuclear Decay Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Javorsek II; P. A. Sturrock; R. N. Lasenby; A. N. Lasenby; J. B. Buncher; E. Fischbach; J. T. Gruenwald; A. W. Hoft; T. J. Horan; J. H. Jenkins; J. L. Kerford; R. H. Lee; A. Longman; J. J. Mattes; B. L. Morreale; D. B. Morris; R. N. Mudry; J. R. Newport; D. O'Keefe; M. A. Petrelli; M. A. Silver; C. A. Stewart; B. Terry

    2010-07-06

    We provide the results from a spectral analysis of nuclear decay data displaying annually varying periodic fluctuations. The analyzed data were obtained from three distinct data sets: 32Si and 36Cl decays reported by an experiment performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), 56Mn decay reported by the Children's Nutrition Research Center (CNRC), but also performed at BNL, and 226Ra decay reported by an experiment performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany. All three data sets exhibit the same primary frequency mode consisting of an annual period. Additional spectral comparisons of the data to local ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity, Earth-Sun distance, and their reciprocals were performed. No common phases were found between the factors investigated and those exhibited by the nuclear decay data. This suggests that either a combination of factors was responsible, or that, if it was a single factor, its effects on the decay rate experiments are not a direct synchronous modulation. We conclude that the annual periodicity in these data sets is a real effect, but that further study involving additional carefully controlled experiments will be needed to establish its origin.

  9. Baryon helicity in B decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2005-05-13

    We extend the perturbative argument of helicity amplitudes to the two-body baryonic decays of B decays.

  10. Higgs boson decays in the littlest Higgs model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez-Sprinberg, G.A.; Martinez, R.; Rodriguez, J.-Alexis

    2005-02-01

    We calculate the two body Higgs boson decays in the framework of the littlest Higgs model. The decay H{yields}{gamma}Z is computed at one-loop-level and, using previous results, we evaluate the branching fractions in the framework of the littlest Higgs model. A wide range of the space parameter of the model is considered and possible deviations from the standard model are explored.

  11. Charmless $B\\to PP, PV, VV$ Decays Based on the six-quark Effective Hamiltonian with Strong Phase Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang Su; Yue-Liang Wu; Yi-Bo Yang; Ci Zhuang

    2010-11-15

    Based on an approximate six-quark operator effective Hamiltonian from perturbative QCD, we present a systematical study of charmless $B \\to PP, PV, VV$ decays ($P$ and $V$ denoting pseudoscalar and vector mesons, respectively). The calculation of the relevant hard-scattering kernels is completed, the resulting transition form factors are consistent with the results of QCD sum rule calculation. Important classes of power corrections include "chirally-enhanced" terms, vertex corrections and weak annihilation contributions with non-trivial strong phase. With these considerations, predictions are presented for the branching ratios and CP asymmetries of B-meson decays into PP, PV and VV final states, and also for the corresponding polarization observables in VV final states. Several decay modes and observables, which are of particular interest phenomenologically, are discussed in detail, including the effect of annihilation amplitude with strong phase, the $\\pi\\pi$, $\\pi K$ and $\\pi \\rho$ systems, the longitudinal polarization fraction $f_L$ in $\\rho K^*$ and $\\phi K^*$ systems and so on. It is observed that predictions in our framework generally agree with the current experimental data.

  12. Quasi-Nambu-Goldstone Modes in Bose-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uchino, Shun [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kobayashi, Michikazu [Department of Basic Science, University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Nitta, Muneto [Department of Physics, and Research and Education Center for Natural Sciences, Keio University, 4-1-1 Hiyoshi, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan); Ueda, Masahito [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); ERATO Macroscopic Quantum Project, JST, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2010-12-03

    We show that quasi-Nambu-Goldstone (NG) modes, which play prominent roles in high energy physics but have been elusive experimentally, can be realized with atomic Bose-Einstein condensates. The quasi-NG modes emerge when the symmetry of a ground state is larger than that of the Hamiltonian. When they appear, the conventional vacuum manifold should be enlarged. Consequently, topological defects that are stable within the conventional vacuum manifold become unstable and decay by emitting the quasi-NG modes. Contrary to conventional wisdom, however, we show that the topological defects are stabilized by quantum fluctuations that make the quasi-NG modes massive, thereby suppressing their emission.

  13. $B$ flavour tagging using charm decays at the LHCb experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LHCb collaboration; R. Aaij; B. Adeva; M. Adinolfi; A. Affolder; Z. Ajaltouni; S. Akar; J. Albrecht; F. Alessio; M. Alexander; S. Ali; G. Alkhazov; P. Alvarez Cartelle; A. A. Alves Jr; S. Amato; S. Amerio; Y. Amhis; L. An; L. Anderlini; J. Anderson; G. Andreassi; M. Andreotti; J. E. Andrews; R. B. Appleby; O. Aquines Gutierrez; F. Archilli; P. d'Argent; A. Artamonov; M. Artuso; E. Aslanides; G. Auriemma; M. Baalouch; S. Bachmann; J. J. Back; A. Badalov; C. Baesso; W. Baldini; R. J. Barlow; C. Barschel; S. Barsuk; W. Barter; V. Batozskaya; V. Battista; A. Bay; L. Beaucourt; J. Beddow; F. Bedeschi; I. Bediaga; L. J. Bel; V. Bellee; N. Belloli; I. Belyaev; E. Ben-Haim; G. Bencivenni; S. Benson; J. Benton; A. Berezhnoy; R. Bernet; A. Bertolin; M. -O. Bettler; M. van Beuzekom; A. Bien; S. Bifani; P. Billoir; T. Bird; A. Birnkraut; A. Bizzeti; T. Blake; F. Blanc; J. Blouw; S. Blusk; V. Bocci; A. Bondar; N. Bondar; W. Bonivento; S. Borghi; M. Borsato; T. J. V. Bowcock; E. Bowen; C. Bozzi; S. Braun; M. Britsch; T. Britton; J. Brodzicka; N. H. Brook; E. Buchanan; A. Bursche; J. Buytaert; S. Cadeddu; R. Calabrese; M. Calvi; M. Calvo Gomez; P. Campana; D. Campora Perez; L. Capriotti; A. Carbone; G. Carboni; R. Cardinale; A. Cardini; P. Carniti; L. Carson; K. Carvalho Akiba; G. Casse; L. Cassina; L. Castillo Garcia; M. Cattaneo; Ch. Cauet; G. Cavallero; R. Cenci; M. Charles; Ph. Charpentier; M. Chefdeville; S. Chen; S. -F. Cheung; N. Chiapolini; M. Chrzaszcz; X. Cid Vidal; G. Ciezarek; P. E. L. Clarke; M. Clemencic; H. V. Cliff; J. Closier; V. Coco; J. Cogan; E. Cogneras; V. Cogoni; L. Cojocariu; G. Collazuol; P. Collins; A. Comerma-Montells; A. Contu; A. Cook; M. Coombes; S. Coquereau; G. Corti; M. Corvo; B. Couturier; G. A. Cowan; D. C. Craik; A. Crocombe; M. Cruz Torres; S. Cunliffe; R. Currie; C. D'Ambrosio; E. Dall'Occo; J. Dalseno; P. N. Y. David; A. Davis; K. De Bruyn; S. De Capua; M. De Cian; J. M. De Miranda; L. De Paula; P. De Simone; C. -T. Dean; D. Decamp; M. Deckenhoff; L. Del Buono; N. Déléage; M. Demmer; D. Derkach; O. Deschamps; F. Dettori; B. Dey; A. Di Canto; F. Di Ruscio; H. Dijkstra; S. Donleavy; F. Dordei; M. Dorigo; A. Dosil Suárez; D. Dossett; A. Dovbnya; K. Dreimanis; L. Dufour; G. Dujany; F. Dupertuis; P. Durante; R. Dzhelyadin; A. Dziurda; A. Dzyuba; S. Easo; U. Egede; V. Egorychev; S. Eidelman; S. Eisenhardt; U. Eitschberger; R. Ekelhof; L. Eklund; I. El Rifai; Ch. Elsasser; S. Ely; S. Esen; H. M. Evans; T. Evans; A. Falabella; C. Färber; C. Farinelli; N. Farley; S. Farry; R. Fay; D. Ferguson; V. Fernandez Albor; F. Ferrari; F. Ferreira Rodrigues; M. Ferro-Luzzi; S. Filippov; M. Fiore; M. Fiorini; M. Firlej; C. Fitzpatrick; T. Fiutowski; K. Fohl; P. Fol; M. Fontana; F. Fontanelli; R. Forty; O. Francisco; M. Frank; C. Frei; M. Frosini; J. Fu; E. Furfaro; A. Gallas Torreira; D. Galli; S. Gallorini; S. Gambetta; M. Gandelman; P. Gandini; Y. Gao; J. García Pardiñas; J. Garra Tico; L. Garrido; D. Gascon; C. Gaspar; R. Gauld; L. Gavardi; G. Gazzoni; D. Gerick; E. Gersabeck; M. Gersabeck; T. Gershon; Ph. Ghez; A. Gianelle; S. Gianì; V. Gibson; O. G. Girard; L. Giubega; V. V. Gligorov; C. Göbel; D. Golubkov; A. Golutvin; A. Gomes; C. Gotti; M. Grabalosa Gándara; R. Graciani Diaz; L. A. Granado Cardoso; E. Graugés; E. Graverini; G. Graziani; A. Grecu; E. Greening; S. Gregson; P. Griffith; L. Grillo; O. Grünberg; B. Gui; E. Gushchin; Yu. Guz; T. Gys; T. Hadavizadeh; C. Hadjivasiliou; G. Haefeli; C. Haen; S. C. Haines; S. Hall; B. Hamilton; X. Han; S. Hansmann-Menzemer; N. Harnew; S. T. Harnew; J. Harrison; J. He; T. Head; V. Heijne; K. Hennessy; P. Henrard; L. Henry; J. A. Hernando Morata; E. van Herwijnen; M. Heß; A. Hicheur; D. Hill; M. Hoballah; C. Hombach; W. Hulsbergen; T. Humair; N. Hussain; D. Hutchcroft; D. Hynds; M. Idzik; P. Ilten; R. Jacobsson; A. Jaeger; J. Jalocha; E. Jans; A. Jawahery; F. Jing; M. John; D. Johnson; C. R. Jones; C. Joram; B. Jost; N. Jurik; S. Kandybei; W. Kanso; M. Karacson; T. M. Karbach; S. Karodia; M. Kecke; M. Kelsey; I. R. Kenyon; M. Kenzie; T. Ketel; B. Khanji; C. Khurewathanakul; S. Klaver; K. Klimaszewski; O. Kochebina; M. Kolpin; I. Komarov; R. F. Koopman; P. Koppenburg; M. Kozeiha; L. Kravchuk; K. Kreplin; M. Kreps; G. Krocker; P. Krokovny; F. Kruse; W. Krzemien; W. Kucewicz; M. Kucharczyk; V. Kudryavtsev; A. K. Kuonen; K. Kurek; T. Kvaratskheliya; D. Lacarrere; G. Lafferty; A. Lai; D. Lambert; G. Lanfranchi; C. Langenbruch; B. Langhans; T. Latham; C. Lazzeroni; R. Le Gac; J. van Leerdam; J. -P. Lees; R. Lefèvre; A. Leflat; J. Lefrançois; O. Leroy; T. Lesiak; B. Leverington; Y. Li; T. Likhomanenko; M. Liles; R. Lindner; C. Linn; F. Lionetto; B. Liu; X. Liu; D. Loh; I. Longstaff; J. H. Lopes; D. Lucchesi; M. Lucio Martinez; H. Luo; A. Lupato; E. Luppi; O. Lupton; A. Lusiani; F. Machefert; F. Maciuc; O. Maev; K. Maguire

    2015-10-09

    An algorithm is described for tagging the flavour content at production of neutral $B$ mesons in the LHCb experiment. The algorithm exploits the correlation of the flavour of a $B$ meson with the charge of a reconstructed secondary charm hadron from the decay of the other $b$ hadron produced in the proton-proton collision. Charm hadron candidates are identified in a number of fully or partially reconstructed Cabibbo-favoured decay modes. The algorithm is calibrated on the self-tagged decay modes $B^+ \\to J/\\psi \\, K^+$ and $B^0 \\to J/\\psi \\, K^{*0}$ using $3.0\\mathrm{\\,fb}^{-1}$ of data collected by the LHCb experiment at $pp$ centre-of-mass energies of $7\\mathrm{\\,TeV}$ and $8\\mathrm{\\,TeV}$. Its tagging power on these samples of $B \\to J/\\psi \\, X$ decays is $(0.30 \\pm 0.01 \\pm 0.01) \\%$.

  14. Searches for New Physics in Top Decays at D0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pleier, Marc-Andre; /Brookhaven

    2011-08-01

    The Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab with its centre of mass energy of 1.96 TeV allows for pair production of top quarks and the study of top quark decay properties. This report reflects the current status of measurements of the W boson helicity in top quark decays and the ratio of top quark branching fractions as well as searches for neutral current top quark decays and pair production of fourth generation t' quarks, performed by the D0 Collaboration utilising datasets of up to 5.4 fb{sup -1}.

  15. Updated Search for the Flavor-Changing Neutral-Current Decay $D^0 \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2010-08-01

    We report on a search for the flavor-changing neutral-current decay D{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96TeV using 360 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. A displaced vertex trigger selects long-lived D{sup 0} candidates in the {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, and K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decay modes. We use the Cabibbo-favored D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} channel to optimize the selection criteria in an unbiased manner, and the kinematically similar D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} channel for normalization. We set an upper limit on the branching fraction {Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) < 2.1 x 10{sup -7} (3.0 x 10{sup -7}) at the 90% (95%) confidence level.

  16. Suppressing Proton Decay in Theories with Localised Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bobby S. Acharya; Roberto Valandro

    2006-08-01

    We calculate the contribution to the proton decay amplitude from Kaluza-Klein lepto-quarks in theories with extra dimensions, localised fermions and gauge fields which propagate in the bulk. Such models naturally occur within the context of M-theory. In SU(5) models we show that carefully including all such modes gives a distinctive pattern of decays through various channels including a strong suppression of decays into neutrinos or right handed positrons. By contrast there is no such suppression for SO(10).

  17. CDF/PUB/EXOTIC/PUBLIC/10737 Search for a Standard Model Higgs Boson Decaying Into Photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    CDF/PUB/EXOTIC/PUBLIC/10737 Search for a Standard Model Higgs Boson Decaying Into Photons at CDF) A search for the SM Higgs boson in the diphoton decay channel is reported using data corre- sponding are set on the production cross section times the H branching fraction for hypothetical Higgs boson

  18. Prompt proton decay in the vicinity of {sup 56}Ni

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johansson, E. K.; Rudolph, D.; Andersson, L-L.; Fahlander, C.; Rietz, R. du; Torres, D. A.; Carpenter, M. P.; Seweryniak, D.; Zhu, S.; Charity, R. J.; Chiara, C. J.; Hoel, C.; Pechenaya, O. L.; Reviol, W.; Sarantites, D. G.; Sobotka, L. G.; Ekman, J.

    2007-11-30

    A new decay mode, the so called prompt proton decay, was discovered in 1998. It has since proven to be an important decay mechanism for several neutron deficient nuclei in the A{approx}60 region. To measure with high accuracy the energies and angular distributions of these protons, a state-of-the-art charged particle detector--LuWuSiA--was developed. It was first utilized during a fusion-evaporation reaction experiment performed at Argonne National Laboratory, U.S.A. In this contribution, the characteristics of the prompt proton decay are discussed along with the special features of LuWuSiA as well as a revisit to the prompt proton decay in {sup 58}Cu.

  19. Dark radiation from particle decay: cosmological constraints and opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasenkamp, Jasper; Kersten, Jörn, E-mail: Jasper.Hasenkamp@desy.de, E-mail: Joern.Kersten@desy.de [II. Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Hamburg, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    We study particle decay as the origin of dark radiation. After elaborating general properties and useful parametrisations we provide model-independent and easy-to-use constraints from nucleosynthesis, the cosmic microwave background and structure formation. Bounds on branching ratios and mass hierarchies depend in a unique way on the time of decay. We demonstrate their power to exclude well-motivated scenarios taking the example of the lightest ordinary sparticle decaying into the gravitino. We point out signatures and opportunities in cosmological observations and structure formation. For example, if there are two dark decay modes, dark radiation and the observed dark matter with adjustable free-streaming can originate from the same decaying particle, solving small-scale problems of structure formation. Hot dark matter mimicking a neutrino mass scale as deduced from cosmological observations can arise and possibly be distinguished after a discovery. Our results can be used as a guideline for model building.

  20. Higgs Boson Decays into Single Photon plus Unparticle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kingman Cheung; Chong Sheng Li; Tzu-Chiang Yuan

    2007-11-21

    The decay of the standard model Higgs boson into a single photon and a vector unparticle through a one-loop process is studied. For an intermediate mass Higgs boson, this single photon plus unparticle mode can have a branching ratio comparable with the two-photon discovery mode. The emitted photon has a continuous energy spectrum encoding the nature of the recoil unparticle. It can be measured in precision studies of the Higgs boson after its discovery.

  1. Observation of B(0) decay to 2 charmless mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Ball, S.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

    1993-12-01

    We report results from a search for the decays B0 --> pi+pi-, B0 --> K+pi-, and B0 --> K+K-. We find 90% confidence level upper limits on the branching fractions, B(pipi) < 2.9 x 10(-5) , B(Kpi) < 2.6 x 10(-5), and B(KK) ...

  2. Observation of the diphoton decay of the Higgs boson and measurement of its properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apyan, Aram

    Observation of the diphoton decay mode of the recently discovered Higgs boson and measurement of some of its properties are reported. The analysis uses the entire dataset collected by the CMS experiment in proton-proton ...

  3. Measurements of the Decays $B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^0\\proton\\antiproton$, $B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^{*0}\\proton\\antiproton$, $B^0 \\to D^{-}\\proton\\antiproton?^+$, and $B^0 \\to D^{*-}\\proton\\antiproton?^+$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The BABAR Collaboration; B. Aubert

    2006-07-21

    We present measurements of branching fractions of $B^0$ decays to multi-body final states containing protons, based on 232 million $\\Upsilon(4S)\\to B\\bar{B}$ decays collected with the BaBar detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy $B$ factory. We measure the branching fractions ${\\cal B}(B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^0\\proton\\antiproton)=(1.13\\pm0.06\\pm0.08)\\times 10^{-4}$, ${\\cal B}(B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^{*0}\\proton\\antiproton)=(1.01\\pm0.10\\pm0.09)\\times 10^{-4}$, ${\\cal B}(B^0 \\to D^{-}\\proton\\antiproton\\pi^+)=(3.38\\pm0.14\\pm0.29)\\times 10^{-4}$, and ${\\cal B}(B^0 \\to D^{*-}\\proton\\antiproton\\pi^+)=(4.81\\pm0.22\\pm0.44)\\times 10^{-4}$ where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. We present a search for the charmed pentaquark state, $\\Theta_c(3100)$ observed by H1 and put limits on the branching fraction ${\\cal B} (B^0 \\to \\Theta_c \\antiproton\\pi^+)\\times{\\cal B}(\\Theta_c \\to D^{*-}\\proton)proton)<9\\times10^{-6}$. Upon investigation of the decay structure of the above four $B^{0}$ decay modes, we see an enhancement at low $p\\bar{p}$ mass and deviations from phase-space in the $\\bar{D}\\bar{p}$ and $\\bar{D}p$ invariant mass spectra.

  4. Analysis of the charmed semileptonic decay D+ ---> rho0 mu+ nu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luiggi, Eduardo E.; /Vanderbilt U.; ,

    2008-12-01

    The search for the fundamental constituents of matter has been pursued and studied since the dawn of civilization. As early as the fourth century BCE, Democritus, expanding the teachings of Leucippus, proposed small, indivisible entities called atoms, interacting with each other to form the Universe. Democritus was convinced of this by observing the environment around him. He observed, for example, how a collection of tiny grains of sand can make out smooth beaches. Today, following the lead set by Democritus more than 2500 years ago, at the heart of particle physics is the hypothesis that everything we can observe in the Universe is made of a small number of fundamental particles interacting with each other. In contrast to Democritus, for the last hundred years we have been able to perform experiments that probe deeper and deeper into matter in the search for the fundamental particles of nature. Today's knowledge is encapsulated in the Standard Model of particle physics, a model describing the fundamental particles and their interactions. It is within this model that the work in this thesis is presented. This work attempts to add to the understanding of the Standard Model by measuring the relative branching fraction of the charmed semileptonic decay D{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{mu}{sup +}{nu} with respect to D{sup +} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0} {mu}{sup +}{nu}. Many theoretical models that describe hadronic interactions predict the value of this relative branching fraction, but only a handful of experiments have been able to measure it with any precision. By making a precise measurement of this relative branching fraction theorists can distinguish between viable models as well as refine existing ones. In this thesis we presented the measurement of the branching fraction ratio of the Cabibbo suppressed semileptonic decay mode D{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{mu}{sup +}{nu} with respect to the Cabibbo favored mode D{sup +} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0} {mu}{sup +}{nu} using data collected by the FOCUS collaboration. We used a binned maximum log-likelihood fit that included all known semileptonic backgrounds as well as combinatorial and muonmisidentification backgrounds to extract the yields for both the signal and normalization modes. We reconstructed 320 {+-} 44 D{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{mu}{sup +}{nu} events and 11372 {+-} 161 D{sup +} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{mu}{sup +}{nu} events. Taking into account the non-resonant contribution to the D{sup +} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{mu}{sup +}{nu} yield due to a s-wave interference first measured by FOCUS the branching fraction ratio is: {Lambda}(D{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{mu}{sup +}{nu}) = 0.0412 {+-} 0.0057 {+-} 0.0040 (VII.1) where the first error is statistical and the second error is the systematic uncertainty. This represents a substantial improvement over the previous world average. More importantly, the new world average for {Lambda}(D{sup +}{yields}{rho}{sup 0}{mu}{sup +}{nu})/{Lambda}(D{sup +}{yields}{bar K}*{sup 0}{mu}{sup +}{nu}) along with the improved measurements in the electronic mode can be used to discriminate among different theoretical approaches that aim to understand the hadronic current involved in the charm to light quark decay process. The average of the electronic and muonic modes indicate that predictions for the partial decay width {Lambda}(D{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) and the ratio {Lambda}(D{sup +}{yields}{rho}{sup 0}{ell}{sup +}{nu})/{Lambda}(D{sup +}{yields}{bar K}*{sup 0}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) based on Sum Rules are too low. Using the same data used to extract {Lambda}(D{sup +}{yields}{rho}{sup 0}{mu}{sup +}{nu})/{Lambda}(D{sup +}{yields}{bar K}*{sup 0}{mu}{sup +}{nu}) we studied the feasibility of measuring the form factors for the D{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{mu}{sup +}{nu} decay. We found that the need to further reduce the combinatorial and muon misidentification backgrounds left us with a much smaller sample of 52 {+-} 12 D{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{mu}{sup +}{mu} events; not enough to make a statistically significa

  5. Rare Hadronic B Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bevan, A.J.

    2006-06-07

    Rare hadronic B-meson decays allow us to study CP violation. The class of B-decays final states containing two vector mesons provides a rich set of angular correlation observables to study. This article reviews some of the recent experimental results from the BABAR and Belle collaborations.

  6. Observation of ?c1 Decays into Vector Meson Pairs ??, ?? and, ??

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; An, L.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini, R.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Berger, N.; et al

    2011-08-22

    Using (106±4)×10? ?(3686) events accumulated with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e?e? collider, we present the first measurement of decays of ?c1 to vector meson pairs ??, ??, and ??. The branching fractions are measured to be (4.4±0.3±0.5)×10??, (6.0±0.3±0.7)×10??, and (2.2±0.6±0.2)×10??, for ?c1 ???, ??, and ??, respectively, which indicates that the hadron helicity selection rule is significantly violated in ?cJ decays. In addition, the measurement of ?cJ??? provides the first indication of the rate of doubly OZI-suppressed ?cJ decay. Finally, we present improved measurements for the branching fractions of ?c0 and ?c2 to vector meson pairs.

  7. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson decaying to two W bosons at CMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Si, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, we search for the production of the Standard Model Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider, through its decay mode to two W bosons, which each in turn decay into a charged lepton and a neutrino. The Higgs ...

  8. CDF note 10978 Search for Rare Z Decays into Two Reconstructed Photons at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigg, Chris

    as an isolated photon, with only a slightly smaller central photon identification efficiency. With such low not measure a limit on the 0 0 decay mode. In Z decays involving a 0 , the neutral pion is isolated (not is challenging. However, with the abundance of Z bosons produced in high-energy hadron colliders

  9. Search for a neutral Higgs boson in B-meson decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1989-08-01

    Using the CLEO detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring we have searched for neutral-Higgs-boson production in B decay, both through the exclusive modes B?H(0)K and B?H(0)K? using the decay of the H(0) into a pair of muons, pions, or kaons...

  10. ß-delayed ?-proton decay in ??Zn: Analysis of the charged-particle spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orrigo, S. E.A.; Rubio, B.; Fujita, Y.; Blank, B.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ascher, P.; Cáceres, L.; Cakirli, R. B.; Fujita, H.; Ganio?lu, E.; Gerbaux, M.; Kozer, H. C.; Kucuk, L.; Kurtukian-Nieto, T.; Popescu, L.; Rogers, A. M.; Susoy, G.; Stodel, C.; Suzuki, T.; Tamii, A.; Thomas, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    A study of the ? decay of the proton-rich Tz = –2 nucleus ??Zn has been reported in a recent publication. A rare and exotic decay mode, ?-de-layed ?-proton decay, has been observed there for the first time in the fp shell. Here, we expand on some of the details of the data analysis, focusing on the charged particle spectrum.

  11. Microfluidic Devices for Blood Fractionation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, Han Wei

    Blood, a complex biological fluid, comprises 45% cellular components suspended in protein rich plasma. These different hematologic components perform distinct functions in vivo and thus the ability to efficiently fractionate ...

  12. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Schulz

    2004-11-05

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies could provide an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. This analysis, however, does not take credit for the additional barrier and establishes only the total release fractions for bare unconfined intact commercial SNF assemblies, which may be conservatively applied to confined intact commercial I SNF assemblies.

  13. DS+ DECAYS TO ETA-PI+ AND ETA'PI+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.; Ro, S.

    1992-03-01

    Using the CLEO II detector, we have accurately measured D(s) decay branching ratios relative to the phi-pi+ mode for the eta-pi+ and eta'pi+ states, for which there are conflicting claims; our results are 0.54 +/- 0.09 +/- 0.06 and 1.20 +/- 0...

  14. Modulated curvaton decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Assadullahi, Hooshyar; Wands, David [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Firouzjahi, Hassan [School of Astronomy, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P. O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein, E-mail: hooshyar.assadullahi@port.ac.uk, E-mail: firouz@mail.ipm.ir, E-mail: mh.namjoo@mail.ipm.ir, E-mail: david.wands@port.ac.uk [Yukawa Institute for theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2013-03-01

    We study primordial density perturbations generated by the late decay of a curvaton field whose decay rate may be modulated by the local value of another isocurvature field, analogous to models of modulated reheating at the end of inflation. We calculate the primordial density perturbation and its local-type non-Gaussianity using the sudden-decay approximation for the curvaton field, recovering standard curvaton and modulated reheating results as limiting cases. We verify the Suyama-Yamaguchi inequality between bispectrum and trispectrum parameters for the primordial density field generated by multiple field fluctuations, and find conditions for the bound to be saturated.

  15. Physics and Outlook for Rare, All-neutral Eta Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mack, David J.

    2014-06-01

    The $\\eta$ meson provides a laboratory to study isospin violation and search for new flavor-conserving sources of C and CP violation with a sensitivity approaching $10^{-6}$ of the isospin-conserving strong amplitude. Some of the most interesting rare $\\eta$ decays are the neutral modes, yet the effective loss of photons from the relatively common decay $\\eta \\rightarrow 3\\pi^0 \\rightarrow 6\\gamma$ (33$\\%$) has largely limited the sensitivity for decays producing 3-5$\\gamma$'s. Particularly important relevant branches include the highly suppressed $\\eta \\rightarrow \\pi^0 2\\gamma \\rightarrow 4\\gamma$, which provides a rare window on testing models of $O(p^6)$ contributions in ChPTh, and $\\eta \\rightarrow 3\\gamma$ and $\\eta \\rightarrow 2\\pi^0 \\gamma \\rightarrow 5\\gamma$ which provide direct constraints on C violation in flavor-conserving processes. The substitution of lead tungstate in the forward calorimeter of the GluEx setup in Jefferson Lab's new Hall D would allow dramatically improved measurements. The main niche of this facility, which we call the JLab Eta Factory (JEF), would be $\\eta$ decay neutral modes. However, this could likely be expanded to rare $\\eta'(958)$ decays for low energy QCD studies as well as $\\eta$ decays involving muons for new physics searches.

  16. Search for the rare decay Bs0??+?-

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; et al

    2010-10-01

    We present the results of a search for the flavor changing neutral current decay B0susing 6.1 fb-1 of pp? collisions at collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The observed number of B0scandidates is consistent with background expectations. The resulting upper limit on the branching fraction is B (B0s ? ????) -8 at the 95% C.L. This limit is a factor of 2.4 better than that of the previous D0 analysis and the best limit to date.

  17. Search for ? mesons in ? lepton decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1997-02-01

    ¯m and Em the momentum and energy of the event. All charged tracks are assumed to be pions. @19# R.A. Fisher, Ann. Eugen. 7, 179 ~1936!. @20# B. Flury and H. Ridewyl, Multivariate Statistics, A Practical Approach ~New York, Chapman and Hall, 1988!. @21# S... of information on a possible four-quark state @C~1480!# with a mass 1480 MeV/c2 and JPC5122 @3,4# which decays into fp . Building on the work of Ref. @5#, Eidelman and Ivanchenko @6# estimate the branching fraction of t2!fp2n t assuming that the C~1480...

  18. Search for the Rare Decays B^+ -> mu^+ mu^- K^+, B^0 -> mu^+ mu^- K^*0(892), and B^0_s -> mu^+ mu^- phi at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab

    2008-04-01

    The authors search for b {yields} s{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} transitions in B meson (B{sup +}, B{sup 0}, or B{sub s}{sup 0}) decays with 924 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. They find excesses with significances of 4.5, 2.9, and 2.4 standard deviations in the B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K{sup +}, B{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K*(892){sup 0}, and B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{phi} decay modes, respectively. Using B {yields} J/{psi}h (h - K{sup +}, K*(892){sup 0}, {phi}) decays as normalization channels, they report branching fractions for the previously observed B{sup +} and B{sup 0} decays as normalization channels, they report branching fractions for the previously observed B{sup +} and B{sup 0} decays, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K{sup +}) = (0.59 {+-} 0.15 {+-} 0.04) x 10{sup -6}, and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K*(892){sup 0}) = (0.81 {+-} 0.30 {+-} 0.10) x 10{sup -6}, where the first uncertainty is statistical, and the second is systematic. These measurements are consistent with the world average results, and are competitive with the best available measurements. They set an upper limit on the relative branching fraction {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{phi})/{Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{phi}) < 2.6(2.3) x 10{sup -3} at the 95(90)% confidence level, which is the most stringent to date.

  19. Improved Limits on $B^{0}$ Decays to Invisible $(+gamma)$ Final States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, David Nathan; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; /British Columbia U.; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Blinov, V.E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U.; /more authors.; ,

    2013-11-01

    We establish improved upper limits on branching fractions for B{sup 0} decays to final states where the decay products are purely invisible (i.e., no observable final state particles) and for final states where the only visible product is a photon. Within the Standard Model, these decays have branching fractions that are below the current experimental sensitivity, but various models of physics beyond the Standard Model predict significant contributions for these channels. Using 471 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon} (4S) resonance by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, we establish upper limits at the 90% confidence level of 2.4 x 10{sup -5} for the branching fraction of B{sup 0} {yields} invisible and 1.7 x 10{sup -5} for the branching fraction of B{sup 0} {yields} invisible + {gamma}.

  20. Study of B??Xul?? decays in BB? events tagged by a fully reconstructed B-meson decay and determination of |Vub|

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; et al

    2012-08-07

    We report measurements of partial branching fractions for inclusive charmless semileptonic B decays B¯¯¯?Xul?¯ and the determination of the Cabibbo–Kobayashi–Maskawa (CKM) matrix element |Vub|. The analysis is based on a sample of 467×10? ?(4S)?BB¯¯¯ decays recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e?e? storage rings. We select events in which the decay of one of the B mesons is fully reconstructed and an electron or a muon signals the semileptonic decay of the other B meson. We measure partial branching fractions ?B in several restricted regions of phase space and determine the CKM element |Vub| based on different QCDmore »predictions. For decays with a charged lepton momentum p*l>1.0 GeV in the B meson rest frame, we obtain ?B=(1.80±0.13stat±0.15sys±0.02theo)×10?³ from a fit to the two-dimensional MX-q² distribution. Here, MX refers to the invariant mass of the final state hadron X and q² is the invariant mass squared of the charged lepton and neutrino. From this measurement we extract |Vub|=(4.33±0.24exp?±0.15theo)×10?³ as the arithmetic average of four results obtained from four different QCD predictions of the partial rate. We separately determine partial branching fractions for B¯¯¯0 and B? decays and derive a limit on the isospin breaking in B¯¯¯?Xul?¯ decays.« less

  1. Neutrinoless double beta decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Zuber

    2012-01-23

    The physics potential of neutrinoless double beta decay is discussed. Furthermore, experimental considerations are presented as well as the current status of experiments. Finally an outlook towards the future, work on nuclear matrix elements and alternative processes is given.

  2. Double Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven R. Elliott; Petr Vogel

    2002-02-27

    The motivation, present status, and future plans of the search for the neutrinoless double beta decay are reviewed. It is argued that, motivated by the recent observations of neutrino oscillations, there is a reasonable hope that neutrinoless double beta decay corresponding to the neutrino mass scale suggested by oscillations, of about 50 meV, actually exists. The challenges to achieve the sensitivity corresponding to this mass scale, and plans to overcome them, are described.

  3. Measurement of the absolute branching fraction for D(0) -> K- pi+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Ball, S.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

    1993-11-01

    Using 1.79 fb-1 of data recorded by the CLEO II detector we have measured the absolute branching fraction for D0 --> K-pi+. The angular correlation between the pi+ emitted in the decay D*+ --> D0pi+, and the jet direction in e+e- --> ccBAR events...

  4. Mixed-mode cooling.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brager, Gail

    2006-01-01

    ASHRAE’s permission. Mixed-Mode Cooling Photo Credit: Paulnatural ventilation for cooling. Buildings typically had1950s of large-scale mechanical cooling, along with other

  5. Cluster Compatibility Mode

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the needed runtime environment. Users can also compile codes for CCM on Hopper. All compilers available to Hopper's native programming environment (Extreme Scalability Mode, ESM...

  6. Search for a heavy vector boson decaying to two gluons in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    We present a search for a new heavy vector boson Z[superscript ?] that decays to gluons. Decays to on-shell gluons are suppressed, leading to a dominant decay mode of Z[superscript ?]?g[superscript *]g. We study the case ...

  7. DS+ DECAYS TO ETA-RHO+, ETA'RHO+, AND PHI-RHO+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.; Ro, S.

    1992-03-01

    We have observed the previously unseen eta-rho+ and eta'rho+ decay modes of the D(s)+, and measured branching ratios relative to the phi-pi+ mode of 2.86 +/- 0.38(-0.38)+0.36 and 3.44 +/-0.62(-0.46)+0.44, respectively. In addition, the relative...

  8. STUDY OF HIGGS BOSON PRODUCTION IN BOSONIC DECAY CHANNELS AT THE LHC (INCLUDING OFF-SHELL PRODUCTION)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oda, Susumu; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies of the Higgs boson production in bosonic decay channels by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC are described in this paper. The Higgs boson was the last undiscovered particle in the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. The bosonic decay channels include $\\gamma\\gamma$, $Z\\gamma$, $ZZ^*$, $WW^*$. In the $\\gamma\\gamma$, $Z\\gamma$ and $ZZ^*$ decay channels, the whole event topology can be reconstructed. The $Z\\gamma$ decay channel can be sensitive to exotic Higgs decay beyond the SM. Because of its large branching fraction, the $WW^*$ decay channel is adequate to study bosonic production. Off-shell production is considered to be sensitive to the total Higgs decay width. The bosonic decay channels are a key to probe the SM and beyond.

  9. Experimental efforts in search of 76Ge Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Somnath Choudhury

    2008-03-12

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is one of the most sensitive approaches in non-accelerator particle physics to take us into a regime of physics beyond the standard model. This article is a brief review of the experiments in search of neutrinoless double beta decay from 76Ge. Following a brief introduction of the process of double beta decay from 76Ge, the results of the very first experiments IGEX and Heidelberg-Moscow which give indications of the existence of possible neutrinoless double beta decay mode has been reviewed. Then ongoing efforts to substantiate the early findings are presented and the Majorana experiment as a future experimental approach which will allow a very detailed study of the neutrinoless decay mode is discussed.

  10. Symmetry fractionalization and twist defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Tarantino; Netanel Lindner; Lukasz Fidkowski

    2015-06-22

    Topological order in two dimensions can be described in terms of deconfined quasiparticle excitations - anyons - and their braiding statistics. However, it has recently been realized that this data does not completely describe the situation in the presence of an unbroken global symmetry. In this case, there can be multiple distinct quantum phases with the same anyons and statistics, but with different patterns of symmetry fractionalization - termed symmetry enriched topological (SET) order. When the global symmetry group $G$, which we take to be discrete, does not change topological superselection sectors - i.e. does not change one type of anyon into a different type of anyon - one can imagine a local version of the action of $G$ around each anyon. This leads to projective representations and a group cohomology description of symmetry fractionalization, with $H^2(G,{\\cal A})$ being the relevant group. In this paper, we treat the general case of a symmetry group $G$ possibly permuting anyon types. We show that despite the lack of a local action of $G$, one can still make sense of a so-called twisted group cohomology description of symmetry fractionalization, and show how this data is encoded in the associativity of fusion rules of the extrinsic `twist' defects of the symmetry. Furthermore, building on work of Hermele, we construct a wide class of exactly solved models which exhibit this twisted symmetry fractionalization, and connect them to our formal framework.

  11. The Bootstrap Fraction in TFTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoang, G. T.

    1997-04-15

    The TRANSP plasma analysis code is used to calculate the bootstrap current generated during neutral-beam injection and ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating for a wide variety of TFTR discharges. An empirical scaling relation is given for the bootstrap current fraction using the ratio of the peakedness of the thermal pressure and the total current density.

  12. Gauge Invariance and Fractional Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. R. P. Lima; R. R. Landim

    2006-10-04

    We present a new $(2+1)$-dimensional field theory showing exotic statistics and fractional spin. This theory is achieved through a redefinition of the gauge field $A_{\\mu}$. New properties are found. Another way to implement the field redefinition is used with the same results obtained.

  13. Observation of $B^0_s \\to J/\\psi K^{*0}(892)$ and $B^0_s \\to J/\\psi K^0_S$ Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-02-01

    The authors report the first observation of two Cabibbo-suppressed decay modes of the B{sub s}{sup 0} meson. Using a sample of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV corresponding to 5.9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron, they search for new B{sub s}{sup 0} decay modes in a sample of events containing J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decays. They reconstruct a B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi} K*(892){sup 0} signal with K*(892){sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, observing a yield of 151 {+-} 25 events with a statistical significance of 8.0{sigma}. They also reconstruct a B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi} K{sub S}{sup 0} signal with K{sub S}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, observing a yield of 64 {+-} 14 events with a statistical significance of 7.2{sigma}. From these yields, they extract the branching ratios {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi} K*(892){sup 0}) = (8.3 {+-} 3.8) x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi} K{sup 0}) = (3.5 {+-} 0.8) x 10{sup -5}, where statistical, systematic, and fragmentation-fraction uncertainties are included in the combined uncertainty.

  14. Delayed Nickel Decay in Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. C. McLaughlin; R. A. M. J. Wijers

    2002-05-19

    Recently observed emission lines in the X-ray afterglow of gamma ray bursts suggest that iron group elements are either produced in the gamma ray burst, or are present nearby. If this material is the product of a thermonuclear burn, then such material would be expected to be rich in Nickel-56. If the nickel remains partially ionized, this prevents the electron capture reaction normally associated with the decay of Nickel-56, dramatically increasing the decay timescale. Here we examine the consequences of rapid ejection of a fraction of a solar mass of iron group material from the center of a collapsar/hypernova. The exact rate of decay then depends on the details of the ionization and therefore the ejection process. Future observations of iron, nickel and cobalt lines can be used to diagnose the origin of these elements and to better understand the astrophysical site of gamma ray bursts. In this model, the X-ray lines of these iron-group elements could be detected in suspected hypernovae that did not produce an observable gamma ray burst due to beaming.

  15. Excited Upsilon Radiative Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randy Lewis; R. M. Woloshyn

    2011-11-13

    Bottomonium S-wave states were studied using lattice NRQCD. Masses of ground and excited states were calculated using multiexponential fitting to a set of correlation functions constructed using both local and wavefunction-smeared operators. Three-point functions for M1 transitions between vector and pseudoscalar states were computed. Robust signals for transitions involving the first two excited states were obtained. The qualitative features of the transition matrix elements are in agreement with expectations. The calculated values of matrix elements for Y(2S) and Y(3S) decay are considerably larger than values inferred from measured decay widths.

  16. EFFICIENT SPECTRAL-GALERKIN METHODS FOR FRACTIONAL ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-11-17

    EFFICIENT SPECTRAL-GALERKIN METHODS FOR FRACTIONAL PARTIAL. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS WITH VARIABLE COEFFICIENTS. ZHIPING MAO†

  17. Fractional conservation laws in optimal control theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gastao S. F. Frederico; Delfim F. M. Torres

    2007-11-05

    Using the recent formulation of Noether's theorem for the problems of the calculus of variations with fractional derivatives, the Lagrange multiplier technique, and the fractional Euler-Lagrange equations, we prove a Noether-like theorem to the more general context of the fractional optimal control. As a corollary, it follows that in the fractional case the autonomous Hamiltonian does not define anymore a conservation law. Instead, it is proved that the fractional conservation law adds to the Hamiltonian a new term which depends on the fractional-order of differentiation, the generalized momentum, and the fractional derivative of the state variable.

  18. Search for Invisible Decays of a Higgs Boson Produced in Association with a Z Boson in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for evidence of invisible-particle decay modes of a Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson at the Large Hadron Collider is presented. No deviation from the standard model expectation is observed in ...

  19. Measurements of CP violation in the three-body phase space of charmless B[superscript ±] decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaij, R.

    The charmless three-body decay modes B[superscript ±] ? K[superscript ±]?[superscript +]?[superscript -], B[superscript ±] ? K[superscript ±]K[superscript +]K[superscript -], B[superscript ±] ? ?[superscript ±]K[superscript ...

  20. Study of the decay B?[superscript 0]??[+ over c]p??[superscript +]?[superscript -] and its intermediate states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowan, Ray Franklin

    We study the decay B?[superscript 0]??[+ over c]p??[superscript +]?[superscript -], reconstructing the ?[+ over c] baryon in the pK[superscript -]?[superscript +] mode, using a data sample of 467×10[superscript 6] BB? pairs ...

  1. WHY SEARCH FOR DOUBLE BETA DECAY?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kayser, B.

    2010-01-01

    the search for neutrinoless double beta decay may prove verySearching for neutrinoless double beta decay is the onlysensitivity of neutrinoless double beta decay. The potential

  2. The electron geodesic acoustic mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakrabarti, N. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Calcutta 700 064 (India); Guzdar, P. N. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Kaw, P. K. [Institute for Plasma Research Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2012-09-15

    In this report, a novel new mode, named the electron geodesic acoustic mode, is presented. This mode can occur in toroidal plasmas like the conventional geodesic acoustic mode (GAM). The frequency of this new mode is much larger than that of the conventional GAM by a factor equal to the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio.

  3. Double-{beta} decay Q value of {sup 150}Nd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolhinen, V. S.; Eronen, T.; Gorelov, D.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Moore, I. D.; Rissanen, J.; Saastamoinen, A.; Suhonen, J.; Aeystoe, J. [Department of Physics, P. O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2010-08-15

    The double-{beta} decay Q value of {sup 150}Nd was determined by using the JYFLTRAP Penning trap mass spectrometer. The measured mass difference between {sup 150}Nd and {sup 150}Sm is 3371.38(20) keV. This new value deviates by 3.7 keV from the previously adopted value of 3367.7(22) keV and is a factor of 10 more precise. Accurate knowledge of this Q value is important because {sup 150}Nd is a primary candidate to be used in the search for neutrinoless double-{beta} decay modes in several experiments.

  4. Rare Decays And Exotic States With BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, S.H.; /McGill U.

    2006-08-28

    Results from the BABAR experiment are presented for searches for several rare FCNC B and D meson decays, including the modes B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and D{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, B {yields} ({rho},{omega}){gamma} and B{sup +} {yields} (K,{pi}){sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}. Limits on lepton flavor violation in neutrino-less {tau} decays are also discussed. Finally, results of BABAR searches for the strange pentaquark states {Theta}{sup +}(1540), {Xi}{sup --}(1860) and {Xi}{sup 0}(1860) are summarized.

  5. Entropy mode loops and cosmological correlations during perturbative reheating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaya, Ali; Kutluk, Emine Seyma E-mail: seymakutluk@gmail.com

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that during preheating the entropy modes circulating in the loops, which correspond to the inflaton decay products, meaningfully modify the cosmological correlation functions at superhorizon scales. In this paper, we determine the significance of the same effect when reheating occurs in the perturbative regime. In a typical two scalar field model, the magnitude of the loop corrections are shown to depend on several parameters like the background inflaton amplitude in the beginning of reheating, the inflaton decay rate and the inflaton mass. Although the loop contributions turn out to be small as compared to the preheating case, they still come out larger than the loop effects during inflation.

  6. Mode coupling of Schwarzschild perturbations: Ringdown frequencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pazos, Enrique [Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, 837 State Street, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0430 (United States); Departamento de Matematica, Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala, Edificio T4, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciudad Universitaria z. 12 (Guatemala); Brizuela, David [Theoretisch-Physikalisches Institut, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Martin-Garcia, Jose M. [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 98bis Boulevard Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Laboratoire Univers et Theories, CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92190 Meudon (France); Tiglio, Manuel [Department of Physics, Center for Fundamental Physics, Center for Scientific Computation and Mathematical Modeling, Joint Space Sciences Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Within linearized perturbation theory, black holes decay to their final stationary state through the well-known spectrum of quasinormal modes. Here we numerically study whether nonlinearities change this picture. For that purpose we study the ringdown frequencies of gauge-invariant second-order gravitational perturbations induced by self-coupling of linearized perturbations of Schwarzschild black holes. We do so through high-accuracy simulations in the time domain of first and second-order Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli type equations, for a variety of initial data sets. We consider first-order even-parity (l=2, m={+-}2) perturbations and odd-parity (l=2, m=0) ones, and all the multipoles that they generate through self-coupling. For all of them and all the initial data sets considered we find that--in contrast to previous predictions in the literature--the numerical decay frequencies of second-order perturbations are the same ones of linearized theory, and we explain the observed behavior. This would indicate, in particular, that when modeling or searching for ringdown gravitational waves, appropriately including the standard quasinormal modes already takes into account nonlinear effects.

  7. Attention decay in science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parolo, Pietro Della Briotta; Ghosh, Rumi; Huberman, Bernardo A; Kaski, Kimmo; Fortunato, Santo

    2015-01-01

    The exponential growth in the number of scientific papers makes it increasingly difficult for researchers to keep track of all the publications relevant to their work. Consequently, the attention that can be devoted to individual papers, measured by their citation counts, is bound to decay rapidly. In this work we make a thorough study of the life-cycle of papers in different disciplines. Typically, the citation rate of a paper increases up to a few years after its publication, reaches a peak and then decreases rapidly. This decay can be described by an exponential or a power law behavior, as in ultradiffusive processes, with exponential fitting better than power law for the majority of cases. The decay is also becoming faster over the years, signaling that nowadays papers are forgotten more quickly. However, when time is counted in terms of the number of published papers, the rate of decay of citations is fairly independent of the period considered. This indicates that the attention of scholars depends on th...

  8. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinrich Päs; Werner Rodejohann

    2015-07-01

    We review the potential to probe new physics with neutrinoless double beta decay $(A,Z) \\to (A,Z+2) + 2 e^-$. Both the standard long-range light neutrino mechanism as well as short-range mechanisms mediated by heavy particles are discussed. We also stress aspects of the connection to lepton number violation at colliders and the implications for baryogenesis.

  9. Neutrinoless double beta decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petr Vogel

    2006-11-17

    The status of the search for neutrinoless double beta decay is reviewed. The effort to reach the sensitivity needed to cover the effective Majorana neutrino mass corresponding to the degenerate and inverted mass hierarchy is described. Various issues concerning the theory (and phenomenology) of the relation between the $0\

  10. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Päs, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    We review the potential to probe new physics with neutrinoless double beta decay $(A,Z) \\to (A,Z+2) + 2 e^-$. Both the standard long-range light neutrino mechanism as well as short-range mechanisms mediated by heavy particles are discussed. We also stress aspects of the connection to lepton number violation at colliders and the implications for baryogenesis.

  11. Vacuum Energy Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrique Álvarez; Roberto Vidal

    2011-11-09

    The problem of the vacuum energy decay is studied through the analysis of the vacuum survival amplitude ${\\mathcal A}(z, z')$. Transition amplitudes are computed for finite time-span, $Z\\equiv z^\\prime-z$, and their {\\em late time} behavior is discussed up to first order in the coupling constant, $\\l$.

  12. Fractional Authorship in Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritychenko, B

    2015-01-01

    Large, multi-institutional groups or collaborations of scientists are engaged in nuclear physics research projects, and the number of research facilities is dwindling. These collaborations have their own authorship rules, and they produce a large number of highly-cited papers. Multiple authorship of nuclear physics publications creates a problem with the assessment of an individual author's productivity relative to his/her colleagues and renders ineffective a performance metrics solely based on annual publication and citation counts. Many institutions are increasingly relying on the total number of first-author papers; however, this approach becomes counterproductive for large research collaborations with an alphabetical order of authors. A concept of fractional authorship (the claiming of credit for authorship by more than one individual) helps to clarify this issue by providing a more complete picture of research activities. In the present work, nuclear physics fractional and total authorships have been inv...

  13. Modes of perceiving and imagining 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nudds, Matthew

    2000-01-01

    We enjoy modes of sensory imagining corresponding to our five modes of perception - seeing, touching, hearing, smelling and tasting. An account of what constitutes these different modes of perseption needs also to explain ...

  14. Phonon-roton modes of liquid 4He beyond the roton in MCM-41

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azuah, Richard T NIST Center for Neutron Research , Gaithersburg, MD; Omar Diallo, Souleymane ORNL; Adams, Mark A. ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Kirichek, Oleg ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Glyde, Henry R University of Delaware

    2013-01-01

    We present neutron scattering measurements of the phonon-roton (P-R) mode of superfluid 4He confined in 47 A MCM-41 at T = 0.5 K at wave vectors, Q, beyond the roton wave vector (QR = 1.92 A-1). Measurements beyond the roton require access to high wave vectors (up to Q = 4 A-1) with excellent energy resolution and high statistical precision. The present results show for the first time that at T = 0.5 K the P-R mode in MCM-41 extends out to wave-vector Q 3.6 A-1 with the same energy and zero width (within precision) as observed in bulk superfluid 4He. Layer modes in the roton region are also observed. Specifically, the P-R mode energy, !Q, increases with Q for Q > QR and reaches a plateau at a maximum energy !Q = 2 where is the roton energy, = 0.74 0.01 meV in MCM-41. This upper limit means the P-R mode decays to two rotons when its energy exceeds 2 . It also means that the P-R mode does not decay to two layers modes. If the P-R could decay to two layer modes, !Q would plateau at a lower energy, !Q = 2 L where L = 0.60 meV is the energy of the roton like minimum of the layer mode. The observation of the P-R mode with energy up to 2 shows that the P-R mode and the layer modes are independent modes with apparently little interaction between them.

  15. First observation of the isospin violating decay J/??????+c.c.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Berger, N.; et al

    2012-08-15

    Using a sample of (225.2±2.8)×10? J/? events collected with the BESIII detector, we present results of a study of J/?????¯¯¯ and report the first observation of the isospin violating decay J/????¯¯¯?+c.c., in which ?¯¯¯? decays to ??¯¯¯. The measured branching fractions are B(J/???¯¯¯??)=(1.46±0.11±0.12)×10?? and B(J/????¯¯¯?)=(1.37±0.12±0.11)×10??. We search for ?(1520)??? decay, and find no evident signal, and an upper limit for the product branching fraction B(J/????¯¯¯(1520)+c.c.)×B(?(1520)???)c???¯¯¯ in J/????c, ?c???¯¯¯ and measure the branching fraction B(?c???¯¯¯)=(1.16±0.12(stat)±0.19(syst)±0.28(PDG))×10?³.

  16. An Enquiry Concerning Charmless Semileptonic Decays of Bottom Mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaisanguanthum, Kris Somboon; /Harvard U. /SLAC

    2008-09-19

    The branching fractions for the decays B {yields} P{ell}{nu}{sub {ell}}, where P are the pseudoscalar charmless mesons {pi}{sup {+-}}, {pi}{sup 0}, {eta} and {eta}{prime} and {ell} is an electron or muon, are measured with B{sup 0} and B{sup {+-}} mesons found in the recoil of a second B meson decaying as B {yields} D{ell}{nu}{sub {ell}} or B {yields} D*{ell}{nu}{sub {ell}}. The measurements are based on a data set of 348 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV recorded with the BABAR detector. Assuming isospin symmetry, measured pionic branching fractions are combined into {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}) = (1.54 {+-} 0.17{sub (stat)} {+-} 0.09{sub (syst)}) x 10{sup -4}. First evidence of the B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}} decay is seen; its branching fraction is measured to be {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}) = (0.64 {+-} 0.20{sub (stat)} {+-} 0.03{sub (syst)}) x 10{sup -4}. It is determined that {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{prime}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}) < 0.47 x 10{sup -4} to 90% confidence. Partial branching fractions for the pionic decays in ranges of the momentum transfer and various published calculations of the B {yields} {pi} hadronic form factor are used to obtain values of the magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element V{sub ub} between 3.61 and 4.07 x 10{sup -3}.

  17. Search for proton decay via p??K+ using 260 kiloton·year data of Super-Kamiokande

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abe, K.; Hayato, Y.; Iyogi, K.; Kameda, J.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nakayama, S.; Wendell, R.?A.; Sekiya, H.; et al

    2014-10-14

    We have searched for proton decay via p??K+ using Super-Kamiokande data from April 1996 to February 2013, 260 kiloton•year exposure in total. No evidence for this proton decay mode is found. A lower limit of the proton lifetime is set to ?/B(p??K+)>5.9×1033 years at 90% confidence level.

  18. Investigation of dominant spin wave modes by domain walls collision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramu, M.; Purnama, I.; Goolaup, S.; Chandra Sekhar, M.; Lew, W. S.

    2014-06-28

    Spin wave emission due to field-driven domain wall (DW) collision has been investigated numerically and analytically in permalloy nanowires. The spin wave modes generated are diagonally symmetric with respect to the collision point. The non-propagating mode has the highest amplitude along the middle of the width. The frequency of this mode is strongly correlated to the nanowire geometrical dimensions and is independent of the strength of applied field within the range of 0.1?mT to 1?mT. For nanowire with film thickness below 5?nm, a second spin wave harmonic mode is observed. The decay coefficient of the spin wave power suggests that the DWs in a memory device should be at least 300?nm apart for them to be free of interference from the spin waves.

  19. Constraints on Light Dark Matter from Single-Photon Decays of Heavy Quarkonium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Nicolas; Stengel, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    We investigate constraints on the interactions of light dark matter with Standard Model quarks in a framework with effective contact operators mediating the decay of heavy flavor bound state quarkonium to dark matter and a photon. When considered in combination with decays to purely invisible final states, constraints from heavy quarkonium decays at high intensity electron-positron colliders can complement missing energy searches at high energy colliders and provide sensitivity to dark matter masses difficult to probe at direct and indirect detection experiments. We calculate the approximate limits on the branching fraction for $\\Upsilon (1 S)$ decays to dark matter and a photon. Given the approximate limits on the branching fractions for all dimension 6 or lower contact operators, we present the corresponding limits on the interaction strength for each operator and the inferred limits on dark matter-nucleon scattering. Complementary constraints on dark matter annihilation from gamma-ray searches from dwarf s...

  20. Amplitude analyses of the decays ?c1?????? and ?c1??'????

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adams, G. S.; Napolitano, J.; Ecklund, K. M.; Insler, J.; Muramatsu, H.; Park, C. S.; Pearson, L. J.; Thorndike, E. H.; Ricciardi, S.; Thomas, C.; et al

    2011-12-01

    Using a data sample of 2.59×10? ?(2S) decays obtained with the CLEO-c detector, we perform amplitude analyses of the complementary decay chains ?(2S)???c1; ?c1?????? and ?(2S)???c1; ?c1??'????. We find evidence for an exotic P-wave ?'? amplitude, which, if interpreted as a resonance, would have parameters consistent with the ??(1600) state reported in other production mechanisms. We also make the first observation of the decay a?(980)??'? and measure the ratio of branching fractions B(a?(980)??'?)/B(a?(980)???)=0.064±0.014±0.014. The ?? spectrum produced with a recoiling ? is compared to that with ?' recoil.

  1. Study of J?decaying into ?p \\bar p

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BES Collaboration

    2007-12-03

    The decay $J/\\psi \\to \\omega p \\bar p$ is studied using a $5.8 \\times 10^7$ $J/\\psi$ event sample accumulated with the BES II detector at the Beijing electron-positron collider. The decay branching fraction is measured to be $B(J/\\psi \\to \\omega p \\bar p)=(9.8\\pm 0.3\\pm 1.4)\\times 10^{-4}$. No significant enhancement near the $p\\bar p$ mass threshold is observed, and an upper limit of $B(J/\\psi \\to \\omega X(1860))B(X(1860)\\to p\\bar p)$$ $$p\\bar p$ mass spectrum in $J/\\psi \\to \\gamma p \\bar p$ decays.

  2. Inhomogeneous big bang nucleosynthesis with late-decaying massive particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Lopez-Suarez; R. Canal

    1998-04-22

    We investigate the possibility of accounting for the currently inferred primordial abundances of D, 3He, 4He, and 7Li by big bang nucleosynthesis in the presence of baryon density inhomogeneities plus the effects of late-decaying massive particles (X), and we explore the allowed range of baryonic fraction of the closure density Omega_b in such context. We find that, depending on the parameters of this composite model (characteristic size and density contrast of the inhomogeneities; mass-density, lifetime, and effective baryon number in the decay of the X-particles), values as high as \\Omega_{b}h_{50}^{2}\\simeq 0.25-0.35 could be compatible with the primordial abundances of the light nuclides. We include diffusion of neutrons and protons at all stages, and we consider the contribution of the X particles to the energy density, the entropy production by their decay, the possibility that the X-products could photodissociate the light nuclei produced during the previous stages of nucleosynthesis, and also the possibility that the decay products of the X-particles would include a substantial fraction of hadrons. Specific predictions for the primordial abundance of Be are made.

  3. Observation of the Decay B- --> Ds(*) K- l- nubar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U.; /more authors..

    2011-08-12

    We report the observation of the decay B{sup -} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+} K{sup -}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} based on 342 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings at SLAC. A simultaneous fit to three D{sub s}{sup +} decay chains is performed to extract the signal yield from measurements of the squared missing mass in the B meson decay. We observe the decay B{sup -} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+} K{sup -}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} with a significance greater than five standard deviations (including systematic uncertainties) and measure its branching fraction to be {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+} K{sup -}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) = [6.13{sub -1.03}{sup +1.04}(stat.) {+-} 0.43(syst.) {+-} 0.51({Beta}(D{sub s}))] x 10{sup -4}, where the last error reflects the limited knowledge of the D{sub s} branching fractions.

  4. A Measurement of the B ---> Eta/C K Branching Fraction Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Frank; /Manchester U.

    2006-04-26

    The branching fraction is measured for the decay channels B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{sub c}K{sub S}{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{sub c}K{sup +} where {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{bar K}{pi}, using the BABAR detector. The {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decay channels are used, including non-resonant decays and possibly those through intermediate resonances.

  5. CLNS 98/1575 An Update on CLEO's Study of B Meson Decays 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    six to eight years, many general properties of B meson decay were measured at DORIS and CESR. In 1988 via the tree diagram. The listed branching fractions, for ex­ ample Br(B ! Xlš) = (10:4 \\Sigma 0 over electron, muon and tau semileptonic decay is 2:3 \\Theta (10:4 \\Sigma 0:4) = (23:9 \\Sigma 0

  6. Fast Proton Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tianjun Li; Dimitri V. Nanopoulos; Joel W. Walker

    2010-09-10

    We consider proton decay in the testable flipped SU(5) X U(1)_X models with TeV-scale vector-like particles which can be realized in free fermionic string constructions and F-theory model building. We significantly improve upon the determination of light threshold effects from prior studies, and perform a fresh calculation of the second loop for the process p \\to e^+ \\pi^0 from the heavy gauge boson exchange. The cumulative result is comparatively fast proton decay, with a majority of the most plausible parameter space within reach of the future Hyper-Kamiokande and DUSEL experiments. Because the TeV-scale vector-like particles can be produced at the LHC, we predict a strong correlation between the most exciting particle physics experiments of the coming decade.

  7. Handbook on string decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberto Iengo; Jorge G. Russo

    2006-02-20

    We explain simple semi-classical rules to estimate the lifetime of any given highly-excited quantum state of the string spectrum in flat spacetime. We discuss both the decays by splitting into two massive states and by massless emission. As an application, we study a solution describing a rotating and pulsating ellipse which becomes folded at an instant of time -- the ``squashing ellipse''. This string interpolates between the folded string with maximum angular momentum and the pulsating circular string. We explicitly compute the quantum decay rate for the corresponding quantum state, and verify the basic rules that we propose. Finally, we give a more general (4-parameter) family of closed string solutions representing rotating and pulsating elliptical strings.

  8. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay in Heavy Deformed Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorge G. Hirsch; O. Castaños; P. O. Hess

    1994-07-12

    The zero neutrino mode of the double beta decay in heavy deformed nuclei is investigated in the framework of the pseudo SU(3) model, which has provided an accurate description of collective nuclear structure and predicted half-lives for the two neutrino mode in good agreement with experiments. In the case of $^{238}U$ the calculated zero neutrino half-life is at least three orders of magnitude greater than the two neutrino one, giving strong support of the identification of the radiochemically determined half-life as being the two neutrino double beta decay. For $^{150}Nd$ the zero neutrino matrix elements are of the order of magnitude of, but lesser than, those evaluated using the QRPA. This result confirms that different nuclear models produce similar zero neutrino matrix elements, contrary to the two neutrino case. Using these pseudo SU(3) results and the upper limit for the neutrino mass we estimate the $\\beta\\beta_{0\

  9. Double Beta Decay Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nanal, Vandana [Dept. of Nuclear and Atomic Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

    2011-11-23

    At present, neutrinoless double beta decay is perhaps the only experiment that can tell us whether the neutrino is a Dirac or a Majorana particle. Given the significance of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta}, there is a widespread interest for these rare event studies employing a variety of novel techniques. This paper describes the current status of DBD experiments. The Indian effort for an underground NDBD experiment at the upcoming INO laboratory is also presented.

  10. Decay of Hypernuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Parreño; C. Bennhold; A. Ramos

    1999-02-17

    We present a nonrelativistic transition potential for the weak strangeness-changing reaction $\\Lambda N \\to NN$. The potential is based on a one meson exchange model (OME), where, in addition to the long-ranged pion, the exchange of the pseudoscalar $K, \\eta$, as well as the vector $\\rho, \\omega, K^*$ mesons is considered. Results obtained for different hypernuclear decay observables are compared to the available experimental data.

  11. Fractional Inversion in Krylov Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Bunk

    1998-05-28

    The fractional inverse $M^{-\\gamma}$ (real $\\gamma >0$) of a matrix $M$ is expanded in a series of Gegenbauer polynomials. If the spectrum of $M$ is confined to an ellipse not including the origin, convergence is exponential, with the same rate as for Chebyshev inversion. The approximants can be improved recursively and lead to an iterative solver for $M^\\gamma x = b$ in Krylov space. In case of $\\gamma = 1/2$, the expansion is in terms of Legendre polynomials, and rigorous bounds for the truncation error are derived.

  12. Radioactive decay data tables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    The estimation of radiation dose to man from either external or internal exposure to radionuclides requires a knowledge of the energies and intensities of the atomic and nuclear radiations emitted during the radioactive decay process. The availability of evaluated decay data for the large number of radionuclides of interest is thus of fundamental importance for radiation dosimetry. This handbook contains a compilation of decay data for approximately 500 radionuclides. These data constitute an evaluated data file constructed for use in the radiological assessment activities of the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The radionuclides selected for this handbook include those occurring naturally in the environment, those of potential importance in routine or accidental releases from the nuclear fuel cycle, those of current interest in nuclear medicine and fusion reactor technology, and some of those of interest to Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the estimation of annual limits on intake via inhalation and ingestion for occupationally exposed individuals.

  13. CLNS 05/1914 Measurement of Absolute Hadronic Branching Fractions of D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a double tag technique. Among measurements for three D 0 and six D + modes, we obtain reference branching fractions B(D 0 ! K \\Gamma Ã? + ) = (3:91 \\Sigma 0:08 \\Sigma 0:09)% and B(D + ! K \\Gamma Ã? + Ã? + ) = (9:5 \\Sigma 0:2 \\Sigma 0:3)%, where the uncertainties are stati

  14. Cluster Compatibility Mode

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsCluster Compatibility Mode Cluster Compatibility Mode Edison compute

  15. Cluster Compatibility Mode

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsCluster Compatibility Mode Cluster Compatibility Mode Edison

  16. Updated measurements of hadronic B decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morello, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The CDF experiment at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider established that extensive and detailed exploration of the b-quark dynamics is possible in hadron collisions, with results competitive and supplementary to those from e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders. This provides a rich, and highly rewarding program that has currently reached full maturity. In the following I report some recent results on hadronic decays: the evidence for the charmless annihilation decay mode B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, and the first reconstruction in hadron collisions of the suppressed decays B{sup -} {yields} D({yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0})K{sup -} and B{sup -} {yields} D({yields} K{sup +} {pi}{sup -}){pi}{sup -}.

  17. Short-range correlations and neutrinoless double beta decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kortelainen; O. Civitarese; J. Suhonen; J. Toivanen

    2007-01-18

    In this work we report on the effects of short-range correlations upon the matrix elements of neutrinoless double beta decay. We focus on the calculation of the matrix elements of the neutrino-mass mode of neutrinoless double beta decays of 48Ca and 76Ge. The nuclear-structure components of the calculation, that is the participant nuclear wave functions, have been calculated in the shell-model scheme for 48Ca and in the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation (pnQRPA) scheme for 76Ge. We compare the traditional approach of using the Jastrow correlation function with the more complete scheme of the unitary correlation operator method (UCOM). Our results indicate that the Jastrow method vastly exaggerates the effects of short-range correlations on the neutrinoless double beta decay nuclear matrix elements.

  18. Search for dinucleon decay into pions at Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Gustafson; K. Abe; Y. Haga; Y. Hayato; M. Ikeda; K. Iyogi; J. Kameda; Y. Kishimoto; M. Miura; S. Moriyama; M. Nakahata; T. Nakajima; Y. Nakano; S. Nakayama; A. Orii; H. Sekiya; M. Shiozawa; A. Takeda; H. Tanaka; T. Tomura; R. A. Wendell; T. Irvine; T. Kajita; I. Kametani; K. Kaneyuki; Y. Nishimura; E. Richard; K. Okumura; L. Labarga; P. Fernandez; S. Berkman; H. A. Tanaka; S. Tobayama; E. Kearns; J. L. Raaf; J. L. Stone; L. R. Sulak; M. Goldhaber; G. Carminati; W. R. Kropp; S. Mine; P. Weatherly; A. Renshaw; M. B. Smy; H. W. Sobel; V. Takhistov; K. S. Ganezer; B. L. Hartfiel; J. Hill; N. Hong; J. Y. Kim; I. T. Lim; T. Akiri; A. Himmel; K. Scholberg; C. W. Walter; T. Wongjirad; T. Ishizuka; S. Tasaka; J. S. Jang; J. G. Learned; S. Matsuno; S. N. Smith; T. Hasegawa; T. Ishida; T. Ishii; T. Kobayashi; T. Nakadaira; K. Nakamura; Y. Oyama; K. Sakashita; T. Sekiguchi; T. TsukamotoA. T. Suzuki; Y. Takeuchi; T. Yano; S. Hirota; K. Huang; K. Ieki; T. Kikawa; A. Minamino; T. Nakaya; K. Suzuki; S. Takahashi; Y. Fukuda; K. Choi; Y. Itow; G. Mitsuka; T. Suzuki; P. Mijakowski; J. Hignight; J. Imber; C. K. Jung; J. L. Palomino; C. Yanagisawa; H. Ishino; T. Kayano; A. Kibayashi; Y. Koshio; T. Mori; M. Sakuda; Y. Kuno; R. Tacik; S. B. Kim; H. Okazawa; Y. Choi; K. Nishijima; M. Koshiba; Y. Suda; Y. Totsuka; M. Yokoyama; C. Bronner; K. Martens; Ll. Marti; Y. Suzuki; M. R. Vagins; J. F. Martin; P. de Perio; A. Konaka; M. J. Wilking; S. Chen; Y. Zhang; R. J. Wilkes

    2015-04-04

    A search for dinucleon decay into pions with the Super-Kamiokande detector has been performed with an exposure of 282.1 kiloton-years. Dinucleon decay is a process that violates baryon number by two units. We present the first search for dinucleon decay to pions in a large water Cherenkov detector. The modes $^{16}$O$(pp) \\rightarrow$ $^{14}$C$\\pi^{+}\\pi^{+}$, $^{16}$O$(pn) \\rightarrow$ $^{14}$N$\\pi^{+}\\pi^{0}$, and $^{16}$O$(nn) \\rightarrow$ $^{14}$O$\\pi^{0}\\pi^{0}$ are investigated. No significant excess in the Super-Kamiokande data has been found, so a lower limit on the lifetime of the process per oxygen nucleus is determined. These limits are: $\\tau_{pp\\rightarrow\\pi^{+}\\pi^{+}} > 7.22 \\times 10^{31}$ years, $\\tau_{pn\\rightarrow\\pi^{+}\\pi^{0}} > 1.70 \\times 10^{32}$ years, and $\\tau_{nn\\rightarrow\\pi^{0}\\pi^{0}} > 4.04 \\times 10^{32}$ years. The lower limits on each mode are about two orders of magnitude better than previous limits from searches for dinucleon decay in iron.

  19. Search for dinucleon decay into pions at Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustafson, J; Haga, Y; Hayato, Y; Ikeda, M; Iyogi, K; Kameda, J; Kishimoto, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakajima, T; Nakano, Y; Nakayama, S; Orii, A; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Takeda, A; Tanaka, H; Tomura, T; Wendell, R A; Irvine, T; Kajita, T; Kametani, I; Kaneyuki, K; Nishimura, Y; Richard, E; Okumura, K; Labarga, L; Fernandez, P; Berkman, S; Tanaka, H A; Tobayama, S; Kearns, E; Raaf, J L; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Goldhaber, M; Carminati, G; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Weatherly, P; Renshaw, A; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Takhistov, V; Ganezer, K S; Hartfiel, B L; Hill, J; Hong, N; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Akiri, T; Himmel, A; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wongjirad, T; Ishizuka, T; Tasaka, S; Jang, J S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Smith, S N; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Suzuki, T TsukamotoA T; Takeuchi, Y; Yano, T; Hirota, S; Huang, K; Ieki, K; Kikawa, T; Minamino, A; Nakaya, T; Suzuki, K; Takahashi, S; Fukuda, Y; Choi, K; Itow, Y; Mitsuka, G; Suzuki, T; Mijakowski, P; Hignight, J; Imber, J; Jung, C K; Palomino, J L; Yanagisawa, C; Ishino, H; Kayano, T; Kibayashi, A; Koshio, Y; Mori, T; Sakuda, M; Kuno, Y; Tacik, R; Kim, S B; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Nishijima, K; Koshiba, M; Suda, Y; Totsuka, Y; Yokoyama, M; Bronner, C; Martens, K; Marti, Ll; Suzuki, Y; Vagins, M R; Martin, J F; de Perio, P; Konaka, A; Wilking, M J; Chen, S; Zhang, Y; Wilkes, R J

    2015-01-01

    A search for dinucleon decay into pions with the Super-Kamiokande detector has been performed with an exposure of 282.1 kiloton-years. Dinucleon decay is a process that violates baryon number by two units. We present the first search for dinucleon decay to pions in a large water Cherenkov detector. The modes $^{16}$O$(pp) \\rightarrow$ $^{14}$C$\\pi^{+}\\pi^{+}$, $^{16}$O$(pn) \\rightarrow$ $^{14}$N$\\pi^{+}\\pi^{0}$, and $^{16}$O$(nn) \\rightarrow$ $^{14}$O$\\pi^{0}\\pi^{0}$ are investigated. No significant excess in the Super-Kamiokande data has been found, so a lower limit on the lifetime of the process per oxygen nucleus is determined. These limits are: $\\tau_{pp\\rightarrow\\pi^{+}\\pi^{+}} > 7.22 \\times 10^{31}$ years, $\\tau_{pn\\rightarrow\\pi^{+}\\pi^{0}} > 1.70 \\times 10^{32}$ years, and $\\tau_{nn\\rightarrow\\pi^{0}\\pi^{0}} > 4.04 \\times 10^{32}$ years. The lower limits on each mode are about two orders of magnitude better than previous limits from searches for dinucleon decay in iron.

  20. Time Fractional Formalism: Classical and Quantum Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hosein Nasrolahpour

    2012-03-18

    In this review, we present some fundamental classical and quantum phenomena in view of time fractional formalism. Time fractional formalism is a very useful tool in describing systems with memory and delay. We hope that this study can provide a deeper understanding of the physical interpretations of fractional derivative.

  1. Fractional quantum Hall effect and nonabelian statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Read; G. Moore

    1992-02-03

    It is argued that fractional quantum Hall effect wavefunctions can be interpreted as conformal blocks of two-dimensional conformal field theory. Fractional statistics can be extended to nonabelian statistics and examples can be constructed from conformal field theory. The Pfaffian state is related to the 2D Ising model and possesses fractionally charged excitations which are predicted to obey nonabelian statistics.

  2. Generating an entangled coherent state of two cavity modes in a three-level ?- type atomic system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing-Xia Mu; Yong-Hong Ma; L. Zhou

    2007-11-27

    In this paper, we present a scheme to generate an entangled coherent state by considering a three-level \\Lambda - type atom interacting with a two-mode cavity driven by classical fields. The two-mode entangled coherent state can be obtained under large detuning conditions. Considering the cavity decay, an analytical solution is deduced.

  3. Probing the Goldstone equivalence theorem in Heavy Weak Doublet Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta, Bhaskar; Sanford, David; Walker, Joel W

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the decays from heavy higgsino-like weak-doublets into Z, h bosons and missing particles. When pair-produced at the LHC, the subsequent Z, h to 2l, 2b decays in the doublet decay cascade can yield 4l, 2l 2b, and 4b + MET + jets final states. Mutual observation of any two of these channels would provide information on the the associated doublets' decay branching fractions into a Z or h, thereby probing the Goldstone equivalence relation, shedding additional light on the Higgs sector of beyond the Standard Model theories, and facilitating the discrimination of various contending models, in turn. We compare the Z/h decay ratio expected in the Minimal Supersymmetric model, the Next-to Minimal Supersymmetric model and a minimal singlet-doublet dark matter model. Additionally, we conduct a full Monte Carlo analysis of the prospects for detecting the targeted final states during 14 TeV running of the LHC in the context of a representative NMSSM benchmark model.

  4. Rare B Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, P.D.; /Victoria U.

    2006-02-24

    Recent results from Belle and BaBar on rare B decays involving flavor-changing neutral currents or purely leptonic final states are presented. Measurements of the CP asymmetries in B {yields} K*{gamma} and b {yields} s{gamma} are reported. Also reported are updated limits on B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}, B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}, B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu} and the recent measurement of B {yields} X{sub s}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}.

  5. Dark matter from decaying topological defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hindmarsh, Mark [Helsinki Institute of Physics, Gustaf Hällströmin katu, P.O. Box 64, 00014 Helsinki University (Finland); Kirk, Russell; West, Stephen M., E-mail: m.b.hindmarsh@sussex.ac.uk, E-mail: russell.kirk.2008@live.rhul.ac.uk, E-mail: stephen.west@rhul.ac.uk [Dept. of Physics, Royal Holloway University of London, Egham Hill, Egham, Surrey, TW20 0EX (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-01

    We study dark matter production by decaying topological defects, in particular cosmic strings. In topological defect or ''top-down'' (TD) scenarios, the dark matter injection rate varies as a power law with time with exponent p?4. We find a formula in closed form for the yield for all p < 3/2, which accurately reproduces the solution of the Boltzmann equation. We investigate two scenarios (p = 1, p = 7/6) motivated by cosmic strings which decay into TeV-scale states with a high branching fraction into dark matter particles. For dark matter models annihilating either by s-wave or p-wave, we find the regions of parameter space where the TD model can account for the dark matter relic density as measured by Planck. We find that topological defects can be the principal source of dark matter, even when the standard freeze-out calculation under-predicts the relic density and hence can lead to potentially large ''boost factor'' enhancements in the dark matter annihilation rate. We examine dark matter model-independent limits on this scenario arising from unitarity and discuss example model-dependent limits coming from indirect dark matter search experiments. In the four cases studied, the upper bound on G? for strings with an appreciable channel into TeV-scale states is significantly more stringent than the current Cosmic Microwave Background limits.

  6. Study of Bbar to Xu l nubar Decays in BBbar Events Tagged by a Fully Reconstructed B-meson Decay and Determination of |V_{ub}|

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.

    2012-07-13

    We report measurements of partial branching fractions for inclusive charmless semileptonic B decays {bar B} {yields} X{sub u}{ell}{bar {nu}}, and the determination of the CKM matrix element |V{sub ub}|. The analysis is based on a sample of 467 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. We select events in which the decay of one of the B mesons is fully reconstructed and an electron or a muon signals the semileptonic decay of the other B meson. We measure partial branching fractions {Delta}{Beta} in several restricted regions of phase space and determine the CKM element |V{sub ub}| based on four different QCD predictions. For decays with a charged lepton momentum p*{sub {ell}} > 1.0 GeV in the B meson rest frame, we obtain {Delta}{Beta} = (1.80 {+-} 0.13{sub stat.} {+-} 0.15{sub sys.} {+-} 0.02{sub theo.}) x 10{sup -3} from a maximum likelihood fit to the two-dimensional M{sub X} - q{sup 2} distribution. Here, M{sub X} refers to the invariant mass of the final state hadron X and q{sup 2} is the invariant mass squared of the charged lepton and neutrino. From this measurement we extract |V{sub ub}| = (4.31 {+-} 0.25{sub exp.} {+-} 0.16{sub theo.}) x 10{sup -3} as the arithmetic average of four results obtained from four different QCD predictions of the partial rate. We separately determine partial branching fractions for {bar B}{sup 0} and B{sup -} decays and derive a limit on the isospin breaking in {bar B} {yields} X{sub u}{ell}{bar {nu}} decays.

  7. Mixed-oxide fuel decay heat analysis for BWR LOCA safety evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiang, R. T.

    2013-07-01

    The mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel decay heat behavior is analyzed for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) safety evaluation. The physical reasoning on why the decay heat power fractions of MOX fuel fission product (FP) are significantly lower than the corresponding decay heat power fractions of uranium-oxide (UOX) fuel FP is illustrated. This is primarily due to the following physical phenomena. -The recoverable energies per fission of plutonium (Pu)-239 and Pu-241 are significantly higher than those of uranium (U)-235 and U-238. Consequently, the fission rate required to produce the same amount of power in MOX fuel is significantly lower than that in UOX fuel, which leads to lower subsequent FP generation rate and associated decay heat power in MOX fuel than those in UOX fuel. - The effective FP decay energy per fission of Pu-239 is significantly lower than the corresponding effective FP decay energy per fission of U-235, e.g., Pu-239's 10.63 Mega-electron-Volt (MeV) vs. U-235's 12.81 MeV at the cooling time 0.2 second. This also leads to lower decay heat power in MOX fuel than that in UOX fuel. The FP decay heat is shown to account for more than 90% of the total decay heat immediately after shutdown. The FP decay heat results based on the American National Standard Institute (ANSI)/American Nuclear Society (ANS)-5.1-1979 standard method are shown very close to the corresponding FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-2005 standard method. The FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1979 simplified method are shown very close to but mostly slightly lower than the corresponding FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1971 method. The FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1979 simplified method or the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1971 method are shown significantly larger than the corresponding FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1979 standard method or the ANSI/ANS-5.1-2005 standard method. (authors)

  8. Constraining primordial vector mode from B-mode polarization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saga, Shohei; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Shiraishi, Maresuke E-mail: maresuke.shiraishi@pd.infn.it

    2014-10-01

    The B-mode polarization spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) may be the smoking gun of not only the primordial tensor mode but also of the primordial vector mode. If there exist nonzero vector-mode metric perturbations in the early Universe, they are known to be supported by anisotropic stress fluctuations of free-streaming particles such as neutrinos, and to create characteristic signatures on both the CMB temperature, E-mode, and B-mode polarization anisotropies. We place constraints on the properties of the primordial vector mode characterized by the vector-to-scalar ratio r{sub v} and the spectral index n{sub v} of the vector-shear power spectrum, from the Planck and BICEP2 B-mode data. We find that, for scale-invariant initial spectra, the ?CDM model including the vector mode fits the data better than the model including the tensor mode. The difference in ?{sup 2} between the vector and tensor models is ??{sup 2} = 3.294, because, on large scales the vector mode generates smaller temperature fluctuations than the tensor mode, which is preferred for the data. In contrast, the tensor mode can fit the data set equally well if we allow a significantly blue-tilted spectrum. We find that the best-fitting tensor mode has a large blue tilt and leads to an indistinct reionization bump on larger angular scales. The slightly red-tilted vector mode supported by the current data set can also create O(10{sup -22})-Gauss magnetic fields at cosmological recombination. Our constraints should motivate research that considers models of the early Universe that involve the vector mode.

  9. Leptonic Decays of the Charged B Meson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corwin, Luke A.; /Ohio State U.; ,

    2010-06-11

    The authors present a search for the decay B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}} ({ell} = {tau}, {mu}, or e) in (458.9 {+-} 5.1) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) decays recorded with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory. A sample of events with one reconstructed exclusive semi-leptonic B decay (B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}X) is selected, and in the recoil a search for B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}} signal is performed. The {tau} is identified in the following channels: {tau}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, and {tau}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}. The analysis strategy and the statistical procedure is set up for branching fraction extraction or upper limit determination. They determine from the dataset a preliminary measurement of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (1.8 {+-} 0.8 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup -4}, which excludes zero at 2.4{sigma}, and f{sub B} = 255 {+-} 58 MeV. Combination with the hadronically tagged measurement yields {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (1.8 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -4}. They also set preliminary limits on the branching fractions at {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}) < 7.7 x 10{sup -6} (90% C.L.), {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}}) < 11 x 10{sup -6} (90% C.L.), and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 3.2 x 10{sup -4} (90% C.L.).

  10. Measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions of Bc± ? J/??±and B± ? J/? K± and B(Bc±? J/? ?±?±?-/+)/B(Bc± ? J/? ?±) in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-01-13

    The ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions (?(Bc±) B(Bc± ? J/??±))/(?(B±) B(B± ? J/?K±) is studied in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The kinematic region investigated requires Ba,sub>c± and B±mesons with transverse momentum p? > 15 GeV and rapidity |y| -1. The ratio is determined to be [0.48 ± 0.05 (stat) ± 0.03(syst) ± 0.05 (?Bc)]% The J/??±?±?-/+ decay mode is also observed in the same data sample. Using a model-independent method developed tomore »measure the efficiency given the presence of resonant behaviour in the three-pion system, the ratio of the branching fractions J/? ?±?±?-/+)/B(Bc± is measured to be 2.55 ± 0.80(stat) ± 0.33(syst) +0.04-0.01 (?Bc), consistent with the previous LHCb result.« less

  11. Measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions of Bc± ? J/??±and B± ? J/? K± and B(Bc±? J/? ?±?±?-/+)/B(Bc± ? J/? ?±) in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia)

    2015-01-01

    The ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions (?(Bc±) B(Bc± ? J/??±))/(?(B±) B(B± ? J/?K±) is studied in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The kinematic region investigated requires Ba,sub>c± and B±mesons with transverse momentum p? > 15 GeV and rapidity |y| -1. The ratio is determined to be [0.48 ± 0.05 (stat) ± 0.03(syst) ± 0.05 (?Bc)]% The J/??±?±?-/+ decay mode is also observed in the same data sample. Using a model-independent method developed to measure the efficiency given the presence of resonant behaviour in the three-pion system, the ratio of the branching fractions J/? ?±?±?-/+)/B(Bc± is measured to be 2.55 ± 0.80(stat) ± 0.33(syst) +0.04-0.01 (?Bc), consistent with the previous LHCb result.

  12. Flow Field Flow Fractionation Method Development for Applied Bioanalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schachermeyer, Samantha Lynn

    2013-01-01

    E. ; Caldwell, K. , Field-Flow Fractionation Handbook. JohnJ. P. , Sedimentation field-flow-fractionation: emergence ofby sedimentation field-flow fractionation. Am. Lab. (

  13. Direct CP, Lepton Flavor, and Isospin Asymmetries in the Decays B-->K(*)l+l-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowan, Ray Franklin

    We measure branching fractions and integrated rate asymmetries for the rare decays B?K(*)l+l-, where l+l- is either e+e- or ?+?-, using a sample of 384×10(6) BB? events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- ...

  14. Study of the decay tau(-)->2 pi(-)pi(+)3 pi(0)nu(tau)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

    1997-11-01

    The decay tau(-) --> 2 pi(-)pi(+)3 pi(0) nu(tau) has been studied with the CLEO II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. The branching fraction is measured to be (2.85 +/- 0.56 +/- 0.51) x 10(-4). The result is ...

  15. Measurement of the production fraction times branching fraction $\\boldsymbol{ f(b\\to\\Lambda_{b})\\cdot \\mathcal{B}(\\Lambda_{b}\\to J/\\psi \\Lambda)}$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2011-05-01

    The {Lambda}{sub b}(udb) baryon is observed in the decay {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda} using 6.1 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected with the D0 detector at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The production fraction multiplied by the branching fraction for this decay relative to that for the decay B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0} is measured to be 0.345 {+-} 0.034 (stat.) {+-} 0.033 (syst.) {+-} 0.003 (PDG). Using the world average value of f(b {yields} B{sup 0}) {center_dot} {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0}) = (1.74 {+-} 0.08) x 10{sup -5}, they obtain f(b {yields} {Lambda}{sub b}) {center_dot} {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{psi}{Lambda}) = (6.01 {+-} 0.60 (stat.) {+-} 0.58 (syst.) {+-} 0.28 (PDG)) x 10{sup -5}. This measurement represents an improvement in precision by about a factor of three with respect to the current world average.

  16. WATER FRACTIONS IN EXTRASOLAR PLANETESIMALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jura, M.; Xu, S., E-mail: jura@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: sxu@astro.ucla.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1562 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    With the goal of using externally polluted white dwarfs to investigate the water fractions of extrasolar planetesimals, we assemble from the literature a sample that we estimate to be more than 60% complete of DB white dwarfs warmer than 13,000 K, more luminous than 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} L{sub Sun }, and within 80 pc of the Sun. When considering all the stars together, we find that the summed mass accretion rate of heavy atoms exceeds that of hydrogen by over a factor of 1000. If so, this sub-population of extrasolar asteroids treated as an ensemble has little water and is at least a factor of 20 drier than CI chondrites, the most primitive meteorites. Furthermore, while an apparent 'excess' of oxygen in a single DB can be interpreted as evidence that the accreted material originated in a water-rich parent body, we show that at least in some cases, there can be sufficient uncertainties in the time history of the accretion rate that such an argument may be ambiguous. Regardless of the difficulty associated with interpreting the results from an individual object, our analysis of the population of polluted DBs provides indirect observational support for the theoretical view that a snow line is important in disks where rocky planetesimals form.

  17. Riemann-Liouville Fractional Einstein Field Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joakim Munkhammar

    2010-03-18

    In this paper we establish a fractional generalization of Einstein field equations based on the Riemann-Liouville fractional generalization of the ordinary differential operator $\\partial_\\mu$. We show some elementary properties and prove that the field equations correspond to the regular Einstein field equations for the fractional order $\\alpha = 1$. In addition to this we show that the field theory is inherently non-local in this approach. We also derive the linear field equations and show that they are a generalized version of the time fractional diffusion-wave equation. We show that in the Newtonian limit a fractional version of Poisson's equation for gravity arises. Finally we conclude open problems such as the relation of the non-locality of this theory to quantum field theories and the possible relation to fractional mechanics.

  18. Review of Some Promising Fractional Physical Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasily E. Tarasov

    2015-02-14

    Fractional dynamics is a field of study in physics and mechanics investigating the behavior of objects and systems that are characterized by power-law non-locality, power-law long-term memory or fractal properties by using integrations and differentiation of non-integer orders, i.e., by methods of the fractional calculus. This paper is a review of physical models that look very promising for future development of fractional dynamics. We suggest a short introduction to fractional calculus as a theory of integration and differentiation of non-integer order. Some applications of integro-differentiations of fractional orders in physics are discussed. Models of discrete systems with memory, lattice with long-range inter-particle interaction, dynamics of fractal media are presented. Quantum analogs of fractional derivatives and model of open nano-system systems with memory are also discussed.

  19. Top decays in extended models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaitan, R.; Miranda, O. G.; Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.

    2009-04-20

    Top quark decays are interesting as a mean to test the Standard Model (SM) predictions. The Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM)-suppressed process t{yields}cWW, and the rare decays t{yields}cZ, t{yields}H{sup 0}+c, and t{yields}c{gamma} an excellent window to probe the predictions of theories beyond the SM. We evaluate the flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) decay t{yields}H{sup 0}+c in the context of Alternative Left-Right symmetric Models (ALRM) with extra isosinglet heavy fermions; the FCNC decays may place at tree level and are only supressed by the mixing between ordinary top and charm quarks. We also comment on the decay process t{yields}c+{gamma}, which involves radiative corrections.

  20. Observation of ?cJ decaying into the pp?K?K? final state

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Alberto, D.; An, L.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini, R.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; et al

    2011-06-27

    First measurements of the decays of the three ?cJ states to pp?K?K? final states are presented. Intermediate ??K?K? and ?(1520)?pK? resonance states are observed, and branching fractions for ?cJ?p?K??(1520), ?(1520)?¯¯¯(1520), and ?pp? are reported. We also measure branching fractions for direct ?cJ?pp?K?K? decays. These are first observations of ?cJ decays to unstable baryon resonances and provide useful information about the ?cJ states. The experiment uses samples of ?cJ mesons produced via radiative transitions from 106×10? ?' mesons collected in the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e?e? collider.

  1. WEIGHTED NORM INEQUALITIES FOR FRACTIONAL MAXIMAL ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-11-19

    We study classical weighted Lp ? Lq inequalities for the fractional max- imal operators on Rd, proved originally by Muckenhoupt and Wheeden in the 70's. We

  2. Proton Decay and the Planck Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Daniel T.

    2009-01-01

    LBNL- 56556 PROTON DECAY AND THE PLANCK SCALE DANIEL T.ph/0410035v1 2 Oct 2004 PROTON DECAY AND THE PLANCK SCALE ?without grand uni?cation, proton decay can be a powerful

  3. Search for neutrinoless decays of the ? lepton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1990-02-01

    We have searched for neutrinoless ? decays into three charged particles. Evidence of such decays would demonstrate nonconservation of lepton flavor and, in some cases, lepton number. We see no signal for any such neutrinoless ? decays and set upper...

  4. R-mode astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kokkotas, Kostas D

    2015-01-01

    Next generation gravitational wave detectors will start taking data in the near future. Here we discuss the chances to detect the continuous emission from r-mode oscillations in compact stars and study which properties of compact stars we can infer from such novel data. In particular we show that the combination of the gravitational wave data with electromagnetic multi-messenger observations could give us detailed insight into compact star properties, ranging from precise mass-radius measurements to the determination of the equation of state and the phase structure of dense matter.

  5. OPTIMIZING OF SUMS AND PRODUCTS OF LINEAR FRACTIONAL FUNCTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OPTIMIZING OF SUMS AND PRODUCTS OF LINEAR FRACTIONAL FUNCTIONS UNDER LINEAR CONSTRAINTS JOACHIM of two linear fractional functions under linear constraints. Results of computational experiments. Fractional programming, composite objective functions, linear fractional functions, Charnes

  6. Sudden transition from naked atom decay to dressed atom decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Zhu; D. L. Zhou

    2015-07-09

    The studies on quantum open system play key roles not only in fundamental problems in quantum mechanics but also in quantum computing and information processes. Here we propose a scheme to use a one dimensional coupling cavity array (CCA) as an artificial electromagnetic environment of a two-level atom. For a finite length of CCA, we find that after a turning time the population of excited state deviates suddenly from the exponential decay. We show that physically this phenomena corresponds to a transition from a naked atom decay to a dressed state decay. We hope that our finding will promote the studies on quantum system with a finite size environment.

  7. DOSIMETRY; RADIOISOTOPES; DECAY; ACCURACY; DATA COMPILATION;...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Radioactive decay data tables Kocher, D.C. 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; RADIOISOTOPES; DECAY; ACCURACY; DATA COMPILATION; DOSIMETRY; M CODES; COMPUTER CODES; DATA;...

  8. Measurements of the ion fraction and mobility of α - and β -decay

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(JournalspectroscopyReport) | SciTechelement method in the

  9. An Investigation of the Neutral Cascade Muon Semileptonic Decay and its Observation at KTeV, Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomes, Ricardo Avelino

    2005-07-01

    The authors report an investigation of the semileptonic decay {Xi}{sup 0} {yields} {sigma}{sup +} {mu}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}. This decay was observed for the first time with nine identified events using the KTeV beam line and detector at Fermilab. The decay is normalized to the {Xi}{sup 0} beta decay mode and yields a value for the ratio of decay rates {Lambda}({Xi}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +} {mu}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}})/{Lambda}({Xi}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}e{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub e}) of (1.8{sub -0.5}{sup +0.7}(stat.) {+-} 0.2(syst.)) x 10{sup -2} at the 68.27% confidence level, being the official measurement of KTeV Collaboration. They also used the dominant decay {Xi}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{pi}{sup 0}({Lambda} {yields} p{pi}{sup -}) as normalization mode in an independent analysis which corroborated with the main result. In addition, a new measurement of the {Xi}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +} e{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub e} branching ratio is presented, based on 1139 events and normalized to the {Xi}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{pi}{sup 0}({Lambda} {yields} p{pi}{sup -}) decay mode. The results are in agreement with the SU(3) flavor symmetric quark model.

  10. Devices, systems, and methods for microscale isoelectric fractionation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and methods for microscale isoelectric fractionation Embodiments of the present invention provide devices, systems, and methods for microscale isoelectric fractionation....

  11. Precision Unification and Proton Decay in F-Theory GUTs with High Scale Supersymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arthur Hebecker; James Unwin

    2014-09-23

    F-theory GUTs provide a promising UV completion for models with approximate gauge coupling unification, such as the (non-supersymmetric) Standard Model. More specifically, if the superparters have masses well above the TeV scale, the resulting imperfection in unification can be accounted for by the, in principle calculable, classical F-theory correction at the high scale. In this paper we argue for the correct form of the F-theory corrections to unification, including KK mode loop effects. However, the price of compensating the imprecise unification in such High Scale SUSY models with F-theory corrections is that the GUT scale is lowered, potentially leading to a dangerously high proton decay rate from dimension-6 operators. We analyse the possibility of suppressing the decay rate by the localization of $X,Y$ gauge bosons in higher dimensions. While this effect can be very strong for the zero modes, we find that in the simplest models of this type it is difficult to realize a significant suppression for higher modes (Landau levels). Notably, in the absence of substantial suppressions to the proton decay rate, the superpartners must be lighter than 100 TeV to satisfy proton decay constraints. We highlight that multiple correlated signals of proton decay could verify this scenario.

  12. [Carbon isotope fractionation inplants]. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Leary, M.H.

    1990-12-31

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  13. Search for Charged Lepton Violation in Narrow Upsilon Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Hawkes, C.M.; /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Columbus Supercond., Genova /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-19

    Charged lepton flavor violating processes are unobservable in the standard model, but they are predicted to be enhanced in several extensions to the standard model, including supersymmetry and models with leptoquarks or compositeness. We present a search for such processes in a sample of 99 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(2S) decays and 117 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) decays collected with the BABAR detector. We place upper limits on the branching fractions {Beta}({Upsilon}(nS) {yields} e{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {-+}}) and {Beta}({Upsilon}(nS) {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {-+}}) (n = 2, 3) at the 10{sup -6} level and use these results to place lower limits of order 1 TeV on the mass scale of charged lepton flavor violating effective operators.

  14. Airborne release fractions/rates and respirable fractions for nonreactor nuclear facilities. Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This document contains compiled data from the DOE Handbook on Airborne Release Fractions/Rates and Respirable Fractions for Nonreactor Nuclear facilities. Source data and example facilities utilized, such as the Plutonium Recovery Facility, are included.

  15. A Search For the Higgs Boson in CMS in the Two Photon Decay Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Palmer

    2011-09-30

    We report on a search for SM Higgs Boson in the two photon decay mode conducted by the CMS experiment with the data accumulated during the 2010 & 2011 running of the LHC at center of mass collision energy of 7 TeV.

  16. $D_s^+ \\to ??^+$ Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. El aaoud

    1998-01-08

    Motivated by the experimental measurement of the decay rate, $\\Gamma$, and the longitudinal polarization, $P_L$, in the Cabibbo favored decay $D_s^+\\to \\phi {\\rho}^{+}$, we have studied theoretical prediction within the context of factorization approximation invoking several form factors models. We were able to obtain agreement with experiment for both $\\Gamma$ and $P_L$ by using experimentally measured values of the form factors $A_1^{D_s\\phi}(0)$, $A_2^{D_s\\phi}(0)$ and $V^{D_s\\phi}(0)$ in the semi-leptonic decay $D_s^+\\to \\phi l^{+}\

  17. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroaki Sugiyama

    2003-07-25

    A brief overview is given of theoretical analyses with neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. Theoretical bounds on the ``observable'', _betabeta, are presented. By using experimental bounds on _betabeta, allowed regions are obtained on the m_l-cos{2theta_12} plane, where m_l stands for the lightest neutrino mass. It is shown that Majorana neutrinos can be excluded by combining possible results of future neutrinoless double beta decay and {}^3H beta decay experiments. A possibility to constrain one of two Majorana phases is discussed also.

  18. Wave Decay in MHD Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrey Beresnyak; Alex Lazarian

    2008-05-06

    We present a model for nonlinear decay of the weak wave in three-dimensional incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. We show that the decay rate is different for parallel and perpendicular waves. We provide a general formula for arbitrarily directed waves and discuss particular limiting cases known in the literature. We test our predictions with direct numerical simulations of wave decay in three-dimensional MHD turbulence, and discuss the influence of turbulent damping on the development of linear instabilities in the interstellar medium and on other important astrophysical processes.

  19. Spontaneous emission into a planar optical waveguide mode by an atom outside the waveguide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Modoran; Gregory Lafyatis

    2006-09-18

    An electronically excited atom or molecule located outside but near a planar optical waveguide can decay by spontaneous emission of a photon into a guided mode of the waveguide. We outline a QED theory for calculating the probability for this process and describe general physical insights from that theory. A couple of representative examples are discussed in detail.

  20. Q-Value and Half-Lives for the Double-Beta-Decay Nuclide 110Pd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Fink; J. Barea; D. Beck; K. Blaum; Ch. Böhm; Ch. Borgmann; M. Breitenfeldt; F. Herfurth; A. Herlert; J. Kotila; M. Kowalska; S. Kreim; D. Lunney; S. Naimi; M. Rosenbusch; S. Schwarz; L. Schweikhard; F. Simkovic; J. Stanja; K. Zuber

    2011-12-25

    The 110Pd double-beta decay Q-value was measured with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP to be Q = 2017.85(64) keV. This value shifted by 14 keV compared to the literature value and is 17 times more precise, resulting in new phase-space factors for the two-neutrino and neutrinoless decay modes. In addition a new set of the relevant matrix elements has been calculated. The expected half-life of the two-neutrino mode was reevaluated as 1.5(6) E20 yr. With its high natural abundance, the new results reveal 110Pd to be an excellent candidate for double-beta decay studies.

  1. Degenerate Higgs bosons decays to ${??}$ and ${Z?}$ in the type II Seesaw Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Chabab; M. C. Peyranere; L. Rahili

    2014-08-11

    Using the most recent results of CMS and ATLAS, we study the Higgs decays to $\\gamma\\gamma$ and $Z\\gamma$ in the scenario where the two CP even Higgs predicted by the type II seesaw model (HTM) are close to mass degenerate with a mass near $125$ GeV. We analyse the effects of the Higgs potential parameters constrained by the full set of perturbative unitarity, boundedness from below (BFB) as well as from precision electroweak measurements on these decay modes. Our analysis demonstrates that the observed excess in the diphoton Higgs decay channel can be interpreted in our scenario within a delineated region controlled by $\\lambda_{1}$ and $\\lambda_{4}$ coupling. We also find a deviation in the Higgs decay to $Z\\gamma$ with respect to the Standard Model prediction and the largest enhancement is found for a ratio $R_{Z\\gamma}$ of the order $1.6$. Furthermore we show that consistency with current ATLAS data on the diphoton decay channel favours a light doubly charged Higgs with mass in the range $92 - 180$~GeV. Finally, we find that the $\\gamma\\gamma$ and $Z \\gamma$ Higgs decay modes are generally correlated and the magnitude of correlation is sensitive to the sign of the $\\lambda_{1}$ parameter.

  2. Measurement of the decay B????l?? and determination of |Vub|

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ha, H.; Won, E.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Balagura, V.; Barberio, E.; Bay, A.; Belous, K.; et al

    2011-04-01

    We present a measurement of the charmless semileptonic decay B????l?? using a data sample containing 657×10? BB¯ events collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e?e? collider operating near the ?(4S) resonance. We determine the total branching fraction of the decay, B(B????l??) =(1.49±0.04(stat)±0.07(syst))×10??. We also report a new precise measurement of the differential decay rate and extract the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |Vub| using model-independent and model-dependent approaches. From a simultaneous fit to the measured differential decay rate and lattice QCD results, we obtain |Vub|=(3.43±0.33)×10?³, where the error includes both experimental and theoretical uncertainties.

  3. Probing a panoply of curvaton-decay scenarios using CMB data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tristan L. Smith; Daniel Grin

    2015-11-23

    In the curvaton scenario, primordial curvature perturbations are produced by a second field that is sub-dominant during inflation. Depending on how the curvaton decays [possibly producing baryon number, lepton number, or cold dark matter (CDM)], mixtures of correlated isocurvature perturbations are produced, allowing the curvaton scenario to be tested using cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. Here, a full range of 27 curvaton-decay scenarios is compared with CMB data, placing limits on the curvaton fraction at decay, $r_D$, and the lepton asymmetry, $\\xi_{\\rm lep}$. If baryon number is generated by curvaton decay and CDM before (or vice-versa), these limits imply specific predictions for non-Gaussian signatures testable by future CMB experiments and upcoming large-scale-structure surveys.

  4. Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays and Neutron-Decay Halos from Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. D. Dermer

    2001-03-20

    Simple arguments concerning power and acceleration efficiency show that ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRS) with energies >~ 10^{19} eV could originate from GRBs. Neutrons formed through photo-pion production processes in GRB blast waves leave the acceleration site and travel through intergalactic space, where they decay and inject a very energetic proton and electron component into intergalactic space. The neutron-decay protons form a component of the UHECRs, whereas the neutron-decay electrons produce optical/X-ray synchrotron and gamma radiation from Compton-scattered background radiation. A significant fraction of galaxies with GRB activity should be surrounded by neutron-decay halos of characteristic size ~ 100 kpc.

  5. Electron geodesic acoustic modes in electron temperature gradient mode turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Johan; Nordman, Hans [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Singh, Raghvendra; Kaw, Predhiman [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

    2012-08-15

    In this work, the first demonstration of an electron branch of the geodesic acoustic mode (el-GAM) driven by electron temperature gradient (ETG) modes is presented. The work is based on a fluid description of the ETG mode retaining non-adiabatic ions and the dispersion relation for el-GAMs driven nonlinearly by ETG modes is derived. A new saturation mechanism for ETG turbulence through the interaction with el-GAMs is found, resulting in a significantly enhanced ETG turbulence saturation level compared to the mixing length estimate.

  6. The decay of hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-11-01

    The formation of hot compound nuclei in intermediate-energy heavy ion reactions is discussed. The statistical decay of such compound nuclei is responsible for the abundant emission of complex fragments and high energy gamma rays. 43 refs., 23 figs.

  7. Non-exponential Auger decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishkhanyan, A M

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of non-exponential Auger decay of atoms irradiated by X-ray photons. This effect can occur at times, which are greater than the lifetime of a system under consideration. The mechanism for non-exponential depletion of an initial quasi-stationary state is the cutting of the electron energy spectrum of final continuous states at small energies. Then the Auger decay amplitude obeys power-law dependence on long observation times.

  8. CP violation in sbottom decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank F. Deppisch; Olaf Kittel

    2010-03-26

    We study CP asymmetries in two-body decays of bottom squarks into charginos and tops. These asymmetries probe the SUSY CP phases of the sbottom and the chargino sector in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. We identify the MSSM parameter space where the CP asymmetries are sizeable, and analyze the feasibility of their observation at the LHC. As a result, potentially detectable CP asymmetries in sbottom decays are found, which motivates further detailed experimental studies for probing the SUSY CP phases.

  9. Evidence of CP violation in B -> hhh charmless decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    We present the first evidence of CP violation in the B+? pi+pi-pi+,  B+? K+pi+pi-, B+? K+K-pi+ and B+?K+K-K+ decays using the 1.0 fb-1 of data collected by the LHCb experiment during 2011. The results show that the 3pi and Kpipi channels present a positive asymmetry while the KKpi and KKK modes present a negative asymmetry. We also study the variation of the CP violation effects in the phase space of each three-body decay.  We find significant inhomogeneities that reveal regions with particularly large asymmetries in the pipi and KK low mass regions in B+?pi+pi-pi+ and B+?K+K-pi+ respectively.

  10. Search for a light Higgs boson decaying to two gluons or ss? in the radiative decays of ?(1S)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; et al

    2013-08-06

    We search for the decay ?(1S)??A?, A??gg or ss?, where A? is the pseudoscalar light Higgs boson predicted by the next-to-minimal supersymmetric Standard Model. We use a sample of (17.6±0.3)×10? ?(1S) mesons produced in the BABAR experiment via e?e???(2S)??????(1S). We see no significant signal and set 90%-confidence-level upper limits on the product branching fraction B(?(1S)??A?)·B(A??gg or ss?) ranging from 10?? to 10?² for A? masses in the range 0.5–9.0 GeV/c².

  11. Search for a light Higgs boson decaying to two gluons or ss? in the radiative decays of ?(1S)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Bougher, J.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Schubert, K.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Anulli, F.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindemann, D.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wang, W. F.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Zambito, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2013-08-01

    We search for the decay ?(1S)??A?, A??gg or ss?, where A? is the pseudoscalar light Higgs boson predicted by the next-to-minimal supersymmetric Standard Model. We use a sample of (17.6±0.3)×10? ?(1S) mesons produced in the BABAR experiment via e?e???(2S)??????(1S). We see no significant signal and set 90%-confidence-level upper limits on the product branching fraction B(?(1S)??A?)·B(A??gg or ss?) ranging from 10?? to 10?² for A? masses in the range 0.5–9.0 GeV/c².

  12. Signature of nonexponential nuclear decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Ray; A K Sikdar; A De

    2015-03-18

    Precision tests of decay law of radioactive nuclei have not so far found any deviation from the exponential decay law at early time, as predicted by quantum mechanics. In this paper, we show that the quantum decoherence time (i.e. the timescale of nonexponential decay) of the quasifission or fission process should be of the order of attosecond considering the atom of the fissioning nucleus as a quantum detector. Hence, the observed decay timescale of the quasifission or fission process of even highly excited (EX greater than 50 MeV) transuranium and uraniumlike complexes should be rather long (of the order of attosecond) in spite of their very fast exponential decay timescale (of the order of zeptosecond) as measured by the nuclear techniques. Recent controversy regarding the observation of very long (of the order of attosecond ) and very short (of the order of zeptosecond ) quasifission or fission timescales for similar systems at similar excitation energies as obtained by direct techniques (crystal blocking, X ray fission fragment) and nuclear techniques could be interpreted as evidence for nonexponential decays in nuclear systems

  13. Measurements of the Branching fractions for $B_(s) -> D_(s)???$ and $?_b^0 -> ?_c^+???$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LHCb Collaboration; R. Aaij; B. Adeva; M. Adinolfi; C. Adrover; A. Affolder; Z. Ajaltouni; J. Albrecht; F. Alessio; M. Alexander; G. Alkhazov; P. Alvarez Cartelle; A. A. Alves Jr; S. Amato; Y. Amhis; J. Anderson; R. B. Appleby; O. Aquines Gutierrez; F. Archilli; L. Arrabito; A. Artamonov; M. Artuso; E. Aslanides; G. Auriemma; S. Bachmann; J. J. Back; D. S. Bailey; V. Balagura; W. Baldini; R. J. Barlow; C. Barschel; S. Barsuk; W. Barter; A. Bates; C. Bauer; Th. Bauer; A. Bay; I. Bediaga; K. Belous; I. Belyaev; E. Ben-Haim; M. Benayoun; G. Bencivenni; S. Benson; J. Benton; R. Bernet; M. -O. Bettler; M. van Beuzekom; A. Bien; S. Bifani; A. Bizzeti; P. M. Bjørnstad; T. Blake; F. Blanc; C. Blanks; J. Blouw; S. Blusk; A. Bobrov; V. Bocci; A. Bondar; N. Bondar; W. Bonivento; S. Borghi; A. Borgia; T. J. V. Bowcock; C. Bozzi; T. Brambach; J. van den Brand; J. Bressieux; D. Brett; S. Brisbane; M. Britsch; T. Britton; N. H. Brook; H. Brown; A. Büchler-Germann; I. Burducea; A. Bursche; J. Buytaert; S. Cadeddu; J. M. Caicedo Carvajal; O. Callot; M. Calvi; M. Calvo Gomez; A. Camboni; P. Campana; A. Carbone; G. Carboni; R. Cardinale; A. Cardini; L. Carson; K. Carvalho Akiba; G. Casse; M. Cattaneo; M. Charles; Ph. Charpentier; N. Chiapolini; K. Ciba; X. Cid Vidal; G. Ciezarek; P. E. L. Clarke; M. Clemencic; H. V. Cliff; J. Closier; C. Coca; V. Coco; J. Cogan; P. Collins; F. Constantin; G. Conti; A. Contu; A. Cook; M. Coombes; G. Corti; G. A. Cowan; R. Currie; B. D'Almagne; C. D'Ambrosio; P. David; I. De Bonis; S. De Capua; M. De Cian; F. De Lorenzi; J. M. De Miranda; L. De Paula; P. De Simone; D. Decamp; M. Deckenhoff; H. Degaudenzi; M. Deissenroth; L. Del Buono; C. Deplano; O. Deschamps; F. Dettori; J. Dickens; H. Dijkstra; P. Diniz Batista; S. Donleavy; A. Dosil Suárez; D. Dossett; A. Dovbnya; F. Dupertuis; R. Dzhelyadin; C. Eames; S. Easo; U. Egede; V. Egorychev; S. Eidelman; D. van Eijk; F. Eisele; S. Eisenhardt; R. Ekelhof; L. Eklund; Ch. Elsasser; D. G. d'Enterria; D. Esperante Pereira; L. Estéve; A. Falabella; E. Fanchini; C. Färber; G. Fardell; C. Farinelli; S. Farry; V. Fave; V. Fernandez Albor; M. Ferro-Luzzi; S. Filippov; C. Fitzpatrick; M. Fontana; F. Fontanelli; R. Forty; M. Frank; C. Frei; M. Frosini; S. Furcas; A. Gallas Torreira; D. Galli; M. Gandelman; P. Gandini; Y. Gao; J-C. Garnier; J. Garofoli; J. Garra Tico; L. Garrido; C. Gaspar; N. Gauvin; M. Gersabeck; T. Gershon; Ph. Ghez; V. Gibson; V. V. Gligorov; C. Göbel; D. Golubkov; A. Golutvin; A. Gomes; H. Gordon; M. Grabalosa Gándara; R. Graciani Diaz; L. A. Granado Cardoso; E. Graugés; G. Graziani; A. Grecu; S. Gregson; B. Gui; E. Gushchin; Yu. Guz; T. Gys; G. Haefeli; C. Haen; S. C. Haines; T. Hampson; S. Hansmann-Menzemer; R. Harji; N. Harnew; J. Harrison; P. F. Harrison; J. He; V. Heijne; K. Hennessy; P. Henrard; J. A. Hernando Morata; E. van Herwijnen; E. Hicks; W. Hofmann; K. Holubyev; P. Hopchev; W. Hulsbergen; P. Hunt; T. Huse; R. S. Huston; D. Hutchcroft; D. Hynds; V. Iakovenko; P. Ilten; J. Imong; R. Jacobsson; A. Jaeger; M. Jahjah Hussein; E. Jans; F. Jansen; P. Jaton; B. Jean-Marie; F. Jing; M. John; D. Johnson; C. R. Jones; B. Jost; S. Kandybei; M. Karacson; T. M. Karbach; J. Keaveney; U. Kerzel; T. Ketel; A. Keune; B. Khanji; Y. M. Kim; M. Knecht; S. Koblitz; P. Koppenburg; A. Kozlinskiy; L. Kravchuk; K. Kreplin; M. Kreps; G. Krocker; P. Krokovny; F. Kruse; K. Kruzelecki; M. Kucharczyk; S. Kukulak; R. Kumar; T. Kvaratskheliya; V. N. La Thi; D. Lacarrere; G. Lafferty; A. Lai; D. Lambert; R. W. Lambert; E. Lanciotti; G. Lanfranchi; C. Langenbruch; T. Latham; R. Le Gac; J. van Leerdam; J. -P. Lees; R. Lefévre; A. Leflat; J. Lefrançois; O. Leroy; T. Lesiak; L. Li; L. Li Gioi; M. Lieng; M. Liles; R. Lindner; C. Linn; B. Liu; G. Liu; J. H. Lopes; E. Lopez Asamar; N. Lopez-March; J. Luisier; F. Machefert; I. V. Machikhiliyan; F. Maciuc; O. Maev; J. Magnin; S. Malde; R. M. D. Mamunur; G. Manca; G. Mancinelli; N. Mangiafave; U. Marconi; R. Märki; J. Marks; G. Martellotti; A. Martens; L. Martin; A. Martín Sánchez; D. Martinez Santos; A. Massafferri; Z. Mathe; C. Matteuzzi; M. Matveev; E. Maurice; B. Maynard; A. Mazurov; G. McGregor; R. McNulty; C. Mclean; M. Meissner; M. Merk; J. Merkel; R. Messi; S. Miglioranzi; D. A. Milanes; M. -N. Minard; S. Monteil; D. Moran; P. Morawski; R. Mountain; I. Mous; F. Muheim; K. Müller; R. Muresan; B. Muryn; M. Musy; J. Mylroie-Smith; P. Naik; T. Nakada; R. Nandakumar; J. Nardulli; I. Nasteva; M. Nedos; M. Needham; N. Neufeld; C. Nguyen-Mau; M. Nicol; S. Nies; V. Niess; N. Nikitin; A. Oblakowska-Mucha; V. Obraztsov; S. Oggero; S. Ogilvy; O. Okhrimenko; R. Oldeman; M. Orlandea; J. M. Otalora Goicochea; P. Owen; B. Pal; J. Palacios; M. Palutan; J. Panman; A. Papanestis; M. Pappagallo; C. Parkes; C. J. Parkinson; G. Passaleva; G. D. Patel; M. Patel; S. K. Paterson

    2011-09-30

    Branching fractions of the decays $H_b\\to H_c\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ relative to $H_b\\to H_c\\pi^-$ are presented, where $H_b$ ($H_c$) represents B^0-bar($D^+$), $B^-$ ($D^0$), B_s^0-bar ($D_s^+$) and $\\Lambda_b^0$ ($\\Lambda_c^+$). The measurements are performed with the LHCb detector using 35${\\rm pb^{-1}}$ of data collected at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV. The ratios of branching fractions are measured to be B(B^0-bar -> D^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-)/ B(B^0-bar -> D^+\\pi^-) = 2.38\\pm0.11\\pm0.21 B(B^- -> D^0\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-) / B(B^- -> D^0\\pi^-) = 1.27\\pm0.06\\pm0.11 B(B_s^0-bar -> D_s^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-) / B(B_s^0-bar -> D_s^+\\pi^-) = 2.01\\pm0.37\\pm0.20 B(\\Lambda_b^0->\\Lambda_c^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-) / B(\\Lambda_b^0 -> \\Lambda_c^+\\pi^-) = 1.43\\pm0.16\\pm0.13. We also report measurements of partial decay rates of these decays to excited charm hadrons. These results are of comparable or higher precision than existing measurements.

  14. CLNS 07/2005 Measurement of Absolute Hadronic Branching Fractions of D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Among measurements for three D 0 and six D + modes, we obtain reference branching fractions B(D 0 ! K \\Gamma Ã? + ) = (3:891 \\Sigma 0:035 \\Sigma 0:059 \\Sigma 0:035)% and B(D + ! K \\Gamma Ã? + Ã? + ) = (9:14 \\Sigma 0:10 \\Sigma 0:16 \\Sigma 0:07)%, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is all

  15. Linear and multilinear fractional operators: weighted inequalities, sharp bounds, and other properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moen, Kabe

    2009-04-27

    In this work we consider various fractional operators, including the classical fractional integral operators, related fractional maximal functions, multilinear fractional integral operators, and multisublinear fractional ...

  16. Observation of the decay Xi0 ---> Sigma+ mu- anti-nu(mu)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alavi-Harati, A.; Alexopoulos, T.; Arenton, M.; Barbosa, R.F.; Barker, A.R.; Barrio, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellavance, A.; Blucher, E.; Bock, G.J.; Bown, C.; Bright, S.; Cheu, E.; Coleman, R.; Corcoran, M.D.; Cox, B.; Erwin, A.R.; Escobar, C.O.; Ford, R.; Glazov, A.; Golossanov, A.; /Arizona U. /UCLA /UC, San Diego /Campinas State U. /Chicago U., EFI /Colorado U. /Elmhurst Coll. /Fermilab /Osaka U. /Rice U. /Sao Paulo U. /Virginia U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-04-01

    The {Xi}{sup 0} muon semi-leptonic decay has been observed for the first time with nine identified events using the KTeV beam line and detector at Fermilab. The decay is normalized to the {Xi}{sup 0} beta decay mode and yields a value for the ratio of decay rates {Lambda}({Xi}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}})/{Lambda}({Xi}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}e{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub e}) of (1.8{sub -0.5}{sup +0.7}(stat.) {+-} 0.2(syst.)) x 10{sup -2} at the 68% confidence level. This is in agreement with the SU(3) flavor symmetric quark model.

  17. Nuclear Shell Model Analyses and Predictions of Double-Beta Decay Observables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horoi, Mihai [Department of Physics, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, Michigan, 48859 (United States)

    2010-11-24

    Recent results from neutrino oscillation experiments have convincingly demonstrated that neutrinos have mass and they can mix. The neutrinoless double beta decay is the most sensitive process to determine the absolute scale of the neutrino masses, and the only one that can distinguish whether neutrino is a Dirac or a Majorana particle. A key ingredient for extracting the absolute neutrino masses from neutrinoless double beta decay experiments is a precise knowledge of the nuclear matrix elements (NME) for this process. Newly developed shell model approaches for computing the NME and half-lifes for the two-neutrino and neutrinoless double beta decay modes using modern effective interactions are presented. The implications of the new results on the experimental limits of the effective neutrino mass are discussed by comparing the decays of {sup 48}Ca and {sup 76}Ge.

  18. Supersymmetric QCD Corrections to the Charged Higgs Boson Decay of the Top Quark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaume Guasch; Ricardo A. Jimenez; Joan SOLA

    1995-07-31

    The one-loop supersymmetric QCD quantum effects on the width of the unconventional top quark decay mode $t\\rightarrow H^{+}\\, b$ are evaluated within the MSSM. The study of this process is useful to hint at the supersymmetric nature of the charged Higgs emerging from that decay. Remarkably enough, recent calculations of supersymmetric corrections to $Z$-boson observables have shown that the particular conditions by which the decay $t\\rightarrow H^{+}\\, b$ becomes competitive with the standard decay $t\\rightarrow W^{+}\\,b$ have a chance to be realized in nature. This further motivates us to focus our attention on the dynamics of $t\\rightarrow H^{+}\\, b$ as an excellent laboratory to unravel Supersymmetry at the quantum level in future experiments at Tevatron and at LHC.

  19. Multi-dimensional laser mode combs (mode hyper-combs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Alon

    2012-01-01

    Laser frequency combs, as most lasers, are one-dimensional. Here we present a realization of d-dimensional laser mode lattices (mode hyper-combs) with unique properties. They are constructed from regular 1-dimensional combs by multi-frequency modulation in active mode-locking (AML). The hyper-comb, with near neighbor mode interaction and noise functioning as temperature, is mapped to interacting magnetic spin-lattices in the spherical-model, which is one of the few statistical-mechanics systems soluble in all dimensions. The important result is that such systems have, in d>2 dimensions, a phase-transition to a global mode-phase-ordered hyper-comb. It changes the nature of AML lasers, giving ultimately short and robust pulses which can capture very broad frequency bandwidths. Additionally, the hyper-combs can serve as a rare physical realization of the spherical-model in any dimension.

  20. Excitation of kinetic geodesic acoustic modes by drift waves in nonuniform plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu, Z.; Chen, L.; Dept. Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of California, Irvine, California 92697-4575 ; Zonca, F.; Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.P. 65 - I-00044 - Frascati

    2014-02-15

    Effects of system nonuniformities and kinetic dispersiveness on the spontaneous excitation of Geodesic Acoustic Mode (GAM) by Drift Wave (DW) turbulence are investigated based on nonlinear gyrokinetic theory. The coupled nonlinear equations describing parametric decay of DW into GAM and DW lower sideband are derived and then solved both analytically and numerically to investigate the effects on the parametric decay process due to system nonuniformities, such as nonuniform diamagnetic frequency, finite radial envelope of DW pump, and kinetic dispersiveness. It is found that the parametric decay process is a convective instability for typical tokamak parameters when finite group velocities of DW and GAM associated with kinetic dispersiveness and finite radial envelope are taken into account. When, however, nonuniformity of diamagnetic frequency is taken into account, the parametric decay process becomes, time asymptotically, a quasi-exponentially growing absolute instability.

  1. Measurement of the Branching fraction ratio B ---> D K / B ---> D pi with the CDF II detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Squillacioti, Paola; /INFN, Pisa /Siena U.

    2006-11-01

    In this thesis the author has described the first measurement performed at a hadron collider of the branching fraction of the Cabibbo-suppressed mode B{sup +} {yields} {bar D}{sup 0} K{sup +}. The analysis has been performed with 360 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector.

  2. Integral equations, fractional calculus and shift operator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Babusci; G. Dattoli; D. Sacchetti

    2010-07-29

    We present an extension of a previously developed method employing the formalism of the fractional derivatives to solve new classes of integral equations. This method uses different forms of integral operators that generalizes the exponential shift operator.

  3. Bio-oil fractionation and condensation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Robert C; Jones, Samuel T; Pollard, Anthony

    2013-07-02

    A method of fractionating bio-oil vapors which involves providing bio-oil vapors comprising bio-oil constituents is described. The bio-oil vapors are cooled in a first stage which comprises a condenser having passages for the bio-oil separated by a heat conducting wall from passages for a coolant. The coolant in the condenser of the first stage is maintained at a substantially constant temperature, set at a temperature in the range of 75 to 100.degree. C., to condense a first liquid fraction of liquefied bio-oil constituents in the condenser of the first stage. The first liquid fraction of liquified bio-oil constituents from the condenser in the first stage is collected. Also described are steps for subsequently recovering further liquid fractions of liquefied bio-oil constituents. Particular compositions of bio-oil condensation products are also described.

  4. Algebra of Fractions of Algebra with Conjugation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleks Kleyn

    2012-05-09

    In the paper, I considered construction of algebra of fractions of algebra with conjugation. I also considered algebra of polynomials and algebra of rational mappings over algebra with conjugation.

  5. Unconventional Sequence of Fractional Quantum Hall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yacoby, Amir

    Unconventional Sequence of Fractional Quantum Hall States in Suspended Graphene Benjamin E. Feldman- netic field B to a two-dimensional elec- tron gas (2DEG) gives rise to flat energy bands called Landau

  6. The Proposed Majorana 76Ge Double-Beta Decay Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Anderson, Dale N.; Arthur, Richard J.; Avignone, Frank T.; Baktash, Cryus; Ball, Thedore; Barabash, Alexander S.; Bertrand, F.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Brudanin, V.; Bugg, William; Champagne, A. E.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Cianciolo, Thomas V.; Collar, J. I.; Creswick, R. W.; Descovich, M.; Di Marco, Marie; Doe, P. J.; Dunham, Glen C.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egerov, V.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, Steven R.; Emanuel, A.; Fallon, Paul; Farach, H. A.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Gehman, Victor; Grzywacz, Robert; Hallin, A.; Hazma, R.; Henning, R.; Hime, Andrew; Hossbach, Todd W.; Jordan, David V.; Kazkaz, K.; Kephart, Jeremy; King, G. S.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Lesko, Kevin; Luke, P.; Luzum, M.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; McDonald, A.; Mei, Dongming; Miley, Harry S.; Mills, G. B.; Mokhtarani, A.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Palms, John M.; Poon, Alan; Radford, D. C.; Reeves, James H.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Runkle, Robert C.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof P.; Saburov, Konstantin; Sandukovsky, Viatcheslav; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Tornow, W.; Tull, C.; van de Water, R. G.; Vanushin, Igor; Vetter, Kai; Warner, Ray A.; Wilkerson, John F.; Wouters, Jan M.; Young , A. R.; Yumatov, V.

    2005-01-01

    The proposed Majorana experiment is based on an array of segmented intrinsic Ge detectors with a total mass of 500 kg of Ge isotopically enriched to 86% in 76Ge. Background reduction will be accomplished by: material selection, detector segmentation, pulse shape analysis, electro-formation of copper parts, and granularity of detector spacing. The predicted experimental sensitivity for measurement of the neutrinoless double-beta decay mode of 76Ge, over a data acquisition period of 5000 kg•y, is ~ 4?1027 y.

  7. Cosmological Bounds on an Invisibly Decaying Higgs Boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Bertolami; M. C. Bento; R. Rosenfeld

    2001-11-21

    We derive bounds on the Higgs boson coupling $g^{\\prime}$ to a stable light scalar which is regarded as a collisional dark matter candidate. We study the behaviour of this scalar, that we refer to as phion ($\\phi$), in the early Universe for different ranges of its mass. We find that a phion in the mass range of $100 \\mev$ is excluded, while if its mass is about $1 \\gev$, a rather large coupling constant, $g^{\\prime} \\gsim 2$, and $m_h \\lsim 130 \\gev$ are required in order to avoid overabundance. In the latter case, the invisible decay mode of the Higgs boson is dominant.

  8. Summary of CP Violation in D -> hh Decays at Belle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric White

    2013-01-20

    Although CP violation is predicted to be small in the Standard Model, there exists a continuing theoretical interest within the charm sector due to enhancements of CPV through new physics processes. We present an overview of the measurements of direct CP violation in the charm sector at Belle. We give a brief review of the theory of CP violation in charm physics, then discuss recent measurements for the decay modes $D^{+}_{(s)}\\rightarrow \\phi\\pi^{+}$; $D^{0}\\rightarrow K^{0}_{S}\\pi^{0}, K^{0}_{S}\\eta^{(\\prime)}$; $D^{+}\\rightarrow \\pi^{+}\\eta^{(\\prime)}$; and $D^{+}\\rightarrow K^{0}_{S}\\pi^{+}$.

  9. Extending Bauer's corollary to fractional derivatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David W. Dreisigmeyer; Peter M. Young

    2004-02-11

    We comment on the method of Dreisigmeyer and Young [D. W. Dreisigmeyer and P. M. Young, J. Phys. A \\textbf{36}, 8297, (2003)] to model nonconservative systems with fractional derivatives. It was previously hoped that using fractional derivatives in an action would allow us to derive a single retarded equation of motion using a variational principle. It is proven that, under certain reasonable assumptions, the method of Dreisigmeyer and Young fails.

  10. Development of plutonium aerosol fractionation system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mekala, Malla R.

    1993-01-01

    DEVELOPMENT OF A PLUTONIUM AEROSOL FRACTIONATION SYSTEM A Thesis by MALLA R. MEKALA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... 1993 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DEVELOPMENT OP A PLUTONIUM AEROSOL FRACTIONATION SYSTEM A Thesis by MALLA R. MEKALA Approved as to style and content by: A. R. McFarland (Chair of Committee) N. K. Anand (Mer toer) (', & C. B...

  11. Thermal entanglement of bosonic modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Asoudeh

    2006-07-21

    We study the change of entanglement under general linear transformation of modes in a bosonic system and determine the conditions under which entanglement can be generated under such transformation. As an example we consider the thermal entanglement between the vibrational modes of two coupled oscillators and determine the temperature above which quantum correlations are destroyed by thermal fluctuations.

  12. Time-dependent Dalitz-Plot Analysis of the Charmless Decay B^0 -> K^0S Pi Pi- at BABAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilic, J

    2009-10-17

    A time-dependent amplitude analysis of B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays is performed in order to extract the CP violation parameters of f{sub 0}(980)K{sub S}{sup 0} and {rho}{sup 0}(770)K{sub S}{sup 0} and direct CP asymmetries of K*{sup +}(892){pi}{sup -}. The results are obtained from the final BABAR data sample of (465 {+-} 5)10{sup 6} B{bar B} decays, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC. The time dependent CP asymmetry for f{sub 0}(980)K{sub S}{sup 0} and {rho}{sup 0}(770)K{sub S}{sup 0} are measured to be S(f{sub 0}(980)K{sub S}{sup 0}) = -0.97 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.01 {+-} 0.01, and S({rho}{sup 0}(770)K{sub S}{sup 0}) = 0.67 {+-} 0.20 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.04, respectively. In decays to K*{sup +}(892){pi}{sup -} the direct CP asymmetry is found to be A{sub CP}(K*{sup {+-}}(892){pi}{sup {-+}}) = -0.18 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.04 {+-} 0.00. The relative phases between B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup +}(892){pi}{sup -} and {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup -}(892){pi}{sup +}, relevant for the extraction of the unitarity triangle angle {gamma}, is measured to be {Delta}{phi}(K*(892){pi}) = (34.9 {+-} 23.1 {+-} 7.5 {+-} 4.7){sup o}, where uncertainties are statistical, systematic and model-dependent, respectively. Fit fractions, direct CP asymmetries and the relative phases of different other resonant modes have also been measured. A new method for extracting longitudinal shower development information from longitudinally unsegmented calorimeters is also presented. This method has been implemented as a part of the BABAR final particle identification algorithm. A significant improvement in low momenta muon identification at BABAR is obtained.

  13. Search for Proton Decay via p -> e^+ pi^0 and p -> mu^+ pi^0 in a Large Water Cherenkov Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; :; H. Nishino; S. Clark

    2009-04-09

    We have searched for proton decays via p -> e^+ pi^0 and p -> mu^+ pi^0 using data from a 91.7 kiloton year exposure of Super-Kamiokande-I and a 49.2 kiloton year exposure of Super-Kamiokande-II. No candidate events were observed with expected backgrounds induced by atmospheric neutrinos of 0.3 events for each decay mode. From these results, we set lower limits on the partial lifetime of 8.2$\\times10^{33}$ and 6.6$\\times10^{33}$ years at 90% confidence level for p -> e^+ pi^0 and p -> mu^+ pi^0 modes, respectively.

  14. Signature of nonexponential nuclear decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, A; De, A

    2015-01-01

    Precision tests of decay law of radioactive nuclei have not so far found any deviation from the exponential decay law at early time, as predicted by quantum mechanics. In this paper, we show that the quantum decoherence time (i.e. the timescale of nonexponential decay) of the quasifission or fission process should be of the order of attosecond considering the atom of the fissioning nucleus as a quantum detector. Hence, the observed decay timescale of the quasifission or fission process of even highly excited (EX greater than 50 MeV) transuranium and uraniumlike complexes should be rather long (of the order of attosecond) in spite of their very fast exponential decay timescale (of the order of zeptosecond) as measured by the nuclear techniques. Recent controversy regarding the observation of very long (of the order of attosecond ) and very short (of the order of zeptosecond ) quasifission or fission timescales for similar systems at similar excitation energies as obtained by direct techniques (crystal blocking...

  15. Beauty Production in Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA using Decays into Electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Shehzadi

    2011-09-22

    The results from a recent analysis on beauty production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA using decays into electrons from the ZEUS collaboration are presented. The fractions of events containing b quarks were extracted from a likelihood fit using variables sensitive to electron identification as well as to semileptonic decays. Total and differential cross sections were measured and compared with next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. The beauty contribution to the proton structure function F_2 was extracted from the double-differential cross sections.

  16. Strong constraints on the rare decays Bs -> mu+ mu- and B0 -> mu+ mu-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LHCb collaboration; R. Aaij; C. Abellan Beteta; A. Adametz; B. Adeva; M. Adinolfi; C. Adrover; A. Affolder; Z. Ajaltouni; J. Albrecht; F. Alessio; M. Alexander; S. Ali; G. Alkhazov; P. Alvarez Cartelle; A. A. Alves Jr; S. Amato; Y. Amhis; J. Anderson; R. B. Appleby; O. Aquines Gutierrez; F. Archilli; A. Artamonov; M. Artuso; E. Aslanides; G. Auriemma; S. Bachmann; J. J. Back; V. Balagura; W. Baldini; R. J. Barlow; C. Barschel; S. Barsuk; W. Barter; A. Bates; C. Bauer; Th. Bauer; A. Bay; J. Beddow; I. Bediaga; S. Belogurov; K. Belous; I. Belyaev; E. Ben-Haim; M. Benayoun; G. Bencivenni; S. Benson; J. Benton; R. Bernet; M. -O. Bettler; M. van Beuzekom; A. Bien; S. Bifani; T. Bird; A. Bizzeti; P. M. Bjørnstad; T. Blake; F. Blanc; C. Blanks; J. Blouw; S. Blusk; A. Bobrov; V. Bocci; A. Bondar; N. Bondar; W. Bonivento; S. Borghi; A. Borgia; T. J. V. Bowcock; C. Bozzi; T. Brambach; J. van den Brand; J. Bressieux; D. Brett; M. Britsch; T. Britton; N. H. Brook; H. Brown; A. Büchler-Germann; I. Burducea; A. Bursche; J. Buytaert; S. Cadeddu; O. Callot; M. Calvi; M. Calvo Gomez; A. Camboni; P. Campana; A. Carbone; G. Carboni; R. Cardinale; A. Cardini; L. Carson; K. Carvalho Akiba; G. Casse; M. Cattaneo; Ch. Cauet; M. Charles; Ph. Charpentier; N. Chiapolini; M. Chrzaszcz; K. Ciba; X. Cid Vidal; G. Ciezarek; P. E. L. Clarke; M. Clemencic; H. V. Cliff; J. Closier; C. Coca; V. Coco; J. Cogan; E. Cogneras; P. Collins; A. Comerma-Montells; A. Contu; A. Cook; M. Coombes; G. Corti; B. Couturier; G. A. Cowan; R. Currie; C. D'Ambrosio; P. David; P. N. Y. David; I. De Bonis; K. De Bruyn; S. De Capua; M. De Cian; J. M. De Miranda; L. De Paula; P. De Simone; D. Decamp; M. Deckenhoff; H. Degaudenzi; L. Del Buono; C. Deplano; D. Derkach; O. Deschamps; F. Dettori; J. Dickens; H. Dijkstra; P. Diniz Batista; F. Domingo Bonal; S. Donleavy; F. Dordei; P. Dornan; A. Dosil Suárez; D. Dossett; A. Dovbnya; F. Dupertuis; R. Dzhelyadin; A. Dziurda; A. Dzyuba; S. Easo; U. Egede; V. Egorychev; S. Eidelman; D. van Eijk; F. Eisele; S. Eisenhardt; R. Ekelhof; L. Eklund; Ch. Elsasser; D. Elsby; D. Esperante Pereira; A. Falabella; C. Färber; G. Fardell; C. Farinelli; S. Farry; V. Fave; V. Fernandez Albor; M. Ferro-Luzzi; S. Filippov; C. Fitzpatrick; M. Fontana; F. Fontanelli; R. Forty; O. Francisco; M. Frank; C. Frei; M. Frosini; S. Furcas; A. Gallas Torreira; D. Galli; M. Gandelman; P. Gandini; Y. Gao; J-C. Garnier; J. Garofoli; J. Garra Tico; L. Garrido; D. Gascon; C. Gaspar; R. Gauld; N. Gauvin; M. Gersabeck; T. Gershon; Ph. Ghez; V. Gibson; V. V. Gligorov; C. Göbel; D. Golubkov; A. Golutvin; A. Gomes; H. Gordon; M. Grabalosa Gándara; R. Graciani Diaz; L. A. Granado Cardoso; E. Graugés; G. Graziani; A. Grecu; E. Greening; S. Gregson; O. Grünberg; B. Gui; E. Gushchin; Yu. Guz; T. Gys; C. Hadjivasiliou; G. Haefeli; C. Haen; S. C. Haines; T. Hampson; S. Hansmann-Menzemer; N. Harnew; J. Harrison; P. F. Harrison; T. Hartmann; J. He; V. Heijne; K. Hennessy; P. Henrard; J. A. Hernando Morata; E. van Herwijnen; E. Hicks; K. Holubyev; P. Hopchev; W. Hulsbergen; P. Hunt; T. Huse; R. S. Huston; D. Hutchcroft; D. Hynds; V. Iakovenko; P. Ilten; J. Imong; R. Jacobsson; A. Jaeger; M. Jahjah Hussein; E. Jans; F. Jansen; P. Jaton; B. Jean-Marie; F. Jing; M. John; D. Johnson; C. R. Jones; B. Jost; M. Kaballo; S. Kandybei; M. Karacson; T. M. Karbach; J. Keaveney; I. R. Kenyon; U. Kerzel; T. Ketel; A. Keune; B. Khanji; Y. M. Kim; M. Knecht; I. Komarov; R. F. Koopman; P. Koppenburg; M. Korolev; A. Kozlinskiy; L. Kravchuk; K. Kreplin; M. Kreps; G. Krocker; P. Krokovny; F. Kruse; K. Kruzelecki; M. Kucharczyk; V. Kudryavtsev; T. Kvaratskheliya; V. N. La Thi; D. Lacarrere; G. Lafferty; A. Lai; D. Lambert; R. W. Lambert; E. Lanciotti; G. Lanfranchi; C. Langenbruch; T. Latham; C. Lazzeroni; R. Le Gac; J. van Leerdam; J. -P. Lees; R. Lefévre; A. Leflat; J. Lefrançois; O. Leroy; T. Lesiak; L. Li; Y. Li; L. Li Gioi; M. Lieng; M. Liles; R. Lindner; C. Linn; B. Liu; G. Liu; J. von Loeben; J. H. Lopes; E. Lopez Asamar; N. Lopez-March; H. Lu; J. Luisier; A. Mac Raighne; F. Machefert; I. V. Machikhiliyan; F. Maciuc; O. Maev; J. Magnin; S. Malde; R. M. D. Mamunur; G. Manca; G. Mancinelli; N. Mangiafave; U. Marconi; R. Märki; J. Marks; G. Martellotti; A. Martens; L. Martin; A. Martín Sánchez; M. Martinelli; D. Martinez Santos; A. Massafferri; Z. Mathe; C. Matteuzzi; M. Matveev; E. Maurice; B. Maynard; A. Mazurov; G. McGregor; R. McNulty; M. Meissner; M. Merk; J. Merkel; S. Miglioranzi; D. A. Milanes; M. -N. Minard; J. Molina Rodriguez; S. Monteil; D. Moran; P. Morawski; R. Mountain; I. Mous; F. Muheim; K. Müller; R. Muresan; B. Muryn; B. Muster; J. Mylroie-Smith; P. Naik; T. Nakada; R. Nandakumar; I. Nasteva; M. Needham; N. Neufeld; A. D. Nguyen; C. Nguyen-Mau; M. Nicol; V. Niess; N. Nikitin; T. Nikodem; A. Nomerotski

    2012-04-26

    A search for Bs -> mu+ mu- and B0 -> mu+ mu- decays is performed using 1.0 fb^-1 of pp collision data collected at \\sqrt{s}=7 TeV with the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. For both decays the number of observed events is consistent with expectation from background and Standard Model signal predictions. Upper limits on the branching fractions are determined to be BR(Bs -> mu+ mu-) mu+ mu-) < 1.0 (0.81) x 10^-9 at 95% (90%) confidence level.

  17. No evidence of the 17-keV neutrino in the decay of [sup 71]Ge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiGregorio, D.E.; Gil, S.; Huck, H.; Batista, E.R.; Ferrero, A.M.J.; Gattone, A.O. (Departamento de Fisica, TANDAR, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avenida del Libertador 8250, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina))

    1993-06-01

    We have measured the internal bremsstrahlung spectrum of the electron capture decay of [sup 71]Ge in search for a possible mass component of the emitted neutrino. The main relevance of this experiment is given by the collected statistics which is 20 times larger than in a previously published work studying the same decay. Analyses of the data exclude the presence of a massive component of 17.2[sub [minus]1.1][sup +1.3] keV and (1.6[plus minus]0.7)% mixing fraction claimed by Zlimen [ital et] [ital al]. for this same nucleus, at the 99.0% confidence level.

  18. Baryonic matter perturbations in decaying vacuum cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marttens, R.F. vom; Zimdahl, W.; Hipólito-Ricaldi, W.S. E-mail: wiliam.ricaldi@ufes.br

    2014-08-01

    We consider the perturbation dynamics for the cosmic baryon fluid and determine the corresponding power spectrum for a ?(t)CDM model in which a cosmological term decays into dark matter linearly with the Hubble rate. The model is tested by a joint analysis of data from supernovae of type Ia (SNIa) (Constitution and Union 2.1), baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO), the position of the first peak of the anisotropy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and large-scale-structure (LSS) data (SDSS DR7). While the homogeneous and isotropic background dynamics is only marginally influenced by the baryons, there are modifications on the perturbative level if a separately conserved baryon fluid is included. Considering the present baryon fraction as a free parameter, we reproduce the observed abundance of the order of 5% independently of the dark-matter abundance which is of the order of 32% for this model. Generally, the concordance between background and perturbation dynamics is improved if baryons are explicitly taken into account.

  19. DISCOVERY OF A NEUTRON STAR OSCILLATION MODE DURING A SUPERBURST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strohmayer, Tod [Astrophysics Science Division and Joint Space-Science Institute, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mahmoodifar, Simin [Department of Physics and Joint Space-Science Institute, University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Neutron stars are among the most compact objects in the universe and provide a unique laboratory for the study of cold ultra-dense matter. While asteroseismology can provide a powerful probe of the interiors of stars, for example, helioseismology has provided unprecedented insights about the interior of the Sun, comparable capabilities for neutron star seismology have not yet been achieved. Here, we report the discovery of a coherent X-ray modulation from the neutron star 4U 1636–536 during the 2001 February 22 thermonuclear superburst seen with NASA's Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) that is very likely produced by a global oscillation mode. The observed frequency is 835.6440 ± 0.0002 Hz (1.43546 times the stellar spin frequency of 582.14323 Hz) and the modulation is well described by a sinusoid (A + Bsin (? – ?{sub 0})) with a fractional half-amplitude of B/A = 0.19 ± 0.04% (4-15 keV). The observed frequency is consistent with the expected inertial frame frequency of a rotationally modified surface g-mode, an interfacial mode in the ocean-crust interface, or perhaps an r-mode. Observing an inertial frame frequency—as opposed to a co-rotating frame frequency—appears consistent with the superburst's thermal emission arising from the entire surface of the neutron star, and the mode may become visible by perturbing the local surface temperature. We briefly discuss the implications of the mode detection for the neutron star's projected velocity and mass. Our results provide further strong evidence that global oscillation modes can produce observable modulations in the X-ray flux from neutron stars.

  20. Measurement of the Absolute Branching Fraction of D0 to K- pi+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Button-Shafer, J.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-04-25

    The authors measure the absolute branching fraction for D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +} using partial reconstruction of {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}X{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} decays, in which only the charged lepton and the pion from the decay D*{sup +} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +} are used. Based on a data sample of 230 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC, they obtain {Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = (4.007 {+-} 0.037 {+-} 0.070)%, where the first error is statistical and the second error is systematic.

  1. Predicting Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Hirsch; Ernest Ma; J. W. F. Valle; A. Villanova del Moral

    2005-07-12

    We give predictions for the neutrinoless double beta decay rate in a simple variant of the A_4 family symmetry model. We show that there is a lower bound for the neutrinoless double beta decay amplitude even in the case of normal hierarchical neutrino masses, corresponding to an effective mass parameter |m_{ee}| >= 0.17 \\sqrt{\\Delta m^2_{ATM}}. This result holds both for the CP conserving and CP violating cases. In the latter case we show explicitly that the lower bound on |m_{ee}| is sensitive to the value of the Majorana phase. We conclude therefore that in our scheme, neutrinoless double beta decay may be accessible to the next generation of high sensitivity experiments.

  2. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto Garfagnini

    2014-08-11

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is the only process known so far able to test the neutrino intrinsic nature: its experimental observation would imply that the lepton number is violated by two units and prove that neutrinos have a Majorana mass components, being their own anti-particle. While several experiments searching for such a rare decay have been performed in the past, a new generation of experiments using different isotopes and techniques have recently released their results or are taking data and will provide new limits, should no signal be observed, in the next few years to come. The present contribution reviews the latest public results on double beta decay searches and gives an overview on the expected sensitivities of the experiments in construction which will be able to set stronger limits in the near future.

  3. MemScale: Active Low-Power Modes for Main Memory Qingyuan Deng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenisch, Thomas F.

    is responsible for a large and increasing fraction of the energy consumed by servers. Prior work has focused on exploiting DRAM low-power states to conserve energy. However, these states require entire DRAM ranks to conserve memory energy while improving its energy- proportionality by creating active low-power modes

  4. Mode Competition in Dual-Mode Quantum Dots Semiconductor Microlaser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chusseau, Laurent; Viktorovitch, P; Letartre, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the modeling of quantum dots lasers with the aim of assessing the conditions for stable cw dual-mode operation when the mode separation lies in the THz range. Several possible models suited for InAs quantum dots in InP barriers are analytically evaluated, in particular quantum dots electrically coupled through a direct exchange of excitation by the wetting layer or quantum dots optically coupled through the homogeneous broadening of their optical gain. A stable dual-mode regime is shown possible in all cases when quantum dots are used as active layer whereas a gain medium of quantum well or bulk type inevitably leads to bistable behavior. The choice of a quantum dots gain medium perfectly matched the production of dual-mode lasers devoted to THz generation by photomixing.

  5. Mode Competition in Dual-Mode Quantum Dots Semiconductor Microlaser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurent Chusseau; Fabrice Philippe; P. Viktorovitch; Xavier Letartre

    2013-03-07

    This paper describes the modeling of quantum dots lasers with the aim of assessing the conditions for stable cw dual-mode operation when the mode separation lies in the THz range. Several possible models suited for InAs quantum dots in InP barriers are analytically evaluated, in particular quantum dots electrically coupled through a direct exchange of excitation by the wetting layer or quantum dots optically coupled through the homogeneous broadening of their optical gain. A stable dual-mode regime is shown possible in all cases when quantum dots are used as active layer whereas a gain medium of quantum well or bulk type inevitably leads to bistable behavior. The choice of a quantum dots gain medium perfectly matched the production of dual-mode lasers devoted to THz generation by photomixing.

  6. Clues for flavor from rare lepton and quark decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivo de Medeiros Varzielas; Gudrun Hiller

    2015-06-08

    Flavor symmetries successfully explain lepton and quark masses and mixings yet it is usually hard to distinguish different models that predict the same mixing angles. Further experimental input could be available, if the agents of flavor breaking are sufficiently low in mass and detectable or if new physics with non-trivial flavor charges is sufficiently low in mass and detectable. The recent hint for lepton-nonuniversality in the ratio of branching fractions $B \\to K \\mu \\mu$ over $B \\to K e e$, $R_K$, suggests the latter, at least for indirect detection via rare decays. We demonstrate the discriminating power of the rare decay data on flavor model building taking into account viable leptonic mixings and show how correlations with other observables exist in leptoquark models. We give expectations for branching ratios $B \\to K \\ell \\ell^\\prime, B_{(s)} \\to \\ell \\ell^\\prime$ and $\\ell \\to \\ell^\\prime \\gamma$, and Higgs decays $h \\to \\ell \\ell^\\prime$.

  7. CP violation in charm decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto Corrêa dos Reis; on behalf of the LHCb collaboration

    2013-08-06

    Results on CP violation searches in charm decays performed by the LHCb experiment are reviewed. These include an update of the measurement of the difference in time-integrated {\\em CP} asymmetry between $D^0\\to K^-K^+$ and $D^0\\to \\pi^-\\pi^+$ using $D^0$ from prompt $D^{*+}, a measurement of the same observable using an independent sample of $D^0$ from semileptonic B decays, and CP violation searches performed on charged $D$ mesons. All results have been released since FPCP 2012.

  8. Search for Rare Multi-Pion Decays of the Tau Lepton Using the BABAR Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ter-Antonyan, Ruben

    2007-09-18

    A search for the decay of the {tau} lepton to rare multi-pion final states is performed using the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The analysis uses 232 fb-1 of data at center-of-mass energies on or near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. In the search for the {tau}- {yields} 3{pi}-2{pi}+2{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay, we observe 10 events with an expected background of 6.5{sup +2.0}{sub -1.4} events. In the absence of a signal, we calculate the decay branching ratio upper limit {beta}({tau}- {yields} 3{pi}-2{pi}+2{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 3.4 x 10{sup -6} at the 90% confidence level. This is more than a factor of 30 improvement over the previously established limit. In addition, we search for the exclusive decay mode {tau}- {yields} 2{omega}{pi}-{nu}{sub {tau}} with the further decay of {omega} {yields} {pi}-{pi}+{pi}{sup 0}. We observe 1 event, expecting 0.4{sup +1.0}{sub -0.4} background events, and calculate the upper limit {beta}{tau}-{yields} 2{omega}{pi}-{nu}{sub {tau}} < 5.4 x 10{sup -7} at the 90% confidence level. This is the first upper limit for this mode.

  9. Probing Spectator Scattering and Annihilation Corrections in $B_{s}$ $\\to$ $PV$ Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin Chang; Xiaohui Hu; Junfeng Sun; Yueling Yang

    2015-04-20

    Motivated by the recent LHCb measurements on $\\bar{B}_{s}$ $\\to$ $\\pi^{-}K^{*+}$ and $\\bar{B}_{s}$ $\\to$ $K^{\\pm}K^{*\\mp}$ decay modes, we revisit the $B_{s}$ $\\to$ $PV$ decays within QCD factorization framework. The effects of hard-spectator scattering and annihilation corrections are studied in detail. After performing a $\\chi^2$-fit on the end-point parameters $X_A^{i,f}$ ($\\rho_A^{i,f}$, $\\phi_A^{i,f}$) and $X_H$ ($\\rho_H$, $\\phi_H$) with available data, it is found that although some possible mismatches exist, the universalities of $X_A^{i,f}$ and $X_H$ in $B_s$ and $B_{u,d}$ systems are still allowed within theoretical uncertainties and experimental errors. With the end-point parameters gotten from $B_{u,d}$ $\\to$ $PV$ decays, the numerical results and detailed analyses for the observables of $\\bar{B}_{s}$ ${\\to}$ $\\pi K^{\\ast}$, $\\rho K$, $\\pi\\rho$, $\\pi\\phi$ and $K\\phi$ decay modes are presented. In addition, we have identified a few useful observables, especially the ones of $\\bar{B}_{s}$ $\\to$ $\\pi^{0}\\phi$ decay for instance, for probing hard-spectator scattering and annihilation contributions.

  10. Symmetry violations in nuclear and neutron $?$ decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. K. Vos; H. W. Wilschut; R. G. E. Timmermans

    2015-09-14

    The role of $\\beta$ decay as a low-energy probe of physics beyond the Standard Model is reviewed. Traditional searches for deviations from the Standard Model structure of the weak interaction in $\\beta$ decay are discussed in the light of constraints from the LHC and the neutrino mass. Limits on the violation of time-reversal symmetry in $\\beta$ decay are compared to the strong constraints from electric dipole moments. Novel searches for Lorentz symmetry breaking in the weak interaction in $\\beta$ decay are also included, where we discuss the unique sensitivity of $\\beta$ decay to test Lorentz invariance. We end with a roadmap for future $\\beta$-decay experiments.

  11. On sampling fractions and electron shower shapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peryshkin, Alexander; Raja, Rajendran; /Fermilab

    2011-12-01

    We study the usage of various definitions of sampling fractions in understanding electron shower shapes in a sampling multilayer electromagnetic calorimeter. We show that the sampling fractions obtained by the conventional definition (I) of (average observed energy in layer)/(average deposited energy in layer) will not give the best energy resolution for the calorimeter. The reason for this is shown to be the presence of layer by layer correlations in an electromagnetic shower. The best resolution is obtained by minimizing the deviation from the total input energy using a least squares algorithm. The 'sampling fractions' obtained by this method (II) are shown to give the best resolution for overall energy. We further show that the method (II) sampling fractions are obtained by summing the columns of a non-local {lambda} tensor that incorporates the correlations. We establish that the sampling fractions (II) cannot be used to predict the layer by layer energies and that one needs to employ the full {lambda} tensor for this purpose. This effect is again a result of the correlations.

  12. Multi-mode radio frequency device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Ronald W. (Morgan Hill, CA); Carrender, Curtis Lee (Morgan Hill, CA); Anderson, Gordon A. (Benton City, WA); Steele, Kerry D. (Kennewick, WA)

    2007-02-13

    A transponder device having multiple modes of operation, such as an active mode and a passive mode, wherein the modes of operation are selected in response to the strength of a received radio frequency signal. A communication system is also provided having a transceiver configured to transmit a radio frequency signal and to receive a responsive signal, and a transponder configured to operate in a plurality of modes and to activate modes of operation in response to the radio frequency signal. Ideally, each mode of operation is activated and deactivated independent of the other modes, although two or more modes may be concurrently operational.

  13. What can we learn from neutrinoless double beta decay experiments?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahcall, John N.

    2009-01-01

    Limits From Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay (Rev. ),” ina next generation neutrinoless double beta decay search andPARTICLES? NO NEUTRINOLESS DOUBLE BETA DECAY AND INVERTED

  14. A Search for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay of Te-130

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryant, Adam Douglas

    2010-01-01

    far unobserved, neutrinoless double beta decay is a possibleright for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 130 Te. Thisprocess, with neutrinoless double beta decay being the most

  15. Fraction of clogging configurations sampled by granular hopper flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. C. Thomas; D. J. Durian

    2015-05-05

    We measure the fraction $F$ of flowing grain configurations that precede a clog, based on the average mass discharged between clogging events for various aperture geometries. By tilting the hopper, we demonstrate that $F$ is a function of the hole area projected in the direction of the exiting grain velocity. By varying the length of slits, we demonstrate that grains clog in the same manner as if they were flowing out of a set of smaller independent circular openings. The collapsed data for $F$ can be fit to a decay that is exponential in hole width raised to the power of the system dimensionality. This is consistent with a simple model in which individual grains near the hole have a large but constant probability to precede a clog. Such a picture implies that there is no sharp clogging transition, and that all hoppers have a nonzero probability to clog. See Supplemental Material for models of clogging as a discrete Poisson process, and for resulting alternative measures of l based on the standard deviation of the discharge mass distribution.

  16. Method Development: Identification of the Soluble Organic Fraction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Method Development: Identification of the Soluble Organic Fraction of Particulate Matter on DPF Soot Method Development: Identification of the Soluble Organic Fraction of...

  17. Fractional Topological Phases and Broken Time-Reversal Symmetry...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fractional Topological Phases and Broken Time-Reversal Symmetry in Strained Graphene Prev Next Title: Fractional Topological Phases and Broken Time-Reversal Symmetry in...

  18. Intake fraction of nonreactive vehicle emissions in US urban areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, J D; Teoh, S K; Nazaroff, William W

    2005-01-01

    fraction of nonreactive vehicle emissions JD Marshall et al.and trends in motor vehicle emissions to monthly urbanExposure to motor vehicle emissions: An intake fraction

  19. The decay of debris disks around solar-type stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sierchio, J. M.; Rieke, G. H.; Su, K. Y. L.; Gáspár, Andras, E-mail: sierchio@mit.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-04-10

    We present a Spitzer MIPS study of the decay of debris disk excesses at 24 and 70 ?m for 255 stars of types F4-K2. We have used multiple tests, including consistency between chromospheric and X-ray activity and placement on the H-R diagram, to assign accurate stellar ages. Within this spectral type range, at 24 ?m, 13.6% ± 2.8% of the stars younger than 1 Gyr have excesses at the 3? level or more, whereas none of the older stars do, confirming previous work. At 70 ?m, 22.5% ± 3.6% of the younger stars have excesses at ?3? significance, whereas only 4.7{sub ?2.2}{sup +3.7}% of the older stars do. To characterize the far-infrared behavior of debris disks more robustly, we doubled the sample by including stars from the DEBRIS and DUNES surveys. For the F4-K4 stars in this combined sample, there is only a weak (statistically not significant) trend in the incidence of far-infrared excess with spectral type (detected fractions of 21.9{sub ?4.3}{sup +4.8}%, late F; 16.5{sub ?3.3}{sup +3.9}%, G; and 16.9{sub ?5.0}{sup +6.3}%, early K). Taking this spectral type range together, there is a significant decline between 3 and 4.5 Gyr in the incidence of excesses, with fractional luminosities just under 10{sup –5}. There is an indication that the timescale for decay of infrared excesses varies roughly inversely with the fractional luminosity. This behavior is consistent with theoretical expectations for passive evolution. However, more excesses are detected around the oldest stars than are expected from passive evolution, suggesting that there is late-phase dynamical activity around these stars.

  20. Search For B --> K* Nu Anti-Nu Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.

    2008-08-15

    We present a search for the decays B {yields} K* {nu}{bar {nu}} using 454 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory. We first select an event sample where one B is reconstructed in a semileptonic or hadronic mode with one charmed meson. The remaining particles in the event are then examined to search for a B {yields} K* {nu}{bar {nu}} decay. The charged K* is reconstructed as K*{sup +} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +} or K*{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}; the neutral K* is identified in K*{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} mode. We establish upper limits at 90% confidence level of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K*{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}}) < 8 x 10{sup -5}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0} {nu}{bar {nu}}) < 12 x 10{sup -5}, and {Beta}(B {yields} K* {nu}{bar {nu}}) < 8 x 10{sup -5}.

  1. DISCHARGE IMPROVEMENT THROUGH CONTROL OF NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODES BY LOCALIZED ECCD IN DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PRATER,R; LAHAYE,RJ; LOHR,J; LUCE,TC; PETTY,CC; FERRON,JR; HUMPHREYS,DA; STRAIT,EJ; PERKINS,FW; HARVEY,RW

    2002-10-01

    A271 DISCHARGE IMPROVEMENT THROUGH CONTROL OF NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODES BY LOCALIZED ECCD IN DIII-D. Neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) are MHD modes which can limit the performance of high beta discharges in tokamaks, in some cases leading to a major disruption. The destabilizing effect which results in NTM growth is a helical decrease in the bootstrap current caused by a local reduction of the plasma pressure gradient by seed magnetic islands. The NTM is particularly well suited to control since the mode is linearly stable although nonlinearly unstable, so if the island amplitude can be decreased below a threshold size the mode will decay and vanish. One means of shrinking the island is the replacement of the missing bootstrap current by a localized current generated by electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD). This method has been applied to the m=3/n=2 neoclassical tearing mode in DIII-D, in H-mode plasmas with ongoing ELMs and sawteeth, both of which generate seed islands periodically. In the case of the 3/2 mode, full suppression was obtained robustly by applying about 1.5 MW of ECCD very near the rational surface of the mode. When the mode first appears in the plasma the stored energy decreases by 20%, but after the mode is stabilized by the ECCD the beta may be raised above the initial threshold pressure by 20% by additional neutral beam heating, thereby generating an improvement in the limiting beta of nearly a factor 2. An innovative automated search algorithm was implemented to find and retain the optimum location for the ECCD in the presence of the mode.

  2. Nonlocal theory of electromagnetic wave decay into two electromagnetic waves in a rippled density plasma channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sati, Priti; Tripathi, V. K.

    2012-12-15

    Parametric decay of a large amplitude electromagnetic wave into two electromagnetic modes in a rippled density plasma channel is investigated. The channel is taken to possess step density profile besides a density ripple of axial wave vector. The density ripple accounts for the momentum mismatch between the interacting waves and facilitates nonlinear coupling. For a given pump wave frequency, the requisite ripple wave number varies only a little w.r.t. the frequency of the low frequency decay wave. The radial localization of electromagnetic wave reduces the growth rate of the parametric instability. The growth rate decreases with the frequency of low frequency electromagnetic wave.

  3. Decoherence of interacting Majorana modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. T. Ng

    2015-07-31

    We study the decoherence of Majorana modes of a fermion chain, where the fermions interact with their nearest neighbours. We investigate the effect of dissipation and dephasing on the Majorana modes of a fermionic chain. The dissipative and dephasing noises induce the non-parity- and parity-preserving transitions between the eigenstates of the system, respectively. Therefore, these two types of noises lead to the different decoherence mechanisms. In each type of noise, we discuss the low- and high-frequency regimes to describe the different environments. We numerically calculate the dissipation and dephasing rates in the presence of long-range interactions. We find that the decoherence rate of interacting Majorana modes is different to that of non-interacting modes. We show the examples that the long-range interactions can reduce the decoherence rate. It is advantageous to the potential applications of quantum information processing.

  4. Measurement of the Forward-Backward Asymmetry in the $B \\to K^{(*)} \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ Decay and First Observation of the $B^0_s \\to \\phi \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ Decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-01-01

    We reconstruct the rare decays B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} K*(892){sup 0} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, and B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}(1020){mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} in a data sample corresponding to 4.4 fb{sup -1} collected in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Using 120 {+-} 16 B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and 101 {+-} 12 B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decays we report the branching ratios. In addition, we report the measurement of the differential branching ratio and the muon forward-backward asymmetry in the B{sup +} and B{sup 0} decay modes, and the K*{sup 0} longitudinal polarization in the B{sup 0} decay mode with respect to the squared dimuon mass. These are consistent with the theoretical prediction from the standard model, and most recent determinations from other experiments and of comparable accuracy. We also report the first observation of the B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decay and measure its branching ratio {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) = [1.44 {+-} 0.33 {+-} 0.46] x 10{sup -6} using 27 {+-} 6 signal events. This is currently the most rare B{sub s}{sup 0} decay observed.

  5. Carbon isotope fractionation in autotrophic Chromatium 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, William Wai-Lun

    1974-01-01

    . 8 and -27. 8 o/oo respect- 13 PDB ively. Fructose and glucose separated from the sugar fraction have an identical 6 C value of -21. 8 o/oo; 13 whereas aspartic acid, glutamic acid and alanine separated from the amino acid fraction have 6PDBC... ACETYL- Ca A F UKIARATE CITRATE ATP CO ATP DPNH 2 1 I TPNH CO GLYOX SUCCINATE ISOCITRATE YLATE + GLUTAMATE 16 led POLLER et al. (1961) and LOSADA et al. (1960) to believe that PEP carboxvlase is also active in the bacterium during...

  6. Selecting Fractionators for Product Composition Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, D. E.; Anderson, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    FRACTIONATORS FOR PRODUCT COMPOSITION CONTROL D. E. Griffin and J. E. Anderson Applied Automation, Inc. Pawhuska Road Bartlesville, OK 74004 ABSTRACT The benefits resulting from computer control of fractionators have been proven in many installations... Progress 74,4, pp. 49-55. 3. Smith, D. E., W. S. Stewart and D. E. Griffin, February, 1978, "Distill With Composition Control, "Hydrocarbon Processing 57, 2, pp. 99-107. 4. Griffin, D. E., J. R. Parsons and D. E. Smith, "The Use of Process Analyzers...

  7. The Fractional Kinetic Equation and Thermonuclear Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

    2000-01-16

    The paper discusses the solution of a simple kinetic equation of the type used for the computation of the change of the chemical composition in stars like the Sun. Starting from the standard form of the kinetic equation it is generalized to a fractional kinetic equation and its solutions in terms of H-functions are obtained. The role of thermonuclear functions, which are also represented in terms of G- and H-functions, in such a fractional kinetic equation is emphasized. Results contained in this paper are related to recent investigations of possible astrophysical solutions of the solar neutrino problem.

  8. Constraining neutrinoless double beta decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Dorame; D. Meloni; S. Morisi; E. Peinado; J. W. F. Valle

    2011-11-23

    A class of discrete flavor-symmetry-based models predicts constrained neutrino mass matrix schemes that lead to specific neutrino mass sum-rules (MSR). We show how these theories may constrain the absolute scale of neutrino mass, leading in most of the cases to a lower bound on the neutrinoless double beta decay effective amplitude.

  9. New Physics in $B$ decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crivellin, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    While the LHC did not observe direct evidence for physics beyond the standard model, indirect hints for new physics were uncovered in the flavour sector in the decays $B\\to K^*\\mu^+\\mu^-$, $B\\to K\\mu^+\\mu^-/B\\to Ke^+e^-$, $B_s\\to\\phi\\mu^+\\mu^-$, $B\\to D^{(*)}\\tau\

  10. Rare decays at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrington, S.M.; /Liverpool U.

    2006-01-01

    The confidence level limits of the CDF and D0 searches for the B{sub s}{sup 0}, B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{phi} rare decays are presented.

  11. Invisible Higgs Decay at the LHeC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Lei Tang; Chen Zhang; Shou-hua Zhu

    2015-08-25

    The possibility that the 125 GeV Higgs boson may decay into invisible non-standard-model (non-SM) particles is theoretically and phenomenologically intriguing. In this letter we investigate the sensitivity of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC) to an invisibly decaying Higgs, in its proposed high luminosity running mode. We focus on the neutral current Higgs production channel which offers more kinematical handles than its charged current counterpart. The signal contains one electron, one jet and large missing energy. With a cut-based parton level analysis, we estimate that if the $hZZ$ coupling is at its standard model (SM) value, then assuming an integrated luminosity of $1\\,\\mbox{ab}^{-1}$ the LHeC with the proposed 60 GeV electron beam (with $-0.9$ polarization) and 7 TeV proton beam is capable of probing $\\mathrm{Br}(h\\rightarrow E\\!\\!\\!\\!/_T)=6\\%$ at $2\\sigma$ level. Good lepton veto performance (especially hadronic $\\tau$ veto) in the forward region is crucial to the suppression of the dominant $Wje$ background. We also explicitly point out the important role that may be played by the LHeC in probing a wide class of exotic Higgs decay processes and emphasize the general function of lepton-hadron colliders in precision study of new resonances after their discovery in hadron-hadron collisions.

  12. Constraints on new phenomena via Higgs boson couplings and invisible decays with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-11-30

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC has measured the Higgs boson couplings and mass, and searched for invisible Higgs boson decays, using multiple production and decay channels with up to 4.7 fb-1 of pp collision data at ?s=7 TeV and 20.3 fb-1 at ?s=8 TeV. In the current study, the measured production and decay rates of the observed Higgs boson in the ??, ZZ, W W , Z?, bb, ? ? , and ?? decay channels, along with results from the associated production of a Higgs boson with a top-quark pair, are used to probe the scaling of the couplingsmore »with mass. The limits are set on parameters in extensions of the Standard Model including a composite Higgs boson, an additional electroweak singlet, and two-Higgs-doublet models. Together with the measured mass of the scalar Higgs boson in the ?? and ZZ decay modes, a lower limit is set on the pseudoscalar Higgs boson mass of m A > 370 GeV in the “hMSSM” simplified Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. Results from direct searches for heavy Higgs bosons are also interpreted in the hMSSM. Finally, direct searches for invisible Higgs boson decays in the vector-boson fusion and associated production of a Higgs boson with W/Z (Z ? ??, W/Z ? jj) modes are statistically combined to set an upper limit on the Higgs boson invisible branching ratio of 0.25. As a result, the use of the measured visible decay rates in a more general coupling fit improves the upper limit to 0.23, constraining a Higgs portal model of dark matter.« less

  13. Constraints on new phenomena via Higgs boson couplings and invisible decays with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-11-30

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC has measured the Higgs boson couplings and mass, and searched for invisible Higgs boson decays, using multiple production and decay channels with up to 4.7 fb-1 of pp collision data at ?s=7 TeV and 20.3 fb-1 at ?s=8 TeV. In the current study, the measured production and decay rates of the observed Higgs boson in the ??, ZZ, W W , Z?, bb, ? ? , and ?? decay channels, along with results from the associated production of a Higgs boson with a top-quark pair, are used to probe the scaling of the couplings with mass. The limits are set on parameters in extensions of the Standard Model including a composite Higgs boson, an additional electroweak singlet, and two-Higgs-doublet models. Together with the measured mass of the scalar Higgs boson in the ?? and ZZ decay modes, a lower limit is set on the pseudoscalar Higgs boson mass of m A > 370 GeV in the “hMSSM” simplified Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. Results from direct searches for heavy Higgs bosons are also interpreted in the hMSSM. Finally, direct searches for invisible Higgs boson decays in the vector-boson fusion and associated production of a Higgs boson with W/Z (Z ? ??, W/Z ? jj) modes are statistically combined to set an upper limit on the Higgs boson invisible branching ratio of 0.25. As a result, the use of the measured visible decay rates in a more general coupling fit improves the upper limit to 0.23, constraining a Higgs portal model of dark matter.

  14. Constraints on new phenomena via Higgs boson couplings and invisible decays with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-09-02

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC has measured the Higgs boson couplings and mass, and searched for invisible Higgs boson decays, using multiple production and decay channels with up to 4.7 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV and 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV. In the current study, the measured production and decay rates of the observed Higgs boson in the $\\gamma\\gamma$, $ZZ$, $WW$, $Z\\gamma$, $bb$, $\\tau\\tau$, and $\\mu\\mu$ decay channels, along with results from the associated production of a Higgs boson with a top-quark pair, are used to probe the scaling of the couplings with mass. Limits are set on parameters in extensions of the Standard Model including a composite Higgs boson, an additional electroweak singlet, and two-Higgs-doublet models. Together with the measured mass of the scalar Higgs boson in the $\\gamma\\gamma$ and $ZZ$ decay modes, a lower limit is set on the pseudoscalar Higgs boson mass of $m_{A}>370$ GeV in the "hMSSM" simplified Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. Results from direct searches for heavy Higgs bosons are also interpreted in the hMSSM. Direct searches for invisible Higgs boson decays in the vector-boson fusion and associated production of a Higgs boson with $W/Z$ ($Z\\to ll$, $W/Z \\to jj$) modes are statistically combined to set an upper limit on the Higgs boson invisible branching ratio of 0.25. The use of the measured visible decay rates in a more general coupling fit improves the upper limit to 0.23, constraining a Higgs portal model of dark matter.

  15. Proton decay matrix elements from lattice QCD 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooney, Paul

    2010-01-01

    We present results for the matrix elements relevant for proton decay in Grand Unified Theories (GUTs), using two methods. In the indirect method, we rely on an effective field theory description of proton decay, where ...

  16. Causes and Control of Wood Decay,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Causes and Control of Wood Decay, Degradation & Stain #12;2 Contents Moisture .................................................................................3 Wood Degradation: Causes and Control..............................4 Weathering......................................................................................................4 Naturally Decay-resistant Species...........................................................5 Wood

  17. Nuclear matrix elements for double beta decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vadim Rodin

    2009-10-30

    The present status of calculations of the nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless double beta decay is reviewed. A proposal which allows in principle to measure the neutrinoless double beta decay Fermi matrix element is briefly described.

  18. First measurement of suppressed B- -> D0 K- decays through the ADS method in hadron collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garosi, Paola

    2011-01-01

    We report the first measurement of branching fractions and CP-violating asymmetries of suppressed B- -> DK- decays in hadron collisions, using the approach proposed by Atwood, Dunietz, and Soni (ADS) to determine the CKM angle gamma in 7.0 fb^-1 of data. The ADS parameters are determined with accuracy comparable with B-factory measurements and significantly improve the global knowledge of the angle gamma.

  19. Two-body B meson decays to eta and eta ': Observation of B ->eta ' K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, L.

    1998-04-01

    In a sample of 6.6 x 10(6) produced B mesons we have observed decays B --> eta'K, with branching fractions B(B+ --> eta'K+)= (6.5(-1.4)(+1.5) +/- 0.9) X 10(-5) and B(B-0 --> eta'K-0) = (4.7(-2.0)(+2.7) +/- 0.9) X 10(-5). We have searched...

  20. First measurement of suppressed B- -> D0 K- decays through the ADS method in hadron collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paola Garosi; for the CDF Collaboration

    2011-10-11

    We report the first measurement of branching fractions and CP-violating asymmetries of suppressed B- -> DK- decays in hadron collisions, using the approach proposed by Atwood, Dunietz, and Soni (ADS) to determine the CKM angle gamma in 7.0 fb^-1 of data. The ADS parameters are determined with accuracy comparable with B-factory measurements and significantly improve the global knowledge of the angle gamma.

  1. Search for the rare decays Bs -> mu+ mu- and B0 -> mu+ mu-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LHCb Collaboration; R. Aaij; C. Abellan Beteta; B. Adeva; M. Adinolfi; C. Adrover; A. Affolder; Z. Ajaltouni; J. Albrecht; F. Alessio; M. Alexander; G. Alkhazov; P. Alvarez Cartelle; A. A. Alves Jr; S. Amato; Y. Amhis; J. Anderson; R. B. Appleby; O. Aquines Gutierrez; F. Archilli; L. Arrabito; A. Artamonov; M. Artuso; E. Aslanides; G. Auriemma; S. Bachmann; J. J. Back; D. S. Bailey; V. Balagura; W. Baldini; R. J. Barlow; C. Barschel; S. Barsuk; W. Barter; A. Bates; C. Bauer; Th. Bauer; A. Bay; I. Bediaga; S. Belogurov; K. Belous; I. Belyaev; E. Ben-Haim; M. Benayoun; G. Bencivenni; S. Benson; J. Benton; R. Bernet; M. -O. Bettler; M. van Beuzekom; A. Bien; S. Bifani; T. Bird; A. Bizzeti; P. M. Bjørnstad; T. Blake; F. Blanc; C. Blanks; J. Blouw; S. Blusk; A. Bobrov; V. Bocci; A. Bondar; N. Bondar; W. Bonivento; S. Borghi; A. Borgia; T. J. V. Bowcock; C. Bozzi; T. Brambach; J. van den Brand; J. Bressieux; D. Brett; M. Britsch; T. Britton; N. H. Brook; H. Brown; A. Büchler-Germann; I. Burducea; A. Bursche; J. Buytaert; S. Cadeddu; O. Callot; M. Calvi; M. Calvo Gomez; A. Camboni; P. Campana; A. Carbone; G. Carboni; R. Cardinale; A. Cardini; L. Carson; K. Carvalho Akiba; G. Casse; M. Cattaneo; Ch. Cauet; M. Charles; Ph. Charpentier; N. Chiapolini; K. Ciba; X. Cid Vidal; G. Ciezarek; P. E. L. Clarke; M. Clemencic; H. V. Cliff; J. Closier; C. Coca; V. Coco; J. Cogan; P. Collins; A. Comerma-Montells; F. Constantin; G. Conti; A. Contu; A. Cook; M. Coombes; G. Corti; G. A. Cowan; R. Currie; B. D'Almagne; C. D'Ambrosio; P. David; P. N. Y. David; I. De Bonis; S. De Capua; M. De Cian; F. De Lorenzi; J. M. De Miranda; L. De Paula; P. De Simone; D. Decamp; M. Deckenhoff; H. Degaudenzi; M. Deissenroth; L. Del Buono; C. Deplano; D. Derkach; O. Deschamps; F. Dettori; J. Dickens; H. Dijkstra; P. Diniz Batista; F. Domingo Bonal; S. Donleavy; F. Dordei; P. Dornan; A. Dosil Suárez; D. Dossett; A. Dovbnya; F. Dupertuis; R. Dzhelyadin; A. Dziurda; S. Easo; U. Egede; V. Egorychev; S. Eidelman; D. van Eijk; F. Eisele; S. Eisenhardt; R. Ekelhof; L. Eklund; Ch. Elsasser; D. Elsby; D. Esperante Pereira; L. Estéve; A. Falabella; E. Fanchini; C. Färber; G. Fardell; C. Farinelli; S. Farry; V. Fave; V. Fernandez Albor; M. Ferro-Luzzi; S. Filippov; C. Fitzpatrick; M. Fontana; F. Fontanelli; R. Forty; M. Frank; C. Frei; M. Frosini; S. Furcas; A. Gallas Torreira; D. Galli; M. Gandelman; P. Gandini; Y. Gao; J-C. Garnier; J. Garofoli; J. Garra Tico; L. Garrido; D. Gascon; C. Gaspar; N. Gauvin; M. Gersabeck; T. Gershon; Ph. Ghez; V. Gibson; V. V. Gligorov; C. Göbel; D. Golubkov; A. Golutvin; A. Gomes; H. Gordon; M. Grabalosa Gándara; R. Graciani Diaz; L. A. Granado Cardoso; E. Graugés; G. Graziani; A. Grecu; E. Greening; S. Gregson; B. Gui; E. Gushchin; Yu. Guz; T. Gys; G. Haefeli; C. Haen; S. C. Haines; T. Hampson; S. Hansmann-Menzemer; R. Harji; N. Harnew; J. Harrison; P. F. Harrison; J. He; V. Heijne; K. Hennessy; P. Henrard; J. A. Hernando Morata; E. van Herwijnen; E. Hicks; K. Holubyev; P. Hopchev; W. Hulsbergen; P. Hunt; T. Huse; R. S. Huston; D. Hutchcroft; D. Hynds; V. Iakovenko; P. Ilten; J. Imong; R. Jacobsson; A. Jaeger; M. Jahjah Hussein; E. Jans; F. Jansen; P. Jaton; B. Jean-Marie; F. Jing; M. John; D. Johnson; C. R. Jones; B. Jost; M. Kaballo; S. Kandybei; M. Karacson; T. M. Karbach; J. Keaveney; I. R. Kenyon; U. Kerzel; T. Ketel; A. Keune; B. Khanji; Y. M. Kim; M. Knecht; P. Koppenburg; A. Kozlinskiy; L. Kravchuk; K. Kreplin; M. Kreps; G. Krocker; P. Krokovny; F. Kruse; K. Kruzelecki; M. Kucharczyk; T. Kvaratskheliya; V. N. La Thi; D. Lacarrere; G. Lafferty; A. Lai; D. Lambert; R. W. Lambert; E. Lanciotti; G. Lanfranchi; C. Langenbruch; T. Latham; C. Lazzeroni; R. Le Gac; J. van Leerdam; J. -P. Lees; R. Lefévre; A. Leflat; J. Lefrançois; O. Leroy; T. Lesiak; L. Li; L. Li Gioi; M. Lieng; M. Liles; R. Lindner; C. Linn; B. Liu; G. Liu; J. H. Lopes; E. Lopez Asamar; N. Lopez-March; H. Lu; J. Luisier; A. Mac Raighne; F. Machefert; I. V. Machikhiliyan; F. Maciuc; O. Maev; J. Magnin; S. Malde; R. M. D. Mamunur; G. Manca; G. Mancinelli; N. Mangiafave; U. Marconi; R. Märki; J. Marks; G. Martellotti; A. Martens; L. Martin; A. Martín Sánchez; D. Martinez Santos; A. Massafferri; Z. Mathe; C. Matteuzzi; M. Matveev; E. Maurice; B. Maynard; A. Mazurov; G. McGregor; R. McNulty; C. Mclean; M. Meissner; M. Merk; J. Merkel; R. Messi; S. Miglioranzi; D. A. Milanes; M. -N. Minard; J. Molina Rodriguez; S. Monteil; D. Moran; P. Morawski; R. Mountain; I. Mous; F. Muheim; K. Müller; R. Muresan; B. Muryn; B. Muster; M. Musy; J. Mylroie-Smith; P. Naik; T. Nakada; R. Nandakumar; I. Nasteva; M. Nedos; M. Needham; N. Neufeld; C. Nguyen-Mau; M. Nicol; V. Niess; N. Nikitin; A. Nomerotski; A. Novoselov; A. Oblakowska-Mucha; V. Obraztsov; S. Oggero; S. Ogilvy; O. Okhrimenko; R. Oldeman; M. Orlandea

    2012-01-15

    A search for the decays Bs -> mu+ mu- and B0 -> mu+ mu- is performed with 0.37 fb^-1 of pp collisions at sqrt{s} = 7 TeV collected by the LHCb experiment in 2011. The upper limits on the branching fractions are BR (Bs -> mu+ mu-) mu+ mu-) mu+ mu-) mu+ mu-) < 3.2 x 10^-9 at 95% confidence level.

  2. Study of B??Xul?? decays in BB? events tagged by a fully reconstructed B-meson decay and determination of |Vub|

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Tackmann, K.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Benitez, J. F.; Burchat, P. R.

    2012-08-07

    We report measurements of partial branching fractions for inclusive charmless semileptonic B decays B¯¯¯?Xul?¯ and the determination of the Cabibbo–Kobayashi–Maskawa (CKM) matrix element |Vub|. The analysis is based on a sample of 467×10? ?(4S)?BB¯¯¯ decays recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e?e? storage rings. We select events in which the decay of one of the B mesons is fully reconstructed and an electron or a muon signals the semileptonic decay of the other B meson. We measure partial branching fractions ?B in several restricted regions of phase space and determine the CKM element |Vub| based on different QCD predictions. For decays with a charged lepton momentum p*l>1.0 GeV in the B meson rest frame, we obtain ?B=(1.80±0.13stat±0.15sys±0.02theo)×10?³ from a fit to the two-dimensional MX-q² distribution. Here, MX refers to the invariant mass of the final state hadron X and q² is the invariant mass squared of the charged lepton and neutrino. From this measurement we extract |Vub|=(4.33±0.24exp?±0.15theo)×10?³ as the arithmetic average of four results obtained from four different QCD predictions of the partial rate. We separately determine partial branching fractions for B¯¯¯0 and B? decays and derive a limit on the isospin breaking in B¯¯¯?Xul?¯ decays.

  3. Double beta decay: experiments and theory review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Nucciotti

    2007-07-28

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is one of the most powerful tools to set the neutrino mass absolute scale and establish whether the neutrino is a Majorana particle. After a summary of the neutrinoless double beta decay phenomenology, the present status of the experimental search for this rare decay is reported and the prospects for next generation experiments are reviewed.

  4. Imperfect World of $??$-decay Nuclear Data Sets?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Pritychenko

    2015-03-11

    The precision of double-beta ($\\beta\\beta$) decay experimental half-lives and their uncertainties is reevaluated. A complementary analysis of the decay uncertainties indicates deficiencies due to small size of statistical samples, and incomplete collection of experimental information. Further experimental and theoretical efforts would lead toward more precise values of $\\beta\\beta$-decay half-lives and nuclear matrix elements.

  5. Hamilton-Jacobi Fractional Sequential Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eqab M. Rabei; Bashar S. Ababneh

    2007-04-04

    As a continuation of Rabei et al. work [11], the Hamilton- Jacobi partial differential equation is generalized to be applicable for systems containing fractional derivatives. The Hamilton- Jacobi function in configuration space is obtained in a similar manner to the usual mechanics. Two problems are considered to demonstrate the application of the formalism. The result found to be in exact agreement with Agrawal's formalism.

  6. Measurement of the D -> pipi branching fractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Ball, S.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

    1993-09-01

    Using data from CLEO II at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring we provide a new measurement of the branching fraction for D0 --> pi+pi-, and we present the first measurements of D0 --> pi0pi0 and of D+ --> pi+pi0, which is due to an isospin changing...

  7. Evaluation of Some Blockcipher Modes of Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogaway, Phillip

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 4. CBC, CFB, and OFB Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 5. CTR; many are widely used. The modes under consideration are the encryption schemes ECB, CBC, CFB, OFB, CTR

  8. Systematic Effects in Pulse Shape Analysis of HPGe Detector Signals for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gehman, Victor M; Mei, Dongming

    2009-01-01

    Pulse shape analysis is an important background reduction and signal identification technique for next generation of neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments examining 76Ge. We present a study of the systematic uncertainties in one such parametric pulse-shape analysis technique for separating multi-site backgrounds from single-site signal events. We examined systematic uncertainties for events in full-energy gamma peaks (predominantly multi-site), double escape peaks (predominantly single-site) and the Compton continuum near double-beta decay endpoint (which will be the dominant background for most neutrinoless double-beta decay searches). In short, we find total (statistical plus systematic) fractional uncertainties in the pulse shape cut survival probabilities of: 6.6%, 1.5% and 3.8% for double-escape, continuum and gamma-ray events respectively.

  9. Systematic Effects in Pulse Shape Analysis of HPGe Detector Signals for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor M Gehman; Steven R Elliott; Dongming Mei

    2010-03-05

    Pulse shape analysis is an important background reduction and signal identification technique for next generation of neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments examining 76Ge. We present a study of the systematic uncertainties in one such parametric pulse-shape analysis technique for separating multi-site backgrounds from single-site signal events. We examined systematic uncertainties for events in full-energy gamma peaks (predominantly multi-site), double escape peaks (predominantly single-site) and the Compton continuum near double-beta decay endpoint (which will be the dominant background for most neutrinoless double-beta decay searches). In short, we find total (statistical plus systematic) fractional uncertainties in the pulse shape cut survival probabilities of: 6.6%, 1.5% and 3.8% for double-escape, continuum and gamma-ray events respectively.

  10. Constraints on decaying dark matter from Fermi observations of nearby galaxies and clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dugger, Leanna; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Astronomy and Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA (United States); Jeltema, Tesla E., E-mail: greentee01@gmail.com, E-mail: tesla@ucolick.org, E-mail: profumo@scipp.ucsc.edu [UCO/Lick Observatories, 1156 High St., Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2010-12-01

    We analyze the impact of Fermi gamma-ray observations (primarily non-detections) of selected nearby galaxies, including dwarf spheroidals, and of clusters of galaxies on decaying dark matter models. We show that the fact that galaxy clusters do not shine in gamma rays puts the most stringent limits available to-date on the lifetime of dark matter particles for a wide range of particle masses and decay final states. In particular, our results put strong constraints on the possibility of ascribing to decaying dark matter both the increasing positron fraction reported by PAMELA and the high-energy feature in the electron-positron spectrum measured by Fermi. Observations of nearby dwarf galaxies and of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) do not provide as strong limits as those from galaxy clusters, while still improving on previous constraints in some cases.

  11. Observation of D??K??(') and Search for CP Violation in D?????(') Decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Won, E.; Ko, B. R.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Bay, A.; et al

    2011-11-21

    We report the first observation of the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decays D??K??(') using a 791 fb?¹ data sample collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e?e? collider. The ratio of the branching fractions of doubly Cabibbo-suppressed relative to singly Cabibbo-suppressed D?????(') decays are B(K??)/B(D?????)=(3.06±0.43±0.14)% and B(K??('))/B(D?????(')) = (3.77±0.39±0.10)%. From these, we find that the relative final-state phase difference between the tree and annihilation amplitudes in D? decays, ?TA, is (72±9)° or (288±9)°. We also report the most precise measurements of CP asymmetries to date: AD?CP=(+1.74±1.13±0.19)% and AD???+?'CP = (-0.12±1.12±0.17)%.

  12. Measurement of Polarization and Search for CP Violation in Bs0??? Decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; et al

    2011-12-22

    We present the first measurement of polarization and CP-violating asymmetries in a Bs0 decay into two light vector mesons, Bs0???, and an improved determination of its branching ratio using 295 decays reconstructed in a data sample corresponding to 2.9 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The fraction of longitudinal polarization is determined to be fL=0.348±0.041(stat)±0.021(syst), and the branching ratio B(Bs0???)=[2.32±0.18(stat)±0.82(syst)]×10??. Asymmetries of decay angle distributions sensitive to CP violation are measured to be Au=-0.007±0.064(stat)±0.018(syst) and Av=-0.120±0.064(stat)±0.016(syst).

  13. Search for exotic decays of a Higgs boson into undetectable particles and photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khachatryan, Vardan; CMS Collaboration; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; A??lar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Knünz, Valentin; König, Axel; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Van Parijs, Isis; Barria, Patrizia; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Crucy, Shannon; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Mertens, Alexandre; Nuttens, Claude; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Hensel, Carsten; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Souza Santos, Angelo; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Micanovic, Sasa; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A search is presented for exotic decays of a Higgs boson into undetectable particles and one or two isolated photons in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of up to 19.4 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. Higgs bosons produced in gluon-gluon fusion and in association with a Z boson are investigated, using models in which the Higgs boson decays into a gravitino and a neutralino or a pair of neutralinos, followed by the decay of the neutralino to a gravitino and a photon. The selected events are consistent with the background-only hypothesis, and limits are placed on the product of cross sections and branching fractions. Assuming a standard model Higgs boson production cross-section, a 95% confidence level upper limit is set on the branching fraction of a 125 GeV Higgs boson decaying into undetectable particles and one or two isolated photons as a function of the neutralino mass. For neutralino masses from 1 to 120 GeV an upper li...

  14. Determination of |V{sub ub}| in Inclusive Semileptonic B Meson Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B

    2004-08-18

    The authors present a preliminary determination of the CKM matrix element |V{sub ub}| based on the analysis of semileptonic B decays from a sample of 88 million {Upsilon}(4S) decays collected with the BaBar detector at the e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. Charmless semileptonic B decays are selected using the electron energy E-e and the invariant mass q{sup 2} of the electron-neutrino pair. The neutrino meomentum is inferred from a measurement of the visible energy and momentum in the detector and knowledge of the e{sup +}e{sup -} beam momenta. The partial branching fraction is determined in a region of the q{sup 2}-E-e plane where semileptonic B decays to charm are highly suppressed. The total charmless semileptonic branching fraction is extracted using a theoretical calculation based on the heavy quark expansion. Preliminary results yield |V{sub ub}| = (4.57 {+-} 0.21 {+-} 0.25 {+-} 0.34 + 0.59 - 0.29 {+-} 0.22) x 10{sup -3} where the uncertainties are from statistics (data and MC), detector modeling, background modeling, the shape function, and the heavy quark operator product expansion, respectively.

  15. Search for exotic decays of a Higgs boson into undetectable particles and photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    A search is presented for exotic decays of a Higgs boson into undetectable particles and one or two isolated photons in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of up to 19.4 inverse femtobarns collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. Higgs bosons produced in gluon-gluon fusion and in association with a Z boson are investigated, using models in which the Higgs boson decays into a gravitino and a neutralino or a pair of neutralinos, followed by the decay of the neutralino to a gravitino and a photon. The selected events are consistent with the background-only hypothesis, and limits are placed on the product of cross sections and branching fractions. Assuming a standard model Higgs boson production cross-section, a 95% confidence level upper limit is set on the branching fraction of a 125 GeV Higgs boson decaying into undetectable particles and one or two isolated photons as a function of the neutralino mass. For neutralino masses from 1 to 120 GeV an upper limit in the range of 7 to 13% is obtained. Further results are given as a function of the neutralino lifetime, and also for a range of Higgs boson masses.

  16. Search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to bottom quarks in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alver, B.

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson (H) decaying to b[bar over b] when produced in association with weak vector bosons (V) is reported for the following modes: W(??)H, W(e?)H, Z(??)H, Z(ee)H and Z(??)H. The search ...

  17. Low energy collective modes of deformed superfluid nuclei within the finite amplitude method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nobuo Hinohara; Markus Kortelainen; Witold Nazarewicz

    2013-04-15

    Background: The major challenge for nuclear theory is to describe and predict global properties and collective modes of atomic nuclei. Of particular interest is the response of the nucleus to a time-dependent external field that impacts the low-energy multipole and beta-decay strength. Purpose: We propose a method to compute low-lying collective modes in deformed nuclei within the finite amplitude method (FAM) based on the quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA). By using the analytic property of the response function, we find the QRPA amplitudes by computing the residua of the FAM amplitudes by means of a contour integration around the QRPA poles in a complex frequency plane. Methods: We use the superfluid nuclear density functional theory with Skyrme energy density functionals, FAM-QRPA approach, and the conventional matrix formulation of the QRPA (MQRPA). Results: We demonstrate that the complex-energy FAM-QRPA method reproduces low-lying collective states obtained within the conventional matrix formulation of the QRPA theory. Illustrative calculations are performed for the isoscalar monopole strength in deformed 24Mg and for low-lying K = 0 quadrupole vibrational modes of deformed Yb and Er isotopes. Conclusions: The proposed FAM-QRPA approach allows one to efficiently calculate low-lying collective modes in spherical and deformed nuclei throughout the entire nuclear landscape, including shape-vibrational excitations, pairing vibrational modes, and beta-decay rates.

  18. Acoustic wave propagation through a supercooled liquid: A normal mode analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuki Matsuoka; Hideyuki Mizuno; Ryoichi Yamamoto

    2012-10-17

    The mechanism of acoustic wave propagation in supercooled liquids is not yet fully understood since the vibrational dynamics of supercooled liquids are strongly affected by their amorphous inherent structures. In this paper, the acoustic wave propagation in a supercooled model liquid is studied by using normal mode analysis. Due to the highly disordered inherent structure, a single acoustic wave is decomposed into many normal modes in broad frequency range. This causes the rapid decay of the acoustic wave and results in anomalous wavenumber dependency of the dispersion relation and the rate of attenuation.

  19. Inclusive decay B??X

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1996-06-01

    Using data samples taken at the ?(4S) resonance and nearby continuum e(+)e(?) annihilation with the CLEO-II detector at CESR, we have measured the inclusive branching fraction B(B??X)=(17.6±1.1±1.2)%, and the momentum distribution of the ? mesons...

  20. FDCSUSYDecay: A MSSM Decay package

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Qi; Jian-Xiong Wang

    2006-12-01

    FDCSUSYDecay is a FORTRAN program package generated by FDC (Feynman Diagram Calculation) system fully automatically. It is dedicated to calculate at tree-level all the possible 2-body decays of SUSY and Higgs particles in the Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM). The format of its output files complies with SUSY Les Houches Accord and can be easily imported by other packages.

  1. Speeding-up Thorium decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Cardone; R. Mignani; A. Petrucci

    2007-10-26

    We show that cavitation of a solution of thorium-228 in water induces its transformation at a rate 10000 times faster than the natural radioactive decay would do. This result agrees with the alteration of the secular equilibrium of thorium-234 obtained by a Russian team via explosion of titanium foils in water and solutions. These evidences further support some preliminary clues for the possibility of piezonuclear reactions (namely nuclear reactions induced by pressure waves) obtained in the last ten years.

  2. Scissors modes: The first overtone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatada, Keisuke [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, c.p. 13, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Hayakawa, Kuniko [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, c.p. 13, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Centro Fermi, Compendio Viminale, Roma I-00184 (Italy); Palumbo, Fabrizio [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, c.p. 13, I-00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2011-07-15

    Scissors modes were predicted in the framework of the two-rotor model. This model has an intrinsic harmonic spectrum, so that the level above the scissors mode, the first overtone, has excitation energy twice that of the scissors mode. Because the latter is of the order of 3 MeV in the rare-earth region, the energy of the overtone is below threshold for nucleon emission, and its width should remain small enough for the overtone to be observable. We find that B(E2){up_arrow}{sub overtone}=(1/64 {theta}{sub 0}{sup 2})B(E2){up_arrow}{sub scissors}, where {theta}{sub 0} is the zero-point oscillation amplitude, which in the rare-earth region is of order 10{sup -1}.

  3. Measurement of Branching Ratios for Non-leptonic Cabibbo-suppressed Decays of the Charmed-Strange Baryon Xic+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vazquez Jauregui, Eric; /San Luis Potosi U.

    2008-08-01

    We studied several {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} decay modes, most of them with a hyperon in the final state, and determined their branching ratios. The data used in this analysis come from the fixed target experiment SELEX, a multi-stage spectrometer with high acceptance for forward interactions, that took data during 1996 and 1997 at Fermilab with 600 GeV=c (mainly {Sigma}{sup -}, {pi}{sup -}) and 540 GeV/c (mainly p) beams incident on copper and carbon targets. The thesis mainly details the first observation of two Cabibbo-suppressed decay modes, {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}. The branching ratios of the decays relative to the Cabibbo-favored {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} are measured to be: {Lambda}({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +})/{Lambda}({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.184 {+-} 0.086. Systematic studies have been performed in order to check the stability of the measurements varying all cuts used in the selection of events over a wide interval and we do not observe evidence of any trend, so the systematic error is negligible in the final results because the quadrature sum of the total error is not affected. The branching ratios for the same decay modes of the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} are measured to check the methodology of the analysis. The branching ratio of the decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} is measured relative to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -} {pi}{sup +}, while the one of the decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} is relative to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, as they have been reported earlier. The results for the control modes are: {Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/{Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -} {pi}{sup +}) = 0.716 {+-} 0.144 and {Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +})/{Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.382 {+-} 0.104. The branching ratio of the decay mode {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -} {pi}{sup +} relative to {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} is considered as another control mode, the measured value is {Gamma}({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/{Gamma}({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.194 {+-} 0.054. Systematic studies have been also performed for the control modes and all systematic variations are also small compared to the statistical error. We also report the first observation of two more decay modes, the Cabibbo-suppressed decay {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -} K{sup +}{pi}{sup +} and the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, but their branching ratios have not been measured up to now.

  4. Shell model analysis of the neutrinoless double-{beta} decay of {sup 48}Ca

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horoi, Mihai [Department of Physics, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, Michigan 48859 (United States); Stoica, Sabin [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), 407 Atomistilor, Magurele-Bucharest, R-077125 (Romania)

    2010-02-15

    The neutrinoless double-{beta} (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) decay process could provide crucial information to determine the absolute scale of neutrino masses, and it is the only one that can establish whether a neutrino is a Dirac or a Majorana particle. A key ingredient for extracting the absolute neutrino masses from 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay experiments is a precise knowledge of the nuclear matrix elements (NMEs) describing the half-life of this process. We developed a shell model approach for computing the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay NME, and we used it to analyze the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} mode of {sup 48}Ca. The dependence of the NME on the short-range correlation parameters, on the average energy of the intermediate states, on the finite-size cutoff parameters, and on the effective interaction used for many-body calculations is discussed.

  5. Methods And Apparatus For Acoustic Fiber Fractionation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brodeur, Pierre (Smyrna, GA)

    1999-11-09

    Methods and apparatus for acoustic fiber fractionation using a plane ultrasonic wave field interacting with water suspended fibers circulating in a channel flow using acoustic radiation forces to separate fibers into two or more fractions based on fiber radius, with applications of the separation concept in the pulp and paper industry. The continuous process relies on the use of a wall-mounted, rectangular cross-section piezoelectric ceramic transducer to selectively deflect flowing fibers as they penetrate the ultrasonic field. The described embodiment uses a transducer frequency of approximately 150 kHz. Depending upon the amount of dissolved gas in water, separation is obtained using a standing or a traveling wave field.

  6. Radiotherapy Dose Fractionation under Parameter Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davison, Matt; Kim, Daero; Keller, Harald

    2011-11-30

    In radiotherapy, radiation is directed to damage a tumor while avoiding surrounding healthy tissue. Tradeoffs ensue because dose cannot be exactly shaped to the tumor. It is particularly important to ensure that sensitive biological structures near the tumor are not damaged more than a certain amount. Biological tissue is known to have a nonlinear response to incident radiation. The linear quadratic dose response model, which requires the specification of two clinically and experimentally observed response coefficients, is commonly used to model this effect. This model yields an optimization problem giving two different types of optimal dose sequences (fractionation schedules). Which fractionation schedule is preferred depends on the response coefficients. These coefficients are uncertainly known and may differ from patient to patient. Because of this not only the expected outcomes but also the uncertainty around these outcomes are important, and it might not be prudent to select the strategy with the best expected outcome.

  7. Fractional Quantum Hall States in Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed Jellal; Bellati Malika

    2011-04-27

    We quantum mechanically analyze the fractional quantum Hall effect in graphene. This will be done by building the corresponding states in terms of a potential governing the interactions and discussing other issues. More precisely, we consider a system of particles in the presence of an external magnetic field and take into account of a specific interaction that captures the basic features of the Laughlin series \

  8. Excursions of diffusion processes and continued fractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alain Comtet; Yves Tourigny

    2010-02-11

    It is well-known that the excursions of a one-dimensional diffusion process can be studied by considering a certain Riccati equation associated with the process. We show that, in many cases of interest, the Riccati equation can be solved in terms of an infinite continued fraction. We examine the probabilistic significance of the expansion. To illustrate our results, we discuss some examples of diffusions in deterministic and in random environments.

  9. Fractionated Branes and Black Hole Interiors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emil J. Martinec

    2015-05-20

    Combining a variety of results in string theory and general relativity, a picture of the black hole interior is developed wherein spacetime caps off at an inner horizon, and the inter-horizon region is occupied by a Hagedorn gas of a very low tension state of fractionated branes. This picture leads to natural resolutions of a variety of puzzles concerning quantum black holes. Gravity Research Foundation 2015 Fourth Prize Award for Essays on Gravitation.

  10. The Fractional London Equation and The Fractional Pippard Model For Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    José Weberszpil

    2012-07-23

    With the discovery of new superconductors there was a running to find the justifications for the new properties found in these materials. In order to describe these new effects some theories were adapted and some others have been tried. In this work we present an application of the fractional calculus to study the superconductor in the context of London theory. Here we investigated the linear London equation modified by fractional derivatives for non-differentiable functions, instead of integer ones, in a coarse grained scenario. We apply the fractional approach based in the modified Riemann-Liouville sense to improve the model in order to include possible non-local interactions and the media. It is argued that the e ects of non-locality and long memory, intrinsic to the formalism of the fractional calculus, are relevant to achieving a satisfactory phenomenological description. In order to compare the present results with the usual London theory, we calculated the magnetic field distribution for a mesoscopic superconductor system. Also, a fractional Pippard-like model is proposed to take into account the non-locality beside effects of interactions and the media. We propose that parameter alfa of fractionality can be used to create an alternative way to characterize superconductors.

  11. The First Calculation of Fractional Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Bertolini; Jesse Thaler; Jonathan R. Walsh

    2015-05-14

    In collider physics, jet algorithms are a ubiquitous tool for clustering particles into discrete jet objects. Event shapes offer an alternative way to characterize jets, and one can define a jet multiplicity event shape, which can take on fractional values, using the framework of "jets without jets". In this paper, we perform the first analytic studies of fractional jet multiplicity $\\tilde{N}_{\\rm jet}$ in the context of $e^+e^-$ collisions. We use fixed-order QCD to understand the $\\tilde{N}_{\\rm jet}$ cross section at order $\\alpha_s^2$, and we introduce a candidate factorization theorem to capture certain higher-order effects. The resulting distributions have a hybrid jet algorithm/event shape behavior which agrees with parton shower Monte Carlo generators. The $\\tilde{N}_{\\rm jet}$ observable does not satisfy ordinary soft-collinear factorization, and the $\\tilde{N}_{\\rm jet}$ cross section exhibits a number of unique features, including the absence of collinear logarithms and the presence of soft logarithms that are purely non-global. Additionally, we find novel divergences connected to the energy sharing between emissions, which are reminiscent of rapidity divergences encountered in other applications. Given these interesting properties of fractional jet multiplicity, we advocate for future measurements and calculations of $\\tilde{N}_{\\rm jet}$ at hadron colliders like the LHC.

  12. Probing Spectator Scattering and Annihilation Corrections in $B_{s}$ $\\to$ $PV$ Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Qin; Sun, Junfeng; Yang, Yueling

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the recent LHCb measurements on $\\bar{B}_{s}$ $\\to$ $\\pi^{-}K^{*+}$ and $\\bar{B}_{s}$ $\\to$ $K^{\\pm}K^{*\\mp}$ decay modes, we revisit the $B_{s}$ $\\to$ $PV$ decays within QCD factorization framework. The effects of hard-spectator scattering and annihilation corrections are studied in detail. After performing a $\\chi^2$-fit on the end-point parameters $X_A^{i,f}$ ($\\rho_A^{i,f}$, $\\phi_A^{i,f}$) and $X_H$ ($\\rho_H$, $\\phi_H$) with available data, it is found that although some possible mismatches exist, the universalities of $X_A^{i,f}$ and $X_H$ in $B_s$ and $B_{u,d}$ systems are still allowed within theoretical uncertainties and experimental errors. With the end-point parameters gotten from $B_{u,d}$ $\\to$ $PV$ decays, the numerical results and detailed analyses for the observables of $\\bar{B}_{s}$ ${\\to}$ $\\pi K^{\\ast}$, $\\rho K$, $\\pi\\rho$, $\\pi\\phi$ and $K\\phi$ decay modes are presented. In addition, we have identified a few useful observables, especially the ones of $\\bar{B}_{s}$ $\\to$ $\\pi^...

  13. B - L violating nucleon decay and GUT scale baryogenesis in SO(10)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babu, K. S. [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States)

    2012-07-27

    Minimal SO(10) models which utilize a 126-plet of Higgs for breaking B - L symmetry are predictive schemes for neutrino masses and mixings. These models have been known to predict sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13} Asymptotically-Equal-To 0.09, which is consistent with recent measurements. It is shown that the same class of models generates naturally baryon number violating dimension seven operators leading to novel nucleon decay modes such as n{yields}e{sup -}K{sup +}, e{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and p{yields}{nu}{pi}{sup +} which violate B - L by two units. We find that in two-step breaking schemes of non-supersymmetric SO(10), the partial lifetimes for these modes can be within reach of experiments. The interactions responsible for these decay modes also provide a new way to understand the origin of matter in the universe via the decays of GUT scale colored scalar bosons. Their (B - L)-violating nature guarantees that the GUT scale induced baryon asymmetry is not washed out by the electroweak sphaleron interactions. In minimal SO(10) models this asymmetry is closely tied to the masses of quarks, leptons and the neutrinos.

  14. Advancing the Physics Basis of Quiescent H-mode through Exploration of ITER Relevant Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, W. M.; Burrell, K. H.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Garofalo, A. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Loarte, A.; McKee, G. R.; Nazikian, R.; Snyder, B. P.

    2014-09-01

    Recent experiments on DIII-D have overcome a long-standing limitation in accessing quiescent H-mode (QH-mode), a high confinement state of the plasma that does not exhibit the explosive instabilities associated with edge localized modes (ELMs). In the past, QH-mode was associated with low density operation, but has now been extended to high normalized densities compatible with operation envisioned for ITER. Through the use of strong shaping, QH-mode plasmas have been maintained at high densities, both absolute (?e ? 7 × 1019 m—3) and normalized Greenwald fraction (?e/?G > 0:7) . In these plasmas, the pedestal can evolve to very high pressures and current as the density is increased. Calculations of the pedestal height and width from the EPED model are quantitatively consistent with the experimental observed evolution with density. The comparison of the dependence of the maximum density threshold for QH-mode with plasma shape help validate the underlying theoretical peeling-ballooning models describing ELM stability. High density QH-mode operation with strong shaping has allowed stable access to a previously predicted regime of very high pedestal dubbed \\Super H-mode". In general, QH-mode is found to achieve ELM-stable operation while maintaining adequate impurity exhaust, due to the enhanced impurity transport from an edge harmonic oscillation, thought to be a saturated kink- peeling mode driven by rotation shear. In addition, the impurity confinement time is not affected by rotation, even though the energy confinement time and measured E ? B shear is observed to increase at low toroidal rotation. Together with demonstrations of high beta, high confinement and low q95 for many energy confinement times, these results suggest QH-mode as a potentially attractive operating scenario for ITER's Q=10 mission.

  15. Search for non Standard Model Higgs boson decays in events with displaced muon-jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dildick, Sven; Krutelyov, Slava; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Tararinov, Aysen; Bouhali, Othmane; Hernandez, Alfredo Martin Castaneda

    2015-01-01

    New light bosons that couple weakly to the standard model (SM) particles are predicted in various extensions of the standard model (BSM). Examples include supersymmetric (SUSY) theories with extended Higgs sectors or with a hidden valleys (dark SUSY). In these models the light bosons can be produced directly in the decay of a Higgs boson, or as part of the decay chain of SUSY particles. Depending on the branching fraction, the exotic decays of the SM-Higgs can be undetected in standard analysis techniques or due to its modified production cross section of the Higgs bosons at the LHC. Therefore, direct searches for non-SM decays of the Higgs boson are the fastest way to understand the nature of the Higgs boson. Either it will confirm its SM character, or it will rule out a whole array of BSM scenarios. We present status of the search at CMS for non-SM Higgs boson decays in events with displaced muon-jets.

  16. SU(3) breaking effects in hyperon beta decay from lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoichi Sasaki; Takeshi Yamazaki

    2006-10-13

    We present results of an exploratory study of flavor SU(3) breaking effects in hyperon beta decays using domain wall fermions. From phenomenological point of view, the significance of this subject is twofold: (1) to extract the element $V_{us}$ of the Cabibbo-Kabayashi-Maskawa mixing matrix from the $\\Delta S=1$ decay process, and (2) to provide vital information to analysis of the strange quark fraction of the proton spin with the polarized deep inelastic scattering data. In this study, we explore the $\\Xi^0 \\to \\Sigma^+$ beta decay, which is highly sensitive to the SU(3) breaking since this decay corresponds to the direct analogue of neutron beta decay under an exchange between the down quark and the strange quark. We expose the SU(3) breaking effect on $g_A/g_V=g_1(0)/f_1(0)$ up to the first order in breaking. The second-class form factors $g_2$ and $f_3$, of which non-zero values are the direct signals of the SU(3) breaking effect, are also measured. Finally, we estimate $f_1(0)$ up to the second-order correction and then evaluate $|V_{us}|$ combined with the KTeV experiment.

  17. Excluded volume causes integer and fractional plateaus in colloidal ratchet currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pietro Tierno; Thomas M. Fischer

    2015-07-06

    We study the collective transport of paramagnetic colloids driven above a magnetic bubble lattice by an external rotating magnetic ?eld. We measure a direct ratchet current which rises in integer and fractional steps with the ?eld amplitude. The stepwise increase is caused by excluded volume interactions between the particles, which form composite clusters above the bubbles with mobile and immobile occupation sites. Transient energy minima located at the interstitials between the bubbles cause the colloids to hop from one composite cluster to the next with synchronous and period doubled modes of transport. The colloidal current may be polarized to make selective use of type up or type down interstitials.

  18. Strange quark momentum fraction from overlap fermion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mingyang Sun; Yi-Bo Yang; Keh-Fei Liu; Ming Gong

    2015-03-10

    We present a calculation of $_s$ for the strange quark in the nucleon. We also report the ratio of the strange $$ to that of $u/d$ in the disconnected insertion which will be useful in constraining the global fit of parton distribution functions at small $x$. We adopt overlap fermion action on $2 + 1$ flavor domain-wall fermion configurations on the $24^3 \\times 64$ lattice with a light sea quark mass which corresponds to $m_{\\pi}=330$ MeV. Smeared grid $Z_3$ sources are deployed to calculate the nucleon propagator with low-mode substitution. Even-odd grid sources and time-dilution technique with stochastic noises are used to calculate the high mode contribution to the quark loop. Low mode averaging (LMA) for the quark loop is applied to reduce the statistical error of the disconnected insertion calculation. We find the ratio $_s/_{u/d}^{\\mathrm{DI}}= 0.78(3)$ in this study.

  19. Strange quark momentum fraction from overlap fermion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Mingyang; Liu, Keh-Fei; Gong, Ming

    2015-01-01

    We present a calculation of $\\langle x \\rangle_s$ for the strange quark in the nucleon. We also report the ratio of the strange $\\langle x \\rangle$ to that of $u/d$ in the disconnected insertion which will be useful in constraining the global fit of parton distribution functions at small $x$. We adopt overlap fermion action on $2 + 1$ flavor domain-wall fermion configurations on the $24^3 \\times 64$ lattice with a light sea quark mass which corresponds to $m_{\\pi}=330$ MeV. Smeared grid $Z_3$ sources are deployed to calculate the nucleon propagator with low-mode substitution. Even-odd grid sources and time-dilution technique with stochastic noises are used to calculate the high mode contribution to the quark loop. Low mode averaging (LMA) for the quark loop is applied to reduce the statistical error of the disconnected insertion calculation. We find the ratio $\\langle x \\rangle_s/\\langle x \\rangle_{u/d}^{\\mathrm{DI}}= 0.78(3)$ in this study.

  20. Search for Majoron-emitting modes of double-beta decay ofXe136with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A. ; Rowson, P. C. ; Rozo, M. P. ; Russell, J. J. ; Schubert, A. ; Sinclair, D. ; Smith, E. ; Stekhanov, V. ; Tarka, M. ; Tolba, T. ; Tosi, D. ; Tsang, R. ; Twelker, K. ;...

  1. Double Beta Decay in Xenon-136: Measuring the Neutrino-Emitting Mode and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Discrimination ofDynamicsBi2Sr2-

  2. Double Beta Decay in Xenon-136: Measuring the Neutrino-Emitting Mode and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Discrimination ofDynamicsBi2Sr2-Searching for

  3. Search for Majoron-emitting modes of double-beta decay of Xe 136 with

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference) | SciTechsaturatedcrystals (Journal Article) |EXO-200 (Journal Article)

  4. Measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions of Bc± ? J/??±and B± ? J/? K± and B(Bc±? J/? ?±?±?-/+)/B(Bc± ? J/? ?±) in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia)

    2015-01-01

    The ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions (?(Bc±) B(Bc± ? J/??±))/(?(B±) B(B± ? J/?K±) is studied in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The kinematic region investigated requires Ba,sub>c± and B±mesons with transverse momentum p? > 15 GeV and rapidity |y| < 1.6. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.1 fb-1. The ratio is determined to be [0.48 ± 0.05 (stat) ± 0.03(syst) ± 0.05 (?Bc)]% The J/??±?±?-/+ decay mode is also observed in the same data sample. Using a model-independent method developed to measure the efficiency given the presence of resonant behaviour in the three-pion system, the ratio of the branching fractions J/? ?±?±?-/+)/B(Bc± is measured to be 2.55 ± 0.80(stat) ± 0.33(syst) +0.04-0.01 (?Bc), consistent with the previous LHCb result.

  5. Branching fractions for chi_cJ -> p p-bar pi^0, p p-bar eta, and p p-bar omega

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLEO Collaboration; P. U. E. Onyisi; J. L. Rosner; J. P. Alexander; D. G. Cassel; S. Das; R. Ehrlich; L. Fields; L. Gibbons; S. W. Gray; D. L. Hartill; B. K. Heltsley; J. M. Hunt; D. L. Kreinick; V. E. Kuznetsov; J. Ledoux; J. R. Patterson; D. Peterson; D. Riley; A. Ryd; A. J. Sadoff; X. Shi; W. M. Sun; J. Yelton; P. Rubin; N. Lowrey; S. Mehrabyan; M. Selen; J. Wiss; S. Adams; M. Kornicer; R. E. Mitchell; M. R. Shepherd; C. M. Tarbert; D. Besson; T. K. Pedlar; J. Xavier; D. Cronin-Hennessy; J. Hietala; P. Zweber; S. Dobbs; Z. Metreveli; K. K. Seth; T. Xiao; A. Tomaradze; S. Brisbane; J. Libby; L. Martin; A. Powell; P. Spradlin; G. Wilkinson; H. Mendez; J. Y. Ge; D. H. Miller; I. P. J. Shipsey; B. Xin; G. S. Adams; D. Hu; B. Moziak; J. Napolitano; K. M. Ecklund; J. Insler; H. Muramatsu; C. S. Park; E. H. Thorndike; F. Yang; S. Ricciardi; C. Thomas; M. Artuso; S. Blusk; R. Mountain; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; J. C. Wang; L. M. Zhang; G. Bonvicini; D. Cinabro; A. Lincoln; M. J. Smith; P. Zhou; J. Zhu; P. Naik; J. Rademacker; D. M. Asner; K. W. Edwards; J. Reed; K. Randrianarivony; A. N. Robichaud; G. Tatishvili; E. J. White; R. A. Briere; H. Vogel

    2010-05-28

    Using a sample of 25.9 million psi(2S) decays acquired with the CLEO-c detector at the CESR e^+e^- collider, we report branching fractions for the decays chi_cJ -> p p-bar pi^0, p p-bar eta, and p p-bar omega, with J=0,1,2. Our results for B(chi_cJ-> p p-bar pi^0) and B(chi_cJ-> p p-bar eta) are consistent with, but more precise than, previous measurements. Furthermore, we include the first measurement of B(chi_cJ-> p p-bar omega).

  6. Dalitz plot studies of D0 --> K0S pi+ pi- decays in a factorization approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. -P. Dedonder; R. Kaminski; L. Lesniak; B. Loiseau

    2014-09-23

    The presently available high-statistics data of the D0 --> K0S pi+ pi- processes measured by the Belle and BABAR Collaborations are analyzed within a quasi two-body QCD factorization framework. Starting from the weak effective Hamiltonian, tree and annihilation amplitudes build up the D0 --> K0S pi+ pi- decay amplitude. Two of the three final-state mesons are assumed to form a single scalar, vector or tensor state originating from a quark-antiquark pair so that the factorization hypothesis can be applied. The meson-meson final state interactions are described by K pi and pi pi scalar and vector form factors for the S and P waves and by relativistic Breit-Wigner formulae for the D waves. A combined chi^2 fit to a Belle Dalitz plot density distribution, to the total experimental branching fraction and to the tau^- --> K0S pi- nu_tau decay data is carried out to fix the 33 free parameters. These are mainly related to the strengths of the scalar form factors and to unknown meson to meson transition form factors at a large momentum transfer squared equal to the D0 mass squared. A good overall agreement to the Belle Dalitz plot density distribution is achieved. Another set of parameters fits equally well the BABAR Collaboration Dalitz plot model. The branching fractions of the dominant channels compare well with those of the isobar Belle or BABAR models.The lower-limit values of the branching fractions of the annihilation amplitudes are significant. Built upon experimental data from other processes, the unitary K pi and pi pi scalar form factors, entering our decay amplitude and satisfying analyticity and chiral symmetry constraints, are furthermore constrained by the present Dalitz plot analysis. Our decay amplitude could be a useful input for determinations of D0-D0bar mixing parameters and of the CKM angle gamma (or phi3).

  7. Electroweak penguin decays at LHCb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Blake

    2011-09-29

    Promising ways to search for New Physics effects in radiative penguin decays are in the angular analysis of $B_{d} \\rightarrow K^{*0} \\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$, in the measurement of direct CP violation in $\\B_{d} \\rightarrow K^{*0}\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ and a time dependent analysis of $B_{s} \\rightarrow \\phi \\gamma$. All of these studies are being pursued at LHCb. First results will be shown from the 2010 and early 2011 data, with particular emphasis on $B_{d} \\rightarrow K^{*0} \\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$.

  8. Neutrinoless double beta decay experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Zuber

    2006-10-04

    The study of neutrinoless double beta decay is of outmost importance for neutrino physics. It is considered to be the gold plated channel to probe the fundamental character of neutrinos and to determine the neutrino mass. From the experimental point about nine different isotopes are explored for the search. After a general introduction follows a short discussion on nuclear matrix element calculations and supportive measurements. The current experimental status of double beta searches is presented followed by a short discussion of the ideas and proposals for large scale experiments.

  9. Searches for invisible Higgs boson decays with ATLAS and CMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calfayan, Philippe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS and CMS experiments carried out searches for invisible decays of the Higgs boson. The analyses have been led in final states with missing energy in the transverse plane of the detector, in the case of typical signatures where the Higgs boson is produced in association with an electroweak vector boson, or via gluon-gluon or vector boson fusion. Upper bounds on the branching fraction of a Higgs boson decaying to invisible particles have been derived as function of the assumed mass of the Higgs boson. Additional interpretations have been considered in the context of Higgs-portal models, which resulted in constraints on the production of Dark Matter candidates. The searches are based on the complete datasets from the Run-1 of the Large Hadron Collider, which includes proton-proton collision at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=7$ or $8\\,\\mathrm{TeV}$, with up to $20\\,\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity.

  10. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and CP Violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick J. O'Donnell; Utpal Sarkar

    1993-05-27

    We study the relation between the Majorana neutrino mass matrices and the neutrinoless double beta decay when CP is not conserved. We give an explicit form of the decay rate in terms of a rephasing invariant quantity and demonstrate that in the presence of CP violation it is impossible to have vanishing neutrinoless double beta decay in the case of two neutrino generations (or when the third generation leptons do not mix with other leptons and hence decouple).

  11. Polyfunctional catalyst for processiing benzene fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Byakov; B.D. Zubitskii; B.G. Tryasunov; I.Ya. Petrov

    2009-05-15

    A by-product of the coke industry is a raw benzene fraction benzene- 1 which may serve as for catalytic processes. The paper reports a study on the influence of the composition and temperatures on the activity and selectivity of NiO-V{sub 2}O{sub 6}-MoO{sub 3}/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts and the corresponding binary and tertiary subsystems are studied by a pulse method in model reactions; the hydrodealkylating of toluene and the hydrodesulfurizing of thioprhene. The optimal catalyst composition is established. The new catalyst is compared with industrial catalysts.

  12. Motility fractionation of bacteria by centrifugation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudio Maggi; Alessia Lepore; Jacopo Solari; Alessandro Rizzo; Roberto Di Leonardo

    2013-10-10

    Centrifugation is a widespread laboratory technique used to separate mixtures into fractions characterized by a specific size, weight or density. We demonstrate that centrifugation can be also used to separate swimming cells having different motility. To do this we study self-propelled bacteria under the influence of an external centrifugal field. Using dynamic image correlation spectroscopy we measure the spatially resolved motility of bacteria after centrifugation. A significant gradient in swimming-speeds is observed for increasing centrifugal speeds. Our results can be reproduced by a model that treats bacteria as "hot" colloidal particles having a diffusion coefficient that depends on the swimming speed.

  13. Hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Torget, Robert W. (Littleton, CO); Padukone, Nandan (Denver, CO); Hatzis, Christos (Denver, CO); Wyman, Charles E. (Lakewood, CO)

    2000-01-01

    A multi-function process is described for the hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass to separate hemicellulosic sugars from other biomass components such as extractives and proteins; a portion of the solubilized lignin; cellulose; glucose derived from cellulose; and insoluble lignin from said biomass comprising one or more of the following: optionally, as function 1, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing a lignocellulosic biomass material at a temperature of about 94 to about 160.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 120 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of extractives, lignin, and protein by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 2, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0, either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing either fresh biomass or the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 1 at a temperature of about 94-220.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of hemicellulosic sugars, semisoluble sugars and other compounds, and amorphous glucans by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 3, optionally, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 2 at a temperature of about 180-280.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of cellulosic sugars by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; and as function 4, optionally, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 3 at a temperature of about 180-280.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of cellulosic sugars by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process.

  14. Fractionation Development Center FDC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban TransportFortistar LLC Jump to:EnergyMontana:Fox,Fractionation

  15. The Decay of the Neutron or Beta Decay, the Big Bang, and the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Decay of the Neutron or Beta Decay, the Big Bang, and the Left-Handed Universe Apr 03 2014 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM Geoffrey L. Greene Physics Division, ORNL Research Accelerator...

  16. Displacement Echoes: Classical Decay and Quantum Freeze

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cyril Petitjean; Diego V. Bevilaqua; Eric J. Heller; Philippe Jacquod

    2007-04-23

    Motivated by neutron scattering experiments, we investigate the decay of the fidelity with which a wave packet is reconstructed by a perfect time-reversal operation performed after a phase space displacement. In the semiclassical limit, we show that the decay rate is generically given by the Lyapunov exponent of the classical dynamics. For small displacements, we additionally show that, following a short-time Lyapunov decay, the decay freezes well above the ergodic value because of quantum effects. Our analytical results are corroborated by numerical simulations.

  17. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay: Present and Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliviero Cremonesi

    2002-10-04

    Present status, and future plans for Double Beta Decay searches are reviewed. Given the recent observations of neutrino oscillations, a possibility to observe $\\beta\\beta(0\

  18. Review of double beta decay experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Barabash

    2014-03-12

    The brief review of current experiments on search and studying of double beta decay processes is done. Best present limits on $\\langle m_{\

  19. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and Neutrino Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Duerr

    2012-06-04

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is a promising test for lepton number violating physics beyond the standard model of particle physics. There is a deep connection between this decay and the phenomenon of neutrino masses. In particular, we will discuss the relation between neutrinoless double beta decay and Majorana neutrino masses provided by the so-called Schechter--Valle theorem in a quantitative way. Furthermore, we will present an experimental cross check to discriminate neutrinoless double beta decay from unknown nuclear background using only one isotope, i.e., within one experiment.

  20. Displacement Echoes: Classical Decay and Quantum Freeze

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petitjean, Cyril [Departement de Physique Theorique, Universite de Geneve, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Bevilaqua, Diego V. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Heller, Eric J. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Jacquod, Philippe [Physics Department, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

    2007-04-20

    Motivated by neutron scattering experiments, we investigate the decay of the fidelity with which a wave packet is reconstructed by a perfect time-reversal operation performed after a phase-space displacement. In the semiclassical limit, we show that the decay rate is generically given by the Lyapunov exponent of the classical dynamics. For small displacements, we additionally show that, following a short-time Lyapunov decay, the decay freezes well above the ergodic value because of quantum effects. Our analytical results are corroborated by numerical simulations.

  1. Nuclear beta-decay measurements and |Vud|

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dan Melconian

    2011-08-11

    Some recent work in nuclear beta decay related to the value of |Vud| is described along with some near-term goals for future measurements.

  2. Direct CP violation in B decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kreps

    2008-07-01

    We review recent experimental results on direct CP violation. The hot topic is a measurement in charmless two-body decays of B0, B+. In connection to this the first analogous measurements in Bs0 and Lambda_b0 decays are now available. Furthermore first evidence for direct CP violation in B+ decays is obtained from Dalitz plot analyzes of the K+pi-pi+ final state at B-factories. The last group of discussed results probes the b -> c\\bar{c}d transition in attempt to resolve the discrepancy between Belle and BABAR experiments in CP violation in the B0 -> D+D- decays.

  3. Constraints on new phenomena via Higgs boson couplings and invisible decays with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; ?lvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC has measured the Higgs boson couplings and mass, and searched for invisible Higgs boson decays, using multiple production and decay channels with up to 4.7 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV and 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV. In the current study, the measured production and decay rates of the observed Higgs boson in the $\\gamma\\gamma$, $ZZ$, $WW$, $Z\\gamma$, $bb$, $\\tau\\tau$, and $\\mu\\mu$ decay channels, along with results from the associated production of a Higgs boson with a top-quark pair, are used to probe the scaling of the couplings with mass. Limits are set on parameters in extensions of the Standard Model including a composite Higgs boson, an additional electroweak singlet, and two-Higgs-doublet models. Together with the measured mass of the scalar Higgs boson in the $\\gamma\\gamma$ and $ZZ$ decay modes, a lower limit is set on the pseudoscalar Higgs boson mass of $m_{A}>370$ GeV in the ``hMSSM'' simplified Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model...

  4. Reexamining charmless B\\to PV decays in QCD factorization approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xinqiang Li; Yadong Yang

    2006-06-12

    Using the QCD factorization approach, we reexamine the two-body hadronic charmless $B$-meson decays to final states involving a pseudoscalar~($P$) and a vector~($V$) meson, with inclusion of the penguin contractions of spectator-scattering amplitudes induced by the $b\\to D g^\\ast g^\\ast$~(where $D=d$ or $s$, and $g^\\ast$ denotes an off-shell gluon) transitions, which are of order $\\alpha_s^2$. Their impacts on the CP-averaged branching ratios and CP-violating asymmetries are examined. We find that these higher order penguin contraction contributions have significant impacts on some specific decay modes. Since $B\\to \\pi K^{\\ast}$, $K \\rho$ decays involve the same electro-weak physics as $B\\to \\pi K$ puzzles, we present a detailed analysis of these decays and find that the five R-ratios for $B\\to \\pi K^{\\ast}$, $K \\rho$ system are in agreement with experimental data except for $R(\\pi K^*)$. Generally, these new contributions are found to be important for penguin-dominated $B\\to PV$ decays.

  5. Charmless $B \\to PV, VV $ decays and new physics effects in the mSUGRA model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenjuan Zou; Zhenjun Xiao

    2005-10-24

    By employing the QCD factorization approach, we calculate the new physics contributions to the branching radios of the two-body charmless $ B \\to PV$ and $B \\to VV$ decays in the framework of the minimal supergravity (mSUGRA) model. we choose three typical sets of the mSUGRA input parameters in which the Wilson coefficient $C_{7\\gamma}(m_b)$ can be either SM-like (the case A and C) or has a flipped-sign (the case B). We found numerically that (a) the SUSY contributions are always very small for both case A and C; (b) for those tree-dominated decays, the SUSY contributions in case B are also very small; (c) for those QCD penguin-dominated decay modes, the SUSY contributions in case B can be significant, and can provide an enhancement about $30% \\sim 260%$ to the branching ratios of $B \\to K^*(\\pi,\\phi,\\rho)$ and $K \\phi$ decays, but a reduction about $30% \\sim 80%$ to $ B\\to K(\\rho, \\omega)$ decays; and (d) the large SUSY contributions in the case B may be masked by the large theoretical errors dominated by the uncertainty from our ignorance of calculating the annihilation contributions in the QCD factorization approach.

  6. Beta processes in a high-temperature field and nuclear multibeta decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopytin, I. V., E-mail: kopytin@yandex.ru; Hussain, Imad A. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)] [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    Sources of the temperature dependence of rates of nuclear beta processes in matter of massive stars are systematized. Electron and positron beta decays and electron capture (K capture and the capture of unbound electrons) fromexcited nuclear states (thermal decays) are considered along with the photobeta decays from ground and excited nuclear states. The possible quantum degeneracy of an electron gas in matter and the degree of ionization of an atomic K shell in a high-temperature field are taken into account. For a number of multidecay odd-nuclei, the temperature dependences of the ratios of the total rates of their {beta}{sup -} decays to the sum of the total rates over all of decay modes for the same nuclei are calculated in the range of nuclear temperature from 2 to 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} K. It is shown that the deviation of this ratio from the experimental value obtained at 'normal' temperature may be quite sizable. This circumstance should be taken into account in models that consider the problem of synthesis of nuclei in matter of massive stars.

  7. CP-violation in $b \\to s$ Penguin Decays at BaBar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BaBar Collaboration; Nitesh Soni

    2007-10-16

    We present the new and updated $BABAR$ measurements of CP-violation studies for many $b\\to s $ penguin decay modes. We report the first observation of mixing-induced CP-violation in $B^0 \\to \\eta ^{'} K^0$ with a significance (including systematic uncertainties) of 5.5$\\sigma$. We also present the first observation of the decay $B^0 \\to \\rho ^0 K^0$. Using the time-dependent Dalitz plot analysis of $B^0\\to K^+K^- K^0$ decay, the CP-parameters $\\mathcal A_{CP}$ and $\\beta_{eff}$ are measured with $4.8\\sigma$ significance, and we reject the solution near $\\pi /2 - \\beta_{eff}$ at $4.5\\sigma$. We also present the updated measurements of CP-violating parameters for $B^0 \\to K_S^0 \\pi ^0$, $K_S^0K_S^0K_S^0$ and $\\pi ^0 \\pi ^0 K_S^0$ decays. An updated measurements of the CP-violating charge asymmetries for $B^{\\pm}\\to \\eta ^{'} K^{\\pm}$, $\\eta K^{\\pm}$, $\\omega K^{\\pm}$ decays are also presented. The measurements are based on the data sample recorded at the $\\Upsilon (4S)$ resonance with $BABAR$ detector at the PEP-II $B$-meson Factory at SLAC.

  8. Uncertainties in nuclear transition matrix elements of neutrinoless ?? decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rath, P. K.

    2013-12-30

    To estimate the uncertainties associated with the nuclear transition matrix elements M{sup (K)} (K=0?/0N) for the 0{sup +} ? 0{sup +} transitions of electron and positron emitting modes of the neutrinoless ?? decay, a statistical analysis has been performed by calculating sets of eight (twelve) different nuclear transition matrix elements M{sup (K)} in the PHFB model by employing four different parameterizations of a Hamiltonian with pairing plus multipolar effective two-body interaction and two (three) different parameterizations of Jastrow short range correlations. The averages in conjunction with their standard deviations provide an estimate of the uncertainties associated the nuclear transition matrix elements M{sup (K)} calculated within the PHFB model, the maximum of which turn out to be 13% and 19% owing to the exchange of light and heavy Majorana neutrinos, respectively.

  9. Primordial Graviton Production and Decaying Vacuum Energy Density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamayo, David; Bessada, D F A

    2015-01-01

    The problem of cosmological production of (massless) gravitons is discussed in the framework of an expanding, spatially homogeneous and isotropic FRW type Universe with decaying vacuum energy density ($\\Lambda \\equiv \\Lambda(H(t))$) described by general relativity theory. The gravitational wave equation is established and its time-dependent part has analytically been solved for different epochs in the case of a flat geometry. Unlike the standard $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology (no interacting vacuum), we show that massless gravitons can be produced during the radiation era. However, high frequency modes are damped out even faster than in the standard cosmology both in the radiation and matter-vacuum dominated epoch. The formation of the stochastic background of gravitons and the remnant power spectrum generated at different cosmological eras are also explicitly evaluated.

  10. E-model for Transportation Problem of Linear Stochastic Fractional ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dr.V.Charles

    2007-03-07

    Abstract: This paper deals with the so-called transportation problem of linear stochastic fractional programming, and ... sophisticated analysis. Stochastic ... circuit board of multi-objective LSFP, algorithm to identify redundant fractional objective ...

  11. Hydrogen isotope fractionation during lipid biosynthesis by Haloarcula marismortui

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen isotope fractionation during lipid biosynthesis by Haloarcula marismortui Sitindra S studied the controls on the fractionation of hydrogen isotopes during lipid biosynthesis by Haloarcula marismortui, a halophilic archaea, in pure culture experiments by varying organic substrate, the hydrogen

  12. Assessing the impacts of fractionation on pointing-intensive spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Michael Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Fractionated spacecraft consist of physically independent, "free-flying" modules composed of various subsystems. Thus, a fractionated spacecraft might consist of one-module responsible for the power generation and storage, ...

  13. Numerical Chaos in a Fractional Order Logistic Map

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joakim Munkhammar

    2010-11-10

    In this paper we investigate a fractional order logistic map and its discrete time dynamics. We show some basic properties of the fractional logistic map and numerically study its period-doubling route to chaos.

  14. Continuous scanning mode for ptychography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Jesse N.; Huang, Xiaojing; Harder, Ross J.; Robinson, Ian K.

    2014-10-15

    We outline how ptychographic imaging can be performed without the need for discrete scan positions. Through an idealized experiment, we demonstrate how a discrete-position scan regime can be replaced with a continuously scanned one with suitable modification of the reconstruction scheme based on coherent modes. The impact of this is that acquisition times can be reduced, significantly aiding ptychographic imaging with x rays, electrons, or visible light.

  15. Continuous scanning mode for ptychography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Clark, Jesse N.; Huang, Xiaojing; Harder, Ross J.; Robinson, Ian K.

    2014-01-01

    We outline how ptychographic imaging can be performed without the need for discrete scan positions. Through an idealized experiment, we demonstrate how a discrete-position scan regime can be replaced with a continuously scanned one with suitable modification of the reconstruction scheme based on coherent modes. The impact of this is that acquisition times can be reduced, significantly aiding ptychographic imaging with x rays, electrons, or visible light.

  16. Non-local fractional model of rate independent plasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wojciech Sumelka

    2013-09-14

    In the paper the generalisation of classical rate independent plasticity using fractional calculus is presented. This new formulation is non-local due to properties of applied fractional differential operator during definition of kinematics. In the description small fractional strains assumption is hold together with additive decomposition of total fractional strains into elastic and plastic parts. Classical local rate independent plasticity is recovered as a special case.

  17. Soliton Solutions of Fractional order KdV-Burger's Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muhammad Younis

    2013-08-31

    In this article, the new exact travelling wave solutions of the time-and space-fractional KdV-Burgers equation has been found. For this the fractional complex transformation have been implemented to convert nonlinear partial fractional differential equations to nonlinear ordinary differential equations, in the sense of the Jumarie's modified Riemann-Liouville derivative. Afterwards, the improved (G'/G)-expansion method can be implemented to celebrate the soliton solutions of KdV-Burger's equation of fractional order.

  18. An Epiperimetric Inequality Approach to the Thin and Fractional ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arshak Petrosyan(joint with Nicola Garofalo, Camelia Pop, and Mariana Smit Vega Garcia)

    2015-07-28

    Jun 15, 2015 ... An Epiperimetric Inequality. Approach to the Thin and. Fractional Obstacle Problems. Geometric Analysis. Free Boundary Problems. & Measure ...

  19. Measurement of the W boson helicity in top quark decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gmyrek, Bryan David; /Arizona U.

    2007-08-01

    A measurement of the fraction, f{sup +}, of right-handed W bosons produced in top quark decays is presented. This analysis is based on a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 370 pb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} Collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The helicity angle, {theta}*, is reconstructed for each lepton. f{sup +} is determined by comparing the cos {theta}* distribution from the data with that for the expected background and signal for various values of f{sup +}. The fraction of longitudinal W bosons, f{sup 0}, is assumed to be 0.7 as predicted by the standard model. This yields f{sup +} = 0.109 {+-} 0.094 (stat) {+-} 0.063 (syst), consistent with the standard model prediction of f{sup +} = 3.6x 10{sup -4}. The possibility that both f{sup +} and f{sup 0} stray from standard model values is also investigated. In this case cos {theta}* distributions for each possible W helicity state, along with the backgrounds, are fit to the cos {theta}* distribution for the data. The best fit values are f{sup +} = 0.82 {+-} 0.30(stat) and f{sup 0} = -0.58 {+-} 0.50(stat).

  20. Process for stabilization of coal liquid fractions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, Geoffrey (Boston, MA); El-Toukhy, Ahmed (Alexandria, EG)

    1987-01-01

    Coal liquid fractions to be used as fuels are stabilized against gum formation and viscosity increases during storage, permitting the fuel to be burned as is, without further expensive treatments to remove gums or gum-forming materials. Stabilization is accomplished by addition of cyclohexanol or other simple inexpensive secondary and tertiary alcohols, secondary and tertiary amines, and ketones to such coal liquids at levels of 5-25% by weight with respect to the coal liquid being treated. Cyclohexanol is a particularly effective and cost-efficient stabilizer. Other stabilizers are isopropanol, diphenylmethanol, tertiary butanol, dipropylamine, triethylamine, diphenylamine, ethylmethylketone, cyclohexanone, methylphenylketone, and benzophenone. Experimental data indicate that stabilization is achieved by breaking hydrogen bonds between phenols in the coal liquid, thereby preventing or retarding oxidative coupling. In addition, it has been found that coal liquid fractions stabilized according to the invention can be mixed with petroleum-derived liquid fuels to produce mixtures in which gum deposition is prevented or reduced relative to similar mixtures not containing stabilizer.

  1. Field-flow fractionation of chromosomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giddings, J.C.

    1991-09-01

    The work done on this project is divided into two principal areas. The first involves the application of sedimentation/steric FFF to metaphase chromosomes in an attempt to fractionate the chromosomes according to their size. The preparation of chromosomes from a number of organisms was attempted; procedures were finally worked out in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory for the preparation of metaphase chromosomes from Chinese hamster cells. After extensive experimental work was done to identify suitable operating conditions, the partial fractionation of the Chinese hamster chromosomes was achieved. In the second component of the project, flow FFF was applied to the separation of DNA fragments. Figures are provided that show considerable success in the separation of plasmid digests and in the separation of single from double stranded DNA under 10{sup 4} base pairs. Preliminary work was done on DNA fragments having a size greater than 10{sup 4} base pairs. This work has served to establish the inversion point for DNA.

  2. I: Maxwell's equations with Ohm's law. II: Polynomial energy decay. Polynomial decay rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phung, Kim-dang.- Le Laboratoire de Mathématiques

    I: Maxwell's equations with Ohm's law. II: Polynomial energy decay. Polynomial decay rate: Maxwell's equations with Ohm's law. II: Polynomial energy decay. Maxwell's equation with Ohm's law Let@ = 0 2 L1 ( ) and 0 take "o = o = 1 #12;I: Maxwell's equations with Ohm's law. II: Polynomial energy

  3. Some Applications of the Fractional Poisson Probability Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nick Laskin

    2011-11-17

    Physical and mathematical applications of fractional Poisson probability distribution have been presented. As a physical application, a new family of quantum coherent states has been introduced and studied. As mathematical applications, we have discovered and developed the fractional generalization of Bell polynomials, Bell numbers, and Stirling numbers. Appearance of fractional Bell polynomials is natural if one evaluates the diagonal matrix element of the evolution operator in the basis of newly introduced quantum coherent states. Fractional Stirling numbers of the second kind have been applied to evaluate skewness and kurtosis of the fractional Poisson probability distribution function. A new representation of Bernoulli numbers in terms of fractional Stirling numbers of the second kind has been obtained. A representation of Schlafli polynomials in terms of fractional Stirling numbers of the second kind has been found. A new representations of Mittag-Leffler function involving fractional Bell polynomials and fractional Stirling numbers of the second kind have been discovered. Fractional Stirling numbers of the first kind have been introduced and studied. Two new polynomial sequences associated with fractional Poisson probability distribution have been launched and explored. The relationship between new polynomials and the orthogonal Charlier polynomials has also been investigated. In the limit case when the fractional Poisson probability distribution becomes the Poisson probability distribution, all of the above listed developments and implementations turn into the well-known results of quantum optics, the theory of combinatorial numbers and the theory of orthogonal polynomials of discrete variable.

  4. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Metagenomic analysis of size-fractionated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Frank

    and metabolism of OMZ microorganisms vary between particle-associated and free-living size fractions. We used.6 lm) and small (0.2­1.6 lm) filter size fractions along a depth gradient in the OMZ off Chile. Despite steep vertical redox gradients, size fraction was a significantly stronger predictor of community

  5. Deviation probability bounds for fractional martingales and related remarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saussereau, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we prove exponential inequalities (also called Bernstein's inequality) for fractional martingales. As an immediate corollary, we will discuss weak law of large numbers for fractional martingales under divergence assumption on the $\\beta-$variation of the fractional martingale. A non trivial example of application of this convergence result is proposed.

  6. Hamilton-Jacobi formulation of systems within Caputo's fractional derivative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eqab M. Rabei; Ibtesam Almayteh; Sami I. Muslih; Dumitru Baleanu

    2007-03-26

    In this paper we develop a fractional Hamilton-Jacobi formulation for discrete systems in terms of fractional Caputo derivatives. The fractional action function is obtained and the solutions of the equations of motion are recovered. An example is studied in details.

  7. Mixing and CP Violation in Charm Meson Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meadows, B; /Cincinnati U.

    2010-08-26

    Mixing and CP violation (CPV ) in the neutral D system were first discussed over thirty years ago but mixing was observed for the first time only very recently. Since then, these observations have been confirmed in other experiments and in other D{sup 0} decay modes. Unlike the K, B and B{sub s} systems, for which mixing was observed years earlier, the short distance ({Delta}C = 2) amplitude contributing to mixing in the D system arises from box diagrams with down- rather than up-type quarks in the loops. The d and s components are GIM-suppressed, and the b component is suppressed by the small V{sub ub} CKM coupling. In the standard model (SM), therefore, long range, non-perturbative effects, a coherent sum over intermediate states accessible to both D{sup 0} and {bar D}{sup 0}, are the main contribution to mixing. These are hard to compute reliably, however. The phenomenon of mixing in neutral meson systems has now been observed in all flavours, but only in the past year in the D{sup 0} system. The standard model anticipated that, for the charm sector, the mixing rate would be small, and also that CP violation, either in mixing or in direct decay, would be below the present levels of observability. It is hoped that further study of these phenomena might reveal signs of new physics. A review of recently available, experimental results is given.

  8. Investigation of physical processes limiting plasma density in H-mode on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maingi, R.; Mahdavi, M.A.; Jernigan, T.C.

    1996-12-01

    A series of experiments was conducted on the DIII-D tokamak to investigate the physical processes which limit density in high confinement mode (H-mode) discharges. The typical H-mode to low confinement mode (L-mode) transition limit at high density near the empirical Greenwald density limit was avoided by divertor pumping, which reduced divertor neutral pressure and prevented formation of a high density, intense radiation zone (MARFE) near the X-point. It was determined that the density decay time after pellet injection was independent of density relative to the Greenwald limit and increased non-linearly with the plasma current. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity in pellet-fueled plasmas was observed at all power levels, and often caused unacceptable confinement degradation, except when the neutral beam injected (NBI) power was {le} 3 MW. Formation of MARFEs on closed field lines was avoided with low safety factor (q) operation but was observed at high q, qualitatively consistent with theory. By using pellet fueling and optimizing discharge parameters to avoid each of these limits, an operational space was accessed in which density {approximately} 1.5 {times} Greenwald limit was achieved for 600 ms, and good H-mode confinement was maintained for 300 ms of the density flattop. More significantly, the density was successfully increased to the limit where a central radiative collapse was observed, the most fundamental density limit in tokamaks.

  9. Path planning during combustion mode switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jiang, Li; Ravi, Nikhil

    2015-12-29

    Systems and methods are provided for transitioning between a first combustion mode and a second combustion mode in an internal combustion engine. A current operating point of the engine is identified and a target operating point for the internal combustion engine in the second combustion mode is also determined. A predefined optimized transition operating point is selected from memory. While operating in the first combustion mode, one or more engine actuator settings are adjusted to cause the operating point of the internal combustion engine to approach the selected optimized transition operating point. When the engine is operating at the selected optimized transition operating point, the combustion mode is switched from the first combustion mode to the second combustion mode. While operating in the second combustion mode, one or more engine actuator settings are adjusted to cause the operating point of the internal combustion to approach the target operating point.

  10. Interferometric detection of mode splitting for whispering gallery mode biosensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knittel, Joachim; Lee, Kwan H; Bowen, Warwick P

    2010-01-01

    Sensors based on whispering gallery mode resonators can detect single nanoparticles and even single molecules. Particles attaching to the resonator induce a doublet in the transmission spectrum which provides a self-referenced detection signal. However, in practice this spectral feature is often obscured by the width of the resonance line which hides the doublet structure. This happens particularly in liquid environments that reduce the effective Q factor of the resonator. In this paper we demonstrate an interferometric set-up that allows the direct detection of the hidden doublet and thus provides a pathway for developing practical sensor applications.

  11. Optical waveguides having flattened high order modes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Messerly, Michael Joseph; Beach, Raymond John; Heebner, John Edward; Dawson, Jay Walter; Pax, Paul Henry

    2014-08-05

    A deterministic methodology is provided for designing optical fibers that support field-flattened, ring-like higher order modes. The effective and group indices of its modes can be tuned by adjusting the widths of the guide's field-flattened layers or the average index of certain groups of layers. The approach outlined here provides a path to designing fibers that simultaneously have large mode areas and large separations between the propagation constants of its modes.

  12. Spectroscopy and decays of charm and bottom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, J.N.

    1997-10-01

    After a brief review of the quark model, we discuss our present knowledge of the spectroscopy of charm and bottom mesons and baryons. We go on to review the lifetimes, semileptonic, and purely leptonic decays of these particles. We conclude with a brief discussion B and D mixing and rare decays.

  13. Neutrinoless double beta decay and neutrino physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werner Rodejohann

    2012-08-20

    The connection of neutrino physics with neutrinoless double beta decay is reviewed. After presenting the current status of the PMNS matrix and the theoretical background of neutrino mass and lepton mixing, we will summarize the various implications of neutrino physics for double beta decay. The influence of light sterile neutrinos and other exotic modifications of the three neutrino picture is also discussed.

  14. Higgs boson decay to Ali Abbasabadi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Repko, Wayne

    Higgs boson decay to #22;#22;#22; Ali Abbasabadi Department of Physical Sciences, Ferris State, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, USA (April 17, 2000) The Higgs boson decay, H ! #22;#22;#22; , is studied in the Standard Model at the tree and one-loop levels. It is shown that for Higgs boson masses above 110 Ge

  15. Testing the Standard Model with Kaon Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew Moulson

    2012-09-15

    During the last few years, new experimental and theoretical results have allowed ever more stringent tests of the Standard Model to be performed using kaon decays. This overview of recent progress includes an updated evaluation of the CKM matrix element Vus. Tests of CKM unitarity and gauge universality and lepton universality tests with Kl2 and Kl3 decays are discussed.

  16. Batch-mode Supervised Learning Linear regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehenkel, Louis

    Batch-mode Supervised Learning Linear regression Applied inductive learning - Lecture 3 Louis (& Pierre Geurts)AIA... (1/19) #12;Batch-mode Supervised Learning Linear regression Batch-mode Supervised Learning Linear regression Least mean square error solution Regularization and algorithmics Residual

  17. Hydrodynamic Lyapunov Modes in Translation Invariant Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrodynamic Lyapunov Modes in Translation Invariant Systems Jean­Pierre Eckmann and Omri Gat De modes in the slowly growing part of the Lyapunov spectrum, which are analogous to the hydrodynamic modes)]. The hydrodynamic Lyapunov vectors loose the typical random structure and exhibit instead the structure of weakly

  18. Hydrodynamic Lyapunov Modes in Translation Invariant Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eckmann, Jean-Pierre

    Hydrodynamic Lyapunov Modes in Translation Invariant Systems Jean­Pierre Eckmann and Omri Gat De modes in the slowly growing part of the Lyapunov spectrum, which are analogous to the hydrodynamic modes)]. The hydrodynamic Lyapunov vectors loose the typical random structure and exhibit instead the structure of weakly

  19. Predicting neutrinoless double beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, M.; Villanova del Moral, A.; Valle, J.W.F. [AHEP Group, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular - C.S.I.C./Universitat de Valencia, Edificio Institutos de Paterna, Apt 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Ma, Ernest [Physics Department, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, University of Durham, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2005-11-01

    We give predictions for the neutrinoless double beta decay rate in a simple variant of the A{sub 4} family symmetry model. We show that there is a lower bound for the {beta}{beta}{sub 0{nu}} amplitude even in the case of normal hierarchical neutrino masses, corresponding to an effective mass parameter vertical bar m{sub ee} vertical bar {>=}0.17{radical}({delta}m{sub ATM}{sup 2}). This result holds both for the CP conserving and CP violating cases. In the latter case we show explicitly that the lower bound on vertical bar m{sub ee} vertical bar is sensitive to the value of the Majorana phase. We conclude therefore that in our scheme, {beta}{beta}{sub 0{nu}} may be accessible to the next generation of high sensitivity experiments.

  20. Dark photons as fractional cosmic neutrino masquerader

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, Kin-Wang; Tu, Huitzu; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang E-mail: huitzu@phys.sinica.edu.tw

    2014-09-01

    Recently, Weinberg proposed a Higgs portal model with a spontaneously broken global U(1) symmetry in which Goldstone bosons may be masquerading as fractional cosmic neutrinos. We extend the model by gauging the U(1) symmetry. This gives rise to the so-called dark photon and dark Higgs. The dark photons can constitute about 0.912 (0.167) to the effective number of light neutrino species if they decouple from the thermal bath before the pions become non-relativistic and after (before) the QCD transition. Restriction on the parameter space of the portal coupling and the dark Higgs mass is obtained from the freeze-out condition of the dark photons. Combining with the collider data constraints on the invisible width of the standard model Higgs requires the dark Higgs mass to be less than a few GeV.

  1. Anomalous Topological Pumps and Fractional Josephson Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan Zhang; C. L. Kane

    2013-10-20

    We discover novel topological pumps in the Josephson effects for superconductors. The phase difference, which is odd under the chiral symmetry defined by the product of time-reversal and particle-hole symmetries, acts as an anomalous adiabatic parameter. These pumping cycles are different from those in the "periodic table", and are characterized by $Z\\times Z$ or $Z_2\\times Z_2$ strong invariants. We determine the general classifications in class AIII, and those in class DIII with a single anomalous parameter. For the $Z_2\\times Z_2$ topological pump in class DIII, one $Z_2$ invariant describes the coincidence of fermion parity and spin pumps whereas the other one reflects the non-Abelian statistics of Majorana Kramers pairs, leading to three distinct fractional Josephson effects.

  2. Release fractions for Rocky Flats specific accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, R.C.

    1992-09-01

    As Rocky Flats and other DOE facilities begin the transition process towards decommissioning, the nature of the scenarios to be studied in safety analysis will change. Whereas the previous emphasis in safety accidents related to production, now the emphasis is shifting to accidents related tc decommissioning and waste management. Accident scenarios of concern at Rocky Flats now include situations of a different nature and different scale than are represented by most of the existing experimental accident data. This presentation will discuss approaches@to use for applying the existing body of release fraction data to this new emphasis. Mention will also be made of ongoing efforts to produce new data and improve the understanding of physical mechanisms involved.

  3. Partial fractioning reduction of perturbative amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srednyak, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    A new method is presented for the simplification of loop integrals in one particle irreducible diagrams with large numbers of external lines, based on the partial fractioning of products of propagators. Whenever a loop diagram in $d$ dimensions has $d+1$ or more lines that carry the same linear combination of loop momenta, its integral can be reexpressed as a linear combination of integrals with no more than $d+1$ denominators for each such set of lines, of which $d$ are linear in the loop momenta and only one quadratic. In multiloop diagrams, the total number of linear denominators can be reduced further. In integrals with numerator momenta there may also be up to $d+1$ linear factors in the numerator.

  4. Partial fractioning reduction of perturbative amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanislav Srednyak

    2011-12-23

    A new method is presented for the simplification of loop integrals in one particle irreducible diagrams with large numbers of external lines, based on the partial fractioning of products of propagators. Whenever a loop diagram in $d$ dimensions has $d+1$ or more lines that carry the same linear combination of loop momenta, its integral can be reexpressed as a linear combination of integrals with no more than $d+1$ denominators for each such set of lines, of which $d$ are linear in the loop momenta and only one quadratic. In multiloop diagrams, the total number of linear denominators can be reduced further. In integrals with numerator momenta there may also be up to $d+1$ linear factors in the numerator.

  5. Strong effects in weak nonleptonic decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, M.B.

    1980-04-01

    In this report the weak nonleptonic decays of kaons and hyperons are examined with the hope of gaining insight into a recently proposed mechanism for the ..delta..I = 1/2 rule. The effective Hamiltonian for ..delta..S = 1 weak nonleptonic decays and that for K/sup 0/-anti K/sup 0/ mixing are calculated in the six-quark model using the leading logarithmic approximation. These are used to examine the CP violation parameters of the kaon system. It is found that if Penguin-type diagrams make important contributions to K ..-->.. ..pi pi.. decay amplitudes then upcoming experiments may be able to distinguish the six-quark model for CP violation from the superweak model. The weak radiative decays of hyperons are discussed with an emphasis on what they can teach us about hyperon nonleptonic decays and the ..delta..I = 1/2 rule.

  6. Heat Equations with Fractional White Noise Potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Y. [Department of Mathematics, University of Kansas, 405 Snow Hall, Lawrence, KS 66045-2142 (United States)], E-mail: hu@math.ukans.edu

    2001-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the following stochastic heat equations: ({partial_derivative}u{sub t}(x))/({partial_derivative}t=1/2 u{sub t}(x)+{omega}{sup H}.u{sub t}(x)), x element of {sup d}, t>0, where w{sup H} is a time independent fractional white noise with Hurst parameter H=(h{sub 1}, h{sub 2},..., h{sub d}) , or a time dependent fractional white noise with Hurst parameter H=(h{sub 0}, h{sub 1},..., h{sub d}) . Denote | H | =h{sub 1}+h{sub 2}+...+h{sub d} . When the noise is time independent, it is shown that if 1/2 d-1 , then the solution is in L{sub 2} and the L{sub 2} -Lyapunov exponent of the solution is estimated. When the noise is time dependent, it is shown that if 1/2 d- 2 /( 2h{sub 0}-1 ) , the solution is in L{sub 2} and the L{sub 2} -Lyapunov exponent of the solution is also estimated. A family of distribution spaces S{sub {rho}} , {rho} element of RR , is introduced so that every chaos of an element in S{sub {rho}} is in L{sub 2} . The Lyapunov exponents in S{sub {rho}} of the solution are also estimated.

  7. The fractional Poisson process and the inverse stable subordinator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark M. Meerschaert; Erkan Nane; P. Vellaisamy

    2011-02-23

    The fractional Poisson process is a renewal process with Mittag-Leffler waiting times. Its distributions solve a time-fractional analogue of the Kolmogorov forward equation for a Poisson process. This paper shows that a traditional Poisson process, with the time variable replaced by an independent inverse stable subordinator, is also a fractional Poisson process. This result unifies the two main approaches in the stochastic theory of time-fractional diffusion equations. The equivalence extends to a broad class of renewal processes that include models for tempered fractional diffusion, and distributed-order (e.g., ultraslow) fractional diffusion. The paper also establishes an interesting connection between the fractional Poisson process and Brownian time.

  8. Fractional Calculus in Hydrologic Modeling: A Numerical Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Benson; Mark M. Meerschaert; Jordan Revielle

    2012-01-01

    Fractional derivatives can be viewed either as a handy extension of classical calculus or, more deeply, as mathematical operators defined by natural phenomena. This follows the view that the diffusion equation is defined as the governing equation of a Brownian motion. In this paper, we emphasize that fractional derivatives come from the governing equations of stable Levy motion, and that fractional integration is the corresponding inverse operator. Fractional integration, and its multi-dimensional extensions derived in this way, are intimately tied to fractional Brownian (and Levy) motions and noises. By following these general principles, we discuss the Eulerian and Lagrangian numerical solutions to fractional partial differential equations, and Eulerian methods for stochastic integrals. These numerical approximations illuminate the essential nature of the fractional calculus.

  9. THE LIGHT CURVE AND INTERNAL MAGNETIC FIELD OF THE MODE-SWITCHING PULSAR PSR B0943+10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storch, Natalia I.; Lai, Dong [Center for Space Research, Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Ho, Wynn C. G. [Mathematical Sciences and STAG Research Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Bogdanov, Slavko [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Heinke, Craig O. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, CCIS 4-181, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E1 (Canada)

    2014-07-10

    A number of radio pulsars exhibit intriguing mode-switching behavior. Recent observations of PSR B0943+10 revealed correlated radio and X-ray mode switches, providing a new avenue for understanding this class of objects. The large X-ray pulse fraction observed during the radio-quiet phase (Q-mode) was previously interpreted as a result of changing obscuration of X-rays by dense magnetosphere plasma. We show that the large X-ray pulse fraction can be explained by including the beaming effect of a magnetic atmosphere, while remaining consistent with the dipole field geometry constrained by radio observations. We also explore a more extreme magnetic field configuration, where a magnetic dipole displaced from the center of the star produces two magnetic polar caps of different sizes and magnetic field strengths. These models are currently consistent with data in radio and X-rays and can be tested or constrained by future X-ray observations.

  10. Lepton flavor violation in Higgs boson decays under the rare...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lepton flavor violation in Higgs boson decays under the rare tau decay results Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Lepton flavor violation in Higgs boson decays under the...

  11. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay in Light of SNO Salt Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    2009-01-01

    Limits From Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay (Rev. ),” incan also cause neutrinoless double-beta decay (see e.g. , [LBNL-53996 Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay in Light of SNO

  12. Validation of ATR Fission Power Deposition Fraction in HEU and LEU Fuel Plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. S. Chang

    2008-09-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power (250 MW), high neutron flux research reactor operating in the United States. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum unperturbed thermal neutron flux rating of 1.0 x 1015 n/cm2–s. Because of its high power and large test volumes located in high flux areas, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting an HEU driven reactor to a low-enriched core. A detailed plate-by-plate MCNP ATR full core model has been developed and validated for the low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel conversion feasibility study. Using this model, an analysis has been performed to determine the LEU density and U-235 enrichment required in the fuel meat to yield equivalent K-eff versus effective full power days (EFPDs) between the HEU and LEU cores. This model has also been used to optimize U-235 content of the LEU core, minimizing the differences in K-eff and heat flux profile between the HEU and LEU cores at 115 MW total core power for 125 EFPDs. The LEU core conversion feasibility study evaluated foil type (U-10Mo) fuel with the LEU reference design of 19.7 wt% U-235 enrichment. The LEU reference design has a fixed fuel meat thickness of 0.330 mm and can sustain the same operating cycle length as the HEU fuel. Heat flux and fission power density are parameters that are proportional to the fraction of fission power deposited in fuel. Thus, the accurate determination of the fraction of fission power deposited in the fuel is important to ATR nuclear safety. In this work, a new approach was developed and validated, the Tally Fuel Cells Only (TFCO) method. This method calculates and compares the fission power deposition fraction between HEU and LEU fuel plates. Due to the high density of the U-10Mo LEU fuel, the fission ?-energy deposition fraction is 37.12%, which is larger than the HEU’s ?-energy deposition fraction of 19.7%. As a result, the fuel decay heat cooling will need to be improved. During the power operation, the total fission energy (200 MeV per fission) deposition fraction of LEU and HEU are 90.9% and 89.1%, respectively.

  13. New Modes of Nuclear Excitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nadia Tsoneva; Horst Lenske

    2013-10-01

    We present a theoretical approach based on density functional theory supplemented by a microscopic multi-phonon model which is applied for investigations of pygmy resonances and other excitations of different multipolarities in stable and exotic nuclei. The possible relation of low-energy modes to the properties of neutron or proton skins is systematically studied in isotonic and isotopic chains. The fine structure of nuclear electric and magnetic response functions is analyzed and compared to experimental data. Their relevance to nuclear astrophysics is discussed.

  14. Mode Meter - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMission Mission Missionof EnergyJennings= a nMode

  15. Organic waste amendments effect on zinc fraction of two soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shuman, L.M.

    1999-10-01

    Organic soil amendments can ameliorate metal toxicity to plants by redistributing metals to less available fractions. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of organic amendments on Zn distribution among soil fractions. Two soils were amended with five organic waste materials (some of which contained Zn) or commercial humic acid with and without 400 mg kg{sup {minus}1} Zn, incubated, and fractionated using a sequential extraction technique. Where no Zn was added most of the metals were in the residual fraction. Commercial compost, poultry litter, and industrial sewage sludge increased Zn in the exchangeable (EXC), organic (OM), and manganese oxide (MnOx) fractions due to Zn in the materials. Spent mushroom compost (SMC) redistributed Zn from the EXC fraction to the MnOx fraction for the coarse-textured soil. Where Zn was added, most of the metal was in the EXC and OM fractions. The SMC and humic acid lowered Zn in the EXC fraction and increased Zn in the other fractions. Effects of the organic materials on Zn in soil fractions were more evident for the sandy soil dominated by quartz in the clay than for the finer-textured soil dominated by kaolinite in the clay-size fraction. It was concluded that organic materials high in Zn can increase Zn in the EXC, OM, and MnOx fractions where the soil is not contaminated and others such as SMC and HA can lower the potential availability of Zn in contaminated soils by redistributing it from the EXC to less soluble fractions.

  16. Roles of poloidal rotation in the q = 1 high-order harmonic tearing modes in a tokamak plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei Lai; Wang Zhengxiong [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Beams of the Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Roles of poloidal rotation in stabilizing the m/n=1/1 kink-tearing mode and exciting its high-order harmonic tearing modes are numerically investigated by using a reduced magnetohydrodynamic model. It is found that the high-order harmonic tearing modes, such as m/n=2/2, m/n=3/3, or even much higher-m harmonics, can be destabilized so significantly by rotation shear as to be more unstable than or comparable to the m/n=1/1 mode. Moreover, the short wave-length Kelvin- Helmholtz (KH) instabilities can be excited in the large rotation shear regime. The scaling power laws of the linear growth rate for each harmonic mode in different rotation shear regimes are verified by the previous relevant theoretical results based on the non-constant-{psi} and constant-{psi} behavior categories in tearing modes. During the nonlinear evolution, the m/n=2/2 mode dominated phase first appears and then is followed by the m/n=1/1 mode dominated nonlinear phase instead. Afterward, some smaller sub-islands due to the high-order harmonics are produced in the large irregular m=1 crescent-shaped island, and then a coalescence process of turbulent island chains occurs before the decay phase.

  17. Quantum Accelerator Modes from the Farey Tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Buchleitner; M. B. d'Arcy; S. Fishman; S. A. Gardiner; I. Guarneri; Z. -Y. Ma; L. Rebuzzini; G. S. Summy

    2006-06-09

    We show that mode-locking finds a purely quantum non-dissipative counterpart in atom-optical quantum accelerator modes. These modes are formed by exposing cold atoms to periodic kicks in the direction of the gravitational field. They are anchored to generalized Arnol'd tongues, parameter regions where driven nonlinear classical systems exhibit mode-locking. A hierarchy for the rational numbers known as the Farey Tree provides an ordering of the Arnol'd tongues and hence of experimentally observed accelerator modes.

  18. Nonlinear classical model for the decay widths of isoscalar giant monopole resonances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papachristou, P. K.; Mavrommatis, E.; Diakonos, F. K. [Department of Physics, University of Athens, GR-15771, Athens (Greece); Constantoudis, V. [Institute of Microelectronics (IMEL), NCSR 'Demokritos', P. O. Box 60228, Aghia Paraskevi, Attiki, Greece 15310 and Physics Department, National Technical University, Athens (Greece); Wambach, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstr. 9, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2008-04-15

    The decay of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance (ISGMR) in nuclei is studied by means of a nonlinear classical model consisting of several noninteracting nucleons (particles) moving in a potential well with an oscillating nuclear surface (wall). The motion of the nuclear surface is described by means of a collective variable that appears explicitly in the Hamiltonian as an additional degree of freedom. The total energy of the system is therefore conserved. Although the particles do not directly interact with each other, their motions are indirectly coupled by means of their interaction with the moving nuclear surface. We consider as free parameters in this model the degree of collectivity and the fraction of nucleons that participate to the decay of the collective excitation. Specifically, we have calculated the decay width of the ISGMR in the spherical nuclei {sup 208}Pb, {sup 144}Sm, {sup 116}Sn, and {sup 90}Zr. Despite its simplicity and its purely classical nature, the model reproduces the trend of the experimental data that show that with increasing mass number the decay width decreases. Moreover the experimental results (with the exception of {sup 90}Zr) can be well fitted using appropriate values for the free parameters mentioned above. It is also found that these values allow for a good description of the experimentally measured {sup 112}Sn and {sup 124}Sn decay widths. In addition, we give a prediction for the decay width of the exotic isotope {sup 132}Sn for which there is experimental interest. The agreement of our results with the corresponding experimental data for medium-heavy nuclei is dictated by the underlying classical mechanics, i.e., the behavior of the maximum Lyapunov exponent as a function of the system size.

  19. Batch-mode vs Online-mode Supervised Learning Motivations for Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehenkel, Louis

    Batch-mode vs Online-mode Supervised Learning Motivations for Artificial Neural Networks Linear ANN-mode vs Online-mode Supervised Learning Motivations for Artificial Neural Networks Linear ANN Models for Artificial Neural Networks Linear ANN Models Single neuron models Single layer models Nonlinear ANN Models

  20. Tests of mode-coupling theory in two dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabian Weysser; David Hajnal

    2011-04-26

    We analyze the glassy dynamics of a binary mixtures of hard disks in two dimensions. Predictions of the Mode-Coupling theory(MCT) are tested with extensive Brownian dynamics simulations. Measuring the collective particle density correlation functions in the vicinity of the glass transition we verify four predicted mixing effects. For instance, for large size disparities, adding a small amount of small particles at fixed packing fraction leads to a speed up in the long time dynamics, while at small size disparity it leads to a slowing down. Qualitative features of the non-ergodicity parameters and the $\\beta$-relaxation which both depend in a non-trivial way on the mixing ratio are found in the simulated correlators. Studying one system in detail we are able to determine its ideal MCT glass transition point as $\\phi^c = 0.7948$ and test MCT predictions quantitatively.

  1. Search for: "neutrinoless double beta decay" | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    neutrinoless double beta decay" Find + Advanced Search Advanced Search All Fields: "neutrinoless double beta decay" Title: Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator Author: Name...

  2. SciTech Connect: "neutrinoless double beta decay"

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    neutrinoless double beta decay" Find + Advanced Search Term Search Semantic Search Advanced Search All Fields: "neutrinoless double beta decay" Semantic Semantic Term Title:...

  3. A Model-Independent Search for the decay B->l nu gamma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, Bernard; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS; /more authors..

    2012-10-09

    The authors present a search for the radiative leptonic decay B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}{gamma}, where {ell} = e, {mu}, using a data sample of 465 million B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR experiment. In this analysis, they fully reconstruct the hadronic decay of one of the B mesons in {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{sup +}B{sup -} decays, then search for evidence of B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}{gamma} in the rest of the event. They observe no significant evidence of signal decays and report model-independent branching fraction upper limits of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}{gamma}) < 17 x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}}{gamma}) < 24 x 10{sup -6}, and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}{gamma}) < 15.6 x 10{sup -6} ({ell} = e or {mu}), all at the 90% confidence level.

  4. Measurement of Polarization and Search for CP Violation in Bs0??? Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; De Cecco, S.; De Lorenzo, G.; Dell’Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.

    2011-12-01

    We present the first measurement of polarization and CP-violating asymmetries in a Bs0 decay into two light vector mesons, Bs0???, and an improved determination of its branching ratio using 295 decays reconstructed in a data sample corresponding to 2.9 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The fraction of longitudinal polarization is determined to be fL=0.348±0.041(stat)±0.021(syst), and the branching ratio B(Bs0???)=[2.32±0.18(stat)±0.82(syst)]×10??. Asymmetries of decay angle distributions sensitive to CP violation are measured to be Au=-0.007±0.064(stat)±0.018(syst) and Av=-0.120±0.064(stat)±0.016(syst).

  5. Leptonic Decays of Charged Pseudoscalar Mesons - 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosner, Jonathan L; Van de Water, Ruth S

    2015-01-01

    We review the physics of purely leptonic decays of $\\pi^\\pm$, $K^\\pm$, $D^{\\pm}$, $D_s^\\pm$, and $B^\\pm$ pseudoscalar mesons. The measured decay rates are related to the product of the relevant weak-interaction-based CKM matrix element of the constituent quarks and a strong interaction parameter related to the overlap of the quark and antiquark wave-functions in the meson, called the decay constant $f_P$. The leptonic decay constants for $\\pi^\\pm$, $K^\\pm$, $D^{\\pm}$, $D_s^\\pm$, and $B^\\pm$ mesons can be obtained with controlled theoretical uncertainties and high precision from {\\it ab initio} lattice-QCD simulations. The combination of experimental leptonic decay-rate measurements and theoretical decay-constant calculations enables the determination of several elements of the CKM matrix within the standard model. These determinations are competitive with those obtained from semileptonic decays, and also complementary because they are sensitive to different quark flavor-changing currents. They can also be use...

  6. Search for an Invisibly Decaying Higgs Boson Produced via Vector Boson Fusion with ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bassalat, Ahmed; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The recently discovered Higgs boson at a mass 125 GeV provides an excellent tool to probe beyond the Standard Model physics. Many extensions of the Standard Model predict the decay of the Higgs boson into weakly interacting or neutral particles which do not interact with the detector, that could be candidates for dark matter. Using proton-proton collision data collected by the ATLAS detector during Run 1, searches have been performed for an invisibly decaying Higgs boson in three production channels: via vector boson fusion (VBF). An upper bound of 0.28 is set on the branching fraction of H -> invisible at 95% confidence level, where the expected upper limit is 0.31. The results are interpreted in models of Higgs-portal dark matter and of supersymmetry with a compressed mass spectrum.

  7. Measurements of the Angular Distributions in the Decays B ? K(*) µ+µ- at CDF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T; Gonzalez, B. Alvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A; Apresyan, A.; et al

    2012-02-24

    We reconstruct the decays B ? K(*) µ+µ- and measure their angular distributions in pp? collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.8 fb-1. The transverse polarization asymmetry AT(2) and the time-reversal-odd charge-and-parity asymmetry Aim are measured for the first time, together with the K* longitudinal polarization fraction FL and the µ on forward-backward asymmetry AFB, for the decays B0?K*0µ+µ- and B0?K*+µ+µ-. Our results are among the most accurate to date and consistent with those from other experiments.

  8. B, D and K Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artuso, M.; Asner, D.M.; Ball, P.; Baracchini, E.; Bell, G.; Beneke, M.; Berryhill, J.; Bevan, A.; Bigi, I.I.; Blanke, M.; Bobeth, Ch.; Bona, M.; Borzumati, F.; Browder, T.; Buanes, T.; Buchalla, G.; Buchmuller, O.; Buras, A.J.; Burdin, S.; Cassel, D.G.; Cavanaugh, R.; /Syracuse U. /Carleton U. /Durham U., IPPP /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Karlsruhe U. /RWTH Aachen U. /Fermilab /Queen Mary, U. of London /Notre Dame U. /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Dortmund U. /Annecy, LAPP /ICTP, Trieste /Taiwan, Natl. Central U. /Hawaii U. /Bergen U. /Munich U. /CERN /Liverpool U.

    2008-03-07

    The present report documents the results of Working Group 2: B, D and K decays, of the workshop on Flavor in the Era of the LHC, held at CERN from November 2005 through March 2007. With the advent of the LHC, we will be able to probe New Physics (NP) up to energy scales almost one order of magnitude larger than it has been possible with present accelerator facilities. While direct detection of new particles will be the main avenue to establish the presence of NP at the LHC, indirect searches will provide precious complementary information, since most probably it will not be possible to measure the full spectrum of new particles and their couplings through direct production. In particular, precision measurements and computations in the realm of flavor physics are expected to play a key role in constraining the unknown parameters of the Lagrangian of any NP model emerging from direct searches at the LHC. The aim of Working Group 2 was twofold: on one hand, to provide a coherent, up-to-date picture of the status of flavor physics before the start of the LHC; on the other hand, to initiate activities on the path towards integrating information on NP from high-p{sub T} and flavor data. This report is organized as follows. In Sec. 1, we give an overview of NP models, focusing on a few examples that have been discussed in some detail during the workshop, with a short description of the available computational tools for flavor observables in NP models. Sec. 2 contains a concise discussion of the main theoretical problem in flavor physics: the evaluation of the relevant hadronic matrix elements for weak decays. Sec. 3 contains a detailed discussion of NP effects in a set of flavor observables that we identified as 'benchmark channels' for NP searches. The experimental prospects for flavor physics at future facilities are discussed in Sec. 4. Finally, Sec. 5 contains some assessments on the work done at the workshop and the prospects for future developments.

  9. Model-Independent Results for the Decay B \\to L Nu(L) Gamma at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindemann, D.M.; /McGill U.

    2012-04-09

    We present a search for the radiative leptonic decays B{sub +} {yields} e{sup +} {nu}{sub e}{gamma} and B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}}{gamma} using data collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory. We fully reconstruct the hadronic decay of one of the B mesons in {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{sup +}B{sup -} and then search for evidence of the signal decay within the rest of the event. This method provides clean kinematic information on the signal's missing energy and high momentum photon and lepton, and allows for a model-independent analysis of this decay. Using a data sample of 465 million B-meson pairs, we obtain sensitivity to branching fractions of the same order as predicted by the Standard Model. We report a model-independent branching fraction upper limit of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}{gamma}) < 15.6 x 10{sup -6} ({ell} = e or {mu}) at the 90% confidence level.

  10. Observation of the Decay B??Ds(*)+K?l????l

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, T. M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Volk, A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Perez, A.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, L.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Anderson, J.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Sciolla, G.; Zhao, M.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.

    2011-07-22

    We report the observation of the decay B??Ds(*)+K?l??¯l based on 342fb?¹ of data collected at the ?(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e?e? storage rings at SLAC. A simultaneous fit to three D+s decay chains is performed to extract the signal yield from measurements of the squared missing mass in the B meson decay. We observe the decay B??Ds(*)+K?l??¯l with a significance greater than 5 standard deviations (including systematic uncertainties) and measure its branching fraction to be B(B??Ds(*)+K?l??¯l)=[6.13+1.04-1.03(stat)±0.43(syst)±0.51(B(Ds))]×10??, where the last error reflects the limited knowledge of the Ds branching fractions.

  11. Linear Transformation Method for Multinuclide Decay Calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding Yuan

    2010-12-29

    A linear transformation method for generic multinuclide decay calculations is presented together with its properties and implications. The method takes advantage of the linear form of the decay solution N(t) = F(t)N{sub 0}, where N(t) is a column vector that represents the numbers of atoms of the radioactive nuclides in the decay chain, N{sub 0} is the initial value vector of N(t), and F(t) is a lower triangular matrix whose time-dependent elements are independent of the initial values of the system.

  12. Closed strings from decaying D-branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil Lambert; Hong Liu; Juan Maldacena

    2007-02-05

    We compute the emission of closed string radiation from homogeneous rolling tachyons. For an unstable decaying D$p$-brane the radiated energy is infinite to leading order for $p\\leq 2$ and finite for $p>2$. The closed string state produced by a decaying brane is closely related to the state produced by D-instantons at a critical Euclidean distance from $t=0$. In the case of a D0 brane one can cutoff this divergence so that we get a finite energy final state which would be the state that the brane decays into.

  13. Power variation of some integral fractional processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corcuera, José Manuel; Nualart, David; Woerner, Jeannette H.C.

    2006-08-01

    Power variation of some integral fractional processes J O S E´ M A N U E L C O R C U E R A 1,* , DAV I D N UA L A RT 1,* * and JEANNETTE H.C. WOERNER2 1Universitat de Barcelona, Gran Via de les Corts Catalanes 585, 08007 Barcelona, Spain. E... ð t 0 jusj p ds ¼ m#1;1þ pH X[mt] j¼1 #3;#3;#3;#3; ð( j=m) ( j#1;1)=m) us dB H s #3;#3;#3;#3; p #1; ju( j#1;1)=m(B Hj=m #1; B H( j#1;1)=m)j p ! þ m#1;1þ pH X[mt] j¼1 ju( j#1;1)=m(B Hj=m #1; B H( j#1;1)=m)j p #1; X[nt] i¼1 ju(i#1;1)=nj p X j2 I n...

  14. Fractionalization of Interstitials in Curved Colloidal Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William T. M. Irvine; Mark J. Bowick; Paul M. Chaikin

    2013-10-11

    Understanding the out-of equilibrium behaviour of point defects in crystals, yields insights into the nature and fragility of the ordered state, as well as being of great practical importance. In some rare cases defects are spontaneously healed - a one-dimensional crystal formed by a line of identical charged particles, for example, can accommodate an interstitial (extra particle) by a re-adjusting all particle positions to even out the spacing. In sharp contrast, particles organized into a perfect hexagonal crystal in the plane cannot accommodate an interstitial by a simple re-adjustment of the particle spacing - the interstitial remains instead trapped between lattice sites and diffuses by hopping, leaving the crystal permanently defected. Here we report on the behavior of interstitials in colloidal crystals on curved surfaces. Using optical tweezers operated independently of three dimensional imaging, we insert a colloidal interstitial in a lattice of similar particles on flat and curved (positively and negatively) oil-glycerol interfaces and image the ensuing dynamics. We find that, unlike in flat space, the curved crystals self-heal through a collective rearrangement that re-distributes the increased density associated with the interstitial. The self-healing process can be interpreted in terms of an out of equilibrium interaction of topological defects with each other and with the underlying curvature. Our observations suggest the existence of "particle fractionalization" on curved surface crystals.

  15. Request for approval, vented container annual release fraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HILL, J.S.

    1999-10-12

    In accordance with the approval conditions for Modification to the Central Waste Complex (CWC) Radioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction (NOC). dated August 24,1998, a new release fraction has been developed for submittal to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH). The proposed annual release fraction of 2.50 E-14 is proposed for use in future NOCs involving the storage and handling operations associated with vented containers on the Hanford Site. The proposed annual release fraction was the largest release fraction calculated from alpha measurements of the NucFil filters from 10 vented containers consisting of nine 55-gallon drums and one burial box with dimensions of 9.3 x 5.7 x 6.4 feet. An annual release fraction of 2.0 E-09 was used in the modification to the CWC radioactive air emissions NOC. This study confirmed that the release fraction used in the CWC radioactive air emissions NOC was conservative.

  16. Mirror Modes in the Heliosheath

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsurutani, B. T. [Jet Propulsion Lab., Calif. Inst. Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States); Guarnieri, F. L. [UNIVAP, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Echer, E. E. [INPE, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Lakhina, G. S. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Navi Mumbai (India); Verkhoglyadova, O. P. [CSPAR, Univ. Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States)

    2011-01-04

    Mirror mode (MM) structures are identified in the Voyager 1 heliosheath magnetic field data. Their characteristics are: (1) quasiperiodic structures with a typical scale size of {approx}57 {rho}{sub p}(proton gyroradii), (2) little or no angular changes across the structures ({approx}3 deg. longitude and {approx}3 deg. latitude), and (3) a lack of sharp boundaries at the magnetic dip edges. It is proposed that the pickup of interstellar neutrals in the upstream region of the termination shock (TS) is the likely cause of MM instability during intervals when the IMF is nearly orthogonal to the solar wind flow direction. Concomitant (quasiperpendicular) shock compression of the MM structures at the TS and additional injection of pickup ions (PUIs) throughout the heliosheath will enhance MM growth.

  17. Search for the decay B^+ \\to K_S^0 K_S^0 \\pi ^+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, R.N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-02-23

    The authors search for charmless decays of charged B mesons to the three-body final state K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}. Using a data sample of 423.7 fb{sup -1} collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector, corresponding to (465.1 {+-} 5.1) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs, they find no significant signal and determine a 90% confidence level upper limit on the branching fraction of 5.1 x 10{sup -7}.

  18. B Decays to Hadronic States with Charm/Charmonium in BaBar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuagnin, G

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the studies of three different B decays to hadronic states are presented. These results are based on 1999-2003 dataset collected by the BaBar experiment at the PEP-II e+e- storage ring at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The measurements are the hadronic branching fraction of B+ -> J/psi p Lambda-bar, B0 -> J/psi p p-bar, B0 -> D*+D-, and the direct CP-asymmetry in B0 -> D0(CP) K- channels.

  19. Searches for Direct CP Violation in D+ Decays And for D0 Anti-D0 Mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purohit, M.V.; /South Carolina U.

    2005-10-11

    The authors present preliminary results of a search for direct CP violation in D{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} {pi}{sup +} decays using 87 fb{sup -1} of data acquired by the Babar experiment running on and near the {Upsilon}(4S) from 1999-2002. The authors report the asymmetries in the signal mode and in the main resonant subchannels. Based on the same dataset, they also report a new 90% CL upper limit of 0.0042 on the rate of D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing using the decay modes D*{sup +} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}, D{sup 0} {yields} [K/K*]ev (+c.c.).

  20. Power-law Spatial Dispersion from Fractional Liouville Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasily E. Tarasov

    2013-07-18

    A microscopic model in the framework of fractional kinetics to describe spatial dispersion of power-law type is suggested. The Liouville equation with the Caputo fractional derivatives is used to obtain the power-law dependence of the absolute permittivity on the wave vector. The fractional differential equations for electrostatic potential in the media with power-law spatial dispersion are derived. The particular solutions of these equations for the electric potential of point charge in this media are considered.