Sample records for deadman corn er

  1. Corn Silage Virginia Corn &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Virginia Corn Silage Testing 2006 Virginia Corn & Small Grain Management #12;#12; The 2006 Virginia Corn Silage Hybrid Trials The 2006 Virginia Corn Silage Hybrid Trials Coordnated by B. Jones, H. Behl Syngenta Co.) NK Brand Po Box 959, Mnneapols, MN 55440 Poneer H-bred Int'l, Inc. Poneer 7501 Memoral

  2. Corn Hybrid Virginia Corn &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Virginia Corn Hybrid and Management Trials 2007 Virginia Corn & Small Grain Management #12;VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID AND MANAGEMENT TRIALS IN 2007 Coordinators of Virginia Corn Hybrid Trials in 2007 Wade Thomason, Extension Specialist, Department of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech Harry

  3. Corn Hybrid Virginia Corn &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Virginia Corn Hybrid Management and Trials 2006 Virginia Corn & Small Grain Management #12;#12;Virginia Corn Hybrid and Management Trials 2006 Coordinators of Virginia Corn Hybrid Trials in 2006 Wade Thomason, Extension Specialist, Department of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech Harry

  4. Characteristics of corn and sorghum for tortilla processing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez de Palacios, Maria de Jesus

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHARACTERISTICS OF CORN AND SORGHUM FOR TORTILLA PROCESSING A Thesis by MARIA DE JESUS GONZALEZ DE PALACIOS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1980 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology CHARACTERISTICS OF CORN AND SORGHUM FOR TORTILLA PROCESSING A Thesis by MARIA DE JESUS GONZALEZ DE PALACIOS Approved as to style and content by: an o omm t em er em er ea o...

  5. Characteristics of corn and sorghum for tortilla processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez de Palacios, Maria de Jesus

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHARACTERISTICS OF CORN AND SORGHUM FOR TORTILLA PROCESSING A Thesis by MARIA DE JESUS GONZALEZ DE PALACIOS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1980 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology CHARACTERISTICS OF CORN AND SORGHUM FOR TORTILLA PROCESSING A Thesis by MARIA DE JESUS GONZALEZ DE PALACIOS Approved as to style and content by: an o omm t em er em er ea o...

  6. Cont. Rot. Rot. DC Cont. Rot. Rot. DC Cont. Rot. Rot. DC Corn Corn Beans Wheat Beans Corn Corn Beans Wheat Beans Corn Corn Beans Wheat Beans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Scott A.

    Cont. Rot. Rot. DC Cont. Rot. Rot. DC Cont. Rot. Rot. DC Corn Corn Beans Wheat Beans Corn Corn Beans Wheat Beans Corn Corn Beans Wheat Beans Expected yield per acre2 118 126 39 62 23 149 158 49 70 29

  7. Cont. Rot. Rot. DC Cont. Rot. Rot. DC Cont. Rot. Rot. DC Corn Corn Beans Wheat Beans Corn Corn Beans Wheat Beans Corn Corn Beans Wheat Beans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cont. Rot. Rot. DC Cont. Rot. Rot. DC Cont. Rot. Rot. DC Corn Corn Beans Wheat Beans Corn Corn Beans Wheat Beans Corn Corn Beans Wheat Beans Expected yield per acre2 119 127 39 62 23 149 159 49 70 29

  8. Corn Hybrids for Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bockholt, A. J.; Collier, J. W.

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Land resource areas and corn test locations. Discussion of Results e areas affords an opportunity to determine if any Weather conditions were highly differences in adaptation to climatic and general corn production during the 3 soil conditions... usually has a climate for corn production and appr TABLE 6. CORN PERFORMANCE TEST, EAST BERLANDS, 1957-59 Bushels of shelled corn per acre ' Y-1 Kirby- Nacog- Mount Bowie' jr: ville doches Jyk~leasant countv A'! Texas 30 Texas 32 Texas 28 Texas...

  9. Mechanical Harvesting of Corn.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorenson, J. W. (Jerome Wallace); Smith, H. P. (Harris Pearson)

    1948-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - - TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. D. LEWIS, Director ' College Station, Texas BULLETIN 706 OCTOBER 1948 Mechanical Harvesting of Corn H. P. SMITH and J. W. SORENSON, JR. Department of Agricultural Engineering LlBRARY Atricaltr... of corn, from which they harvest about 77 million bushels valued at about 584 million. Most of the corn produced in Texas is harvested by hand. There were approximately 800 corn-picking machines of all types used in Texas in 1947. Texas farmers grow...

  10. Corn Production in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collier, Jesse W. (Jesse Wilton); Rogers, John S. (John Sinclair)

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    during wet seasons, and they may cause appreciable damage each year in the more humid sections. Hybrids such as Texas 24 and 30, which possess some resistance, shorrld be used where diseases and i~sects are a serious problem. The Texas hybrid corn... in this bulletin and recommendations are given for corn production in the different areas of the ' State. Numerous diseases and insects attack corn in Texas and are responsible for considerable damage to the crop. These organisms are especiallv prevalent...

  11. FOOD PRESERVATION SERIES CornMichigan-grown corn is available

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    under cool running water before preparing it. Do not use soap or detergent. Use a separate cutting board kernels and cooked lima beans. Add corn kernels to other raw vegetables in a salad. Add canned corn. sodium Boil whole ears of corn. Remove husk and silk from ears. Wash corn under cool running water. Fill

  12. Corn Hybrids for Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, J. S.; Bockholt, A. J.; Collier, J. W.

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - Corn Hybrid$ for . ;mE Tgmt 4.College Sta. 9Sulphw Spgr. @.Holland l9.GreenviUe 24Stephmville 5.Kibyvilb IO.(;brkrvilb B.Tanpb 20Mm 25.Chilkothe TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIC R. D. LEWIS. DIRECTOR, COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS DIGEST... - . Corn hybrids were planted on 81 percent of the Texas corn acreage in 1956. Most of this acreage was devoted to hybrids developed and released by the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station. These hybrids usually outyield open-pollinated varieties by 20...

  13. Corn Hybrids for Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, J. S.; McAfee, T. E.

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corn Hybrids for Terns ST LOCATIONS AREA I AREA II ARE4 Ill AREA IV 2Prdrie View 7.Tylw lZ.Lockhart 17.Waxahachie 22San Antonio 3.Cleveland 8.Mt. Pbctont I3Brsnha B.Garland 23Lamposas 4.Colbqe Sta. 9Sulphw Spp. 14Holland l9.0reenvilb 24...Stephenville ,J* 5.K'rbyvilb I0.Cbrkdb 15.Tanpk 2ODetiion 25.Wllothe TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. D. LEWIS. DIRECTOR, COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS DIGEST The Texas corn acreage planted to hybrids increased from less than 1 percent of the total acrea...

  14. Potato Corn Chowder Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    tablespoons margarine 1/4 cup all-purpose flour 2 cups skim milk 1/8 teaspoon pepper Directions 1. Wash. 2. Microwave on high for 8 minutes. 3. Open corn and pour into a colander. Rinse with cool water. Stir until thoroughly mixed and smooth. 5. Slowly add skim milk to saucepan and stir until thickened

  15. Estimating Corn Grain Yields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumenthal, Jurg M.; Thompson, Wayne

    2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    can collect samples from a corn field and use this data to calculate the yield estimate. An interactive grain yield calculator is provided in the Appendix of the pdf version of this publication. The calculator is also located in the publication.... Plan and prepare for sample and data collection. 2. Collect field samples and record data. 3. Analyze the data using the interactive grain yield calculator in the Appendix. Plan and prepare for sample and data collection Predetermine sample locations...

  16. Ethanol extraction of phytosterols from corn fiber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IL); Binder, Thomas P. (Decatur, IL); Rammelsberg, Anne M. (Decatur, IL)

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a process for extracting sterols from a high solids, thermochemically hydrolyzed corn fiber using ethanol as the extractant. The process includes obtaining a corn fiber slurry having a moisture content from about 20 weight percent to about 50 weight percent solids (high solids content), thermochemically processing the corn fiber slurry having high solids content of 20 to 50% to produce a hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry, dewatering the hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, washing the residual corn fiber, dewatering the washed, hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, and extracting the residual corn fiber with ethanol and separating at least one sterol.

  17. 2015 Request for Proposals from the Michigan Corn Marketing Program Corn Marketing Program of Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    1 2015 Request for Proposals from the Michigan Corn Marketing Program Corn Marketing Program of Michigan 2015 Request for Proposals Released August 24, 2014 The Corn Marketing Program of Michigan (CMPM for increasing economic viability of corn production in Michigan through innovative research and market

  18. Butterbean, Corn and Tomato Salad Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Butterbean, Corn and Tomato Salad Ingredients: 15 ounces butter beans, drained and rinsed 15 ounces cans of butterbeans and corn. Pour into a colander, and rinse under running water to remove sodium

  19. Broccoli and Corn Bake Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    broccoli, frozen, thawed 20 low sodium whole-wheat crackers 1 egg, beaten 5 ounces evaporated skim milk and pour into a colander. Rinse under cool water to remove salt, set aside to drain. 3. Place crackers milk and add to egg. Beat until well mixed. 5. Add corn, thawed broccoli, half of the crushed crackers

  20. The Corn and Climate Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debinski, Diane M.

    Administration National Weather Service North Central Bioeconomy Consortium US Climate Change Science Program Editorial Board Brendan Jordan, Great Plains Institute, staff for the North Central Bioeconomy Consortium Institute, staff for the North Central Bioeconomy Consortium Prepared by Megan Hassler and Sarah Wash Corn

  1. OoEr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN .METALS~ c3ppY-.I ' Y{OoEr 1325.8

  2. INDEX TO VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID AND MANAGEMENT TRIALS 1998 SECTION I. VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 1998.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    INDEX TO VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID AND MANAGEMENT TRIALS 1998 SECTION I. VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 1998. Companies participating in the 1998 Corn Hybrid Trials 2 1998 Virginia Corn Hybird Plot, and 1998. 36 SECTION II. EVALUATION OF DOUBLECROP CORN UNDER IRRIGATION IN EASTERN VIRGINIA. Table 27

  3. SECTION I. VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 1997. Companies Participating in the 1997 Corn Hybrid Trials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    1 SECTION I. VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 1997. Companies Participating in the 1997 Corn Hybrid COLUMBIA PLAINVIEW TX 79072 NORTHRUP KING CO. NORTHRUP KING PO BOX 959 MINNEAPOLIS MN 55440 PIONEER HI, INC. WILSON PO BOX 391 HARLAN IA 51537 VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 1997 Coordinated by H. Behl, E

  4. Estrogen receptor alpha 36 (ER-36) and other novel spliced ERs are widely expressed in ER-66-negative breast tumors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of ER are examined using qPCR in ER-negative cell lines MCF7 MDA-MB-231 SKBR3 MCF7/218 (MC-20)(F-10-66-neagtive SKBR3 cells and ER-66-positive MCF7/218cells. A novel spliced form of ER is detected by WB using anti-ER(MC-20) antibody in ER-66- negative MDA-MB-231 and SKBR3 cell lines. 4. A novel

  5. Protein folding in the ER.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, F. J.; Argon, Y.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Chicago

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a major protein folding compartment for secreted, plasma membrane and organelle proteins. Each of these newly-synthesized polypeptides folds in a deterministic process, affected by the unique conditions that exist in the ER. An understanding of protein folding in the ER is a fundamental biomolecular challenge at two levels. The first level addresses how the amino acid sequence programs that polypeptide to efficiently arrive at a particular fold out of a multitude of alternatives, and how different sequences obtain similar folds. At the second level are the issues introduced by folding not in the cytosol, but in the ER, including the risk of aggregation in a molecularly crowded environment, accommodation of post-translational modifications and the compatibility with subsequent intracellular trafficking. This review discusses both the physicochemical and cell biological constraints of folding, which are the challenges that the ER molecular chaperones help overcome.

  6. Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Topics: PV, Wind, environmental justice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    the levelized cost of electricity. [5 points] #12;Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Topics: PV, Wind Points: 102 [ER100/PP184], 113 [ER200/PP284] - 2 - 2. Wind Power Analysis [18 points grad, 10 pointsEnergy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Topics: PV, Wind, environmental justice Due Nov. 21

  7. Managing Insect and Mite Pests of Texas Corn.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, J.W.; Patrick, Carl; Cronholm, Gregory B.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    damage to the brace roots and fibrous roots may cause plants to lodge. A "goose necking" appearance occurs when lodged plants continue to grow. The southern corn rootworm deposits eggs in he corn field after the corn is in the seedling stage... practice. Producers are encouraged to rotate soil insecticides each year for best results. SEEDLING TO PRE-TASSEL STAGE INSECT CONTROL Corn Leaf Aphid Although heavy populations of corn leaf aphids may cause damage to seedling corn plants, fields...

  8. Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State of Technology Model Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State of Technology Model An update to...

  9. Owens Corning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany OilInformationPre-TaxShelf LandsOpenCorning Jump

  10. BIOENERGI ER BLEVET MODERNE 4DECEMBER 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , biogas og bioethanol. Bioenergi er den eneste vedvarende energikilde, der findes i fast, flydende og

  11. September 2010 FAPRI-MU US Biofuels, Corn Processing,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    September 2010 FAPRI-MU US Biofuels, Corn Processing, Distillers Grains, Fats, Switchgrass-882-4256 or the US Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights. #12;1 Overview of FAPRI-MU Biofuels, Corn listed here represent US biofuel, corn processing, distillers grains, fats, switchgrass, and corn stover

  12. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment of Bioethanol Derived from Corn and Corn Stover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Bioethanol Derived from Corn and Corn Stover Dora Ip Farbod Ahmadi Diba Derek Pope University of British Farbod Ahmadi Diba Derek Pope 4/16/2010 Life Cycle Assessment of Bioethanol Derived from Corn and Corn Stover #12;2 Abstract This paper follows the growing research of bioethanol fuels produced from farmed

  13. Maximizing the enzymic saccharification of corn stover 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaar, William Edward

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ; thus, biomass has considerable potential as a fermentation feedstock. Corn stover represents an especially important resource because it is the single largest source of agricultural residue in the United States. The best method to obtain fermentable...

  14. The estimated costs of corn, corn silage, soybeans, alfalfa, and pasture maintenance in this report are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    The estimated costs of corn, corn silage, soybeans, alfalfa, and pasture maintenance in this report summaries, production and costs data from the Depart- ments of Economics, Agricultural and Biosystems and other input suppliers around the state. These costs estimates are representative of average costs

  15. Corn Performance Trials Companies Participating in the 1994 Corn Performance Trials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Virginia Corn Performance Trials in 1994 #12;#12;1 Companies Participating in the 1994 Corn IN 46031 CARGILL HYBRID SEEDS CARGILL PO BOX 5645 MINNEAPOLIS MN 55440 CAVERNDALE FARMS INC. CAVERNDALE SCIENCES MYCOGEN 624 27TH ST LUBBOCK TX 79404 NORTHRUP KING CO. NORTHRUP KING 317 330TH ST STANTON MN 55018

  16. MHK Projects/Deadman Cove | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformationCygnet < MHK Projects Jump to:Notnac, LADeadman

  17. Energy and Society ER100/PPC184/ER200/PPC284, Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    of the process. If the article comes from New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Economist, Time, etc Timeliness1 Energy and Society ER100/PPC184/ER200/PPC284, Fall 2014 Problem Set #2 Total Points: 100 for ER100/PPC184 120 for ER200/PPC284 Topics covered: Energy and development, Combustion, Exponential growth

  18. af biobraendsler er: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Society (ER100PP184ER200PP284) Topics: Personal energy audit, the grid, nuclear, fracking Renewable Energy Websites Summary: Energy and Society (ER100PP184ER200PP284)...

  19. alleviates er stress: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Society (ER100PP184ER200PP284) Topics: Personal energy audit, the grid, nuclear, fracking Renewable Energy Websites Summary: Energy and Society (ER100PP184ER200PP284)...

  20. Barley tortillas and barley flours in corn tortillas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitre-Dieste, Carlos Marcelo

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Barley tortillas (100%) were easily processed using corn tortilla technology. Flavor and color of barley tortillas were different from those of corn or wheat tortillas. Barley tortillas were generally darker, maybe due to ...

  1. Tank 241-ER-311, grab samples, ER311-98-1, ER311-98-2, ER311-98-3 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FULLER, R.K.

    1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final report for catch tank 241-ER-311 grab samples. Three grab samples ER311-98-1, ER311-98-2 and ER311-98-3 were taken from East riser of tank 241-ER-311 on August 4, 1998 and received by the 222-S Laboratory on August 4, 1998. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Sasaki, 1998)and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) (Mulkey and Miller, 1997). The analytical results are presented in the data summary report (Table 1). No notification limits were exceeded.

  2. The estimated costs of corn, corn silage, soybeans, al-falfa, and pasture maintenance in this report are based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    The estimated costs of corn, corn silage, soybeans, al- falfa, and pasture maintenance record summaries, production and costs data from the Departments of Economics, Agricultural cooperatives and other input suppliers around the state. These costs estimates are representative of average

  3. ANTHRAQUINONE CORN SEED TREATMENT (AVITECTM ) AS A FEEDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANTHRAQUINONE CORN SEED TREATMENT (AVITECTM ) AS A FEEDING REPELLENT FOR RING-NECKED PHEASANTS and Fisheries Sciences South Dakota State University 2009 #12;ANTHRAQUINONE CORN SEED TREATMENT (AVITECTM the South Dakota Department of Game, Fish, and Parks. #12;v ABSTRACT ANTHRAQUINONE CORN SEED TREATMENT

  4. THE 2001 NET ENERGY BALANCE OF CORN-ETHANOL (PRELIMINARY)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    .S. Department of Energy, Center for Transportation Research, Energy Systems Division, Argonne National per gallon for the industry. The study results suggest that corn ethanol is energy efficient on the latest data on corn production and corn yield, (2) improving the quality of estimates for energy used

  5. Thermodynamics of the Corn-Ethanol Biofuel Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    into Corn Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 3.11 Solar Energy Input into Corn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 4.5 Overall Energy Balance of the Corn-Ethanol Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 II.1 The Earth is an Open System to Heat Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 10.2 Conclusions

  6. Variations in Vitamin A and in Chemical Composition of Corn.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1931-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such as rickets, scurvy, or beri-beri. Vitamin A was one of the first vitamins discovered. It occurs in large quantity in yellow corn, while little or none is founcl in white corn. For the purpose of this study, samples of corn grown at the various substations...

  7. FIELD CROPS 2012 Weeds: Corn 5-53

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    in Delmarva corn production. To be successful in controlling weeds in corn, the weed control program must this record to plan your weed control program. Cultural control. Several aspects of cultural weed control should be considered in planning a corn weed control program. These include weed-free seed, cover crops

  8. Biofuel derived from Microalgae Corn-based Ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    ) Comparing both Energy Sources (1) 0 500 1000 1500 2000 Corn Microalgae Land Area Needed (M ha) 0 20000 40000 60000 80000 100000 Corn Microalgae Oil Yield (L/ha) #12;Comparing both Energy Sources (2) BackgroundBiofuel derived from Microalgae Corn-based Ethanol #12;Outline · Production processes for each

  9. Energy Analysis of the Corn-Ethanol Biofuel Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Energy Analysis of the Corn-Ethanol Biofuel Cycle First Draft Tad W. Patzek Department of Civil legitimately ask: Why do the various energy balances of the corn-ethanol cycle still differ so much? Why do some authors claim that the corn-ethanol cycle has a positive net energy balance (Wang et al., 1997

  10. Bioaugmentation for Electricity Generation from Corn Stover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that it is possible to directly generate electricity from waste corn stover in MFCs through bioaugmentation using of an MFC, bacteria break down organic matter and release electrons to the electrode. Most MFC tests used by Zuo et al., 501 ( 20 mW/m2 was generated from a paper recycling wastewater containing cellulose

  11. DOW CORNING CORPORATION Material Safety Data Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garmestani, Hamid

    -88-3 Toluene The above components are hazardous as defined in 29 CFR 1910.1200. 3. HAZARDS or water spray. Water can be used to cool fire exposed containers. Fire Fighting Measures: Self to keep fire exposed containers cool. #12;DOW CORNING CORPORATION Material Safety Data Sheet Page: 3 of 8

  12. Corn Ethanol -April 2006 11 Cover Story

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Corn Ethanol - April 2006 11 Cover Story orn ethanol is the fuel du jour. It's domestic. It oil into gasoline or diesel fuel. Ethanol refineries also use huge amounts of water. An average dry's not oil. Ethanol's going to help promote "energy independence." Magazines trumpet it as the motor vehicle

  13. er 1, 2012 (v ctrical Engi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    digital c one or m above a dependin Deadline Contac er 1, 2012 (v searc Post-Doct ctrical Engi y invites

  14. Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Topics: PV, Wind, environmental justice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Topics: PV, Wind, environmental justice Due Nov. 21) Topics: PV, Wind, environmental justice Due Nov. 21, in class, or before 5pm outside 310 Barrows Fall

  15. Solstrling er temaet i denne boka. Alt liv er avhengig av solstrling sola gir liv, og sola er

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahay, Sundeep

    #12;Solstråling er temaet i denne boka. Alt liv er avhengig av solstråling ­ sola gir liv, og sola solstrålingens betydning for vår helse og gi en naturfaglig bakgrunn for hvordan en bør styre sine solvaner. Sola de viktigste, og at det innebærer en større risiko hvis en ikke lar sola skinne på kroppen. I

  16. Energy and Society ER100/PPC184/ER200/PPC284, Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    countries with average annual per capita energy consumption rates under 1 TOE)? [5 points] 2. Exponential, poverty and gender The chapter "Energy and Poverty" from the 2002 World Energy Outlook, states "...theEnergy and Society ER100/PPC184/ER200/PPC284, Fall 2014 Problem Set #2 Total Points: 100 for ER100

  17. Ternary Dy-Er-Al magnetic refrigerants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.; Takeya, Hiroyuki

    1995-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A ternary magnetic refrigerant material comprising (Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Er{sub x})Al{sub 2} for a magnetic refrigerator using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle spanning a temperature range from about 60K to about 10K, which can be adjusted by changing the Dy to Er ratio of the refrigerant. 29 figs.

  18. Ternary Dy-Er-Al magnetic refrigerants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A. (Ames, IA); Takeya, Hiroyuki (Ibaraki, JP)

    1995-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A ternary magnetic refrigerant material comprising (Dy.sub.1-x Er.sub.x)Al.sub.2 for a magnetic refrigerator using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle spanning a temperature range from about 60K to about 10K, which can be adjusted by changing the Dy to Er ratio of the refrigerant.

  19. A supply forecasting model for Zimbabwe's corn sector: a time series and structural analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makaudze, Ephias

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Zimbabwean government utilizes the corn supply forecasts to establish producer prices for the following growing season, estimate corn storage and handling costs, project corn import needs and associated costs, and to assess the Grain Marketing...

  20. Microscopic Analysis of Corn Fiber Using Corn Starch- and Cellulose-Specific Molecular Probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, S. E.; Donohoe, B. S.; Beery, K. E.; Xu, Q.; Ding, S.-Y.; Vinzant, T. B.; Abbas, C. A.; Himmel, M. E.

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ethanol is the primary liquid transportation fuel produced from renewable feedstocks in the United States today. The majority of corn grain, the primary feedstock for ethanol production, has been historically processed in wet mills yielding products such as gluten feed, gluten meal, starch, and germ. Starch extracted from the grain is used to produce ethanol in saccharification and fermentation steps; however the extraction of starch is not 100% efficient. To better understand starch extraction during the wet milling process, we have developed fluorescent probes that can be used to visually localize starch and cellulose in samples using confocal microscopy. These probes are based on the binding specificities of two types of carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), which are small substrate-specific protein domains derived from carbohydrate degrading enzymes. CBMs were fused, using molecular cloning techniques, to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) or to the red fluorescent protein DsRed (RFP). Using these engineered probes, we found that the binding of the starch-specific probe correlates with starch content in corn fiber samples. We also demonstrate that there is starch internally localized in the endosperm that may contribute to the high starch content in corn fiber. We also surprisingly found that the cellulose-specific probe did not bind to most corn fiber samples, but only to corn fiber that had been hydrolyzed using a thermochemical process that removes the residual starch and much of the hemicellulose. Our findings should be of interest to those working to increase the efficiency of the corn grain to ethanol process.

  1. Corn Belt Energy Corporation- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Corn Belt Energy Corporation (CBEC), in association with the Wabash Valley Power Association, provides its customers with the "Power Moves" energy efficiency rebate program. Through this program,...

  2. Sandia Energy - JBEI Researchers Splice Corn Gene into Switchgrass...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The JBEI researchers, working with researchers at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service, have demonstrated that introducing a maize (corn)...

  3. acid pretreated corn: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (LCA) using the Ga 77 Researchers use corn waste to generate electricity Renewable Energy Websites Summary: to create hydrogen." The Penn State researcher and colleagues also...

  4. STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY OWENS CORNING SCIENCE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Building-Integrated Photovoltaic Shingles Using Monocrystalline Silicon Thin Film Solar Cells." OWENS CORNING is a sub-awardee under the cooperative agreement. Solexel Inc....

  5. Partnership Logging Accidents Cornelis de Hoop, LA Forest Products Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partnership Logging Accidents · by · Cornelis de Hoop, LA Forest Products Lab · Albert Lefort Agreement · 1998 & 1999 Accident Reports · 25 injuries reported · 185 loggers signed up · 8 deaths 1999

  6. Characterization of the ER stress checkpoint in mammalian cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Meifan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    role in oxidative protein folding in the endoplasmiccellular demand for protein folding and ER capacity has beenlipids. To ensure proper protein folding within the ER, the

  7. In vitro analysis of ER-associated protein degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garza, Renee Marie

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    required for ER-associated degradation. Nat Cell Biol, 3,Cue1p in ubiquitination and degradation at the ER surface.1999) Measuring protein degradation with green fluorescent

  8. Improved Multivariate Calibration Models for Corn Stover Feedstock and Dilute-Acid Pretreated Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfrum, E. J.; Sluiter, A. D.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied rapid calibration models to predict the composition of a variety of biomass feedstocks by correlating near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic data to compositional data produced using traditional wet chemical analysis techniques. The rapid calibration models are developed using multivariate statistical analysis of the spectroscopic and wet chemical data. This work discusses the latest versions of the NIR calibration models for corn stover feedstock and dilute-acid pretreated corn stover. Measures of the calibration precision and uncertainty are presented. No statistically significant differences (p = 0.05) are seen between NIR calibration models built using different mathematical pretreatments. Finally, two common algorithms for building NIR calibration models are compared; no statistically significant differences (p = 0.05) are seen for the major constituents glucan, xylan, and lignin, but the algorithms did produce different predictions for total extractives. A single calibration model combining the corn stover feedstock and dilute-acid pretreated corn stover samples gave less satisfactory predictions than the separate models.

  9. An ab initio-based Er–He interatomic potential in hcp Er

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Li; ye, Yeting; Fan, K. M.; Shen, Huahai; Peng, Shuming; Long, XG; Zhou, X. S.; Zu, Xiaotao; Gao, Fei

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed an empirical erbium-helium (Er-He) potential by fitting to the results calculated from ab initio method. Based on the electronic hybridization between Er and He atoms, an s-band model, along with a repulsive pair potential, has been derived to describe the Er-He interaction. The atomic configurations and the formation energies of single He defects, small He interstitial clusters (Hen) and He-vacancy (HenV ) clusters obtained by ab initio calculations are used as the fitting database. The binding energies and relative stabilities of the HnVm clusters are studied by the present potential and compared with the ab initio calculations. The Er-He potential is also applied to study the migration of He in hcp-Er at different temperatures, and He clustering is found to occur at 600 K in hcp Er crystal, which may be due to the anisotropic migration behavior of He interstitials.

  10. Environmental release summary (ERS) database CY 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleckler, B.P.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the Environmental Release Summary (ERS) database. The current needs of the Effluent and Environmental database is continually modified to fulfill monitoring (EEM) program (managed by Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Incorporated, Air and Water Services Organization). Changes are made to accurately calculate current releases, to affect how past releases are calculated. This document serves as a snap-shot of the database and software for the CY-1997 data and releases. This document contains all of the relevant data for calculating radioactive-airborne and liquid effluent. The ERS database is the official repository for the CY-1997 ERS release reports and the settings used to generate those reports. As part of the Tri-Party Agreement, FDH is committed to provide a hard copy of the ERS database for Washington State Department of Ecology, upon request. This document also serves as that hard copy for the last complete calendar year.

  11. Corn Storage Protein - A Molecular Genetic Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messing, Joachim [Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Corn is the highest yielding crop on earth and probably the most valuable agricultural product of the United States. Because it converts sun energy through photosynthesis into starch and proteins, we addressed energy savings by focusing on protein quality. People and animals require essential amino acids derived from the digestion of proteins. If proteins are relatively low in certain essential amino acids, the crop becomes nutritionally defective and has to be supplemented. Such deficiency affects meat and fish production and countries where corn is a staple. Because corn seed proteins have relatively low levels of lysine and methionine, a diet has to be supplemented with soybeans for the missing lysine and with chemically synthesized methionine. We therefore have studied genes expressed during maize seed development and their chromosomal organization. A critical technical requirement for the understanding of the molecular structure of genes and their positional information was DNA sequencing. Because of the length of sequences, DNA sequencing methods themselves were insufficient for this type of analysis. We therefore developed the so-called “DNA shotgun sequencing” strategy, where overlapping DNA fragments were sequenced in parallel and used to reconstruct large DNA molecules via overlaps. Our publications became the most frequently cited ones during the decade of 1981-1990 and former Associate Director of Science for the Office of Basic Energy Sciences Patricia M. Dehmer presented our work as one of the great successes of this program. A major component of the sequencing strategy was the development of bacterial strains and vectors, which were also used to develop the first biotechnology crops. These crops possessed new traits thanks to the expression of foreign genes in plants. To enable such expression, chimeric genes had to be constructed using our materials and methods by the industry. Because we made our materials and methods freely available to academia and industry, progress in plant research and new crop development could accelerate and benefit the public.

  12. Prediction of corn tortilla textural quality using stress relaxation methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zhihong

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ). The effects of moisture content and resting time on corn masa textural property were investigated. Texture of properties of corn tortilla (fresh up to stale) was evaluated using the stress relaxation technique in two different modes, pure tension and bending-tension...

  13. Biofuels from Corn Stover: Pyrolytic Production and Catalytic Upgrading Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capunitan, Jewel Alviar

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    explored, in an attempt to convert an abundant agricultural residue, corn stover, into potential bio-fuels. Pyrolysis of corn stover was carried out at 400, 500 and 600oC and at moderate pressure. Maximum bio-char yield of 37.3 wt.% and liquid product...

  14. Suggestions for Weed Control in Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, Paul A.

    2002-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    F r ontier ? for additional w eed contr ol. Consult (R efer to label for specific w eeds BASF U se rate determined b y inches of soil) or sur face applied the pr oduct label. R o tational cr o p r estrictions will contr olled.) C.E.C. (cationex...) or sur face contr olled.) BASF applied within 2 w eeks of U se rate is determined b y C.E.C. (cation ex change planting. Early postemergence capacity) or soil textur e and organic matter befor e corn is12 inches tall, but content. Can make split...

  15. Tall Corn Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to:Holdings Co08.0 -TEEMP JumpTakigamiTalbotts LtdTall Corn

  16. Glacial Lakes Corn Processors | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/Exploration <Glacial Energy HoldingsGlacial Lakes Corn

  17. Grupo Corn lio Brennand | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/ExplorationGoods |Grundy Electric Coop, IncGrupo Corn lio

  18. Managing Insect and Mite Pests of Texas Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Patrick; Cronholm, Gregory B.; Parker, Roy D.; Troxclair, Noel N.; Patrick, Carl D.; Biles, Stephen; Morrison, William P.

    2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    weedy fields, larvae may be able to feed on weed roots until they are large and then move to corn roots and cause significant damage. In this case, control may not be as good as it should have been. Also, it is common for a very small percentage... be reduced or in some cases eliminated by a crop rotation scheme including soybeans or other crops that are not fed upon by rootworms. In most areas of Texas, corn has been rotated successfully with sorghum without damage from the Mexican corn rootworm...

  19. Sweet Corn Tests in the Lower Rio Grande Valley.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickett, B. S. (Barzalli Stewart)

    1947-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Erie has more earworm resistance than either Ioarn or Golden Hybrid 2439. It is less sub- ject to bird damage than 2439. and suckers less. The plant is taller and more vigorous than most of the sweet corn varieties studied. It is slightly later... supply, * an important factor in corn earworm control. Jour. of Anr. Res. 68:73-77. 1944. 3. Dicke, F. F.. and M. T. Jenkins: Susceptibility of certain strains of field cc in hybrid combinations to damage by corn ear worms. U.S.D.A. Tech. Bul. 898...

  20. Watergrass and Volunteer Sorghum Control in Corn.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiese, A.F.; Chenault, E.W.; Lavake, D.E.; Hollingsworth, Dale

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corn Preplant LblA emergence LblA emergence herbicide (ai) herbicide (ail herbicide (ail (LbIA) (BulA) c*" (NolA) AAtrex 442 c-e 820 c-e 1,561 b-d 1506 3 e 2 350 de 12,192 ab 12,288 ab 1 1,328 a-c 11,616a-c Princep AAtrex 1ya iha 125... Aatrex 3 _ Evik + SC 2 202 e 123a-c 11,136a-c Check .- -_ 4,991 a 90 d 9,216 c Weans followed by the sgme letaer --&= fwel of significance. bSun 11Eoilat 1 gaHanper&cmin COupont WK surfactant at 0.5% of mtzi&k%ume. TABLE 8. WATERGRASS COMa AND...

  1. Low temperature properties of some Er-rich intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.A. Gshneidner,jr; A.O. Pecharsky; L.Hale; V.K. Pecharsky

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The low temperature volumetric heat capacity ({approx}3.5 to 350 K) and magnetic susceptibility ({approx}4 to 320 K) of Er{sub 3}Rh, Er{sub 3}Ir, Er{sub 3}Pt, Er{sub 2}Al, and Er{sub 2}Sn have been measured. All of the compounds order antiferromagnetically (or ferrimagnetically), and most exhibit more than one magnetic ordering transition. The volumetric heat capacities in general are smaller than those of the prototype magnetic regenerator materials, except for Er{sub 3}Ir in the 12 to 14 K temperature range.

  2. Corn Belt Energy Coop- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Corn Belt Energy, through the Wabash Valley Power Association, offers business, school, and farm customers a variety of energy efficient rebates and incentives through its "Power Moves" program....

  3. Direct Comparison of Alfalfa Nitrogen Credits to Corn and Wheat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    Station Ashland Ag Research Station #12;Alfalfa N credits to corn: · Infrequent fertilizer N responses Rate Aug Sep lb/a --------- bu/a --------- 15 48 48 35 55 43 55 52 51 75 62 49 Ashland, 2001

  4. Lime pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Se Hoon

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable energy sources, such as lignocellulosic biomass, are environmentally friendly because they emit less pollution without contributing net carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Among lignocellulosic biomass, corn stover is a very useful feedstock...

  5. Lime pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Se Hoon

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable energy sources, such as lignocellulosic biomass, are environmentally friendly because they emit less pollution without contributing net carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Among lignocellulosic biomass, corn stover is a very useful feedstock...

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sylvania Corning Nuclear...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    to SYLVANIA CORNING NUCLEAR CORP., INC., SYLVANIA LABORATORIES NY.07-1 - Letter, Smith to Norris, Contract at (30-1)-1293- U Metal Requirements, March 5, 1953 NY.07-2 -...

  7. The Origin of Indian Corn and its Relatives.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangelsdorf, Paul C. (Paul Christoph); Reeves, R. G. (Robert Gatlin)

    1939-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    if it were not that when it hybridizes with Zea, some of the segregates are indistinguishable from Mexican varieties. Zea L. Maize, Indian Corn The genus Zea usually is distinguished from its near relatives by having separate staminate and pistillate...TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR, College Station, Texas BULLETIN NO. 574 (Monograph) MAY 1939 THE ORIGIN OF INDIAN CORN AND ITS RELATIVES P. C. MANGELSDORF AND R. G. REEVES Division of Agronomy (In cooperation...

  8. The values and practices associated with high moisture corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finch, Charles B

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    damage and a corresponding reduction in feeding value can occur. Kernel size will vary greatly depending on corn growing conditions, variety and 13 especially kernel location on the cob. Kernels which come from the upper end of the cob will be smaller... of the corn. Owens (1986) states that browning of HMC does not affect performance, but discoloration can be an indication of heating during feedout which in turn decreases feed intake. Possible chemical causes could be a reaction between reducing sugars...

  9. Legumes for Soil Improvement for Cotton and Corn.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, E. B.; Rea, H. E.; Whitney, Eli; Rich, P. A.; Roberts, J. E.

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    medium yields, averaging about 28 bushels for the several treatments, were caused by severe corn rootworm damage. In an adjoin- ing experiment, which suffered little or no damage by the rootworm, the average yield was nearly 50 bushels per acre... of all the treatments was about 51 bushels per acre. Low to medium yields in the other years were caused bv deficient or poor distribution of rainfall, unavoidable lateness of planting or replanting necessitated by corn rootworm dam- age. In 1950...

  10. Greenhouse gases in the corn-to-fuel ethanol pathway.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M. Q.

    1998-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has applied its Greenhouse gas, Regulated Emissions and Energy in Transportation (GREET) full-fuel-cycle analysis model to examine greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of corn-feedstock ethanol, given present and near-future production technology and practice. On the basis of updated information appropriate to corn farming and processing operations in the four principal corn- and ethanol-producing states (Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, and Nebraska), the model was used to estimate energy requirements and GHG emissions of corn farming; the manufacture, transportation to farms, and field application of fertilizer and pesticide; transportation of harvested corn to ethanol plants; nitrous oxide emissions from cultivated cornfields; ethanol production in current average and future technology wet and dry mills; and operation of cars and light trucks using ethanol fuels. For all cases examined on the basis of mass emissions per travel mile, the corn-to-ethanol fuel cycle for Midwest-produced ethanol used in both E85 and E10 blends with gasoline outperforms conventional (current) and reformulated (future) gasoline with respect to energy use and GHG production. Also, GHG reductions (but not energy use) appear surprisingly sensitive to the value chosen for combined soil and leached N-fertilizer conversion to nitrous oxide. Co-product energy-use attribution remains the single key factor in estimating ethanol's relative benefits because this value can range from 0 to 50%, depending on the attribution method chosen.

  11. Kenya (Rpublique du) Admission 1 er

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montréal, Université de

    2014-04-14 Kenya (République du) Admission 1 er cycle Programmes à capacité d'accueil limitée : complément d'informations Seuils requis selon les programmes Détails sur le test Kenya Certificate

  12. Explorewww.trentu.ca/ers Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Michael

    environmental research, natural resource conservation, environmental planning and assessment, water and wasteExplorewww.trentu.ca/ers Explore Your Passion Environmental and Resource Studies/Science. Trent. You. #12;LEARNING TO MAKE A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE.TM Career Conscious Skills in environmental studies

  13. DOE/ER-0214 February 1985

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DOE/ER-0214 Magnetic Program Fusion Plan February 1985 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Research Washington, D.C. 20585 #12;U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Research February 1985, available resources, and the nation's need for future energy sources. #12;PREFACE During the past few years

  14. Correlations in Multiparticle Markus Ringn' er

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ringnér, Markus

    Production Markus Ringn' er Department of Theoretical Physics Lund University, Sweden Thesis for the degree, with the permission of the Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences of Lund University, for public criticism field which should survive fragmentation is presented. Inspired by the Feynman­Wilson gas analogy

  15. Bt vs. non-Bt corn (Zea mays L.) hybrids: effect on degradation of corn stover in soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvatore, Herminia T.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Page Figure 1 Mean temperatures during 2004 corn growing season in College Station, TX. .......???????????????????...... 48 Figure 2 Monthly rain in millimeters during the first half of 2004 in College Station, TX...., 2000; Mann et al., 2002; Spedding et al., 2004; DeFelice et al., 2006), and therefore, farmers adopt various techniques to deal with the stover. At least 50% of corn stover, roughly 300 billion pounds, will be tilled back into the soil (DeFelice et al...

  16. Unique ER Cistromes Control Cell Type-Specific Gene Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Myles

    -specific E2 regulation of gene expression in MCF7 and U2OS- ER cells, we compared the ER binding sites on DNA a critical role in defining the ER cistrome in MCF7 cells, it is not expressed in U2OS-ER cells, and forkhead-specific effects, however, remains to be explained. We have compared the gene expres- sion profile of the MCF7

  17. The ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway directs ubiquitin-mediated degradation of a variety of ER-associated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampton, Randy

    476 The ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway directs ubiquitin-mediated degradation carboxypeptidase Y DER degradation in the ER ERAD ER-associated degradation FPP farnesyl pyrophosphate HMGR 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase HRD HMG-CoA reductase degradation SCAP SREBP cleavage

  18. ER-12-1 completion report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, C.E.; Gillespie, D.; Cole, J.C.; Drellack, S.L. [and others

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of drillhole ER-12-1 was to determine the hydrogeology of paleozoic carbonate rocks and of the Eleana Formation, a regional aquitard, in an area potentially downgradient from underground nuclear testing conducted in nearby Rainier Mesa. This objective was addressed through the drilling of well ER-12-1 at N886,640.26 E640,538.85 Nevada Central Coordinates. Drilling of the 1094 m (3588 ft) well began on July 19, 1991 and was completed on October 17, 1991. Drilling problems included hole deviation and hole instability that prevented the timely completion of this borehole. Drilling methods used include rotary tri-cone and rotary hammer drilling with conventional and reverse circulation using air/water, air/foam (Davis mix), and bentonite mud. Geologic cuttings and geophysical logs were obtained from the well. The rocks penetrated by the ER-12-1 drillhole are a complex assemblage of Silurian, Devonian, and Mississippian sedimentary rocks that are bounded by numerous faults that show substantial stratigraphic offset. The final 7.3 m (24 ft) of this hole penetrated an unusual intrusive rock of Cretaceous age. The geology of this borehole was substantially different from that expected, with the Tongue Wash Fault encountered at a much shallower depth, paleozoic rocks shuffled out of stratigraphic sequence, and the presence of an altered biotite-rich microporphyritic igneous rock at the bottom of the borehole. Conodont CAI analyses and rock pyrolysis analyses indicate that the carbonate rocks in ER-12-1, as well as the intervening sheets of Eleana siltstone, have been thermally overprinted following movement on the faults that separate them. The probable source of heat for this thermal disturbance is the microporphyritic intrusion encountered at the bottom of the hole, and its age establishes that the major fault activity must have occurred prior to 102.3+0.5 Ma (middle Cretaceous).

  19. MBI Biorefinery: Corn to Biomass, Ethanol to Biochemicals and Biomaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2006-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The project is a continuation of DOE-funded work (FY02 and FY03) that has focused on the development of the ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) pretreatment technology, fermentation production of succinic acid and new processes and products to enhance dry mill profitability. The primary objective for work beginning in April 2004 and ending in November 2005 is focus on the key issues related to the: (1) design, costing and construction plan for a pilot AFEX pretreatment system, formation of a stakeholder development team to assist in the planning and design of a biorefinery pilot plant, continued evaluation of corn fractionation technologies, corn oil extraction, AFEX treatment of corn fiber/DDGs; (2) development of a process to fractionate AFEX-treated corn fiber and corn stover--cellulose and hemicellulose fractionation and sugar recovery; and (3) development of a scalable batch succinic acid production process at 500 L at or below $.42/lb, a laboratory scale fed-batch process for succinic acid production at or below $.40/lb, a recovery process for succinic acid that reduces the cost of succinic acid by $.02/lb and the development of an acid tolerant succinic acid production strain at lab scale (last objective not to be completed during this project time period).

  20. Effects of Bt-corn decomposition on the composition of the soil meso-and macrofauna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    to the environment. At this point genetically modified corn, expressing Cry proteins of the soil bacterium Bacillus bags Soil invertebrates a b s t r a c t Genetically modified Bt-corn is able to fight main insect pests than 4%. All corn varieties were likewise used as food resource by decomposers, thus the Bt

  1. INTERSPECIFIC AND INTRASPECIFIC COMPETITION OF COMMON SUNFLOWER (HELIANTHUS ANNUUS L.) IN FIELD CORN (ZEA MAYS L.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falkenberg, Nyland R.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    corn. Field studies were conducted in 2006 and 2007 to 1) define the density-dependent effects of common sunflower competition with corn; 2) define the necessary weed-free periods of common sunflower in corn; 3) evaluate common sunflower control...

  2. Kaffir Corn and Milo Maize for Fattening Cattle.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, F. R. (Frederick Rupert); Burns, John C.

    1907-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is used, when price permits, for mixing with ground feed. Even though this be the case at this time the grower has no complaint to make, because all of the grain offered for sale up to this time has been taken at fair prices. It is altogether desirable... liaffir corn at a price much lover than that of Indian corn, biit refuqe to do so because of a misunderstanding of its ac- tual value. It is with a view to serving thes6 two classas as well as others lilcelp to desire infformation upon tbe same snbjecte...

  3. ER85773 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11 ENVIROISSUES PAGEMesoscopy andAbout UsER85773

  4. DOE/ER--0547T DE92

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The itemAIR57451 Clean Energy5655994DP-1513 . D iER--0547T

  5. Alternatives for Using Failed Corn in the Texas High Plains Ted McCollum III and Brent Bean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    for Using Failed Corn in the Texas High Plains Ted McCollum III and Brent Bean Extension Beef Cattle The Texas A&M University System SCS-1998-18 Some corn producers are deciding to quit watering a portion of their corn fields in order to reallocate the water. What can be done to salvage some value from the corn

  6. Energy and Society ER100/PPC184/ER200/PPC284, Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    CO2 (in $/ton CO2) over time. Assume a GHG emission rate of 530g CO2/kWh from the natural gas power CO2 for the society (as represented by these four entities) on an annual basis. A net benefit/PP184 120 for ER200/PP284 Topics covered: NPV, Energy efficiency, Electricity grid, Learning curve 1

  7. SECO - Dow Corning's Wood Fueled Industrial Cogeneration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betts, W. D.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1979, Dow Corning Corporation decided to build a wood fueled steam and electric cogeneration (SECO) power plant at Midland, Michigan. This decision was prompted by the high cost of oil and natural gas, an abundant supply of wood in mid Michigan...

  8. SECO - Dow Corning's Wood Fueled Industrial Cogeneration Project 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betts, W. D.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1979, Dow Corning Corporation decided to build a wood fueled steam and electric cogeneration (SECO) power plant at Midland, Michigan. This decision was prompted by the high cost of oil and natural gas, an abundant supply of wood in mid Michigan...

  9. An Improved Algorithm for Quanti er Elimination Over Real Closed ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    assumption that each polynomial in the input depend ..... We call this procedure uniform quanti er elim- .... and describe the inputs, outputs and complexities of.

  10. ER85357_Phase2_Eltron | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Unconventional High Temperature Nanofiltration for Produced Water Treatment Last Reviewed 6252013 DE-10ER85357 Goal The project goal is to further develop a proprietary,...

  11. INDEX TO VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID AND MANAGEMENT TRIALS 1999 SECTION I. VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 1999.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    CORPORTATION AUGUSTA 106 FAIRBURN RD MT SOLON VA 22843 BIO GENE BIO GENE 5491 TRI COUNTY HWY SARDINIA OH 45171 at Middlesex County, Virginia in 1998 and at New Kent County, Virginia in 1999 37 Table 29. Three-year corn hybrid studies at Middlesex County, Virginia in 1997 and 1998 and at New Kent County in 1999. 37 SECTION

  12. RisNyt NO2 2005 1313 Demand response er som at kbe benzin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RisøNyt NO2 2005 1313 Demand response er som at købe benzin når den er billigst Af Leif Sønderberg tankstationen og købe mest muligt benzin når prisen er lavest. Sådan er Demand Response, som vi også vil opleve at ændre på dette er Demand Response (DR), hvor man inden for korte tids- intervaller skal agere på

  13. Final Technical Report for Award # ER64999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metcalf, William W. [University of Illinois

    2014-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a summary of activities for Award # ER64999, a Genomes to Life Project funded by the Office of Science, Basic Energy Research. The project was entitled "Methanogenic archaea and the global carbon cycle: a systems biology approach to the study of Methanosarcina species". The long-term goal of this multi-investigator project was the creation of integrated, multiscale models that accurately and quantitatively predict the role of Methanosarcina species in the global carbon cycle under dynamic environmental conditions. To achieve these goals we pursed four specific aims: (1) genome sequencing of numerous members of the Order Methanosarcinales, (2) identification of genomic sources of phenotypic variation through in silico comparative genomics, (3) elucidation of the transcriptional networks of two Methanosarcina species, and (4) development of comprehensive metabolic network models for characterized strains to address the question of how metabolic models scale with genetic distance.

  14. Comparative activation of estrogen receptor alpha (er alpha) by endocrine disruptors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Fei

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    -dependent,. These results demonstrate that various ER ligands differentially activate ER? in breast cancer cells and transgenic mice, and their activities are dependent on ER? variants, promoter-, cell-context and selective use of different Sp proteins, suggesting...

  15. Corn Varieties in Texas : Their Regional and Seasonal Adaptation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangelsdorf, Paul C. (Paul Christoph)

    1929-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    presented in Progress Reports from Angleton, Denton, Beaumont, Troup, Beeville, Temple, Spur, Lubbock, Pecos, and Nacogdoches, and in Bulletin 276, "Corn Variety Experiments, Substation No. 3, Angleton." SCOPE OF THE BULLETIN Two of the most important... to both regional ' and seasonal variations. To determine the adaptation of varieties to these two influences a variety-date-of-planting test was instituted in 1918. This test has been conducted at eleven substations throughout the State, in most cases...

  16. The effect of stress cracked and broken corn kernels on alkaline processing losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, David Scott

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (~. 70, P&. 06). There were significant differences in COD and DML (KRATIO= 100) between highly damaged corn and the less damaged counterpart of the same hybrid. Stress cracked corn, however, only slightly increased COD and DML. The ease of pericarp... Sigruficance of Com and Cooking Parameters . . . LIST OF FIGURES Page Stress Crack, Pericarp, and Broken Kernel Damage of Corn . . Flow Chart of Procedutes and Differences Between Cook Methods I and H 21 24 Correlation between Thousand Kernel Weight...

  17. A Study of the Black and the Yellow Molds of Ear Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taubenhaus, J. J. (Jacob Joseph)

    1920-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    corn from t Lrne cause, it map be asserted that the Texas growers are sustaini yearly loss of $5,818,349. The thoughtful farmer will at once real the importance of being able to save this unnecessary waste. It sho~ be added that as far as the corn... that in some regions, practically every ear of sweet corn was damaged, and that throughout the entire country 70 to 90 per cer *Monthly Crop Reporter, .U. S. Department of Agriculture, 5:121-11 Dec. 1919. lt. 10, TLTURAL of the ears of field corn were...

  18. alkaline-pretreated corn stover: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stronach) 1931-01-01 68 Researchers use corn waste to generate electricity Renewable Energy Websites Summary: to create hydrogen." The Penn State researcher and colleagues also...

  19. afex-treated corn stover: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stronach) 1931-01-01 68 Researchers use corn waste to generate electricity Renewable Energy Websites Summary: to create hydrogen." The Penn State researcher and colleagues also...

  20. CORN DEVELOPMENT AND KEY GROWTH STAGES Brent Bean and Carl Patrick, Extension Agronomist and Entomologist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    CORN DEVELOPMENT AND KEY GROWTH STAGES Brent Bean and Carl Patrick, Extension Agronomist to have the soil profile full of water prior to tas

  1. Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

  2. Electron spin resonance study of Er-concentration effect in GaAs;Er,O containing charge carriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmasry, F. [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Okubo, S. [Molecular Photoscience Research Center, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Ohta, H., E-mail: hoht@kobe-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Molecular Photoscience Research Center, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Fujiwara, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Er-concentration effect in GaAs;Er,O containing charge carriers (n-type, high resistance, p-type) has been studied by X-band Electron spin resonance (ESR) at low temperature (4.7?K?Er,O without carrier. The local structure around Er-2O centers is not affected by carriers because similar angular dependence of g-values was observed in both cases (with/without carrier). For temperature dependence, linewidth and lineshape analysis suggested the existence of Er dimers with antiferromagnetic exchange interaction of about 7?K. Moreover, drastic decrease of ESR intensity for C signal in p-type sample was observed and it correlates with the decrease of photoluminescence (PL) intensity. Possible model for the Er-2O trap level in GaAs:Er,O is discussed from the ESR and PL experimental results.

  3. Balanced Ero1 activation and inactivation establishes ER redox homeostasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sunghwan

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) provides an environment optimized for oxidative protein folding through the action of Ero1p, which generates disulfide bonds, and Pdi1p, which receives disulfide bonds from Ero1p and transfers ...

  4. Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbas, Charles; Beery, Kyle; Orth, Rick; Zacher, Alan

    2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE)-supported corn fiber conversion project, “Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation” is to develop and demonstrate an integrated, economical process for the separation of corn fiber into its principal components to produce higher value-added fuel (ethanol and biodiesel), nutraceuticals (phytosterols), chemicals (polyols), and animal feed (corn fiber molasses). This project has successfully demonstrated the corn fiber conversion process on the pilot scale, and ensured that the process will integrate well into existing ADM corn wet-mills. This process involves hydrolyzing the corn fiber to solubilize 50% of the corn fiber as oligosaccharides and soluble protein. The solubilized fiber is removed and the remaining fiber residue is solvent extracted to remove the corn fiber oil, which contains valuable phytosterols. The extracted oil is refined to separate the phytosterols and the remaining oil is converted to biodiesel. The de-oiled fiber is enzymatically hydrolyzed and remixed with the soluble oligosaccharides in a fermentation vessel where it is fermented by a recombinant yeast, which is capable of fermenting the glucose and xylose to produce ethanol. The fermentation broth is distilled to remove the ethanol. The stillage is centrifuged to separate the yeast cell mass from the soluble components. The yeast cell mass is sold as a high-protein yeast cream and the remaining sugars in the stillage can be purified to produce a feedstock for catalytic conversion of the sugars to polyols (mainly ethylene glycol and propylene glycol) if desirable. The remaining materials from the purification step and any materials remaining after catalytic conversion are concentrated and sold as a corn fiber molasses. Additional high-value products are being investigated for the use of the corn fiber as a dietary fiber sources.

  5. The conversion of corn stover and pig manure to carboxylic acids with the MixAlco process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Amanda Spring

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    of these processes to a feedstock of corn stover and pig manure. During fermentation, corn stover was the energy source (carbohydrates) and pig manure was the nutrient source (vitamins, minerals, and growth factors). A countercurrent fermentation procedure...

  6. Increasing corn for biofuel production reduces biocontrol services in agricultural landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    November 5, 2008 (received for review May 22, 2008) Increased demand for corn grain as an ethanol feedstock of cellulosic ethanol production processes that use a variety of feedstocks could foster increased diversity has driven a rapid expansion of the corn ethanol industry in the United States. Continuing growth

  7. Global Indirect Effects of U.S. Corn Ethanol Production: A Review of the Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    Global Indirect Effects of U.S. Corn Ethanol Production: A Review of the Evidence Energy security) requires 36 billion gallons of ethanol by 2022 to replace about 20 percent of U.S. gasoline consumption. Since 2001 ethanol produc- tion, mainly from corn, has increased dramatically at an annual average

  8. Summary of findings from the Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation (CAFI): corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    employed to develop comparative sugar yield data for each pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis (CAFI): corn stover pretreatment Richard T. Elander Æ Bruce E. Dale Æ Mark Holtzapple Æ Michael R, has devel- oped comparative data on the conversion of corn stover to sugars by several leading

  9. Coproducts From Corn Processing 47 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 128, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Increased demand for ethanol as a fuel additive has resulted in dramatic growth in ethanol production production was 3 billion gal/yr (1). Much of the fuel ethanol production capacity in the United States. Ethanol is produced from corn by either wet milling or dry-grind processing. In wet milling, the corn

  10. M. Lelic 12/7/99 1CORNING Inc. L 5033PRE PID Controllers in Nineties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gajic, Zoran

    M. Lelic 12/7/99 1CORNING Inc. L 5033PRE PID Controllers in Nineties Muhidin Lelic CorningOverview Purpose: extract the essence of the most recent development of PID control Based on the survey of papers-Nichols based PIDs (10) Frequency domain based PIDs (22) Relay based PIDs (29) Optimization methods based PIDs

  11. 16 CSA News March 2013 thanol from corn has been the primary biofuel for liq-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    16 CSA News March 2013 E thanol from corn has been the primary biofuel for liq- uid fuels in the United States, but perennial cellulosic biofuels are on the horizon. Intensive corn production with large of nitrogen losses on large, tile-drained fields planted with perennial biofuels in the Midwest of the United

  12. Effects of barley flour and beta-glucans in corn tortillas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silva, Laura

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of b-glucan on corn tortilla texture were evaluated. Barley flour (9.7% b-glucan) was substituted at 2.5, 5 and 10% for dry masa flour in corn tortillas. Texture was evaluated after 4 hr and up to 7 d storage ...

  13. Ecology and Management of the Western Bean Cutworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Corn and Dry Beans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Ecology and Management of the Western Bean Cutworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Corn and Dry Beans Lansing MI 48824. J. Integ. Pest Mngmt. 1(1): 2010; DOI: 10.1603/IPM10003 ABSTRACT. The western bean mainly on corn and dry beans. The historical geographic range of the western bean cutworm covered

  14. Influence of Genetic Background on Anthocyanin and Co-Pigment Profile and Stability of Colored Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collison, Amy Elizabeth

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    stability of several experimental hybrid varieties of corn from four phenotypes (red, purple, blue, and red/blue). The goal was to determine if genetics/phenotype can be utilized to selectively breed for pigmented corn lines with greater stability during...

  15. The effect of CO regulations on the cost of corn ethanol production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    The effect of CO 2 regulations on the cost of corn ethanol production This article has been) 024003 (9pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/3/2/024003 The effect of CO2 regulations on the cost of corn ethanol the effect of CO2 price on the effective cost of ethanol production we have developed a model that integrates

  16. Evaluation of mixing characteristics of corn dry masa flours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lobeira Massu, Rodrigo

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by loyd . Roon (Chair of Com ' ee) Ronald L. Richter (Member) Ralph D. Waniska (Member) ert Almeida-Dominguez (Member) ry Acu (Chair, Food Science and Technology Faculty) E. C. A. Rung (Head... of the embryonic axis and the scutellum which functions as a nutritive organ for the embryo. The germ makes up 10-12% of the kernel dry weight. About 85'/o of the lipids in corn are in the germ which has a lipid concentration of 30-38'%%d . Mos t lipid sar e fre...

  17. Dow Corning Europe S A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict ofDongjin Semichem CoDow Corning Europe S A

  18. Robbins Corn & Bulk Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to: navigation, searchRobbins Corn & Bulk

  19. South Corning, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, NewSingaporeSonix Japan IncInformation SouthHeights,Corning,

  20. Corn LP formerly Central Iowa Renewable Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers| Open EnergyAl.,A,CorixBeltCorn

  1. Little Sioux Corn Processors LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin ZhongdiantouLichuan CityLiqcrytech LLC JumpListLittle Sioux Corn

  2. Gene Controls Flowering Time in Corn - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFundingGene Controls Flowering Time in Corn Great

  3. Ash Reduction of Corn Stover by Mild Hydrothermal Preprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Toufiq Reza; Rachel Emerson; M. Helal Uddin; Garold Gresham; Charles J. Coronella

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignocellulosic biomass such as corn stover can contain high ash content, which may act as an inhibitor in downstream conversion processes. Most of the structural ash in biomass is located in the cross-linked structure of lignin, which is mildly reactive in basic solutions. Four organic acids (formic, oxalic, tartaric, and citric) were evaluated for effectiveness in ash reduction, with limited success. Because of sodium citrate’s chelating and basic characteristics, it is effective in ash removal. More than 75 % of structural and 85 % of whole ash was removed from the biomass by treatment with 0.1 g of sodium citrate per gram of biomass at 130 °C and 2.7 bar. FTIR, fiber analysis, and chemical analyses show that cellulose and hemicellulose were unaffected by the treatment. ICP–AES showed that all inorganics measured were reduced within the biomass feedstock, except sodium due to the addition of Na through the treatment. Sodium citrate addition to the preconversion process of corn stover is an effective way to reduced physiological ash content of the feedstock without negatively impacting carbohydrate and lignin content.

  4. Coordination of Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Signaling During Maize Seed Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boston, Rebecca S.

    2010-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Seed storage reserves represent one of the most important sources of renewable fixed carbon and nitrogen found in nature. Seeds are well-adapted for diverting metabolic resources to synthesize storage proteins as well as enzymes and structural proteins needed for their transport and packaging into membrane bound storage protein bodies. Our underlying hypothesis is that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response provides the critical cellular control of metabolic flux required for optimal accumulation of storage reserves in seeds. This highly conserved response is a cellular mechanism to monitor the protein folding environment of the ER and restore homeostasis in the presence of unfolded or misfolded proteins. In seeds, deposition of storage proteins in protein bodies is a highly specialized process that takes place even in the presence of mutant proteins that no longer fold and package properly. The capacity of the ER to deposit these aberrant proteins in protein bodies during a period that extends several weeks provides an excellent model for deconvoluting the ER stress response of plants. We have focused in this project on the means by which the ER senses and responds to functional perturbations and the underlying intracellular communication that occurs among biosynthetic, trafficking and degradative pathways for proteins during seed development.

  5. ER=EPR, GHZ, and the Consistency of Quantum Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard Susskind

    2014-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper illustrates various aspects of the ER=EPR conjecture.It begins with a brief heuristic argument, using the Ryu-Takayanagi correspondence, for why entanglement between black holes implies the existence of Einstein-Rosen bridges. The main part of the paper addresses a fundamental question: Is ER=EPR consistent with the standard postulates of quantum mechanics? Naively it seems to lead to an inconsistency between observations made on entangled systems by different observers. The resolution of the paradox lies in the properties of multiple black holes, entangled in the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger pattern. The last part of the paper is about entanglement as a resource for quantum communication. ER=EPR provides a way to visualize protocols like quantum teleportation. In some sense teleportation takes place through the wormhole, but as usual, classical communication is necessary to complete the protocol.

  6. Update of distillers grains displacement ratios for corn ethanol life-cycle analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arora, S.; Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production of corn-based ethanol (either by wet milling or by dry milling) yields the following coproducts: distillers grains with solubles (DGS), corn gluten meal (CGM), corn gluten feed (CGF), and corn oil. Of these coproducts, all except corn oil can replace conventional animal feeds, such as corn, soybean meal, and urea. Displacement ratios of corn-ethanol coproducts including DGS, CGM, and CGF were last updated in 1998 at a workshop at Argonne National Laboratory on the basis of input from a group of experts on animal feeds, including Prof. Klopfenstein (University of Nebraska, Lincoln), Prof. Berger (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), Mr. Madson (Rapheal Katzen International Associates, Inc.), and Prof. Trenkle (Iowa State University) (Wang 1999). Table 1 presents current dry milling coproduct displacement ratios being used in the GREET model. The current effort focuses on updating displacement ratios of dry milling corn-ethanol coproducts used in the animal feed industry. Because of the increased availability and use of these coproducts as animal feeds, more information is available on how these coproducts replace conventional animal feeds. To glean this information, it is also important to understand how industry selects feed. Because of the wide variety of available feeds, animal nutritionists use commercial software (such as Brill Formulation{trademark}) for feed formulation. The software recommends feed for the animal on the basis of the nutritional characteristics, availability, and price of various animal feeds, as well as on the nutritional requirements of the animal (Corn Refiners Association 2006). Therefore, feed formulation considers both the economic and the nutritional characteristics of feed products.

  7. Nutritional value of Quality Protein Maize, food and feed corn for starter and grower pigs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, James Scot

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    corn, 7. 6, , 29, . 054, 4. 01. Growth trials with starter (28-d duration, four pens of six pigs/diet, 6 kg initial weight) and grower (35-d duration, eight pens of two pigs/diet, 23 kg initial weight) pigs evaluated five diets, a QPM-soybean meal... diet formulated on a lysine basis (. 96g in starter and . 70g in grower diets) and four diets arranged in a 2 (food corn vs feed corn) X 2 (Iow vs high soybean meal) factorial, Soybean meal was added to provide the level in the QPM diet...

  8. A Five-Year Assessment of Corn Stover Harvest in Central Iowa, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas L. Karlen; Stuart J. Birell; J. Richard Hess

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainable feedstock harvest strategies are needed to ensure bioenergy production does not irreversibly degrade soil resources. The objective for this study was to document corn (Zea mays L.) grain and stover fraction yields, plant nutrient removal and replacement costs, feedstock quality, soil-test changes, and soil quality indicator response to four stover harvest strategies for continuous corn and a corn-soybean [Glycine max. (L.) Merr.] rotation. The treatments included collecting (1) all standing plant material above a stubble height of 10 cm (whole plant), (2) the upper-half by height (ear shank upward), (3) the lower-half by height (from the 10 cm stubble height to just below the earshank), or (4) no removal. Collectable biomass from Treatment 2 averaged 3.9 ({+-}0.8) Mg ha{sup -1} for continuous corn (2005 through 2009), and 4.8 ({+-}0.4) Mg ha{sup -1} for the rotated corn (2005, 2007, and 2009). Compared to harvesting only the grain, collecting stover increased the average N-P-K removal by 29, 3 and 34 kg ha{sup -1} for continuous corn and 42, 3, and 34 kg ha{sup -1} for rotated corn, respectively. Harvesting the lower-half of the corn plant (Treatment 3) required two passes, resulted in frequent plugging of the combine, and provided a feedstock with low quality for conversion to biofuel. Therefore, Treatment 3 was replaced by a 'cobs-only' harvest starting in 2009. Structural sugars glucan and xylan accounted for up to 60% of the chemical composition, while galactan, arabinan, and mannose constituted less than 5% of the harvest fractions collected from 2005 through 2008. Soil-test data from samples collected after the first harvest (2005) revealed low to very low plant-available P and K levels which reduced soybean yield in 2006 after harvesting the whole-plant in 2005. Average continuous corn yields were 21% lower than rotated yields with no significant differences due to stover harvest. Rotated corn yields in 2009 showed some significant differences, presumably because soil-test P was again in the low range. A soil quality analysis using the Soil Management Assessment Framework (SMAF) with six indicators showed that soils at the continuous corn and rotated sites were functioning at an average of 93 and 83% of their inherent potential, respectively. With good crop management practices, including routine soil-testing, adequate fertilization, maintenance of soil organic matter, sustained soil structure, and prevention of wind, water or tillage erosion, a portion of the corn stover being produced in central Iowa, USA can be harvested in a sustainable manner.

  9. Corn Meal in the Food Supply of Texans.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winters, Jet C.; Scoular, Florence I.; McLaughlin, Laura; Lamb, Mina W.; Whitacre, Jessie

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the non-enriched meal makes a variable contribution to the value of the corresponding enriched meal. TABLE 2. THIAMINE CONTENT OF CORN ME : ALS Mcg/g wet basis1 Kind of Non-enriched Enriche meal No. No. repli- Range Av. repli- Range Av. cations...-enriched Enriched Non-enriched Enriched bread No. repli- Range Avm NO. repli- Range cations Av. Range Av. Range Av. cations i Texas Tech. Sour milk Everlite 3 1.40 2 1.35 1.35 1.44 1.51 2.29 2.26 i::: 2.36 1.43 2.24 Aunt Jemima Sweet milk 1.28 1.40 2...

  10. Pahute Mesa Well Development and Testing Analyses for Wells ER-20-7, ER-20-8 #2, and ER-EC-11, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Ruskauff

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report analyzes the following data collected from ER-20-7, ER-20-8 No.2, and ER-EC-11 during WDT operations: (1) Chemical indicators of well development (Section 2.0); (2) Static hydraulic head (Section 3.0); (3) Radiochemistry and geochemistry (Section 4.0); (4) Drawdown observed at locations distal to the pumping well (Section 5.0); and (5) Drilling water production, flow logs, and temperature logs (Section 6.0). The new data are further considered with respect to existing data as to how they enhance or change interpretations of groundwater flow and transport, and an interim small-scale conceptual model is also developed and compared to Phase I concepts. The purpose of well development is to remove drilling fluids and drilling-associated fines from the formation adjacent to a well so samples reflecting ambient groundwater water quality can be collected, and to restore hydraulic properties near the well bore. Drilling fluids can contaminate environmental samples from the well, resulting in nonrepresentative measurements. Both drilling fluids and preexisting fines in the formation adjacent to the well can impede the flow of water from the formation to the well, creating artifacts in hydraulic response data measured in the well.

  11. Video Entity Resolution: Applying ER Techniques for Smart Video Surveillance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalashnikov, Dmitri V.

    buildings, smart grid, and so on. In this paper, we focus on smart surveillance systems wherein video improvements on how the building is used. One of the key challenges in building smart surveillance systemsVideo Entity Resolution: Applying ER Techniques for Smart Video Surveillance Liyan Zhang Ronen

  12. Economic Impact Report BInghamton UnIvERsIty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Economic Impact Report 2007 #12;BInghamton UnIvERsIty 8:1 return on investment The term "return will be returned to the state economy and $6 to the local economy -- delivering an economic impact of $8.65 billion as an engine of economic growth that improves the financial health of our region and state. EconomIc Impact

  13. ALGEBRA LINEAL I 1er Curso de CC. Fisicas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guijarro, Luis

    ´ALGEBRA LINEAL I 1er Curso de CC. F´isicas. Examen Final. 4 de Febrero de 2008. Apellidos: Nombre subespacio complementario de S1 S2. 4. Hallar la matriz en la base can´onica de una aplicaci´on lineal f : R

  14. Dette er en overskrift > Grn forskning -Status og perspektiver 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;> Grøn forskning - Status og perspektiver2 indhold forord 3 1. indledning 4 2. Danmark som Det er regeringens ambition at gøre Danmark til en grøn vækstnation. Vi har et godt udgangspunkt, men vision, at Danmark udvikler sig til et internationalt center for grøn forskning og innovation. Denne

  15. ccsd00001676, Epitaxy and growth of titanium bu er layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ccsd­00001676, version 1 ­ 16 Jun 2004 Epitaxy and growth of titanium bu#11;er layers on Al 2 O 3 de Lourmel, 75015 Paris, France Abstract The structure and growth of thin #12;lms of titanium on #11 [2110] and Ti[1010] k Al 2 O 3 [1100] epitaxy of the #11; phase of titanium reported before for thick

  16. Effects of material growth technique and Mg doping on Er{sup 3+} photoluminescence in Er-implanted GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.; Henry, R. L.; Wickenden, A. E.; Koleske, D. D.; Rhee, S. J.; White, J. O.; Myoung, J. M.; Kim, K.; Li, X.; Coleman, J. J. (and others)

    2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoluminescence (PL) and photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopies have been carried out at 6 K on the {similar_to}1540 nm {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}{endash}{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} emissions of Er{sup 3+} in Er-implanted and annealed GaN. These studies revealed the existence of multiple Er{sup 3+} centers and associated PL spectra in Er-implanted GaN films grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, hydride vapor phase epitaxy, and molecular beam epitaxy. The results demonstrate that the multiple Er{sup 3+}PL centers and below-gap defect-related absorption bands by which they are selectively excited are universal features of Er-implanted GaN grown by different techniques. It is suggested that implantation-induced defects common to all the GaN samples are responsible for the Er site distortions that give rise to the distinctive, selectively excited Er{sup 3+}PL spectra. The investigations of selectively excited Er{sup 3+}PL and PLE spectra have also been extended to Er-implanted samples of Mg-doped GaN grown by various techniques. In each of these samples, the so-called violet-pumped Er{sup 3+}PL band and its associated broad violet PLE band are significantly enhanced relative to the PL and PLE of the other selectively excited Er{sup 3+}PL centers. More importantly, the violet-pumped Er{sup 3+}PL spectrum dominates the above-gap excited Er{sup 3+}PL spectrum of Er-implanted Mg-doped GaN, whereas it was unobservable under above-gap excitation in Er-implanted undoped GaN. These results confirm the hypothesis that appropriate codopants can increase the efficiency of trap-mediated above-gap excitation of Er{sup 3+} emission in Er-implanted GaN. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Characterization and Combustion Performance of Corn Oil-Based Biofuel Blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savant, Gautam Sandesh

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    into biodiesel. It is well known vegetable oil to biodiesel conversion involves many processes including transesterification, which makes biodiesel costly and time-consuming to produce. In this study, the effects of blending high-viscosity fresh and used corn...

  18. BIOETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM WET OXIDSED CORN STOVER USING PRE-TREATED MANURE AS A NUTRIENT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIOETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM WET OXIDSED CORN STOVER USING PRE-TREATED MANURE AS A NUTRIENT SOURCE E for the production of bioethanol. This pre-treatment method, similar to other hot water pre-treatments, acts

  19. Iowa farmer hopes corn cobs will bring in extra cash | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    supply the United States with a biofuel that may have a promising future: cellulosic ethanol. He grows corn and soybeans at his farm in Cylinder, a little community of about 100...

  20. STA'n:MENT OF CONSIDERAT IONS REQUEST BY CORNING J 'CORP ORA...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    quality and performance of ceramic electrolyte members and developing th e manufac turing mea ns to dramatically lower their cost. CORNING 's success should enable PolyPus ' s...

  1. The effects of Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus (MDMV) on different corn hybrids (Zea mays L.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lammoglia Villagomez, Agustin

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus (MDMV) on different agronomic and grain quality characteristics of 106 corn hybrids. A randomized split-plot design with 3 replications was used. The virus isolate obtained...

  2. Tolerance and weed management systems in imidazolinone tolerant corn (Zea mays L.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Ann Marie

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of imidazolinone weed management systems and tolerance of imidazolinone tolerant corn to imazapic. Field experiments were conducted in 1997 and 1998 at the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station (TAES...

  3. Energy Efficiency Improvements and Cost Saving Opportunities in the Corn Wet Milling Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, C.; Worrell, E.

    Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry in the food and kindred products group (SIC 20). Plants typically spend approximately $15 to 25 million per year on energy, one of its largest operating costs, making energy efficiency...

  4. Antistaling properties of amylases, wheat gluten and CMC on corn tortilla 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bueso Ucles, Francisco Javier

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Antistaling properties of enzymes (xylanase, bacterial maltogenic and conventional a-amylases), CMC and vital wheat gluten on corn tortillas were evaluated during storage for up to 21 days. Effect of storage time (0-21 ...

  5. Comparative activation of estrogen receptor alpha (er alpha) by endocrine disruptors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Fei

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Estrogen receptor ? (ER?) is a ligand activated transcription factor. Many widely used synthetic compounds and natural chemicals can activate ER?. The compounds investigated in this study include 17?-estradiol (E2), diethylstilbestrol (DES...

  6. Structure-Based Virtual Screening for Plant-Based ER -Selective Ligands as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    * Department of Molecular Pharmacology & Toxicology and the Program in Neuroscience, School of Pharmacy. Two nuclear receptors for estrogen (ERs), ERR and ER , have been identified. In the central nervous

  7. Interrelationships among alternative export variables and their impacts on corn prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Somkid Tammakrut

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    export variable. Corn export sales data (collected by USDA since 1973) provide an additional source of information on export movements, thus offering an alternative export demand indicator. Data on commercial stocks at terminals and port elevators...). The primary objective of this study was to assess the impacts of these alternative export variables (sales, stocks, and shipments) on corn prices, and to investigate the dynamic interrelationships among these variables. The observations were carried out...

  8. Determination of total dietary fiber and resistant starch in processed corn and rice products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corujo Martinez, Juan Ignacio

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DETERMINATION OF TOTAL DIETARY FIBER AND RESISTANT STARCH IN PROCESSED CORN AND RICE PRODUCTS A Thesis by JUAN IGNACIO CORUJO MARTINEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree 'of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology DETERMINATION OF TOTAL DIETARY FIBER AND RESISTANT STARCH IN PROCESSED CORN AND RICE PRODUCTS A Thesis by JUAN IGNACIO CORUJO MARTINEZ Approved...

  9. Economic Impact of Harvesting Corn Stover under Time Constraint: The Case of North Dakota

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maung, Thein A.; Gustafson, Cole R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the impact of stochastic harvest field time on profit maximizing potential of corn cob/stover collection in North Dakota. Three harvest options are analyzed using mathematical programming models. Our findings show that under the first corn grain only harvest option, farmers are able to complete harvesting corn grain and achieve maximum net income in a fairly short amount of time with existing combine technology. However, under the second simultaneous corn grain and cob (one-pass) harvest option, farmers generate lower net income compared to the net income of the first option. This is due to the slowdown in combinemore »harvest capacity as a consequence of harvesting corn cobs. Under the third option of separate corn grain and stover (two-pass) harvest option, time allocation is the main challenge and our evidence shows that with limited harvest field time available, farmers find it optimal to allocate most of their time harvesting grain and then proceed to harvest and bale stover if time permits at the end of harvest season. The overall findings suggest is that it would be more economically efficient to allow a firm that is specialized in collecting biomass feedstock to participate in cob/stover harvest business.« less

  10. Life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emission impacts of different corn ethanol plant types.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Wu, M.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the United States began a program to develop ethanol as a transportation fuel, its use has increased from 175 million gallons in 1980 to 4.9 billion gallons in 2006. Virtually all of the ethanol used for transportation has been produced from corn. During the period of fuel ethanol growth, corn farming productivity has increased dramatically, and energy use in ethanol plants has been reduced by almost by half. The majority of corn ethanol plants are powered by natural gas. However, as natural gas prices have skyrocketed over the last several years, efforts have been made to further reduce the energy used in ethanol plants or to switch from natural gas to other fuels, such as coal and wood chips. In this paper, we examine nine corn ethanol plant types--categorized according to the type of process fuels employed, use of combined heat and power, and production of wet distiller grains and solubles. We found that these ethanol plant types can have distinctly different energy and greenhouse gas emission effects on a full fuel-cycle basis. In particular, greenhouse gas emission impacts can vary significantly--from a 3% increase if coal is the process fuel to a 52% reduction if wood chips are used. Our results show that, in order to achieve energy and greenhouse gas emission benefits, researchers need to closely examine and differentiate among the types of plants used to produce corn ethanol so that corn ethanol production would move towards a more sustainable path.

  11. Technical Report No. 480 CE: The Classi er Estimator Framework for Data mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalkilic, Mehmet

    Technical Report No. 480 CE: The Classi er Estimator Framework for Data mining Mehmet M. Dalkilic a coherent framework for data mining in the relational model. Observing that data mining depends on two. The classi er indicates the target of the data mining investigation. The classi er may be di cult to express

  12. 10 FUGLE O G N ATUR 0408 f alle vore rovfugle er Hedehgen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorup, Kasper

    Danmark, at et større antal fugle har fået vingemærker, men også i bl.a. Tyskland, Holland og Frankrig, og Afrika. Hedehøgen er blevet en sjælden fugl i Danmark, og den er gået tilbage i store dele af dens yngleområde, ikke mindst i Danmark. Vi er stort set på bar bund, når vi taler om, hvorvidt Hedehøgens

  13. ER Membrane Protein Complex Required for Nuclear Fusion Davis T.W. Ng and Peter Walter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Peter

    ER Membrane Protein Complex Required for Nuclear Fusion Davis T.W. Ng and Peter Walter Department is localized to the luminal (i.e., noncytoplasmic) face of the ER mem- brane, yet nuclear fusion must initiate of Sec63p, Sec71p, and Sec72p plays a central role in mediating nuclear mem- brane fusion and requires ER

  14. In and Out of the ER: Protein Folding, Quality Control, Degradation, and Related Human Diseases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hebert, Daniel N.

    In and Out of the ER: Protein Folding, Quality Control, Degradation, and Related Human Diseases 1377 C. Protein folding 1378 II. Protein Translocation, Folding, and Quality Control in the Endoplasmic Reticulum 1379 A. Protein targeting to the ER 1379 B. Chaperone-assisted protein folding in the ER 1379 C

  15. Aflatoxin resistance in selected maize (Zea mays L.) varieties as affected by corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea [Boddie]) infestation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uphoff, Michael Donald

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) in preharvest corn is a severe problem in some parts of the U. S. An experiment was designed to determine if the corn earworm (Heli~cov ~ yea a[Boddie]) was an effective vector of g. ~a and if damage caused by the insect predisposed maize varieties.... No differences among overall treatments were found. Apparently, treatment with corn earworm eggs was not effective in causing an increased amount of ear damage. Results showed there were statistically significant differences among varieties for inoculated...

  16. ALGEBRA LINEAL I 1er Curso de CC. Fisicas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guijarro, Luis

    ´ALGEBRA LINEAL I 1er Curso de CC. F´isicas. Examen Extraordinario. 14 de Septiembre de 2006 un vector u perpendicular a L. b) Hallar la matriz de la aplicaci´on lineal f : R3 R3 consistente en la simetr´ia ortogonal respecto al plano de ecuaci´on 2x+y = 0. (Se trata de la aplicaci´on lineal

  17. ALGEBRA LINEAL I 1er Curso de CC. Fisicas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guijarro, Luis

    ´ALGEBRA LINEAL I 1er Curso de CC. F´isicas. Examen Final. 9 de Febrero de 2006. Apellidos: Nombrex2 +10 = 0. 2. Dado el sistema de ecuaciones lineales: x -y +2z = 2 x +y -z = 1 2x +az = c 3x +y +bz la base can´onica de R2 de una aplicaci´on lineal de R2 en R2 , tal que f(1, 1) = (0, 1) f(-1, 1

  18. DRH/BPE/BDCS 1er PELICHET Marie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesbah, Mounir

    12ème GAYTE Marie 13ème REY Marie-Bénédicte 14ème CONILLEAU Claire 15ème ZOUAOUI Karen 1/12 #12 FAKERI TABRIZI Ali 22e ROMERO RAMIREZ Miguel 23e CREUS TOMAS Jordi 24e DUBOIS Swan 25e MOVAHEDI Zeinab 26 8ème PIERRE Juliette 9ème FRAS François 10ème BOUDET Sophie 11ème HAMIE Ali 1er MEYER Robert 2ème

  19. Final Report DE-FG02-07ER64416

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seymour, Joseph D.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The document provides the Final Report for DE-FG02-07ER64416 on the use of magnetic resonance (MR) methods to quantify transport in porous media impacted by biological and chemical processes. Products resulting from the research in the form of peer reviewed publications and conference presentations are presented. The research correlated numerical simulations and MR measurements to test simulation methodology. Biofilm and uranium detection by MR was demonstrated.

  20. Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 1: Cost of feedstock supply logistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supply of corn stover to produce heat and power for a typical 170 dam3 dry mill ethanol plant is proposed. The corn ethanol plant requires 5.6 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat, which creates the annual stover demand of as much as 140 Gg. The corn stover supply system consists of collection, preprocessing, transportation and on-site fuel storage and preparation to produce heat and power for the ethanol plant. Economics of the entire supply system was conducted using the Integrated Biomass Supply Analysis and Logistics (IBSAL) simulation model. Corn stover was delivered in three formats (square bales, dry chops and pellets) to the combined heat and power plant. Delivered cost of biomass ready to be burned was calculated at 73 $ Mg-1 for bales, 86 $ Mg-1 for pellets and 84 $ Mg-1 for field chopped biomass. Among the three formats of stover supply systems, delivered cost of pelleted biomass was the highest due to high pelleting cost. Bulk transport of biomass in the form of chops and pellets can provide a promising future biomass supply logistic system in the US, if the costs of pelleting and transport are minimized.

  1. Tunable, diode side-pumped Er: YAG laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Charles E. (Bellevue, WA); Furu, Laurence H. (Modesto, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A discrete-element Er:YAG laser, side pumped by a 220 Watt peak-power InGaAs diode array, generates >500 mWatts at 2.94 .mu.m, and is tunable over a 6 nm range near about 2.936 .mu.m. The oscillator is a plano-concave resonator consisting of a concave high reflector, a flat output coupler, a Er:YAG crystal and a YAG intracavity etalon, which serves as the tuning element. The cavity length is variable from 3 cm to 4 cm. The oscillator uses total internal reflection in the Er:YAG crystal to allow efficient coupling of the diode emission into the resonating modes of the oscillator. With the tuning element removed, the oscillator produces up to 1.3 Watts of average power at 2.94 .mu.m. The duty factor of the laser is 6.5% and the repetition rate is variable up to 1 kHz. This laser is useful for tuning to an atmospheric transmission window at 2.935 .mu.m (air wavelength). The laser is also useful as a spectroscopic tool because it can access several infrared water vapor transitions, as well as transitions in organic compounds. Other uses include medical applications (e.g., for tissue ablation and uses with fiber optic laser scalpels) and as part of industrial effluent monitoring systems.

  2. Tunable, diode side-pumped Er:YAG laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamilton, C.E.; Furu, L.H.

    1997-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A discrete-element Er:YAG laser, side pumped by a 220 Watt peak-power InGaAs diode array, generates >500 mWatts at 2.94 {micro}m, and is tunable over a 6 nm range near about 2.936 {micro}m. The oscillator is a plano-concave resonator consisting of a concave high reflector, a flat output coupler, a Er:YAG crystal and a YAG intracavity etalon, which serves as the tuning element. The cavity length is variable from 3 cm to 4 cm. The oscillator uses total internal reflection in the Er:YAG crystal to allow efficient coupling of the diode emission into the resonating modes of the oscillator. With the tuning element removed, the oscillator produces up to 1.3 Watts of average power at 2.94 {micro}m. The duty factor of the laser is 6.5% and the repetition rate is variable up to 1 kHz. This laser is useful for tuning to an atmospheric transmission window at 2.935 {micro}m (air wavelength). The laser is also useful as a spectroscopic tool because it can access several infrared water vapor transitions, as well as transitions in organic compounds. Other uses include medical applications (e.g., for tissue ablation and uses with fiber optic laser scalpels) and as part of industrial effluent monitoring systems. 4 figs.

  3. COMPLETION REPORT FOR WELL CLUSTER ER-5-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well Cluster ER-5-3 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This cluster of 3 wells was drilled in 2000 and 2001 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program in Frenchman Flat. The first borehole in the cluster, Well ER-5-3, was drilled in February and March 2000. A 47.0-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 374.8 meters. The hole diameter was decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 794.3 meters within welded ash-flow tuff. A piezometer string with 1 slotted interval was installed in the annulus of the surface casing, open to the saturated alluvium. A completion string with 2 slotted intervals was installed in the main hole, open to saturated alluvium and to the welded tuff aquifer. A second piezometer string with 1 slotted interval open to the welded-tuff aquifer was installed outside the completion string. Well ER-5-3 No.2 was drilled about 30 meters west of the first borehole in March 2000, and was recompleted in March 2001. A 66.0-centimeter hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 613.8 meters. The hole diameter was decreased to 44.5 centimeters and the borehole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 849.0 meters. The hole diameter was decreased once more to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,732.2 meters in dolomite. A completion string open to the dolomite (lower carbonate aquifer) was installed. Well ER-5-3 No.3 was drilled approximately 30 meters north of the first 2 boreholes in February 2001. A 66.0-centimeter hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 36.6 meters, then the main 25.1-centimeter-diameter hole was drilled to a total depth of 548.6 meters in alluvium. A slotted stainless-steel tubing string was installed in the saturated alluvium. A preliminary composite, static water level was measured at the depth of 282.6 meters, prior to development and hydrologic testing. Detailed lithologic descriptions and stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 120 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 91 meters in Wells ER-5-3 and ER-5-3 No.2, supplemented by geophysical log data. The wells penetrated Quaternary/Tertiary alluvium to the depth of 622.4 meters, and an 8.5-meter-thick basalt flow was encountered within the alluvium. Tertiary tuff was penetrated to the depth of approximately 1,425.9 meters, where the top of the lower carbonate aquifer was tagged in Well ER-5-3 No.2.

  4. Costs of Harvesting, Storing in a Large Pile, and Transporting Corn Stover in a Wet Form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corn stover is potentially an attractive biomass resource, but must be stored if used to supply a biorefinery year-round. Based on experience with successfully storing water-saturated large piles of bagasse for the pulping industry, Atchison and Hettenhaus (2003) proposed that such a system can also be applied to corn stover. Regardless of the technical feasibility of this system, in this article we estimate the cost of harvesting corn stover in a single pass with corn grain, delivering the chopped biomass to a storage pile, storing the stover in a wet form in a large pile at 75% moisture in a 211,700-dry Mg facility within a radius of 24 km from the field, and transporting the stover 64 km to a biorefinery. Field-ground corn stover can be delivered to a biorefinery by rail for $55 to $61/dry Mg. Truck transport is more expensive, $71 to $77/dry Mg. To achieve a minimum cost in the system proposed by Atchison and Hettenhaus, it is necessary to field densify stover to 74 dry kg/m3, without losing combine field efficiency, have a large storage pile to spread fixed costs of storage over enough biomass, and use rail transportation. Compared to storage in an on-farm bunker silo at $60/dry Mg, there are limited circumstances in which large pile storage has a cost advantage.

  5. The Energy Balance of Corn Ethanol: An Update. By Hosein Shapouri, James A. Duffield, and Michael Wang. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Office of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    #12;The Energy Balance of Corn Ethanol: An Update. By Hosein Shapouri, James A. Duffield.34. Keywords: Ethanol, net energy balance, corn production, energy. About the Authors Shapouri and Duffield . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Energy Balance Issue

  6. Elements of Dry-Grind Corn-Processing Streams 113 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 134, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of ethanol as a fuel additive, ethanol production has increased markedly in the past decade. Ethanol-grind corn process is one of two technologies used to convert corn into ethanol. In this process, all kernel with solubles; ethanol; dry-grind processing; stillage; syrup; element concentrations. #12;114 Belyea et al

  7. Field Experiments at College Station with Corn, Cotton and Forage Plants.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connel, J. H.; Clayton, James

    1896-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H O J Z m P O P m r i I [ F Z M?Seed from A. W. Burpee, Phila? delphia, Pa.; cost, $2.25 per half-bushel. Same as Waterloo Early Dent; roasting ear, June 14th; yield per acre, 35.8 bushels of corn. One hun? dred pounds shucked ear corn yield 88... medium size; yield per acre, 31.3 bush? els of com. One hundred pounds shucked ear corn yield 87.4 pounds grain. S H o Z t [ m F T H P C Z KF s O P mM?Seed from D. Landreth & Sons, Phila? delphia, Pa.; cost, $1.75 per half-bushel. A white flint...

  8. Lifetimes of negative parity states in {sup 168}Er

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genilloud, L. [Institut de Physique, Universite de Fribourg, Perolles, CH-1700 Fribourg, (Switzerland)] [Institut de Physique, Universite de Fribourg, Perolles, CH-1700 Fribourg, (Switzerland); Jolie, J. [Institut de Physique, Universite de Fribourg, Perolles, CH-1700 Fribourg, (Switzerland)] [Institut de Physique, Universite de Fribourg, Perolles, CH-1700 Fribourg, (Switzerland); Boerner, H. G. [Institut Laue-Langevin, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9, (France)] [Institut Laue-Langevin, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9, (France); Lehmann, H. [Institut Laue-Langevin, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9, (France)] [Institut Laue-Langevin, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9, (France); Becvar, F. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, CZ-180 00 Prague 8, (Czech Republic)] [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, CZ-180 00 Prague 8, (Czech Republic); Krticka, M. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, CZ-180 00 Prague 8, (Czech Republic)] [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, CZ-180 00 Prague 8, (Czech Republic); Zamfir, N. V. [WNSL, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States) [WNSL, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts 01610 (United States); Casten, R. F. [WNSL, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)] [WNSL, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the GRID method the lifetimes of 12 states belonging to four negative parity bands in {sup 168}Er were measured at the high flux reactor of the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL). For K{sup {pi}}=0{sub 1}{sup -} and K{sup {pi}}=2{sub 1}{sup -} bands the absolute E1 transitions are in agreement with those obtained within the framework of the sdf IBA-1 model and their octupole vibrational character is confirmed. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  9. Completion report for well ER-3-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-3-2 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project (NV ERP) at the Nevada Test Site. IT Corporation (IT) was the principal environmental contractor for the project. The roles and responsibilities of IT and other contractors involved in the project are described in the Raytheon Services Nevada (RSN) Drilling Program and the Underground Test Area Operable Unit Project Management Plan. The well will become part of the Underground Test Area (UGTA) monitoring well network.

  10. Factors affecting the efficiency of the mechanical corn picker in Mississippi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimbrough, Emmett Alexander

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . piciher s C~eett, Ph pt. hee nee ste-pes en hens Pets seethes e nle harvest approximately h75 acre pex. hour, depending on ths field con ditions and field cise General dimensions and s cificaticns, The machine weighs approxi mateIy 1~509 pounds...) picker net yield& {2) picker losses, (3) loose eax' losses x and (4) shelled cox?l losses s The last operation cr factor studied before the corn pickax' was operated in the corn plots wss to search for loose ears that, msy' have been knocked off...

  11. Factors affecting the efficiency of the mechanical corn picker in Mississippi 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimbrough, Emmett Alexander

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . piciher s C~eett, Ph pt. hee nee ste-pes en hens Pets seethes e nle harvest approximately h75 acre pex. hour, depending on ths field con ditions and field cise General dimensions and s cificaticns, The machine weighs approxi mateIy 1~509 pounds...) picker net yield& {2) picker losses, (3) loose eax' losses x and (4) shelled cox?l losses s The last operation cr factor studied before the corn pickax' was operated in the corn plots wss to search for loose ears that, msy' have been knocked off...

  12. Photoluminescence and positron annihilation spectroscopy investigation of (Ge, Er) codoped Si oxides deposited by magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heng, C. L.; Chelomentsev, E.; Peng, Z. L.; Mascher, P. [Department of Engineering Physics and Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada); Simpson, P. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the nature of violet-blue emission from (Ge, Er) codoped Si oxides (Ge+Er+SiO{sub 2}) using photoluminescence (PL) and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) measurements. The PL spectra and PAS analysis for a control Ge-doped SiO{sub 2} (Ge+SiO{sub 2}) indicate that Ge-associated neutral oxygen vacancies (Ge-NOV) are likely responsible for the major emission in the violet-blue band. For Ge+Er+SiO{sub 2}, both Ge-NOV and GeO color centers are believed to be responsible for the emission band. The addition of Er has a significant influence on the emission, which is discussed in terms of Er-concentration-related structural change in the Ge+Er+SiO{sub 2}.

  13. Sources of Corn for Ethanol Production in the United States: A Review and Decomposition Analysis of the Empirical Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Uria Martinez, Rocio [ORNL; Eaton, Laurence M [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of corn for ethanol production in the United States quintupled between 2001 and 2009, generating concerns that this could lead to the conversion of forests and grasslands around the globe, known as indirect land-use change (iLUC). Estimates of iLUC and related food versus fuel concerns rest on the assumption that the corn used for ethanol production in the United States would come primarily from displacing corn exports and land previously used for other crops. A number of modeling efforts based on these assumptions have projected significant iLUC from the increases in the use of corn for ethanol production. The current study tests the veracity of these assumptions through a systematic decomposition analysis of the empirical data from 2001 to 2009. The logarithmic mean divisia index decomposition method (Type I) was used to estimate contributions of different factors to meeting the corn demand for ethanol production. Results show that about 79% of the change in corn used for ethanol production can be attributed to changes in the distribution of domestic corn consumption among different uses. Increases in the domestic consumption share of corn supply contributed only about 5%. The remaining contributions were 19% from added corn production, and 2% from stock changes. Yield change accounted for about two-thirds of the contributions from production changes. Thus, the results of this study provide little support for large land-use changes or diversion of corn exports because of ethanol production in the United States during the past decade.

  14. Control of cell division by nutrients, and ER stress signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Jinbai

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    /glucose deprivation, elevated protein synthesis, expression of misfolded proteins and blocked secretory pathway (Lee, 1992). Mutations impairing the client protein folding or chemicals that disturb the protein folding can cause ER stress (Gething and Sambrook, 1992... cells have evolved specific signaling pathways and effector mechanisms to deal with ER stress. By the late 1980s, it had been known that there is a 13 specific link between manipulations that perturb protein folding in the ER and the induction...

  15. Specific features of the nonradiative relaxation of Er{sup 3+} ions in epitaxial Si structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kudryavtsev, K. E., E-mail: konstantin@ipmras.ru; Kryzhkov, D. I.; Antonov, A. V.; Shengurov, D. V.; Shmagin, V. B.; Krasilnik, Z. F. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The specific features of the nonradiative relaxation of Er{sup 3+} ions in Si:Er layers grown by sublimation molecular-beam epitaxy (SMBE) are studied. In Si:Er/Si diode structures containing precipitation-type emitting centers, a resonance photoresponse at the wavelength ? ? 1.5 ?m is observed, which is indicative of the nonradiative relaxation of Er3+ ions via the energy back-transfer mechanism. Saturation of the erbium-related photocurrent is for the first time observed at high temperatures. This allows estimation of the concentration of Er centers that undergo relaxation via the above-mentioned back-transfer mechanism (N{sub 0} ? 5 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup ?3}). In terms of order of magnitude, the estimated concentration N{sub 0} corresponds to the concentration of optically active Er ions upon excitation of the Si:Er layers by means of the recombination mechanism. The features of the nonradiative relaxation of Er{sup 3+} ions in Si:Er/Si structures with different types of emitting centers are analyzed.

  16. Completion Report for Well ER-2-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-2-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (formerly Nevada Operations Office), in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in February and March of 2003, as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit in the northeastern portion of the Nevada Test Site. Well ER-2-1 was drilled as part of the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit Phase I drilling initiative. The well is located in north central Yucca Flat within Area 2 of the Nevada Test Site, and provided information regarding the radiological and physical environment near underground nuclear tests conducted in a saturated volcanic aquifer setting. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 83 sidewall samples taken at various depths between 113.7 and 754.4 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, chemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 27 samples of drill cuttings. The well was collared in tuffaceous alluvium, and penetrated Tertiary-age tuffs of the Timber Mountain and Paintbrush Groups, Calico Hills and Wahmonie Formations, Crater Flat Group, Grouse Canyon Formation, before reaching total depth in the Tunnel Bed Formation.

  17. Completion Report for Well ER-8-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-8-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in October and November of 2002 as part of a Hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit in the northeastern portion of the Nevada Test Site. Well ER-8-1 is located at the north end of Yucca Flat approximately 580 meters south-southeast of the surface exposure of the Climax granitic intrusive. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters, and 21 sidewall samples taken at various depths between 351.1 and 573.0 meters, supplemented by incomplete geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, geochemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 22 samples of drill cuttings. Drilling began in tuffaceous alluvium, and the borehole penetrated Tertiary age bedded tuffs of the Volcanics of Oak Spring Butte and carbonate sediments of Paleozoic age, which were encountered at a depth of 334 meters. The borehole unexpectedly penetrated granite at the depth of 538.9 meters in which drilling was stopped. Contact metamorphic rocks and intrusive dikes associated with the Cretaceous-age granitic intrusive and at least one significant fault zone were encountered.

  18. Companies Participating in the 1996 Corn Performance Trials Company Brand Address

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    CARGILL HYBRID SEEDS CARGILL PO BOX 5645 MINNEAPOLIS MN 55440 DEKALB PLANT GENETICS DEKALB 3100 SYCAMORE MYCOGEN PO BOX 68 TULIA TX 79088 NORTHRUP KING CO. NORTHRUP KING PO BOX 959 MINNEAPOLIS MN 55440 PIONEER-6000 WILSON SEEDS, INC. WILSON PO BOX 391 HARLAN IA 51537 VIRGINIA CORN PERFORMANCE TRIALS IN 1996 Coordinated

  19. Companies Participating in the 1995 Corn Performance Trials Company Brand Address

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    MINNEAPOLIS MN 55440 CAVERNDALE FARMS INC. CAVERNDALE 1921 BLUEGRASS RD DANVILLE KY 40422-9293 DEKALB PLANT MINNEAPOLIS MN 55440 PIONEER HI-BRED INT., INC. PIONEER BRAND 1000 W JEFFERSON ST TIPTON IN 46072 SOUTHERN PO BOX 391 HARLAN IA 51537 VIRGINIA CORN PERFORMANCE TRIALS IN 1995 Coordinated by H. Behl, E. R

  20. Developing and Testing a Trafficability Index for Planting Corn and Cotton in the Texas Blackland Prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helms, Adam J.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    to producers because the high water holding capacity is a product of a high clay percentage. This research was aimed to develop and test an expert-based trafficabililty index, based upon soil moisture, for planting cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and corn (Zea...

  1. Fractionation of phenolic compounds from a purple corn extract and evaluation of antioxidant and antimutagenic activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedreschi, Romina Paola

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    anthocyanin-glucosides. Cyadinin-3glucoside was the main constituent (44.4 ?? 4.7%) followed by the acylated cyanidin-3-glucoside (26.9 ?? 8.0%). Other phenolic compounds present in the purple corn corresponded to protocatechuic acid, vanillic acid, and p...

  2. The Integrated Biorefinery: Conversion of Corn Fiber to Value-added Chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susanne Kleff

    2007-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides a summary of Michigan Biotechnology Institute's efforts to employ the corn fiber fraction of a dry grind ethanol plant as a feedstock to produce succinic acid which has potential as a building block intermediate for a wide range of commodity chemicals.

  3. Potential impact of Thailand's alcohol program on production, consumption, and trade of cassava, sugarcane, and corn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boonserm, P.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On the first of May 1980, Thailand's fuel-alcohol program was announced by the Thai government. According to the program, a target of 147 million liters of ethanol would be produced in 1981, from cassava, sugarcane, and other biomasses. Projecting increases in output each year, the target level of ethanol produciton was set at 482 million liters of ethanol for 1986. The proposed amount of ethanol production could create a major shift up in the demand schedule of energy crops such as cassava, sugarcane, and corn. The extent of the adjustments in price, production, consumption, and exports for these energy crops need to be evaluated. The purpose of this study is to assess the potential impact of Thailand's fuel-alcohol program on price, production, consumption, and exports of three potential energy crops: cassava, sugarcane, and corn. Econometric commodity models of cassava, sugarcane, and corn are constructed and used as a method of assessment. The overall results of the forecasting simulations of the models indicate that the fuel-alcohol program proposed by the Thai government will cause the price, production, and total consumption of cassava, sugarcane, and corn to increase; on the other hand, it will cause exports to decline. In addition, based on the relative prices and the technical coefficients of ethanol production of these three energy crops, this study concludes that only cassava should be used to produce the proposed target of ethanol production.

  4. Cellulase Adsorption and Relationship to Features of Corn Stover Solids Produced by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    ARTICLE Cellulase Adsorption and Relationship to Features of Corn Stover Solids Produced by Leading to sugars for fermentation to ethanol or other products, enzyme adsorption and its relationship to substrate acid, lime, and sulfur dioxide (SO2) pretreat- ments were measured at 48C. Langmuir adsorption para

  5. FARM NET INCOME IMPACT OF SWITCHGRASS PRODUCTION AND CORN STOVER COLLECTION FOR HEAT AND POWER GENERATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    GENERATION by Mitchell A. Myhre A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree and Corn Stover Collection for Heat and Power Generation Mitchell A. Myhre Advisor: Associate Professor. Last but not least I would like to thank my wife Lisa for her love and support. #12;iv Table

  6. GEOSPATIAL DECISION SUPPORT FOR SEED COMPANIES IN THE CORN BELT Marcus E. Tooze1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    GEOSPATIAL DECISION SUPPORT FOR SEED COMPANIES IN THE CORN BELT Marcus E. Tooze1 , S. Hatten2 , W in the seed industry, new applications emerge for mapping, analysis, and interpretation of cultivar. In addition, a geospatial framework was developed to identify the soil landscapes that had the best soil

  7. Wednesday, July 19, 2006 Researchers use corn waste to generate electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's process uses a microbial fuel cell to convert organic material into electricity. Previous work has shown compounds in the corn waste and these compounds can be fed to microbial fuel cells. The microbial fuel cells atoms that combine with the electrons and oxygen to form water. The microbial fuel cells were inoculated

  8. Direct application of West Coast geothermal resources in a wet-corn-milling plant. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The engineering and economic feasibility of using the geothermal resources in East Mesa, California, in a new corn processing plant is evaluated. Institutional barriers were also identified and evaluated. Several alternative plant designs which used geothermal energy were developed. A capital cost estimate and rate of return type of economic analysis were performed to evaluate each alternative. (MHR)

  9. Agricultural Robot Turning in the Headland of Corn Fields Jinlin Xue1,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of variable FOV of camera. A settled FOV has been always used in autonomous vehicles for field applications so robot in corn fields. 1. Introduction Since agricultural vehicle navigation based on machine vision was first proposed, methods based on machine vision have been studied extensively in agricultural vehicles

  10. Economic Analysis of Atoxigenic Mitigation Methods for Aflatoxin in Corn in Central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sampson, Jessica Sue

    2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    atoxigenic treatments and each case was simulated across a range of crop insurance options available to corn producers in Bell County. A total of 50 scenarios were simulated and compared based on net revenue. Results show atoxigenics do provide a monetary...

  11. MICHIGAN'S SOIL NITRATE TEST FOR CORN MSU SOIL AND PLANT NUTRIENT LAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    MICHIGAN'S SOIL NITRATE TEST FOR CORN MSU SOIL AND PLANT NUTRIENT LAB Michigan State University Extension Crop and Soil Sciences Department Michigan State University WHY TEST SOIL FOR NITRATES Nitrate testing of soil is an excellent and inexpensive way of evaluating the available nitrogen (N) status

  12. Membrane separation of solids from corn processing streams Tricia L. Templin a,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) 1536­1545 #12;requiring use of scrubbers and thermal oxidizers; exposure of coproducts to heat can are characterized by high water content. Removal of water and recovery of solids are major economic and logistical. Ultrafiltration of STW and SKW had little effect on water removal or solids recovery. Corn was processed

  13. Impact of surfactants on pretreatment of corn stover Qing Qing, Bin Yang 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    glycol 4000 during water-only or dilute acid pretreatment of corn stover at 140­220 °C were evaluated energy security, trade deficit, environmental, and economic issues that are becoming more urgent in light of declining petroleum reserves and increasing international demand for transportation fuels. However

  14. Forest Fuel Reduction Survey Analysis: Forest Administrators Cornelis F. de Hoop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Qinglin

    Forest Fuel Reduction Survey Analysis: Forest Administrators by Cornelis F. de Hoop Amith Hanumappa to seriously investigate and execute the methods required to carry out a successful fuel reduction project operations wherein fuel reduction is a primary management objective. Literature on this wave of activity

  15. A Review of "John Milton: Life, Work, and Thought" by Gordon Campbell and Thomas N. Corns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nardo, Anna K.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that no liberal scholar would waste his time on the kind of dross the antiquaries worked on? (356). By contrast, these two modern antiquaries turn dross into true coin. Campbell and Corns do for Milton?s prose what Barbara Lewalski did for Milton?s poetry...

  16. USDA Projections of Bioenergy-Related Corn and Soyoil Use for 2010-2019

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    biofuel policy and trends, and e) bioenergy impacts on U.S. grain prices are explained below. EconomicUSDA Projections of Bioenergy-Related Corn and Soyoil Use for 2010-2019 Daniel M. O through 2019 period included estimates of world and U.S. energy prices, ethanol and biodiesel production

  17. Imaging corn plants with PhytoPET, a modular PET system for plant biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.; Kross, B.; McKisson, J.; McKisson, J. E.; Weisenberger, A. G.; Xi, W.; Zorn, C.; Bonito, G.; Howell, C. R.; Reid, C. D.; Crowell, A.; Cumberbatch, L. C.; Topp, C.; Smith, M. F.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PhytoPET is a modular positron emission tomography (PET) system designed specifically for plant imaging. The PhytoPET design allows flexible arrangements of PET detectors based on individual standalone detector modules built from single Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes and pixelated LYSO arrays. We have used the PhytoPET system to perform preliminary corn plant imaging studies at the Duke University Biology Department Phytotron. Initial evaluation of the PhytoPET system to image the biodistribution of the positron emitting tracer {sup 11}C in corn plants is presented. {sup 11}CO{sub 2} is loaded into corn seedlings by a leaf-labeling cuvette and translocation of {sup 11}C-sugars is imaged by a flexible arrangement of PhytoPET modules on each side. The PhytoPET system successfully images {sup 11}C within corn plants and allows for the dynamic measurement of {sup 11}C-sugar translocation from the leaf to the roots.

  18. Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for corn refining plants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, G. A.; Decision and Information Sciences; USEPA

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing their plant's performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing facilities can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the corn refining industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for facilities that produce a variety of products--including corn starch, corn oil, animal feed, corn sweeteners, and ethanol--for the paper, food, beverage, and other industries in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for corn refining plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.

  19. Size reduction of high- and low-moisture corn stalks by linear knife grid system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Igathinathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Narayan, S. [First American Scientific Co.

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High- and low-moisture corn stalks were tested using a linear knife grid size reduction device developed for first-stage size reduction. The device was used in conjunction with a universal test machine that quantified shearing stress and energy characteristics for forcing a bed of corn stalks through a grid of sharp knives. No published engineering performance data for corn stover with similar devices are available to optimize performance; however, commercial knife grid systems exist for forage size reduction. From the force displacement data, mean and maximum ultimate shear stresses, cumulative and peak mass-based cutting energies for corn stalks, and mean new surface area-based cutting energies were determined from 4 5 refill runs at two moisture contents (78.8% and 11.3% wet basis), three knife grid spacings (25.4, 50.8, and 101.6 mm), and three bed depths (50.8, 101.6, and 152.4 mm). In general, the results indicated that peak failure load, ultimate shear stress, and cutting energy values varied directly with bed depth and inversely with knife grid spacing. Mean separation analysis established that high- and low-moisture conditions and bed depths 101.6 mm did not differ significantly (P < 0.05) for ultimate stress and cutting energy values, but knife grid spacing were significantly different. Linear knife grid cutting energy requirements for both moisture conditions of corn stalks were much smaller than reported cutting energy requirements. Ultimate shear stress and cutting energy results of this research should aid the engineering design of commercial scale linear knife gird size reduction equipment for various biomass feedstocks.

  20. 2001 4232 -0 Aerospace EngineeringBokadia and Valasek SEV ER E W EATH ER AV O ID AN C E

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valasek, John

    2001 ­ 4232 -0 Aerospace EngineeringBokadia and Valasek SEV ER E W EATH ER AV O ID AN C E U SIN G IN FO R M ED H EU R ISTIC SEAR C H AIAA-2001-4232 Sangeeta Bokadia and Dr. John Valasek Aerospace Engineering AIAA GN&C Conference, Montreal, Canada 7 August 2001 #12;2001 ­ 4232 -1 Aerospace Engineering

  1. The Future of Corn-Ethanol in Fuel Sector of United States from Environmental and Economic Standpoint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tulva, Arya Nath

    2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    per gallon to the cost. ? Corn production in the U.S. erodes soil about 12 times faster than the soil can be reformed and irrigating corn mines groundwater 25 percent faster than the natural recharge rate of ground water. The environmental system...-products. Shapouri and Graboski estimates NEV of 16,193 Btu/gal. They indicate that ethanol production utilizes abundant domestic energy supplies of coal and natural gas to convert corn into a premium liquid fuel that can replace petroleum imports by a factor of 7...

  2. Corn versus three sorghums grown under the same dryland conditions as feeds for growing-finishing swine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meadows, Doyle Gene

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ), received the same fertilisation rate and. were cleaned prior to feeding. The four gra, ins and the diets in which they werc used were designated. : corn, non-yellow sorghum (N-Y), hetero-yellow sorghum (H-Y) and yellow sorghum (Y). The grains...-Y sorghum to S. 02fo for the N-Y sorghum. Lysinc content was higher in corn than the average of the sorghums (0. 25 us. 0. 22fo). Corn had a. slightly higher gross energy value (8. 97 kcal/g) than the average of the sorghums (g. 94 kcal/g) which resulted...

  3. Corn versus three sorghums grown under the same dryland conditions as feeds for growing-finishing swine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meadows, Doyle Gene

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , (range of 8$. 5 to 102. 4 percent) the value of corn. A wide variation existed in effic'ency due to quality of' grain and protein supplements, creating a need for m &re identification of' ration constituents, More recent trials in which high quality... The data, indicates a 5. Pjo advantage in feed efficI. ency for corn over the average of the sorghum diets ($. 15 vs. 3. 27) . The advan- tage for corn in feed ef'ficiency is less than has been reported by Peo and. Hudman (1958), 11. II@; Danielson and...

  4. Pieter Kik OASIS Workshop, Italy 2002 Towards an Er doped Si nanocrystal sensitized WG laser -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kik, Pieter

    Pieter Kik ­ OASIS Workshop, Italy 2002 Towards an Er doped Si nanocrystal sensitized WG laser Physics Amsterdam, The Netherlands #12;Pieter Kik ­ OASIS Workshop, Italy 2002 Er fiber amplifiersSiO2 broad energy bands allowed abs(458nm) 2×10-16 cm2 use cheap pump diode? #12;Pieter Kik ­ OASIS

  5. Nearly quantum-noise-limited timing jitter from miniature Er:Yb:glass lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Ursula

    Nearly quantum-noise-limited timing jitter from miniature Er:Yb:glass lasers A. Schlatter, B. Rudin Received January 4, 2005 We report on nearly quantum-limited timing-jitter performance of two passively mode-locked Er:Yb:glass lasers with a repetition rate of 10 GHz. The relative timing jitter of both

  6. Exploiting Hysteresis in a CMOS Bu er Radu M. Secareanu, Victor Adler, and Eby G. Friedman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Eby G.

    tapered bu ers 2 6 have been proposed. Approaches for driving highly resis- tive RC lines for optimal placement, sizing, and power dissipation. A CMOS in- verter driving a distributed RC line is shown@ece.rochester.edu, adler@ece.rochester.edu, friedman@ece.rochester.edu Abstract| A high drive CMOS bu er circuit character

  7. PO*WW*ER mobile treatment unit process hazards analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, R.B.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to demonstrate that a thorough assessment of the risks associated with the operation of the Rust Geotech patented PO*WW*ER mobile treatment unit (MTU) has been performed and documented. The MTU was developed to treat aqueous mixed wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office sites. The MTU uses evaporation to separate organics and water from radionuclides and solids, and catalytic oxidation to convert the hazardous into byproducts. This process hazards analysis evaluated a number of accident scenarios not directly related to the operation of the MTU, such as natural phenomena damage and mishandling of chemical containers. Worst case accident scenarios were further evaluated to determine the risk potential to the MTU and to workers, the public, and the environment. The overall risk to any group from operation of the MTU was determined to be very low; the MTU is classified as a Radiological Facility with low hazards.

  8. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, M.J.

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth 675.1 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,524.0 meters. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of approximately 566.3 meters prior to installation of the completion string. One completion string with three isolated, slotted intervals was installed in the well. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 31 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 680 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Timber Mountain Group, the Paintbrush Group, the Calico Hills Formation, the Crater Flat Group, and the Volcanics of Quartz Mountain. The preliminary geologic interpretation of data from Well ER-EC-1 indicates the presence of a structural trough or bench filled with a thick section of post-Rainier Mesa lava. These data also suggest that this site is located on a buried structural ridge that may separate the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes.

  9. Carrier transfer from InAs quantum dots to ErAs metal nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haughn, C. R.; Chen, E. Y.; Zide, J. M. O.; Doty, M. F., E-mail: doty@udel.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Steenbergen, E. H.; Bissell, L. J.; Eyink, K. G. [AFRL/RXAN, Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Erbium arsenide (ErAs) is a semi-metallic material that self-assembles into nanoparticles when grown in GaAs via molecular beam epitaxy. We use steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence to examine the mechanism of carrier transfer between indium arsenide (InAs) quantum dots and ErAs nanoparticles in a GaAs host. We probe the electronic structure of the ErAs metal nanoparticles (MNPs) and the optoelectronic properties of the nanocomposite and show that the carrier transfer rates are independent of pump intensity. This result suggests that the ErAs MNPs have a continuous density of states and effectively act as traps. The absence of a temperature dependence tells us that carrier transfer from the InAs quantum dots to ErAs MNPs is not phonon assisted. We show that the measured photoluminescence decay rates are consistent with a carrier tunneling model.

  10. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Owens Corning Commercial Energy Calculator (OC-CEC) version 1.1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that Owens Corning Commercial Energy Calculator (OC-CEC) version 1.1 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  11. The effect of enzymes and hydrocolloids on the texture of tortillas from fresh nixtamalized masa and nixtamalized corn flour 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutierrez de Velasco, Arturo Carlos

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The texture of tortillas was improved by the addition of maltogenic amylase and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and guar gum to fresh masa from ground nixtamal (FNM) and nixtamalized corn flour (NCF) masa. Differences in the ...

  12. Comparison of lines of corn selected on Lufkin fine sandy loam and Norwood silt loam with and without commercial fertilizer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAfee, Thomas Edison

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COMPARISON OF LINES OF CORN SELE CTED ON LUFKIN FINE SANDY LOAM AND NORWOOD SILT LOAM WITH AND WITHOUT COMMERCIAL FERTILIZER A Dissertation By Thomas Edison MoAfee Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee Heac...Kor Department May, 1953 COMPARISON OF LINES OF CORN SELECTED ON LUFKIN FINE SANDY LOAM AND NORWOOD SILT LOAM WITH AND WITHOUT COMMERCIAL FERTILIZER By Thomas Edison McAfee 111 A Dissertation Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural...

  13. Quantifying Cradle-to-Farm Gate Life-Cycle Impacts Associated with Fertilizer used for Corn, Soybean, and Stover Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, S. E.

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fertilizer use can cause environmental problems, particular eutrophication of water bodies from excess nitrogen or phosphorus. Increased fertilizer runoff is a concern for harvesting corn stover for ethanol production. This modeling study found that eutrophication potential for the base case already exceeds proposed water quality standards, that switching to no-till cultivation and collecting stover increased that eutrophication potential by 21%, and that switching to continuous-corn production on top of that would triple eutrophication potential.

  14. Fuel ethanol produced from U.S. Midwest corn : help or hindrance to the vision of Kyoto?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Saricks, C.; Wu, M.; Energy Systems

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we examined the role of corn-feedstock ethanol in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, given present and near-future technology and practice for corn farming and ethanol production. We analyzed the full-fuel-cycle GHG effects of corn-based ethanol using updated information on corn operations in the upper Midwest and existing ethanol production technologies. Information was obtained from representatives of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, faculty of midwestern universities with expertise in corn production and animal feed, and acknowledged authorities in the field of ethanol plant engineering, design, and operations. Cases examined included use of E85 (85% ethanol and 15% gasoline by volume) and E10 (10% ethanol and 90% gasoline). Among key findings is that Midwest-produced ethanol outperforms conventional (current) and reformulated (future) gasoline with respect to energy use and GHG emissions (on a mass emission per travel mile basis). The superiority of the energy and GHG results is well outside the range of model noise. An important facet of this work has been conducting sensitivity analyses. These analyses let us rank the factors in the corn-to-ethanol cycle that are most important for limiting GHG generation. These rankings could help ensure that efforts to reduce that generation are targeted more effectively.

  15. Energy and greenhouse gas emission effects of corn and cellulosic ethanol with technology improvements and land use changes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Han, J.; Haq, Z; Tyner, .W.; Wu, M.; Elgowainy, A. (Energy Systems)

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of ethanol as a transportation fuel in the United States has grown from 76 dam{sup 3} in 1980 to over 40.1 hm{sup 3} in 2009 - and virtually all of it has been produced from corn. It has been debated whether using corn ethanol results in any energy and greenhouse gas benefits. This issue has been especially critical in the past several years, when indirect effects, such as indirect land use changes, associated with U.S. corn ethanol production are considered in evaluation. In the past three years, modeling of direct and indirect land use changes related to the production of corn ethanol has advanced significantly. Meanwhile, technology improvements in key stages of the ethanol life cycle (such as corn farming and ethanol production) have been made. With updated simulation results of direct and indirect land use changes and observed technology improvements in the past several years, we conducted a life-cycle analysis of ethanol and show that at present and in the near future, using corn ethanol reduces greenhouse gas emission by more than 20%, relative to those of petroleum gasoline. On the other hand, second-generation ethanol could achieve much higher reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. In a broader sense, sound evaluation of U.S. biofuel policies should account for both unanticipated consequences and technology potentials. We maintain that the usefulness of such evaluations is to provide insight into how to prevent unanticipated consequences and how to promote efficient technologies with policy intervention.

  16. Enzymatic Digestibility of Corn Stover Fractions in Response to Fungal Pretreatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Z. F.; Wan, C. X.; Shi, J.; Sykes, R. W.; Li, Y. B.

    2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Corn stover fractions (leaves, cobs, and stalks) were studied for enzymatic digestibility after pretreatment with a white rot fungus, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora. Among the three fractions, leaves had the least recalcitrance to fungal pretreatment and the lignin degradation reached 45% after 30 days of pretreatment. The lignin degradation of stalks and cobs was similar but was significantly lower than that of leaves (p < 0.05). For all fractions, xylan and glucan degradation followed a pattern similar to lignin degradation, with leaves having a significantly higher percentage of degradation (p < 0.05). Hydrolytic enzyme activity also revealed that the fungus was more active in the degradation of carbohydrates in leaves. As a result of fungal pretreatment, the highest sugar yield, however, was obtained with corn cobs.

  17. Development and evaluation of corn cooking procedures for the production of tortillas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Des Rosiers, Mary Candace

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    each cooking treatment. The texture of the tortillas was then measured by the Instron. Extent of gelatinization via enzyme susceptibility was negatively correlated with the Instron grain shear values. Amylograph peaks and particle size determination... Samples of Corn. Chemical Analysis. Preparation of Nixtamal Preparation of Masa. Preparation of Tortillas Evaluation of Particle Size Measurement of Gelatinization. Evaluation of Optimum Cook Time. Color Measurement and Subjective Tests Evaluation...

  18. Creating Reliable Data and Reporting to Support Strategic Energy Management at Corning Incorporated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garforth, P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Creating Reliable Data & Reporting to Support Strategic Energy Management at Corning Incorporated Industrial Energy Technology Conference May 20th, 2014 New Orleans, Louisiana Peter Garforth Garforth International llc Energy Managers’ Workshop ESL... relevant energy data to support Corporate performance targets ESL-IE-14-05-29 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 Performance Reporting Totals – Usage, Cost, GHG-Emissions Corp Division...

  19. Prececal, postileal and total tract starch digestion in ponies fed corn, oats, barley or sorghum grain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Fairfax Ferguson

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the foot during the acute disease . J. Equine Mad . and Surg. 2: 439. Householder, D. D. 1978. Prececal, postileal and total tract digestion and growth performance in horses fed concentrate rations containing oats or sorghum grain processed by crimping...PRECECAL, POSTILEAL AND TOTAL TRACT STARCH DIGESTION IN PONIES FED CORN, OATS, BARLEY OR SORGHUM GRAIN A Thesis by FAIRFAX FERGUSON ARNOLD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  20. Life-cycle assessment of corn-based butanol as a potential transportation fuel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Liu, J.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Butanol produced from bio-sources (such as corn) could have attractive properties as a transportation fuel. Production of butanol through a fermentation process called acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) has been the focus of increasing research and development efforts. Advances in ABE process development in recent years have led to drastic increases in ABE productivity and yields, making butanol production worthy of evaluation for use in motor vehicles. Consequently, chemical/fuel industries have announced their intention to produce butanol from bio-based materials. The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential life-cycle energy and emission effects associated with using bio-butanol as a transportation fuel. The study employs a well-to-wheels analysis tool--the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory--and the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} model developed by AspenTech. The study describes the butanol production from corn, including grain processing, fermentation, gas stripping, distillation, and adsorption for products separation. The Aspen{reg_sign} results that we obtained for the corn-to-butanol production process provide the basis for GREET modeling to estimate life-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. The GREET model was expanded to simulate the bio-butanol life cycle, from agricultural chemical production to butanol use in motor vehicles. We then compared the results for bio-butanol with those of conventional gasoline. We also analyzed the bio-acetone that is coproduced with bio-butanol as an alternative to petroleum-based acetone. Our study shows that, while the use of corn-based butanol achieves energy benefits and reduces greenhouse gas emissions, the results are affected by the methods used to treat the acetone that is co-produced in butanol plants.

  1. Recovery of Recombinant and Native Proteins from Rice and Corn Seed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilken, Lisa Rachelle

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    .5 precipitation and pH 6 adsorption and 2) pH 4.5 extraction and pH 6 adsorption in the presence of TRIS counter-ions. Both methods improved the binding capacity from 8.6 mg/mL to >25 mg/mL and maintained HuLZ purity. Processing of dry-milled corn germ to increase...

  2. Succinic Acid as a Byproduct in a Corn-based Ethanol Biorefinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MBI International

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    MBI endeavored to develop a process for succinic acid production suitable for integration into a corn-based ethanol biorefinery. The project investigated the fermentative production of succinic acid using byproducts of corn mill operations. The fermentation process was attuned to include raw starch, endosperm, as the sugar source. A clean-not-sterile process was established to treat the endosperm and release the monomeric sugars. We developed the fermentation process to utilize a byproduct of corn ethanol fermentations, thin stillage, as the source of complex nitrogen and vitamin components needed to support succinic acid production in A. succinogenes. Further supplementations were eliminated without lowering titers and yields and a productivity above 0.6 g l-1 hr-1was achieved. Strain development was accomplished through generation of a recombinant strain that increased yields of succinic acid production. Isolation of additional strains with improved features was also pursued and frozen stocks were prepared from enriched, characterized cultures. Two recovery processes were evaluated at pilot scale and data obtained was incorporated into our economic analyses.

  3. Completion Report for Wells ER-20-8 and ER-20-8#2 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Wells ER-20-8 and ER-20-8#2 were drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The holes were drilled in July and August 2009, as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of these wells was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. They may also be used as long-term monitoring wells.

  4. FUNDRAISING AND GIFT ACCEPTANCE University Policy No: ER4105 Classification: External Relations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    1 FUNDRAISING AND GIFT ACCEPTANCE University Policy No: ER4105 Classification: External Relations.01 For Gifts-in-kind to the Library or to the University of Victoria Art Collection, authority may be delegated

  5. Ingefr p tropiske er Af projektleder, seniorforsker, ph.d. Axel Dalberg Poulsen,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    og et stort øko- nomisk potentiale. I tropiske lande bruges mange flere arter end i Danmark. De Danmark. #12;242 Endvidere indsamledes frø, som senere er spiret i vækst- huse i Den Kongelige Botaniske

  6. Ris har udgivet en rapport om moderne bioenergi. Den slr fast, at biomasse er en

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ressource som vind, og at Danmark vil kunne spille en væsentlig rolle i udviklingen af den teknologi, der, både til det danske samfund og den øvrige verden. Samtidig er Danmark verdens største

  7. Influence of Bi on the Er luminescence in yttrium-erbium disilicate thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scarangella, Adriana [MATIS-IMM CNR, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Miritello, Maria, E-mail: maria.miritello@ct.infn.it [MATIS-IMM CNR, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Priolo, Francesco [MATIS-IMM CNR, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Scuola Superiore di Catania, Università di Catania, Via Valdisavoia 9, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of bismuth on erbium optical properties at 1.54??m has been investigated in yttrium-erbium disilicate thin films synthesized by magnetron co-sputtering and implanted with two Bi different doses. The Bi depth distribution and the evolution of its oxidation states after annealing treatments at 1000?°C in two atmospheres, O{sub 2} and N{sub 2}, have been investigated. It was found that only in O{sub 2} the Bi{sup 3+} valence state is prevalent, thanks to the enhanced Bi mobility in the oxidizing ambient, as demonstrated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. At lower Bi content, although the formation of Bi{sup 0} metallic nanoparticles that are deleterious non radiative channels for Er luminescence, efficient energy transfer from Bi to Er has been obtained only in O{sub 2}. It is due to the excitation of ultraviolet broad Bi{sup 3+} absorption band and the energy transfer to Er ions. We have evaluated that in this case, Er effective excitation cross section increased by a factor of 5 in respect with the one for direct Er absorption at 488?nm. At higher Bi dose, this mechanism is absent, but an increased Er optical efficiency at 1.54??m has been observed under resonant excitation. It is due to the contribution of a fraction of Er ions having an increased lifetime. This phenomenon is associated with the formation of Bi agglomerates, induced at higher Bi doses, which well isolate Er from non-radiative quenching centers. The increased decay time assures higher optical efficiency at 1.54??m.

  8. At skrive speciale eller ph.d.-afhandling p Ris er en mulighed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    forskningsmiljø- et. Det er en god ballast at have med i det senere karriereforløb". Når seniorforsker Jimmy Bak for Optik og Fluid Dynamik udbyder Jimmy Bak et forskningsprojekt som del af et ph.d.-studie. Projektet, der ugen. Side 11 >> E-mail: jimmy.bak@risoe.dk "Som vejleder vil jeg påstå, at udfor- dringen ikke kun er

  9. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-2A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Townsend

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-2A was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in January and February of 2000 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program in the Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Nevada Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 412.9 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,516.1 meters. One completion string with three isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static water level was measured at the depth of 228.0 meters, approximately two months after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 81 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 212 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, chemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 30 samples. The well was collared in rhyolite lava and penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Volcanics of Fortymile Canyon and the Timber Mountain Group. The preliminary geologic interpretation of borehole data indicates that this well was drilled within the margins of the buried Rainier Mesa and Ammonia Tanks calderas, and that caldera collapse in this area was deeper than expected, resulting in a section of Volcanics of Fortymile Canyon (caldera-filling deposit) that is much thicker than expected.

  10. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Townsend

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-4 was drilled for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the summer of 1999 as part of the U.S Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 263.7 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,062.8 meters. One completion string with three isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of 228.3 meters, two months after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 35 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 286.5 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well was collared in basalt and penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Thirsty Canyon Group, the Volcanics of Fortymile Canyon, and the Timber Mountain Group. The preliminary geologic interpretation of data from this well helps pinpoint the location of the western margin of the Timber Mountain caldera complex in the southern Nevada volcanic field.

  11. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-5 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the summer of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Nevada Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 342.6 meters below ground surface. The borehole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 762.0 meters. One completion string with three isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static water level was measured at the depth of 309.9 meters, 40 days after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 18 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 349.6 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data and results from detailed chemical and mineralogical analyses of rock samples. The well penetrated Tertiary-age tuffs of the Thirsty Canyon Group, caldera moat-filling sedimentary deposits, lava of the Beatty Wash Formation, and landslide breccia and tuffs of the Timber Mountain Group. The well reached total depth in welded ashflow tuff of the Ammonia Tanks Tuff after penetrating 440.1 meters of this unit, which is also the main water-producing unit in the well. The geologic interpretation of data from this well constrains the western margin of the Ammonia Tanks caldera to the west of the well location.

  12. Completion report for Well ER-EC-6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Townsend

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-6 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the DOE's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Nevada Test Site. A 66-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 485.1 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,524.0 meters. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of approximately 434.6 meters prior to installation of the completion string. One completion string with four isolated, slotted intervals was installed in the well. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 33 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 504.4 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Timber Mountain Group, the Paintbrush Group, the Calico Hills Formation, and the Volcanics of Quartz Mountain. Intense hydrothermal alteration was observed below the depth of 640 m. The preliminary geologic interpretation indicates that this site may be located on a buried structural ridge that separates the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes.

  13. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-7 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the summer of 1999 as part of the Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 265.8 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 422.5 meters. The planned depth of 762 meters was not reached due to borehole stability problems. One completion string with two isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of 227.8 meters, 20 days after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings, supplemented by geophysical log data, and incorporating data from detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples. Beneath a thin alluvial deposit, the well penetrated 410 meters of lava and bedded tuff of the Volcanics of Fortymile Canyon Group, deposited in the Timber Mountain caldera moat after caldera collapse. The geologic interpretation of data from this well provides information on the thickness, lithologic composition, and hydrogeologic character of moat-filling rocks in the southern portion of the Timber Mountain caldera complex in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field.

  14. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-8 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the summer of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Nevada Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 129.8 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 609.6 meters. One completion string with three isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static water level was measured at the depth of 98.4 meters, 24 days after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on evaluation of composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 20 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 157.9 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data and results of detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples. Drilling began in Tertiary-age tuff of the Thirsty Canyon Group, and penetrated tuffs of the Beatty Wash Formation, tuff of Buttonhook Wash, and the upper portion of the Ammonia Tanks Tuff. The geologic interpretation of data from this well helps define the location of the western margin of the Timber Mountain caldera complex in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field. Geologic and hydrologic data from the well will aid in development of models to predict groundwater flow and contaminant migration within and near the Nevada Test Site.

  15. Pahute Mesa Well Development and Testing Analyses for Wells ER-20-8 and ER-20-4, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Ruskauff and Sam Marutzky

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wells ER-20-4 and ER-20-8 were drilled during fiscal year (FY) 2009 and FY 2010 (NNSA/NSO, 2011a and b). The closest underground nuclear test detonations to the area of investigation are TYBO (U-20y), BELMONT (U-20as), MOLBO (U-20ag), BENHAM (U-20c), and HOYA (U-20 be) (Figure 1-1). The TYBO, MOLBO, and BENHAM detonations had working points located below the regional water table. The BELMONT and HOYA detonation working points were located just above the water table, and the cavity for these detonations are calculated to extend below the water table (Pawloski et al., 2002). The broad purpose of Wells ER-20-4 and ER-20-8 is to determine the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater, the geologic formations, groundwater geochemistry as an indicator of age and origin, and the water-bearing properties and hydraulic conditions that influence radionuclide migration. Well development and testing is performed to determine the hydraulic properties at the well and between other wells, and to obtain groundwater samples at the well that are representative of the formation at the well. The area location, wells, underground nuclear detonations, and other features are shown in Figure 1-1. Hydrostratigraphic cross sections A-A’, B-B’, C-C’, and D-D’ are shown in Figures 1-2 through 1-5, respectively.

  16. Electrospun nanofibers of Er{sup 3+}-doped TiO{sub 2} with photocatalytic activity beyond the absorption edge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Yali; Wang, Wenzhong, E-mail: wzwang@mail.sic.ac.cn

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Er{sup 3+}-doped TiO{sub 2} nanofibers with different Er{sup 3+} contents were prepared via electrospinning and characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, ultraviolet–visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and photocurrent measurement. Photocatalytic activities of the as-prepared samples were evaluated by the decolorization of methyl orange aqueous solution under simulated solar light irradiation. The results indicated that the photocatalytic activity of Er{sup 3+}-doped TiO{sub 2} nanofibers was much higher than that of the undoped one, and the optimal dosage of Er{sup 3+} at 1 mol% achieved the highest degradation rate. Moreover, the photocatalytic activity of Er{sup 3+}-doped TiO{sub 2} nanofibers under the irradiation of light with the wavelength beyond the absorption edge of TiO{sub 2} was explored by the decolorization of a dye, rhodamine B and the photodegradation of a typical colorless pollutant, phenol. The results further revealed the mechanism of the enhanced photocatalytic activity through Er{sup 3+} doping in TiO{sub 2} nanofibers. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: ?Er{sup 3+}:TiO{sub 2} nanofibers with different Er{sup 3+} contents were prepared via electrospinning. ?The photocatalytic activity of Er{sup 3+}:TiO{sub 2} was much higher than that of undoped one. ?Er{sup 3+}:TiO{sub 2} could be activated by the light with wavelength beyond the absorption edge.

  17. WMU Power Generation Study Task 2.0 Corn Cob Co-Combustion Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Much attention has been focused on renewable energy use in large-scale utilities and very small scale distributed energy systems. However, there is little information available regarding renewable energy options for midscale municipal utilities. The Willmar Municipal Utilities Corn Cob-Coal Co-Combustion Project was initiated to investigate opportunities available for small to midscale municipal utilities to "go green". The overall goal of the Project was to understand the current t'enewable energy research and energy efficiency projects that are or have been implemented at both larger and smaller scale and determine the applicability to midscale municipal utilities. More specific objectives for Task 2.0 of this project were to determine the technical feasibility of co-combusting com cobs with coal in the existing WMU boiler, and to identify any regulatory issues that might need to be addressed if WMU were to obtain a significant portion of its heat from such co-combustion. This report addresses the issues as laid out in the study proposal. The study investigated the feasibility of and demonstrated the technical effectiveness of co-combusting corn cobs with coal in the Willmar Municipal Utilities stoker boiler steam generation power plant. The results of the WMU Co-Combustion Project will serve as a model for other midscale utilities who wish to use corn cobs to generate renewable electrical energy. As a result of the Co-Combustion Project, the WMU plans to upgrade their stoker boiler to accept whole corn cobs as well as other types of biomass, while still allowing the fuel delivery system to use 100% coal as needed. Benefits of co-combustion will include: energy security, reduced Hg and CO2 air emissions, improved ash chemistry, potential future carbon credit sales, an immediate positive effect on the local economy, and positive attention focused on the WMU and the City of Willmar. The first step in the study was to complete a feasibility analysis. The feasibility analysis anticipated only positive results from the combustion of corn cobs with coal in the WMU power plant boiler, and therefore recommended that the project proceed. The study proceeded with a review of the existing WMU Power Plant configuration; cob fuel analyses; an application for an Air Quality Permit from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency to conduct the co-combustion test burns; identification of and a site visit to a similar facility in Iowa; an evaluation of cob grinding machines; and agreements with a corn grower, a cob harvester, and the City of Willmar to procure, harvest, and store cobs. The WMU power plant staff constructed a temporary cob feed system whereby the cobs could be injected into the #3 Boiler firebox, at rates up to 40% of the boiler total heat input. Test burns were conducted, during which air emissions were monitored and fuel and ash samples analyzed. The results of the test burns indicated that the monitored flue gas quality improved slightly during the test burns. The WMU was able to determine that modifications to the #3 Boiler fuel feed system to accept com cobs on a permanent basis would be technically feasible and would enable the WMU to generate electricity from renewable fuels on a dispatchable basis.

  18. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry within the food and kindred products group (SIC 20), using 15 percent of the energy in the entire food industry. After corn, energy is the second largest operating cost for corn wet millers in the United States. A typical corn wet milling plant in the United States spends approximately $20 to $30 million per year on energy, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs and increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy-price volatility. This report shows energy efficiency opportunities available for wet corn millers. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure and production of the corn wet milling industry and the energy used in the milling and refining process. Specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The report draws upon the experiences of corn, wheat and other starch processing plants worldwide for energy efficiency measures. The findings suggest that given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the corn wet milling industry while maintaining the quality of the products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as the applicability of these to different wet milling practices, is needed to assess the feasibility of implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

  19. Fattening Steers on Cottonseed Meal and Cottonseed Hulls With and Without Corn; The Influence of Age on Fattening Steers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, J. M. (John McKinley); Lush, Jay L. (Jay Laurence); Jones, James Hazlitt

    1923-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    111 llsteers Lot IV 10 steers Third thirty days. ..... 115.6C.S.M 274.6corn ......... 612.8 hulls. ....... 210.2C.S.M ..... 871.1 hulls. ....... I 3.54C.S.M ...... 8.41corn .......... 18.77 hulls. ........ 5.39C.S.M ...... 22.34 hulls.... ........ Lot I11 11 steers Lot IV 10 steers Fourth thirty days. $10.11 8.17 ...... 3.23C.S.M 10.41 corn.. ........ 23.21 hulls. ........ ...... 6.18C.S.M 26.54 hulls. ........ Lot 111 llsteers Lot IV 10 steers (If the steer with the abscess were...

  20. A comparison of silage and grain yields of four corn hybrids at three locations in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martelino, Rafael Agcaoili

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A (X)HPARISOM Of SILAGM AND GRAIN YI~ QF FODR ~ HYBRIDS AT THRE1'' LOGATIONS IM TzXAS A Thesis RAPAol, A. I JKThI, INO Approve as to stgrle aml content Qs (~chairmen of GcnsmLtt ( Haad Department June, 1&54 , ;. RY OF TE A v..., grain yield and lodging peroentage of four corn hybrids and three spacings& Tyler . . ~ 17 ') ~ bined analysis of varianoe of silage yields for the tmo locations ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 20 10. Combined analysis of varianoe of grain...

  1. Dust suppression characteristics of mineral oil when applied to corn, wheat, or soybeans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, David Don

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and must be added repeatedly. Several water applications could raise the mo i stu re content of grain to the point of encouraging mold growth. Peterson (1977) reported that an average worker wi 1 1 breathe from 4 to 10 m of air during an eight hour work... Jones, B. S. , Texas Al!M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Calvin B. Parnell, Jr. Corn, wheat, and soybean samples weighing 454 g each were treated with mineral oil at rates of 50, 100, 200, 400, and 600 ppm and grain dust...

  2. Effect of genotype on cooking and texture of corn for tortilla production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedolla, Santiago

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cell to measure n1xtamal texture . . . Plunger (A) and Ottawa cell (C) to measure tortilla texture Page 13 17 Effect of cook1ng time on n1xtamal texture of corneous, 1ntermediate and floury hybrids (Linear model) Effect of cooking time... composition of corn on the average is: water, 13. 5K; protein, 10K; oil, 4%; carbohydrates 70. 7X; and ash, 1. 4X. The germ contains about 35% oil, 20K protein and 10% ash (Hopkins et al. , 1903; Katz et al. , 1974). Nixtamal Preparation Nethods...

  3. Green emission from Er-doped GaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steckl, Andrew J.

    Green emission from Er-doped GaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si substrates R. Birkhahn and A grown by MBE on sapphire substrates. In this letter, we report on Er-doped GaN growth experiments on Si Er-doped -GaN thin films grown on Si 111 . The GaN was grown by molecular beam epitaxy using solid

  4. Effect of Enrichment on the Thiamine, Riboflavin and Niacin of Corn Meal and Grits as Prepared for Eating.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitacre, Jessie; Pace, June K.; Thomas, Kathreen

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects of Enrichment on the Thiamine, Riboflavin and Niacin of Corn Meal and Grits as Prepared for Eating [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] DIGEST This bulletin deals with the increase in the vitamin value of corn meal and grits dishes due... was as nearly as possible like Texas home procedure. Each prepar- ation was analyzed to find out how much of each vitamin was left in the cooked product. Approximately the same amount of riboflavin and niacin was in each preparation after cooking as before...

  5. Hairy Vetch, Bur Clover and Oats as Soil-Building Crops for Cotton and Corn in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, H. F. (Harry Forest); Johnson, P. R. (Paul Rufus); Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner)

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for soil improvement increased the average yields of cot- ton ancl corn about 40 percent at College Station for the 11 years, 1937-47. Vetch increased the average yield of cotton 75 to 84 percent and practically doubled the yield of corn at Tyler... yields of cotton than the use of 400 pounds of a 4-8-4 fertilizer per acre at Tyler and Nacog- doches. Hairy vetch was a better green-manure crop than oats at Tyler and oats or bur clover at Nacogdoches. The effects of plowing under hairy vetch lasted...

  6. The feasibility and profitability of short season corn and sorghum cropping systems on the Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vagts, Todd Anthony

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the U. S. , therefore, irrigation management, particularly with limited irrigation, is very critical (Howell et al. , 1989). Seasonal ET rates for corn range from 30. 8 to 39. 5 inches with corn yields varying from 132 bu/acre to 204 bu/acre (Eck... 80 bu/acre for grain only wheat and 70 bu/acre for graze-grain wheat. All phosphorous was applied in the fall. Fertilizer was applied in fifteen inch bands in the fall with a knife injector and was applied in granular form in the spring...

  7. Carrier transport properties of nanocrystalline Er{sub 3}N@C{sub 80}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yong, E-mail: sun@ele.kyutech.ac.jp; Maeda, Yuki; Sezaimaru, Hiroki; Sakaino, Masamichi [Department of Applied Science for Integrated System Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Senshuimachi, Tobata, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 804-8550 (Japan); Kirimoto, Kenta [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Kitakyushu National College of Technology, 5-20-1 shii, Kokuraminami, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 802-0985 (Japan)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical transport properties of the nanocrystalline Er{sub 3}N@C{sub 80} with fcc crystal structure were characterized by measuring both temperature-dependent d.c. conductance and a.c. impedance. The results showed that the Er{sub 3}N@C{sub 80} sample has characteristics of n-type semiconductor and an electron affinity larger than work function of gold metal. The Er{sub 3}N@C{sub 80}/Au interface has an ohmic contact behavior and the contact resistance was very small as compared with bulk resistance of the Er{sub 3}N@C{sub 80} sample. The charge carriers in the sample were thermally excited from various trapped levels and both acoustic phonon and ionic scatterings become a dominant process in different temperature regions, respectively. At temperatures below 250?K, the activation energy of the trapped carrier was estimated to be 35.5?meV, and the ionic scattering was a dominant mechanism. On the other hand, at temperatures above 350?K, the activation energy was reduced to 15.9?meV, and the acoustic phonon scattering was a dominant mechanism. In addition, a polarization effect from the charge carrier was observed at low frequencies below 2.0 MHz, and the relative intrinsic permittivity of the Er{sub 3}N@C{sub 80} nanocrystalline lattice was estimated to be 4.6 at frequency of 5.0 MHz.

  8. EFFECT OF ANATOMICAL FRACTIONATION ON THE ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF ACID AND ALKALINE PRETREATED CORN STOVER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Duguid; M. D. Montross; C. W. Radtke; C. L. Crofcheck; L. M. Wendt; S. A. Shearer

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to concerns with biomass collection systems and soil sustainability there are opportunities to investigate the optimal plant fractions to collect for conversion. An ideal feedstock would require low severity pretreatment to release a maximum amount of sugar during enzymatic hydrolysis. Corn stover fractions were separated by hand and analyzed for glucan, xylan, acid soluble lignin, acid insoluble lignin, and ash composition. The stover fractions were also pretreated with either 0, 0.4, or 0.8% NaOH for 2 hours at room temperature, washed, autoclaved and saccharified. In addition, acid pretreated samples underwent simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) to ethanol. In general, the two pretreatments produced similar trends with cobs, husks, and leaves responding best to the pretreatments, the tops of stalks responding slightly less, and the bottom of the stalks responding the least. For example, corn husks pretreated with 0.8% NaOH released over 90% (standard error of 3.8%) of the available glucan, while only 45% (standard error of 1.1%) of the glucan was produced from identically treated stalk bottoms. Estimates of the theoretical ethanol yield using acid pretreatment followed by SSF were 65% (standard error of 15.9%) for husks and 29% (standard error of 1.8%) for stalk bottoms. This suggests that integration of biomass collection systems to remove sustainable feedstocks could be integrated with the processes within a biorefinery to minimize overall ethanol production costs.

  9. Modification of Corn Starch Ethanol Refinery to Efficiently Accept Various High-Impact Cellulosic Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derr, Dan

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Corn-to-Cellulosic Migration (CCM) pilot facility was to demonstrate the implementation of advanced technologies and methods for conversion of non-food, cellulosic feedstocks into ethanol, assess the economics of the facility and evaluate potential environmental benefits for biomass to fuels conversion. The CCM project was comprised of design, build, and operate phases for the CCM pilot facility as well as research & development, and modeling components. The CCM pilot facility was designed to process 1 tonne per day of non-food biomass and biologically convert that biomass to ethanol at a rate of 70 gallons per tonne. The plant demonstrated throughputs in excess of 1 tonne per day for an extended run of 1400 hours. Although target yields were not fully achieved, the continuous operation validated the design and operability of the plant. These designs will permit the design of larger scale operations at existing corn milling operations or for greenfield plants. EdeniQ, a partner in the project and the owner of the pilot plant, continues to operate and evaluate other feedstocks.

  10. Modeled Impacts of Cover Crops and Vegetative Barriers on Corn Stover Availability and Soil Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian J. Bonner; David J. Muth Jr.; Joshua B. Koch; Douglas L. Karlen

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmentally benign, economically viable, and socially acceptable agronomic strategies are needed to launch a sustainable lignocellulosic biofuel industry. Our objective was to demonstrate a landscape planning process that can ensure adequate supplies of corn (Zea mays L.) stover feedstock while protecting and improving soil quality. The Landscape Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) was used to develop land use strategies that were then scaled up for five U.S. Corn Belt states (Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Minnesota) to illustrate the impact that could be achieved. Our results show an annual sustainable stover supply of 194 million Mg without exceeding soil erosion T values or depleting soil organic carbon [i.e., soil conditioning index (SCI)?>?0] when no-till, winter cover crop, and vegetative barriers were incorporated into the landscape. A second, more rigorous conservation target was set to enhance soil quality while sustainably harvesting stover. By requiring erosion to be <1/2 T and the SCI-organic matter (OM) subfactor to be >?0, the annual sustainable quantity of harvestable stover dropped to148 million Mg. Examining removal rates by state and soil resource showed that soil capability class and slope generally determined the effectiveness of the three conservation practices and the resulting sustainable harvest rate. This emphasizes that sustainable biomass harvest must be based on subfield management decisions to ensure soil resources are conserved or enhanced, while providing sufficient biomass feedstock to support the economic growth of bioenergy enterprises.

  11. Effect of pelleting on the recalcitrance and bioconversion of dilute-acid pretreated corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison E Ray; Amber Hoover; Gary Gresham

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Knowledge regarding the performance of densified biomass in biochemical processes is limited. The effects of densification on biochemical conversion are explored here. Methods: Pelleted corn stover samples were generated from bales that were milled to 6.35 mm. Low-solids acid pretreatment and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation were performed to evaluate pretreatment efficacy and ethanol yields achieved for pelleted and ground stover (6.35 mm and 2 mm) samples. Both pelleted and 6.35-mm ground stover were evaluated using a ZipperClave® reactor under high-solids, process-relevant conditions for multiple pretreatment severities (Ro), followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of the washed, pretreated solids. Results: Monomeric xylose yields were significantly higher for pellets (approximately 60%) than for ground formats (approximately 38%). Pellets achieved approximately 84% of theoretical ethanol yield (TEY); ground stover formats had similar profiles, reaching approximately 68% TEY. Pelleting corn stover was not detrimental to pretreatment efficacy for both low- and high-solids conditions, and even enhanced ethanol yields.

  12. The electroluminescence mechanism of Er³? in different silicon oxide and silicon nitride environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebohle, L., E-mail: l.rebohle@hzdr.de; Wutzler, R.; Braun, M.; Helm, M.; Skorupa, W. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Berencén, Y.; Ramírez, J. M.; Garrido, B. [Dept. Electrònica, Martí i Franquès 1, Universitat de Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Hiller, D. [IMTEK, Faculty of Engineering, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Georges-Köhler-Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare earth doped metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures are of great interest for Si-based light emission. However, several physical limitations make it difficult to achieve the performance of light emitters based on compound semiconductors. To address this point, in this work the electroluminescence (EL) excitation and quenching mechanism of Er-implanted MOS structures with different designs of the dielectric stack are investigated. The devices usually consist of an injection layer made of SiO? and an Er-implanted layer made of SiO?, Si-rich SiO?, silicon nitride, or Si-rich silicon nitride. All structures implanted with Er show intense EL around 1540 nm with EL power efficiencies in the order of 2 × 10?³ (for SiO?:Er) or 2 × 10??(all other matrices) for lower current densities. The EL is excited by the impact of hot electrons with an excitation cross section in the range of 0.5–1.5 × 10?¹?cm?². Whereas the fraction of potentially excitable Er ions in SiO? can reach values up to 50%, five times lower values were observed for other matrices. The decrease of the EL decay time for devices with Si-rich SiO? or Si nitride compared to SiO? as host matrix implies an increase of the number of defects adding additional non-radiative de-excitation paths for Er³?. For all investigated devices, EL quenching cross sections in the 10?²? cm² range and charge-to-breakdown values in the range of 1–10 C cm?² were measured. For the present design with a SiO? acceleration layer, thickness reduction and the use of different host matrices did not improve the EL power efficiency or the operation lifetime, but strongly lowered the operation voltage needed to achieve intense EL.

  13. Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U.S. Midwest Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    #12;Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U on a mass emission per travel mile basis, the corn-to-ethanol fuel cycle for Midwest-produced ethanol% of total domestic ethanol production. That is, while the model still covers all alternative fuels and five

  14. Soil compaction is a manageable factor that can lim-it grain or silage yield on many Virginia soils. Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Soil compaction is a manageable factor that can lim- it grain or silage yield on many Virginia soils. Corn plants growing on compacted areas are often stunted and have slower root penetration rates grown in these areas. Compaction is created when soil particles are pressed together, reducing the pore

  15. A Review of "The Complete Works of Gerrard Winstanley" edited by Thomas N. Corns, Ann Hughes, and David Loewenstein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Tom

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -modern English politics for some time to come. Thomas N. Corns, Ann Hughes, and David Loewenstein, eds. The Complete Works of Gerrard Winstanley. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009. Vol. I. xi+600pp. Vol. II. 465pp. $335. Review by tom hayes, baruch...

  16. As corn-based biofuels reach their practical limits, advanced algae-based biofuels are poised to supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisslein, Martin

    SEMTE abstract As corn-based biofuels reach their practical limits, advanced algae-based biofuels of Energy, General Electric, Algenol Biofuels, and Southern Company. Currently a post-doctoral fellow working for Algenol Biofuels, Dr. Lively is expanding his expertise in gas and liquid separations

  17. Current biofuel feedstock crops such as corn lead to large environmental losses of N through nitrate leaching and N2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    219 Current biofuel feedstock crops such as corn lead to large environmental losses of N through biofuel crops established on a rich Mollisol soil. Reduced Nitrogen Losses after Conversion of Row Crop Agriculture to Perennial Biofuel Crops Candice M. Smith, Mark B. david,* Corey A. Mitchell, Michael d. Masters

  18. Keeping Corn Farmers Seeing Green As recently as 100 years ago, farmers plowed their fields with horses and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and agencies such as U.S. Department of Agriculture have long relied on NOAA's weather and climate begins. The economic ties between climate information and agriculture are considerable. For example: Global Climate Change Impacts in the U.S., 2009) #12;impacts. Corn is particularly susceptible to heat

  19. Land Use and Water Efficiency in Current and Potential Future U.S. Corn and Brazilian Sugarcane Ethanol Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ethanol Systems Ethan Warner1, Yimin Zhang1, Helena Chum2 , Robin Newmark1 Biofuels represent technological learning, sugarcane and corn ethanol industries have achieved steady improvements in resource Scope Abstract Conclusions The GHG savings and land energy productivity of both ethanol systems have

  20. Owens Corning

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Residential Insulation, Frank O'Brien Bernini, VP & Chief Sustainability Officer, Paul Smith, VP Building Materials Group Marketing, John Libonati, VP Government and Public...

  1. Corn fodder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis, Geo. W. (George Washington)

    1891-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from stalks below; 4th best-or poorest plan of all-to strip leaves from entire stalk. PLAT 1. Tope cut, only, above eara 14.375 4.258 2.145 65.558 1.587 9.750 -- Protein ....................... Fat .......................... Crude Fibre...

  2. Owens Corning

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOfEnergyOutreach toOverviewOverview

  3. In tobacco leaf epidermal cells, the integrity of protein export from the endoplasmic reticulum and of ER export sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In tobacco leaf epidermal cells, the integrity of protein export from the endoplasmic reticulum and of ER export sites depends on active COPI machinery Giovanni Stefano1, , Luciana Renna1, , Laurent between COPI and COPII for the maintenance of ER protein export, the mechanisms by which COPI influences

  4. Vacancy-type defects in Er-doped GaN studied by a monoenergetic positron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uedono, A.; Shaoqiang, C.; Jongwon, S.; Ito, K.; Nakamori, H.; Honda, N.; Tomita, S.; Akimoto, K.; Kudo, H. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8573 (Japan); Ishibashi, S. [Research Institute for Computational Sciences, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8568 (Japan)

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A relationship between intra-4f transitions of Er and vacancy-type defects in Er-doped GaN was studied by using a monoenergetic positron beam. Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation were measured for Er-doped GaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy. A clear correlation between the defect concentration and the photoluminescence (PL) intensity was observed. The major defect species detected by positrons was identified as a Ga vacancy V{sub Ga}, and its concentration increased with increasing Er concentration [Er]. For the sample with [Er]=3.3 at. %, the maximum integrated intensity of PL was observed. The V{sub Ga} concentration was above 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and additional vacancies such as divacancies started to be introduced at this Er concentration. For the sample with higher [Er], the PL intensity decreased, and the mean size of vacancies decreased due to an introduction of precipitates and/or metastable phases.

  5. Ice Classification in the Southern Ocean Using ERS-1 Scatterometer David S.Early, David G. Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Ice Classification in the Southern Ocean Using ERS-1 Scatterometer Data David S.Early, David G for classifying Southern Ocean sea ice from enhanced resolution ERS-1 scat- terometer images is presented of a measure of the anisotropy, is used to further help delineate sea ice types. Ice 'l'ype Backscatter feange

  6. Towards an Er-doped Si nanocrystal sensitized waveguide laser the thin line between gain and loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polman, Albert

    somehow be eliminated from this scheme, the fabrication of low-cost Si based Er doped optical amplifiers1 Towards an Er-doped Si nanocrystal sensitized waveguide laser ­ the thin line between gain-doped Si nanocrystal co-doped SiO2, a composite material that can potentially be fabricated using a VLSI

  7. Defect production in strained p-type Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} by Er implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamor, M. [Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica and INPAC, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Physics, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 50, Muscat 123, Sultanate of Oman (Oman); Pipeleers, B.; Vantomme, A. [Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica and INPAC, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Auret, F. D. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strained p-Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} (x=5.3%, 10.2%, and 15.4%) was irradiated at room temperature with 160 keV {sup 166}Er{sup 2+} ions to a fluence of 1x10{sup 10} or 3x10{sup 13} Er/cm{sup 2}. The defects induced by ion implantation were investigated experimentally using high-resolution x-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering and channeling spectroscopy, and deep level transient spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction indicates that the damage induced by Er implantation produces a slight perpendicular expansion of the SiGe lattice. For all compositions, channeling measurements reveal that Er implantation in p-Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} to a fluence of 3x10{sup 13} Er/cm{sup 2} induces an amorphous region below the Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} surface. Annealing at 850 deg. C for 30 s, results in a reduction in damage density, a relaxation of the implantation-induced perpendicular expansion of the SiGe lattice in the implanted region, while a more pronounced relaxation of the compressive strain SiGe is observed for higher Ge content (x=0.10 and 0.15). On the other hand, for the annealed SiGe samples that were implanted with Er at the fluence of 10{sup 10} Er/cm{sup 2}, the compressive strain in the SiGe layer is nearly completely retained. Deep level transient spectroscopy studies indicate that two prominent defects with discrete energy levels above the valence band are introduced during Er implantation. Their activation energy was found to decrease with increasing Ge content. However, the relatively large local strain induced by high fluence Er implantation reduces the activation energy by 40 meV with respect to the low fluence Er implanted p-Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}. This shift (40 meV) in the activation energy remains constant regardless of the Ge content, suggesting that the Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} layers remained fully strained after Er implantation. The observed defects are further compared to those introduced by alpha particle irradiation and electron beam metal deposition. The results indicate that defects introduced by Er implantation have similar electronic properties as those of defects detected after electron beam deposition and alpha particle irradiation. Therefore, it is concluded that these defects are due to the Er implantation-induced damage and not to the Er species specifically.

  8. 500 ZENITNovEmbEr2010 Warmte-eilandeffect van de stad Utrecht

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandsma, Theo

    500 ZENITNovEmbEr2010 Warmte-eilandeffect van de stad Utrecht Foto: Eclipse Ballooning, www waargenomen opwarming van de aarde. Het KNMI heeft daarom mobiele metingen ver- richt in de stad Utrecht. De indicatie van het effect van het warmte-eiland van de stad Utrecht op de temperatuur in De Bilt. W armte

  9. Gain Improvement of Er-doped Amplifiers for the Feedback Filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Xiaomin

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    contrast between these two materials and the electro-optical properties of Ti: LiNbO3. Furthermore, waveguide gain is introduced through selective surface erbium (Er) doping which yields high quality loss-compensated or even amplifying waveguides without...

  10. Een robotvogel die zo natuurge-trouw vliegt dat andere vogels er

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Twente, Universiteit

    bewegen. Die spieren kun je niet allemaal nabootsen in een kleine robot. Dus komt er flink wat analyse aan te pas om toch een robot te ontwerpen die levensecht vliegt. Die van Nijenhuis vliegt op een accu en.clearflightsolutions.com DOOR Christian Jongeneel fOtOgRafie Gijs van Ouwerkerk spin-Off RObOtvOGel "In de varianten valk en

  11. RisNyt NO1 2005 "Det globale brintsamfund er et langsigtet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    bæredygtigt brint- samfund. Arbejdet udføres under European Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Platform, som er på vej med." Sådan beskriver afdelings- chef Hans Larsen budskabet fra International Hydrogen Day i Berlin, hvor han gaffeltruck. Amtet har bevilget 3,75 millioner kr. i årene 2004-2006 til Hydrogen Innovation & Research Centre

  12. 76 PostErs EMBnet.journal 19.B An ontology describing congenital heart defects data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    76 PostErs EMBnet.journal 19.B An ontology describing congenital heart defects data Charalampos interests: the authors have declared that no competing interests exist. Abstract Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are a group of diseases characterized by a structural anomaly of the heart that is pre- sent

  13. Synthesis of multiferroic Er-Fe-O thin films by atomic layer and chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mantovan, R., E-mail: roberto.mantovan@mdm.imm.cnr.it; Vangelista, S.; Wiemer, C.; Lamperti, A.; Tallarida, G. [Laboratorio MDM IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Chikoidze, E.; Dumont, Y. [GEMaC, Université de Versailles St. Quentin en Yvelines-CNRS, Versailles (France); Fanciulli, M. [Laboratorio MDM IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    R-Fe-O (R?=?rare earth) compounds have recently attracted high interest as potential new multiferroic materials. Here, we report a method based on the solid-state reaction between Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe layers, respectively grown by atomic layer deposition and chemical vapor deposition, to synthesize Er-Fe-O thin films. The reaction is induced by thermal annealing and evolution of the formed phases is followed by in situ grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Dominant ErFeO{sub 3} and ErFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases develop following subsequent thermal annealing processes at 850?°C in air and N{sub 2}. Structural, chemical, and morphological characterization of the layers are conducted through X-ray diffraction and reflectivity, time-of-flight secondary ion-mass spectrometry, and atomic force microscopy. Magnetic properties are evaluated by magnetic force microscopy, conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer, being consistent with the presence of the phases identified by X-ray diffraction. Our results constitute a first step toward the use of cost-effective chemical methods for the synthesis of this class of multiferroic thin films.

  14. Effect of Er doping on the structural and magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prathapani, Sateesh; Vinitha, M.; Das, D., E-mail: ddse@uohyd.ernet.in [School of Engineering Sciences and Technology, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Jayaraman, T. V. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanocrystalline particulates of Er doped cobalt-ferrites CoFe{sub (2?x)}Er{sub x}O{sub 4} (0???x???0.04), were synthesized, using sol-gel assisted autocombustion method. Co-, Fe-, and Er- nitrates were the oxidizers, and malic acid served as a fuel and chelating agent. Calcination (400–600?°C for 4?h) of the precursor powders was followed by sintering (1000?°C for 4?h) and structural and magnetic characterization. X-ray diffraction confirmed the formation of single phase of spinel for the compositions x?=?0, 0.01, and 0.02; and for higher compositions an additional orthoferrite phase formed along with the spinel phase. Lattice parameter of the doped cobalt-ferrites was higher than that of pure cobalt-ferrite. The observed red shift in the doped cobalt-ferrites indicates the presence of induced strain in the cobalt-ferrite matrix due to large size of the Er{sup +3} compared to Fe{sup +3}. Greater than two-fold increase in coercivity (?66?kA/m for x?=?0.02) was observed in doped cobalt-ferrites compared to CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (?29?kA/m)

  15. That which does not kill me makes me stronger: adapting to chronic ER stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedwell, David M.

    by activating signal transduction cascades that improve protein folding. One example of such a cascade is the unfolded protein response (UPR), which senses protein folding stress in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and leads to improvement in the protein folding and proces- sing capacity of the organelle. A central

  16. Global observations of UV-absorbing aerosols from ERS-2/GOME Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    Global observations of UV-absorbing aerosols from ERS-2/GOME Data Martin de Graaf Piet Stammes Absorbing Aerosol Index ­ Theory GOME AAI results Conclusions & Outlook #12; Absorbing Aerosol Index; Rayleigh (multiple) scattering clouds aerosols surface Top Of Atmosphere incoming radiation outgoing

  17. ? "Y SILF: WE,ASIiER ? Mailed Mov. 15, 1934 A Science Service Feature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of polr?er, t o the humidity and under extreme atmosi3heric conditions t?cy mount t o 30 per Cent. According t o the United States Bureau of Standards this idea sulting from the lubrication of the sprint be obtained under conditions of high humidity.a ( A l l rights reserved by Science Service, Inc,) u - - I

  18. Imrovements to Platt's SMO Algorithm for SVM Classi er Design 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keerthi, S. Sathiya

    Imrovements to Platt's SMO Algorithm for SVM Classi#12;er Design 1 S.S. Keerthi S.K. Shevade CÃ?ciency in Platt's Sequential Minimal Optimization (SMO) algorithm that is caused by the use of a single threshold have been suggested[9,4,7,3,6]. Platt's Sequential Minimization Algorithm (SMO)[9,11] is an important

  19. MinErAl prEpArAtion EnginEEring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    MinErAl prEpArAtion EnginEEring College of Engineering and Mines Department of Mining ­ 36 credits The mineral preparation engineering program offers specialization in the processes used to concentrate target minerals and remove undesir- able material from mined ore. Interdisciplinary study

  20. TOWARDS A SEMASIOLOGICAL ACCOUNT OF EVIDENTIALS: AN ENUNCIATIVE APPROACH OF ER IN MODERN WESTERN ARMENIAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    TOWARDS A SEMASIOLOGICAL ACCOUNT OF EVIDENTIALS: AN ENUNCIATIVE APPROACH OF ­ER IN MODERN WESTERN ARMENIAN Anaïd Donabédian Modern Western Armenian1 (henceforth MWA) has a specific form of completed past observed in MWA coincide with those found in descriptions of Balkan and Caucasian languages, commonly

  1. Environmental and Resource Studies Program Books, Maps & Videos Available For Use in ERS Courses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Michael

    Environmental and Resource Studies Program Books, Maps & Videos Available For Use in ERS Courses find and/or purchase it. We will try to accommodate every request, but resources are generally Bioenergetics 3.0 Focus on Peatlands and Peat Mosses Forest Ecology Forest Ecology- Foundation for Sustainable

  2. ALGEBRA LINEAL I 1er Curso de CC. Fisicas. Examen Final. 4 de Febrero de 2005.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guijarro, Luis

    ´ALGEBRA LINEAL I 1er Curso de CC. F´isicas. Examen Final. 4 de Febrero de 2005. Apellidos: Nombre aplicaci´on lineal f : R3 R3 tal que Kerf = Nf x -y = 0 y -z = 0 Imf x + 2y + 3z = 0. 4. Sean L, U y B

  3. Evaluation of ERS Scatterometer soil moisture products over a half-degree region in Southwestern France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . Based on a high resolution soil moisture simulation (1km²) validated at the local scale, the ERS in the water and energy exchanges between the land surface and the atmosphere. Several authors have shown027231 #12;Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sensors such as the AMSR-E radiometer (since 2002

  4. SMG on SMP Clusters: Performance Issues Sue Goudy, Lorie Liebrock, and Steve Scha#er

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SMG on SMP Clusters: Performance Issues Sue Goudy, Lorie Liebrock, and Steve Scha#er New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology Socorro, New Mexico 87801 spgoudy@nmt.edu February 3, 2003 Abstract be a high speed interconnect as in Intel Teraflops or some relatively slow connection such as ethernet

  5. Extending ER Models to Capture Database Transformations to Build Data Sets for Data Mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ordonez, Carlos

    transformation tables in abstract form can be useful not only for optimizing the generation of new data sets stages of data transformation, mathematical functions and the powerful SQL CASE statement, which doesExtending ER Models to Capture Database Transformations to Build Data Sets for Data Mining Carlos

  6. Multi-date ERS tandem interferogram analysis: application to alpine glaciers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Multi-date ERS tandem interferogram analysis: application to alpine glaciers Lionel Bombrun, Ivan P.landes@insa-strasbourg.fr Abstract--Temperate glaciers are an indicator of the local effects of global climate change. For economical to detect significant changes and to constrain glacier flow models. In this paper, five descending one

  7. 25RIS N Y T 2/01 Fremtidens mlle er stor og vindomsust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    avancerede forsknings- og udviklingsområder, vi overhovedet har i Danmark. siger Peter Hjuler Jensen (tv). Vi avancerede forsknings- og udviklingsområder, vi overhovedet har i Danmark. Man kan så glæde sig over, at Dan århundrede stædigt har holdt fast ved, at vindenergi er værd at satse på, står Danmark stærkt. Det gæl- der

  8. "Omprioriteringen af Riss forskningsvirke er en enestende chance for endelig at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at give Danmark et selvstændigt nationalt forskningscenter, der på én gang er forank- ret i grundforskning omprioriteringen af Risøs forsknings- virke betyder til gengæld en enestå- ende chance for endelig at give Danmark haft Danmarks udvikling på sinde Allerede i sine studieår, hvor Haldor Topsøe læste på Danmarks

  9. Indledning Velkommen til Microsoft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Side 4 Inspiration Vi er drevet af passion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Side 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Galen

    af software og it-løsninger . Siden 1990 har Microsoft været repræsenteret i Danmark, hvor vi i dag Danmark kombinerer det bedste fra to verdener: det ameri- kanske fokus på performance og talentudvikling,fleksibilitetogklaremålervoresDNA. Hos Microsoft Danmark er vi 450 medarbejdere med vidt forskellige baggrunde og kompetenc

  10. Salt Accumulation in the Loessial Sequence in the Be'er Sheva Basin, Israel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gvirtzman, Haim

    Salt Accumulation in the Loessial Sequence in the Be'er Sheva Basin, Israel MORDECKAIMAGARr / Evidence of climatic changes is recorded in the salt content of the surface sediments in arid zones, In wetter periods airborne salts are removed downward by leaching to the groundwater, whereas in drier

  11. Propostes temes del treball sobre ER Treball sobre una font d'energia renovable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batiste, Oriol

    Propostes temes del treball sobre ER Treball sobre una font d'energia renovable Estudi de l'estat de desenvolupament, la implantaci´o i evoluci´o hist`orica d'u- na font d'energia renovable concreta: · Solar fotovoltaica · Solar trmica · Biocombustibiles · Elica Treball sobre una tecnologia espec

  12. UC Santa Cruz Review / Fall 2005 17 er plants by converting waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yi

    UC Santa Cruz Review / Fall 2005 17 er plants by converting waste heat to electricity. But first's engine will be wasted as heat, while only one- third will actually be used to get you where you want so that "hot" electrons that have absorbed energy from a heat source can flow more easily than "cold

  13. Magnetism of Ho and Er Atoms on Close-Packed Metal Surfaces F. Donati,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thévenaz, Jacques

    Magnetism of Ho and Er Atoms on Close-Packed Metal Surfaces F. Donati,1 A. Singha,1 S. Stepanow,2 C; published 3 December 2014) We investigated the magnetic properties of individual Ho atoms adsorbed on the (111) surface of Pt, which have been recently claimed to display single ion magnetic behavior

  14. Excellent optical thermometry based on short-wavelength upconversion emissions in Er3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    Excellent optical thermometry based on short-wavelength upconversion emissions in Er3 Yb3 codoped (Doc. ID 175753); published November 22, 2012 Excited by a 980 nm laser, upconversion emissions coupled levels, which can emit the shortest wavelength emissions for optical thermometry known so far

  15. Melting of small Arctic ice caps observed from ERS scatterometer time series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Laurence C.

    Melting of small Arctic ice caps observed from ERS scatterometer time series Laurence C. Smith,1 of melt onset can be observed over small ice caps, as well as the major ice sheets and multi-year sea ice for 14 small Arctic ice caps from 1992­2000. Interannual and regional variability in the timing of melt

  16. Selective modification of the Er3 4 I112 branching ratio by energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polman, Albert

    an investigation of Er3 photoluminescence in Y2O3 waveguides codoped with Eu3 . As a function of europium show that this is due to an energy transfer from the 4 I11/24 I13/2 transition in erbium to europium/2 emission is obtained for europium concentrations between 0.1 and 0.3 at. %. In addition

  17. Comparison of Dow Corning 544 antifoam to IIT747 antifoam in the 1/240 SRAT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D.C.

    2000-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility requested that the Immobilization Technology Section compare the relative foaming tendencies of sludge simulant during simulated Chemical Processing Cell operations (HLW-DWPF-TTR-99-0012). Dow Corning 544 antifoam, currently used in DWPF, was compared to a new antifoam formulation developed at the Illinois Institute of Technology. A task plan was written and approved. The task plan deliverables included a recommendation on the choice of antifoam, an evaluation of the influence of solids concentration on foaming, an evaluation on the effect of boil-up rate on foaming, an estimate of the mass of steam stripped to remove 90 percent of the mercury, and a determination of the fate of mercury. Additional parameters to be investigated during experimentation included the maximum foam height observed, hydrogen generation rates, and nitrite destruction rates.

  18. Effects of feeding stimulant and insecticide mixtures on feeding response and morality of adult male corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie)(Lepidoptera:Noctuidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemens, Christopher Glen

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stimulants on feeding behavior and mortality of pheromone trap captured adult male corn earworms, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), to screen and evaluate toxicants for use in an attracticide formulation. Commercially-available formulations of acephate, boric acid...

  19. Effects of feeding stimulant and insecticide mixtures on feeding response and morality of adult male corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie)(Lepidoptera:Noctuidae) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemens, Christopher Glen

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stimulants on feeding behavior and mortality of pheromone trap captured adult male corn earworms, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), to screen and evaluate toxicants for use in an attracticide formulation. Commercially-available formulations of acephate, boric acid...

  20. Effect of reducing amino acid excess in a corn-soybean meal diet on performance, nitrogen balance and nutrient digestibilities of growing pigs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Katherine Ann

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF REDUCING AMINO ACID EXCESS IN A CORN-SOYBEAN MEAL DIET ON PERFORMANCE, NITROGEN BALANCE AND NUTRIENT DIGESTIBILITIES OF GROWING PIGS A Thesis by KATHERINE ANN KELLY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1988 Major Subject: Nutrition EFFECT OF REDUCING AMINO ACID EXCESS IN A CORN-SOYBEAN MEAL DIET ON PERFORMANCE, NITROGEN BALANCE AND NUTRIFNT DIGESTIBILITIES OF GROWING...

  1. Selective emission and luminescence of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} under intense laser excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchenko, V M; Studenikin, M I [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Iskhakova, L D [Fiber Optics Research Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The microstructure of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} polycrystals synthesised by laser heating is studied. The synthesis of erbium silicate (Er{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}) layers was observed upon interaction of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} melts. The dependences of the selective emission (SE) and luminescence spectra of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} polycrystals in the range 200 – 1700 nm on the intensity of laser-thermal (at the wavelength ? = 10.6 ?m) and resonant laser (? ? 975 nm) excitation are investigated. The emission of heated Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} polycrystals arises as a result of multiphonon relaxation of absorbed energy and is a superposition of the SE at the electronic-vibrational transitions of Er{sup 3+} ions and the thermal radiation of the crystal lattice. The shape of the SE spectra of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} polycrystals in the range 400 – 1700 nm almost does not change upon laser-thermal heating from 300 to 1500 K and subsequent cooling and corresponds to the absorption spectra of Er{sup 3+} ions. With increasing temperature, the thermal radiation intensity increases faster than the SE intensity, and the shape of the Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} spectrum becomes closer to the calculated spectrum of a blackbody. The anti-Stokes luminescence spectra of Er{sup 3+} ions formed under intense laser excitation of the {sup 4}I{sub 11/2} level are explained by additional SE caused by heating of the crystal matrix due to the Stokes losses. A difference between the SE and luminescence spectra is observed at low intensities of resonant laser excitation and low temperatures, when only the Stokes luminescence occurs. The temperature dependences of the SE and luminescence spectra of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} upon laser excitation testify to the fundamental role played by the interaction of the electronic f-shell of Er{sup 3+} ions with crystal lattice vibrations in the processes of multiphonon radiative and nonradiative relaxation. The laser-thermal synthesis is promising for inprocess variation of the chemical composition of rare-earth samples. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  2. High multi-photon visible upconversion emissions of Er{sup 3+} singly doped BiOCl microcrystals: A photon avalanche of Er{sup 3+} induced by 980?nm excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yongjin; Song, Zhiguo, E-mail: songzg@kmust.edu.cn; Li, Chen; Wan, Ronghua; Qiu, Jianbei; Yang, Zhengwen; Yin, Zhaoyi; Yang, Yong; Zhou, Dacheng; Wang, Qi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Under 980?nm excitation, high multi-photon upconversion (UC) emission from the {sup 2}H{sub 11/2}/{sup 4}S{sub 3/2} (green) and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} (red) levels of Er{sup 3+} ions were observed from Er{sup 3+} singly doped BiOCl microcrystals. These high-energy excited states were populated by a three to ten photon UC process conditionally, which depended on the pump power density and the Er{sup 3+} ion doping concentration, characterizing as a hetero-looping enhanced energy transfer avalanche UC process. UC emission lifetime and Raman analysis suggest that the unusual UC phenomena are initiated by the new and intense phonon vibration modes of BiOCl lattices due to Er{sup 3+} ions doping.

  3. Photonic crystal light emitting diode based on Er and Si nanoclusters co-doped slot waveguide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo Savio, R.; Galli, M.; Liscidini, M.; Andreani, L. C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pavia, Via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Franzò, G.; Iacona, F.; Miritello, M. [MATIS-IMM CNR and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Irrera, A. [CNR-IPCF, Viale Ferdinando Stagno d'Alcontres 37, 98158 Messina (Italy); Sanfilippo, D.; Piana, A. [ST Microelectronics, Stradale Primosole 50, 95121 Catania (Italy); Priolo, F. [MATIS-IMM CNR and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Scuola Superiore di Catania, Università di Catania, Via Valdisavoia 9, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the design, fabrication, and electro-optical characterization of a light emitting device operating at 1.54??m, whose active layer consists of silicon oxide containing Er-doped Si nanoclusters. A photonic crystal (PhC) is fabricated on the top-electrode to enhance the light extraction in the vertical direction, and thus the external efficiency of the device. This occurs if a photonic mode of the PhC slab is resonant with the Er emission energy, as confirmed by theoretical calculations and experimental analyses. We measure an increase of the extraction efficiency by a factor of 3 with a high directionality of light emission in a narrow vertical cone. External quantum efficiency and power efficiency are among the highest reported for this kind of material. These results are important for the realization of CMOS-compatible efficient light emitters at telecom wavelengths.

  4. Paleocene and Lower Eocene Ostracoda from the Umm er Radhuma Formation of Suadi Arabia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Furiah, A. A. F.

    1983-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    °53'24" E. to lat 27 0 59' N., long 45°2748" E.). The rate of deposition was greater to the north of the reference sec- tion, shown by the thickness in Safaniya W-3. The upper contact of the Umm er Rad- 2 The University of Kansas Paleontological... Contributions—Paper 107 Table 1. Thicknesses (in feet) of the Umm er Radhuma Formation based on Well Measurements. Well Lat. Long. Thick-ness ST-23 23°36' 51°17' 1,105 S-I132 23°44' 48°53' 1,130 G. Uthmaniyah VV-4 25°113' 49°00' 880 S-710 VVVV 25°13' 48°21' 680...

  5. Effect of plant populations and row spacings on plant and ear characters and grain yield of corn hybrids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silapapun, Anek

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    break- age and barren stalks increased with increase in population densities. Allessi and Power (2) also found that number of barren stalks increased and ear weight decreased with increased plant population. Bleasdale (7) proposed that if a crop...EFFECT OF PLANT POPULATIONS AND ROW SPACINGS ON PLANT AND EAR CHARACTERS AND GRAIN YIELD OF CORN HYBRIDS A Thesis by ANEK SILAPAPUN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

  6. Forecasting Mexican imports of U.S. corn, sorghum and soybeans under free trade and debt reduction scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyford, Conrad Power

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INFORMATION Mexican External Debt and Structural Adjustment U. S. - Mexico Agricultural Trade Commodity Specific Factors LITERATURE REVIEW Economic Integration and the Welfare Impacts of a FTA Modeling Methods METHOD OF ANALYSIS AND DATA Description... BACKGROUND INFORMATION To analyze corn, sorghum and soybean trade it is useful to outline several background factors. First, Mexican external debt and its impact on U. S. -Mexican agricultural trade will be discussed. Second, U. S. -Mexican agricultural...

  7. PROBLEMES ER (TERMODIN`AMICA) Els problemes proposats pretenen exemplificar les implicacions dels principis b`asics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batiste, Oriol

    PROBLEMES ER (TERMODIN`AMICA) Els problemes proposats pretenen exemplificar les implicacions dels principis b`asics de la termodin`amica en processos de conversi´o d'energia rellevants per a l

  8. Amorphous Diamond Flat Panel Displays - Final Report of ER-LTR CRADA project with SI Diamond Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ager III, Joel W.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Department of Energy under a CRADA (Cooperative Research andnm in size. Page 4 of 7 SIDT CRADA Final Report In order toFinal report of ER-LTR CRADA Project Lawrence Berkeley

  9. Response Surface Analysis of Elemental Composition and Energy Properties of Corn Stover During Torrefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Richard D. Boardman; Christopher T. Wright

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research studied the effects of torrefaction temperature (250-250 C) and time (30-120 minutes) on elemental composition and energy properties changes in corn stover. Torrefied material was analyzed for moisture content, moisture-free carbon (%), hydrogen (%), nitrogen (%), sulfur (%), and higher heating value (MJ/kg). Results at 350 C and 120 minutes indicated a steep decrease in moisture content to a final value of about 1.48% - a reduction of about 69%. With respect to carbon content, the increase was about 23%, while hydrogen and sulfur content decreased by about 46.82% and 66.6%, respectively. The hydrogen-to-carbon ratio decreased as torrefaction temperature and time increased, with the lowest value of 0.6 observed at 350 C and 120 minutes. Higher heating value measured at 350 C and 60 minutes increased by about 22% and the maximum degree of carbonization observed was about 1.21. Further, the regression models developed for chemical composition in terms of torrefaction temperature and time adequately described the process with coefficient of determination values (R2) in the range of 0.92-0.99 for the elemental composition and energy properties studied. Response surface plots indicated that increasing both torrefaction temperature and time resulted in decreased moisture content, hydrogen content, and the hydrogen to-carbon ratio, and increased carbon content and higher heating value. This effect was more significant at torrefaction temperatures and times >280 C and >30 minutes.

  10. STABILITY OF DOW CORNING Q2-3183A ANTIFOAM IN IRRADIATED HYDROXIDE SOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, T; Crawford, C; Burket, P; Calloway, B

    2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) examined the stability of Dow Corning Q2-3183A antifoam to radiation and aqueous hydroxide solutions. Initial foam control studies with Hanford tank waste showed the antifoam reduced foaming. The antifoam was further tested using simulated Hanford tank waste spiked with antifoam that was heated and irradiated (2.1 x 10{sup 4} rad/h) at conditions (90 C, 3 M NaOH, 8 h) expected in the processing of radioactive waste through the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at Hanford. After irradiation, the concentration of the major polymer components polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polypropylene glycol (PPG) in the antifoam was determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). No loss of the major polymer components was observed after 24 h and only 15 wt% loss of PDMS was reported after 48 h. The presence of degradation products were not observed by gas chromatography (GC), gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) or high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). G values were calculated from the GPC analysis and tabulated. The findings indicate the antifoam is stable for 24 h after exposure to gamma radiation, heat, and alkaline simulated waste.

  11. Response of corn to fertilizer placement on a Hockley fine sandy loam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matocha, John Edward

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nf tbs rov, afte" plan? ng or wa- m:x sr] w i!I-. ;I& e soi! before pl i "ti g +& -, n ?vitt a" y o'I e, methorl of p'. i emsn'. Flu sev . r. & . d; d iiot i. ' iud tr et'men w li =h invo! vs 1 tl . -. u!a. . emunt of fer'i!i. er wit! the seed Gut.... . ' a& tl-. e s &ine . lo& ation ea h yea . Th = & &pe" m' n. & irs des&gned as a comp' . !e! y ra ndom? d bio -. u. i'h a. ? x t x g factor ial arrangement ?&ill- four add&& ona! &re &'met? a&id a. & h. ctt, The ? 1 tr a'm-n&, iv . ri. rep&&cat ed...

  12. Inner Mongolia Bayannao er Fuhui Wind Power Co Ltd | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergyFarms AHefeiHydroenergyInformation Bayannao er Fuhui

  13. Audit Report: ER-B-00-03 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  14. Audit Report: ER-B-95-04 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  15. Audit Report: ER-B-98-05 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  16. Audit Report: ER-B-98-07 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  17. Audit Report: ER-B-98-08 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  18. Combined Final Technical Report 04ER86191 H2Cryo.pdf

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The itemAIR57451 Clean Energy Technologies A!FG02-04ER86191

  19. Audit Report: ER-B-95-05 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  20. Audit Report: ER-B-96-02 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  1. Audit Report: ER-B-97-02 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  2. Audit Report: ER-B-98-02 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  3. Audit Report: ER-B-98-03 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments from TarasaName Affiliation3 AuditMA-95-02ER-B-95-057-02

  4. Audit Report: ER-B-98-06 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  5. Audit Report: ER-B-98-07 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments from TarasaName Affiliation38-06 Audit Report: ER-B-98-06

  6. USACE ER 200-2-2 Procedures for Implementing NEPA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtle Airships JumpTypefor Africa |Green6NFCRCOpenSEIA|ER

  7. Engineering, Nutrient Removal, and Feedstock Conversion Evaluations of Four Corn Stover Harvest Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed L. Hoskinson; Douglas L. Karlen; Stuart J. Birrell; Corey W. Radtke; W.W. Wilhelm

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crop residue has been identified as a near-term source of biomass for renewable fuel, heat, power, chemicals and other bio-materials. Replicated plots were established in a corn (Zea mays L.) field near Ames, IA to evaluate four harvest scenarios (low cut, high-cut top, high-cut bottom, and normal cut). A prototype one-pass harvest system was used to collect the residue samples. High-cut top and high-cut bottom samples were obtained from the same plots in two separate operations. Chemical composition, dilute acid pretreatment response, ethanol conversion efficiency and gasification parameters for each scenario were determined. Mean grain yield (10.1 Mg ha-1 dry weight) was representative of the area. The four harvest scenarios removed 6.7, 4.9, 1.7, and 5.1 Mg ha-1 of dry matter. Expressed as harvest indices (HI) the values were 0.60 for low cut, 0.66 for normal cut, and 0.61 for the total high-cut (top + bottom) scenarios, which are probably realistic for machine harvest and current hybrids. The macro-nutrient replacement value for the normal harvest scenario under our conditions was $57.36 ha-1 or $11.27 Mg-1. Harvesting stalk bottoms increased the water content, the risk of combine damage, the transportation costs, and left insufficient soil cover, while also producing a problematic feedstock. Harvesting stover at current combine height (~40 cm) would be best for farmers and ethanol producers because of better harvest speed and efficiency as well as the quality of the ethanol feedstock.

  8. Influence of Airflow on Laboratory Storage of High Moisture Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn M. Wendt; Ian J. Bonner; Amber N. Hoover; Rachel M. Emerson; William A. Smith

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Storing high moisture biomass for bioenergy use is a reality in many areas of the country where wet harvest conditions and environmental factors prevent dry storage from being feasible. Aerobic storage of high moisture biomass leads to microbial degradation and self-heating, but oxygen limitation can aid in material preservation. To understand the influence of oxygen presence on high moisture biomass (50 %, wet basis), three airflow rates were tested on corn stover stored in laboratory reactors. Temperature, carbon dioxide production, dry matter loss, chemical composition, fungal abundance, pH, and organic acids were used to monitor the effects of airflow on storage conditions. The results of this work indicate that oxygen availability impacts both the duration of self-heating and the severity of dry matter loss. High airflow systems experienced the greatest initial rates of loss but a shortened microbially active period that limited total dry matter loss (19 %). Intermediate airflow had improved preservation in short-term storage compared to high airflow systems but accumulated the greatest dry matter loss over time (up to 27 %) as a result of an extended microbially active period. Low airflow systems displayed the best performance with the lowest rates of loss and total loss (10 %) in storage at 50 days. Total structural sugar levels of the stored material were preserved, although glucan enrichment and xylan loss were documented in the high and intermediate flow conditions. By understanding the role of oxygen availability on biomass storage performance, the requirements for high moisture storage solutions may begin to be experimentally defined.

  9. Absence of exchange interaction between localized magnetic moments and conduction-electrons in diluted Er{sup 3+} gold-nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesseux, G. G., E-mail: lesseux@ifi.unicamp.br; Urbano, R. R. [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” UNICAMP, 13083-859 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Iwamoto, W. [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” UNICAMP, 13083-859 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Instituto de Física, UFU, 38400-902 Uberlândia, Minas Gerais (Brazil); García-Flores, A. F. [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, UFABC, 09210-971 Santo André, São Paulo (Brazil); Rettori, C. [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” UNICAMP, 13083-859 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, UFABC, 09210-971 Santo André, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) of diluted Er{sup 3+} magnetic ions in Au nanoparticles (NPs) is reported. The NPs were synthesized by reducing chloro triphenyl-phosphine gold(I) and erbium(III) trifluoroacetate. The Er{sup 3+} g-value along with the observed hyperfine splitting indicate that the Er{sup 3+} impurities are in a local cubic symmetry. Furthermore, the Er{sup 3+} ESR spectra show that the exchange interaction between the 4f and the conduction electrons (ce) is absent or negligible in Au{sub 1–x}Er{sub x} NPs, in contrast to the ESR results in bulk Au{sub 1–x}Er{sub x}. Therefore, the nature of this interaction needs to be reexamined at the nano scale range.

  10. Coupling of Er light emissions to plasmon modes on In{sub 2}O{sub 3}: Sn nanoparticle sheets in the near-infrared range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsui, Hiroaki, E-mail: hiroaki@ee.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Tabata, Hitoshi [Department of Bioengineering, The University of Tokyo, 1-3-7 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, The University of Tokyo, 1-3-7 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Badalawa, Wasanthamala; Nomura, Wataru; Yatsui, Takashi; Ohtsu, Motoichi [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, The University of Tokyo, 1-3-7 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Hasebe, Takayuki [Central Customs Laboratory, Ministry of Finance, 5-3-6 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 270-0882 (Japan); Furuta, Shinya [Tomoe Works Co. Ltd., 1-3-6 Namiyoke, Minato-ku, Osaka 552-0001 (Japan)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Near-infrared Er photoluminescence (PL) is markedly modified using a plasmonic In{sub 2}O{sub 3}: Sn nanoparticle (NP) sheet. Modeling and optical measurements reveal the presence of different electric fields (E-field) in the NP sheet. The local E-field excited at the interface between the NP sheet and Er-emitting layer of ZnO contributes significantly towards the spectral modifications of Er PL due to matching with the photon energy of Er PL. We also determine the critical temperature for Er PL modifications, which is related to the energy transfer efficiency between Er transition dipoles in ZnO and the plasmon modes on the NP sheet.

  11. Hydrocarbon Liquid Production via Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Phenolic Oils Fractionated from Fast Pyrolysis of Red Oak and Corn Stover

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Wang, Huamin; Rover, Majorie; Whitmer, Lysle; Smith, Ryan; Brown, Robert C.

    2015-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Phenolic oils were produced from fast pyrolysis of two different biomass feedstocks, red oak and corn stover and evaluated in hydroprocessing tests for production of liquid hydrocarbon products. The phenolic oils were produced with a bio-oil fractionating process in combination with a simple water wash of the heavy ends from the fractionating process. Phenolic oils derived from the pyrolysis of red oak and corn stover were recovered with yields (wet biomass basis) of 28.7 wt% and 14.9 wt%, respectively, and 54.3% and 58.6% on a carbon basis. Both precious metal catalysts and sulfided base metal catalyst were evaluated for hydrotreatingmore »the phenolic oils, as an extrapolation from whole bio-oil hydrotreatment. They were effective in removing heteroatoms with carbon yields as high as 81% (unadjusted for the 90% carbon balance). There was nearly complete heteroatom removal with residual O of only 0.4% to 5%, while N and S were reduced to less than 0.05%. Use of the precious metal catalysts resulted in more saturated products less completely hydrotreated compared to the sulfided base metal catalyst, which was operated at higher temperature. The liquid product was 42-52% gasoline range molecules and about 43% diesel range molecules. Particulate matter in the phenolic oils complicated operation of the reactors, causing plugging in the fixed-beds especially for the corn stover phenolic oil. This difficulty contrasts with the catalyst bed fouling and plugging, which is typically seen with hydrotreatment of whole bio-oil. This problem was substantially alleviated by filtering the phenolic oils before hydrotreating. More thorough washing of the phenolic oils during their preparation from the heavy ends of bio-oil or on-line filtration of pyrolysis vapors to remove particulate matter before condensation of the bio-oil fractions is recommended.« less

  12. Hydrocarbon Liquid Production via Catalytic Hydroprocessing of Phenolic Oils Fractionated from Fast Pyrolysis of Red Oak and Corn Stover

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Elliott, Douglas C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Huamin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rover, Majorie [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Whitmer, Lysle [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Smith, Ryan [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Brown, Robert C. [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Phenolic oils were produced from fast pyrolysis of two different biomass feedstocks, red oak and corn stover and evaluated in hydroprocessing tests for production of liquid hydrocarbon products. The phenolic oils were produced with a bio-oil fractionating process in combination with a simple water wash of the heavy ends from the fractionating process. Phenolic oils derived from the pyrolysis of red oak and corn stover were recovered with yields (wet biomass basis) of 28.7 wt% and 14.9 wt%, respectively, and 54.3% and 58.6% on a carbon basis. Both precious metal catalysts and sulfided base metal catalyst were evaluated for hydrotreating the phenolic oils, as an extrapolation from whole bio-oil hydrotreatment. They were effective in removing heteroatoms with carbon yields as high as 81% (unadjusted for the 90% carbon balance). There was nearly complete heteroatom removal with residual O of only 0.4% to 5%, while N and S were reduced to less than 0.05%. Use of the precious metal catalysts resulted in more saturated products less completely hydrotreated compared to the sulfided base metal catalyst, which was operated at higher temperature. The liquid product was 42-52% gasoline range molecules and about 43% diesel range molecules. Particulate matter in the phenolic oils complicated operation of the reactors, causing plugging in the fixed-beds especially for the corn stover phenolic oil. This difficulty contrasts with the catalyst bed fouling and plugging, which is typically seen with hydrotreatment of whole bio-oil. This problem was substantially alleviated by filtering the phenolic oils before hydrotreating. More thorough washing of the phenolic oils during their preparation from the heavy ends of bio-oil or on-line filtration of pyrolysis vapors to remove particulate matter before condensation of the bio-oil fractions is recommended.

  13. A physiological basis for determining a possible mechanism for migration in Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), the corn earworm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weise, Carolyn Joan

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the stimulation and capacity of a migratory insect. 13 2. Restraining of the insect in the dissecting dish using modeling clay (a), so that the neck membrane is exposed (b) for the allatectomy procedure... 18 3. Tethered corn earworm moth on a flight mill 19 4... dissecting dish. To restrain the insect, a clay "seat" was molded in the bottom of the dish. The insect was then laid in the seat with its ventral side up and held by placing one strip of clay across the thorax, as illustrated in Figure 2a. The head...

  14. Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+}co-doped bismuth molybdate nanosheets upconversion photocatalyst with enhanced photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adhikari, Rajesh; Gyawali, Gobinda; Cho, Sung Hun [Research Center for Eco-Multifunctional Nanomaterials, Sun Moon University (Korea, Republic of); Narro-García, R. [Centro de Investigaciones en Óptica, A. P.1-948, León, Gto. 37150, México (Mexico); Sekino, Tohru [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University (Japan); Lee, Soo Wohn, E-mail: swlee@sunmoon.ac.kr [Research Center for Eco-Multifunctional Nanomaterials, Sun Moon University (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we report the microwave hydrothermal synthesis of Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} co-doped Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} upconversion photocatalyst. Crystal structure, morphology, elemental composition, optical properties and BET surface area were analyzed in detail. Infrared to visible upconversion luminescence at 532 nm and 546 nm of the co-doped samples was investigated under excitation at 980 nm. The results revealed that the co-doping of Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} into Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} exhibited enhanced photocatalytic activity for the decomposition of rhodamine B under simulated solar light irradiation. Enhanced photocatalytic activity can be attributed to the energy transfer between Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} and Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} via infrared to visible upconversion from Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} ion and higher surface area of the Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} nanosheets. Therefore, this synthetic approach may exhibit a better alternative to fabricate upconversion photocatalyst for integral solar light absorption. - Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of the upconversion photocatalysis. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} co-doped Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} upconversion photocatalyst is successfully synthesized. • We obtained the nanosheets having high surface area. • Upconversion of IR to visible light was confirmed. • Upconversion phenomena can be utilized for effective photocatalysis.

  15. Atelier " i l ti ri e e l i e e ilie lli i el " e re er t ire e ri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Passot, Thierry

    Atelier " i l ti ri e e l i e e ilie lli i el " e re er t ire e ri A r e i ti e A r e l i e ti l i e et le r l e e l er et re l i " le i ti e" i i t er e i i e r le l r e elle ti te relle t et r r el t li #12; Atelier " i l ti ri e e l i e e ilie lli i el " e re er t ire e ri

  16. The role of Nb in intensity increase of Er ion upconversion luminescence in zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smits, K., E-mail: smits@cfi.lu.lv; Sarakovskis, A.; Grigorjeva, L.; Millers, D. [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, 8 Kengaraga Str., Riga LV1063 (Latvia); Grabis, J. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Riga Technical University, Salaspils-1 LV2169 (Latvia)

    2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    It is found that Nb co-doping increases the luminescence and upconversion luminescence intensity in rare earth doped zirconia. Er and Yb-doped nanocrystalline samples with or without Nb co-doping were prepared by sol-gel method and thermally annealed to check for the impact of phase transition on luminescence properties. Phase composition and grain sizes were examined by X-ray diffraction; the morphology was checked by scanning- and high-resolution transmission electron microscopes. Both steady-state and time-resolved luminescence were studied. Comparison of samples with different oxygen vacancy concentrations and different Nb concentrations confirmed the known assumption that oxygen vacancies are the main agents for tetragonal or cubic phase stabilization. The oxygen vacancies quench the upconversion luminescence; however, they also prevent agglomeration of rare-earth ions and/or displacement of rare-earth ions to grain surfaces. It is found that co-doping with Nb ions significantly (>20 times) increases upconversion luminescence intensity. Hence, ZrO{sub 2}:Er:Yb:Nb nanocrystals may show promise for upconversion applications.

  17. Atomistic simulation of Er irradiation induced defects in GaN nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullah, M. W., E-mail: mohammad.ullah@helsinki.fi; Kuronen, A.; Djurabekova, F.; Nordlund, K. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, FIN-00014 (Finland); Stukowski, A. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Classical molecular dynamics simulation was used to irradiate a GaN nanowire with rear-earth erbium (Er). Ten cumulative irradiations were done using an ion energy of 37.5?keV on a 10?×?10?nm{sup 2} surface area which corresponds to a fluence of 1?×?10{sup 13?}cm{sup ?2}. We studied the location and types of defects produced in the irradiation. Er implantation leads to a net positive (expansion) strain in the nanowire and especially at the top region a clear expansion has been observed in the lateral and axial directions. The lattice expansion is due to the hydrostatic strain imposed by a large number of radiation induced defects at the top of the NW. Due to the large surface-to-volume ratio, most of the defects were concentrated at the surface region, which suggests that the experimentally observed yellow luminescence (YL) in ion implanted GaN NWs arises from surface defects. We observed big clusters of point defects and vacancy clusters which are correlated with stable lattice strain and the YL band, respectively.

  18. Monitoring change in the Bering Glacier region, Alaska: Using Landsat TM and ERS-1 imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payne, J.F. [Bureau of Land Management, Anchorage, AK (United States); Coffeen, M. [Bureau of Land Management, Glennallen, AK (United States); Macleod, R.D. [Ducks Unlimited, Inc., Sacramento, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bering Glacier is the largest (5,180 km{sup 2}) and longest (191 km) glacier in continental North America. This glacier is one of about 200 temperate glaciers in the Alaska/Canada region that are known to surge. Surges at the Bering Glacier typically occur on a 20-30 year cycle. The objective of this project was to extract information regarding the position of the terminus of the glacier from historic aerial photography, early 20{sup th} century ground photography, Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) satellite data, and European Space Agency, Synthetic Aperture RADAR (ERS-1 SAR) data and integrate it into a single digital database that would lend itself to change detection analysis. ERS-1 SAR data was acquired from six dates between 1992-95 and was terrain corrected and co-registered A single Landsat TM image from June 1991 was used as the base image for classifying land cover types. Historic locations of the glacier terminus were generated using traditional photo interpretation techniques from aerial and ground photography. The result of this platform combination, along with the historical data, is providing land managers with the unique opportunity to generate complete assessments of glacial movement this century and determine land cover changes which may impact wildlife and recreational opportunities.

  19. Abbreviated life tables of natural populations of the corn earworm, Heliothis zea (Boddie) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), on peanuts in Comanche and Erath Counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sears, Darrell Eugene

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the corn earworm on irrigated peanuts in Comanche and Erath Counti es, Texas, 1973 21 4 Abbreviated natural mortality table for the corn earworm on dryland peanuts in Comanche and Erath Counties, Texas, 1973 23 5 Partial mortality budget for the July...); the cereal leaf beetle, Oulema ~1 ~ (L)(Shed t 1. 1970); th p p1 9 11 , d ~Sa erda inornata Say (Gimbl e and Knight 1970) . In addition, Harcourt (1963) initiated a th) ee-part study on the popu- 1 ti dy i 6 th 6 1 d p t t 6 tl, 6~it decemlineata (Say...

  20. High-power, hybrid Er:fiber/Tm:fiber frequency comb source in the 2 {\\mu}m wavelength region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Florian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a 2-\\mum frequency comb based on a reliable mode-locked Er:fiber laser with 100 MHz repetition rate. After shifting the spectrum of the amplified Er:fiber comb to longer wavelengths, a single-clad Tm/Ho:fiber is used as a self-pumped pre-amplifier to generate a coherent and broadband spectrum centered at 1.93 \\mum. Subsequently, a cladding-pumped Tm:fiber amplifier boosts the system to a maximum output power of 4.8 W at 1.96 \\mum. After compression in a compact grating compressor, our amplified Er:fiber/Tm:fiber hybrid system delivers as much as 2.9 W with a pulse duration of 141 fs. The system's comb properties are examined via heterodyne measurement.

  1. Metabolism of carbaryl, chloropyrifos, DDT, and parathion in the European corn borer: effects of microsporidiosis on toxicity and detoxication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tetreault, G.E.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation was conducted to examine the effects of microsporidiosis on an insect's response to insecticide intoxication. Healthy European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, larvae and those heavily infected with the microsporidian pathogen, Nosema pyrausta, were bioassayed with ten insecticides. The compounds used were carbaryl, carbofuran, chlorophrifos, DDT, diazinon, fonofos, methomyl, parathion, permethrin, and terbufos. Third instar larvae were used for topical bioassays. The compounds carbaryl, carbofuran, chlorophrifos, methomyl and terbufos were found to be significantly more toxic to diseased insects than healthy insects at the 0.05 probability level. To examine the effect of Nosema pyrausta infection on the European corn borer's ability to detoxify insecticides, /sup 14/C ring-labeled carbaryl, chlorophrifos, DDT, and parathion were topically applied to fourth instar larvae. Qualitative differences between healthy and diseased insects were found in the metabolic pathways of carbaryl, DDT, and parathion. The degradative fate of chlorophrifos was the same in both groups. Quantitatively, each insecticide penetrated diseased larvae faster. This resulted in larger amounts of the applied dose of parent compound and metabolites being found in the feces from diseased insects. Conversely, healthy insects had more of these materials present in the body and associated with the cuticle.

  2. Investigation of the use of an Er:YAG laser and a fluoride glass fiber for laser angioplasty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwark, Bongsin

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INVESTIGATION OF THE USE OF AN ER:YAG LASER AND A FLUORIDE ClLASS FIBER FOR LASER ANGIOPLASTY A Thes&s BONC'SIN KA'ARK Submitted to the Office of Clraduate Sturlies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of 'tIASTER OF SGIEVCE December Iqg9 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering INVESTIGATION OF THE IJSE OF AN ER:YAG LASER. AND A FLUORIDE GLASS FIBER FOR LASER ANGIOPLASTY A Thesis bi BONGSIN I~AVARI~ Approved as to style and content by: ry...

  3. IFP --Oil & Gas Science and Technology --(Script : 1er specimen) --1 --Oil & Gas Science and Technology --rev. IFP, Vol. xx (2009), No X, pp. 00-00

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IFP -- Oil & Gas Science and Technology -- (Script : 1er specimen) -- 1 -- Oil & Gas Science2010 Author manuscript, published in "Oil & Gas Science and Technology - Rev. IFP, 65, 3 (2010) 435-444" DOI : 10.2516/ogst/2010007 #12;IFP -- Oil & Gas Science and Technology -- (Script : 1er specimen) -- 2

  4. Optical Temperature Sensor Using Infrared-to-Visible-Frequency Upconversion in Er This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    Optical Temperature Sensor Using Infrared-to-Visible-Frequency Upconversion in Er 3+ /Yb 3. 8 (2011) 087804 Optical Temperature Sensor Using Infrared-to-Visible-Frequency Upconversion in Er3 State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA (Received 24 May 2011) An optical temperature

  5. Completion Report for Model Evaluation Well ER-11-2: Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Underground Test Area and Boreholes Programs and Operations

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Model Evaluation Well ER-11-2 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of Nevada Environmental Management Operations at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site). The well was drilled in August 2012 as part of a model evaluation program in the Frenchman Flat area of Nye County, Nevada. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed geologic, hydrogeologic, chemical, and radionuclide data that can be used to test and build confidence in the applicability of the Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit flow and transport models for their intended purpose. In particular, this well was designed to provide data to evaluate the uncertainty in model forecasts of contaminant migration from the upgradient underground nuclear test PIN STRIPE, conducted in borehole U-11b in 1966. Well ER-11-2 will provide information that can be used to refine the Phase II Frenchman Flat hydrostratigraphic framework model if necessary, as well as to support future groundwater flow and transport modeling. The main 31.1-centimeter (cm) hole was drilled to a total depth of 399.6 meters (m). A completion casing string was not set in Well ER-11-2. However, a piezometer string was installed in the 31.1-cm open hole. The piezometer is composed of 7.3-cm stainless-steel tubing hung on 6.0-cm carbon-steel tubing via a crossover sub. The piezometer string was landed at 394.5 m, for monitoring the lower tuff confining unit. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 m, various geophysical logs, water quality (including tritium and other test-related radionuclides) measurements, and water level measurements. The well penetrated 42.7 m of Quaternary and Tertiary alluvium and 356.9 m of Tertiary volcanic rock. The water-level measured in the piezometer string on September 25, 2012, was 353.8 m below ground surface. No tritium above levels detectable by field methods were encountered in this hole. No well development or hydrologic testing was conducted in this well immediately after completion, and future well development, sampling, and hydrologic testing planned for this well will be limited due to the diameter of the piezometer string. The stratigraphy, general lithology, and the water level are as expected, but the section of geology encountered is higher than expected due to faulting. No tritium above the minimum detection limit of the field equipment was detected because the target aquifer (the Topopah Spring aquifer) at Well ER-11-2 is structurally higher than expected and thus unsaturated.

  6. A novel mechanism and kinetic model to explain enhanced xylose yields from dilute sulfuric acid compared to hydrothermal pretreatment of corn stover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    A novel mechanism and kinetic model to explain enhanced xylose yields from dilute sulfuric acid stover Dilute sulfuric acid Hydrothermal pretreatment Kinetic model Xylose a b s t r a c t Pretreatment of corn stover in 0.5% sulfuric acid at 160 °C for 40 min realized a maximum monomeric plus oligomeric

  7. Investment in Corn-Ethanol Plants in the Midwestern United States: An Analysis Using Reduced-Form and Structural Models1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    1 Investment in Corn-Ethanol Plants in the Midwestern United States: An Analysis Using Reduced-Form and Structural Models1 C.-Y. Cynthia Lin and Karen E. Thome Abstract Ethanol has attracted considerable policy policy and strategic interactions affect decisions about when and where to invest in building new ethanol

  8. Consequences of reproductive barriers for genealogical discordance in the European corn Erik B. Dopman, Luisa Prez, Steven M. Bogdanowicz, and Richard G. Harrison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dopman, Erik B.

    borer Consequences of reproductive barriers for genealogical discordance in the European corn Erik, see: Notes: #12;Consequences of reproductive barriers for genealogical discordance in the European is often incomplete, gene genealogies will be discordant, and most regions of the genome will display

  9. Determining Fiber and Protein Degradation Rates of Corn Milling (Co)Products and Their Effects on Rumen Bacterial Populations and Lactating Dairy Cow Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Whitney

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    as within a single ethanol plant (Belyea et al., 2004). As more information about the quality of corn (co)products becomes available, new strategies of (co)product feeding will be developed. Feedstuff processing methods have been shown to affect feed...

  10. Is New Zealand's food supply under threat? What have we learned from the escape of genetically modified (GM) corn throughout New

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Is New Zealand's food supply under threat? What have we learned from the escape of genetically. This realization undermines claims that uses of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) outside of the laboratory can modified (GM) corn throughout New Zealand? The most alarming outcome of the recently concluded

  11. Atmospheric deposition, resuspension, and root uptake of Pu in corn and other grain-producing agroecosystems near a nuclear fuel facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinder, J.E. III; McLeod, K.W.; Adriano, D.C.; Corey, J.C.; Boni, A.L. (Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Aiken, SC (USA))

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plutonium released to the environment may contribute to dose to humans through inhalation or ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs. Plutonium contamination of agricultural plants may result from interception and retention of atmospheric deposition, resuspension of Pu-bearing soil particles to plant surfaces, and root uptake. Plutonium on vegetation surfaces may be transferred to grain surfaces during mechanical harvesting. Data obtained from corn grown near the U.S. Department of Energy's H-Area nuclear fuel chemical separations facility on the Savannah River Site were used to estimate parameters of a simple model of Pu transport in agroecosystems. The parameter estimates for corn were compared to those previously obtained for wheat and soybeans. Despite some differences in parameter estimates among crops, the relative importances of atmospheric deposition, resuspension, and root uptake were similar among crops. For even small deposition rates, the relative importances of processes for Pu contamination of corn grain should be: transfer of atmospheric deposition from vegetation surfaces to grain surfaces during combining greater than resuspension of soil to grain surfaces greater than root uptake. Approximately 3.9 X 10(-5) of a year's atmospheric deposition is transferred to grain. Approximately 6.2 X 10(-9) of the Pu inventory in the soil is resuspended to corn grain, and a further 7.3 X 10(-10) of the soil Pu inventory is absorbed and translocated to grains.

  12. Atmospheric deposition, resuspension and root uptake of plutonium in corn and other grain-producing agroecosystems near a nuclear fuel facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinder, J.E. III; McLeod, K.W.; Adriano, D.C. (Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (United States)); Corey, J.C.; Boni, A.L. (Savannah River Lab., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plutonium released to the environment may contribute to dose to humans through inhalation or ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs. Plutonium contamination of agricultural plants may result from interception and retention of atmospheric deposition, resuspension of Pu-bearing soil particles to plant surfaces, and root uptake and translocation to grain. Plutonium on vegetation surfaces may be transferred to grain surfaces during mechanical harvesting. Data obtained from corn grown near the US Department of Energy's H-Area nuclear fuel chemical separations facility on the Savannah River Site was used to estimated parameters of a simple model of Pu transport in agroecosystems. The parameter estimates for corn were compared to those previously obtained for wheat and soybeans. Despite some differences in parameter estimates among crops, the relative importances of atmospheric deposition, resuspension and root uptake were similar among crops. For even small deposition rates, the relative importances of processes for Pu contamination of corn grain should be: transfer of atmospheric deposition from vegetation surfaces to grain surfaces during combining > resuspension of soil to grain surfaces > root uptake. Approximately 3.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} of a year's atmospheric deposition is transferred to grain. Approximately 6.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} of the Pu inventory in the soil is resuspended to corn grain, and a further 7.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} of the soil inventory is absorbed by roots and translocated to grains.

  13. Atmospheric deposition, resuspension and root uptake of plutonium in corn and other grain-producing agroecosystems near a nuclear fuel facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinder, J.E. III; McLeod, K.W.; Adriano, D.C. [Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (United States); Corey, J.C.; Boni, A.L. [Savannah River Lab., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Plutonium released to the environment may contribute to dose to humans through inhalation or ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs. Plutonium contamination of agricultural plants may result from interception and retention of atmospheric deposition, resuspension of Pu-bearing soil particles to plant surfaces, and root uptake and translocation to grain. Plutonium on vegetation surfaces may be transferred to grain surfaces during mechanical harvesting. Data obtained from corn grown near the US Department of Energy`s H-Area nuclear fuel chemical separations facility on the Savannah River Site was used to estimated parameters of a simple model of Pu transport in agroecosystems. The parameter estimates for corn were compared to those previously obtained for wheat and soybeans. Despite some differences in parameter estimates among crops, the relative importances of atmospheric deposition, resuspension and root uptake were similar among crops. For even small deposition rates, the relative importances of processes for Pu contamination of corn grain should be: transfer of atmospheric deposition from vegetation surfaces to grain surfaces during combining > resuspension of soil to grain surfaces > root uptake. Approximately 3.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} of a year`s atmospheric deposition is transferred to grain. Approximately 6.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} of the Pu inventory in the soil is resuspended to corn grain, and a further 7.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} of the soil inventory is absorbed by roots and translocated to grains.

  14. Regional-Scale Assessment of Nitrous Oxide Emissions within the US Corn Belt: The Impact of Precipitation and Agricultural Drainage on Indirect Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Regional-Scale Assessment of Nitrous Oxide Emissions within the US Corn Belt: The Impact of Precipitation and Agricultural Drainage on Indirect Emissions Tim Griffis1, Xuhui Lee2, John Baker3, Peter, but mitigation strategies have been limited by the large uncertainties in both direct and indirect emission

  15. Instructions for Corning Model 220 pH Meter The electrode tip is a fragile glass bulb. Be careful or you will break it with a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cross, George

    Instructions for Corning Model 220 pH Meter The electrode tip is a fragile glass bulb. Be careful a polymer body electrode can create sufficient internal pressure to "explode" the glass bulb. When of cotton in the plastic electrode cover sleeve, add pH 7 buffer, and insert the electrode bulb

  16. Transformation E.R. Bachmann & P.L. McDowell MV 4202 Page 1 of3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDowell, Perry

    Transformation E.R. Bachmann & P.L. McDowell MV 4202 Page 1 of3 5. Transformations Overview window coordinates Modeling Transformations Projection Transformation Perspective Division Viewport Transformation Object Coordinates x, y, z, w Modelview Matrix Projection Matrix Eye Coordinates Clip Coordinates

  17. DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY ER 11-1-321 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Change 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Appendix C Sample Content of VE Plan and Work Breakdown Structure to Appendix C Scheduling Requirements to ER 11-1-321, 28 February 2005, a. Corrects VE study applicability for total project cost from $2M to $1M, Paragraph 2. b. Changes Paragraph 5. Definitions. Glossary inserted in Appendices replaces

  18. Postdoctoral fellowship in ore-deposit geology/igneous geochemistry Marie-Curie Initial Training Network ABYSS (ER1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Postdoctoral fellowship in ore-deposit geology/igneous geochemistry Marie-Curie Initial Training Network ABYSS (ER1) Training network on reactive geological systems from the mantle to the abyssal sub-Cu-PGE deposits Requirements: Candidates must hold PhD in geology/geochemistry This fellowship is for a period

  19. 112 IEEE MICROWAVE AND GUIDED WAVE LETI'ERS, VOL. 4, NO. 4, APRIL 1994 Planar Amplifier Array With Improved

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, Robert A.

    -wave applications demanding large output power, with low-noise, high- efficiency, and solid-state reliability the amplifier measurements and device requirements. A simple resistive feedback amplifier was designed, using112 IEEE MICROWAVE AND GUIDED WAVE LETI'ERS, VOL. 4, NO. 4, APRIL 1994 Planar Amplifier Array

  20. Utilisation des archives ERS pour la dtection de mouvements de glaciers rocheux dans les Alpes franaises par interfromtrie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Utilisation des archives ERS pour la détection de mouvements de glaciers rocheux dans les Alpes semblait pertinente pour détecter le fluage des glaciers rocheux. Dans cette étude nous nous intéressons à la détection des mouvements des glaciers rocheux sur la totalité des Alpes françaises. Pour cela nous

  1. ER 100/200, PP C184/284 GSI Section Notes Energy & Society Section Week 5: Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    . Property Diagrams and Power Cycles V. Additional Material, Terms, and Variables VI. Practice Problems I form to another. As an equation, this is simply: Esystem = 0 = Ein ­ Eout #12;ER 100/200, PP C184 system its change in energy will be the balance between the heat transferred to (Qin) and the work done

  2. Sjaggeren, der hopper rundt i haven og spiser af vinterens udbud af rdne bler, er ankommet fra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorup, Kasper

    , rovfugle, ænder, gæs og vadefugle passerer hen over Danmark i træksæso- nerne. Nogle af dem yngler i Danmark, andre er her kun som vintergæster, men langt størstedelen passerer bare igennem landet. Kun en lille andel af de danske arter forbliver hele deres liv inden for Danmarks grænser (Bønløkke et al. i

  3. Final report for DOE-FG02-02ER54688: Study of nonlinear interactions between counterpropagating shear Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, T A

    2006-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Final report for DOE Plasma Physics Junior Faculty Development award DOE-FG02-02ER54688. Reports on research undertaken from 8/1/2002 until 5/15/2006, investigating nonlinear interactions between Alfven waves in a laboratory experiment.

  4. MGS MAG/ER observations at the magnetic pileup boundary of Mars: draping enhancement and low frequency waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    MGS MAG/ER observations at the magnetic pileup boundary of Mars: draping enhancement and low Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109, USA Received 26 November 2002; received in revised form 19 March 2003; accepted 24 April 2003 Abstract The magnetic pileup boundary (MPB) is a sharp

  5. Nanocomposites of Semimetallic ErAs Nanoparticles Epitaxially Embedded within InGaAlAs-based Semiconductors for Thermoelectric Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GaAlAs-based Semiconductors for Thermoelectric Materials J.M.O. Zide', G. Zeng2, J.H. Bahk2, W. Kim3, S. L. Singer3, DAs nanoparticles which are epitaxially embedded within InGaAlAs-based semiconductors. The properties. In one geometry, barriers of InGaAlAs, a wider bandgap semiconductor, are introduced into an Er

  6. ISodotY of PetroIeumEr@nwrsI Petroleum Reservoir Simulation in a Virtual Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a'4P w ._ m I I ISodotY of PetroIeumEr@nwrsI SPE 29118 Petroleum Reservoir Simulation in a VirtualSPE Member TM paperwas preperedfor presentationat the 13fh SPE Sym~ium on ReservoirSimulationheld in San, 1S2245SPEUT. ABSTRACT In this paper, we describe an approach to combining a reservoir simulation

  7. Octave-spanning supercontinuum generation for an er-doped fiber laser frequency comb at a 1 ghz repetition rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, David

    We developed a 1 GHz Er-doped femtosecond fiber laser system providing 2nJ pulses at [equivalence relation symbol]100fs durations and demonstrated octave-spanning supercontinuum generation from 1µm - 2.4µm that is suitable ...

  8. TOWARDS AN ER-DOPED SI NANOCRYSTAL SENSITIZED WAVEGUIDE LASER THE THIN LINE BETWEEN GAIN AND LOSS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kik, Pieter

    and waveguide. If the pump laser could somehow be eliminated from this scheme, the fabrication of low-cost SiTOWARDS AN ER-DOPED SI NANOCRYSTAL SENSITIZED WAVEGUIDE LASER ­ THE THIN LINE BETWEEN GAIN AND LOSS-doped SiO2, a composite material that can potentially be fabricated using a VLSI compatible process

  9. Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane technical mixture regulates cell cycle and apoptosis genes through the activation of CAR and ER? in mouse livers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazantseva, Yuliya A.; Yarushkin, Andrei A. [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics SB RAMS, Novosibirsk, Timakova str., 2, 630117 (Russian Federation); Pustylnyak, Vladimir O., E-mail: pustylnyak@ngs.ru [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics SB RAMS, Novosibirsk, Timakova str., 2, 630117 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk, Pirogova str., 2, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) is a widely used organochlorine pesticide and a xenoestrogen that promotes rodent hepatomegaly and tumours. A recent study has shown significant correlation between DDT serum concentration and liver cancer incidence in humans, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We hypothesised that a mixture of DDT isomers could exert effects on the liver through pathways instead of classical ERs. The acute effects of a DDT mixture containing the two major isomers p,p?-DDT (85%) and o,p?-DDT (15%) on CAR and ER? receptors and their cell cycle and apoptosis target genes were studied in mouse livers. ChIP results demonstrated increased CAR and ER? recruitment to their specific target gene binding sites in response to the DDT mixture. The results of real-time RT-PCR were consistent with the ChIP data and demonstrated that the DDT was able to activate both CAR and ER? in mouse livers, leading to target gene transcriptional increases including Cyp2b10, Gadd45?, cMyc, Mdm2, Ccnd1, cFos and E2f1. Western blot analysis demonstrated increases in cell cycle progression proteins cMyc, Cyclin D1, CDK4 and E2f1 and anti-apoptosis proteins Mdm2 and Gadd45?. In addition, DDT exposure led to Rb phosphorylation. Increases in cell cycle progression and anti-apoptosis proteins were accompanied by a decrease in p53 content and its transcriptional activity. However, the DDT was unable to stimulate the ?-catenin signalling pathway, which can play an important role in hepatocyte proliferation. Thus, our results indicate that DDT treatment may result in cell cycle progression and apoptosis inhibition through CAR- and ER?-mediated gene activation in mouse livers. These findings suggest that the proliferative and anti-apoptotic conditions induced by CAR and ER? activation may be important contributors to the early stages of hepatocarcinogenesis as produced by DDT in rodent livers. - Highlights: • DDT activated both CAR and ER? and their cell cycle and apoptosis target genes. • DDT produced increases in cell cycle and anti-apoptosis proteins and decrease in p53. • DDT mixture was unable to stimulate the ?-catenin signalling pathway in mouse livers.

  10. The crystal structure of {pi}-ErBO{sub 3}: New single-crystal data for an old problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitscheider, Almut [Institut fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kaindl, Reinhard [Institut fuer Mineralogie und Petrographie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Oeckler, Oliver [Department Chemie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Butenandtstrasse 5-13, D-81377 Muenchen (Germany); Huppertz, Hubert, E-mail: Hubert.Huppertz@uibk.ac.a [Institut fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Single crystals of the orthoborate {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} were synthesized from Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} under high-pressure/high-temperature conditions of 2 GPa and 800 {sup o}C in a Walker-type multianvil apparatus. The crystal structure was determined on the basis of single-crystal X-ray diffraction data, collected at room temperature. The title compound crystallizes in the monoclinic pseudowollastonite-type structure, space group C2/c, with the lattice parameters a=1128.4(2) pm, b=652.6(2) pm, c=954.0(2) pm, and {beta}=112.8(1){sup o} (R{sub 1}=0.0124 and wR{sub 2}=0.0404 for all data). -- graphical abstract: The first satisfying single-crystal structure determination of {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} sheds light on the extensively discussed structure of {pi}-orthoborates. The application of light pressure during the solid state synthesis yielded in high-quality crystals, due to pressure-induced crystallization. Research highlights: {yields} High-quality single crystals of {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} were prepared via high-pressure-induced crystallization. {yields} At least five different space groups for the rare-earth {pi}-orthoborates are reported. {yields} {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} is isotypic to the pseudowollastonite-type CaSiO{sub 3}. {yields} Remaining ambiguities regarding the structure of the rare-earth {pi}-orthoborates are resolved.

  11. The protein pheromone Er-1 of the ciliate Euplotes raikovi stimulates human T-cell activity: Involvement of interleukin-2 system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cervia, Davide, E-mail: d.cervia@unitus.it [Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-food and Forest systems (DIBAF), University of Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy) [Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-food and Forest systems (DIBAF), University of Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy); Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, “Luigi Sacco” University Hospital, University of Milan, Milano (Italy); Catalani, Elisabetta; Belardinelli, Maria Cristina [Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-food and Forest systems (DIBAF), University of Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy)] [Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-food and Forest systems (DIBAF), University of Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy); Perrotta, Cristiana [Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, “Luigi Sacco” University Hospital, University of Milan, Milano (Italy)] [Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, “Luigi Sacco” University Hospital, University of Milan, Milano (Italy); Picchietti, Simona [Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-food and Forest systems (DIBAF), University of Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy)] [Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-food and Forest systems (DIBAF), University of Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy); Alimenti, Claudio [Department of Environmental and Natural Sciences, University of Camerino, Camerino (Italy)] [Department of Environmental and Natural Sciences, University of Camerino, Camerino (Italy); Casini, Giovanni; Fausto, Anna Maria [Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-food and Forest systems (DIBAF), University of Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy)] [Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-food and Forest systems (DIBAF), University of Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy); Vallesi, Adriana [Department of Environmental and Natural Sciences, University of Camerino, Camerino (Italy)] [Department of Environmental and Natural Sciences, University of Camerino, Camerino (Italy)

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water-soluble protein signals (pheromones) of the ciliate Euplotes have been supposed to be functional precursors of growth factors and cytokines that regulate cell–cell interaction in multi-cellular eukaryotes. This work provides evidence that native preparations of the Euplotes raikovi pheromone Er-1 (a helical protein of 40 amino acids) specifically increases viability, DNA synthesis, proliferation, and the production of interferon-?, tumor necrosis factor-?, interleukin (IL)-1?, IL-2, and IL-13 in human Jurkat T-cells. Also, Er-1 significantly decreases the mRNA levels of the ? and ? subunits of IL-2 receptor (IL-2R), while the mRNA levels of the ? subunit appeared to be not affected. Jurkat T-cell treatments with Er-1 induced the down-regulation of the IL-2R? subunit by a reversible and time-dependent endocytosis, and increased the levels of phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). The cell-type specificity of these effects was supported by the finding that Er-1, although unable to directly influence the growth of human glioma U-373 cells, induced Jurkat cells to synthesize and release factors that, in turn, inhibited the U-373 cell proliferation. Overall, these findings imply that Er-1 coupling to IL-2R and ERK immuno-enhances T-cell activity, and that this effect likely translates to an inhibition of glioma cell growth. -- Highlights: ? Euplotes pheromone Er-1 increases the growth of human Jurkat T-cells. ? Er-1 increases the T-cell production of specific cytokines. ? Er-1 activates interleukin-2 receptor and extracellular signal-regulated kinases. ? The immuno-enhancing effect of Er-1 on Jurkat cells translates to an inhibition of human glioma cell growth.

  12. Inland EmpIrE mErchandIsE Exports calIfornIa statE UnIvErsIty fUllErton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Inland EmpIrE mErchandIsE Exports calIfornIa statE UnIvErsIty fUllErton 20122012 CSUF Mihaylo University, Fullerton An Overview and Analysis of Inland Empire Exports #12;novEmbEr 2011 InstItUtE for EconomIc and EnvIronmEntal stUdIEs33 #12;Inland EmpIrE mErchandIsE Exports calIfornIa statE UnIvErsIty f

  13. Analysis of Well ER-6-2 Testing, Yucca Flat FY 2004 Testing Program, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Ruskauff

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the analysis of data collected for Well ER-6-2 during fiscal year (FY) 2004 Yucca Flat well development and testing program (herein referred to as the ''testing program''). Participants in Well ER-6-2 field development and hydraulic testing activities were: Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), Bechtel Nevada (BN), Desert Research Institute (DRI), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas-Harry Reid Center (UNLV-HRC). The analyses of data collected from the Well ER-6-2 testing program were performed by the SNJV.

  14. The effects of Biozyme on the germination and emergence of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and sweet corn (Zea mays L.) seeds under suboptimal temperatures, pesticide overdose, and salinity stress 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campos Cruz, Armando

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS OF BIOZYME? ON THE GERMINATION AND EMERGENCE OF BEAN (Phaseolus vulgaris L) AND SWEET CORN (Zea mays L. ) SEEDS UNDER SUBOPTIMAL TEMPERATURES, PESTICIDE OVERDOSE, AND SALINITY STRESS A Thesis by ARMANDO CAMPOS CRUZ Submitted... vulgaris L) AND SWEET CORN (Zea mays I ) SEEDS UNDER SUBOPTIMAL TEMPERATURES, PESTICIDE OVERDOSE, AND SALINITY STRESS A Thesis by ARMANDO CAMPOS CRUZ Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  15. Helium release and microstructural changes in Er(D,T)2-x3Hex films).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D. S. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA); Browning, James Frederick; Snow, Clark Sheldon; Banks, James Clifford; Mangan, Michael A.; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Brewer, Luke N.; Kotula, Paul Gabriel

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Er(D,T){sub 2-x} {sup 3}He{sub x}, erbium di-tritide, films of thicknesses 500 nm, 400 nm, 300 nm, 200 nm, and 100 nm were grown and analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Ion Beam Analysis to determine variations in film microstructure as a function of film thickness and age, due to the time-dependent build-up of {sup 3}He in the film from the radioactive decay of tritium. Several interesting features were observed: One, the amount of helium released as a function of film thickness is relatively constant. This suggests that the helium is being released only from the near surface region and that the helium is not diffusing to the surface from the bulk of the film. Two, lenticular helium bubbles are observed as a result of the radioactive decay of tritium into {sup 3}He. These bubbles grow along the [111] crystallographic direction. Three, a helium bubble free zone, or 'denuded zone' is observed near the surface. The size of this region is independent of film thickness. Four, an analysis of secondary diffraction spots in the Transmission Electron Microscopy study indicate that small erbium oxide precipitates, 5-10 nm in size, exist throughout the film. Further, all of the films had large erbium oxide inclusions, in many cases these inclusions span the depth of the film.

  16. Letter Report: Borehole Flow and Horizontal Hydraulic Conductivity with Depth at Well ER-12-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Oberlander; C. Russell

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole flow and fluid temperature during pumping were measured at well ER-12-3 at the Nevada Test Site in Nye County, Nevada. This well was constructed to characterize the carbonate aquifer. The well is cased from land surface to the total depth at 1,487 m (4,880 ft) below ground surface (bgs). Slotted screen is placed in an upper screened section from 1,095 to 1,160 m bgs (3,591 to 3,805 ft bgs) and in the lower screened section from 1,278 to 1,474 m bgs (4,191 to 4,834 ft bgs). Borehole flow velocity (LT-1) with depth was measured with an impeller flowmeter from the top of the screened section to the maximum accessible depth while the well was pumped and under ambient conditions. A complicating factor to data interpretation is that the well was not filter packed and there is significant upward and downward vertical flow in the open annulus under ambient and pumping conditions. The open annulus and large vertical flow velocities in the well casing result in the measured borehole flow rates being potentially highly nonrepresentative of conditions in the aquifer. Hydraulic conductivities calculated under these conditions would require unsupportable assumptions and would be subject to very large uncertainties. Borehole hydraulic conductivities are not presented under these conditions.

  17. Letter Report: Borehole Flow and Horizontal Hydraulic Conductivity with Depth at Well ER-12-4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phil L. Oberlander; Charles E. Russell

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole flow and fluid temperature during pumping were measured at well ER-12-4 at the Nevada Test Site in Nye County, Nevada. This well was constructed to characterize the carbonate aquifer. The well is cased from land surface to the total depth at 1,132 m (3,713 ft bgs) below ground surface (bgs). The screened section of the well consists of alternating sections of slotted well screen and blank casing from 948 to 1,132 m bgs (3,111 to 3,713 ft bgs). Borehole flow velocity (LT-1) with depth was measured with an impeller flowmeter from the top of the screened section to the maximum accessible depth while the well was pumped and under ambient conditions. A complicating factor to data interpretation is that the well was not filter packed and there is upward and downward vertical flow in the open annulus under ambient and pumping conditions. The open annulus in the well casing likely causes the calculated borehole flow rates being highly nonrepresentative of inflow from the formation. Hydraulic conductivities calculated under these conditions would require unsupportable assumptions and would be subject to very large uncertainties. Borehole hydraulic conductivities are not presented under these conditions.

  18. Final Technical Report for Award DE-FG02-98ER41080

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Alan

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The prime motivation of the project at McMaster University was to carry out the critical evaluation and compilation of Nuclear Structure and Decay data, and of nuclear astrophysics data with continued participation in the United States Nuclear Data Program (US-NDP). A large body of evaluated and compiled structure data were supplied for databases such as ENSDF, XUNDL, NSR, etc. residing on webpage of National Nuclear Data Center of the Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York, USA. Thermonuclear reaction rates of importance to stellar explosions, such as novae, x-ray bursts and supernovae, were evaluated as well. This effort was closely coupled to our ongoing experimental effort, which took advantage of radioactive ion beam and stable beam facilities worldwide to study these key reaction rates. This report contains brief descriptions of the various activities together with references to all the publications in peer-reviewed journals which were the result of work carried out with the award DE-FG02-98-ER41080, during 1998-2013.

  19. Completion Report for the Well ER-6-2 Site Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat - Climax Mine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-6-2 and its satellite hole, Well ER-6-2 No.1, were drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Well ER-6-2 was drilled in two stages in 1993 and 1994; the satellite hole, Well ER-6-2 No.1 was drilled nearby in 1993 but was abandoned. The wells were drilled as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit Number 97, in the northeastern portion of the Nevada Test Site. The wells are located in Yucca Flat, within Area 6 of the Nevada Test Site. The wells provided information regarding the radiological and hydrogeological environment in a potentially down-gradient position from tests conducted in northern and central Yucca Flat. Construction of Well ER-6-2 began with a 1.2-meter-diameter surface conductor hole, which was drilled and cased off to a depth of 30.8 meters below the surface. A 50.8-centimeter diameter surface hole was then rotary drilled to the depth of 578.5 meters and cased off to the depth of 530.4 meters. The hole diameter was then reduced to 27.0 centimeters, and the borehole was advanced to a temporary depth of 611.4 meters. The borehole was conventionally cored to a total depth of 1,045 meters with a diameter of 14.0 centimeters. Borehole sloughing required cementing and re-drilling of several zones. The open-hole completion accesses the lower carbonate aquifer, the CP thrust fault, and the upper clastic confining unit. A fluid level depth of 543.2 meters was most recently measured in the open borehole in September 2007. No radionuclides were encountered during drilling. The satellite hole Well ER-6-2 No.1 was drilled approximately 15.2 meters north of Well ER-6-2 on the same drill pad. This was planned to be used as an observation well during future hydrologic testing at Well ER-6-2; however, the satellite hole was abandoned at the depth of 399 meters due to stuck drill pipe, and was subsequently cemented to the surface. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments in this report are based on composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters, cores taken between the depths of 619.3 and 1,042.4 meters, and geophysical log data. Stratigraphic assignments within the Paleozoic section are based on paleontological analyses. The well was collared in alluvium and at 30.8 meters penetrated Paleozoic carbonate rocks. These consisted of dolostone with minor shale and limestone of the Bonanza King Formation, and limestone with minor quartzite, sandstone, and dolostone assigned to the Guilmette Formation. The borehole reached total depth in a shale unit assigned to the Chainman Shale. The units below the Bonanza King Formation are overturned due to faulting and folding and, therefore, are stratigraphically upside-down.

  20. Silver nanoparticles enhanced luminescence properties of Er{sup 3+} doped tellurite glasses: Effect of heat treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fares, Hssen; Férid, Mokhtar [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Matériaux Minéraux et leurs Applications, Centre National de Recherches en Sciences des Matériaux, B.P. 95 Hammam-Lif, 2050 (Tunisia); Elhouichet, Habib, E-mail: habib.elhouichet@fst.rnu.tn [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Matériaux Minéraux et leurs Applications, Centre National de Recherches en Sciences des Matériaux, B.P. 95 Hammam-Lif, 2050 (Tunisia); Department of Physics, Sciences Faculty of Tunis, University Tunis ElManar 2092 (Tunisia); Gelloz, Bernard [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, 2-24-16 Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Tellurite glasses doped Er{sup 3+} ions and containing Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are prepared using melt quenching technique. The nucleation and growth of Ag NPs were controlled by a thermal annealing process. The X-ray diffraction pattern shows no sharp peak indicating an amorphous nature of the glasses. The presence of Ag NPs is confirmed from transmission electron microscopy micrograph. Absorption spectra show typical surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band of Ag NPs within the 510–550?nm range in addition to the distinctive absorption peaks of Er{sup 3+} ions. The Judd-Ofelt (J-O) intensity parameters, oscillator strengths, spontaneous transition probabilities, branching ratios, and radiative lifetimes were successfully calculated based on the experimental absorption spectrum and the J-O theory. It was found that the presence of silver NPs nucleated and grown during the heat annealing process improves both of the photoluminescence (PL) intensity and the PL lifetime relative to the {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}???{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transition. Optimum PL enhancement was obtained after 10?h of heat-treatment. Such enhancements are mainly attributed to the strong local electric field induced by SPR of silver NPs and also to energy transfer from the surface of silver NPs to Er{sup 3+} ions, whereas the quenching is ascribed to the energy transfer from Er{sup 3+} ions to silver NPs. Using the Mc Cumber method, absorption cross-section, calculated emission cross-section, and gain cross-section for the {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} ? {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transition were determined and compared for the doped and co-doped glasses. The present results indicate that the glass heat-treated for 10?h has good prospect as a gain medium applied for 1.53??m band broad and high-gain erbium-doped fiber amplifiers.

  1. Gain dynamics in a soft X-ray laser ampli er perturbed by a strong injected X-ray eld

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yong [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Wang, Shoujun [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Oliva, E [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas] [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas; Lu, L [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas] [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL] [ORNL; Yin, Liang [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Nejdl, J [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Luther, Brad [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Proux, C [Laboratoire d’Optique Applique´e, ENSTA, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique] [Laboratoire d’Optique Applique´e, ENSTA, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique; Le, T. T. [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas] [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas; Dunn, James [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Ros, D [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas] [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas; Zeitoun, Philippe [École Polytechnique] [École Polytechnique; Rocca, Jorge [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seeding soft X-ray plasma ampli ers with high harmonics has been demonstrated to generate high-brightness soft X-ray laser pulses with full spatial and temporal coherence. The interaction between the injected coherent eld and the swept-gain medium has been modelled. However, no exper- iment has been conducted to probe the gain dynamics when perturbed by a strong external seed eld. Here, we report the rst X-ray pump X-ray probe measurement of the nonlinear response of a plasma ampli er perturbed by a strong soft X-ray ultra-short pulse. We injected a sequence of two time-delayed high-harmonic pulses (l518.9 nm) into a collisionally excited nickel-like molybdenum plasma to measure with femto-second resolution the gain depletion induced by the saturated ampli cation of the high-harmonic pump and its subsequent recovery. The measured fast gain recovery in 1.5 1.75 ps con rms the possibility to generate ultra-intense, fully phase-coherent soft X-ray lasers by chirped pulse ampli cation in plasma ampli ers.

  2. Spectroscopic properties of Er{sup 3+} doped lead telluroborate glasses for 1.5 ?m broadband amplifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vijayakumar, R., E-mail: mari-ram2000@yahoo.com; Arunkumar, S., E-mail: mari-ram2000@yahoo.com; Vijayakumar, M., E-mail: mari-ram2000@yahoo.com; Marimuthu, K., E-mail: mari-ram2000@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Gandhigram Rural Institute ? Deemed University, Gandhigram - 624302 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Er{sup 3+} doped lead telluroborate glasses (xEPTB) with the composition 25B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-(25-x)TeO{sub 2}-25PbO-10Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}-15CdO-xEr{sub 2}O{sub 3} (where x=0.1, 0.5, 1 and 2 wt%) have been prepared and characterised using NIR luminescence and decay measurements for 1.5 ?m broadband amplifier applications. Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters have been derived to predict radiative properties of the {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}?{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} emission transition. The larger values of stimulated emission cross-section (?P), FWHM, gain bandwidth (?G), radiative lifetime (?{sup cal}), quantum efficiency (?) of the 1EPTB glass suggest their potential use in broadband amplifiers. The effect of RE ion concentration and OH{sup ?} content on the lifetime of {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}?{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transition and the energy transfer mechanism of Er{sup 3+} ions have also been discussed and reported in the present study.

  3. Optical absorption and fluorescence properties of Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} codoped lead bismuth alumina borate glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goud, K. Krishna Murthy, E-mail: krishnamurthy.phy@gmail.com; Reddy, M. Chandra Shekhar, E-mail: krishnamurthy.phy@gmail.com; Rao, B. Appa, E-mail: krishnamurthy.phy@gmail.com [Dept. of Physics, Osmania University, Hyderabad-500007, Andhra Pradesh (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Lead bismuth alumina borate glasses codoped with Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} were prepared by melt quenching technique. Optical absorption, FTIR and photoluminescence spectra of these glasses have been studied. Judd-Ofelt theory has been applied to to the f ? f transitions for evaluating ?{sub 2}, ?{sub 4} and ?{sub 6} parameters. Radiative properties like branching ratio ?{sub r} and the radiative life time ?{sub R} have been determined on the basis of Judd-Ofelt theory. Upconversion emissions have been observed under 980nm laser excitation at room temperature. Green and red up-conversion emissions are centered at 530, 550 and 656 nm corresponding to {sup 2}H{sub 11/2}?{sup 4}I{sub 15/2}, {sup 4}S{sub 3/2}?{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}?{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transitions of Er{sup 3+} respectively. The results obtained are discussed quantitatively based on the energy transfer between Yb{sup 3+} and Er{sup 3+}.

  4. Photoluminescence properties and energy levels of RE (RE?=?Pr, Sm, Er, Tm) in layered-CaZnOS oxysulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhi-Jun, E-mail: zhangzj@mail.sic.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Transparent Opto-Functional Inorganic Materials of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Shanghai 200050 (China); Feng, Ang; Chen, Xiang-Yang [Key Laboratory of Transparent Opto-Functional Inorganic Materials of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Shanghai 200050 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Zhao, Jing-Tai, E-mail: jtzhao@mail.sic.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Transparent Opto-Functional Inorganic Materials of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Shanghai 200050 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China)

    2013-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    RE{sup 3+} (RE?=?Pr, Sm, Er, Tm)-activated CaZnOS samples were prepared by a solid-state reaction method at high temperature, and their photoluminescence properties were investigated. Doping with RE{sup 3+} (RE?=?Pr, Sm, Er, Tm) into layered-CaZnOS resulted in typical RE{sup 3+} (RE?=?Pr, Sm, Er, Tm) f-f line absorptions and emissions, as well as the charge transfer band of Sm{sup 3+} at about 3.3?eV. The energy level scheme containing the position of the 4f and 5d levels of all divalent and trivalent lanthanide ions with respect to the valence and conduction bands of CaZnOS has been constructed based on the new data presented in this work, together with the data from literature on Ce{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 2+} doping in CaZnOS. The detailed energy level scheme provides a platform for interpreting the optical spectra and could be used to comment on the valence stability of the lanthanide ions in CaZnOS.

  5. Evaluation of lysine deficient grower diets for heavy breed replacement pullets and a comparison of sorghum grains and corn as a carbohydrate source for broiler-breeder hens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolan, Alan

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF LYSINE DEFICIENT GROWER DIETS FOR HEAVY BREED REPLACEMENT PULLETS AND A COMPARISON OF SORGHUM GRAINS AND CORN AS A CARBOHYDRATE SOURCE FOR BROILER-BREEDER HENS A Thesis ALAN TOLAN Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas... ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1967 Major Subject: Animal Nutrition EVALUATION OF LYSINE DEFICIENT GROWER DIETS FOR HEAVY BREED REPLACEMENT PULLETS AND A COMPARISON OF SORGHUM...

  6. Analyzing the Effect of Variations in Soil and Management Practices on the Sustainability of Corn Stover-Based Bioethanol Production in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woli, Prem; Paz, Joel

    2011-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The inherent variability in corn stover productivity due to variations in soils and crop management practices might contribute to a variation in corn stover-based bioethanol sustainability. This study was carried out to examine how changes in soil types and crop management options would affect corn stover yield (CSY) and the sustainability of the stover-based ethanol production in the Delta region of Mississippi. Based on potential acreage and geographical representation, three locations were selected. Using CERES-Maize model, stover yields were simulated for several scenarios of soils and crop management options. Based on 'net energy value (NEV)' computed from CSYs, a sustainability indicator for stover-based bioethanol production was established. The effects of soils and crop management options on CSY and NEV were determined using ANOVA tests and regression analyses. Both CSY and NEV were significantly different across sandy loam, silt loam, and silty clay loam soils and also across high-, mid-, and low-yielding cultivars. With an increase in irrigation level, both CSY and NEV increased initially and decreased after reaching a peak. A third-degree polynomial relationship was found between planting date and CSY and NEV each. By moving from the lowest to the highest production scenario, values of CSY and NEV could be increased by 86 to 553%, depending on location and weather condition. The effects of variations in soils and crop management options on NEV were the same as on CSY. The NEV was positive for all scenarios, indicating that corn stover-based ethanol production system in the Delta region is sustainable.

  7. Direct application of west coast geothermal resources in a wet corn milling plant supplementary analyses and information dissemination. Final report, addendum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In an extension to the scope of the previous studies, supplementary analyses were to be performed for both plants which would assess the economics of geothermal energy if coal had been the primary fuel rather than oil and gas. The studies include: supplementary analysis for a coal fired wet corn milling plant, supplementary analysis for an East Coast frozen food plant with coal fired boilers, and information dissemination activities.

  8. Interaction of Ce{sub 1?x}Er{sub x}O{sub 2?y} nanoparticles with SiO{sub 2}-effect of temperature and atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kepinski, L., E-mail: L.Kepinski@int.pan.wroc.pl; Krajczyk, L.; Mista, W.

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Morphology, microstructure and phase evolution of homogeneous, nanocrystalline Ce{sub 1?x}Er{sub x}O{sub 2?x/2} mixed oxide (x=0.3 and 0.5), prepared by microemulsion method, supported on amorphous SiO{sub 2} was studied in oxidizing and reducing atmosphere by XRD, TEM, SEM-EDS and N{sub 2} adsorption. The system is structurally and chemically stable in the oxidizing atmosphere up to 1000 °C, exhibiting only a small increase of the mean crystallite size of the oxide to ?4 nm. At 1100 °C formation of Er silicate with unusual structure isomorphic with y-Y{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} (yttrialite), stabilized by Ce{sup 4+} ions was observed. In the reducing atmosphere the Ce{sub 1?x}Er{sub x}O{sub 2?x/2} reacted with SiO{sub 2} already at 900 °C, due to high affinity of the reduced Ce{sup 3+} to form a silicate phase. At higher temperature the silicate crystallized into the tetragonal, low temperature A-(Ce{sub 1?x}Er{sub x}){sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} polymorph. Such systems, containing nanocrystalline silicate particles with Er{sup 3+} ions placed in well defined sites embedded in silica matrix, may be interesting as highly efficient active components of optical waveguides amplifiers integrated with Si microelectronics. The nanocrystalline Ce–Er–O/SiO{sub 2} system prepared by the impregnation of the silica with the aqueous solution of nitrates appeared to be chemically inhomogeneous and less stable in both oxidising and reducing atmosphere. - Graphical abstract: Structure evolution of Ce{sub 0.5}Er{sub 0.5}O{sub 1.75} in air and in H{sub 2}. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Homogeneous 3 nm Ce{sub 1?x}Er{sub x}O{sub 2?y} particles were prepared and uniformly dispersed on SiO{sub 2}. • Er diffusion to SiO{sub 2} determines the stability of the mixed oxide in air to ?1000 °C. • Spreading of Ce{sub 1?x}Er{sub x}O{sub 2?y} onto SiO{sub 2} occurs in hydrogen at 900 °C. • Nanocrystalline A-(Ce,Er){sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} silicate forms in H{sub 2} at 1100 °C.

  9. Final Report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-06ER64160 Retrieval of Cloud Properties and Direct Testing of Cloud and Radiation Parameterizations using ARM Observations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donovan, David Patrick [KNMI

    2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report briefly summaries the work performed at KNMI under DOE Grant DE-FG02-06ER64160 which, in turn was conducted in support of DOE Grant DE-FG02-90ER61071 lead by E. Clothieux of Penn. State U. The specific work at KNMI revolved around the development and application of the EarthCARE simulator to ground-based multi-sensor simulations.

  10. Role of estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha) insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I-induced responses in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shu

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ROLE OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR ? (ER?) IN INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR (IGF)-I-INDUCED RESPONSES IN MCF-7 BREAST CANCER CELLS A Dissertation by SHU ZHANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2007 Major Subject: Toxicology ROLE OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR ? (ER?) IN INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR (IGF)-I-INDUCED RESPONSES IN MCF-7 BREAST CANCER CELLS A Dissertation...

  11. WBS-FOR CREATING AN ER-MODEL Let A(Ei) = the set of attributes of entity-set an Ei.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Sukhamay

    WBS-FOR CREATING AN ER-MODEL · Let A(Ei) = the set of attributes of entity-set an Ei. · Let A from each Ei partici- pating in Rj, can interact multiple times, then we need a pri- mary key among FOR CREATING ER-MODELS Identify name and A(Ei) for each Ei Identify a primary key for each Ei Identify name

  12. Completion Report for Model Evaluation Well ER-5-5: Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Underground Test Area and Boreholes Programs and Operations

    2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Model Evaluation Well ER-5-5 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of Nevada Environmental Management Operations at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site). The well was drilled in July and August 2012 as part of a model evaluation well program in the Frenchman Flat area of Nye County, Nevada. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed geologic, hydrogeologic, chemical, and radiological data that can be used to test and build confidence in the applicability of the Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit flow and transport models for their intended purpose. In particular, this well was designed to obtain data to evaluate the uncertainty in model forecasts of contaminant migration from the upgradient underground nuclear test MILK SHAKE, conducted in Emplacement Hole U-5k in 1968, which were considered to be uncertain due to the unknown extent of a basalt lava-flow aquifer present in this area. Well ER-5-5 is expected to provide information to refine the Phase II Frenchman Flat hydrostratigraphic framework model, if necessary, as well as to support future groundwater flow and transport modeling. The 31.1-centimeter (cm) diameter hole was drilled to a total depth of 331.3 meters (m). The completion string, set at the depth of 317.2 m, consists of 16.8-cm stainless-steel casing hanging from 19.4-cm carbon-steel casing. The 16.8-cm stainless-steel casing has one slotted interval open to the basalt lava-flow aquifer and limited intervals of the overlying and underlying alluvial aquifer. A piezometer string was also installed in the annulus between the completion string and the borehole wall. The piezometer is composed of 7.3-cm stainless-steel tubing suspended from 6.0-cm carbon-steel tubing. The piezometer string was landed at 319.2 m, to monitor the basalt lava-flow aquifer. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 m, various geophysical logs, preliminary water quality measurements, and water-level measurements. The well penetrated 331.3 m of Quaternary–Tertiary alluvium, including an intercalated layer of saturated basalt lava rubble. No well development or hydrologic testing was conducted in this well immediately after completion; however, a preliminary water level was measured in the piezometer string at the depth of 283.4 m on September 25, 2012. No tritium above the minimum detection limit of the field instruments was detected in this hole. Future well development, sampling, and hydrologic testing planned for this well will provide more accurate hydrologic information for this site. The stratigraphy, general lithology, and water level were as expected, though the expected basalt lava-flow aquifer is basalt rubble and not the dense, fractured lava as modeled. The lack of tritium transport is likely due to the difference in hydraulic properties of the basalt lava-flow rubble encountered in the well, compared to those of the fractured aquifer used in the flow and transport models.

  13. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF) is a facility safety reference document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) environmental restoration activities. The BSAF contains information and guidance for safety analysis documentation required by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for environmental restoration (ER) activities, including: Characterization of potentially contaminated sites. Remedial investigations to identify and remedial actions to clean up existing and potential releases from inactive waste sites Decontamination and dismantlement of surplus facilities. The information is INEL-specific and is in the format required by DOE-EM-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports. An author of safety analysis documentation need only write information concerning that activity and refer to BSAF for further information or copy applicable chapters and sections. The information and guidance provided are suitable for: {sm_bullet} Nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480-23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) with hazards that meet the Category 3 threshold (DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) {sm_bullet} Radiological facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94, Hazard Baseline Documentation) Nonnuclear facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94) that are classified as {open_quotes}low{close_quotes} hazard facilities (DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System). Additionally, the BSAF could be used as an information source for Health and Safety Plans and for Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) for nuclear facilities with hazards equal to or greater than the Category 2 thresholds, or for nonnuclear facilities with {open_quotes}moderate{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} hazard classifications.

  14. Enhanced 1.53??m emission of Er{sup 3+} ions in phosphate glass via energy transfer from Cu{sup +} ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiménez, José A., E-mail: jose.jimenez@unf.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, Florida 32224 (United States); Sendova, Mariana [Optical Spectroscopy and Nano-Materials Lab, New College of Florida, Sarasota, Florida 34243 (United States)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimizing the efficiency of Er{sup 3+} emission in the near-infrared telecommunication window in glass matrices is currently a subject of great interest in photonics research. In this work, Cu{sup +} ions are shown to be successfully stabilized at a high concentration in Er-containing phosphate glass by a single-step melt-quench method, and demonstrated to transfer energy to Er{sup 3+} thereby enhancing the near-infrared emission about 15 times. The spectroscopic data indicate an energy conversion process where Cu{sup +} ions first absorb photons broadly around 360?nm and subsequently transfer energy from the Stokes-shifted emitting states to resonant Er{sup 3+} absorption transitions in the visible. Consequently, the Er{sup 3+} electronic excited states decay and the {sup 4}I{sub 3/2} metastable state is populated, leading to the enhanced emission at 1.53??m. Monovalent copper ions are thus recognized as sensitizers of Er{sup 3+} ions, suggesting the potential of Cu{sup +} co-doping for applications in the telecommunications, solar cells, and solid-state lasing realizable under broad band near-ultraviolet optical pumping.

  15. Magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effects of Gd{sub x}Er{sub 1?x}Ga (0???x???1) compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, X. Q.; Wang, L. C.; Wu, R. R.; Hu, F. X.; Sun, J. R.; Shen, B. G., E-mail: shenbg@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Institute of Physics, State key laboratory for Magnetism, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Chen, J. [Beijing Institute of Aerospace Testing Technology, China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation, Beijing 100074 (China)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We carefully studied the magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effect of Gd{sub x}Er{sub 1-x}Ga (0???x???1) compounds. The Gd{sub x}Er{sub 1-x}Ga compounds undergo two magnetic transitions with temperature increasing: spin-reorientation or antiferromagnetic-to-ferromagnetic (FM) transition and FM-to-paramagnetic transition. As the content of Gd increases from 0 to 1, the transition temperature in low temperature region changes from 15?K to 66?K and the Curie temperature increases obviously from 30?K to 181.9?K. Although the maximum value of magnetic entropy change (?S{sub M}) for Gd{sub x}Er{sub 1?x}Ga decreases with the increase of x, the refrigerant capacity (RC) improves remarkably compared with that of ErGa compound. Table-like ?S{sub M} curves are observed for the compounds with x?=?0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4, which are very useful for real cooling applications. And Gd{sub 0.2}Er{sub 0.8}Ga and Gd{sub 0.3}Er{sub 0.7}Ga compounds show better magnetocaloric features than others in this series under considerations of both ?S{sub M} and RC. The results of this series of compounds show us a possible way to design and improve the magnetic refrigerant materials by making some substitutions.

  16. Long-range ferromagnetic order induced by a donor impurity band exchange in SnO{sub 2}:Er{sup 3+} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aragón, F. H.; Coaquira, J. A. H. [Núcleo de Física Aplicada, Institute of Physics, University of Brasília, Brasília DF 70910-900 (Brazil); Chitta, V. A. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil); Hidalgo, P. [Faculdade Gama-FGA, Sector Central Gama, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF72405-610 (Brazil); Brito, H. F. [Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil)

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, the structural and magnetic properties of Er-doped SnO{sub 2} (SnO{sub 2}:Er) nanoparticles are reported. The SnO{sub 2}:Er nanoparticles have been synthesized by a polymer precursor method with Er content from 1.0% to 10.0%. X-ray diffraction results indicate the formation of only the rutile-type structure in all samples. The estimated mean crystallite size shows a decrease from ?10 to ?4?nm when the Er content is increased from 1.0% to 10.0%. The particle size values have been corroborated by transmission electron microscopy technique. The thermal dependence of the magnetization is consistent with the 3+ oxidation state of erbium ions for all samples. A strong paramagnetic-like behavior coexisting with a ferromagnetic phase has been determined for samples with Er content below 5.0%. Above this concentration, only a paramagnetic behavior has been determined. Isothermal magnetization curves are consistent with the occurrence of long-range ferromagnetic order mediated by donor electrons forming bound magnetic polarons which overlap to produce a spin-split impurity band.

  17. Upcoversion performance improvement of NaYF{sub 4}:Yb, Er by Sn codoping: Enhanced emission intensity and reduced decay time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Han, E-mail: fjfzyh@fzu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 (China); Cao, Wenbing [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 (China); Huang, Qingming [Instrumentation Analysis and Research Center, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Ma, En [Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Zhang, Xinqi [Instrumentation Analysis and Research Center, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Yu, Jianchang [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this manuscript we report a phenomenon that upconversion emission intensity of Er{sup 3+} was enhanced while decay time constant was decreased obviously by Sn codoping with Yb/Er into hexagonal NaYF{sub 4} synchronously. X-ray powder diffiraction, field emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron spin-resonance spectroscopy and upconversion emission spectra were employed to explore the relation of crystal structure and properties. From these characterizations we found that symmetry of the rare earth ion local crystal field could be tuned by different Sn codoping concentration. For the variable valence property of Sn the local crystal field asymmetry and emission intensity of NaYF{sub 4}:Yb, Er arrived to the maximum when 3 mol% Sn was codoped, while decay time was reduced. The study of this changing tends of upconversion emission intensity and decay time constant may be helpful for design and fabrication of high performance upconversion materials. - Graphical abstract: Variable-valenced Sn is introduced with Yb/Er into NaFY{sub 4} to tune structure and local crystal field. Upconversion emission intensity of Er{sup 3+} was enhanced while decay time constant was decreased. Display Omitted - Highlights: • NaYF{sub 4}: Yb, Er was codoped with different concentration Sn. • Upconversion emission intensity was enhanced while decay time constant was decreased. • Introduction of variable-valenced Sn is effective to tune structure and crystal field of NaFY{sub 4}.

  18. Improved Laboratory Transition Probabilities for Er II and Applications to the Erbium Abundances of the Sun and Five r-Process Rich, Metal-Poor Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Lawler; C. Sneden; J. J. Cowan; J. -F. Wyart; I. I. Ivans; J. S. Sobeck; M. H. Stockett; E. A. Den Hartog

    2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent radiative lifetime measurements accurate to +/- 5% (Stockett et al. 2007, J. Phys. B 40, 4529) using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) on 8 even-parity and 62 odd-parity levels of Er II have been combined with new branching fractions measured using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) to determine transition probabilities for 418 lines of Er II. This work moves Er II onto the growing list of rare earth spectra with extensive and accurate modern transition probability measurements using LIF plus FTS data. This improved laboratory data set has been used to determine a new solar photospheric Er abundance, log epsilon = 0.96 +/- 0.03 (sigma = 0.06 from 8 lines), a value in excellent agreement with the recommended meteoric abundance, log epsilon = 0.95 +/- 0.03. Revised Er abundances have also been derived for the r-process-rich metal-poor giant stars CS 22892-052, BD+17 3248, HD 221170, HD 115444, and CS 31082-001. For these five stars the average Er/Eu abundance ratio, = 0.42, is in very good agreement with the solar-system r-process ratio. This study has further strengthened the finding that r-process nucleosynthesis in the early Galaxy which enriched these metal-poor stars yielded a very similar pattern to the r-process which enriched later stars including the Sun.

  19. Structural and ambient/sub-ambient temperature magnetic properties of Er-substituted cobalt-ferrites synthesized by sol-gel assisted auto-combustion method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prathapani, Sateesh [School of Engineering Sciences and Technology, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, IIT-Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Jayaraman, Tanjore V., E-mail: ddas@uohyd.ernet.in, E-mail: tvjayaraman@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Varaprasadarao, Eswara K. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, IIT-Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Das, Dibakar, E-mail: ddas@uohyd.ernet.in, E-mail: tvjayaraman@gmail.com [School of Engineering Sciences and Technology, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Er-substituted cobalt-ferrites CoFe{sub 2?x}Er{sub x}O{sub 4} (0???x???0.04) were synthesized by sol-gel assisted auto-combustion method. The precursor powders were calcined at 673–873?K for 4?h, subsequently pressed into pellets and sintered at 1273?K for 4?h. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed the presence of the spinel phase for all the compositions and, additional orthoferrite phase for higher compositions (x?=?0.03 and 0.04). The XRD spectra and the Transmission Electron Microscopy micrographs indicate that the nanocrystalline particulates of the Er-substituted cobalt ferrites have crystallite size of ?120–200?nm. The magnetization curves show an increase in saturation magnetization (M{sub S}) and coercivity (H{sub C}) for Er-substituted cobalt-ferrites at sub-ambient temperatures. M{sub S} for CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, CoFe{sub 0.99}Er{sub 0.01}O{sub 4}, CoFe{sub 0.98}Er{sub 0.02}O{sub 4}, and CoFe{sub 0.97}Er{sub 0.03}O{sub 4} peak at 89.7?Am{sup 2}/kg, 89.3?Am{sup 2}/kg, 88.8?Am{sup 2}/kg, and 87.1?Am{sup 2}/kg, respectively, at a sub-ambient temperature of ?150?K. H{sub C} substantially increases with decrease in temperature for all the compositions, while it peaks at x?=?0.01?0.02 at all temperatures. The combination of Er content—x???0.02 and the temperature—?5?K provides the maximum H{sub C}???984?kA/m. Er-substituted cobalt-ferrites have higher cubic anisotropy constant, K{sub 1}, compared to pure cobalt-ferrite at ambient/sub-ambient temperatures. K{sub 1} gradually increases for all compositions in the temperature decreasing from 300 to 100?K. While K{sub 1} peaks at ?150?K for pure cobalt-ferrite, it peaks at ?50?K for CoFe{sub 0.99}Er{sub 0.01}O{sub 4}, CoFe{sub 0.98}Er{sub 0.02}O{sub 4}, and CoFe{sub 0.96}Er{sub 0.04}O{sub 4}. The M{sub S} (?88.7?Am{sup 2}/kg), at 5?K, for Er substituted cobalt-ferrite is close to the highest values reported for Sm and Gd substituted cobalt-ferrites. The M{sub S} (?83.5?Am{sup 2}/kg) at 300?K for Er-substituted cobalt-ferrite is the highest among the lanthanide series element substituted cobalt-ferrites. The H{sub C} (at 5?K) for Er substituted cobalt-ferrite is close to the highest values observed for La, Ce, Nd, Sm, and Gd substituted cobalt-ferrites.

  20. Investigation of the use of an Er:YAG laser and a fluoride glass fiber for laser angioplasty 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwark, Bongsin

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is attracting the attention of inany invest&- gators, 'I]. Although many lasers ( c. y. , Ar ion. Nd: YAC(, and excimer) have been tried for laser angioplasty, no clear winner has enierged. Recently it has been suggested that the erbium: yttrium aluminum...INVESTIGATION OF THE USE OF AN ER:YAG LASER AND A FLUORIDE ClLASS FIBER FOR LASER ANGIOPLASTY A Thes&s BONC'SIN KA'ARK Submitted to the Office of Clraduate Sturlies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  1. Completion Report for Well ER-20-4 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-20-4 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in August and September 2010 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to investigate the possibility of radionuclide transport from up-gradient underground nuclear tests conducted in central Pahute Mesa. This well also provided detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section that will help reduce uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model.

  2. Final Report for DOE grant project FG02-07ER41458 [Dense Quark Matter in Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Incera, Vivian

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Final Report for DOE grant DE-FG02-07ER41458. This grant was originally a three-year project. However, this final report summarizes the results of the first two years, as at the end of the second year of the grant the PIs moved to a new university and the grant was closed. The work done under the first two years of the DOE grant led to several papers and presentations. It also served to train one undergraduate and three graduate students.

  3. Huntingtin is required for ER-to-Golgi transport and for secretory vesicle fusion at the plasma membrane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandstaetter, Hemma; Kruppa, Antonina J.; Buss, Folma

    2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    et al., 2009; Presley et al., 1997; Roghi and Allan, 1999). To determine whether compromising dynein activity affects the ER-to-Golgi GFP-hGH transport assay, we performed siRNA knockdown of the dynein associated intermediate chain (DIC... cells. Nature. 389:81-85. Roghi, C., and V.J. Allan. 1999. Dynamic association of cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain 1a with the Golgi apparatus and intermediate compartment. J Cell Sci. 112 ( Pt 24):4673-4685. Sahlender, D.A., R.C. Roberts, S.D. Arden...

  4. Discrimination between energy transfer and back transfer processes for GaAs host and Er luminescent dopants using electric response analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishii, Masashi, E-mail: ISHII.Masashi@nims.go.jp [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Koizumi, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Yasufumi [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Takeda, Yoshikazu [Nagoya Industrial Science Research Institute, Nagoya, Aichi 464-0819 (Japan)

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy transfer and back transfer processes of GaAs co-doped with Er and O (GaAs:Er,O) were experimentally distinguished by using a frequency response analysis of the AC photocurrent. The results were achieved by using the difference in the frequency dispersion between (1) the dispersion of the energy transfer, which is triggered by the trapping of free charges in the GaAs host and is represented with the Debye relaxation response and (2) the dispersion of the energy back transfer, which is induced by non-radiative transition of 4f bound electrons in the Er dopants and is described with a Lorentzian. The Debye relaxation response found in GaAs:Er,O provided a charge trapping time that was dependent on temperature, which was well correlated with the thermal quenching property of intense intra-4f-shell luminescence. The spectral shape of the Lorentzian dependence on the temperature was explained with the thermal excitation of Er 4f electrons and release of trapped charges in GaAs. The thermal excitation and release of charges consistently explained the characteristics of weak 4f luminescence in low- and high-temperature regions, respectively.

  5. Luminescence thermometry below room temperature via up-conversion emission of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+},Er{sup 3+} nanophosphors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lojpur, V.; Nikoli?, G.; Drami?anin, M. D., E-mail: dramican@vinca.rs [Vin?a Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, Belgrade 11001 (Serbia)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This study explores potential of Er{sup 3+}-Yb{sup 3+} doped phosphors for up-conversion luminescence thermometry in the temperature range from 10?K to 300?K. Yttrium oxide nanopowder doped with trivalent ytterbium and erbium ions (Y{sub 1.97}Yb{sub 0.02}Er{sub 0.01}O{sub 3}) was prepared by hydrothermal synthesis as an example. The intensity ratios of up-conversion emissions from thermally coupled {sup 2}H{sub 11/2} and {sup 4}S{sub 3/2} levels of Er{sup 3+} show strong temperature dependence (in the range 150?K–300?K) with much higher relative sensitivity than those reported for thermometry above room temperature with Er{sup 3+}-Yb{sup 3+} based up-conversion materials. The maximal value of relative sensitivity is 5.28%K{sup ?1} at 150?K, with temperature resolution ranging from 0.81?K to 0.06?K. In addition, the intensity ratios of emission from thermally non-coupled Er{sup 3+} levels ({sup 2}H{sub 9/2} and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}) and from {sup 4}S{sub 3/2} also show temperature dependence that can be approximated with an exponential function. With these up-conversion emission ratios, it is possible measure temperature in the range of 10?K to 300?K with excellent sensitivity and resolution.

  6. Optical properties and energy transfer processes of Ho{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}- codoped fluorotellurite glass under 1550?nm excitation for 2.0??m applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Feifei; Liu, Xueqiang [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Hu, Lili; Chen, Danping, E-mail: dpchen2008@aliyun.com [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates 2.0??m emission properties and energy transfer processes in the Er{sup 3+}/Ho{sup 3+} codoped fluorotellurite glass. The measured absorption spectra demonstrate that the codoped sample can be pumped by 1550?nm excitation efficiently. Judd-Ofelt and radiative parameters are calculated and discussed. Intensive 2.0??m emission originating from Ho{sup 3+}: {sup 5}I{sub 7}?{sup 5}I{sub 8} transition is observed and a long lifetime (11?ms) of the {sup 5}I{sub 7} level is measured when Ho{sup 3+} ions are sensitized by Er{sup 3+} ions. Meanwhile, the upconversion spectra of the Er{sup 3+} singly and codoped samples are obtained and the energy transfer processes of the two ions is discussed based on the change of the upconversion emissions. The microscopic interaction parameters of the phonon-assisted (Er{sup 3+}: {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}?Ho{sup 3+}:{sup 5}I{sub 7}) process are calculated and the microparameter reaches as high as 10.1?×?10{sup ?41} cm{sup 6}/s. Hence, these results indicate that this Ho{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} codoped fluorotellurite glass will be a suitable material for developing solid state laser around 2.0??m.

  7. Effect of process variables on the density and durability of the pellets made from high moisture corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flat die pellet mill was used to understand the effect of high levels of feedstock moisture content in the range of 28–38% (w.b.), with die rotational speeds of 40–60 Hz, and preheating temperatures of 30–110 °C on the pelleting characteristics of 4.8 mm screen size ground corn stover using an 8 mm pellet die. The physical properties of the pelletised biomass studied are: (a) pellet moisture content, (b) unit, bulk and tapped density, and (c) durability. Pelletisation experiments were conducted based on central composite design. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated that feedstock moisture content influenced all of the physical properties at P < 0.001. Pellet moisture content decreased with increase in preheating temperature to about 110 °C and decreasing the feedstock moisture content to about 28% (w.b.). Response surface models developed for quality attributes with respect to process variables has adequately described the process with coefficient of determination (R2) values of >0.88. The other pellet quality attributes such as unit, bulk, tapped density, were maximised at feedstock moisture content of 30–33% (w.b.), die speeds of >50 Hz and preheating temperature of >90 °C. In case of durability a medium moisture content of 33–34% (w.b.) and preheating temperatures of >70 °C and higher die speeds >50 Hz resulted in high durable pellets. It can be concluded from the present study that feedstock moisture content, followed by preheating, and die rotational speed are the interacting process variables influencing pellet moisture content, unit, bulk and tapped density and durability.

  8. FInal Report: DE-FG02-04ER41310 "Elementary Particle Physics"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izen, Joseph M. [University of Texas at Dallas] [University of Texas at Dallas; Ishak-Boushaki, Mustapha [University of Texas at Dallas] [University of Texas at Dallas

    2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    ATLAS and the LHC are delivering on the promise of discovery physics at the high energy frontier. Using 4.8 fb^-1 of 2011 ?s=7 TeV data and the first 5.8 fb?1 of 2012 ?s=8 TeV data, ATLAS published the observation of a new particle with a mass of 126 GeV with a significance of 5.9? that is compatible with a Standard Model (SM) Higgs. The LHC is outperforming intial projections for the 2012 run, and ATLAS is on track to integrate ~20 fb^(-1) of proton-proton collisions in 2012 before Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) begins in Spring 2013. University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) physicists will complete work on two ATLAS analyses this fall. The first is the search for the gauge bosons of a hypothesized dark sector. For 2011 data, UTD is responsible for the ?dark photon?search in the electron-jet channel, and we are looking forward to an expanded leadership role in the dark photon search using the full 2012 data set. Our second analysis interest is the study of X/Y/Z exotic states having cc ? content, which builds on our experience in this field from the BABAR experiment After completing a measurement of the Xc(3872) production cross section this fall, we will search for evidence of the Z(4430)+ which is reported by Belle but not confirmed by BABAR. The UTD group has played a strong role in ATLAS operations, with group members serving as Pixel Run Coordinator, ATLAS Shift Leader, and Pixel/Inner Detector Shifter. For most of the current 3-year funding cycle, a group member coordinated the development of the Pixel DAQ code, and another continues to build and maintain the data quality monitoring (DQM) application that is used by the Inner Detector control room shifter. Additionally, members of our group take Pixel on-call expert shifts for DQM and DAQ. We led an optoboard lifetime study to assess concerns of premature on-detector VCSEL failure using the Pixel working prototype detector at CERN. Physicists based at UTD participated through Pixel Offline DQM and ATLAS Distributed Computing Operations Shifts (ADCoS) During Summer 2012, UTD joined upgrade activities in preparation for LS1. We took a major role in the testing of Electro-Readout (ER) Bundle testing for new Service Quarter Panels (nSQP?s), and we developed two utilities to measure the timing jitter and bit error rate of the Pixel readout chain for use commissioning Pixel detector upgrades. During BABAR?s heyday, the UTD group pioneered the use of e^+ e^- annihilation events with hard Initial State Radiation (ISR) to study the charm threshold region, and we carried out the first BABAR double-cc ? analysis. Our most recent ISR paper, written in collaboration with A. Palano (Bari) is Exclusive Production of Ds^+ Ds^-, D_S^(*+) Ds^-, and Ds^(*+) Ds^(*-) via e+ e- Annihilation with Initial-State-Radiation was published in Physical Review D 82, 052004 (2010). Work continues on a study of ISR ?c^+ ?c^- production, and a new search to establish and study double-ss ? production is starting.

  9. Development of Advanced CdTe Solar Cells Based on High Temperature Corning Glass Substrates: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-373

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, T.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL has developed advanced processes for CdTe solar cells, but because of the temperature limitations of conventional soda lime glass, many of these processes have not been transferred to manufacturing. Corning is developing high temperature substrate glasses that are believed to be manufacturable and will lead to lower $/watt modules costs. The purpose of this CRADA is to evaluate these glasses in the advanced NREL processes. In addition, the CRADA seeks to develop manufacturable processes for transparent conductive oxide layers based on cadmium stannate.

  10. Owens Corning and Silicon Valley Power Partner to Make Energy Savings a Reality, Save Energy Now (SEN), Industrial Technologies Program (ITP), Utility Case Study (Brochure)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartmentOutreachDepartment ofProgram49, the Owens Corning Santa

  11. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-14, Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-14 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Management Operations Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS; formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in September and October 2012, as part of the Central and Western Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Unit Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information for the Fortymile Canyon composite hydrostratigraphic unit in the Timber Mountain moat area, within the Timber Mountain caldera complex, that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. The main 55.9-centimeter (cm) hole was drilled to a total depth of 325.5 meters (m) and cased with 40.6-cm casing to 308.1 m. The hole diameter was then decreased to 37.5 cm, and drilling continued to a total depth of 724.8 m. The completion casing string, set to the depth of 690.9 m, consists of 16.8-cm stainless-steel casing hanging from 19.4-cm carbon-steel casing. The stainless-steel casing has two slotted intervals open to the Rainier Mesa Tuff. Two piezometer strings were installed in Well ER-EC-14. Both piezometer strings, each with one slotted interval, consist of 6.0-cm carbon-steel tubing at the surface, then cross over to 7.3-cm stainless-steel tubing just above the water table. The shallow piezometer string was landed at 507.8 m, and the deep piezometer string was landed at 688.6 m. Both piezometer strings are set to monitor groundwater within moderately to densely welded Rainier Mesa Tuff. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 m, various geophysical logs, water quality (including tritium and other radionuclides) measurements, and water level measurements. The well penetrated 15.2 m of alluvium and 709.6 m of Tertiary volcanic rocks. The stratigraphy and general lithology were not as expected due to the position of Well ER-EC-14 relative to the buried caldera margins of the Timber Mountain caldera complex. The well is located inside the Rainier Mesa caldera, but outside the younger Ammonia Tanks caldera. On November 5, 2012, a preliminary fluid level in the shallow piezometer string was measured at the depth of 311.8 m. This water level depth was taken before installation of the bridge plug (to be placed within the main completion casing to separate the two slotted zones). Well development, hydrologic testing, and sampling, will be conducted at a later date. No tritium above levels detectable by field methods were encountered in this hole. All Fluid Management Plan (FMP) requirements for Well ER-EC-14 were met. Analysis of monitoring samples and FMP confirmatory samples indicated that fluids generated during drilling at Well ER-EC-14 met the FMP criteria for discharge to an unlined sump or designated infiltration area. All sanitary and hydrocarbon waste generated was properly handled and disposed of.

  12. The effects of calcitic and dolomitic limestone rates and particle sizes on soil chemical changes, plant nutrient concentration, and yields of corn and Coastal bermudagrass on two acid Texas soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haby, Vincent A

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    significantly increased Ca to 18 inches, while only the 6-ton/acre rate of fine dolomitic lime- stone increased Ca into the same depth. All dolomitic treatments increased Mg to 18-inch depths. Sampling deeper than 18 inches in the 6 ton/acre dolomitic fine... formed soluble salts with the NO and were leached down as Ca(ND ) Limestone treatments did not produce significant increases in yield of corn or Coastal bermudagrass. The no-lime plots produced 70 bushels of corn and 9. 2 tons of oven-dry Coastal...

  13. Up-conversion luminescence in Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+}-codoped PbTiO{sub 3} perovskite obtained via Pechini method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemos, F.C.D. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, C.P. 1605 CEP 59078-970, Natal, RN (Brazil); Melo, D.M.A. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, C.P. 1605 CEP 59078-970, Natal, RN (Brazil); Silva, J.E.C. da [Campus de Araguaina, Universidade Federal do Tocantins, R. Humberto de Campus, 508, B. Sao Joao, CEP 77807-060, Araguaina, TO (Brazil)]. E-mail: jecs@uft.edu.br

    2005-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient infrared-to-visible conversion by Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+}-codoped PbTiO{sub 3} perovskite will be reported. The process is observed under 980 nm laser diode (GAs:Si) excitation and results in the generation of green ({approx}555 nm) and red ({approx}655 nm) emission. The main mechanism that allows for up-conversion is attributed the energy transfer among Yb and Er ions in excited states. The power up-conversion efficiency for red emission is predominant in this material. The results illustrate the large potential of this new class of material for photonic applications involving optoelectronics devices.

  14. DE-FG02-08ER64658 (OASIS) - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharman, Jonathan

    2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Project OASIS (Operation of Advanced Structures, Interfaces and Sub-components for MEAs) was a 12 month project that ran from 1st September 2008 to 31st August 2009, and was managed by the Department of Energy Office of Science, Chicago Office, as Award No DE-FG02-08ER64658, with Johnson Matthey Fuel Cells Inc. as the sole contractor. The project was completed on schedule, with technical successes (details below) and payment of the full grant award made by DOE. The aim of the project was the development of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) for H2/air polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells that would give higher performance under hot/dry and dry operating conditions, ideally with no loss of performance under wet conditions. Reducing or eliminating the need for humidifying the incoming gases will allow significant system cost and size reduction for many fuel cell applications including automotive, stationary and back-up power, and portable systems. Portable systems are also of particular interest in military markets. In previous work Johnson Matthey Fuel Cells had developed very stable, corrosion-resistant catalysts suitable for resisting degradation by carbon corrosion in particular. These materials were applied within the OASIS project as they are considered necessary for systems such as automotive where multiple start-stop events are experienced. These catalysts were contrasted with more conventional materials in the design of catalyst layers and novel microporous layers (MPLs) and gas diffusion layer (GDL) combinations were also explored. Early on in the work it was shown how much more aggressive high temperature operation is than dry operation. At the same humidity, tests at 110?C caused much more dehydration than tests at 80?C and the high temperature condition was much more revealing of improvements made to MEA design. Alloy catalysts were introduced and compared with Pt catalysts with a range of particle sizes. It was apparent that the larger particle sizes of the alloy catalysts led to a reduction in performance that offset much of their kinetic advantage. The Pt-only materials clearly showed that small particles are beneficial to good performance under hot/dry conditions, because of their higher surface area, although they are known to be less stable to cyclic operation. An ex-situ water vapour sorption technique was developed that showed a very clear correlation with in-cell performance: catalyst powders that absorbed more water gave better performance in-cell. It was shown that alloy catalysts could give a 25 mV advantage over Pt-only at 1 Acm-2. GDL design was also shown to influence performance and more permeable GDLs on the anode allowed better membrane hydration and therefore conductivity. A very impermeable GDL on the cathode caused cathode flooding even under dry conditions, but a novel cathode MPL incorporating ionomer and operating at 110?C, 33/17% RH showed a 150 mV gain at 800 mAcm-2 over the conventional MPL. This project has increased the understanding of the factors that influence performance loss under dry conditions, including the development of an insightful ex-situ characterisation technique (Dynamic Vapour Sorption). All the approaches investigated can be readily implemented in state-of the-art MEAs, although optimisation would be needed to integrate the new designs with existing MEA types and to tune to the exact range of operating conditions. The work is thus expected to benefit the public by feeding through more condition-tolerant production MEAs to a range of applications and thereby accelerate the commercialisation of fuel cell technology. In summary, a number of specific catalyst, catalyst layer, MPL and GDL improvements were made during this project. Often the best designs under dry conditions translated to some performance loss under wet conditions, but compromise situations were also found where dry performance was improved with no loss of wet performance.

  15. Relativistic energy density functionals: Low-energy collective states of {sup 240}Pu and {sup 166}Er

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z. P. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); School of Physical Science and Technology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Ring, P. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Physik-Department der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Meng, J. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The empirical relativistic density-dependent, point-coupling energy density functional, adjusted exclusively to experimental binding energies of a large set of deformed nuclei with Aapprox =150-180 and Aapprox =230-250, is tested with spectroscopic data for {sup 166}Er and {sup 240}Pu. Starting from constrained self-consistent triaxial relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov calculations of binding energy maps as functions of the quadrupole deformation in the beta-gamma plane, excitation spectra and E2 transition probabilities are calculated as solutions of the corresponding microscopic collective Hamiltonian in five dimensions for quadrupole vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom and compared with available data on low-energy collective states.

  16. Role of silicon excess in Er-doped silicon-rich nitride light emitting devices at 1.54??m

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramírez, J. M., E-mail: jmramirez@el.ub.edu; Berencén, Y.; Garrido, B. [MIND-IN2UB, Department Electrònica, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Cueff, S. [Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon, École Centrale de Lyon, Écully 69134 (France); Labbé, C. [Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la Photonique (CIMAP), UMR 6252 CNRS/CEA/Ensicaen/UCBN, Caen 14050 (France)

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Erbium-doped silicon-rich nitride electroluminescent thin-films emitting at 1.54??m have been fabricated and integrated within a metal-oxide-semiconductor structure. By gradually varying the stoichiometry of the silicon nitride, we uncover the role of silicon excess on the optoelectronic properties of devices. While the electrical transport is mainly enabled in all cases by Poole-Frenkel conduction, power efficiency and conductivity are strongly altered by the silicon excess content. Specifically, the increase in silicon excess remarkably enhances the conductivity and decreases the charge trapping; however, it also reduces the power efficiency. The main excitation mechanism of Er{sup 3+} ions embedded in silicon-rich nitrides is discussed. The optimum Si excess that balances power efficiency, conductivity, and charge trapping density is found to be close to 16%.

  17. Single and two-photon fluorescence control of Er{sup 3+} ions by phase-shaped femtosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Shian, E-mail: sazhang@phy.ecnu.edu.cn; Ding, Jingxin; Lu, Chenhui; Jia, Tianqing; Sun, Zhenrong, E-mail: zrsun@phy.ecnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, and Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, and Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Xu, Shuwu [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, and Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, and Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); School of Science, Nantong University, Nantong 226007 (China); Qiu, Jianrong [State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices, and Institute of Optical Communication Materials, South China University of Technology, Wushan Road 381, Guangzhou 510640 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices, and Institute of Optical Communication Materials, South China University of Technology, Wushan Road 381, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally demonstrate the control of the single and two-photon fluorescence (SPF and TPF) in Er{sup 3+} ions by shaping the femtosecond laser pulse with a ? or square phase modulation. With the low laser intensity (8.4?×?10{sup 10}?W/cm{sup 2}), SPF keeps a constant while TPF is effectively suppressed by the two control schemes. With the high laser intensity (1.2?×?10{sup 13}?W/cm{sup 2}), both SPF and TPF are simultaneously enhanced or suppressed by the ? phase modulation, and SPF is enhanced while TPF is effectively suppressed by the square phase modulation. The up/down-conversion fluorescence enhancement, suppression, or tuning by the optical control method can greatly expand its applications in various related fields.

  18. Well Completion Report for Well ER-20-11, Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-20-11 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Management Operations Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in September 2012 as part of the Central and Western Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Unit Phase II drilling program. Well ER-20-11 was constructed to further investigate the nature and extent of radionuclidecontaminated groundwater encountered in two nearby UGTA wells, to help define hydraulic and transport parameters for the contaminated Benham aquifer, and to provide data for the UGTA hydrostratigraphic framework model. The 44.5-centimeter (cm) surface hole was drilled to a depth of 520.0 meters (m) and cased with 34.0-cm casing to 511.5 m. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 cm, and the borehole was drilled to a total depth of 915.6 m. The hole was completed to allow access for hydrologic testing and sampling in the target aquifer, which is a lava-flow aquifer known as the Benham aquifer. The completion casing string, set to the depth of 904.3 m, consists of a string of 6?-inch (in.) stainless-steel casing hanging from a string of 7?-in. carbon-steel casing. The stainless-steel casing has one slotted interval at 796.3 to 903.6 m. One piezometer string was installed, which consists of 2?-in. stainless-steel tubing that hangs from 2?-in. carbon-steel tubing via a crossover sub. This string was landed at 903.8 m and is slotted in the interval 795.3 to 903.1 m. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 m, various geophysical logs, fluid samples (for groundwater chemistry analysis and tritium measurements), and water-level measurements. The well penetrated 915.6 m of Tertiary volcanic rock, including one saturated lava flow aquifer. Measurements on samples taken from the undeveloped well indicated elevated tritium levels within the Benham aquifer. The maximum tritium level measured with field equipment was 146,131 picocuries per liter from a sample obtained at the depth of 912.0 m. The fluid level was measured in the piezometer string at a depth of 504.5 m on September 26, 2012. All Fluid Management Plan (FMP) requirements for Well ER-20-11 were met. Analysis of monitoring samples and FMP confirmatory samples indicated that fluids generated during drilling at Well ER-20-11 met the FMP criteria for discharge to an unlined sump or designated infiltration area. Well development, hydrologic testing, and sampling will be conducted at a later date.

  19. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-12 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-12 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in June and July 2010 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section in the area between Pahute Mesa and the Timber Mountain caldera complex that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic model. In particular, the well was intended to help define the structural position and hydraulic parameters for volcanic aquifers potentially down-gradient from historic underground nuclear tests on Pahute Mesa. It may also be used as a long-term monitoring well.

  20. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-15 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-15 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in October and November 2010, as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section in the area between Pahute Mesa and the Timber Mountain caldera complex that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic model. In particular, the well was intended to help define the structural position and hydraulic parameters of volcanic aquifers potentially down-gradient from underground nuclear tests on Pahute Mesa. It may also be used as a long-term monitoring well.

  1. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-13 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-13 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in October 2010 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. A main objective was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information for the Fortymile Canyon composite unit hydrostratigraphic unit in the Timber Mountain moat area, within the Timber Mountain caldera complex, that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. This well may also be used as a long-term monitoring well.

  2. Electrical resistivity and thermopower of single-crystal RNi2B2C (R=Dy, Ho, Er, Tm) magnetic superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatnagar, AK; Rathnayaka, KDD; Naugle, Donald G.; Canfield, PC.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The in-plane resistivity rho and thermopower S of single crystal RNi2B2C (R=Dy, Ho, Er, Tm) has been measured from 4 to 300 K. The resistivity is linear in temperature from about 100 to 300 K, but the low-temperature dependence goes as T-p With p...

  3. Poisoning Incidence in Wisconsin: Does Age Ma2er? Thomas Leschke, BA; Clare Guse, MS; Amy Schlo2hauer, MPH; Peter Layde, MD, MSc IntroducEon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poisoning Incidence in Wisconsin: Does Age Ma2er? Thomas Leschke, BA; Clare groups for both intenEonal opioid and non-opioid poisonings Opioid range: 6 and ICD -10 codes were used to divide poisoning incidents by agent (opioid vs

  4. 12me Colloque National AIP PRIMECA Le Mont Dore -29 Mars-1er avril 2011 DE SYSML A MODELICA : AIDE A LA FORMALISATION DE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    12ème Colloque National AIP PRIMECA Le Mont Dore - 29 Mars- 1er avril 2011 1 DE SYSML A MODELICA lequel l'approche de l'ingénierie système basée sur les modèles est utilisée. SysML et Modelica sont les graphique et visuelle alors que Modelica est un langage textuel destiné à la simulation des modèles. Dans le

  5. FLGESKJEMA FOR SKERE TIL PPU TEACH FIRST NORWAY Dersom du har utdanning som ikke er tatt ved UiO, m du skrive ut dette skjemaet og

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Løw, Erik

    F�LGESKJEMA FOR S�KERE TIL PPU TEACH FIRST NORWAY Dersom du har utdanning som ikke er tatt ved Ui søke PPU Teach First Norway i Søknadsweb. Ditt navn: Fødselsnr: Jeg har søkt om fagdidaktikk i

  6. Role of estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha) insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I-induced responses in MCF-7 breast cancer cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shu

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is a mitogenic polypeptide that induces proliferation and activation of kinase pathways in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The role of estrogen receptor ? (ER?) in mediating responses induced by IGF-I was investigated...

  7. Final Report for Grant DE-FG02-91ER40690 for the period 12/1/2010 to 4/30/2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kass, R.; Durkin, L.; Hill, C.; Braaten, E.; Mathur, S.; Raby, S.; Shigemitsu, J.; Gan, K.; Kagan, H.; Hughes, R.; Winer, B.; Honscheid, K.

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the #12;final report for The Ohio State University high energy physics grant DE-FG02- 91ER40690. The activities of the various Tasks are briefy summarized over the previous grant period. The support from the Department of Energy is greatly appreciated.

  8. The Lujan Center is a national user facility funded by Basic Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy which o ers capability for basic and applied neutron scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Energy which o ers capability for basic and applied neutron scattering relevant to national security are the domain of the low-Q scattering intrument, LQD. These well-established neutron techniques probe long Matter, Local Structure, and Nanomaterials The Lujan Neutron Scattering Center encompasses a set

  9. Butz, T. and von Stryk, O.: Modelling and Simulation of ER and MR Fluid Dampers 1 ZAMM Z. angew. Math. Mech. 78 (1998) 0, 122

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stryk, Oskar von

    Butz, T. and von Stryk, O.: Modelling and Simulation of ER and MR Fluid Dampers 1 ZAMM · Z. angew. Math. Mech. 78 (1998) 0, 1­22 Butz, T.; von Stryk, O. Modelling and Simulation of Electro, phenomenological models, numerical simulation, pas- sive suspension MSC (1991): 65C20, 76A05 1 Introduction Electro

  10. Guided wave absorption and uorescence in epitaxial Er:BaTiO3 on MgO D.M. Gilla,*, G.M. Fordb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Seng-Tiong

    . Keywords: Er:BaTiO3; Fluorescence; Luminescence 1. Introduction The development of low-cost composite waveguides fabricated in erbium-doped thin-®lm epitaxial BaTiO3. Luminescence transient measurements indicate strategies toward the realization of this type of opto-electronic circuit. Proposed designs of hybrid opto

  11. Cotton and Corn Experiments.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittuck, B. C.

    1897-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the different characteristics, if any, of the entiTe :field: Soil Plot. No.- 1. 3. I 5. 7. 9. 11. 13. 15. 17. 20. 25. 26. ------------------ ---- Silica and Sand ..... 94.39 94.28 94.4 94.62 94.11 95.15 94.63 94.06 93.65 94.81 94.07 93.85 Water-air dry....89 38.89 42.45 44.84 41.06 55.01 Diameter-Sand. Between .05 and 0.01 mm. 10.71 6. 87 4. 70 5. 37 8. 40 8. 44 6. 71 10.01 14. 93 3. 78 8. 57 13.18 6. 61 5.06 3. 74 3. 59 15.23 8. 62 14.22 9. 26 2. 76 4. 99 3. 98 5. 87 6. 32 10.02 Diameter-Silt. ? Below...

  12. Southern corn rootworm control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wipprecht, Read

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in all tbe plots ssjcing reylaccting neoesssrN, Expericent No, 4. vas a dupjisate of lbrperisant No, 1 aud vas oondust ed aa Nurleson else ~ soL1 and ad)aoent to Rq?raiment N'o, 2, Cbcs occrn rootsorm damaged plant vas found in a obeob plcct, R... Vg 0 7$ 0 74 0 7& 0 0 0 0 93 0 0 92 0 90 0 90 0 88 0 88 0 95 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 78 73 Vg 75 XETAIL OF TABES 1 Kxyer %naacp Ro RHLLKIS OF VARIA5CE 30, 00 33, 21 0 00 0~00 10, 00 14~ 5 V5 33, %j K, 9Q 27 A +36 ~65 RC $2 35~4~ 365T...

  13. Corn Hybrids for Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bockholt, A. J.; Collier, J. W.

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Loams and sandy loams Sandy soils Coast Prairie Blackland Loams and sandy loams Blackland Prairies Blackland Mixed land Grand Prairie Blackland Mixed land West Cross Timbers Rio Grande Plain Blackland Sands and sandy loams Lower Rio Grande... Valley and Winter Garden Dist. (under irrigation) Clays and loams Sands and sandy loams Rolling Plains Clay loams Sands and sandy loams High Plains (irrigated) Clay loams Sandy loams Sands Spac- Fertilizer dress- I " ing at ing of Planting...

  14. Corn Hybrids for Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, J. S.; Bockholt, A. J.; Collier, J. W.

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Root Stalk Unsound Worm dam- Shelling, % Days to Ears per Entries bushels lodging, % breakage, % ears, % age score1 silk plant Texas 28 ."-' Texas 26 Texas 32 Texas 30 Texas 15W Texas 17W Asgrow lOlW United U72 Keystone 222 Funk G711 De....0 6.3 8.2 9.9 10.1 13.0 13.1 16.9 193 16.7 38 40 43 Texas 28 Texas 26 Texas 30 Texas 15W United U72 Keystone 222 Funk G711 TRF 3 Surcropper Ferguson's Yellow Dent Number of tests included 6-YEAR AVERAGE, 1951-56 'Refers to the relative...

  15. Corn Hybrids for Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, J. S.; McAfee, T. E.

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hybrid, was superior to all othey hybrids in freedom from root lodging. Watsrr 124, Keystone 222, Texas 24, Funk G711 an( Texas 30 were superior to other yellow hybrid\\ in resistance to root lodging. Texas 15W agair Angleton Lake Charles clay... degrees of damage. hybrids in resistance to stalk breakage. Ic.\\db L4, Texas 30 and Watson 124 were the I :ellow hybrids most resistant to stalk breakage. 3nk G711 and Keystone 222 were especially ' :u~eeptible to stalk breakage. a Growers who plan...

  16. Completion Report for Well ER-20-7: Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-20-7 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in June 2009 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to further investigate migration of radionuclides from the nearby, up-gradient TYBO and BENHAM underground nuclear tests, which originally was discovered at Well Cluster ER-20-5. This well also provided detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section that will reduce uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. The main 44.45-centimeter hole was drilled to a depth of 681.8 meters and cased with 33.97-centimeter casing to 671.7 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.12 centimeters, and the well was drilled to total depth of 894.9 meters. The completion string, set to the depth of 890.0 meters, consists of 14.13-centimeter stainless-steel casing hanging from 19.37-centimeter carbon-steel casing. The 14.13-centimeter stainless-steel casing has one continuous slotted interval open to the Topopah Spring aquifer. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 meters, sidewall core samples from 20 depth intervals, various geophysical logs, water quality (primarily tritium) measurements, and water level measurements. The well penetrated 894.9 meters of Tertiary volcanic rock, including two saturated welded-tuff aquifers. A fluid level measurement was obtained during open-hole geophysical well logging for the upper, Tiva Canyon, aquifer at the depth of 615.7 meters on June 19, 2009. The fluid level measured in the open hole on June 27, 2009,after the total depth was reached and the upper aquifer was cased off, was also at the depth of 615.7 meters. Preliminary field measurements indicated 1.5 to 4.5 million picocuries per liter of tritium in the Tiva Canyon aquifer and 20 to 61 million picocuries per liter in the underlying Topopah Spring aquifer.

  17. Mid-infrared frequency comb spanning an octave based on an Er fiber laser and difference-frequency generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz Keilmann; Sergiu Amarie

    2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a coherent mid-infrared continuum source with 700 cm-1 usable bandwidth, readily tuned within 600 - 2500 cm-1 (4 - 17 \\mum) and thus covering much of the infrared "fingerprint" molecular vibration region. It is based on nonlinear frequency conversion in GaSe using a compact commercial 100-fs-pulsed Er fiber laser system providing two amplified near-infrared beams, one of them broadened by a nonlinear optical fiber. The resulting collimated mid-infrared continuum beam of 1 mW quasi-cw power represents a coherent infrared frequency comb with zero carrier-envelope phase, containing about 500,000 modes that are exact multiples of the pulse repetition rate of 40 MHz. The beam's diffraction-limited performance enables long-distance spectroscopic probing as well as maximal focusability for classical and ultraresolving near-field microscopies. Applications are foreseen also in studies of transient chemical phenomena even at ultrafast pump-probe scale, and in high-resolution gas spectroscopy for e.g. breath analysis.

  18. Near infrared and upconversion luminescence behaviour of Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} codoped boro-tellurite glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maheshvaran, K. [Department of Physics, Gandhigram Rural Institute - Deemed University, Gandhigram - 624302, India and Department of Physics, K.S. Rangasamy College of Technology, Trichengode - 637215 (India); Arunkumar, S., E-mail: mari-ram2000@yahoo.com; Vijayakumar, R., E-mail: mari-ram2000@yahoo.com; Marimuthu, K., E-mail: mari-ram2000@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Gandhigram Rural Institute ? Deemed University, Gandhigram - 624302 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The broadband NIR and upconversion luminescence behavior in a new series of Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} codoped TeO{sub 2}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SrO-BaO-Li{sub 2}O-LiF glasses have been studied exciting at a wavelength of 980 nm using semiconductor laser. A broadband emission is observed from 1450 to 1650 nm with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) around 165 nm in 0.5wt% Yb{sup 3+} ion content E0.5YLTB glass. The radiative parameters such as transition probability (A), stimulated emission cross-section (?{sup E}), experimental and calculated branching ratios (?{sub R}), optical gain width (?{sub p}×FWHM) and radiative lifetime (?{sub cal}) have been calculated for the {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}?{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} NIR emission. Upconversion luminescence spectra of the prepared glasses have been studied and the ESA and ET processes have also been discussed and reported.

  19. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-11 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-11 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in September and October 2009 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. A main objective was to investigate radionuclide migration down-gradient from Well Cluster ER-20-5 and Well ER-20-7 and across the northern Timber Mountain moat structural zone into the area referred to as the Bench, between Pahute Mesa and the Timber Mountain caldera complex. A secondary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information for the shallow- to intermediate-depth Tertiary volcanic section in the Bench area. This well also provided detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section to reduce uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model (Bechtel Nevada, 2002). The main 52.1-centimeter hole was drilled to a depth of 507.5 meters and then opened to a diameter of 66.0 centimeters. It was cased with 50.8-centimeter casing to 504.9 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 47.0 centimeters, and drilling continued to a total depth of 979.3 meters. It was then cased with 34.0-centimeter casing set at 965.5 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters and the borehole was drilled to a total depth of 1,264.3 meters. The completion casing string, set to the depth of 1,262.5 meters, consists of 19.4-centimeter stainless-steel casing hanging from 19.4-centimeter carbon-steel casing. The stainless-steel casing has two slotted intervals open to the Tiva Canyon and Topopah Spring aquifers. Four piezometer strings were installed in Well ER-EC-11. A string of carbon-steel 6.0-centimeter tubing with one slotted interval was inserted outside the 50.8-centimeter casing, within the 66.0-centimeter borehole for access to the Timber Mountain aquifer, and landed at 475.3 meters. A second string of 6.0-centimeter tubing with one slotted interval was inserted outside the 34.0-centimeter casing, within the 47.0-centimeter borehole for access to the Benham aquifer, and landed at 911.7 meters. A third piezometer string consists of 7.3-centimeter stainless-steel tubing that hangs from 6.0-centimeter carbon-steel tubing via a crossover sub. This string was landed at 1,029.5 meters to monitor the Tiva Canyon aquifer. The deepest string of 7.3-centimeter tubing was landed at 1,247.8 meters to monitor the Topopah Spring aquifer. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 meters, 67 percussion gun and rotary sidewall core samples, various geophysical logs, fluid samples (for groundwater chemistry analysis and tritium measurements), and water-level measurements. The well penetrated 1,264.3 meters of Tertiary volcanic rock, including three saturated welded-tuff aquifers and one saturated lava-flow aquifer. A water level was measured in the Timber Mountain aquifer at 449.6 meters, during open-hole geophysical logging on September 20, 2009. The fluid level measured after the total depth was reached and the upper aquifer was cased off was 450.0 meters when measured in the open borehole on October 17, 2009. Measurements on samples taken from the undeveloped well indicated that tritium levels averaging approximately 12,430 picocuries per liter (less than Safe Drinking Water Act levels) were encountered within the Benham aquifer. Tritium was below the minimum detectable activity concentration for samples collected from the Tiva Canyon aquifer and the Topopah Spring aquifer.

  20. Thermal conductivity of Er{sup +3}:Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} films grown by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raeisi Fard, Hafez; Hess, Andrew; Pashayi, Kamyar; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian, E-mail: borcat@rpi.edu [Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)] [Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Becker, Nicholas; Proslier, Thomas; Pellin, Michael [Material Sciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Material Sciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Cross-plane thermal conductivity of 800, 458, and 110?nm erbium-doped crystalline yttria (Er{sup +3}:Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) films deposited via atomic layer deposition was measured using the 3? method at room temperature. Thermal conductivity results show 16-fold increase in thermal conductivity from 0.49?W m{sup ?1}K{sup ?1} to 8?W m{sup ?1}K{sup ?1} upon post deposition annealing, partially due to the suppression of the number of the -OH/H{sub 2}O bonds in the films after annealing. Thermal conductivity of the annealed film was ?70% lower than undoped bulk single crystal yttria. The cumulative interface thermal resistivity of substrate-Er{sup +3}:Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-metal heater was determined to be ?2.5?×?10{sup ?8} m{sup 2} K/W.

  1. Temperature of broadband anti-Stokes white emission in LiYbP{sub 4}O{sub 12}: Er nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marciniak, L., E-mail: l.marciniak@int.pan.wroc.pl; Strek, W.; Hreniak, D. [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, 50-422 Wroc?aw (Poland); Guyot, Y. [Institute Light Matter (ILM), UMR5306 CNRS-University Lyon1, University of Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne (France)

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The up-conversion emission of LiYb{sub 0.99}Er{sub 0.01}P{sub 4}O{sub 12} nanocrystals was investigated in vacuum upon the focused beam of infrared laser excitation. The intense white broad band emission was observed above the threshold power of 800 mW. An increase of excitation power results in enhancement of temperature of emitting nanocrystals. The temperature of nanocrystals was determined following the thermally equilibrated f-f emission transitions of Er{sup 3+} ions. The highest measured temperature of white emission was determined to be about 900?K. It is concluded that the black body radiation is not responsible for the white broad band emission.

  2. Emission intensity in the visible and IR spectral ranges from Si-based structures formed by direct bonding with simultaneous doping with erbium (Er) and europium (Eu)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mezdrogina, M. M., E-mail: margaret.m@mail.ioffe.ru; Kostina, L. S.; Beliakova, E. I.; Kuzmin, R. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The photo- and electroluminescence spectra of silicon-based structures formed by direct bonding with simultaneous doping with rare-earth metals are studied. It is shown that emission in the visible and IR spectral ranges can be obtained from n-Si:Er/p-Si and n-Si:Eu/p-Si structures fabricated by the method suggested in the study. The results obtained make this method promising for the fabrication of optoelectronic devices.

  3. Energy transfer characteristics of silicate glass doped with Er{sup 3+}, Tm{sup 3+}, and Ho{sup 3+} for ?2 ?m emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ming; Liu, Xueqiang [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China) [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Guo, Yanyan [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China)] [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China); Hu, Lili [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zhang, Junjie [College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310 018 (China)] [College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310 018 (China)

    2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A Er{sup 3+}/Tm{sup 3+}/Ho{sup 3+} tri-doped silicate glass with good thermal stability is prepared by melt-quenching method. Efficient ?2 ?m emission is observed under 808 nm laser excitation. It is found that the 2.0 ?m emission of Ho{sup 3+} can be enhanced under the excitation at 808 nm by incorporating Er{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+}. Based on the measurement of absorption spectra, the Judd–Ofelt intensity parameters, radiation emission probability, and branching ratio are calculated to evaluate the spectroscopic properties simultaneously. The maximum value of emission cross section of Ho{sup 3+} is 3.54 × 10{sup ?21} cm{sup 2} at 2008 nm. Additionally, the phonon assistance and the micro-parameters in the energy transfer process are quantitatively analyzed by using Dexter model. The energy transfer coefficient from Tm{sup 3+} to Ho{sup 3+} can reach as high as 21.44 × 10{sup ?40} cm{sup 6}/s, respectively. The emission property together with good thermal property indicates that Er{sup 3+}/Tm{sup 3+}/Ho{sup 3+} tri-doped silicate glass is a potential kind of laser glass for efficient 2 ?m laser.

  4. NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} core/shell nanocomposite: A highly efficient visible-light-driven photocatalyst utilizing upconversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yuanyuan; Wang, Wenzhong, E-mail: wzwang@mail.sic.ac.cn; Sun, Songmei; Zhang, Ling

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Design and synthesis of NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} based on upconversion. • NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} nanocomposite was prepared for the first time. • Core–shell structure benefits the properties. • Upconversion contributed to the enhanced photocatalytic activity. • Helps to understand the functionality of new type photocatalysts. - Abstract: NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} core/shell nanocomposite was designed and prepared for the first time based on upconversion. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution TEM (HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS). The results revealed that the as-synthesized NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} consisted of spheres with a core diameter of about 26 nm and a shell diameter of around 6 nm. The core was upconversion illuminant NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb and the shell was Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} around the core, which was confirmed by EDS. The NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} exhibited higher photocatalytic activity for the photodecomposition of Rhodamine B (RhB) under the irradiation of Xe lamp and green light emitting diode (g-LED). The mechanism of the high photocatalytic activity was discussed by photoluminescence spectra (PL), which is mainly attributed to upconversion of NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb in the NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} nanocomposite and the core–shell structure.

  5. The effects of Biozyme on the germination and emergence of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and sweet corn (Zea mays L.) seeds under suboptimal temperatures, pesticide overdose, and salinity stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campos Cruz, Armando

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Biozyme on the Germination and Emergence of Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L ) and Sweet Corn (Zea mays L. ) Seeds Under Suboptimal Temperatures, Pesticide Overdose, and Salinity Stress. (May 1994) Armando Campos Cruz, B S. , Instituto Tecnologico y de... thanks go to Grupo Bioquimico Mexicano S. A. de C. V. , for their financial assistance and support of my research project without which this work could not have been completed, and to the Department of Horticultural Sciences of Texas A&M University...

  6. DJS CLAIM ER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUM SULFATE: A REVIEWThis rcportJ it c 5

  7. DOE/ER-0442

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOSTDOENuclear1382 THE HUMAN GENOME INITIATIVE12

  8. Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humbird, D.; Davis, R.; Tao, L.; Kinchin, C.; Hsu, D.; Aden, A.; Schoen, P.; Lukas, J.; Olthof, B.; Worley, M.; Sexton, D.; Dudgeon, D.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes one potential biochemical ethanol conversion process, conceptually based upon core conversion and process integration research at NREL. The overarching process design converts corn stover to ethanol by dilute-acid pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, and co-fermentation. Building on design reports published in 2002 and 1999, NREL, together with the subcontractor Harris Group Inc., performed a complete review of the process design and economic model for the biomass-to-ethanol process. This update reflects NREL's current vision of the biochemical ethanol process and includes the latest research in the conversion areas (pretreatment, conditioning, saccharification, and fermentation), optimizations in product recovery, and our latest understanding of the ethanol plant's back end (wastewater and utilities). The conceptual design presented here reports ethanol production economics as determined by 2012 conversion targets and 'nth-plant' project costs and financing. For the biorefinery described here, processing 2,205 dry ton/day at 76% theoretical ethanol yield (79 gal/dry ton), the ethanol selling price is $2.15/gal in 2007$.

  9. NREL 2012 Achievement of Ethanol Cost Targets: Biochemical Ethanol Fermentation via Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, L.; Schell, D.; Davis, R.; Tan, E.; Elander, R.; Bratis, A.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office, the annual State of Technology (SOT) assessment is an essential activity for quantifying the benefits of biochemical platform research. This assessment has historically allowed the impact of research progress achieved through targeted Bioenergy Technologies Office funding to be quantified in terms of economic improvements within the context of a fully integrated cellulosic ethanol production process. As such, progress toward the ultimate 2012 goal of demonstrating cost-competitive cellulosic ethanol technology can be tracked. With an assumed feedstock cost for corn stover of $58.50/ton this target has historically been set at $1.41/gal ethanol for conversion costs only (exclusive of feedstock) and $2.15/gal total production cost (inclusive of feedstock) or minimum ethanol selling price (MESP). This year, fully integrated cellulosic ethanol production data generated by National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers in their Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF) successfully demonstrated performance commensurate with both the FY 2012 SOT MESP target of $2.15/gal (2007$, $58.50/ton feedstock cost) and the conversion target of $1.41/gal through core research and process improvements in pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation.

  10. Frequency upconversion in Er{sup 3+} doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanophosphor:Yb{sup 3+} sensitization and tailoring effect of Li{sup +} ion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, K. [Laser and Spectroscopy Laboratory, Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Singh, S.K., E-mail: sunilcfsl@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India); Singh, A.K. [School of Materials Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India); Rai, S.B., E-mail: sbrai49@yahoo.co.in [Laser and Spectroscopy Laboratory, Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Dual mode luminescence behavior of Er{sup 3+} in oxide phosphor. • Sensitization through Yb{sup 3+} codoping, and tailoring effect of lithium ion. • Phosphors for lighting and display applications. - Abstract: Er{sup 3+} doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanophosphor has been synthesized using solution combustion technique and further characterized for structure and optical properties. Optical properties of Er{sup 3+} ion have been studied both through frequency upconversion (UC) as well as through fluorescence (excitation, emission, and CIE co-ordinate analysis) processes. Further to enhance the UC emission of Er{sup 3+} ions, a two step process has been used. In the first step, Yb{sup 3+} ion has been co-doped, which acts as the sensitizer for Er{sup 3+} through energy transfer process. In the second step, different concentrations of Li{sup +} ions have been co-doped in the Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+}:Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} system. Fourier transform infrared analysis, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) followed by Le-Bail refinement of the XRD data reveal that the co-doping of Li{sup +} ion decreases unit cell parameter, increases the particle size, and removes the quenching centers (like OH, NO{sub x}, etc.), which all together causes a significant enhancement in UC emission. Optimum UC luminescence is attained for 5 mol% Li{sup +} doping concentration beyond which a quenching in UC emission is observed. This combined approach, i.e. Yb{sup 3+} sensitization and Li{sup +} ion tailoring simultaneously enhances the UC emission intensity of Er{sup 3+} several times in yttria matrix effectively. The strategy can be generalized in other hosts also which could help in the development of efficient photonic materials for lighting and display devices.

  11. Solution Processed MoS2-PVA Composite for Sub-Bandgap Mode-Locking of a Wideband Tunable Ultrafast Er:Fiber Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Meng; Howe, Richard C. T.; Woodward, Robert I.; Kelleher, Edmund J. R.; Torrisi, Felice; Hu, Guohua; Popov, Sergei V.; Taylor, J. Roy; Hasan, Tawfique

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    with stable, picosecond pulses, tunable from 1535 nm to 1565 nm 2 Solution Processed MoS2-PVA Composite for Sub-Bandgap Mode-Locking of a Wideband Tunable Ultrafast Er:Fiber Laser Meng Zhang1, Richard C. T. Howe2, Robert I. Woodward1... ! to! relaxation! of! thermalized! electron! and!phonon! distribution! [3].! This! combination! of!properties!makes!MoS2!a!suitable!saturable!absorber!(SA)! for! ultrafast! mode+locked! pulsed! lasers,! with!the! potential! for! pulse! generation! at...

  12. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Wstern Utah hot springs: Antelope, Fish (Deadman), Fish (Wilson), Twin Peak, Cudahy, Laverkin, Grantsville, Crystal Prison,...

  13. Evidence of Streamflow and Sediment Effects on Juvenile Coho and Benthic Macroinvertebrates of Lagunitas Creek and San Geronimo Creek, Marin County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ball, Joanie; Diver, Sibyl; Hwan, Jason

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at Big Bend Upstream Trib at Big Bend Devil's Gulch CreekDeadman's Creek Left Bank Trib from GroupWildcat & Pioneer Trail Creek Barnabe Creek Smaller Barnabe

  14. Temperature dependence of Er{sup 3+} ionoluminescence and photoluminescence in Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Bi nanopowder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boruc, Zuzanna, E-mail: z.boruc@stud.elka.pw.edu.pl; Fetli?ski, Bartosz; Kaczkan, Marcin; Malinowski, Micha? [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, ul. Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Gawlik, Grzegorz [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, ul. Wolczynska 133, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionoluminescence (IL) and photoluminescence (PL) of trivalent erbium ions (Er{sup 3+}) in Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanopowder host activated with Bi{sup 3+} ions has been studied in order to establish the link between changes in luminescent spectra and temperature of the sample material. IL measurements have been performed with H{sub 2}{sup +} 100 keV ion beam bombarding the target material for a few seconds, while PL spectra have been collected for temperatures ranging from 20?°C to 700?°C. The PL data was used as a reference in determining the temperature corresponding to IL spectra. The collected data enabled the definition of empirical formula based on the Boltzmann distribution, which allows the temperature to be determined with a maximum sensitivity of 9.7 × 10{sup ?3}?°C{sup ?1}. The analysis of the Er{sup 3+} energy level structure in terms of tendency of the system to stay in thermal equilibrium, explained different behaviors of the line intensities. This work led to the conclusion that temperature changes during ion excitation can be easily defined with separately collected PL spectra. The final result, which is empirical formula describing dependence of fluorescence intensity ratio on temperature, raises the idea of an application of method in temperature control, during processes like ion implantation and some nuclear applications.

  15. Analysis of nanostructure and nanochemistry by ASAXS: Accessing phase composition of oxyfluoride glass ceramics doped with Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, Sylvio; Hoell, Armin; Wurth, Roman; Ruessel, Christian; Boesecke, Peter; Vainio, Ulla [Institute of Applied Materials, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Otto-Schott-Institut fuer Glaschemie, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Fraunhoferstrasse 6, D-07743 Jena (Germany); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); HASYLAB at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here, we describe the analysis of the nanostructure and average chemical compositions of each phase present in an oxyfluoride glass ceramic, which is composed of fluoride nanocrystals and an oxide glass matrix. The overall composition of the oxyfluoride glass ceramic as prepared is 21.1%SiO{sub 2} 6.5%B{sub 2}O{sub 3} 7.0%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} 21.0%PbF{sub 2} 14.3%CdF{sub 2} 11.0%YbF{sub 3} 0.5%ErF{sub 3} 11.0%PbO 7.6%CdO(mole %). Nanocrystals begin to grow at temperatures above the glass transformation temperature at 678 K as observed by x-ray diffraction. We report results from anomalous small-angle x-ray scattering taken at energies of x-ray absorption edges of Er, Yb, Pb, and Cd. By nonlinear regression of the scattering curves obtained from different edges simultaneously, the nanocrystals were found to be describable as polydisperse spheroids. The length of the smaller axis was found to be 6.4+-1.4 nm while the larger axis was found to be 17.7+-3.9 nm. By analyzing the scattering contrast as a function of the x-ray energy we found cadmium only in the glass matrix.

  16. Final Technical Report for DOE DE-FG02-05ER54831 "Laboratory Studies of Dynamos."

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forest, Cary B. [UW-Madison

    2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory Studies of Dynamos: Executive Summary. The self-generation of magnetic #12;fields by astrophysical bodies like planets, stars, accretion disks, galaxies, and even galaxy clusters arises due to a mechanism referred to as a homogeneous dynamo. It is quite simple to demonstrate the generation of a magnetic fi#12;eld from a rotating copper disk coupled with a coil of wire, a device known as the homopolar dynamo. The device works like a magnetic fi#12;eld ampli#12;er with a feedback circuit: the differential rotation of a metal disk past an infinitesimally small seed magnetic field induces currents in the disk which, when coupled to a coil winding, can amplify the #12;field until it becomes strong enough to slow the rotation of the disk. What is remarkable is that the same type of circuit may be achieved in a flowing conducting fluid such as a liquid metal in the case of planetary dynamos or a plasma in the case of astrophysical dynamos. The complexity of describing planetary and stellar dynamos despite their ubiquity and the plethora of observational data from the Earth and the Sun motivates the demonstration of a laboratory homogenous dynamo. To create a homogenous dynamo, one #12;first needs a su#14;fficiently large, fast flow of a highly conducting fluid that the velocity shear in the fluid can bend magnetic #12;field lines. With a high Rm-flow, the magnetic fi#12;eld can be ampli#12;ed by the stretching action provided by di#11;fferential rotation. The other critical ingredient is a flow geometry that provides feedback so that the ampli#12;ed #12;eld reinforces the initial in#12;nitesimal seed #12;field - a mechanism that recreates the feedback provided by the coil of wire in the homopolar dynamo. In the Madison Dynamo Experiment, this combination of magnetic ampli#12;cation and feedback is feasible in the simple geometry of two counter-rotating helical vortices in a 1 meter-diameter spherical vessel #12;lled with liquid sodium. For an optimal helical pitch of the flow the threshold for exciting a dynamo is predicted from laminar flow modeling to be at peak flow speeds of 5 m/s. Liquid metals tend to have viscosities similar to that of water yielding inviscid flows. Whereas the timescale for the dynamo instability is on the resistive dissipation time, the timescale for hydrodynamic instability of the shear layer is quite short meaning that the shear layer required to generate the magnetic #12;eld is broken up by Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The eddies generated by large-scale flow drive instabilities at progressively smaller scale giving rise to a cascade of turbulent eddies driven at the largest scale of the experiment. The major contribution of the Madison Dynamo Experiment has been quantifying the role this turbulence plays in the generation of magnetic #12;elds. Overall, the Madison Dynamo Experiment has now operated for about 1 decade and carried out experiments related to magnetic fi#12;eld generation by turbulent flows of liquid metal. The principle thrust of research and indeed the main scienti#12;fic outcomes are related to how turbulent flows create and transport magnetic fi#12;elds.

  17. Comparison of different liquid anaerobic digestion effluents as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Fuqing; Shi Jian [Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Ohio State University, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, OH 44691 (United States); Lv Wen; Yu Zhongtang [Department of Animal Sciences, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Li Yebo, E-mail: li.851@osu.edu [Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Ohio State University, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, OH 44691 (United States)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compared methane production of solid AD inoculated with different effluents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Food waste effluent (FWE) had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with FWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dairy waste effluent (DWE) was rich of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with DWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 2. - Abstract: Effluents from three liquid anaerobic digesters, fed with municipal sewage sludge, food waste, or dairy waste, were evaluated as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover in mesophilic reactors. Three feedstock-to-effluent (F/E) ratios (i.e., 2, 4, and 6) were tested for each effluent. At an F/E ratio of 2, the reactor inoculated by dairy waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 238.5 L/kgVS{sub feed}, while at an F/E ratio of 4, the reactor inoculated by food waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 199.6 L/kgVS{sub feed}. The microbial population and chemical composition of the three effluents were substantially different. Food waste effluent had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens, while dairy waste effluent had the largest populations of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Dairy waste also had the highest C/N ratio of 8.5 and the highest alkalinity of 19.3 g CaCO{sub 3}/kg. The performance of solid-state batch anaerobic digestion reactors was closely related to the microbial status in the liquid anaerobic digestion effluents.

  18. Effect of Mn doping on structural and magnetic susceptibility of C-type rare earth nano oxides Er{sub 2?x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiba, Zein K. [Ain Shams University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Cairo (Egypt) [Ain Shams University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Cairo (Egypt); Taif University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department (Saudi Arabia); Mohamed, Mohamed Bakr, E-mail: mbm1977@yahoo.com [Ain Shams University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Cairo (Egypt); Fuess, H. [Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)] [Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Er{sub 2?x}Mn{sub x}·O{sub 3} (0.0 ? x ? 0.20) prepared by sol–gel method. ? The change in lattice parameter is not linear with x due to the change in crystallite size with doping. ? Anomalous concentration dependence is found in magnetic susceptibility. ? The effective magnetic moment ?{sub eff} is found to decrease with composition parameter x. ? Superexchange interactions between Er ions depending on the amount of Mn or Er in different sites. -- Abstract: The manganese doped rare earth oxides Er{sub 2?x}Mn{sub x} O{sub 3} (0.0 ? x ? 0.20) were synthesized by a sol–gel process and analyzed by X-ray diffraction using Rietveld refinement methods. A single phase solid solution is formed up to x = 0.15 while for x ? 0.2 a manganese oxide phase appears in the diffraction pattern. Preferential cationic distribution between the non-equivalent sites 8b and 24d of space group Ia3{sup ¯} is found for all samples but to a different extent. The octahedral volume and average bond length of Er{sub 1}-O for 8b site decrease while both octahedral volume and bond length of Er{sub 2}-O for 24d site increase. Magnetization measurements were done in the temperature range 5–300 K. The effective magnetic moment ?{sub eff} is found to decrease with composition parameter x, except for sample x = 0.05 where the magnetization is enhanced. The Curie-Weiss paramagnetic temperatures indicate antiferromagnetic interaction.

  19. The effects of calcitic and dolomitic limestone rates and particle sizes on soil chemical changes, plant nutrient concentration, and yields of corn and Coastal bermudagrass on two acid Texas soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haby, Vincent A

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory study. Particle size. Field study. Source. . 26 . 26 Rate. . 28 Particle size. . . $0 Soil pH change with depth. Influence oi' Limestone on Ca and Ng at Different Soil Depths. . Influence of Limestone on Yields oi' Corn and Coastal... to increase the downward movement of Ca and Mg snd to reduce soil acidity as determined by pH measurements (2, 3, 4, 26, 45, 46, 54, 56). Adams et al. (3) using dolomitic lime- stone, have shown that on a Cecil sandy loam soil, N rates of 0, 400, snd 800...

  20. Laser-induced magnetic fields in ICF capsules, Final Report, DE-FG02-08ER85128, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindman, Erick L

    2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-induced magnetic fields in ICF capsules Final Report, DE-FG02-08ER85128, Phase 1 E. L. LINDMAN, Otowi Technical Services, Los Alamos, NM. The performance of an inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) capsule can be improved by inserting a magnetic field into it before compressing it [Kirkpatrick, et al., Fusion Technol. 27, 205 (1995)]. To obtain standoff in an ICF power generator, a method of inserting the field without the use of low-inductance leads attached to the capsule is desired. A mechanism for generating such a field using a laser was discovered in Japan [Sakagami, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 42, 839 (1979), Kolodner and Yablonovitch, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 1402 (1979)] and studied at Los Alamos in the 1980s [M. A. Yates, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 49, 1702 (1982); Forslund and Brackbill, Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 1614 (1982)]. In this mechanism, a p-polarized laser beam strikes a solid target producing hot electrons that are accelerated away from the target surface by resonant absorption. An electric field is created that returns the hot electrons to the target. But, they do not return to the target along the same trajectory on which they left. The resulting current produces a toroidal magnetic field that was observed to spread over a region outside the hot spot with a radius of a millimeter. No experimental measurements of the magnetic field strength were performed. Estimates from computer simulation suggest that field strengths in the range of 1 to 10 Mega gauss (100 to 1000 Tesla) were obtained outside of the laser spot. To use this mechanism to insert a magnetic field into an ICF capsule, the capsule must be redesigned. In one approach, a central conductor is added, a toroidal gap is cut in the outer wall and the DT fuel is frozen on the inner surface of the capsule. The capsule is dropped into the reaction chamber and struck first with the laser that generates the magnetic field. The laser hot spot is positioned at the center of the toroidal gap. As the magnetic field spreads from the hot spot over the surface that contains the toroidal gap, it will propagate through the gap and set up a steady state in the capsule. The main compression is then initiated. First, it closes the gap and crow-bars the field, then it compresses the fuel to ignition. In addition to this application, we discuss the use of this mechanism to induce Mega-gauss fields in laboratory apparatus for measurements of the effects of large magnetic fields on material samples. A preliminary target design for this purpose is presented. It is made of high-density material with no hydrogen surface contamination to minimize fast ion losses and to minimize x-ray preheat of the sample (the material, whose magnetic properties are to be measured). In it, the gap is designed to allow the magnetic field to move into the interior of the target while minimizing the flow of hot electrons into the interior. By adjusting the size of the gap as well as its configuration, the hot electron effects can be minimized. Since the strength of the magnetic field depends on the radial distance to the sample from the center of the conductor carrying the return current, the sample is located at a point of minimum conductor radius. This location also minimizes the effects on the measurement of any hot electrons that flow into the interior. Useful experiments can be accomplished with the “seed” field alone in this geometry. Compressing the capsule after the insertion of the seed field may allow experiments with even larger magnetic fields. We have used computer-simulation techniques to address a number of issues. Our conclusions include: • This magnetic-field generating mechanism is a viable method for generating magnetic fields in ICF targets and for laboratory experiments. • Useful experiments on material samples can be done with the seed field of 1 to10 Mega gauss (100 to 1000 Tesla) and higher magnetic fields can be obtained by subsequently compressing the capsule. • The results reported here can be studied experimentally with a modest CO2 laser that emits 4.5 J of ene

  1. Analysis of In situ Observations of Cloud Microphysics from M-PACE Final Report, DOE Grant Agreement No. DE-FG02-06ER64168

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael R. Poellot

    2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the findings and accomplishments of work performed under DOE Grant Agreement No. DE-FG02-06ER64168. The focus of the work was the analysis of in situ observations collected by the University of North Dakota Citation research aircraft during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE). This project was conducted in 2004 along the North Slope of Alaska. The objectives of the research were: to characterize certain microphysical properties of clouds sampled during M-PACE, including spatial variability, precipitation formation, ice multiplication; to examine instrument performance and certain data processing algorithms; and to collaborate with other M-PACE investigators on case study analyses. A summary of the findings of the first two objectives is given here in parts 1 and 2; full results are contained in reports listed in part 3 of this report. The collaborative efforts are described in the publications listed in part 3.

  2. Wideband saturable absorption in few-layer molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2) for Q-switching Yb-, Er- and Tm-doped fiber lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodward, R I; Runcorn, T H; Hu, G; Torrisi, F; Kelleher, E J R; Hasan, T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We fabricate a free-standing molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2) saturable absorber by embedding liquid-phase exfoliated few-layer MoSe2 flakes into a polymer film. The MoSe2-polymer composite is used to Q-switch fiber lasers based on ytterbium (Yb), erbium (Er) and thulium (Tm) gain fiber, producing trains of microsecond-duration pulses with kilohertz repetition rates at 1060 nm, 1566 nm and 1924 nm, respectively. Such operating wavelengths correspond to sub-bandgap saturable absorption in MoSe2, which is explained in the context of edge-states, building upon studies of other semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD)-based saturable absorbers. Our work adds few-layer MoSe2 to the growing catalog of TMDs with remarkable optical properties, which offer new opportunities for photonic devices.

  3. A new reasonable scenario to search for ER-alpha energy-time-position correlated sequences in a real time mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsyganov, Y S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new real-time PC based algorithm and a compact C++ code to operate in a real-time mode with a 48x128 strip double side position sensitive large area silicon radiation detector Micron Semiconductors (UK) are developed and tested. Namely with this new approach it has become possible to provide the quick extraction of EVR-alpha correlated sequences in heavy ion induced complete fusion nuclear reactions. Specific attention is paid to the application of new CAMAC 4 M modules for charge particle position measurement during long- term experiments aimed to the synthesis of new superheavy nuclei. Some attention is paid to the different (combined) algorithm scenario to search for ER-alpha and alpha-alpha chains.

  4. Enhanced 2.7 ?m emission from Er{sup 3+} doped oxyfluoride tellurite glasses for a diode-pump mid-infrared laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, F. F.; Yuan, J.; Chen, D. D.; Qian, Q.; Zhang, Q. Y., E-mail: qyzhang@scut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence Materials and Devices, and Institute of Optical Communication Materials, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Zhang, W. J. [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Preparation and Measurement of Building Materials, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China)] [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Preparation and Measurement of Building Materials, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of fluoride and shielding gas (O{sub 2} or Ar) on the physical and spectroscopic properties of Er{sup 3+} doped TeO{sub 2}-ZnO-ZnF{sub 2} glass system is investigated. The larger electronegativity of F than O accounts for the gradual decrease of refractive index, density, and J-O parameters with increasing ZnF{sub 2}. An analysis on Fourier transform infrared transmission spectra reveals that the absorption coefficient of OH{sup ?} around 3 ?m as low as 0.247 cm{sup ?1} can be achieved when 30 mol% ZnF{sub 2} containing sample is treated with Ar gas during glass melting process. The reduction of OH{sup ?} groups combined with the low multiphonon relaxation rate (207 s{sup ?1}) contributes to the enhanced emissions at 1.5 and 2.7 ?m, along with prolonged lifetimes of {sup 4}I{sub 11/2} and {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} levels. A high branching ratio (17.95%) corresponding to the Er{sup 3+}: {sup 4}I{sub 11/2} ? {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} transition, the large absorption and emission cross section (0.44 × 10{sup ?20} cm{sup 2} and 0.45 × 10{sup ?20} cm{sup 2}), and good gain cross section demonstrate that oxyfluoride tellurite glass could be a promising material for a diode-pump 2.7 ?m fiber laser.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of ultrafine Ln{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} (Ln = Sm, Gd, Dy, Er) pyrochlore oxides by stearic acid method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Weiguang, E-mail: zhangweiguang68@yahoo.com.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Chemistry of Low-Dimensional Materials, Huaiyin Normal University, Jiangsu Province, 223300 (China); Zhang Lili; Zhong Hui [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Chemistry of Low-Dimensional Materials, Huaiyin Normal University, Jiangsu Province, 223300 (China); Lu Lude; Yang Xujie [Materials Chemistry Laboratory, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Wang Xin, E-mail: wangx@mail.njust.edu.cn [Materials Chemistry Laboratory, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Stearic acid method (SAM) was developed to synthesize series of pyrochlore Ln{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} (Ln = Sm, Gd, Dy, Er) nanocrystals. The synthesis process was monitored by X-ray diffraction, Thermal-gravimetric-differential thermal analysis and Fourier Transform InfraRed methods. Comparing with traditional solid-state reaction (SSR), Ln{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} can be synthesized at relatively low temperature (700-800 deg. C) with shortened reaction time (2-4 h). The average particle size of Ln{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} was greatly reduced (ca. 40 nm) and the BET surface area was increased (ca. 12 m{sup 2}/g) by using SAM. From the X-ray diffraction patterns, we found that Ln has an effect on the crystal structure of Ln{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}, every lattice peak shifted to larger angle slightly with the increasing atomic number of Ln. Also, the lattice constant of Ln{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} was calculated by Jade.5 and found it decreased along with the decrease of ionic radius of Ln{sup 3+}. The morphology of obtained Ln{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} was determined by transmission electron microscopy technique. Results showed that the obtained Ln{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} were all square-like and the interplanar distance of Ln{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} (Ln = Sm, Gd, Dy, Er) according to (111) plane was 0.65, 0.64, 0.63, and 0.62 nm respectively, which was measured from High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy images. Possible reason for this phenomenon was presented.

  6. Experimental cross sections of 165Ho(?,n)168Tm and 166Er(?,n)169Yb for optical potential studies relevant for the astrophysical ?-process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Glorius; Kerstin Sonnabend; Joachim Goerres; Daniel Robertson; Michael Knoerzer; Antonios Kontos; Thomas Rauscher; René Reifarth; Anne Sauerwein; Edward Stech; Wanpeng Tan; Tanija Thomas; Michael Wiescher

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Optical potentials are crucial ingredients for the prediction of nuclear reaction rates needed in simulations of the astrophysical \\gamma-process. Associated uncertainties are particularly large for reactions involving \\alpha-particles. This includes (\\gamma,\\alpha) reactions which are of special importance in the \\gamma-process. Purpose: The measurement of (\\alpha,n) reactions allows for an optimization of currently used \\alpha-nucleus potentials. The reactions 165Ho(\\alpha,n) and 166Er(\\alpha,n) probe the optical model in a mass region where \\gamma-process calculations exhibit an underproduction of p nuclei which is not yet understood. Method: To investigate the energy-dependent cross sections of the reactions 165Ho(\\alpha,n) and 166Er(\\alpha,n) close to the reaction threshold, self-supporting metallic foils were irradiated with \\alpha-particles using the FN tandem Van de Graaff accelerator at University of Notre Dame. The induced activity was determined afterwards by monitoring the specific \\beta-decay channels. Results: Hauser-Feshbach predictions with a widely used global \\alpha-potential describe the data well at energies where the cross sections are almost exclusively sensitive to the \\alpha-widths. Increasing discrepancies appear towards the reaction threshold at lower energy. Conclusions: The tested global \\alpha-potential is suitable at energies above 14 MeV, while a modification seems necessary close to the reaction threshold. Since the \\gamma- and neutron width show non-negligible impact on the predictions, complementary data are required to judge whether or not the discrepancies found can to be solely assigned to the \\alpha-width.

  7. SYN T H E S I STHE magazinE OF UC DAVIS CANCER CENTER VOL 14 nO 1 SPRing/SUmmER 2011 making their mark against

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    and treatments. Establishment of an epidemiological "shared resource" will help the cancer center formalize ourSYN T H E S I STHE magazinE OF UC DAVIS CANCER CENTER VOL 14 · nO 1 · SPRing/SUmmER 2011 making their mark against breast cancer pA g E 2 2 Radiologist brings modern mammography, screening expertise

  8. 1228 CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 39, JULYAUGUST 1999 Marshall, D.R., and R.W. Allard. 1970. Isozyme polymorphism in ers and isozymes in lentil. Ph.D. Diss. Univ. of Saskatchewan,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gepts, Paul

    polymorphism in ers and isozymes in lentil. Ph.D. Diss. Univ. of Saskatchewan, natural populations of Avena.) Verdc.] is an impor- naeus (1763) described it from a plant from Surinam.tant crop in many countries population structure and (Brouk, 1975). the partitioning of genetic diversity between domesticated and wild

  9. Apport de l'imagerie radar SAR-ERS l'analyse de la gomtrie de la dformation rcente dans les monts Bni Snassen (Maroc) PANGEA No. 45/46 Hassan Tabyaoui et al. June / December 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    monts Béni Snassen (Maroc) PANGEA No. 45/46 Hassan Tabyaoui et al. June / December 2009 18 Apport de l (Maroc nord-oriental) Contribution of the imagery radar SAR-ERS to the analysis of the geometry Modélisation, Equipe Risques Naturels, Aménagement des Territoires et Environnement, BP 1223, Taza-Gare, Maroc

  10. Thermoelectric power generator module of 1616 Bi2Te3 and 0.6% ErAs:,,InGaAs...1-x,,InAlAs...x segmented elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, John

    Thermoelectric power generator module of 16Ã16 Bi2Te3 and 0.6% ErAs:,,InGaAs...1-x; published online 26 August 2009 We report the fabrication and characterization of thermoelectric power temperature was at 610 K. The thermoelectric properties of InGaAs 1-x InAlAs x were characterized from 300 up

  11. Magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effect in the RCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and RCu{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} (R?=?Ho, Er) compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mo, Zhao-Jun [School of Material Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin (China); Key laboratory of cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Shen, Jun, E-mail: jshen@mail.ipc.ac.cn, E-mail: tangcc@hebut.edu.cn; Wu, Jian-Feng [Key laboratory of cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Yan, Li-Qin; Wang, Li-Chen; Sun, Ji-rong; Shen, Bao-Gen [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter, Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Gao, Xin-Qiang; Tang, Cheng-Chun, E-mail: jshen@mail.ipc.ac.cn, E-mail: tangcc@hebut.edu.cn [School of Material Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin (China)

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effect (MCE) in RCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and RCu{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} (R?=?Ho, Er) compounds have been investigated. All these compounds possess an antiferromagnetic (AFM)-paramagnetic (PM) transition around their respective Neel temperatures. The RCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} compounds undergo spin-glassy behavior above Neel temperature. Furthermore, a field-induced metamagnetic transition from AFM to ferromagnetic (FM) states is observed in these compounds. The calculated magnetic entropy changes show that all RCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and RCu{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} (R?=?Ho, Er) compounds, especially, ErCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} exhibits large MCEs with no thermal hysteresis and magnetic hysteresis loss. The value of ??S{sub M}{sup max} reaches 22.8?J/Kg K for magnetic field changes from 0 to 5?T. In particular, for field changes of 1 and 2?T, the giant reversible magnetic entropy changes ??S{sub M}{sup max} are 8.3 and 15.8?J/kg K at 2.5?K, which is lower than the boiling point of helium. The low-field giant magnetic entropy change, together with ignorable thermal hysteresis and field hysteresis loss of ErCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} compound is expected to have effective applications in low temperature magnetic refrigeration.

  12. IEEE TransacTIons on UlTrasonIcs, FErroElEcTrIcs, and FrEqUEncy conTrol, vol. 59, no. 11, novEmbEr 2012 2373 08853010/$25.00 2012 IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    - moelectrical loading. I. Introduction large amounts of waste heat are released from pow- er generation, heating. It was estimated that 58% of the energy consumed in the United states in 2009 was lost as waste heat, which was typically discharged to the environment [1]. more than 80% of this waste heat was produced by electricity

  13. Staling in corn tortillas prepared from nixtamalized corn flour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez de Castro, Deborah Ann

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in starch pasting properties after baking. Amylopectin retrograded slowly and imparted softness and extensibility when present in a gelatinized state. Extensive amylopectin retrogradation occurred after 24 h storage, yielding a brittle, less flexible...

  14. The Heating of Corn Chops.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S.

    1912-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF SUB-STATIONS. E. E. B in fobd , Beeville Sub-Station......... ................................... Beeville, Bee County W, S. H o tc h k is s , Troup Sub-Station........................................ Troup, Smith County E. M. J oh n s to n... , Cooperative Rice Station................Beaumont, Jefferson County I. S. Y o rk , Spur Sub-Station.......................................................... Spur, Dickens County T. W . B u e l l , Denton, Sub...

  15. marrow with beans and corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    When the marrow is *almost* cooked, add the beans and the sweetcorn and cook until the ... If you do need to add water during cooking, keep it to a minimum.

  16. Integrated Corn-Based Biorefinery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet summarizes a U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program research and development project.

  17. Cooking with Corn Syrup (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2001-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    utilizar. Para asegurar una mejor calidad utilice el jarabe en un periodo que no exceda un a?o desde el momento en que lo adquiri?. Imitaci?n de Pay de Nuez (rinde 8 porciones) Ingredientes 1 /2 taza de az?car 1 /4 de taza (media barrita) de mantequilla o... Extensionista Especialista en Nutrici?n, El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M. Producido por Agricultural Communications, El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M. Conforme a la ley federal y la pol...

  18. Cooking with Corn Syrup (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2001-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    fuente de energ?a: 1 cucharada sopera de jarabe de ma?z con- tiene aproximadamente 56 calor?as. Almacenamiento Guarde el jarabe de ma?z sin abrir en un sitio fresco y seco. No lo guarde en el refrigerador por que se pondr? muy espeso y ser? dif?cil de...

  19. Corn Plus | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers| Open

  20. This article was downloaded by:[Univ of N Carolina Chapel Hill] On: 29 July 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entwislea , Stephen J. Walsha , Li Anc , Nathan Badenochd , Daniel G. Brownd , Peter Deadmane , Tom P and comparisons Ronald R. Rindfuss ab ; Barbara Entwisle a ; Stephen J. Walsh a ; Li An c ; Nathan Badenoch d ; Daniel G. Brown d ; Peter Deadman e ; Tom P. Evans f ; Jefferson Fox b ; Jacqueline Geoghegan g ; Myron