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1

MHK Projects/Deadman Cove | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deadman Cove Deadman Cove < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.1359,"lon":-91.5055,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

Corn  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Corn Corn Nature Bulletin No. 118 May 31, 1947 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation CORN Corn, or maize, has never been found growing wild. Columbus found it being grown by the Carib Indians and called it " Mahiz". The Aztecs told Cortez it was a gift from their gods, but the Mayas and the Incas already had been growing corn for thousands of years. Teosinte, a coarse native Mexican grass, appears to be its closest relative and its origin was probably in Central or South America. Our first colonists planted seed obtained from the Indians and, "corn" being the English word for all grain, called this strange new plant "Indian corn". Without man' s help, corn soon would disappear. Each year the seed must be carefully selected, carefully planted, and the soil kept cultivated to remove competition from other plants. Modern scientific breeding has produced varieties remarkable for their rapid growth, uniform size and heavy yield.

3

Corn Milling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... From this analysis, Product Line Leaders target customers and markets and ... has hired experts from the feed, sugar, fermentation, biofuels, and corn ...

4

Owens Corning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Williams, and Mark Lessans of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Technologies Office. Owens Corning requested this meeting to cover a broad set of issues, including: 1....

5

Corn Syndrome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reports of "floppy " corn were numerous earlier this month. Many causes have been proposed for this problem. Herein lies one more look at this curious phenomenon. Click on image to open a larger version. he curious phenomenon referred to as "floppy corn syndrome" reared (or lowered, as it were) its ugly head in some fields in Indiana and Ohio back in early June. The term "floppy corn " simply describes a young (V5 to V8) plant that has fallen over because of the absence of an established nodal root system at the crown of the plant. Affected plants may survive if the mesocotyl remains intact long enough for subsequent nodes of roots to establish themselves in moist soil. If the mesocotyl breaks before subsequent establishment of additional nodal roots, the plant dies. The causes of the poor nodal root development have been debated for years and, indeed, likely vary from situation to situation. Click on image to open a larger version. My own experience with investigating floppy corn events over the years has primarily been associated with the detrimental effects of excessively dry surface soil at the time of initial nodal root elongation in young (V2 to V4) corn plants (Nielsen, 2001). Young roots that emerge from the crown area of the plant will die if their root tips dessicate prior to successful root establishment in moist soil. The crown of a young corn plant is typically located only 3/4 inch or so below the soil surface and so is particularly vulnerable to dry upper soil conditions. Other causes have been implicated in the development of floppy corn, including excessive

Over-extended Mesocotyls; R. L. (bob Nielsen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Owens Corning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OWENS CORNING OWENS CORNING GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS 900 19 TH STREET N.W. SUITE 250 WASHINGTON, DC 20006 202.639.6900 FAX: 202.639.0247 OWENS CORNING September 20, 2013 By email: expartecommunications@hq.doe.gov Daniel Cohen Assistant General Counsel for Legislation and Regulatory Law Office of General Counsel Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington DC 20585-0121 RE: Ex Parte Memo Dear Mr. Cohen: On Thursday, August 29, 2013, Julian Francis, VP & Managing Director Residential Insulation, Frank O'Brien Bernini, VP & Chief Sustainability Officer, Paul Smith, VP Building Materials Group Marketing, John Libonati, VP Government and Public Affairs, and I met with David Lee, Jeremy Williams, and Mark Lessans

7

Cargill Corn Milling North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Manufacturing. Cargill Corn Milling North America. Cargill employees (Photo courtesy of Cargill Corn Milling North America). ...

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

8

STA'n:MENT OF CONSIDERAT IONS REQUEST BY CORNING J 'CORP ORA TED (CORNING) FOR AN ADV t\NCE WAIV  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STA'n:MENT OF CONSIDERAT STA'n:MENT OF CONSIDERAT IONS REQUEST BY CORNING J 'CORP ORA TED (CORNING) FOR AN ADV t\NCE WAIV ER OF DOMESTIC AN D FOREIGN P ATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE A WARD 0 . DE-E£000575 7 W(A) 20 12-034 CORNING has req uested a waive r of domestic and fo reign patent rights for all subj ect in vent ions arising from its partjci pation und er the above-referenced awa rd entitled " Innovative Manufactw-ing of Protected Lithium Electrodes for UltraHi gh Energy Density Batteries." The award was made under the Innovative Manufacturing Initiati ve (DE-FOA-0000560). CORNING is a sub-recipient to PolyPfus Battery Company (Poly Plus), the prime recipi ent of the award. Johnson Controls Inc . is anothar sub-recipi ent under the award. This waiver only applies to CORNING. Johnson Control

9

Cooking with Corn Syrup  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the nutritional value and safe storage of corn syrup, a commodity food. It also offers food preparation ideas.

Anding, Jenna

2001-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

10

Estimating Corn Grain Yields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication explains how to estimate the grain yield of a corn crop before harvest. An interactive grain yield calculator is included. 6 pages, 3 tables, 1 figure.

Blumenthal, Jurg M.; Thompson, Wayne

2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

11

Volunteer corn in soybeans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Volunteer corn is a highly visible weed in Nebraska soybean fields. Most soybean fields in the state are affected to some degree. The problem generally is worse in fields that receive tillage during the spring. We are concerned that soybean producers are not adequately considering the negative consequences of uncontrolled volunteer corn growth in soybean. Impact of volunteer corn on soybean yield Volunteer corn is an extremely competitive weed in soybean. It grows taller than soybean early in the season, and in addition to shading surrounding soybean plants, it competes for nutrient and water resources. The yield effect of volunteer corn depends on its density. South Dakota State University conducted studies in 2007 and 2008 where they established volunteer corn densities of 0 up to 17,800 plants/A in soybean (Alms et al. 2008). The corn was allowed to compete for the entire growing season and soybean yields were measured. A density of 5,000 volunteers/A reduced soybean yield approximately 20%, or a 12 bu/A yield loss in 60 bu/A soybean. With a density of 5,000 plants/A, there would be a volunteer corn

Mark Bernards; Lowell S; Bob Wright

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Corn Rootworm (Diabrotica spp.) and Bt Corn: Effects on Pest Survival, Emergence and Susceptibility.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Corn rootworms (Diabrotica spp.) are one of the most destructive pests of corn in the United States. Bt corn or corn that has been genetically… (more)

Keweshan, Ryan Scott

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Understanding Corn Test Weight  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corn test weight (TW) is an often discussed topic of conversation among corn growers. The topic moves to the forefront in years when corn has been stressed at some point during the grain filling period or when the growing season is ended by frost before physiological maturity is reached. In many cases, the concept of test weight is misunderstood. Test weight is volumetric measurement. An official bushel measures 1.244 cubic feet. To measure TW, we usually take the weight of some smaller unit of measure and make a conversion. The official minimum allowable TW for U.S. No. 1 yellow corn is 56 lbs. per bushel, while No. 2 corn is 54 lbs. per bushel. It's unknown how this all started hundreds of years ago, but perhaps it was easier and more fair to sell things based on volume (length x width x height), something a person could see, instead of weight. Today, of course, corn is sold by weight and often in 56-pound blocks that we, for some reason, still call a bushel. Because weight is contingent on moisture content, grain buyers base their price on a "standard " moisture of (usually) 15 or 15.5 percent. Test weight and yield... Sometimes high TW is associated with high grain yield and low TW is associated with low grain yield. In fact, there is a poor relationship between TW and yield. The same TW can exist across a

Mike Rankin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Corn-O-Copia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an ethanol project initiated by Red Trail Energy at its plant near Richardton, ND, with the goal of producing ethanol from corn using coal for energy. Aside from the fact that it does not substantially reduce carbon emissions, the ...

W. Sweet

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Varo & Owens Corning Teaming Profile  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineers, Inc Owens Corning - Newark Plant 2751 Tuller Parkway 400 Case Avenue Dublin, Ohio 43017 Newark, Ohio 43055 Business: Consulting Engineer Business: Insulation Materials...

16

Robbins Corn & Bulk Services | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Robbins Corn & Bulk Services Jump to: navigation, search Name Robbins Corn & Bulk Services Place Sackets Harbor, NY Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL...

17

Fast Corn Grading System Verification and Modification.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A fast corn grading system can replace the traditional method in unofficial corn grading locations. The initial design of the system proved that it can… (more)

Smith, Leanna Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Delayed Planting Considerations for Corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quite a bit of Indiana’s corn crop remains to be planted, especially in southern Indiana, due to the current rainy spell that put the brakes on what had been a very rapid planting pace. As of 11 May, 42 % of Indiana’s intended corn acreage was yet to be planted (USDA-NASS,

John Obermeyer; Entomology Dept; Tony Vyn; Agronomy Dept

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

The effects of previous-year corn hybrid and cropping system on current-year corn hybrids in second year corn.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Grain yields decrease when corn (Zea mays L.) follows corn compared to corn grown in rotation with other crops. The factors that decrease grain yield… (more)

Kent, Wade Adam

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Ethanol extraction of phytosterols from corn fiber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present invention provides a process for extracting sterols from a high solids, thermochemically hydrolyzed corn fiber using ethanol as the extractant. The process includes obtaining a corn fiber slurry having a moisture content from about 20 weight percent to about 50 weight percent solids (high solids content), thermochemically processing the corn fiber slurry having high solids content of 20 to 50% to produce a hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry, dewatering the hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, washing the residual corn fiber, dewatering the washed, hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, and extracting the residual corn fiber with ethanol and separating at least one sterol.

Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IL); Binder, Thomas P. (Decatur, IL); Rammelsberg, Anne M. (Decatur, IL)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deadman corn er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Corn Yield Prediction Using Climatology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is developed to predict corn yield during the growing season using a plant process model (CERES-Maize), current weather data and climatological data. The procedure is to place the current year's daily weather (temperature and ...

Claude E. Duchon

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Effect of corn stover harvest and winter rye cover crop on corn nitrogen fertilization.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Improvement in N management to optimize corn N fertilization requirement and minimize NO33 – N loss from agricultural fields is an ongoing need for continuous corn… (more)

Pantoja, Jose L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Effects of corn processing and dietary wet corn gluten feed on newly received and growing cattle.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Effects of corn processing with or without the inclusion of wet corn gluten feed (WCGF) on growth and performance were analyzed in two experiments. Treatments… (more)

Siverson, Anna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Corn Ethanol and Wildlife: How are Policy and Market Driven Increases in Corn Plantings Affecting Habitat and Wildlife.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Since 2005, government incentives have driven massive growth in the corn ethanol industry, increasing demand for corn for ethanol by 200%. Corn prices have risen… (more)

Griffin, Elizabeth; Glaser, Aviva; Fogel, Gregory; Johnson, Kristen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Corn Fields Shutting Down  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fields of corn around Indiana, especially early-planted ones, are in the process of shutting down for the season. While only 3 % of the state’s crop was estimated to be mature (i.e., kernel black layer) as of the week ending 31 Aug, 41 % of the crop was estimated to be at dent stage or beyond (Indiana Ag Stats Service, 2 Sep 2003). The onset of maturity is naturally accompanied by an eventual senescence of the entire solar harvesting “machinery”, but some fields appear to be shutting down prematurely and deserve to be monitored for potential stalk health issues prior to harvest (Nielsen, 2003). The short-term forecast for cool evening temperatures in the mid-50’s or lower throughout much of the state the remainder of this week will further accelerate premature senescence of these stressed fields. Plant stresses contributing to the premature “shutdown ” of some fields include: Root systems compromised by saturated soil conditions caused by early and midseason “monsoon ” events. Drier than normal conditions throughout much of August, accompanied by stressful low to mid-90 F temperatures in the latter part of the month.

R. L. (bob Nielsen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Corn Replant Decision-Making  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crappy stands of corn (aka less than desirable) occur somewhere in Indiana every year. The recent spate of cool, rainy days does not bode well for some corn fields planted during the days immediately preceding the onset of the rainy weather. Stands of corn in river bottoms may be destroyed outright by flood waters. Poorly drained soils where ponding has occurred for four or more days are vulnerable to seedling death. Eventual drying of saturated soils often leads to severe crusting that can restrict corn emergence and result in lower than desirable plant populations. Cool, wet soils are also conducive for seedling infection by certain soil-borne diseases. Unacceptable stand establishment in some of these fields may eventually require growers to make decisions about replanting. Deciding to replant a crappy stand of corn should be based on a number of criteria, but unfortunately the major influencing factor is often the emotion associated with looking out the kitchen window at the damaged field every morning or driving by the field every afternoon taking the kids to baseball practice. Make a wise decision about the merits of replanting a damaged field of corn requires more than emotions. In fact, I would rather that emotions be taken out of the equation entirely. Toward that end, I developed a replant decision-making worksheet that assists growers and farm managers in making that important replant decision. The worksheet allows you to determine the damaged field’s current yield potential (if left untouched), its replant yield potential, and the dollar returns (if any) from replanting the field. The worksheet is included in a larger overall publication on corn replanting titled

R. L. (bob Nielsen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

OoEr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

OoEr OoEr 1325.8 (MW . fR)W-001 United States Government memoranduln I~J-U Department of Energy II&& yz;; EH-421 (W. A. Williams, 427-1719) SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites froa the Formerly Utilized Sltes Remedial Actiorr Prograa Tb: The File In 1990, with the assistance of Hr. reviewed a nulaber of sites that had Doug Tonkay and Hs. Michelle LaWs, I services to the Fernald facility as fomerly provided goods and/or subcontractors. sites, recommendations were made to For 24 of.these _ eliainate them from further .-A- - consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remdial Actlon Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, In each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more formal record of the decision on these sites and to ratify and confirm the

28

Al Corn Clean Fuel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search Name Al-Corn Clean Fuel Place Claremont, North Dakota Product Al-Corn is an ethanol plant located in Claremont, North Dakota, which is owned by local...

29

Tall Corn Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tall Corn Ethanol LLC Tall Corn Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Tall Corn Ethanol LLC Place Coon Rapids, Iowa Zip 50058 Product Farmer owned bioethanol production company which owns a 40m gallon (151.4m litre) bioethanol plant in Coon Rapids, Iowa. References Tall Corn Ethanol LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Tall Corn Ethanol LLC is a company located in Coon Rapids, Iowa . References ↑ "Tall Corn Ethanol LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Tall_Corn_Ethanol_LLC&oldid=352015" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

30

DJS CLAIM ER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

t t c 5 "NEUTR DJS CLAIM ER This report was prepared a s an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by t h e United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and

31

DiscLAimEr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mAy 2013 mAy 2013 DiscLAimEr This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal li- ability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or useful- ness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommenda- tion, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency

32

tritrophic interactions among larval western corn rootworm, Bt corn and entomopathogens.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The western corn rootworm Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) is a major soil-borne pest of corn Zea mays L. in both the United States… (more)

Rudeen, Melissa Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

2009 Final Corn and Soybean Yield Forecasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this brief is to update our previous evaluation of yield potential for corn and soybeans in Illinois, Indiana, and

Scott Irwin; Darrel Good; Mike Tannura

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Nitrogen management of corn with sensor technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Corn (Zea mays) is an important cereal crop in Kansas primarily used as livestock feed for cattle in the feedlots, and there has been increased… (more)

Tucker, Andrew Neil

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Oil recovery from condensed corn distillers solubles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Condensed corn distillers solubles (CCDS) contains more oil than dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS), 20 vs. 12% (dry weight basis). Therefore, significant amount of… (more)

Majoni, Sandra

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Wet Corn Milling Plant EPI | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wet Corn Milling Plant EPI Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction...

37

DiScLAimEr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mAy 2011 ii u.S. Department of Energy Advanced carbon Dioxide capture r&D program: Technology update, may 2011 DiScLAimEr This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored...

38

Gourmet and Health-Promoting Specialty OilsChapter 15 Corn Kernel Oil and Corn Fiber Oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gourmet and Health-Promoting Specialty Oils Chapter 15 Corn Kernel Oil and Corn Fiber Oil Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 15 Corn Kerne

39

Varo & Owens Corning - Newark Teaming Profile | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

implements phased-in lighting system upgrade at Owens Corning plant in Newark, Ohio, saving 270,000 annually in electricity and maintenance. Varo & Owens Corning - Newark...

40

Animal Performance and Diet Quality While Grazing Corn Residue.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Grazing cattle on corn residue as a winter feed source has become an integral part of many Nebraska producers’ management plans. Utilizing corn residues extends… (more)

Gigax, Jennifer A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deadman corn er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Optical Imaging and Computer Vision Technology for Corn Quality Measurement.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The official U.S. standards for corn have been available for almost one hundred years. Corn grading system has been gradually updated over the years. In… (more)

Fang, Jian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Essays on ethanol-driven corn demand and crop choice.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Two essays are focused on crop choice and the growth of corn production in the Corn Belt and surrounding areas. The first essay develops a… (more)

[No author

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Data Mining Soil Characteristics Affecting Corn Yield  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ten soil characteristic variables and corn yield were measured in a field located in southeastern Boone County, Iowa. Measurements were made on a grid of 215 locations throughout the field. We use graphical and simple numerical methods to obtain an understanding of the relationship between the soil characteristics and corn yield.

William F. Christensen; Di Cook

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

MEXICAN CORN: Genetic Variability and Trade Liberalisation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is now a well established fact that corn (Zea mays) originated in Mexico and that a great part of the evolution that may be observed in terms of this plant’s genetic variability took place in this country. 2 As the plant’s history unfolded, early forms of these races were taken by people into a wide variety of environments and ecological niches from which many distinct varieties developed in the relative isolation of these separated regions. Thus, Mexico also became a center of genetic diversity for corn, and its stock of germplasm has contributed in a decisive manner to global production of corn. Even the dented varieties of the U.S. Corn Belt are close descendants of the first Mexican landraces. The germplasm resources that are deposited in Mexico’s corn varieties, as well as in the wild relatives of this crop, are of prime importance for the world’s food production system of the next century. 3 Corn germplasm of Mexican origin has played a critical role in improvements for corn cultivated in tropical regions in relation to yield increments, plague resistance, short growth cycle, drought resistance and increases of protein content of grain. It has also been instrumental in increasing yields in the case of corn produced in temperate regions at high latitudes. Mexican 1

Alejandro Nadal; El Colegio De México; Alejandro Nadal; El Colegio De México

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Field evaluation of the availability for corn and soybean of phosphorus recovered as struvite from corn fiber processing for bioenergy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??FIELD EVALUATION OF THE AVAILABILITY FOR CORN AND SOYBEAN OF PHOSPHORUS RECOVERED AS STRUVITE FROM CORN FIBER PROCESSING FOR BIOENERGY A paper to be submitted… (more)

Thompson, Louis Bernard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Effects of a Corn Root Defense Substance on Western Corn Rootworm Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte Larvae.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objectives of this research were to evaluate the effects of hydroxamic acids, a group of corn root defense substances on western corn rootworm (Diabrotica… (more)

Zhao, Zixiao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Characterization of chemical composition, milling properties and carbon dioxide diffusivity resulting from early harvest corn and corn stover.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The increasing demand of corn as food and fuel sources has increased the competition for feedstock between livestock and ethanol industries. Developing an effective corn… (more)

Huang, Haibo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Heartland Corn Products | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corn Products Corn Products Jump to: navigation, search Name Heartland Corn Products Place Winthrop, Minnesota Zip 55396 Product Heartland Corn Products is farmer-owned cooperative that produces corn-derived ethanol. Coordinates 48.47373°, -120.177559° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.47373,"lon":-120.177559,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

49

Rockwell Automation - Owens Corning Teaming Profile  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rockwell Automation Owens Corning Rockwell Automation Owens Corning 1201 S. Second Street 247 York Road Milwaukee, WI 53204 Guelph, Ontario N1E 3G4 Business: Industrial Automation Business: Textile / Fiber Nigel Hitchings Frank Peel Marketing Manager Electrical Support Specialist Phone: 508-357-8404 Phone: 519-823-7208 Email: nehitchings@ra.rockwell.com Email: frank.peel@owenscorning.com Owens Corning partners with Rockwell Automation to retrofit fans with VFDs, saving $67,000 annually Project Scope Owens Corning and Rockwell Automation installed Variable Frequency Drives (VFDs) on one 125HP cooling fan and three 40HP recirculation fans at the Owens Corning Guelph Glass Plant. The VFDs were integrated with the existing Rockwell Automation programmable automation controller to collect

50

Corn/coal fuel characterization study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory analyses and tests were conducted to determine the suitability of shelled corn as a potential supplemental fuel for pulverized coal fired utility boilers. The analyses and tests used were those routinely used for the characterization of coal. The data indicated very high volatility and very low ash. Corn by itself would not be a suitable fuel for conventional boilers, primarily because of the severe fouling and slagging potential of corn ash. Blends of corn and coal minimized the fouling and slagging problems. The blend samples contained 10% corn by BTU or 14% by weight. Approximately 1.05 pounds of this blend would provide the heat equivalent of one pound of coal. The additional fuel input would place an additional load on fuel handling and preparation equipment, but the decrease in ash quantity would reduce the load on ash handling and particulate-type flue gas clean-up equipment. (JSR)

Cioffi, P. L.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

September 2010 FAPRI-MU US Biofuels, Corn Processing,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

September 2010 FAPRI-MU US Biofuels, Corn Processing, Distillers Grains, Fats, Switchgrass-882-4256 or the US Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights. #12;1 Overview of FAPRI-MU Biofuels, Corn listed here represent US biofuel, corn processing, distillers grains, fats, switchgrass, and corn stover

Noble, James S.

52

Development and Practice of Blast Furnace Hearth Deadman Core ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of Residence Time Distribution (RTD) of Fluid Flows in a Four Strand Delta-shaped Tundish Operating Under Isothermal and Non-isothermal ...

53

"Deadman Island Lock and Dam, Ohio River" The Military Engineer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a concrete gravity dam. It is important to use best estimates of loadings and properties and masonry gravity dams for all failure modes including overtopping (Douglas et al 1999). Table 4 Historic annual frequency of failure of concrete and masonry gravity dams Frequency of Failure x 10-5 Concrete

US Army Corps of Engineers

54

Wet Corn Milling Energy Guide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

307 307 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers Christina Galitsky, Ernst Worrell and Michael Ruth Environmental Energy Technologies Division Sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency July 2003 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product,

55

Corn Plus | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plus Plus Jump to: navigation, search Name Corn Plus Place Winnebago, Minnesota Product Farmer Coop which owns an Ethanol plant in Winnebago Mn. Coordinates 42.236095°, -96.472339° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.236095,"lon":-96.472339,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

56

Quad County Corn Processors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Quad County Corn Processors Quad County Corn Processors Jump to: navigation, search Name Quad County Corn Processors Place Galva, Iowa Zip 51020 Product Farmer owned corn processing facility management company. Coordinates 38.38422°, -97.537539° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.38422,"lon":-97.537539,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

57

On-farm Assessment of Nitrogen Fertilizer application to corn on Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in soils cropped to corn with varying N fertilization. Can.as affected by tillage, corn-soybean-alfalfa rotations, andsoil nitrogen mineralization for corn production in eastern

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Economic Restructuring and Rural Subsistence in Mexico: Corn and the Crisis of the 1980s  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Centro Tepoztláh Seminar on Corn and the Economic Crisis in1990a). Mobilization ot Corn Pjot! uCorn in Southern Veracruz,* 1970-

Hewitt de Alcántara, editor, Cynthia

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

YIELD BENEFIT OF CORN EVENT MON 863  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

copies of this document for non-commercial purposes by any means, provide that this Data from field experiments are used to estimate the yield benefit of corn hybrids containing event MON 863 relative to nontransgenic corn hybrids without corn rootworm control and with a soil insecticide for corn rootworm control. Over typical ranges for corn rootworm population pressure, event MON 863 provides a yield benefit of 9-28% relative to no control and of 1.5-4.5 % relative to control with a soil insecticide. For a reasonable range of prices and yields, the value of the event MON 863 yield benefit is $25-$75/ac relative to no control and $4-$12/ac relative to control with a soil insecticide, depending on corn rootworm pressure. Because of the low correlation between yield loss and the root rating difference, a common empirical finding when estimating yield loss with root ratings, the 95% confidence intervals around these averages are quite wide. Though on average, event MON 863 has substantial value, the wide confidence intervals imply that farmers will see a wide variety of actual performance levels in their fields. This uncertainty in the

Paul D. Mitchell; Paul D. Mitchell

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Surveillance Guide - ERS ERS 14.2 Emmissions Monitoring  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EMISSIONS MONITORING EMISSIONS MONITORING 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to verify that the contractor is monitoring emissions of radioactive materials and chemicals. The Facility Representative will verify operability of equipment and examine implementation of procedures and processes for collecting, analyzing and recording data. The Facility Representative evaluates compliance with applicable requirements from DOE and implementation of appropriate codes and standards. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance implements requirements RP-0028 and ER-0023 from the RL S/RIDs. Requirement RP-0028 relates to oversight of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deadman corn er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Climate Forecasts for Corn Producer Decision-Making  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corn is the most widely grown crop in the Americas, with annual production in the US of approximately 332 million metric tons. Improved climate forecasts, together with climate-related decision-tools for corn producers based on these improved ...

Eugene S. Takle; Christopher J. Anderson; Jeffrey Andresen; James Angel; Roger W. Elmore; Benjamin M. Gramig; Patrick Guinan; Steven Hilberg; Doug Kluck; Raymond Massey; Dev Niyogi; Jeanne M. Schneider; Martha D. Shulski; Dennis Todey; Melissa Widhalm

62

Effectiveness Analysis of Corn Combine Based on DEA Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper used DEA method to analyze the production efficiency of corn combine??pointed out how to find the waste of resources??then put forward the way to optimize resource utilization. Keywords: DEA, Corn combine, Efficiency, Evaluation

Xinjie Liu; Baoling Yang

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Pro Corn LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pro Corn LLC Pro Corn LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Pro-Corn LLC Place Preston, Minnesota Zip 55965 Product Minnesotan farmer owned bioethanol production company. Coordinates 47.526531°, -121.936019° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.526531,"lon":-121.936019,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

64

Corn Belt Power Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corn Belt Power Coop Corn Belt Power Coop Place Iowa Utility Id 4363 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO Other Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Corn_Belt_Power_Coop&oldid=41053

65

Innovative Methods for Corn Stover Collecting, Handling, Storing and Transporting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Investigation of innovative methods for collecting, handling, storing, and transporting corn stover for potential use for production of cellulosic ethanol.

Atchison, J. E.; Hettenhaus, J. R.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

8. Corn Hybrid Options for Replanting 1. Determining Vegetative Growth Stages of Corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowing the growth stage of corn is critical to understanding the management practices and potential yield impact from wet weather and/or hail damage. There are a couple methods for determining vegetative growth stages in corn. These different staging methods are used by different disciplines and often occur on different herbicide labels. Knowing the differences between these staging methods will help to reduce confusion when determining corn growth and development. These stages are determined either by the number of visible leaf collars or the number of leaves. Collars and V-Stages The collar is the part of the leaf that wraps

Hail Damage To Corn; Corn Flood Survival; Chad Lee Agronomy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Production Evaluation of 718-ER Alloy - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fill-scale production trial was conducted to evaluate 718-ER in comparison with standard alloy 718. The processing characteristics of both alloys in.

68

Microsoft Word - westwater_er.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview and Recent Results E.R. Westwater, D. Cimini, M. Klein, and V. Leuski Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of ColoradoNational...

69

Corn Stover Impacts on Near-Surface Soil Properties of No-Till Corn In Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corn stover is a primary biofuel feedstock and its expanded use could help reduce reliance on fossil fuels and net CO2 emissions. Excessive stover removal may, however, negatively impact near-surface soil properties within a short period after removal. We assessed changes in soil crust strength, bulk density, and water content over a 1-yr period following a systematic removal or addition of stover from three no-till soils under corn in Ohio.

Blanco-Canqui, H; Lal, Rattan; Post, W M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Owens, L B.

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

70

EAR ROT IN THE 2006 CORN CROP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several incidences of ear rot have been noticed across Illinois and Iowa this year. In most cases, these fields were grown to corn the previous year. It is not surprising that ear rots are developing this year, given the late summer rains and high amount of stalk rots. Growers should be alerted to

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Corn stalk orientation effect on mechanical cutting  

SciTech Connect

Research efforts that increase the efficiency of size reduction of biomass can lead to a significant energy saving. This paper deals with the determination of the effect of sample orientation with respect to cutting element and quantify the possible cutting energy reduction, utilising dry corn stalks as the test material (15%e20% wet basis). To evaluate the mechanical cutting characteristics of corn stalks, a Warnere Bratzler device was modified by replacing its blunt edged cutting element with one having a 30_ single bevel sharp knife edge. Cutting force-deformation characteristics obtained with a universal testing machine were analysed to evaluate the orientation effects at perpendicular (90o), inclined (45o), and parallel (0o) orientations on internodes and nodes for cutting force, energy, ultimate stress, and specific energy of corn stalks. The corn stalks cutting force-displacement characteristics were found to differ with orientation, and internode and node material difference. Overall, the peak failure force, and the total cutting energy of internodes and nodes varied significantly (P < 0.05) with stalk cross-sectional area. The specific energy values (total energy per unit cut area) of dry corn stalk internodes ranged from 11.3 to 23.5 kN m_1, and nodes from 8.6 to 14.0 kN m_1. The parallel orientation (along grain) compared to perpendicular (across grain) produced a significant reduction of the cutting stress and the specific energy to one tenth or better for internodes, and to about one-fifth for nodes.

Igathinathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

ES/ER/TM-78  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

78 78 Methodology for Estimating Radiation Dose Rates to Freshwater Biota Exposed to Radionuclides in the Environment B. G. Blaylock M. L. Frank B. R. O'Neal This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; prices available from 423-576-8401 (fax 423-576-2865). Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Rd., Springfield, VA 22161. ES/ER/TM-78 Methodology for Estimating Radiation Dose Rates to Freshwater Biota Exposed to Radionuclides in the Environment B. G. Blaylock M. L. Frank B. R. O'Neal Date Issued-September 1993 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy

73

Ternary Dy-Er-Al magnetic refrigerants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ternary magnetic refrigerant material comprising (Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Er{sub x})Al{sub 2} for a magnetic refrigerator using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle spanning a temperature range from about 60K to about 10K, which can be adjusted by changing the Dy to Er ratio of the refrigerant. 29 figs.

Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.; Takeya, Hiroyuki

1995-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

74

Ternary Dy-Er-Al magnetic refrigerants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ternary magnetic refrigerant material comprising (Dy.sub.1-x Er.sub.x)Al.sub.2 for a magnetic refrigerator using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle spanning a temperature range from about 60K to about 10K, which can be adjusted by changing the Dy to Er ratio of the refrigerant.

Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A. (Ames, IA); Takeya, Hiroyuki (Ibaraki, JP)

1995-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

75

Corn Plus Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plus Wind Farm Plus Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Corn Plus Wind Farm Facility Corn Plus Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner John Deere Wind Developer John Deere Wind Energy Purchaser N/a Location MN Coordinates 43.760635°, -94.149617° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.760635,"lon":-94.149617,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

76

Corn Belt Energy Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corn Belt Energy Corporation Corn Belt Energy Corporation Place Illinois Utility Id 4362 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png INDUSTRIAL SUBSTATION RATE ("ISR") Industrial RATE 1 RESIDENTIAL & FARM SERVICE Residential RATE 10 ELECTRIC HEAT FOR RESIDENTIAL & FARM SERVICE Residential RATE 11 RESIDENTIAL & FARM SERVICE - INTERRUPTIBLE Residential RATE 12 RESIDENTIAL ELECTRICALLY HEATED APARTMENTS Residential

77

Take Notes from Corn Hybrid Plots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corn harvest is slow to get going this year, with only 5 % of the state’s crop reported harvested as of 24 Sep (USDA-NASS, 25 Sep 2006). The causes of the slow start to harvest are slower than normal maturation of the grain (Fig 1), cool temperatures (slower grain drying), and muddy field conditions due to the continuing pattern of frequent rains. The slow pace of corn harvest coupled with the poor stalk quality in some fields (Nielsen, 2006) reminds us how spoiled we were with generally good harvest conditions of the past two seasons. But, that is not the point of this article. Fig. 1. Percent of Indiana’s corn crop that is rated “mature and safe from frost”, as of 24 Sep 2006. Data source: USDA-NASS. If rainy weather and soggy field conditions are keeping you from your own harvest, spend some of your down time to walk or re-walk neighborhood on-farm hybrid plots before they are harvested. Many of these trials are still “signed ” so that you can identify © 2006, Purdue UnivRL (Bob) Nielsen Page 2 9/27/2006 the seed company and their hybrid numbers. Record notes on hybrid characteristics such as ear height, ear size, completeness of kernel set, husk coverage, standability, and

R. L. (bob Nielsen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATION REQUEST BY DOW CORNING CORPORATION (DOW CORNING) FOR AN ADVANCED  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONSIDERATION CONSIDERATION REQUEST BY DOW CORNING CORPORATION (DOW CORNING) FOR AN ADVANCED WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC22-96PC96050-W(A)-96-026, CH-0915 The Petitioner, Dow Corning, was awarded this cooperative agreement in response to an unsolicited proposal for the engineering scale development of a process for the conversion of natural gas to methyl chloride. The Petitioner was selected based on its past experience in identifying an oxyhydrochlorination catalyst and separation process for this conversion. The initial phase of this work was performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22- 91PC91030. The Contracting Officer has found that the provisions of the 1992 Energy Policy Act P.L. 102-486 apply to this cooperative agreement and that the cost sharing requirement of

79

Microscopic Analysis of Corn Fiber Using Corn Starch- and Cellulose-Specific Molecular Probes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ethanol is the primary liquid transportation fuel produced from renewable feedstocks in the United States today. The majority of corn grain, the primary feedstock for ethanol production, has been historically processed in wet mills yielding products such as gluten feed, gluten meal, starch, and germ. Starch extracted from the grain is used to produce ethanol in saccharification and fermentation steps; however the extraction of starch is not 100% efficient. To better understand starch extraction during the wet milling process, we have developed fluorescent probes that can be used to visually localize starch and cellulose in samples using confocal microscopy. These probes are based on the binding specificities of two types of carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), which are small substrate-specific protein domains derived from carbohydrate degrading enzymes. CBMs were fused, using molecular cloning techniques, to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) or to the red fluorescent protein DsRed (RFP). Using these engineered probes, we found that the binding of the starch-specific probe correlates with starch content in corn fiber samples. We also demonstrate that there is starch internally localized in the endosperm that may contribute to the high starch content in corn fiber. We also surprisingly found that the cellulose-specific probe did not bind to most corn fiber samples, but only to corn fiber that had been hydrolyzed using a thermochemical process that removes the residual starch and much of the hemicellulose. Our findings should be of interest to those working to increase the efficiency of the corn grain to ethanol process.

Porter, S. E.; Donohoe, B. S.; Beery, K. E.; Xu, Q.; Ding, S.-Y.; Vinzant, T. B.; Abbas, C. A.; Himmel, M. E.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Maximizing the enzymic saccharification of corn stover  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lignocellulosic biomass (e.g. agricultural residues, wood, municipal solid waste, tree and yard t gs, sewage sludge, and waste paper) comprises three major components: cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. It can contain as much as 75% polysaccharide; thus, biomass has considerable potential as a fermentation feedstock. Corn stover represents an especially important resource because it is the single largest source of agricultural residue in the United States. The best method to obtain fermentable sugars from biomass is by enzymic saccharification. Before biomass can be effectively saccharified, some pretreatment is required. Calcium hydroxide (Eme) is an effective pretreatment agent for corn stover and is less expensive and easier to recover than other alternatives. The reconunended process conditions for treating corn stover are 4 h at 120 'C using 0. 075 g Ca(OH)2/g dry biomass and 5 g H20/g dry biomass. The maximum sugar yield bv enzymic hydrolysis (25 FPU ceflulase/g dry biomass, 50 'C, 7 days) of pretreated corn stover is 88.0% of the glucose and 88.1% of the total sugars. The recommended enzyme loading is IO FPU ceUulase/g dry biomass. Tween 20 and Tween 80 are effective at improving the enzymic saccharification of corn stover. The recommended loading of Tween is 0. 15 g Tween/g dry biomass; the loading, rather than the concentration, is the critical parameter. Adding Tween to the hydrolytic medium increases the maximum sugar yield to I 00% and 94.8% of the glucose and 97.4% and 93.3 % of the total sugars for Tween 20 and Tween 80, respectively. Tween also reduces the recommended enzyme loading to 3 FPU ceflulase/g dry biomass. The action of Tween is three-fold: (1) Time profiles show that enzymes remain active at higher temperatures in the presence of Tween. (2) Kinetic analyses show that, although the theoretical maximum hydrolysis rate is unchanged by Tween, the adsorption and coverage parameters, a and c, in the HCH-1 model are reduced which results in higher effective hydrolysis rates. (3) The maximum enzymic digestion, which is independent of enzyme effects, is higher with Tween. Thus, the action of Tween is a combination of surfactant, enzyme effector, and fignoceflulose matrix disrupter.

Kaar, William Edward

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deadman corn er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Prenova & Owens Corning Teaming Presentation- Using Service and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentation- Using Service and Product Providers to Leverage Your Energy Efforts: PrenovaOwens Corning Energy Process Optimization Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us...

82

Modernizing the handling of ear corn. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the project was to modernize the handling of ear corn. The corn was picked with a three row JD 300 picker pulled by a tractor. Pulled behind the picker was a side dump wagon with a capacity of 150 bushels of ear corn. When the dump wagon was full, a grain truck was driven along side of the wagon and the dump wagon, controlled by the tractor driver, was emptied into the truck. After two dumps of the wagon, the truck was driven to the storage area. The storage area consisted of ten (ten) 2000 bushel corn cribs set in a semi circle so that the elevator that filled the cribs could be moved from one crib to the next without changing the fill point. At the storage area, the truck full of corn was dumped into the platform feeder. By using a platform feeder to feed the elevator, all ten (10) cribs could be filled without moving it. After the harvest was complete, the corn remains in the cribs until needed for feed or until the corn is sold. During the time that the corn remains in the cribs, the turbine ventilator draws air through the corn and dries it.

Kleptz, C.F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Prediction of corn tortilla textural quality using stress relaxation methods.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Feasibility of the stress relaxation technique which has a strong potential for texture characterization of dough and food products, was evaluated with both corn masa… (more)

Guo, Zhihong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Corn fiber hulls as a food additive or animal feed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a novel animal feed or food additive that may be made from thermochemically hydrolyzed, solvent-extracted corn fiber hulls. The animal feed or food additive may be made, for instance, by thermochemically treating corn fiber hulls to hydrolyze and solubilize the hemicellulose and starch present in the corn fiber hulls to oligosaccharides. The residue may be extracted with a solvent to separate the oil from the corn fiber, leaving a solid residue that may be prepared, for instance by aggolmerating, and sold as a food additive or an animal feed.

Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IN); Cecava, Michael J. (Decatur, IN); Doane, Perry H. (Decatur, IN)

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

85

Properties of Carbonized Corn Straw as Thermal Insulating ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... Properties of Carbonized Corn Straw as Thermal Insulating Agent of Liquid Metal by Nan Wang, Min Chen, Yang Wang, Weiwei Leng, Yulong ...

86

Corn and Palmer amaranth interactions in dryland and irrigated environments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Palmer amaranth is a competitive weed and has caused variable corn yield losses in diverse environments of Kansas. The objectives of this study were to… (more)

Rule, Dwain Michael

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Alternative 2010 Corn Production Scenarios and Policy Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quantity of U.S. corn used for domestic ethanol production has grown rapidly in recent years, driven by mandated production levels of renewable biofuels, tax

Scott Irwin; Darrel Good

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2008 State...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10-46214 August 2009 Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2008 State of Technology Model D. Humbird and A. Aden National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole...

89

Corn Belt Energy Corporation- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Corn Belt Energy Corporation (CBEC), in association with the Wabash Valley Power Association, provides its customers with the "Power Moves" energy efficiency rebate program. Through this program,...

90

Microsoft PowerPoint - Prenova_OwensCorning_Teaming_Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

solution to Owens Corning's North American facilities for: *Energy Supply Management *Energy Price Risk Management *Energy Process Optimization *Bill Payment and Data...

91

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sylvania Corning Nuclear...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Nuclear Corp Inc Sylvania Laboratories - NY 07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: SYLVANIA CORNING NUCLEAR CORP., INC., SYLVANIA LABORATORIES (NY.07) Eliminated from consideration under...

92

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY CORNING INCORPORATED FOR...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is to develop effective, economical technology to enable the removal of mercury from syngas created when coal is gasified. Under the subcontract, Corning will conduct research...

93

Environmental release summary (ERS) database CY 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the Environmental Release Summary (ERS) database. The current needs of the Effluent and Environmental database is continually modified to fulfill monitoring (EEM) program (managed by Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Incorporated, Air and Water Services Organization). Changes are made to accurately calculate current releases, to affect how past releases are calculated. This document serves as a snap-shot of the database and software for the CY-1997 data and releases. This document contains all of the relevant data for calculating radioactive-airborne and liquid effluent. The ERS database is the official repository for the CY-1997 ERS release reports and the settings used to generate those reports. As part of the Tri-Party Agreement, FDH is committed to provide a hard copy of the ERS database for Washington State Department of Ecology, upon request. This document also serves as that hard copy for the last complete calendar year.

Gleckler, B.P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Yield, quality components and nitrogen levels of silage corn fertilized with urea and zeolite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and N fertilization affect corn silage yield and quality. Jand the nitrogen status of corn. J Prod Agric. 1991;4:525-and nitrogen effects on corn silage. Agron. J. ___, Kalonge

Bernardi, Alberto C. de Campos; Souza, Gilberto Batista de; Polidoro, José Carlos; Paiva, Paulo Renato Perdigão; Monte, Marisa Bezerra de Melo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

The Market Effect of a Food Scare: The Case of Genetically Modified StarLink Corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

outweigh the direct effect on corn prices. In retrospect,76. Gadsby, M.C. “StarLink Corn Containment Program” AventisStarLink: Impacts on the U.S. Corn Market and World Trade. ”

Carter, Colin A.; Smith, Aaron

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Yield and nitrogen levels of silage corn fertilized with urea and zeolite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an increase in DM production of corn. Urea has been the mosturea-N is used to fertilized corn, especially on acid soils.levels of nitrogen of silage corn fertilized with urea and

Bernardi, Alberto C. de Campos; Souza, Gilberto Batista de; Polidoro, José Carlos; Paiva, Paulo Renato Perdigão; Monte, Marisa Bezerra de Melo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Corn production with perennial ground covers: evaluation of cover species and their effects on corn growth and development.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The use of perennial ground covers (PGC) in corn production may offer a long term and ecological solution to soil conservation issues while allowing the… (more)

Flynn, Ernest Scott

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Formulating N recommendations for corn in the corn belt using recent data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Making N rate recommendations for corn has been one of the most economically important goals of publicly funded crop production and soil fertility personnel and programs over the past five decades. Changes in cropping systems, hybrids, tillage, and other management practices, along with opportunities in site-specific inputs and awareness of the need to minimize the amount of N

Emerson D. Nafziger; John E. Sawyer; Robert G. Hoeft

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Improved Multivariate Calibration Models for Corn Stover Feedstock and Dilute-Acid Pretreated Corn Stover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have studied rapid calibration models to predict the composition of a variety of biomass feedstocks by correlating near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic data to compositional data produced using traditional wet chemical analysis techniques. The rapid calibration models are developed using multivariate statistical analysis of the spectroscopic and wet chemical data. This work discusses the latest versions of the NIR calibration models for corn stover feedstock and dilute-acid pretreated corn stover. Measures of the calibration precision and uncertainty are presented. No statistically significant differences (p = 0.05) are seen between NIR calibration models built using different mathematical pretreatments. Finally, two common algorithms for building NIR calibration models are compared; no statistically significant differences (p = 0.05) are seen for the major constituents glucan, xylan, and lignin, but the algorithms did produce different predictions for total extractives. A single calibration model combining the corn stover feedstock and dilute-acid pretreated corn stover samples gave less satisfactory predictions than the separate models.

Wolfrum, E. J.; Sluiter, A. D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Alternative Controls for Helicoverpazea on Sweet Corn: Phytotoxicity and Pollination Inhibition from Direct Silk Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Helicoverpa zea, Boddie (corn earworm) is an important pest of sweet corn in New England. Conventional management of this pest is achieved through repeated applications… (more)

Jackson, Tori Lee

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deadman corn er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Characterization of the Impact of Process Variables on the Densification of Corn Stover.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The bulk density of corn stover poses a major obstruction to its large scale viability as a biomass feedstock. Corn stover has a low bulk… (more)

Thoreson, Curtis Peder

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

THE 2001 NET ENERGY BALANCE OF CORN-ETHANOL (PRELIMINARY)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

used on farms, such as gasoline, diesel, LP gas (LPG), natural gas, and electricity, for the production of corn ethanol utilizing the latest survey of U.S. corn producers and the 2001 U.S. survey of ethanol in manufacturing and marketing nitrogen fertilizer, (3) improving the quality of estimates for energy used

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

103

Corn Stover for Bioethanol -- Your New Cash Crop?  

SciTech Connect

Biomass ethanol technology is still developing and important questions need to be answered about corn stover removal, but prospects are excellent for you to someday be able to harvest and sell a substantial portion of your stover for fuel production--without hurting your soil or main corn grain operation.

Brown, H.

2001-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

104

44 LA LOUISIANE | SUmmEr 2011 hE UNIvErSIty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

professional practice in Louisiana. "In a world that has only recently awakened to the value of the wetlands44 LA LOUISIANE | SUmmEr 2011 T hE UNIvErSIty of Louisiana at Lafayette Founda- tion honored four professor of architecture at Louisiana State University in Baton rouge. together, they are partners

Raghavan, Vijay

105

ARM CLASIC ER2 CRS/EDOP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data was taken with the NASA ER-2 aircraft with the Cloud Radar System and other instruments in conjunction with the DOE ARM CLASIC field campaign. The flights were near the SGP site in north Central Oklahoma and targeted small developing convection. The CRS is a 94 GHz nadir pointing Doppler radar. Also on board the ER-2 was the Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL). Seven science flights were conducted but the weather conditions did not cooperate in that there was neither developing convection, or there was heavy rain.

Gerald Heymsfield

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

106

Factors affecting viscosity changes in corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corn meals with known differences were tested using the Rapid Visco Analyzer. Various tests included the effect of solid concentration, effect of heating rate, effect of particle size, effect of Sodium Carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and effect of heating rate, holding temperature and CMC. Differences were found to exist between meals from different crop years which were not attributable to particle size. When tested at 13, 15 and 17% solids, new meal consistently developed viscosity earliest. Aged meal consistently developed the least amount of viscosity. At 17% solids, a distinct peak was formed by new meal. When heated at various heating rate (2, 7 and 14'C/min), the slowest heating rate developed a distinct peak. New meal consistently developed viscosity earliest. Aged meal developed the least amount of viscosity. As particle size decreased, viscosity increased. The addition of various amounts of CMC showed significant differences in viscosity at 95'C. CMC changed the order of highest viscosity and masked differences in peak time. When testing heating rate, holding time and addition of CMC, 95'C was found to develop viscosity to a greater degree than 70'C. Holding temperature did not have a significant effect and CMC masked differences between samples and produced unusual curves. Whole and decorticated corns were stored for various lengths of time at 60, 50, 22 and 6'C. Density decreased over time when stored at elevated temperatures. Hardness values increased, indicating a softer grain. However, this is more likely an indicator of brittleness. Decorticated grains developed higher viscosity. Pericarp acts as a diluent. Peak temperature increased with storage at elevated temperature. Density, hardness, peak viscosity and peak temperature were found to be the most significant indicators measured.

McGill, Kendra Louise

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

DOE/ER-0214 February 1985  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of the National Energy Policy Plan is to foster an adequate supply of energy at reasonable costsDOE/ER-0214 Magnetic Program Fusion Plan February 1985 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Research Washington, D.C. 20585 #12;U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Research February 1985

108

PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF SYLVANIA-CORNING NUCLEAR CORPORATION METALLURGICAL LABORATORY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SYLVANIA-CORNING NUCLEAR CORPORATION SYLVANIA-CORNING NUCLEAR CORPORATION METALLURGICAL LABORATORY BAYSIDE, NEW YORK Work performed by the Health and Safety Research Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 March 1980 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY operated by UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION for the DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites-- Remedial Action Program SYLVANIA-CORNING NUCLEAR CORPORATION METALLURGICAL LABORATORY BAYSIDE, NEW YORK At the request of the Department of Energy (DOE), a preliminary survey was performed at the former Sylvania-Corning Nuclear Corporation in Bayside, New York (see Fig. l), on November 29, 1977, to assess the radiological status of those facilities uti 7 Commission (AEC) contract during the 1950s. _ _ ._. __

109

Corn Based Ethanol in Perspective: An Overview of the Possibilities,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Corn Based Ethanol in Perspective: An Overview of the Possibilities, Corn Based Ethanol in Perspective: An Overview of the Possibilities, Limitations and Consequences Speaker(s): Michael Carnall Date: August 30, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Galen Barbose The use of corn based ethanol as a supplement or replacement of motor fuel gasoline has many champions as well as detractors. In this presentation I attempt to separate hype from facts and wishful thinking from realistic forecasts. The production of corn based ethanol has physical limits based on land required to grow its primary input. It also has economic limits based on the cost of inputs relative to the cost of the fuel it replaces and the value of the environmental and other benefits its use may provide. By exploring these limits and the likely consequences of

110

Similarity Moisture Dew Profiles within a Corn Canopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The amount of dewfall and dewrise to a corn canopy has been estimated over 7 nights by using the Bowen ratio energy balance technique and the soil diffusivity technique, respectively.

A. F. G. Jacobs; W. A. J. van Pul; A. van Dijken

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Alternative 2011 Corn Production, Consumption, and Price Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

corn crop was nearly a billion bushels smaller than early season forecasts. The shortfall reflected a below-trend average yield of 152.8 bushels, 11.9 bushels below the record average yield of 2009. In addition to a smaller than expected crop, corn consumption during the first half of the 2010-11 marketing year was larger than forecast at the start of the year, reflecting a large increase in the amount of corn used for ethanol production. The USDA projects corn use for ethanol production during the 2010-11 marketing year that started on September 1, 2010 at 4.95 billion bushels, 382 million bushels more than used last

Darrel Good; Scott Irwin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Climatology of Tropical System Rainfall on the Eastern Corn Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the frequency of greater than 2.54 cm (1 in) daily rainfall totals averaged within a climate division (CD) associated with tropical systems that moved through the Eastern Corn Belt region during the growing season. These ...

Alex Haberlie; Kari Gale; David Changnon; Mike Tannura

113

Corn Belt Energy Coop- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Corn Belt Energy, through the Wabash Valley Power Association, offers business, school, and farm customers a variety of energy efficient rebates and incentives through its "Power Moves" program....

114

Drought increases price of corn, reduces profits to ethanol ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Drought conditions in Midwestern states have reduced expectations for the amount of corn that may be harvested in 2012, and contributed to a 35% rise in the price of ...

115

Pine Lake Corn Processors LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Farmer owned investment and management team which developed and manages the Pine Lake ethanol plant. References Pine Lake Corn Processors LLC1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

116

Corn Based Ethanol in Perspective: An Overview of the Possibilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Corn Based Ethanol in Perspective: An Overview of the Possibilities, Limitations and Consequences Speaker(s): Michael Carnall Date: August 30, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122...

117

Drought has significant effect on corn crop condition, projected ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The corn crop in the affected region is a main feedstock for ethanol, ... out of a total supply of 14.2 billion ... Farmers took advantage of the relatively warm ...

118

Supplementation with xylanase and beta-xylosidase to reduce xylo-oligomer and xylan inhibition of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose and pretreated corn stover  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pretreatment technologies to corn stover. Bioresourcerelationship to features of corn stover solids produced byexplosion treatment of corn stover. Appl Biochem Biotech

Qing, Qing; Wyman, Charles E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Greenhouse gases in the corn-to-fuel ethanol pathway.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has applied its Greenhouse gas, Regulated Emissions and Energy in Transportation (GREET) full-fuel-cycle analysis model to examine greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of corn-feedstock ethanol, given present and near-future production technology and practice. On the basis of updated information appropriate to corn farming and processing operations in the four principal corn- and ethanol-producing states (Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, and Nebraska), the model was used to estimate energy requirements and GHG emissions of corn farming; the manufacture, transportation to farms, and field application of fertilizer and pesticide; transportation of harvested corn to ethanol plants; nitrous oxide emissions from cultivated cornfields; ethanol production in current average and future technology wet and dry mills; and operation of cars and light trucks using ethanol fuels. For all cases examined on the basis of mass emissions per travel mile, the corn-to-ethanol fuel cycle for Midwest-produced ethanol used in both E85 and E10 blends with gasoline outperforms conventional (current) and reformulated (future) gasoline with respect to energy use and GHG production. Also, GHG reductions (but not energy use) appear surprisingly sensitive to the value chosen for combined soil and leached N-fertilizer conversion to nitrous oxide. Co-product energy-use attribution remains the single key factor in estimating ethanol's relative benefits because this value can range from 0 to 50%, depending on the attribution method chosen.

Wang, M. Q.

1998-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

120

Corn Stover Availability for Biomass Conversion: Situation Analysis  

SciTech Connect

As biorefining conversion technologies become commercial, feedstock availability, supply system logistics, and biomass material attributes are emerging as major barriers to the availability of corn stover for biorefining. While systems do exist to supply corn stover as feedstock to biorefining facilities, stover material attributes affecting physical deconstruction, such as densification and post-harvest material stability, challenge the cost-effectiveness of present-day feedstock logistics systems. In addition, the material characteristics of corn stover create barriers with any supply system design in terms of equipment capacity/efficiency, dry matter loss, and capital use efficiency. However, this study of a large, square-bale corn stover feedstock supply system concludes that (1) where other agronomic factors are not limiting, corn stover can be accessed and supplied to a biorefinery using existing bale-based technologies, (2) technologies and new supply system designs are necessary to overcome biomass bulk density and moisture material property challenges, and (3) major opportunities to improve conventional-bale biomass feedstock supply systems include improvements in equipment efficiency and capacity and reducing biomass losses in harvesting and collection and storage. Finally, the backbone of an effective stover supply system design is the optimization of intended and minimization of unintended material property changes as the corn stover passes through the individual supply system processes from the field to the biorefinery conversion processes.

J. Richard Hess; Kevin L. Kenney; Christopher T. Wright; Robert Perlack; Anthony Turhollow

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deadman corn er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Corn stover availability for biomass conversion: situation analysis  

SciTech Connect

As biorefining conversion technologies become commercial, feedstock availability, supply system logistics, and biomass material attributes are emerging as major barriers to the availability of corn stover for biorefining. While systems do exist to supply corn stover as feedstock to biorefining facilities, stover material attributes affecting physical deconstruction, such as densification and post-harvest material stability, challenge the cost-effectiveness of present-day feedstock logistics systems. In addition, the material characteristics of corn stover create barriers with any supply system design in terms of equipment capacity/efficiency, dry matter loss, and capital use efficiency. However, analysis of a conventional large square bale corn stover feedstock supply system concludes that (1) where other agronomic factors are not limiting, corn stover can be accessed and supplied to a biorefinery using existing bale-based technologies, (2) technologies and new supply system designs are necessary to overcome biomass bulk density and moisture material property challenges, and (3) major opportunities to improve conventional bale biomass feedstock supply systems include improvements in equipment efficiency and capacity and reducing biomass losses in harvesting, collection, and storage. Finally, the backbone of an effective stover supply system design is the optimization of intended and minimization of unintended material property changes as the corn stover passes through the individual supply system processes from the field to the biorefinery conversion processes.

Hess, J. Richard [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Kenney, Kevin L. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Wright, Christopher [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Turhollow, Jr., Anthony [ORNL

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Corn-to-Ethanol Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Corn-to-Ethanol Research Pilot Plant The Illinois Ethanol Research Advisory Board manages and operates the

123

Querying Incomplete Data over Extended ER Schemata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since Chen's Entity-Relationship (ER) model, conceptual modeling has been playing a fundamental role in relational data design. In this paper we consider an extended ER (EER) model enriched with cardinality constraints, disjointness assertions, and is-a relations among both entities and relationships. In this setting, we consider the case of incomplete data, which is likely to occur, for instance, when data from different sources are integrated. In such a context, we address the problem of providing correct answers to conjunctive queries by reasoning on the schema. Based on previous results about decidability of the problem, we provide a query answering algorithm that performs rewriting of the initial query into a recursive Datalog query encoding the information about the schema. We finally show extensions to more general settings.

Cali, Andrea

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Docket Nos. ER02-240-004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Duke Energy South Bay, LLC (DESB), a compliance refund report pursuant to a Commission order approving an Offer of Settlement (Settlement) filed in Docket No. ER02-10-000, et al. 1 The Settlement resolved all issues relating to DEO's and DESB's Year 2002 updates to their Reliability Must Run Agreements with the California Independent Operator Corporation. The Settlement also resolved one of the reserved issues left open by a previous settlement in California Independent System Operator

Duke Energy; South Bay; Duke Energy; South Bay; Mark L. Perlis; John T. Carlson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

ER-12-1 completion report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of drillhole ER-12-1 was to determine the hydrogeology of paleozoic carbonate rocks and of the Eleana Formation, a regional aquitard, in an area potentially downgradient from underground nuclear testing conducted in nearby Rainier Mesa. This objective was addressed through the drilling of well ER-12-1 at N886,640.26 E640,538.85 Nevada Central Coordinates. Drilling of the 1094 m (3588 ft) well began on July 19, 1991 and was completed on October 17, 1991. Drilling problems included hole deviation and hole instability that prevented the timely completion of this borehole. Drilling methods used include rotary tri-cone and rotary hammer drilling with conventional and reverse circulation using air/water, air/foam (Davis mix), and bentonite mud. Geologic cuttings and geophysical logs were obtained from the well. The rocks penetrated by the ER-12-1 drillhole are a complex assemblage of Silurian, Devonian, and Mississippian sedimentary rocks that are bounded by numerous faults that show substantial stratigraphic offset. The final 7.3 m (24 ft) of this hole penetrated an unusual intrusive rock of Cretaceous age. The geology of this borehole was substantially different from that expected, with the Tongue Wash Fault encountered at a much shallower depth, paleozoic rocks shuffled out of stratigraphic sequence, and the presence of an altered biotite-rich microporphyritic igneous rock at the bottom of the borehole. Conodont CAI analyses and rock pyrolysis analyses indicate that the carbonate rocks in ER-12-1, as well as the intervening sheets of Eleana siltstone, have been thermally overprinted following movement on the faults that separate them. The probable source of heat for this thermal disturbance is the microporphyritic intrusion encountered at the bottom of the hole, and its age establishes that the major fault activity must have occurred prior to 102.3+0.5 Ma (middle Cretaceous).

Russell, C.E.; Gillespie, D.; Cole, J.C.; Drellack, S.L. [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Assessing Corn Stover Composition and Sources of Variability via NIRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corn stover, the above-ground, non-grain portion of the crop, is a large, currently available source of biomass that potentially could be collected as a biofuels feedstock. Biomass conversion process economics are directly affected by the overall biochemical conversion yield, which is assumed to be proportional to the carbohydrate content of the feedstock materials used in the process. Variability in the feedstock carbohydrate levels affects the maximum theoretical biofuels yield and may influence the optimum pretreatment or saccharification conditions. The aim of this study is to assess the extent to which commercial hybrid corn stover composition varies and begin to partition the variation among genetic, environmental, or annual influences. A rapid compositional analysis method using near-infrared spectroscopy/partial least squares multivariate modeling (NIR/PLS) was used to evaluate compositional variation among 508 commercial hybrid corn stover samples collected from 47 sites in eight Corn Belt states after the 2001, 2002, and 2003 harvests. The major components of the corn stover, reported as average (standard deviation) % dry weight, whole biomass basis, were glucan 31.9 (2.0), xylan 18.9 (1.3), solubles composite 17.9 (4.1), and lignin (corrected for protein) 13.3 (1.1). We observed wide variability in the major corn stover components. Much of the variation observed in the structural components (on a whole biomass basis) is due to the large variation found in the soluble components. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that the harvest year had the strongest effect on corn stover compositional variation, followed by location and then variety. The NIR/PLS rapid analysis method used here is well suited to testing large numbers of samples, as tested in this study, and will support feedstock improvement and biofuels process research.

Templeton, D. W.; Sluiter, A. D.; Hayward, T. K.; Hames, B. R.; Thomas, S. R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Soil Hydraulic Properties Influenced by Corn Stover Removal from No-Till Corn in Ohio.  

SciTech Connect

Corn (Zea mays L.) stover removal for biofuel production and other uses may alter soil hydraulic properties, but site-specific information needed to determine the threshold levels of removal for the U.S. Corn Belt region is limited. We quantified impacts of systematic removal of corn stover on soil hydraulic parameters after one year of stover management under no-till (NT) systems in three soils in Ohio including Rayne silt loam (fine-loamy, mixed, mesic Typic Hapludult) at Coshocton, Hoytville clay loam (fine, illitic, mesic Mollic Epiaqualfs) at Hoytville, and Celina silt loam (fine, mixed, active, mesic Aquic Hapludalfs) at South Charleston. Interrelationships among soil properties and saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) predictions were also studied. Earthworm middens, Ksat, bulk density (?b), soil-water retention (SWR), pore-size distribution, and air permeability (ka) were determined for six stover treatments including 0 (T0), 25 (T25), 50 (T50), 75 (T75), 100 (T100), and 200 (T200) % of corn stover corresponding to 0, 1.25, 2.50, 3.75, 5.00, and 10.00 Mg ha-1 of stover, respectively. Stover removal reduced the number of middens, Ksat, SWR, and ka at all sites (P<0.01). Complete stover removal reduced earthworm middens by 20-fold across sites, decreased geometric mean Ksat from 6.3 to 0.1 mm h-1 at Coshocton, 3.2 to 0.3 mm h-1 at Hoytville, and 5.8 to 0.6 mm h-1 at Charleston, and increased ?b in the 0- to 10-cm depth by about 15% relative to double stover plots. The SWR for T100 was 1.3 times higher than that for T0 at 0 to -6 kPa. The log ka for T200, T100, and T75 significantly exceeded that under T50, T25, and T0 at Coshocton and Charleston. Measured parameters were strongly correlated, and ka was a potential Ksat predictor. Stover harvesting at rates above 1.25 Mg ha-1 affects soil hydraulic properties and earthworm activity, but further monitoring is needed to ascertain the threshold levels of stover removal.Corn (Zea mays L.) stover removal for biofuel production and other uses may alter soil hydraulic properties, but site-specific information needed to determine the threshold levels of removal for the U.S. Corn Belt region is limited. We quantified impacts of systematic removal of corn stover on soil hydraulic parameters after one year of stover management under no-till (NT) systems in three soils in Ohio including Rayne silt loam (fine-loamy, mixed, mesic Typic Hapludult) at Coshocton, Hoytville clay loam (fine, illitic, mesic Mollic Epiaqualfs) at Hoytville, and Celina silt loam (fine, mixed, active, mesic Aquic Hapludalfs) at South Charleston. Interrelationships among soil properties and saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) predictions were also studied. Earthworm middens, Ksat, bulk density (?b), soil-water retention (SWR), pore-size distribution, and air permeability (ka) were determined for six stover treatments including 0 (T0), 25 (T25), 50 (T50), 75 (T75), 100 (T100), and 200 (T200) % of corn stover corresponding to 0, 1.25, 2.50, 3.75, 5.00, and 10.00 Mg ha-1 of stover, respectively. Stover removal reduced the number of middens, Ksat, SWR, and ka at all sites (P<0.01). Complete stover removal reduced earthworm middens by 20-fold across sites, decreased geometric mean Ksat from 6.3 to 0.1 mm h-1 at Coshocton, 3.2 to 0.3 mm h-1 at Hoytville, and 5.8 to 0.6 mm h-1 at Charleston, and increased ?b in the 0- to 10-cm depth by about 15% relative to double stover plots. The SWR for T100 was 1.3 times higher than that for T0 at 0 to -6 kPa. The log ka for T200, T100, and T75 significantly exceeded that under T50, T25, and T0 at Coshocton and Charleston. Measured parameters were strongly correlated, and ka was a potential Ksat predictor. Stover harvesting at rates above 1.25 Mg ha-1 affects soil hydraulic properties and earthworm activity, but further monitoring is needed to ascertain the threshold levels of stover removal.

Blanco-Canqui, H.; Lal, Rattan; Post, W. M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Shipitalo, M. J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Bt vs. non-Bt corn (Zea mays L.) hybrids: effect on degradation of corn stover in soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A billion tons per year of genetically modified corn residues are soil incorporated having both direct and indirect effects on the belowground environment, soil carbon (C) sequestration, and nutrient cycling. If Bt genetic modification has non-target effects on corn stover structural/non-structural carbohydrate and nitrogen (N) concentrations, then the degradation rate of Bt-corn stover may be different than that of non-Bt isolines, possibly influencing soil C storage and N mineralization. Thus, this research focused primarily on the comparison of C and N mineralization of corn stover in soil as affected by Bt-trait, plant portion, water-availability and HFC-trait; and secondarily on the existence of Bt-related variations in the chemical structure of corn residues that might affect the degradation rate of stover in soil and consequently the soil C and N dynamics. A laboratory experiment was conducted under non-limiting N conditions with stover of Bt/non-Bt isogenic pairs of two varieties, a ?high fermentable corn? (HFC) line harvested at Snook, Texas and a non-HFC corn line harvested at the irrigated field of Snook and the non-irrigated field of College Station, Texas. The stover was partitioned into three plant portions, incorporated into a Weswood soil and incubated during 223 days. Results showed that the differences observed in the degradation in soil of Bt vs. non-Bt corn stover were dependent on environmental conditions (irrigated vs. non-irrigated settings) and hybrid variety (HFC vs. non-HFC hybrid lines). The structural composition of corn plants was affected by the Bt-trait, HFC-trait, irrigation and their interactions. Variations in the biomass fractions of the initial stover of Bt and non-Bt hybrids had minimum to non-impact on soil C and N concentrations measured at the end of the 223-day incubation period. Lignin concentration was affected by a Bt-trait*variety interaction. There were no significant differences in lignin concentration between non-Bt/Bt-corn derived stovers of the non-HFC variety irrespective of irrigation regime but Bt-hybrids of the HFC variety contained more than twice as much lignin as the non-Bt isogenic plants. The effects of higher lignin concentration on C mineralization rate appeared to be offset by an increased lignin degradability inherent in HFC-trait. Overall, results indicated that the cultivation of Bt-modified maize lines is not likely to have significant effects on soil C or N dynamics compared with the cropping of non-Bt hybrids.

Salvatore, Herminia T.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Comparison of corn and lupin in respect to As mobilisation, uptake and release in an arsenic contaminated floodplain soil.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

particular Fe(hydr)oxides. For corn, mobilisation of P V wasorganic anions compared to corn (Dinkelaker et al. , 1989;susceptible to As V toxicity. Corn growth is not reduced in

Vetterlein, Doris; Jahn, Reinhold; Mattusch, Jürgen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Net Energy Balance of Corn Ethanol. An Economic Researchoutputs of corn wet milling are corn sweeteners and ethanol.Both corn sweeteners and ethanol are made from the starch in

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Supplementation with xylanase and beta-xylosidase to reduce xylo-oligomer and xylan inhibition of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose and pretreated corn stover  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or first- generation corn ethanol [1]. However, the inherentof fossil fuels or corn ethanol [3]. Advances in current

Qing, Qing; Wyman, Charles E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

MBI Biorefinery: Corn to Biomass, Ethanol to Biochemicals and Biomaterials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project is a continuation of DOE-funded work (FY02 and FY03) that has focused on the development of the ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) pretreatment technology, fermentation production of succinic acid and new processes and products to enhance dry mill profitability. The primary objective for work beginning in April 2004 and ending in November 2005 is focus on the key issues related to the: (1) design, costing and construction plan for a pilot AFEX pretreatment system, formation of a stakeholder development team to assist in the planning and design of a biorefinery pilot plant, continued evaluation of corn fractionation technologies, corn oil extraction, AFEX treatment of corn fiber/DDGs; (2) development of a process to fractionate AFEX-treated corn fiber and corn stover--cellulose and hemicellulose fractionation and sugar recovery; and (3) development of a scalable batch succinic acid production process at 500 L at or below $.42/lb, a laboratory scale fed-batch process for succinic acid production at or below $.40/lb, a recovery process for succinic acid that reduces the cost of succinic acid by $.02/lb and the development of an acid tolerant succinic acid production strain at lab scale (last objective not to be completed during this project time period).

None

2006-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

133

Anaerobic Digestion of Corn Ethanol Thin Stillage for Biogas Production in Batch and By Downflow Fixed Film Reactor .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Anaerobic digestion (AD) of corn thin stillage (CTS) offers the potential to reduce corn grain ethanol production energy consumption. This thesis focuses on results collected… (more)

Wilkinson, Andrea

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Effects of corn stover as carbon supplement on an integrated anaerobic digestion and ethanol fermentation process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated anaerobic digestion (AD) and ethanol fermentation process on a mixed feedstock of dairy manure and corn stover was performed to investigate the influence of corn stover on biogas production

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Corn Belt Energy Coop - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corn Belt Energy Coop - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Corn Belt Energy Coop - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Illinois) Corn Belt Energy Coop - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Custom Project: $0.06 per kWh reduced or 50% of project cost, up to $50,000 Program Info State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Cooled Unitary Packaged AC/Split Systems: $60 - $75/ton Air Source Heat Pumps: $60 - $75/ton Geothermal Heat Pumps: $60 - $75/ton Packaged Terminal Heat Pump: $50/ton Room A/C: $20 Air Economizer: $150 - $180 Night Covers: $6 Programmable Thermostat: $20 - $25

136

Flowability parameters for chopped switchgrass, wheat straw and corn stover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A direct shear cell to measure the shear strength and flow properties of chopped switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover was designed, fabricated, and tested. Yield loci (r2=0.99) determined at pre-consolidation pressures of 3.80 kPa and 5.02 kPa indicated that chopped biomass followed Mohr-Coulomb failure. Normal stress significantly affected the displacement required for shear failure, as well as the friction coefficient values for all three chopped biomass types. Displacement at shear failure ranged from 30 to 80 mm, and depended on pre-consolidation pressure, normal stress, and particle size. Friction coefficient was inversely related to normal stress, and was highest for chopped corn stover. Also, chopped corn stover exhibited the highest angle of internal friction, unconfined yield strength, major consolidation strength, and cohesive strength, all of which indicated increased challenges in handling chopped corn stover. The measured angle of internal friction and cohesive strength indicated that chopped biomass cannot be handled by gravity alone. The measured angle of internal friction and cohesive strength were 43 and 0.75 kPa for chopped switchgrass; 44 and 0.49 kPa for chopped wheat straw; and 48 and 0.82 kPa for chopped corn stover. Unconfined yield strength and major consolidation strength used for characterization of bulk flow materials and design of hopper dimensions were 3.4 and 10.4 kPa for chopped switchgrass; 2.3 and 9.6 kPa for chopped wheat straw and 4.2 and 11.8 kPa for chopped corn stover. These results are useful for development of efficient handling, storage, and transportation systems for biomass in biorefineries.

Chevanan, Nehru [University of Tennessee; Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Bitra, V.S.P. [University of Tennessee; Yoder, D.C. [University of Tennessee; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Cellulase Accessibility of Dilute-Acid Pretreated Corn Stover  

SciTech Connect

The conclusions of this presentation are: (1) The dilute-acid pretreatment reduces xylan content in corn stover. This reduction in xylan content appears to render the substrate less recalcitrant. Below {approx}8%, xylan content is no longer the dominant factor in biomass recalcitrance. (2) Decreasing xylan content of corn stover also created more binding sites for Cel7A, but no strong correlation with actual xylan content. (3) We found no correlation between bound Cel7A concentration and lignin content. Maybe lignin is blocking the way for Cel7A? The contribution of lignin to biomass recalcitrance requires further investigation.

Jeoh, T.; Johnson, D. K.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Measurement of Porosity in Dilute Acid Pretreated Corn Stover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conclusions of this report are: (1) pretreated corn stover appeared to have more accessible pore volume than raw corn stover; (2) solute exclusion method--differences in the pore volume were not detectable due to the high variability of the measurements; (3) thermoporosimetry--differences in pore volume between pretreated samples were not observed despite the low variability of the measurement and a good correction was found between unfrozen water at 240K and xylan content; and (4) porosity measurements showed no correlation between ethanol yields and the volume accessible to an enzyme size probe, for this sample set.

Ishizawa, C.; Davis, M. F.; Johnson, D. K.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

The Study on Corn Production Prediction in Heilongjiang Province Based on Support Vector Machine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper uses the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm to study the prediction of corn production in Heilongjiang province, forms the sample set with the 1991-2008 data in Heilongjiang province, and set up the SVM model between factors and corn production. ... Keywords: corn production, support vector machine, prediction

Zhu Jing; Fan Yadong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

DOE/ER/13897--9  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE/ER/13897--9 DOE/ER/13897--9 DE89 006617 THE BEHAVIOR OF MATTER UNDER NONEQUILIBRIUM CONDITIONS: FUNDAMENTAL ASPECTS AND APPLICATIONS P r o g r e s s Report A p r i l 1 5 , 1 9 8 8 - A p r i l 1 4 , 1989 3 -s 8 tf » § § *" l & s t l i g S S Hya Prigogine * s l S s l g o s S Center for Studies in S t a t i s t i c a l IVfechanics g -s g. "..§' S .g g S The University of Texas S I 2 g 0..8 j g - Austin, Texas 78712 *a " I'^l s 1 s I l i - S s ^ | S l o . Thisdocumentis ^ 0 o § 5 g c ^ l l t f ^ ^ l PUBLICLY RELEASABLE I l i t l l i l Mvd,N^> a a " - "" .2 ... o * c o s ^ »15 i ; 5 1 & S 5 § "§* § 8 ^ a & s * s ^ g S S e - s - O s s g £ « * - & S C s o S g s s g- S- u 8.^ .11 i & | § 2 S & 1 g I S tt I rf 5 a .s 5 o § « J I | 3 § § i l - g ' S H o i s s . g B e « 3 January 1989 PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARIMENT OF ENERGY

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deadman corn er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

Fearmonger Alert: Freeze Injury Potential for Early-Planted Corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corn planting has been proceeding at a record pace in Indiana thus far in the 2004 growing season. Reasonably warm soil temperatures throughout April have also encouraged faster emergence than usually occurs with such early-planted corn. Such early planting and emergence of corn is always at higher calendar risk of injury by frost events or lethal cold temperatures. Of these two risk factors, lethal cold temperature is the more worrisome one since a corn plant’s growing point region is relatively protected from the effects of simple frost while it remains below the soil surface. Lethal cold temperatures (28F or less) can penetrate the upper inch or two of soil, especially dry surface soils, and kill plant tissue directly, including coleoptiles and growing points. Non-lethal injury by cold temperatures may cause deformed elongation of the mesocotyl or physical damage to the coleoptile in nonemerged seedlings, resulting in the proverbial “cork-screw ” symptom and subsequent leafing out underground. Air temperatures in northern areas of Indiana dipped to the low 30’s early in the morning of 3 May, with lower-lying areas likely less than 30F. Given the risk of frost or chilling

R. L. (bob Nielsen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Greenhouse gas emissions related to ethanol produced from corn  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report confers the details of a panel meeting discussion on greenhouse gases. The topic of this discussion was ethanol. Members discussed all aspects of growing corn and producing ethanol. Then the question was raised as to whether or not this is a suitable substitute to fossil fuel usage in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.

Marland, G.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Considerations for Planting Corn into Damaged Fields of Wheat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many folks are still assessing the condition of wheat fields damaged by the low temperatures of the past week. In some situations, additional damage to wheat has occurred from standing water in fields due to frequent rains this winter and spring. Some growers may decide replanting damaged wheat fields to corn is a viable economic option. Some of the key considerations for doing so are described in this article. Killing the Remaining Stand of Wheat For damaged wheat fields that will be planted to corn, complete and timely control of the existing wheat is more important than if planting to soybean. Corn is more sensitive to early-season weed competition than soybean. Living wheat plants are essentially weeds and can absorb nitrogen and make it unavailable for the corn plants during the same growing season. Use of a glyphosate-based burndown program should include the use of glyphosate at 1.5 lb ae/A + 2.4-D at 1-2 pts/A. The herbicide 2,4-D is needed to control glyphosateresistant marestail which is very prevalent in southern Indiana and help with control of emerged common lambsquarter and ragweed. Apply in a spray volume of 10 to 15 GPA

Bill Johnson; Tony Vyn; Jim Camberato; Christian Krupke; Rl (bob Nielsen; Depts Of Botany; Plant Pathology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Can Delignification Decrease Cellulose Digestibility in Acid Pretreated Corn Stover?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has previously been shown that the improved digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover is at least partially due to the removal of xylan and the consequent increase in accessibility of the cellulose to cellobiohydrolase enzymes. We now report on the impact that lignin removal has on the accessibility and digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover. Samples of corn stover were subjected to dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment with and without simultaneous (partial) lignin removal. In addition, some samples were completely delignified after the pretreatment step using acidified sodium chlorite. The accessibility and digestibility of the samples were tested using a fluorescence-labeled cellobiohydrolase (Trichoderma reesei Cel7A) purified from a commercial cellulase preparation. Partial delignification of corn stover during dilute acid pretreatment was shown to improve cellulose digestibility by T. reesei Cel7A; however, decreasing the lignin content below 5% (g g{sup -1}) by treatment with acidified sodium chlorite resulted in a dramatic reduction in cellulose digestibility. Importantly, this effect was found to be enhanced in samples with lower xylan contents suggesting that the near complete removal of xylan and lignin may cause aggregation of the cellulose microfibrils resulting in decreased cellulase accessibility.

Ishizawa, C. I.; Jeoh, T.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Johnson, D. K.; Davis, M. F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Biofuel derived from Microalgae Corn-based Ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel derived from Microalgae Corn-based Ethanol #12;Outline · Production processes for each source of biofuel · Potential for environmental impacts · Comparative results · Conclusions #12;Definitions Biofuel: clean fuel made from animal and plant fats and tissues (Hollebone, 2008) Ethanol

Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

146

Crop-Hail Damage in the Midwest Corn Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crop-hail damage in the ten Midwest corn belt states is examined during the period 1957–81. Estimates of crop losses due to hail are made from hail insurance data for each state and each significant crop in the region. The crop-hail losses are ...

Harry J. Hillaker Jr.; Paul J. Waite

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

The effect of flaxseed hulls on expanded corn meal products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brown flaxseed hulls were added to de-germed corn meal and processed into extrudates with acceptable texture and increased nutritional benefits. The addition of brown flaxseed hulls to a corn based expanded snack increases the dietary fiber, alpha omega 3 fatty acids, and antioxidants levels. The addition of flaxseed hulls to a corn based snack can increase its susceptibility to oxidative rancidity which can limit shelf life. Whole ground tannin sorghum with added brown flaxseed hulls was processed into extrudates and texture, antioxidant activity, and stability were evaluated. Brown flaxseed hulls were mixed with de-germed yellow corn meal in ratios of 0:100, 15:85, 20:80, and 25:75 (w/w) and extruded with 12 and 15% feed moistures using a twin screw extruder to produce direct expanded extrudates. Expansion of extrudates containing brown hulls decreased as the amount of hulls increased. Dried extrudates had acceptable flavor immediately after processing. Total phenols and antioxidant activity of extrudates containing 20 and 25% brown flaxseed hulls, extruded at 15% feed moisture were higher than de-germed corn meal extruded at 16% feed moisture. Brown flaxseed hulls were added at 20% to whole ground white and sumac (tannin) sorghums and processed into extrudates. Expansion increased for sorghum extrudates containing brown flaxseed hulls. The addition of brown flaxseed hulls increased antioxidant activity and total phenols of both white and sumac (tannin) extrudates. The sumac (tannin) extrudates had the longest delay in producing off odor (paintlike odor) and had the lowest p-Anisidine values compared to white (ATX631x RTX 436) sorghum and corn meal with added flaxseed hulls. Corn meal extrudates with 20% brown flaxseed hulls produce off odors more rapidly than other extrudates. This suggests that the tannins in sorghum maybe extending shelf life because of their antioxidant activity. The addition of brown flaxseed hulls can be used to increase nutritional value and antioxidant levels in a direct expanded product. Also the use of tannins sorghums in products containing flaxseed may help delay oxidation, thus preventing the occurrence of off odors. Further work needs to be done to verify results.

Barron, Marc Edward

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Effects of Feeding Insect-Protected Corn and Corn Residue to Cattle, and Evaluation of Distillers Grains Storage when Mixed with Crop Residue on Cattle Performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Research has been conducted on genetically modified corn fed to livestock since the introduction of insect resistant hybrids. While the overwhelming conclusion of these trials… (more)

Weber, Barry

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Statistical shape fluctuations in /sup 166/Er  

SciTech Connect

Statistical shape fluctuations are calculated for /sup 166/Er at spins 0 and 40(h/2..pi..). The fluctuations produce an average shape, which is distinct from the most probable (i.e., mean field) shape. At low temperatures the average shape is similar to the most probable shape, and the shape fluctuations are small. With increasing temperature the shape fluctuations increase, as does the difference between the average shape and the most probable shape. The fluctuations smooth out the sharp shape transitions predicted by mean field theories. Although the most probable phase at spin 40(h/2..pi..) and critical temperature 1.64 MeV is oblate noncollective rotation, the fluctuations create a high probability for prolate collective, prolate noncollective, and oblate collective rotations as well.

Goodman, A.L.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

ER-L-02-01.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2002 7, 2002 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman (Signed) Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The Department of Energy's Strategy for Disposal of Plutonium" (ER-L-02-01) INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE In September 2000, the United States and the Russian Federation entered into an agreement stipulating that each country will irreversibly transform 34 metric tons of weapons-grade plutonium into forms which could not be used for weapons purposes. To meet the United States' commitment, the Department of Energy planned activities at its Savannah River Site; specifically, to immobilize 8.4 metric tons of weapons-grade plutonium and to convert 25.6 metric tons into nuclear reactor fuel. The plan called for the design and construction of three major facilities at Savannah River: the Pit

151

DOE/ER/06035--7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

06035--7 06035--7 DE85 014321 Technical Progress Report SUPERSONIC METAL CLUSTER BEAMS Department of Ene'rgy Contract No. DE-AS0548ER06035 For Period 3-16-w through 4-l-85 Principal Investigator: R. E. Smalley DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their emptoyecs, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or rcspond- bility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Refer- ence herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark,

152

K DOE/ER/72018~9  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

.^ay^4l.« XlUU..,^!^.:.^ .^ay^4l.« XlUU..,^!^.:.^ K DOE/ER/72018~9 DE92 007472 Ninth Progress Report for the Division of Basic Energy Sciences Department of Energy, Contract DOE EY 76-S-03-0034, P.A. 218 (includes results of the last three years) MULTIHETEROMACROCYCLES THAT COMPLEX METAL IONS PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: INSTITUTIONAL AFFILIATION: REPORTING PERIOD: DATE OF THIS REPORT: Donald J. Cram, Professor of Chemistry Department of Chemistry University of California at Los Angeles 405 Hilgard Avenue Los Angeles, California 90024 1 May 1980-30 April 1983 15 September 1982 Prepared for the Department of Energy, Division of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DOE EY 76 5 03 0Q3/I, P.A. 218, A^^S '7Ce/K 'i^c:,f 5?, DISTRlBUTIOfSi OF THIS DOCUMENT \B UNuiMiTED DISCLAIMER

153

Particle size distributions of ground corn and DDGS from dry grind processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT. Ethanol production has increased in the past decade as a result of growth in the dry grind industry. In the dry grind process, the first step is grinding of corn. The particle size of the resulting ground corn can affect the fermentation process and the particle size of dried distillers ’ grains with solubles (DDGS), a coproduct of dry grind processing. Few data are available that characterize particle size distributions of ground corn or DDGS. The objective was to determine particle size distributions of ground corn and DDGS. Samples of ground corn and DDGS were obtained from nine dry grind plants; particle size distribution, geometric mean diameter (dgw) and geometric standard deviation (Sgw) were determined. The dgw of ground corn and of DDGS were not different among processing plants. The overall mean dgw of ground corn was not different from that of DDGS. Most of the ground corn (80 g/100 g) and DDGS (70 g/100 g) were recovered in the three largest particle size categories. The particle size distributions of ground corn were not correlated (r Corn, DDGS, Distillers dried grains with solubles, Ethanol. Corn is processed into ethanol by one of two major processes: dry grinding or wet milling. Wet milling is more complex than dry grinding because fiber and germ components are separated; this requires considerable equipment and capital. In the dry grind process,

K. D. Rausch; R. L. Belyea; M. R. Ellersieck; V. Singh; D. B. Johnston; M. E. Tumbleson

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Using Topex/Poseidon Data to Enhance ERS-1 Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a relatively straightforward method for efficiently reducing the ERS-1 orbit error using Topex/Postidon data. The method is based on a global minimization of Topex/Poscidon-ERS-1 (TP-E) dual crossover differences. The TP-E ...

P. Y. Le Traon; P. Gaspar; F. Bouyssel; H. Makhmara

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Effects of residues from municipal solid waste landfill on corn yield and heavy metal content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of residues from municipal solid waste landfill, Khon Kaen Municipality, Thailand, on corn (Zea mays L.) yield and heavy metal content were studied. Field experiments with randomized complete block design with five treatments (0, 20, 40, 60 and 80% v/v of residues and soil) and four replications were carried out. Corn yield and heavy metal contents in corn grain were analyzed. Corn yield increased by 50, 72, 85 and 71% at 20, 40, 60 and 80% treatments as compared to the control, respectively. All heavy metals content, except cadmium, nickel and zinc, in corn grain were not significantly different from the control. Arsenic, cadmium and zinc in corn grain were strongly positively correlated with concentrations in soil. The heavy metal content in corn grain was within regulated limits for human consumption.

Prabpai, S. [Suphan Buri Campus Establishment Project, Kasetsart University, 50 U Floor, Administrative Building, Paholyothin Road, Jatujak, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)], E-mail: s.prabpai@hotmail.com; Charerntanyarak, L. [Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)], E-mail: lertchai@kku.ac.th; Siri, B. [Department of Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)], E-mail: boonmee@kku.ac.th; Moore, M.R. [The University of Queensland, The National Research Center for Environmental Toxicology, 39 Kessels Road, Coopers Plans, Brisbane, Queensland 4108 (Australia)], E-mail: m.moore@uq.edu.au; Noller, Barry N. [The University of Queensland, Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia)], E-mail: b.noller@uq.edu.au

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Fall 2012 Topics: Energy & Development, Stoichiometry, Exponential Growth Models Problem Set #2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Points: 90 [ER100/PP184], 110 [ER200/PP284] PROBLEM SET 2 SOLUTIONS Page 1 of 12 "Soft" and "Hard" Energy with social problems, not technological ones. #12;Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Fall 2012 Topics: Energy & Development, Stoichiometry, Exponential Growth Models Problem Set #2 Due September 20

Kammen, Daniel M.

157

City of Corning, Iowa (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corning Corning Place Iowa Utility Id 4375 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial Commercial All-Electric Commercial Residential Residential Residential All-Electric Residential Rural Commercial Commercial Rural Commercial All-Electric Commercial Rural Residential Residential Rural Residential All-Electric Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0977/kWh Commercial: $0.0974/kWh

158

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sylvania Corning Plant - NY 19  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Plant - NY 19 Plant - NY 19 FUSRAP Considered Sites Sylvania-Corning, NY Alternate Name(s): Sylvania Electric Products, Inc. Sylvania Corp. NY.19-1 NY.19-4 Location: Cantiaque Road, Hicksville, Long Island, New York NY.19-5 Historical Operations: Pilot-scale production of powdered metal uranium slugs for AEC's Hanford reactor. NY.19-4 Eligibility Determination: Eligible Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Survey NY.19-3 Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. USACE Website Long-term Care Requirements: To be determined upon completion. Also see Documents Related to Sylvania-Corning, NY Historical documents may contain links which are no longer valid or to outside sources. LM can not attest to the accuracy of information provided by these links. Please see the Leaving LM Website page for more details.

159

Corn LP formerly Central Iowa Renewable Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LP formerly Central Iowa Renewable Energy LP formerly Central Iowa Renewable Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Corn LP (formerly Central Iowa Renewable Energy) Place Goldfield, Iowa Zip 50542 Product Bioethanol producer using corn as raw material Coordinates 37.707559°, -117.233459° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.707559,"lon":-117.233459,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

160

The New Era of Corn, Soybean, and Wheat Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

“Prices have changed so much for what we sell and buy that it is almost impossible to feel confident in the decisions you make.”-- Agriculture Online, July 5, 2008 Prices of corn, soybeans, and wheat started moving higher in the fall of 2006 and have remained generally high and well above average prices in the previous 30 years. These higher prices, and the volatility associated with the higher prices, have resulted in the kind of uncertainty reflected in the quote above. Are higher prices here to stay? If so, what is the expected level and variability of prices during the new era? From a producer’s standpoint, the question really is, “What is a good price for corn, soybeans and wheat? ” These questions

Darrel Good; Scott Irwin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deadman corn er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Current and potential U.S. Corn Stover Supplies  

SciTech Connect

Agricultural residues such as corn (Zea mays L.) stover are a potential feedstock for bioenergy and bio-based products that could reduceU.S. dependence on foreign oil. Collection of such residues must take into account concerns that residue removal could increase erosion, reduce crop productivity, and deplete soil carbon and nutrients. This article estimates where and how much corn stover can be collected sustainably in the USA using existing commercial equipment and estimates costs of that collection. Erosion constraints to collection were considered explicitly, and crop productivity and soil nutrient constraints were considered implicitly, by recognizing the value of residues for maintaining soil moisture and including the cost of fertilizer to replace nutrients removed. Possible soil carbon loss was not considered in the analysis. With an annual production of 196 million Mg of corn grain (about9.2 billion bushels), the USA produces 196 million Mg of stover. Under current rotation and tillage practices, about 30% of this stover could be collected for less than $33 per Mg, taking into consideration erosion and soil moisture concerns and nutrient replacement costs. Wind erosion is a major constraint to stover collection. Analysis suggests three regions of the country (central Illinois, northern Iowa/southern Minnesota, and along the Platte River in Nebraska) produce sufficient stover to support large biorefineries with one million Mg per year feedstock demands and that if farmers converted to universal no-till production of corn, then over 100 million Mg of stover could be collected annually without causing erosion to exceed the tolerable soil loss.

Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL; Nelson, R [Kansas State University; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Sheehan, J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Wright, Lynn L [subcontractor

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Barley tortillas and barley flours in corn tortillas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Barley tortillas (100%) were easily processed using corn tortilla technology. Flavor and color of barley tortillas were different from those of corn or wheat tortillas. Barley tortillas were generally darker, maybe due to ash and phenolic compounds present in the dietary fiber of the flours. All barley tortillas had a unique mild bittersweet-astringent taste. Flavor and color were rated acceptable by an informal sensory panel. The effects of amylose and ?-glucan contents of barley flours on the quality attributes of doughs and tortillas were studied using objective and subjective tests. Barley was milled to obtain increased ?-glucan at the same amylose level. Changes in tortilla attributes were evaluated at 2 h and after storage for up to 28 d at 4°C. Stored tortillas were evaluated after equilibration to 22°C and reheating. As amylose decreased in the flour, fresh tortillas were softer and more extensible. However, upon storage all tortillas became brittle and hard. Increased ?-glucan content increased water absorption of the flours and moisture content of tortillas. Increased moisture gave softer and more extensible barley tortillas. Reheated and fresh tortillas had similar extensibilities. Reheated tortillas had less moisture and required more force to rupture. Barley flours were also substituted at 10 to 25% in corn tortillas. As barley flours increased in the formulation, tortilla extensibility improved. Color was not affected, dietary fiber was increased and a slight off-flavor was observed. Barley tortillas and corn tortillas containing barley flour may be an acceptable way to increase dietary fiber consumption at a competitive cost.

Mitre-Dieste, Carlos Marcelo

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Compositional Analysis of Water-Soluble Materials in Corn Stover  

SciTech Connect

Corn stover is one of the leading feedstock candidates for commodity-scale biomass-to-ethanol processing. The composition of water-soluble materials in corn stover has been determined with greater than 90% mass closure in four of five representative samples. The mass percentage of water-soluble materials in tested stover samples varied from 14 to 27% on a dry weight basis. Over 30 previously unknown constituents of aqueous extracts were identified and quantified using a variety of chromatographic techniques. Monomeric sugars (primarily glucose and fructose) were found to be the predominant water-soluble components of corn stover, accounting for 30-46% of the dry weight of extractives (4-12% of the dry weight of feedstocks). Additional constituents contributing to the mass balance for extractives included various alditols (3-7%), aliphatic acids (7-21%), inorganic ions (10-18%), oligomeric sugars (4-12%), and a distribution of oligomers tentatively identified as being derived from phenolic glycosides (10-18%).

Chen, S. F.; Mowery, R. A.; Scarlata, C. J.; Chambliss, C. K.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Hugleiingar um eli diffurjafna Ekki er ofsagt a diffurjoefnur sfiu sffl staerfraei sem mest er notu til lsingar ff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aflfrae�i ein helsta uppspretta uppgoetvana ff svi�i diffurjafna. ' I greinunum hfir ff eftir ver = v(y) y(0) = x øar sem y er tffkn fyrir ffiøekkta staer�, (sem hfir er fall). Mynd 1: vektorsvi� Mynd vflsitoelustigsins. Hverjar eru aflei�ingar øess? Diffurjafnan er x 0 = kx 2 : Hfir øarf a� rifja upp a�fer�ina um a

Magnus, Robert

165

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY OWENS CORNING SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY LLC (OWENS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OWENS CORNING SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY LLC (OWENS OWENS CORNING SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY LLC (OWENS CORNING) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE AWARD NO. DE-EE0005436; W(A) 2011-065 OWENS CORNING has requested a waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights of the United States of America in all subject inventions arising from its participation under the above referenced cooperative agreement entitled "Development and Productization of High-Efficiency, Low-Cost Building-Integrated Photovoltaic Shingles Using Monocrystalline Silicon Thin Film Solar Cells." OWENS CORNING is a sub-awardee under the cooperative agreement. Solexel Inc. is the prime awardee. This waiver only applies to subject inventions of OWENS CORNING. As described in the petition, the objective of the project funded by the cooperative

166

Saccharification of corn fiber using enzymes from Aureobasidium sp. strain NRRL Y-2311-1  

SciTech Connect

Crude enzyme preparations from Aureobasidium sp. strain NRRL Y-2311-1 were characterized and tested for the capacity to saccharify corn fiber. Cultures grown on xylan, corn fiber, and alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP)-pretreated corn fiber produced specific levels of endoxylanase, amylase, protease, cellulose, and other activities. Using equal units of endoxylanase activity, crude enzymes from AHP-pretreated corn fiber cultures were most effective in saccharification. Multiple enzyme activities were implicated in this process. Pretreatment of corn fiber with AHP nearly doubled the susceptibility of hemicellulose to enzymatic digestion. Up to 138 mg xylose, 125 mg arabinose, and 490 mg glucose were obtained per g pretreated corn fiber under conditions tested. 31 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Leathers, T.D.; Gupta, S.C. [Dept. of Agriculture, Peoria, IL (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Preliminary Assessment and Use of ERS-1 Altimeter Wave Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The satellite ERS-1, launched in July 1991, carries a radar altimeter that provides collocated measurements of significant wave height and wind speed over the oceans. During the calibration period, significant wave height and wind speed ...

S. J. Foreman; M. W. Holt; S. Kelsall

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

The Effects of Rain on ERS-1 Radar Altimeter Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation into a potentially important, but little-studied effect on altimeter data—rain contamination—has been carried out using ERS-1. The method involves identifying large changes in the radar backscatter coefficient and relating these ...

Trevor H. Guymer; Graham D. Quartly; Meric A. Srokosz

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Functionality of alkaline cooked corn bran on tortilla texture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of pericarp and nixtamalized corn bran (NCB) level on corn tortilla attributes was evaluated. The effect of varying pH (4, 9 and 11) on fresh and dry mesa flour (pH 5, 7 and 10) tortillas was also evaluated. Nixtamal was washed at three different levels to obtain tortillas containing about 0, 50 and 100% pericarp. Fumaric acid and lime solutions were used to produce acidic and alkaline tortillas respectively. Tortilla texture was evaluated at 0, 1 and 7 days of storage objectively using a texture analyzer and subjectively using a solvability test. As pericarp content and pH increased tortillas were softer, more flexible and extensible with a darker yellow color. Acidic tortillas were harder with a white color. Pericarp improved texture of tortillas during storage. Commercial corn bran was alkaline treated to obtain NCB with functionality similar to nixtamalized corn pericarp. Dry masa flour (DMF) (1 kg) was mixed with 0, 50 and 100 g dry basis of NCB and processed into tortillas. Tortillas containing NCB had a pH of 9, were more flexible and rollable than control tortillas. Alkaline pH tortillas puffed during baking; these tortillas were yellow with a soft, moist texture. Tortillas containing nixtamalized rice and wheat brans were soft and flexible. A sensory panel found that tortillas containing nixtamalized cereal brans had a strong alkaline flavor and aroma and a blistered surface, with a soft, moist texture. NCB tortillas had the highest overall acceptability scores. Pericarp from nixtamal and alkaline pH slowed the staling mechanisms of tortillas. Nixtamalized commercial brans significantly improved the texture of corn tortillas during storage and enhanced the color, flavor and aroma of DMF tortillas. Nixtamalized cereal brans can be used as an effective additive to extend shelf stability of tortillas and enhance the flavor of DMF products. Tortillas containing NCB could be used in products such as wraps and fried tacos where the bright color and stronger flavor could be an advantage.

Guajardo Flores, Sara

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Lime pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable energy sources, such as lignocellulosic biomass, are environmentally friendly because they emit less pollution without contributing net carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Among lignocellulosic biomass, corn stover is a very useful feedstock to economically produce environmentally friendly biofuels. Corn stover was pretreated with an excess of calcium hydroxide (0.5 g Ca(OH)2/g raw biomass) in non-oxidative and oxidative conditions at 25, 35, 45, and 55oC. The optimal condition is 55oC for 4 weeks with aeration, determined by yields of glucan and xylan. The overall yields of glucose (g glucan hydrolyzed/100 g original glucan) and xylose (g xylan hydrolyzed/100 g original xylan) were 91.3 and 51.8 at 15 FPU/g cellulose, respectively. Furthermore, when considering the dissolved fragments of glucan and xylan in the pretreatment liquors, the overall yields of glucose and xylose were 93.2 and 79.5 at 15 FPU/g cellulose, respectively. The pretreatment liquor has no inhibitory effect on ethanol fermentation using Saccharomyces cerevisiae D5A. At the recommended condition, only 0.073 g Ca(OH)2 was consumed per g of raw corn stover. Under extensive delignification conditions, 87.5% of the initial lignin was removed. Extensive delignfication required oxidative treatment and additional lime consumption. Deacetylation quickly reached a plateau within 1 week. Delignification highly depended on temperature and the presence of oxygen. Lignin and hemicellulose were selectively removed, but cellulose was not affected by lime pretreatment in mild temperatures (25 ?? 55oC). The delignification kinetic models of corn stover were empirically determined by three simultaneous first-order reactions. The activation energies for the oxidative delignification were estimated as 50.15 and 54.21 kJ/mol in the bulk and residual phases, respectively. Crystallinity slightly increased with delignification because amorphous components (lignin, hemicellulose) were removed. However, the increased crystallinity did not negatively affect the 3-d sugar yield of enzyme hydrolysis. Oxidative lime pretreatment lowered the acetyl and lignin contents to obtain high digestibility, regardless of crystallinity. The enzymatic digestibility of lime-treated biomass was affected by the change of structural features (acetylation, lignification, and crystallization) resulting from the treatment. The non-linear models for 3-d hydrolysis yields of glucan and xylan were empirically established as a function of the residual lignin fraction for the corn stover pretreated with lime and air.

Kim, Se Hoon

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Ecophysiology of dryland corn and grain sorghum as affected by alternative planting geometries and seeding rates.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Previous work in the High Plains with alternative planting geometries of corn and grain sorghum has shown potential benefits in dryland production. Studies conducted in… (more)

Haag, Lucas A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Measuring Improvement in the Energy Performance of the U.S. Corn...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Improvement in the Energy Performance of the U.S. Corn Refining Industry Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and...

173

Farm-, Field-, and Plant-scale Effects on European Corn Borer Oviposition.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??New technologies and strategies in commodity agriculture result in higher yields and quality harvests. Corn, one of the most economically important crops in the United… (more)

Ellis, Katherine

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Fate of the mycotoxin fumonisin B1 during alkaline cooking of cultured and whole kernel corn.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fumonisins are Fusarium mycotoxins that are natural contaminants of corn. They are toxic to animals and consumption of contaminated foods, including tortillas, is a suspected… (more)

Burns, Tantiana Donata

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Evaluation of corn and soybean response to phosphorus and potassium fertilization.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Corn (Zea mays) response to fertilization and placement methods has been studied extensively; however studies on soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] response to placement have… (more)

Arns, Ingrid

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Corn and weed interactions with nitrogen in dryland and irrigated environments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Corn yield potential is limited by water deficit stress and limited soil nitrogen. Field and greenhouse experiments were conducted near Manhattan, KS in 2005 and… (more)

Ruf, Ella Kathrene

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Yield and quality responses of corn silage genotypes under reduced irrigation in the Texas High Plains.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Two main options exist for producers to optimize the production of corn silage in limited-irrigation systems. First, they can utilize best management practices to make… (more)

Spinhirne, Bruce

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Impact of Recycling Stillage on Conversion of Dilute Sulfuric Acid Pretreated Corn Stover to Ethanol (Poster)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A description of methods and results from an experiment designed to assess the impact of process water recycle on corn stover-to-ethanol conversion process performance.

Mohagheghi, A.; Schell, D. J.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Characterization of Soil Amended with the By-Product of Corn Stover Fermentation  

SciTech Connect

Corn stover is a potential biofuel; however, removing this stover from the land may increase the risk of erosion and reduce soil organic matter.

Johnson,J.M.F; Reicosky, D; Sharratt, M; Lindstrom,M; Voorhees, W; Carpenter-Boggs,L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Enhancing dry-grind corn ethanol production with fungal cultivation and ozonation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Public opinion of the U.S. fuel ethanol industry has suffered in recent years despite record ethanol production. Debates sparked over the environmental impacts of corn… (more)

Rasmussen, Mary

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deadman corn er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The impact of ethanol driven corn price on the cow-calf industry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??After remaining stable for several decades, corn price has recently had unprecedented price increases and volatility. United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) predicts an average… (more)

Warner, Marcella M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Phosphorus utilization from 32P-triple superphosphate by corn plants, as affected by green manures and nitrogen and phosphate fertilizer rates in cerrado (savannah) soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

phosphate rock mixtures on corn growth. Scientia Agricola.the factors responsible for low corn crop yield, allied tothe amount of N applied to corn in Brazil is, in average, 60

Muraoka, Takashi; Silva, Edson Cabral da; Buzetti, Salatier; Alvarez V., Felipe Carlos; Franzini, Vinicius Ide

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alkali and Conventional Corn Wet-Milling: 100-g Procedures.for Starch Recovery from Corn. Illinois Marketing Board,the Net Energy Balance of Corn Ethanol. An Economic Research

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Soil Acidity and Manganese Nutrition of Corn and Soybeans as Affected by Lime and Nitrogen Applications in an Oxisol under a No-Till System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0–0.10 m depth and leaf Mn content of corn and soybean. **:p Corn Grain Mn , mg kg -1 Soybean ? = 148.86 –m and grain Mn content of corn and soybean. **: p < 0.01.

Caires, Eduardo Fávero; Garbuio, Fernando José; Joris, Hélio Antonio Wood; Pereira, Paulo Roberto da Silva Filho

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

INTERSPECIFIC AND INTRASPECIFIC COMPETITION OF COMMON SUNFLOWER (HELIANTHUS ANNUUS L.) IN FIELD CORN (ZEA MAYS L.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Common sunflower is a competitive annual native dicot found in disturbed areas, on roadsides, dry prairies, and in row crops. Common sunflower is a competitive weed, but little data exist on interference, economic impacts, and competition in field corn. Field studies were conducted in 2006 and 2007 to 1) define the density-dependent effects of common sunflower competition with corn; 2) define the necessary weed-free periods of common sunflower in corn; 3) evaluate common sunflower control with herbicides; 4) and define the economic impact of common sunflower interference with corn. Corn grain yield was significantly reduced when common sunflower densities reached 1 plant/m of row and potentitially damaging common sunflower densities occurred if allowed to compete for more than 2 to 4 wk after planting for maximum corn yield. No significant corn yield reduction occurred if common sunflowers emerged 8 wk after planting. Growing degree day (GDD) heat units for corn showed that the critical point for control of common sunflower was approximately 300 GDD. Atrazine applied PRE, atrazine followed by (fb) glyphosate or halosulfuron POST, glyphosate POST, halosulfuron POST, and halosulfuron plus nicosulfuron POST controlled >87% of common sunflower. Atrazine applied PRE in a 30-cm band, nicosulfuron POST, and atrazine broadcast plus S-metolachlor PRE showed significantly lower common sunflower control and corn grain yield, when compared to atrazine PRE fb glyphosate POST. Economic impact of one sunflower/6 m of crop row caused a yield loss of 293 kg/ha. Various corn planting densities showed that corn yield can be reduced 1990 kg/ha with common sunflower competition. Corn planting densities of 49400 and 59300 plants/ha provided the greatest net returns with or without the presence of common sunflower competition. The highest net returns occurred with no common sunflower competition in 2006 and 2007, at $3,046/ha and $2,687/ha, respectively, when net corn prices were $0.24/kg ($6.00/bu). Potential control costs of various herbicide treatments revealed net returns of $1,156 to $1,910/ha in 2006 and $1,158 to $1,943/ha in 2007. Determining the economic impact of common sunflower interference in field corn allows producers to estimate the overall net return based upon density and duration of common sunflower interference, while considering varying net corn prices, crop planting density, and herbicide application costs.

Falkenberg, Nyland R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE)-supported corn fiber conversion project, “Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation” is to develop and demonstrate an integrated, economical process for the separation of corn fiber into its principal components to produce higher value-added fuel (ethanol and biodiesel), nutraceuticals (phytosterols), chemicals (polyols), and animal feed (corn fiber molasses). This project has successfully demonstrated the corn fiber conversion process on the pilot scale, and ensured that the process will integrate well into existing ADM corn wet-mills. This process involves hydrolyzing the corn fiber to solubilize 50% of the corn fiber as oligosaccharides and soluble protein. The solubilized fiber is removed and the remaining fiber residue is solvent extracted to remove the corn fiber oil, which contains valuable phytosterols. The extracted oil is refined to separate the phytosterols and the remaining oil is converted to biodiesel. The de-oiled fiber is enzymatically hydrolyzed and remixed with the soluble oligosaccharides in a fermentation vessel where it is fermented by a recombinant yeast, which is capable of fermenting the glucose and xylose to produce ethanol. The fermentation broth is distilled to remove the ethanol. The stillage is centrifuged to separate the yeast cell mass from the soluble components. The yeast cell mass is sold as a high-protein yeast cream and the remaining sugars in the stillage can be purified to produce a feedstock for catalytic conversion of the sugars to polyols (mainly ethylene glycol and propylene glycol) if desirable. The remaining materials from the purification step and any materials remaining after catalytic conversion are concentrated and sold as a corn fiber molasses. Additional high-value products are being investigated for the use of the corn fiber as a dietary fiber sources.

Abbas, Charles; Beery, Kyle; Orth, Rick; Zacher, Alan

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

188

Distribution of two rotation-resistant corn pests in eastern Iowa and effects of soybean varieties on biology of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The western corn rootworm Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (WCR) and the northern corn rootworm Diabrotica barberi Smith & Lawrence (NCR) are two significant insect pests… (more)

Dunbar, Michael Wilson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

An ABC transporter gene from Fusarium verticillioides, FvABC1, may confer tolerance to corn antimicrobial compounds.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An ABC transporter gene, FvABC1, was cloned and sequenced from the corn pathogen Fusarium verticillioides in order to study non-degradative tolerance to corn antimicrobial compounds.… (more)

Palencia, Edwin Rene

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Fall 2012 Topics: Thermodynamics of energy systems; Peak Oil; Energy economics. Problem Set #3 Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Peak Oil; Energy economics. Problem Set #3 Solutions Total Points: 103 [ER100/PP184], 133 [ER200/PP284 of energy systems; Peak Oil; Energy economics. Problem Set #3 Solutions Total Points: 103 [ER100/PP184], 133 chillers v. Thermally enhanced oil recovery (Other answers acceptable) e) Approximately what percent

Kammen, Daniel M.

191

Prenova & Owens Corning Teaming Presentation- Using Service and Product  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentation- Using Service and Presentation- Using Service and Product Providers to Leverage Your Energy Efforts: Prenova/Owens Corning Energy Process Optimization Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing

192

Environmental Impacts of Stover Removal in the Corn Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When considering the market for biomass from corn stover resources erosion and soil quality issues are important to consider. Removal of stover can be beneficial in some areas, especially when coordinated with other conservation practices, such as vegetative barrier strips and cover crops. However, benefits are highly dependent on several factors, namely if farmers see costs and benefits associated with erosion and the tradeoffs with the removal of biomass. This paper uses results from an integrated RUSLE2/WEPS model to incorporate six different regime choices, covering management, harvest and conservation, into simple profit maximization model to show these tradeoffs.

Alicia English; Wallace E. Tyner; Juan Sesmero; Phillip Owens; David Muth

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Proton efflux from corn roots induced by tripropyltin  

SciTech Connect

Tripropyltin restores medium acidification by washed corn root tissue in which electrogenic H/sup +/ efflux has been blocked by ATPase inhibitors or injury. However, the restore H/sup +/ efflux is not electrogenic and will not drive K/sup +/ influx, and, by itself, tripropyltin is inhibitory to K/sup +/ influx. Tripropyltin elicits a 5-fold increase in endogenous chloride efflux, and Cl/sup -//OH/sup -/ exchange can, thus, account for the observed acidification of the medium. This explanation cannot be applied equally to the acidification produced by the K/sup +//H/sup +/ exchanging ionophore nigericin.

Chastain, C.J.; Hanson, J.B.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Ethanol and Its Effect on the U.S. Corn Market: How the Price of E-85 Influences Equilibrium Corn Prices and Equilibrium Quantity.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study analyzes the impact the market price of E-85 has on equilibrium price and quantity exchanged of corn in the U.S. market. After presenting… (more)

PINCIN, JARED

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Predicting Large-Area Corn Yield with a Weighted Palmer Z-Index  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palmer's z-index, calculated to reflect only the planting-emergence and anthesis-grainfill stages of the growing season, is related with detrended corn yields to produce a predictive model for Illinois corn production. The model is evaluated to ...

Scott A. Isard; William E. Easterling

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Enzymatic Digestibility of Corn Stover Fractions in Response to Fungal Pretreatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corn stover fractions (leaves, cobs, and stalks) were studied for enzymatic digestibility after pretreatment with a white rot fungus, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora. Among the three fractions, leaves had the least recalcitrance to fungal pretreatment and the lignin degradation reached 45% after 30 days of pretreatment. The lignin degradation of stalks and cobs was similar but was significantly lower than that of leaves (p corn cobs.

Cui, Z. F.; Wan, C. X.; Shi, J.; Sykes, R. W.; Li, Y. B.

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

197

Comparative Detoxification of Vacuum Evaporation/Steam Stripping Combined with Overliming on Corn Stover Prehydrolyzate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tow kinds of physical methods, vacuum evaporation and steam stripping, combined with overliming (calcium hydroxide) were applied to remove inhibitors which were produced simultaneously during the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass. Corn stover was ... Keywords: vacuum evaporation, steam stripping, overliming, corn stover prehydrolyzate, detoxification

Jun-jun Zhu; Qiang Yong; Yong Xu; Shi-yuan Yu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Corn Ethanol Industry Process Data: September 27, 2007 - January 27, 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This subcontract report supplies timely data on the historical make-up of the corn ethanol industry and a current estimate of where the industry stands. The subcontractor has also reported on the expected future trends of the corn ethanol dry grind industry.

BBI International

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

The effect of CO regulations on the cost of corn ethanol production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

e MJ-1 by co-firing 20% biomass in its boiler system, incurring only a small change in production (e.g. raw starch hydrolysis and corn oil extraction, plus either CHP or biomass co-firing), and even (e.g. raw starch hydrolysis and corn oil extraction, plus either CHP or biomass co-firing), and even

Kammen, Daniel M.

200

A supply forecasting model for Zimbabwe's corn sector: a time series and structural analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Zimbabwean government utilizes the corn supply forecasts to establish producer prices for the following growing season, estimate corn storage and handling costs, project corn import needs and associated costs, and to assess the Grain Marketing Board's financial resource needs. Thus, the corn supply forecasts are important information used by the government for contingency planning, decision-making, policy-formulation and implementation. As such, the need for accurate forecasts is obvious. The objectives of the study are: (a) determine how changes in the government-established producer price affects the quantity of corn supplied to the Grain Marketing Board by the large-scale corn-producing sector and (b) whether including rainfall or rainfall probabilities into econometric models would result in an improvement of corn supply forecasts compared to current forecasts by the government. In order to accomplish the first objective a supply elasticity model was specified and estimated using ordinary least squares. This model is intended to provide 'de insight to the government regarding the influence of the government-established corn price and other related variables on corn supplied to the Grain Marketing Board by the large-scale producers. Thus, the estimated model would be useful to the government when establishing corn prices in March/April for production in the following growing season (October - February). To achieve the second objective, preliminary analysis was carried out to verify whether there is statistical evidence to support the hypothesis that rainfall cause" corn production and supply, and also corn prices and sales. Specifically the preliminary analysis involved using the Granger causality tests, stationarity tests and innovation accounting (impulse responses and forecast error decomposition). Having verified and quantified the causal effects of rainfall on corn production and supply, the next task was to investigate whether including rainfall and/or drought probabilities into forecasting econometric models would help provide improved out-of-sample forecasts compared to the government's forecasts. The forecasting accuracy of the models (short-run) was evaluated using standard statistical measures such as, the mean square error (MSE), mean absolute percentage error (MAPEI), improved mean absolute percentage error (IMAPE) and Theil's U-statistic, and thereupon select the best model. The results indicated that by incorporating rainfall and/or rainfall probabilities into econometric forecasting models, there was substantial improvement in corn supply forecasts. It follows that the the government would likely find it beneficial to incorporate the rainfall variable into their forecasting effort.

Makaudze, Ephias

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deadman corn er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

ARM - Field Campaign - AERI-ER Intercomparison IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsAERI-ER Intercomparison IOP govCampaignsAERI-ER Intercomparison IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : AERI-ER Intercomparison IOP 2004.01.12 - 2006.06.29 Lead Scientist : David Turner Data Availability Data were collected and submitted to the ARM Archive for IOPs. For data sets, see below. Summary There were three, potentially four, phases to this experiment. The length of time required for each phase was the time needed to ensure at least one severe clear period, which occur relatively frequently in January and February on the North Slope. The phases were: 1) Run the two systems side-by-side in their nominal modes to ensure that the calibration is reproducible. 2) Adjust the set-point of the hot blackbody on the second system from 60

202

Fly ash as a liming material for corn production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash produced as a by-product of subbituminous coal combustion can potentially serve as an alternative liming material without negatively affecting corn (Zea mays L.) production in areas where use of conventional liming materials can be uneconomical due to transportation costs. A study was conducted to determine if fly ash produced from the Nebraska Public Power District Gerald Gentleman Power Station located in Sutherland, NE could be used as an alternative liming material. Combinations of dry fly ash (DFA), wet fly ash (WFA), beet lime (by-product of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) processing) (BL), and agricultural lime (AGL) were applied at rates ranging from 0.43 to 1.62 times the recommended lime rate to plots on four acidic soils (Anselmo fine sandy loam, Hord fine sandy loam, Holdrege sandy loam, and Valentine fine sand). Soil samples were collected to a depth of 0.2 m from plots and analyzed for pH before lime applications and twice periodically after lime application. The Hord and Valentine soils were analyzed for exchangeable Ca, Mg, K, Na,and Al for determination of percent Al saturation on selected treatments and sampling dates. Corn grain yields were determined annually. It is concluded that the fly ash utilized in this study and applied at rates in this study, increases soil pH comparable to agricultural lime and is an appropriate alternative liming material.

Tarkalson, D.D.; Hergert, G.W.; Stevens, W.B.; McCallister, D.L.; Kackman, S.D. [University of Nebraska, North Platte, NE (US)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Pahute Mesa Well Development and Testing Analyses for Wells ER-20-7, ER-20-8 #2, and ER-EC-11, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes the following data collected from ER-20-7, ER-20-8 No.2, and ER-EC-11 during WDT operations: (1) Chemical indicators of well development (Section 2.0); (2) Static hydraulic head (Section 3.0); (3) Radiochemistry and geochemistry (Section 4.0); (4) Drawdown observed at locations distal to the pumping well (Section 5.0); and (5) Drilling water production, flow logs, and temperature logs (Section 6.0). The new data are further considered with respect to existing data as to how they enhance or change interpretations of groundwater flow and transport, and an interim small-scale conceptual model is also developed and compared to Phase I concepts. The purpose of well development is to remove drilling fluids and drilling-associated fines from the formation adjacent to a well so samples reflecting ambient groundwater water quality can be collected, and to restore hydraulic properties near the well bore. Drilling fluids can contaminate environmental samples from the well, resulting in nonrepresentative measurements. Both drilling fluids and preexisting fines in the formation adjacent to the well can impede the flow of water from the formation to the well, creating artifacts in hydraulic response data measured in the well.

Greg Ruskauff

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Biofuels from Corn Stover: Pyrolytic Production and Catalytic Upgrading Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to security issues in energy supply and environmental concerns, renewable energy production from biomass becomes an increasingly important area of study. Thus, thermal conversion of biomass via pyrolysis and subsequent upgrading procedures were explored, in an attempt to convert an abundant agricultural residue, corn stover, into potential bio-fuels. Pyrolysis of corn stover was carried out at 400, 500 and 600oC and at moderate pressure. Maximum bio-char yield of 37.3 wt.% and liquid product yield of 31.4 wt.% were obtained at 400oC while the gas yield was maximum at 600oC (21.2 wt.%). Bio-char characteristics (energy content, proximate and ultimate analyses) indicated its potential as alternative solid fuel. The bio-oil mainly consisted of phenolic compounds, with significant proportions of aromatic and aliphatic compounds. The gas product has energy content ranging from 10.1 to 21.7 MJ m-3, attributed to significant quantities of methane, hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Mass and energy conversion efficiencies indicated that majority of the mass and energy contained in the feedstock was transferred to the bio-char. Fractional distillation of the bio-oil at atmospheric and reduced pressure yielded approximately 40-45 wt.% heavy distillate (180-250oC) with significantly reduced moisture and total acid number (TAN) and greater energy content. Aromatic compounds and oxygenated compounds were distributed in the light and middle fractions while phenolic compounds were concentrated in the heavy fraction. Finally, hydrotreatment of the bio-oil and the heavy distillate using noble metal catalysts such as ruthenium and palladium on carbon support at 100 bar pressure, 4 hours reaction time and 200o or 300oC showed that ruthenium performed better at the higher temperature (300oC) and was more effective than palladium, giving about 25-26% deoxygenation. The hydrotreated product from the heavy distillate with ruthenium as catalyst at 300oC had the lowest oxygen content and exhibited better product properties (lower moisture, TAN, and highest heating value), and can be a potential feedstock for co-processing with crude oils in existing refineries. Major reactions involved were conversion of phenolics to aromatics and hydrogenation of ketones to alcohols. Results showed that pyrolysis of corn stover and product upgrading produced potentially valuable sources of fuel and chemical feedstock.

Capunitan, Jewel Alviar

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

DOE/El%0455P DOE/ER--0455P  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

455P 455P DOE/ER--0455P DE90 011269 ti DISTWIE3UTIQN Of= THIS DOCUMENT IS UNLlMiTE TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction..................................................................... 3 Materials Sciences ,,.............................. ..*............................. 7 Laser Annealing ................................................................. 7 Superior Ceramics ............................................................... 10 NickelAluminide ............................................................... 12 Synchrotron Light Sources ........................................................ 15 Far-Infrared Detectors ............................................................ 17 Glassy Metals .................................................................. 20

206

Energy and Resources Group Spring 2013 Colloquium Series (ER295)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Resources Group Spring 2013 Colloquium Series (ER295) April 3, 2013 The REN21 Renewables for the future of renewable energy. The report is not one scenario or viewpoint, but captures the contemporary published and prominent energy scenarios by a range of organizations. Conservative projections show 15

Kammen, Daniel M.

207

Energy and Resources Group Fall 2013 Colloquium Series (ER295)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Sidley & Austin, where he primarily worked on energy issues, before joining the University of IllinoisEnergy and Resources Group Fall 2013 Colloquium Series (ER295) October 23, 2013 In the wake, Berkeley. He is also the Co-Director of the Center for Law, Energy, and the Environment. Professor Farber

Kammen, Daniel M.

208

Energy and Resources Group Fall 2012 Colloquium Series (ER295)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Resources Group Fall 2012 Colloquium Series (ER295) September 12, 2012 Severin Borenstein E.T. Grether Chair in Business Administration and Public Policy Co-Director, Energy Institute at Haas Director, U.C. Energy Institute U.C. Berkeley "An Economic Framework for Analyzing Energy

Kammen, Daniel M.

209

Energy and Resources Group Spring 2012 Colloquium Series (ER295)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Resources Group Spring 2012 Colloquium Series (ER295) February 22, 2012 What did I do during my tenure as the 'Clean Energy Czar' at the World Bank? This talk will examine the current patterns and future plans for investment in energy at the World Bank Group, which totals roughly $8 billion

Kammen, Daniel M.

210

Magnetic structure of Er5Si4 J. M. Cadogan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Materials Research, Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council, Chalk River diffraction, ac-susceptibility, and 166 Er Mo¨ssbauer spectroscopy. The crystal space group is orthorhombic-resolution diffractometer at the NRU reactor, Chalk River Laboratories, operated by Atomic Energy Canada Ltd. The neutron

Ryan, Dominic

211

The Meteorological Measurement System on the NASA ER-2 Aircraft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Meteorological Measurement System (MMS) was designed and installed on one of the NASA high-altitude ER-2 aircraft (NASA 706). The MMS provides in situ measurements of free-stream pressure (±0.3 mb), temperature (±0.3°C), and wind vector (±1 m s?...

Stan G. Scott; T. Paul Bui; K. Roland Chan; Stuart W. Bowen

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Update of distillers grains displacement ratios for corn ethanol life-cycle analysis.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production of corn-based ethanol (either by wet milling or by dry milling) yields the following coproducts: distillers grains with solubles (DGS), corn gluten meal (CGM), corn gluten feed (CGF), and corn oil. Of these coproducts, all except corn oil can replace conventional animal feeds, such as corn, soybean meal, and urea. Displacement ratios of corn-ethanol coproducts including DGS, CGM, and CGF were last updated in 1998 at a workshop at Argonne National Laboratory on the basis of input from a group of experts on animal feeds, including Prof. Klopfenstein (University of Nebraska, Lincoln), Prof. Berger (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), Mr. Madson (Rapheal Katzen International Associates, Inc.), and Prof. Trenkle (Iowa State University) (Wang 1999). Table 1 presents current dry milling coproduct displacement ratios being used in the GREET model. The current effort focuses on updating displacement ratios of dry milling corn-ethanol coproducts used in the animal feed industry. Because of the increased availability and use of these coproducts as animal feeds, more information is available on how these coproducts replace conventional animal feeds. To glean this information, it is also important to understand how industry selects feed. Because of the wide variety of available feeds, animal nutritionists use commercial software (such as Brill Formulation{trademark}) for feed formulation. The software recommends feed for the animal on the basis of the nutritional characteristics, availability, and price of various animal feeds, as well as on the nutritional requirements of the animal (Corn Refiners Association 2006). Therefore, feed formulation considers both the economic and the nutritional characteristics of feed products.

Arora, S.; Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Biomechanics of Wheat/Barley Straw and Corn Stover  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The lack of understanding of the mechanical characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks is a limiting factor in economically collecting and processing crop residues, primarily wheat and barley stems and corn stover. Several testing methods, including compression, tension, and bend have been investigated to increase our understanding of the biomechanical behavior of cellulosic feedstocks. Biomechanical data from these tests can provide required input to numerical models and help advance harvesting, handling, and processing techniques. In addition, integrating the models with the complete data set from this study can identify potential tools for manipulating the biomechanical properties of plant varieties in such a manner as to optimize their physical characteristics to produce higher value biomass and more energy efficient harvesting practices.

Christopher T. Wright; Peter A. Pryfogle; Nathan A. Stevens; Eric D. Steffler; J. Richard Hess; Thomas H. Ulrich

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

ERS 14.2 Emissions Monitoring, 4/3/95 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ERS 14.2 Emissions Monitoring, 4395 ERS 14.2 Emissions Monitoring, 4395 The objective of this surveillance is to verify that the contractor is monitoring emissions of...

215

Sonochemical synthesis of Er3+-doped ZnO nanospheres with enhanced upconversion photoluminescence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Er3+-doped ZnO nanospheres have been synthesized via a sonochemical conversion process. The formation mechanism of these nanocrystals is connected with the sonochemical effect of ultrasound irradiation. The as-prepared Er3+ doped ...

Jun Geng, Guang-Hui Song, Jun-Jie Zhu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

WASTE CHARACTERIZATION AT OAK RIDGE, ER-B-00-03 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home WASTE CHARACTERIZATION AT OAK RIDGE, ER-B-00-03 WASTE CHARACTERIZATION AT OAK RIDGE, ER-B-00-03 Waste...

217

Session 4: EER: Extended (or Enhanced) ER Model (CH-2 and 3)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Session 4: EER: Extended (or Enhanced) ER Model (CH-2 and 3) CSCI-585 , Cyrus Shahabi · Example ER to no subclass. EER-to-Relational Mapping · Option 1: One table for superclass + two tables for subclasses (one

Shahabi, Cyrus

218

A Five-Year Assessment of Corn Stover Harvest in Central Iowa, USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sustainable feedstock harvest strategies are needed to ensure bioenergy production does not irreversibly degrade soil resources. The objective for this study was to document corn (Zea mays L.) grain and stover fraction yields, plant nutrient removal and replacement costs, feedstock quality, soil-test changes, and soil quality indicator response to four stover harvest strategies for continuous corn and a corn-soybean [Glycine max. (L.) Merr.] rotation. The treatments included collecting (1) all standing plant material above a stubble height of 10 cm (whole plant), (2) the upper-half by height (ear shank upward), (3) the lower-half by height (from the 10 cm stubble height to just below the earshank), or (4) no removal. Collectable biomass from Treatment 2 averaged 3.9 ({+-}0.8) Mg ha{sup -1} for continuous corn (2005 through 2009), and 4.8 ({+-}0.4) Mg ha{sup -1} for the rotated corn (2005, 2007, and 2009). Compared to harvesting only the grain, collecting stover increased the average N-P-K removal by 29, 3 and 34 kg ha{sup -1} for continuous corn and 42, 3, and 34 kg ha{sup -1} for rotated corn, respectively. Harvesting the lower-half of the corn plant (Treatment 3) required two passes, resulted in frequent plugging of the combine, and provided a feedstock with low quality for conversion to biofuel. Therefore, Treatment 3 was replaced by a 'cobs-only' harvest starting in 2009. Structural sugars glucan and xylan accounted for up to 60% of the chemical composition, while galactan, arabinan, and mannose constituted less than 5% of the harvest fractions collected from 2005 through 2008. Soil-test data from samples collected after the first harvest (2005) revealed low to very low plant-available P and K levels which reduced soybean yield in 2006 after harvesting the whole-plant in 2005. Average continuous corn yields were 21% lower than rotated yields with no significant differences due to stover harvest. Rotated corn yields in 2009 showed some significant differences, presumably because soil-test P was again in the low range. A soil quality analysis using the Soil Management Assessment Framework (SMAF) with six indicators showed that soils at the continuous corn and rotated sites were functioning at an average of 93 and 83% of their inherent potential, respectively. With good crop management practices, including routine soil-testing, adequate fertilization, maintenance of soil organic matter, sustained soil structure, and prevention of wind, water or tillage erosion, a portion of the corn stover being produced in central Iowa, USA can be harvested in a sustainable manner.

Douglas L. Karlen; Stuart J. Birell; J. Richard Hess

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Characterization and Combustion Performance of Corn Oil-Based Biofuel Blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, the development and use of biofuels have received considerable attention due to the high demand for environmentally acceptable (green) fuels. Most of the recent studies have looked at the processes of converting vegetable oils into biodiesel. It is well known vegetable oil to biodiesel conversion involves many processes including transesterification, which makes biodiesel costly and time-consuming to produce. In this study, the effects of blending high-viscosity fresh and used corn oils with low-viscosity diesel and jet fuel mixed with butanol and ethanol were studied. Several corn oil-based blends were formulated and characterized to understand the effect of composition on viscosity, fuel stability and energy content. The formulated corn oil blends were combusted in a 30 kW modified combustion chamber to determine the corresponding NOx and CO emission levels, along with CO? levels. Used corn oil was made by simply heating fresh corn oil for a fixed period of time (about 44 hours), and was characterized by quantifying its total polar material (TPM), iodine value, free fatty acid content, and peroxide value. The combustion experiments were conducted at a constant heat output of 68,620 kJ/hr (19 kW), to observe and study the effects of equivalence ratio, swirl number, and fuel composition on emissions. Used corn oil blends exhibited better combustion performance than fresh corn oil blends, due in part to the higher unsaturation levels in fresh corn oil. NOx emissions for used corn oil increased with swirl number. Among all the blends, the one with the higher amount of diesel (lower amount of corn oil) showed higher NOx emissions. The blend with fresh corn oil showed decreasing NOx with increasing equivalence ratio at swirl number 1.4. All blends showed generally decreasing CO trends at both swirl numbers at very lean conditions. The diesel fuel component as well as the alcohols in the blends were also important in the production of pollutants. Compared to the diesel-based blends mixed with used corn oil, butanol, and ethanol, the jet fuel-based blends showed higher NOx levels and lower CO levels at both swirl numbers.

Savant, Gautam Sandesh

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Land-use change and greenhouse gas emissions from corn and cellulosic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Science Computing, Environment & Life Sciences Energy Engineering & Systems Analysis Photon Sciences Physical Sciences & Engineering Energy Frontier Research Centers Science Highlights Postdoctoral Researchers Land-use change and greenhouse gas emissions from corn and cellulosic ethanol July 16, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint The greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that may accompany land-use change (LUC) from increased biofuel feedstock production are a source of debate in the discussion of drawbacks and advantages of biofuels. Estimates of LUC GHG emissions focus mainly on corn ethanol and vary widely. Increasing the understanding of LUC GHG impacts associated with both corn and cellulosic ethanol will inform the on-going debate concerning their magnitudes and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deadman corn er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Technical Standards, DOE-ER-STD-6001-92- March 12, 1996  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE-ER-STD-6001-92: Implementation Guide for Quality Assurance Programs for Basic and Applied Research; Canceled

222

Electrical and structural properties of high-k Er-silicate gate dielectric formed by interfacial reaction between Er and SiO{sub 2} films  

SciTech Connect

The authors investigate the electrical and structural properties of high-k Er-silicate film formed by the interfacial reaction between Er and SiO{sub 2} films. The increase in rapid thermal annealing temperature leads to the reduction of the interface trap density by one order of magnitude, indicating the improvement in the interface quality of Er-silicate gate dielectric. The increased capacitance value of Er-silicate gate dielectric with thermal treatment is attributed in part to the reduction of SiO{sub 2} thickness and to the increase in the relative dielectric constant of Er-silicate film caused by the chemical bonding change from Si-rich to Er-rich silicate.

Choi, Chel-Jong; Jang, Moon-Gyu; Kim, Yark-Yeon; Jun, Myung-Sim; Kim, Tae-Youb; Song, Myeong-Ho [IT Convergence Technology Research Division, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); National Nanofab Center, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

223

Corn Yield Behavior: Effects of Technological Advance and Weather-Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study explores the relationships between U.S. corn yields (level and stability), advances in technology, and weather. Evaluations at the farm, sub-state, and national levels reveal no evidence of yield plateaus, and absolute, but not ...

Philip Garcia; Susan E. Offutt; Musa Pinar; Stanley A. Changnon

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Prediction of County-Level Corn Yields Using an Energy-Crop Growth Index  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Weather conditions significantly affect corn yields. while weather remains as the major uncontrolled variable in crop production, an understanding of the influence of weather on yields can aid in early and accurate assessment of the impact of ...

Jeffrey A. Andresen; Robert F. Dale; Jerald J. Fletcher; Paul V. Preckel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY CORNING INCORPORATED FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WAIVER OF DOMESTIC WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE CONTRACT NO. DE-FC26- 05NT42461, SUBCONTRACT QZ001; W(A)-05-040, CH-1322 The Petitioner, Corning Incorporated (Corning) was awarded a subcontract under a cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps". The prime contract is with the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). The purpose of the project is to develop effective, economical technology to enable the removal of mercury from syngas created when coal is gasified. Under the subcontract, Corning will conduct research into whether Corning's impregnated monolith technology, in conjunction with the University of North Dakota's

226

Owens Corning and Silicon Valley Power Partner to Make Energy Savings a Reality (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This case study describes how the Owens Corning plant in Santa Clara, California, participated in Save Energy Now energy assessments and used Silicon Valley Power utility incentives to save $252,000.

Not Available

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Frequency of Precipitation across the Northern U.S. Corn Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowledge of the frequency of precipitation events can aid in managing water resources, but little is known concerning the regional variability in the frequency of daily precipitation events in the northern U.S. Corn Belt. The frequency ...

B. S. Sharratt; J. Zandlo; G. Spoden

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Effect of coarse or fine grinding on utilization of dry or ensiled corn by lactating dairy cows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study evaluated the effect of coarse or fine grinding of three forms of corn on the performance of lactating cows. Six diets, fed as total mixed rations, were identical except for the corn portion of the diet. Corn treatments were dry shelled corn, high moisture ensiled ear corn, and high moisture ensiled shelled corn, either coarsely or finely ground. The experimental design was a6 × 6 Latin square with 36 cows. Eighteen cows were assigned to the six different treatments and were fed once daily. Within this group of 18 cows, six had a ruminal cannula and were used to evaluate nutrient digestibilities and ruminal fermentation. The remaining 18 cows, six of which were ruminally cannulated, were similarly assigned, except they were fed twice daily. In the group fed once daily, milk production and composition were not affected by treatment. Starch digestibility was greater with the high moisture and with the finely ground corn treatments. In addition, the high moisture ensiled corn treatments had reduced ruminal ammonia concentrations. In the group that was fed twice daily, milk production and protein yield were greatest for the finely ground high moisture ensiled shelled corn treatment. Starch utilization was improved by fine grinding. Lower ruminal ammonia concentrations were obtained with the high moisture ensiled corn treatments, and there was a tendency for reduced ammonia concentration with fine grinding. Results indicate that high moisture ensiled corn as well as fine grinding improved nitrogen and starch utilization. (Key words: corn, milk, particle size, starch) Abbreviation key: CG = coarsely ground, DSC = dry shelled corn, FG = finely ground, HMEC = high mois-

F. San Emeterio; R. B. Reis; W. E. Campos; L. D. Satter

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

EASURING IMPROVEMENT IN THE ENERGY PERFORMANCE OF THE U.S. CORN REFINING INDUSTRY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| P | P a g e MEASURING IMPROVEMENT IN THE ENERGY PERFORMANCE OF THE U.S. CORN REFINING INDUSTRY SPONSORED BY THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY AS PART OF THE ENERGY STAR® PROGRAM GALE A. BOYD AND CHRISTIAN DELGADO DUKE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS BOX 90097, DURHAM, NC 27708 JULY 10, 2012 2 | P a g e MEASURING IMPROVEMENT IN THE ENERGY PERFORMANCE OF THE U.S. CORN REFINING INDUSTRY CONTENTS Figures .................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 3 Tables ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3

230

Influence of Mechanical Processing on Utilization of Corn Silage by Lactating Dairy Cows 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We conducted three experiments to determine the influence of mechanical processing on corn silage utilization by lactating dairy cows. Total mixed rations contained either unprocessed or processed corn silage harvested between 1/4 and 3/4 milk line. In trial 1, 12 multiparous Holstein cows were used in a replicated double switchback design with 21-d periods. Intake of dry matter (DM) was increased 1.2 kg/d by processing, but milk yield was unaffected. Processing did not affect apparent total-tract DM digestibility, but processing tended to lower starch and corn excretion in feces and reduced concentration of sieved corn kernel particles in feces. In trial 2, 42 Holstein cows were used in an 18-wk randomized complete-block design. Intake of DM and milk yield were unaffected by processing, but milk fat percent was increased 0.35 percentage units by processing. Processing tended to increase total-tract digestibility of starch, but reduced organic matter, crude protein, and neutral detergent fiber digestibilities. In trial 3, 30 Holstein cows were used in a 15-wk randomized complete block design. There was no influence of mechanical processing on intake or lactation performance in this trial. Despite indications of increased starch digestion in two trials and increased DM intake in one trial, effects of processing corn silage on lactation performance were minimal with corn silage at the maturity and moisture contents used in these trials.

T. R. Dhiman; M. A. Bal; Z. Wu; V. R. Moreira; R. D. Shaver; L. D. Satter; K. J. Shinners; R. P. Walgenbach

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emission impacts of different corn ethanol plant types.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the United States began a program to develop ethanol as a transportation fuel, its use has increased from 175 million gallons in 1980 to 4.9 billion gallons in 2006. Virtually all of the ethanol used for transportation has been produced from corn. During the period of fuel ethanol growth, corn farming productivity has increased dramatically, and energy use in ethanol plants has been reduced by almost by half. The majority of corn ethanol plants are powered by natural gas. However, as natural gas prices have skyrocketed over the last several years, efforts have been made to further reduce the energy used in ethanol plants or to switch from natural gas to other fuels, such as coal and wood chips. In this paper, we examine nine corn ethanol plant types--categorized according to the type of process fuels employed, use of combined heat and power, and production of wet distiller grains and solubles. We found that these ethanol plant types can have distinctly different energy and greenhouse gas emission effects on a full fuel-cycle basis. In particular, greenhouse gas emission impacts can vary significantly--from a 3% increase if coal is the process fuel to a 52% reduction if wood chips are used. Our results show that, in order to achieve energy and greenhouse gas emission benefits, researchers need to closely examine and differentiate among the types of plants used to produce corn ethanol so that corn ethanol production would move towards a more sustainable path.

Wang, M.; Wu, M.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Completion Report for Well Cluster ER-6-1  

SciTech Connect

Well Cluster ER-6-1 was constructed for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Division at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This work was initiated as part of the Groundwater Characterization Project, now known as the Underground Test Area Project. The well cluster is located in southeastern Yucca Flat. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments for Well Cluster ER-6-1 are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and conventional core samples taken below 639 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, chemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 11 samples to resolve complex interrelationships between several of the Tertiary tuff units. Additionally, paleontological analyses by the U.S. Geological Survey confirmed the stratigraphic assignments below 539 meters within the Paleozoic sedimentary section. All three wells in the Well ER-6-1 cluster were drilled within the Quaternary and Tertiary alluvium section, the Tertiary volcanic section, and into the Paleozoic sedimentary section.

Bechtel Nevada

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Completion report for Well Cluster ER-20-5  

SciTech Connect

The Well Cluster ER-20-5 drilling and completion project was conducted for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada. Its primary tasks include collecting geological, geophysical, hydrological, and water chemistry data from new and existing wells to define groundwater quality in addition to pathways and rates of groundwater migration. A program of drilling wells near the sites of selected underground nuclear tests (near-field drilling) was implemented to obtain site-specific data about the nature and extent of migration of radionuclides that might have been produced by an underground nuclear explosion. Well Cluster ER-20-5 is the first near-field drilling project initiated at the NTS. This document presents construction data and summarizes the scientific data gathered during the drilling and well-installation phases for all three holes drilled at Well Cluster ER-20-5. Some of this information is preliminary and unprocessed, but was released so that drilling, geotechnical, well design, and completion data could be rapidly disseminated. Additional information about water levels, aquifer testing, and groundwater sampling will be reported after any of this work is performed. Any additional geologic and/or geophysical investigations conducted for this project is described in one or more analysis and interpretation reports. The lithologic and stratigraphic logs, however, are provided in final form.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Completion Report for Well Cluster ER-5-4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well Cluster ER-5-4 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The cluster consists of two wells, positioned about 30 meters apart on the same drill pad, constructed as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for Frenchman Flat at the Nevada Test Site. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments for the well cluster are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 156 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 192 meters in both boreholes, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, chemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 122 samples. Well ER-5-4 penetrated approximately 1,120 meters of Quaternary and Tertiary alluvium before reaching total depth in Tertiary volcanic rocks at 1,137.5 meters. The deeper Well ER-5-4 No.2 penetrated 1,120.4 meters of alluvial sediments, and was terminated within Tertiary volcanic rocks at a depth of 2,133.6 meters, indicating that Paleozoic rocks are deeper than expected at this site.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Inner Mongolia Bayannao er Fuhui Wind Power Co Ltd | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bayannao er Fuhui Wind Power Co Ltd Bayannao er Fuhui Wind Power Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Inner Mongolia Bayannao'er Fuhui Wind Power Co Ltd Place Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China Sector Wind energy Product Wind project developer in China that has two projects in portfolio. References Inner Mongolia Bayannao'er Fuhui Wind Power Co Ltd[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Inner Mongolia Bayannao'er Fuhui Wind Power Co Ltd is a company located in Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China . References ↑ "[ Inner Mongolia Bayannao'er Fuhui Wind Power Co Ltd]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Inner_Mongolia_Bayannao_er_Fuhui_Wind_Power_Co_Ltd&oldid=346931

236

QUARTER SH OR T-T ER M EN ER GY OU TL OO K QUAR TERL Y PROJ  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2 QUARTER SH OR T-T ER M EN ER GY OU TL OO K QUAR TERL Y PROJ ECTIO NS ENERGY INFORMA TION ADMINIST RATION May 1991 This publication may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. Purchasing in formation for this or other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the Government Printing Office or ElA's National Energy Information Center. Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the Center by mail, telephone, or telecommunications device for the hearing impaired. Addresses, telephone numbers, and hours are as follows: National Energy Information Center, El-231 Energy Information Administration Forrestal Building, Room 1F-048 Washington, DC 20585 (202) 586-8800 Telecommunications Device for the

237

Comparative activation of estrogen receptor alpha (er alpha) by endocrine disruptors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estrogen receptor ? (ER?) is a ligand activated transcription factor. Many widely used synthetic compounds and natural chemicals can activate ER?. The compounds investigated in this study include 17?-estradiol (E2), diethylstilbestrol (DES), antiestrogens ICI 182,780, 4-hydroxytamoxifen, the phytoestrogen resveratrol, and the xenoestrogens bisphenol A (BPA), nonylphenol (NP), octylphenol (OP), endosulfan, kepone, 2,2-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-1,1,1- trichloroethane (HPTE) and 2,3,4,5-tetrachlorobiphenylol-4-ol (HO-PCB-Cl4). With the exception of the antiestrogens, all the compounds induced transactivation in MCF-7 or MDA-MB-231 cells transfected with wild-type ER? and a construct (pERE3) containing three tandem estrogen responsive elements (EREs) linked to a luciferase gene. However, these compounds differentially activated C-terminal deletion mutants of ER?. For example, neither E2 nor DES induced transactivation in MCF-7 transfected with ER?(1-537) due to partial deletion of helix 12 of ER?; however, OP, NP, resveratrol, kepone and HPTE induced this ER? mutant, demonstrating that the estrogenic activity of these synthetic compounds do not require activation function 2 (AF-2) of ER?. This study also investigated the effects of xenoestrogens on activation of reporter gene activity in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells transfected with a construct (pSp13) containing three tandem GC-rich Sp binding sites linked to the luciferase gene. In MCF-7 cells, antiestrogen-induced activation of ER?/Sp1 required the zinc finger motifs of ER?, whereas activation by estrogen and some xenoestrogens activation, such as endosulfan, NP and OP required the H12 of ER?. In contrast, xenoestrogens, such as HPTE, BPA, kepone and HO-PCBCl4, significantly induced transactivation of all four ER? deletion mutants tested in this study. Moreover, RNA interference assays demonstrated structuredependent differences in activation of ER?/Sp1, ER?/Sp3 and ER?/Sp4. The in vivo activities of E2, ICI 182,780, BPA and NP were further investigated in a transgenic mouse model containing pSp13 transgene. All the compounds induced luciferase activity in the mouse uterus; however activities observed in the penis and testis of male and stomach of both male and female mice were structure-dependent,. These results demonstrate that various ER ligands differentially activate ER? in breast cancer cells and transgenic mice, and their activities are dependent on ER? variants, promoter-, cell-context and selective use of different Sp proteins, suggesting these structurally diverse compounds are selective ER modulators (SERMs).

Wu, Fei

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

HYGROSCOPIC MOISTURE SORPTION KINETICS MODELING OF CORN STOVER AND ITS FRACTIONS  

SciTech Connect

Corn stover, a major crop-based lignocellulosic biomass feedstock, is required to be at an optimum moisture content for efficient bioconversion processes. Environmental conditions surrounding corn stover, as in storage facilities, affect its moisture due to hygroscopic sorption or desorption. The measurement and modeling of sorption characteristics of corn stover and its leaf, husk, and stalk fractions are useful from utilization and storage standpoints, hence investigated in this article. A benchtop low-temperature humidity chamber provided the test environments of 20 C, 30 C, and 40 C at a constant 95% relative humidity. Measured sorption characteristics with three replications for each fraction were obtained from instantaneous sample masses and initial moisture contents. Observed sorption characteristics were fitted using exponential, Page, and Peleg models. Corn stover fractions displayed a rapid initial moisture uptake followed by a slower sorption rates and eventually becoming almost asymptotic after 25 h. Sorption characteristics of all corn stover fractions were significantly different (P < 0.0001) but not the effect of temperature (P > 0.05) on these fractions. The initial 30 min of sorption was found to be critical due to peak rates of sorption from storage, handling, and processing standpoints. The Page and Peleg models had comparable performance fitting the sorption curves (R2 = 0.995), however the exponential model (R2 = 0.91) was not found suitable because of patterned residuals. The Arrhenius type relationship (P < 0.05; R2 = 0.80) explained the temperature variation of the fitted sorption model parameters. The Peleg model fitted constants, among the sorption models studied, had the best fit (R2 = 0.93) with the Arrhenius relationship. A developed method of mass proportion, involving individual corn stover fraction dry matter ratios, predicted the whole corn stover sorption characteristics from that of its individual fractions. Sorption characteristics models of individual corn stover fractions and predicted whole corn stover including a nomogram can be used for direct and quick estimation. Developed sorption characteristics find application in several fields of corn stover biomass processing, handling, and transport

Igathinathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Pordesimo, L. O. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Effects Of Steam-Flaked Corn Density And Roughage Concentration On In Vitro Fermentation, Performance, Carcass Quality, And Acid-Base Balance Of Finishing Beef Cattle, And Particle Distribution Of Corn Steam Flaked To Varying Densities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In Exp. 1, 128 beef steers were used in a 2 x 2 factorial to evaluate bulk densities of steam-flaked corn (SFC; 335 or 386… (more)

Hales, Kristin E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

COMPLETION REPORT FOR WELL CLUSTER ER-5-3  

SciTech Connect

Well Cluster ER-5-3 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This cluster of 3 wells was drilled in 2000 and 2001 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program in Frenchman Flat. The first borehole in the cluster, Well ER-5-3, was drilled in February and March 2000. A 47.0-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 374.8 meters. The hole diameter was decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 794.3 meters within welded ash-flow tuff. A piezometer string with 1 slotted interval was installed in the annulus of the surface casing, open to the saturated alluvium. A completion string with 2 slotted intervals was installed in the main hole, open to saturated alluvium and to the welded tuff aquifer. A second piezometer string with 1 slotted interval open to the welded-tuff aquifer was installed outside the completion string. Well ER-5-3 No.2 was drilled about 30 meters west of the first borehole in March 2000, and was recompleted in March 2001. A 66.0-centimeter hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 613.8 meters. The hole diameter was decreased to 44.5 centimeters and the borehole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 849.0 meters. The hole diameter was decreased once more to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,732.2 meters in dolomite. A completion string open to the dolomite (lower carbonate aquifer) was installed. Well ER-5-3 No.3 was drilled approximately 30 meters north of the first 2 boreholes in February 2001. A 66.0-centimeter hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 36.6 meters, then the main 25.1-centimeter-diameter hole was drilled to a total depth of 548.6 meters in alluvium. A slotted stainless-steel tubing string was installed in the saturated alluvium. A preliminary composite, static water level was measured at the depth of 282.6 meters, prior to development and hydrologic testing. Detailed lithologic descriptions and stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 120 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 91 meters in Wells ER-5-3 and ER-5-3 No.2, supplemented by geophysical log data. The wells penetrated Quaternary/Tertiary alluvium to the depth of 622.4 meters, and an 8.5-meter-thick basalt flow was encountered within the alluvium. Tertiary tuff was penetrated to the depth of approximately 1,425.9 meters, where the top of the lower carbonate aquifer was tagged in Well ER-5-3 No.2.

BECHTEL NEVADA

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deadman corn er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284)Fall 2012 Topics: Energy Units & Conversions, Global Energy Use Problem Set #1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284)Fall 2012 Topics: Energy Units & Conversions, Global Energy Use Problem Set #1 Due September 6, in class, or before 5pm outside 310 Barrows Total Points: 80 For all problem sets in Energy and Society: 1) Please clearly state any assumptions (e.g., the price

Kammen, Daniel M.

242

Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 1: Cost of feedstock supply logistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supply of corn stover to produce heat and power for a typical 170 dam3 dry mill ethanol plant is proposed. The corn ethanol plant requires 5.6 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat, which creates the annual stover demand of as much as 140 Gg. The corn stover supply system consists of collection, preprocessing, transportation and on-site fuel storage and preparation to produce heat and power for the ethanol plant. Economics of the entire supply system was conducted using the Integrated Biomass Supply Analysis and Logistics (IBSAL) simulation model. Corn stover was delivered in three formats (square bales, dry chops and pellets) to the combined heat and power plant. Delivered cost of biomass ready to be burned was calculated at 73 $ Mg-1 for bales, 86 $ Mg-1 for pellets and 84 $ Mg-1 for field chopped biomass. Among the three formats of stover supply systems, delivered cost of pelleted biomass was the highest due to high pelleting cost. Bulk transport of biomass in the form of chops and pellets can provide a promising future biomass supply logistic system in the US, if the costs of pelleting and transport are minimized.

Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Characterization of Rhizoctonia solani and Rhizoctonia-like Fungi infecting Vegetables in New York and their Pathogenicity to Corn .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Vegetable growers in New York have recently observed that the corn rotation is no longer effective in suppressing diseases caused by Rhizoctonia solani and Rhizoctonia-like… (more)

Ohkura, Mana

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

EFFECT OF FEEDING A BLEND OF NATURALLY-CONTAMINATED CORN ON NUTRIENT DIGESTIBILITY AND FEED PREFERENCE IN WEANLING PIGS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Two experiments were conducted to determine the effect of feeding diets with a 2009 and 2010 naturally-contaminated corn to weaning pigs. For both experiments three… (more)

Escobar, Carlos Santiago

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Starch properties, endogenous amylase activity, and ethanol production of corn kernels with different planting dates and drying conditions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study was conducted with aim to understand how planting dates and drying conditions affected starch properties and dry-grind ethanol production of corn kernels. Three… (more)

Medic, Jelena

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Experimental co-digestion of corn stalk and vermicompost to improve biogas production  

SciTech Connect

Anaerobic co-digestion of corn stalk and vermicompost (VC) as well as mono-digestion of corn stalk were investigated. Batch mono-digestion experiments were performed at 35 {+-} 1 {sup o}C and initial total solid loading (TSL) ranged from 1.2% to 6.0%. Batch co-digestion experiments were performed at 35 {+-} 1 {sup o}C and initial TSL of 6% with VC proportions ranged from 20% to 80% of total solid (TS). For mono-digestion of corn stalk, a maximum methane yield of 217.60 {+-} 13.87 mL/g TS{sub added} was obtained at initial TSL of 4.8%, and acidification was found at initial TSL of 6.0% with the lowest pH value of 5.10 on day 4. Co-digestion improved the methane yields by 4.42-58.61% via enhancing volatile fatty acids (VFAs) concentration and pH value compared with mono-digestion of corn stalk. The maximum biogas yield of 410.30 {+-} 11.01 mL/g TS{sub added} and methane yield of 259.35 {+-} 13.85 mL/g TS{sub added} were obtained for 40% VC addition. Structure analysis by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) showed that the lowest crystallinity of 35.04 of digested corn stalk was obtained from co-digestion with 40% VC, which decreased 29.4% compared to 49.6 obtained from un-treated corn stalk. It is concluded that co-digestion with VC is beneficial for improving biodigestibility and methane yield from corn stalk.

Chen Guangyin [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zheng Zheng, E-mail: zzhenghj@fudan.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Yang Shiguan [National Engineering Laboratory of Biomass Power Generation Equipment, School of Renewable Energy, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Fang Caixia; Zou Xingxing; Luo Yan [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

Hydrogen Generation Rate Scoping Study of DOW Corning Antifoam Agent  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The antifoam agent DOW Corning Q2-3183A will be added to waste streams in the Hanford River Protection Program-Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) to prevent foaming. It consists mostly of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polypropylene glycol (PPG). These and other minor constituents of the antifoam have organic constituents that may participate in radiolytic and chemical reactions that produce hydrogen in Hanford waste. It has been recommended by The WTP R&T Department recommended personnel to treat the organic compounds of the antifoam like the in a similar manner as other organic compounds that are native to the Hanford waste with respect to hydrogen production. This testing has investigated the radiolytic and thermal production of hydrogen from antifoam added to simulant waste solutions to determine if the organic components of the antifoam produce hydrogen in the same manner as the native organic species in Hanford waste. Antifoam additions for this testing were in the range of 4 to 10 wt% to ensure adequate hydrogen detection. Test conditions were selected to bound exposures to the antifoam agent in the WTP. These levels are higher than previously recommended values of 350 mg/L for actual applications in WTP tanks containing air spargers and pulse jet mixers. Limited degradation analyses for the organic components of the antifoam were investigated in this study. A more detailed study involving analyses of antifoam degradation and product formation is in progress at SRNL and results from that study will be reported at a later time. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the Q2-3183A antifoam was measured to be 39.7 {+-} 4.9 wt% TOC. This measurement was performed in triplicate with on three different dilutions of the pure antifoam liquid using a TOC combustion analyzer instrument with catalytic oxidation, followed by CO{sub 2} quantification using an infrared detector. Test results from this study indicate that the WTP HGR correlation conservatively bounds hydrogen generation rates (HGRs) from antifoam-containing simulants if the antifoam organic components are treated the same as other native organics. Tests that used the combination of radiolysis and thermolysis conducted on simulants containing antifoam produced measured hydrogen that was bounded by the WTP correlation. These tests used the bounding WTP temperature of 90 C and a dose rate of 1.8 x 10{sup 5} rad/hr. This dose rate is about ten times higher than the dose rate equivalent calculated for a bounding Hanford sludge slurry composition of 10 Ci/L, or 2 x 10{sup 4} rad/hr. Hydrogen was measured using a quadrupole mass spectroscopy instrument. Based on the analyses from the 4wt% and 10wt% antifoam samples, it is expected that the HGR results are directly proportional to the antifoam concentration added. A native organic-containing simulant that did not contain any added antifoam also produced a measurable radiolytic/thermal hydrogen rates that was in bounded by the WTP correlation. A base simulant with no added organic produced a measurable radiolytic/thermal HGR that was {approx}2X higher than the predicted HGR. Analysis of antifoam-containing simulants after prolonged irradiation of 52 Mrad and heating (23 days at 90 C) indicates that essentially all of the PDMS and greater than 60% of the PPG components are degraded, likely to lower molecular weight species. The antifoam components were analyzed by extraction from the salt simulants, followed by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) by personnel at Dow Corning. A more detailed study of the antifoam degradation and product formation from radiolysis and thermolysis is currently in progress at SRNL. That study uses a dose rate of about 2 x 10{sup 4} rad/hr and bounding temperatures of 90 C. Results from that study will be reported in a future report.

Crawford, Charles

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

248

Costs of Harvesting, Storing in a Large Pile, and Transporting Corn Stover in a Wet Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corn stover is potentially an attractive biomass resource, but must be stored if used to supply a biorefinery year-round. Based on experience with successfully storing water-saturated large piles of bagasse for the pulping industry, Atchison and Hettenhaus (2003) proposed that such a system can also be applied to corn stover. Regardless of the technical feasibility of this system, in this article we estimate the cost of harvesting corn stover in a single pass with corn grain, delivering the chopped biomass to a storage pile, storing the stover in a wet form in a large pile at 75% moisture in a 211,700-dry Mg facility within a radius of 24 km from the field, and transporting the stover 64 km to a biorefinery. Field-ground corn stover can be delivered to a biorefinery by rail for $55 to $61/dry Mg. Truck transport is more expensive, $71 to $77/dry Mg. To achieve a minimum cost in the system proposed by Atchison and Hettenhaus, it is necessary to field densify stover to 74 dry kg/m3, without losing combine field efficiency, have a large storage pile to spread fixed costs of storage over enough biomass, and use rail transportation. Compared to storage in an on-farm bunker silo at $60/dry Mg, there are limited circumstances in which large pile storage has a cost advantage.

Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Size reduction of high- and low-moisture corn stalks by linear knife grid system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High- and low-moisture corn stalks were tested using a linear knife grid size reduction device developed for first-stage size reduction. The device was used in conjunction with a universal test machine that quantified shearing stress and energy characteristics for forcing a bed of corn stalks through a grid of sharp knives. No published engineering performance data for corn stover with similar devices are available to optimize performance; however, commercial knife grid systems exist for forage size reduction. From the force displacement data, mean and maximum ultimate shear stresses, cumulative and peak mass-based cutting energies for corn stalks, and mean new surface area-based cutting energies were determined from 4 5 refill runs at two moisture contents (78.8% and 11.3% wet basis), three knife grid spacings (25.4, 50.8, and 101.6 mm), and three bed depths (50.8, 101.6, and 152.4 mm). In general, the results indicated that peak failure load, ultimate shear stress, and cutting energy values varied directly with bed depth and inversely with knife grid spacing. Mean separation analysis established that high- and low-moisture conditions and bed depths 101.6 mm did not differ significantly (P corn stalks were much smaller than reported cutting energy requirements. Ultimate shear stress and cutting energy results of this research should aid the engineering design of commercial scale linear knife gird size reduction equipment for various biomass feedstocks.

Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Igathinathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Narayan, S. [First American Scientific Co.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Economic and environmental impacts of the corn grain ethanol industry on the United States agricultural sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluated the impacts of increased ethanol production from corn starch on agricultural land use and the environment in the United States. The Policy Analysis System simulation model was used to simulate alternative ethanol production scenarios for 2007 through 2016. Results indicate that increased corn ethanol production had a positive effect on net farm income and economic wellbeing of the US agricultural sector. In addition, government payments to farmers were reduced because of higher commodity prices and enhanced net farm income. Results also indicate that if Conservation Reserve Program land was converted to crop production in response to higher demand for ethanol in the simulation, individual farmers planted more land in crops, including corn. With a larger total US land area in crops due to individual farmer cropping choices, total US crop output rose, which decreased crop prices and aggregate net farm income relative to the scenario where increased ethanol production happened without Conservation Reserve Program land. Substantial shifts in land use occurred with corn area expanding throughout the United States, especially in the traditional corn-growing area of the midcontinent region.

Larson, J.A.; English, B.C.; De La Torre Ugarte, D. G.; Menard, R.J.; Hellwinckel, C.M.; West, Tristram O.

2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

251

Selection of herbaceous energy crops for the western corn belt  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ultimate economic feasibility of biomass depends on its cost of production and on the cost of competing fuels. The purpose of this research project is to evaluate the production costs of several combinations of species and management systems for producing herbaceous biomass for energy use in Iowa. Herbaceous biomass production systems have costs similar to other crop production systems, such as corn, soybean, and forages. Thus, the factors influencing the costs of producing dedicated biomass energy crops include technological factors such as the cultivation system, species, treatments, soil type, and site and economic factors such as input prices and use of fixed resources. In order to investigate how these production alternatives are influenced by soil resources, and climate conditions, two locations in Iowa, Ames and Chariton, with different soil types and slightly different weather patterns were selected for both the agronomic and economic analyses. Nine crops in thirteen cropping systems were grown at the two sites for five years, from 1988 to 1992. Some of the systems had multiple cropping or interplanting, using combinations of cool-season species and warm-season species, in order to meet multiple objectives of maximum biomass, minimal soil loss, reduced nitrogen fertilization or diminished pesticide inputs. Six of the systems use continuous monocropping of herbaceous crops with an emphasis on production. The seven other systems consist of similar crops, but with crop rotation and soil conservation considerations. While the erosion and other off-site effects of these systems is an important consideration in their overall evaluation, this report will concentrate on direct production costs only.

Anderson, I.C.; Buxton, D.R.; Hallam, J.A. [Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Ris har udgivet en rapport om moderne bioenergi. Den slr fast, at biomasse er en  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risø har udgivet en rapport om moderne bioenergi. Den slår fast, at biomasse er en ligeså værdifuld skal til for at udnytte hele dens potentiale. Der er ikke noget nyt i at bruge biomasse til energi' er et spørgsmål om at udnytte ny teknologi til at gøre energi fra biomasse endnu mere rentabel og

253

Completion Report for Well ER-8-1  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-8-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in October and November of 2002 as part of a Hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit in the northeastern portion of the Nevada Test Site. Well ER-8-1 is located at the north end of Yucca Flat approximately 580 meters south-southeast of the surface exposure of the Climax granitic intrusive. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters, and 21 sidewall samples taken at various depths between 351.1 and 573.0 meters, supplemented by incomplete geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, geochemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 22 samples of drill cuttings. Drilling began in tuffaceous alluvium, and the borehole penetrated Tertiary age bedded tuffs of the Volcanics of Oak Spring Butte and carbonate sediments of Paleozoic age, which were encountered at a depth of 334 meters. The borehole unexpectedly penetrated granite at the depth of 538.9 meters in which drilling was stopped. Contact metamorphic rocks and intrusive dikes associated with the Cretaceous-age granitic intrusive and at least one significant fault zone were encountered.

Bechtel Nevada

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Audit Report: ER-B-00-01 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Audit Report: ER-B-00-01 May 11, 2000 Central Shops at Brookhaven National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory's (Brookhaven) Central Shops Division (Central Shops)...

255

Kunnskap er makt! : en studie av maktforhold og sosial praksis i San Juan, Puerto Rico.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Sammendrag Grunnlaget for denne masteroppgaven er et 5 måneders langt feltarbeid i San Juan, Puerto Rico. Fra januar til juni 2011 bodde jeg i hovedstaden… (more)

Hoff, Tuva Høiby

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Audit Report: ER-B-99-08 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Audit Report: ER-B-99-08 May 12, 1999 Health Physics Technician Subcontracts at Brookhaven National Laboratory To supplement its health physics staff, Brookhaven National...

257

DOE-ER-STD-6001-92; Implementation Guide for Quality Assurance...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the evaluation of research results for publication in a professional journal. b. The most essential resource at DOE-ER sponsored facilities is the creativity of scientists and...

258

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY DOW CORNING CORPORATION FOR AN ADVANCE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOW CORNING CORPORATION FOR AN ADVANCE DOW CORNING CORPORATION FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF THE GOVERNMENT'S DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-EE0003915; DOE WAIVER NO. W{A)2011-006; CH1590 The Petitioner, Dow Corning Corporation (DOW), has requested an Advance Waiver of the Government's domestic and foreign rights to inventions in the above cited research and development cooperative agreement issued by DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). See attached Dow's Petition, Answer 1. The waiver is to apply to DOW's and its subcontractors' employee subject inventions, except inventions made by subcontractors eligible to retain title to inventions pursuant to P.L. 96-517 as amended. Subject of the R&D Cooperative Agreement Title: Contributing to Net Zero Building: High Energy Efficient EIFS Wall Systems

259

Small Wind Electric Systems: A Guide for the American Corn Growers Association  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Guide Produced for the Guide Produced for the American Corn Growers Foundation Small Wind Electric Systems Small Wind Electric Systems U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program Small Wind Electric Systems Cover photo: This AOC 15/50 wind turbine on a farm in Clarion, Iowa, saves the Clarion-Goldfield Community School about $9,000 per year on electrical purchase and provides a part of the school's science curriculum. Photo credit - Robert Olson/PIX11649 A national survey of corn producers conducted by the American Corn Growers Foundation (ACGF) found a strong majority level of support among farmers on a range of important wind energy issues. The survey, conducted by Robinson and Muenster Associates, Inc. of Sioux Falls, South Dakota during

260

Iowa farmer hopes corn cobs will bring in extra cash | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

farmer hopes corn cobs will bring in extra cash farmer hopes corn cobs will bring in extra cash Iowa farmer hopes corn cobs will bring in extra cash October 22, 2009 - 12:22pm Addthis Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Todd Mathisen's family has been working the rich soil in Northwest Iowa for the last 130 years, ever since his great-great grandfather homesteaded the land in the 1870s. Todd has cultivated the fields himself for the last three decades. His family's roots here go so deep they'd be pretty hard to pull up now, and he doesn't plan on leaving anytime soon. But that doesn't mean Todd is stuck in his ways. In fact, he's at the forefront of American farmers helping to supply the United States with a biofuel that may have a promising future: cellulosic ethanol.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deadman corn er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Ethanol production using corn, switchgrass, and wood; Biodiesel production using soybean and sunflower  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy outputs from ethanol produced using corn, switchgrass, and wood biomass were each less than the respective fossil energy inputs. The same was true for producing biodiesel using soybeans and sunflower, however, the energy cost for producing soybean biodiesel was only slightly negative compared with ethanol production. Findings in terms of energy outputs compared with the energy inputs were: • Ethanol production using corn grain required 29% more fossil energy than the ethanol fuel produced. • Ethanol production using switchgrass required 50 % more fossil energy than the ethanol fuel produced. • Ethanol production using wood biomass required 57 % more fossil energy than the ethanol fuel produced. • Biodiesel production using soybean required 27 % more fossil energy than the biodiesel fuel produced (Note, the energy yield from soy oil per hectare is far lower than the ethanol yield from corn). • Biodiesel production using sunflower required 118 % more fossil energy than the biodiesel fuel produced.

David Pimentel; Tad W. Patzek

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Dynamic Aspects of the Impact of the Use of Perfect Climate Forecasts in the Corn Belt Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general equilibrium model is linked to a decision model to determine the impact of perfect growing season forecasts for corn produced in the Corn Belt region over a 10-yr period. Five different timing scenarios are examined to determine the ...

James W. Mjelde; John B. Penson Jr.; Clair J. Nixon

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Bulk density and compaction behavior of knife mill chopped switchgrass,wheat straw, and corn stover  

SciTech Connect

Bulk density of comminuted biomass significantly increased by vibration during handling and transportation, and by normal pressure during storage. Compaction characteristics affecting the bulk density of switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover chopped in a knife mill at different operating conditions and using four different classifying screens were studied. Mean loose-filled bulk densities were 67.5 18.4 kg/m3 for switchgrass, 36.1 8.6 kg/m3 for wheat straw, and 52.1 10.8 kg/m3 for corn stover. Mean tapped bulk densities were 81.8 26.2 kg/m3 for switchgrass, 42.8 11.7 kg/m3 for wheat straw, and 58.9 13.4 kg/m3 for corn stover. Percentage changes in compressibility due to variation in particle size obtained from a knife mill ranged from 64.3 to 173.6 for chopped switchgrass, 22.2 51.5 for chopped wheat straw and 42.1 117.7 for chopped corn stover within the tested consolidation pressure range of 5 120 kPa. Pressure and volume relationship of chopped biomass during compression with application of normal pressure can be characterized by the Walker model and Kawakita and Ludde model. Parameter of Walker model was correlated to the compressibility with Pearson correlation coefficient greater than 0.9. Relationship between volume reduction in chopped biomass with respect to number of tappings studied using Sone s model indicated that infinite compressibility was highest for chopped switchgrass followed by chopped wheat straw and corn stover. Degree of difficulty in packing measured using the parameters of Sone s model indicated that the chopped wheat straw particles compacted very rapidly by tapping compared to chopped switchgrass and corn stover. These results are very useful for solving obstacles in handling bulk biomass supply logistics issues for a biorefinery.

Chevanan, Nehru [University of Tennessee; Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Bitra, V.S.P. [University of Tennessee; Igathinathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Yang, Y.T. [University of Tennessee; Miu, P.I [University of Tennessee; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

A First-Law Thermodynamic Analysis of the Corn-Ethanol Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes energy efficiency of the industrial corn-ethanol cycle. In particular, it critically evaluates earlier publications by DOE, USDA, and UC Berkeley Energy Resources Group. It is demonstrated that most of the current First Law net-energy models of the industrial corn-ethanol cycle are based on nonphysical assumptions and should be viewed with caution. In particular, these models do not (i) define the system boundaries, (ii) conserve mass, and (iii) conserve energy. The energy cost of producing and refining carbon fuels in real time, for example, corn and ethanol, is high relative to that of fossil fuels deposited and concentrated over geological time. Proper mass and energy balances of corn fields and ethanol refineries that account for the photosynthetic energy, part of the environment restoration work, and the coproduct energy have been formulated. These balances show that energetically production of ethanol from corn is 2-4 times less favorable than production of gasoline from petroleum. From thermodynamics it also follows that ecological damage wrought by industrial biofuel production must be severe. With the DDGS coproduct energy credit, 3.9 gallons of ethanol displace on average the energy in 1 gallon of gasoline. Without the DDGS energy credit, this average number is 6.2 gallons of ethanol. Equivalent CO{sub 2} emissions from corn ethanol are some 50% higher than those from gasoline, and become 100% higher if methane emissions from cows fed with DDGS are accounted for. From the mass balance of soil it follows that ethanol coproducts should be returned to the fields.

Patzek, Tad W. [University of California, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (United States)], E-mail: patzek@patzek.berkeley.edu

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Introduction to Energy Savings in Process Heating for the Corn Refining  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savings in Process Heating for the Corn Savings in Process Heating for the Corn Refining Industry Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

266

Sources of Corn for Ethanol Production in the United States: A Review and Decomposition Analysis of the Empirical Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of corn for ethanol production in the United States quintupled between 2001 and 2009, generating concerns that this could lead to the conversion of forests and grasslands around the globe, known as indirect land-use change (iLUC). Estimates of iLUC and related food versus fuel concerns rest on the assumption that the corn used for ethanol production in the United States would come primarily from displacing corn exports and land previously used for other crops. A number of modeling efforts based on these assumptions have projected significant iLUC from the increases in the use of corn for ethanol production. The current study tests the veracity of these assumptions through a systematic decomposition analysis of the empirical data from 2001 to 2009. The logarithmic mean divisia index decomposition method (Type I) was used to estimate contributions of different factors to meeting the corn demand for ethanol production. Results show that about 79% of the change in corn used for ethanol production can be attributed to changes in the distribution of domestic corn consumption among different uses. Increases in the domestic consumption share of corn supply contributed only about 5%. The remaining contributions were 19% from added corn production, and 2% from stock changes. Yield change accounted for about two-thirds of the contributions from production changes. Thus, the results of this study provide little support for large land-use changes or diversion of corn exports because of ethanol production in the United States during the past decade.

Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Uria Martinez, Rocio [ORNL; Eaton, Laurence M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Grant No. DE=FG03=86ER113469  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Report, 1993 Annual Report, 1993 Grant No. DE=FG03=86ER113469 "Research in Chemical Kinetics" Principal Ihvestigator, F. S. Rowland This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or use- fulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its usc would not infringc privately owned rights. Reference herein to any spe- cific commercial product, prccess, or ~ M c e by trade name, trademark, manufac- turer, or otherwise docs not nlecessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, m

268

EERE PROJECT M AN AG EM ENT CENT ER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

... RTl\1ENT OF ENERGY ... RTl\1ENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT M AN AG EM ENT CENT ER NEP .... DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:US Synthetic Corporation Page 1 of2 STATE: UT PROJECT TITLE: The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings For use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-OOOO293 OE-EEOOO3633 GFO-OOO3633"()()1 EE3633 Based on my review orthe information concerning tbe proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.iA). I have made Ibe following determination: ex, EA, [ IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including

269

ER/C-S2001, Rev. 0, PCN 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

document document . THIS DOCUMENT IS NOT CONTROLLED AND IS FOR INFORMATION/REFERENCE USE ONLY BECHTEL JACOBS COMPANY LLC f:\template\revorder.doc 1/28/98 REVISION ORDER Effective Date April 1, 1998 PROCEDURE TO BE CHANGED: Page 1 of 1 BJC-ES-01 ER/C-S2001 Risk Assessment Roles And Responsibilities (Manual Number) (Procedure Number and Title) 06/23/1992 0 (Procedure Date) (Rev. Number) Reason for Change: To comply with Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC requirements SECTION DESCRIPTION OF CHANGE Entire Document Replace "Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy systems)" with "Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC." Entire Document Replace Energy Systems Position Titles with Corresponding Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC Position Titles Entire Document Replace "Energy Systems" with "Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC."

270

Grant No. DE-FG03-86ER-13469  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report, 1994 Report, 1994 Grant No. DE-FG03-86ER-13469 "Research in Chemical Kinetics'' Principal Investigator, F. S. Rowland DISCLAIMER T h i s report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or use- fulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any spe- cific commercial product, process. or service by trade name, trademark, manufac- turer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

271

Thomases'er'tm-232 ext.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

32 32 Risk Assessment Program Data Management Implementation Plan This document has been approved by the East Tennessee Technology Park Technical Information Office for release to the public. Date: 11/20/97 ES/ER/TM-232 Risk Assessment Program Data Management Implementation Plan Date Issued-November 1997 Prepared by Environmental Restoration Risk Assessment Program Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management under budget and reporting code EW 20 LOCKHEED MARTIN ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. managing the Environmental Management Activities at the East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge National Laboratory Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant under contract DE-AC05-84OR21400 for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

272

PO*WW*ER mobile treatment unit process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to demonstrate that a thorough assessment of the risks associated with the operation of the Rust Geotech patented PO*WW*ER mobile treatment unit (MTU) has been performed and documented. The MTU was developed to treat aqueous mixed wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office sites. The MTU uses evaporation to separate organics and water from radionuclides and solids, and catalytic oxidation to convert the hazardous into byproducts. This process hazards analysis evaluated a number of accident scenarios not directly related to the operation of the MTU, such as natural phenomena damage and mishandling of chemical containers. Worst case accident scenarios were further evaluated to determine the risk potential to the MTU and to workers, the public, and the environment. The overall risk to any group from operation of the MTU was determined to be very low; the MTU is classified as a Radiological Facility with low hazards.

Richardson, R.B.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

CNSS Papers CI Siegfried S. Hecl^er  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CNSS Papers CNSS Papers CI Siegfried S. Hecl^er m Center for National Security Studies Los Alamos National Laboratory 0!STffl?UlSUrf J? THIS iiOCy^fttMi cS l-^LI^iTEfi CENTER FOR NATIONAL SECURITY STUDIES The Center for National Security Studies is a studies and analysis or- ganization of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Drawing on the broad knowledge at Los Alamos of science and engineering relevant to national security issues, the Center's research focuses on the interaction between technology and policy and on developing insights that may improve the relationship between the development of nevv/ technology and the achieve- ment of national policy goals. The Center's staff includes both resident and visiting researchers. The principal mission of the Center is to promote and conduct long-term

274

The EDOP Radar System on the High-Altitude NASA ER-2 Aircraft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NASA ER-2 high-altitude (20 km) aircraft that emulates a satellite view of precipitation systems carries a variety of passive and active (lidar) remote sensing instruments. A new Doppler weather radar system at X band (9.6 GHz) called the ER-...

Gerald M. Heymsfield; Steven W. Bidwell; I. Jeff Caylor; Syed Ameen; Shaun Nicholson; Wayne Boncyk; Lee Miller; Doug Vandemark; Paul E. Racette; Louis R. Dod

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Data Sources for Figures ER2006-0227 C-1 April 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appendix C Data Sources for Figures #12;#12;ER2006-0227 C-1 April 2006 Feature Data Source Laboratory, ENV­Environmental Remediation & Surveillance Program, ER2005-0496; 1:2,500 Scale Data; 22 Sept:2,500 Scale Data; 10 March 2006. Canyon Rim, Location of the, Townsite South Rim in 1991; in "Line Features

276

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-1  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-EC-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth 675.1 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,524.0 meters. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of approximately 566.3 meters prior to installation of the completion string. One completion string with three isolated, slotted intervals was installed in the well. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 31 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 680 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Timber Mountain Group, the Paintbrush Group, the Calico Hills Formation, the Crater Flat Group, and the Volcanics of Quartz Mountain. The preliminary geologic interpretation of data from Well ER-EC-1 indicates the presence of a structural trough or bench filled with a thick section of post-Rainier Mesa lava. These data also suggest that this site is located on a buried structural ridge that may separate the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes.

Townsend, M.J.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Completion Report for Well ER-18-2  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-18-2 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well, located on Buckboard Mesa in the western part of the Nevada Test Site, was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth 408.1 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 762.0 meters. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of approximately 369.7 meters approximately two months after the completion string was installed. One completion string with three isolated, slotted intervals was installed in the well. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 15 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 420 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data and results of detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples. The upper part of the well penetrated Tertiary-age basalt, underlain by tuffaceous moat-filling sediments interbedded with ash-flow tuff units of the Thirsty Canyon Group and the Beatty Wash Formation. The lower half of the drill hole penetrated ash-flow tuff of the mafic-rich Ammonia Tanks Tuff. The geologic interpretation of data from Well ER-18-2 indicates that this site is located inside the structural margin of the Ammonia Tanks caldera.

Bechtel Nevada

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Shortest Paths in Fuzzy Weighted Graphs Chris Cornelis,* Peter De Kesel,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and fuzzy logic--Theory and applications. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall; 1995. 15. Campos L, Muñoz A;12:213­227. 5. Dubois D, Prade H. Fuzzy sets and systems: Theory and applications. New York: Aca- demic PressShortest Paths in Fuzzy Weighted Graphs Chris Cornelis,* Peter De Kesel, Etienne E. Kerre

Gent, Universiteit

279

Trends and Variability in U.S. Corn Yields Over the Twentieth Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States is currently responsible for 40%–45% of the world’s corn supply and 70% of total global exports [the U.S. Department of Agriculture–National Agricultural Statistics Service (USDA–NASS)]. Therefore, analyses of the spatial and ...

Christopher J. Kucharik; Navin Ramankutty

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Artificial neural networks to predict corn yield from Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the light of recent advances in spectral imaging technology, highly flexible modeling methods must be developed to estimate various soil and crop parameters for precision farming from airborne hyperspectral imagery. The potential of artificial neural ... Keywords: Artificial neural networks, CASI, Corn, Crop yield, Hyperspectral remote sensing, Precision agriculture

Y. Uno; S. O. Prasher; R. Lacroix; P. K. Goel; Y. Karimi; A. Viau; R. M. Patel

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deadman corn er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A method for mapping corn using the US Geological Survey 1992 National Land Cover Dataset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-term exposure to elevated nitrate levels in community drinking water supplies has been associated with an elevated risk of several cancers including non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, colon cancer, and bladder cancer. To estimate human exposure to nitrate, ... Keywords: Corn, Crop mapping, Landsat, National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD), Nebraska, Platte River Valley

S. K. Maxwell; J. R. Nuckols; M. H. Ward

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

BIOETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM WET OXIDSED CORN STOVER USING PRE-TREATED MANURE AS A NUTRIENT SOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM WET OXIDSED CORN STOVER USING PRE-TREATED MANURE AS A NUTRIENT SOURCE E (sugar-, and starch-containing) raw materials represent the major part of the total production cost- linked, rigid lignocellulose complex. This structure severely limits the biological conversion; therefore

283

The Integrated Biorefinery: Conversion of Corn Fiber to Value-added Chemicals  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides a summary of Michigan Biotechnology Institute's efforts to employ the corn fiber fraction of a dry grind ethanol plant as a feedstock to produce succinic acid which has potential as a building block intermediate for a wide range of commodity chemicals.

Susanne Kleff

2007-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

284

Direct application of West Coast geothermal resources in a wet-corn-milling plant. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The engineering and economic feasibility of using the geothermal resources in East Mesa, California, in a new corn processing plant is evaluated. Institutional barriers were also identified and evaluated. Several alternative plant designs which used geothermal energy were developed. A capital cost estimate and rate of return type of economic analysis were performed to evaluate each alternative. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for corn refining plants.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing their plant's performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing facilities can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the corn refining industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for facilities that produce a variety of products--including corn starch, corn oil, animal feed, corn sweeteners, and ethanol--for the paper, food, beverage, and other industries in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for corn refining plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.

Boyd, G. A.; Decision and Information Sciences; USEPA

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

286

Determining the Cost of Producing Ethanol from Corn Starch and Lignocellulosic Feedstocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The mature corn-to-ethanol industry has many similarities to the emerging lignocellulose-to-ethanol industry. It is certainly possible that some of the early practitioners of this new technology will be the current corn ethanol producers. In order to begin to explore synergies between the two industries, a joint project between two agencies responsible for aiding these technologies in the Federal government was established. This joint project of the USDA-ARS and DOE/NREL looked at the two processes on a similar process design and engineering basis, and will eventually explore ways to combine them. This report describes the comparison of the processes, each producing 25 million annual gallons of fuel ethanol. This paper attempts to compare the two processes as mature technologies, which requires assuming that the technology improvements needed to make the lignocellulosic process commercializable are achieved, and enough plants have been built to make the design well-understood. Ass umptions about yield and design improvements possible from continued research were made for the emerging lignocellulose process. In order to compare the lignocellulose-to-ethanol process costs with the commercial corn-to-ethanol costs, it was assumed that the lignocellulose plant was an Nth generation plant, built after the industry had been sufficiently established to eliminate first-of-a-kind costs. This places the lignocellulose plant costs on a similar level with the current, established corn ethanol industry, whose costs are well known. The resulting costs of producing 25 million annual gallons of fuel ethanol from each process were determined. The figure below shows the production cost breakdown for each process. The largest cost contributor in the corn starch process is the feedstock; for the lignocellulosic process it is the capital cost, which is represented by depreciation cost on an annual basis.

McAloon, A.; Taylor, F.; Yee, W.; Ibsen, K.; Wooley, R.

2000-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

287

may make verbatim copies of this document for non-commercial purposes by any means, provided that this copyright notice appears on all such copies. The Effect of Ethanol Production on the U.S. National Corn Price  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A system of equations representing corn supply, feed demand, export demand, food, alcohol and industrial (FAI) demand, and corn price is estimated by three-stage least squares. A price dependent reduced form equation is then formed to investigate the effect of ethanol production on the national average corn price. The elasticity of corn price with respect to ethanol production is then obtained. Results suggest that ethanol production has a positive impact on the national corn price and that the demand from FAI has a greater impact on the corn price than other demand categories. Thus, significant growth in ethanol production is important in explaining corn price determination.

All Fortenbery; Hwanil Park; T. Randall Fortenbery

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Lflnulegar diffurjoefnur OEetta er langur kafli. Lflnulegar diffurjoefnur eru sff flokkur diffurjafna sem menn skilja  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

\\Delta + ann (t)y n + hn (t) * OEa� er frekar ruglingslegt a� enska neikvae�a forskeyti� er nota� hfir ff svipa�an hfftt eins og fyrir vektorvarpanir ø.e. eftir stoekum, en stoekin eru hfir stoek fylkisins (a = AT . Nokkur daemi um øetta ver�a s�nd hfir ff eftir. Setning 6. Ef BA = AB øff er Be A = e A B. Soennun

Magnus, Robert

289

PIV Measurements in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer within and above a Mature Corn Canopy. Part I: Statistics and Energy Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements just within and above a mature corn canopy have been performed to clarify the small-scale spatial structure of the turbulence. The smallest resolved scales are about 15 times the Kolmogorov length ...

R. van Hout; W. Zhu; L. Luznik; J. Katz; J. Kleissl; M. B. Parlange

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Synchrotron X-ray Scattering Analysis of the Interaction Between Corn Starch and an Exogenous Lipid During Hydrothermal Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipids have an important effect on starch physicochemical properties. There exist few reports about the effect of exogenous lipids on native corn starch structural properties. In this work, a study of the morphological, structural and thermal properties of native corn starch with L-alpha-lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC, the main phospholipid in corn) was performed under an excess of water. Synchrotron radiation, in the form of real-time small and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS), was used in order to track structural changes in corn starch, in the presence of LPC during a heating process from 30 to 85 C. When adding LCP, water absorption decreased within starch granule amorphous regions during gelatinization. This is explained by crystallization of the amylose-LPC inclusion complex during gelatinization, which promotes starch granule thermal stability at up to 95 C. Finally, a conceptual model is proposed for explaining the formation mechanism of the starch-LPC complex.

E Hernandez-Hernandez; C Avila-Orta; B Hsiao; j Castro-Rosas; J Gallegos-Infante; J Morales-Castro; L Ochoa-Martinez; C Gomez-Aldapa

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

Gene discovery and transcript analyses in the corn smut pathogen Ustilago maydis: expressed sequence tag and genome sequence comparison  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Background Ustilago maydis is the basidiomycete fungus responsible for common smut of corn and is a model organism for the study of fungal phytopathogenesis. To aid in the annotation of the genome sequence of this organism, several...

Ho, Eric C H; Cahill, Matt J; Saville, Barry J

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

292

Retrieval of Soil Moisture and Vegetation Water Content Using SSM/I Data over a Corn and Soybean Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for soil moisture and vegetation water content retrieval using Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) brightness temperature over a corn and soybean field region was analyzed and assessed using datasets from the Soil Moisture ...

Jun Wen; Thomas J. Jackson; Rajat Bindlish; Ann Y. Hsu; Z. Bob Su

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

An Econometric Analysis of the Relationship among the U.S. Ethanol, Corn and Soybean Sectors, and World Oil Prices.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis aimed to investigate the relationships among the following variables: U.S. corn prices, U.S. ethanol production, U.S. soybean prices and world oil prices. After… (more)

Savernini, Maira Q. M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Economic impact of ethanol production on U.S. livestock sector: a spatial analysis of corn and distillers grain shipment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The production of corn-based ethanol in the U.S. has increased from 1,630 million gallons in 2000 to 4,855 million gallons in 2006, representing a 198%… (more)

N'Guessan, Yapo Genevier

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Quantifying Cradle-to-Farm Gate Life-Cycle Impacts Associated with Fertilizer used for Corn, Soybean, and Stover Production  

SciTech Connect

Fertilizer use can cause environmental problems, particular eutrophication of water bodies from excess nitrogen or phosphorus. Increased fertilizer runoff is a concern for harvesting corn stover for ethanol production. This modeling study found that eutrophication potential for the base case already exceeds proposed water quality standards, that switching to no-till cultivation and collecting stover increased that eutrophication potential by 21%, and that switching to continuous-corn production on top of that would triple eutrophication potential.

Powers, S. E.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Fuel ethanol produced from U.S. Midwest corn : help or hindrance to the vision of Kyoto?  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we examined the role of corn-feedstock ethanol in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, given present and near-future technology and practice for corn farming and ethanol production. We analyzed the full-fuel-cycle GHG effects of corn-based ethanol using updated information on corn operations in the upper Midwest and existing ethanol production technologies. Information was obtained from representatives of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, faculty of midwestern universities with expertise in corn production and animal feed, and acknowledged authorities in the field of ethanol plant engineering, design, and operations. Cases examined included use of E85 (85% ethanol and 15% gasoline by volume) and E10 (10% ethanol and 90% gasoline). Among key findings is that Midwest-produced ethanol outperforms conventional (current) and reformulated (future) gasoline with respect to energy use and GHG emissions (on a mass emission per travel mile basis). The superiority of the energy and GHG results is well outside the range of model noise. An important facet of this work has been conducting sensitivity analyses. These analyses let us rank the factors in the corn-to-ethanol cycle that are most important for limiting GHG generation. These rankings could help ensure that efforts to reduce that generation are targeted more effectively.

Wang, M.; Saricks, C.; Wu, M.; Energy Systems

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Energy and greenhouse gas emission effects of corn and cellulosic ethanol with technology improvements and land use changes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Use of ethanol as a transportation fuel in the United States has grown from 76 dam{sup 3} in 1980 to over 40.1 hm{sup 3} in 2009 - and virtually all of it has been produced from corn. It has been debated whether using corn ethanol results in any energy and greenhouse gas benefits. This issue has been especially critical in the past several years, when indirect effects, such as indirect land use changes, associated with U.S. corn ethanol production are considered in evaluation. In the past three years, modeling of direct and indirect land use changes related to the production of corn ethanol has advanced significantly. Meanwhile, technology improvements in key stages of the ethanol life cycle (such as corn farming and ethanol production) have been made. With updated simulation results of direct and indirect land use changes and observed technology improvements in the past several years, we conducted a life-cycle analysis of ethanol and show that at present and in the near future, using corn ethanol reduces greenhouse gas emission by more than 20%, relative to those of petroleum gasoline. On the other hand, second-generation ethanol could achieve much higher reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. In a broader sense, sound evaluation of U.S. biofuel policies should account for both unanticipated consequences and technology potentials. We maintain that the usefulness of such evaluations is to provide insight into how to prevent unanticipated consequences and how to promote efficient technologies with policy intervention.

Wang, M.; Han, J.; Haq, Z; Tyner, .W.; Wu, M.; Elgowainy, A. (Energy Systems)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Energy Efficiency Improvements and Cost Saving Opportunities in the Corn Wet Milling Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry in the food and kindred products group (SIC 20). Plants typically spend approximately $15 to 25 million per year on energy, one of its largest operating costs, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs and increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy-price volatility. After describing the industry's trends, structure and production and the process's energy use, we examine energy-efficiency opportunities for corn wet millers. Where available, we provide energy savings and typical payback periods for each measure based on case studies of plants that have implemented it. Given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the industry while maintaining the quality of the products produced. Further research on the economics of the measures and their applicability to different wet milling practices is needed to assess implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

Galitsky, C.; Worrell, E.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Completion Report for Wells ER-20-8 and ER-20-8#2 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa  

SciTech Connect

Wells ER-20-8 and ER-20-8#2 were drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The holes were drilled in July and August 2009, as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of these wells was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. They may also be used as long-term monitoring wells.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

300

Audit Report: ER-B-99-07 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ER-B-99-07 ER-B-99-07 Audit Report: ER-B-99-07 May 4, 1999 Maintenance Activities at the Y-12 Plant Department of Energy (Department) policy requires the use of performance measures to assess the efficiency of maintenance operations. The Department recommends that performance measures be developed to evaluate progress toward meeting plant maintenance goals, and that deviations in expected results be analyzed to identify root causes and reported to management for corrective action. The objective of this audit was to determine whether Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (Lockheed Martin) used performance measures to identify and correct inefficiencies in its maintenance program. Audit Report: ER-B-99-07 More Documents & Publications Semiannual Report to Congress: April 1 - September 30, 1999

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deadman corn er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Comparisons of the NASA ER-2 Meteorological Measurement System with Radar Tracking and Radiosonde Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of aircraft longitude, latitude, and velocity, and measurements of atmospheric pressure, temperature, and horizontal wind from the meteorological measurement system (MMS) on board the NASA ER-2 aircraft were compared with independent ...

Steven E. Gaines; Stuart W. Bowen; R. Stephen Hipskind; T. Paul Bui; K. Roland Chan

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Bosch Solar Energy AG former ErSol Solar Energy AG | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Bosch Solar Energy AG former ErSol Solar Energy AG Jump to: navigation, search Name Bosch Solar...

303

Audit Report: ER-B-98-02 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ER-B-98-02 ER-B-98-02 Audit Report: ER-B-98-02 October 24, 1997 Audit of Environmental Monitoring and Health Physics Laboratories at the Savannah River Site The Environmental Monitoring and Health Physics Laboratories at the Department of Energy's (Department) Savannah River Site are over 40 years old and are approaching the end of their useful lives. The managing and operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (Westinghouse), and the Savannah River Operations Office (Operations Office) proposed to build two new facilities to replace them. We conducted this audit to determine whether the construction of new laboratories was the most cost-effective alternative to accomplish the site's environmental monitoring and health physics missions. Audit Report: ER-B-98-02

304

Audit Report: ER-B-99-04 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Audit Report: ER-B-99-04 March 15, 1999 Credit Card Usage at the Ohio Field Office and the Fernald and Miamisburg Environmental Management Projects The Department of Energy...

305

Comparison of Four ERS-1 Scatterometer Wind Retrieval Algorithms with Buoy Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind velocity retrievals from the ERS-1 scatterometer are compared with extensive high-quality hourly buoy winds using four different algorithms in two oceanic regions during 1994. The retrieved winds exhibit significantly different wind velocity ...

Clifford Rufenach

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Assimilation of ERS-1 Altimeter Wave Heights in an Operational Numerical Wave Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observed significant wave heights (SWH) from ERS-1 have been received and evaluated at the Norwegian Meteorological Institute (DNMI) since August 1991. The observations were found to be of high quality. Since January 1992 the data were ...

Lars-Anders Breivik; Magnar Reistad

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

ASCAT Soil Moisture: An Assessment of the Data Quality and Consistency with the ERS Scatterometer Heritage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents a first comparison between remotely sensed surface soil moisture retrieved with the European Remote Sensing Satellite-2 (ERS-2) scatterometer (SCAT) and the corresponding product provided by the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT)...

Vahid Naeimi; Zoltan Bartalis; Wolfgang Wagner

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Audit Report: ER-B-98-03 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Audit Report: ER-B-98-03 November 7, 1997 Audit of the Union Valley Sample Preparation Facility at Oak Ridge In 1991, Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (Energy Systems) determined...

309

Intense Convection Observed by NASA ER-2 in Hurricane Emily (2005)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 17 July, intense convection in the eyewall of Hurricane Emily (2005) was observed by the high-altitude (20 km) NASA ER-2 aircraft. Analysis of this convection is undertaken using downward-looking radar, passive microwave radiometer, electric ...

Daniel J. Cecil; Kevin R. Quinlan; Douglas M. Mach

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Economics of producing fuel-grade alcohol from corn in western Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The production of significant quantities of alcohol fuel will have important effects on the use of agricultural resources, including increased food prices. The two major objectives of this research were to determine (1) the potential effects of alcohol-fuel production on agriculture, and (2) the increase in energy prices needed for alcohol-fuel production to become economic. Western Ohio (the Corn Belt part of the state) was chosen for study. A quadratic-programming model with crop, livestock, and alcohol-fuel-production activities was used for analysis. Four alcohol-fuel-production levels were analyzed: 100, 200, 300 and 400 million gallons. The 400-million-gallon level represents western Ohio's share of alcohol-fuel production for a national gasohol program. The production of alcohol results in a high protein by-product feed that can substitute for soybean meal. Efficient use of this by-product is a crucial factor affecting resource use and food prices. At low alcohol-fuel production levels, 80% of the additional cropland required for increased corn production comes from the cropland released through by-product feeding. However, as alcohol-fuel production increases, livestock's ability to use efficiently this by-product feed decreases. This in turn, reduces greatly the cropland that can be released for increased corn production. Consequently, food prices increase substantially. The quantity of land released through by-product feeding, at high alcohol-fuel-production levels, can be increased if the corn is first wet milled. Wet milling produces high-protein feeds that can be used more efficiently by livestock. For alcohol-fuel production to become economic, crude oil prices must increase by ten cents per gallon for the wet-milling process and 22 cents per gallon for the conventional distillery process (1981 $).

Ott, S.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Small Wind Electric Systems: A Guide Produced for the American Corn Growers Foundation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the Small Wind Electric Systems Consumer's Guide produced for the AGCF is to provide members of the foundation with enough information to help them determine if a small wind electric system will work for them based on their wind resource, the type and size of their sites, and their economics. The cover of this guide contains the results of the 2003 National Corn Producer Survey Wind Energy Issues.

Not Available

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Corn Stover Conversion to Biofuels: DOE's Preparation for Readiness in 2012 (Guest Editorial)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today, the United States Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 focuses on biofuels support research and development (R and D) needed to enable achieving respective volumetric and cost targets. Indeed, the worldwide objective is to bring us closer to independence from transportation fuels derived from fossil resources. This Special Issue highlights key areas of science and technology that impact the rollout of viable corn stover biofuels processes by 2012.

Himmel, M. E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Life-cycle assessment of corn-based butanol as a potential transportation fuel.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Butanol produced from bio-sources (such as corn) could have attractive properties as a transportation fuel. Production of butanol through a fermentation process called acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) has been the focus of increasing research and development efforts. Advances in ABE process development in recent years have led to drastic increases in ABE productivity and yields, making butanol production worthy of evaluation for use in motor vehicles. Consequently, chemical/fuel industries have announced their intention to produce butanol from bio-based materials. The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential life-cycle energy and emission effects associated with using bio-butanol as a transportation fuel. The study employs a well-to-wheels analysis tool--the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory--and the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} model developed by AspenTech. The study describes the butanol production from corn, including grain processing, fermentation, gas stripping, distillation, and adsorption for products separation. The Aspen{reg_sign} results that we obtained for the corn-to-butanol production process provide the basis for GREET modeling to estimate life-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. The GREET model was expanded to simulate the bio-butanol life cycle, from agricultural chemical production to butanol use in motor vehicles. We then compared the results for bio-butanol with those of conventional gasoline. We also analyzed the bio-acetone that is coproduced with bio-butanol as an alternative to petroleum-based acetone. Our study shows that, while the use of corn-based butanol achieves energy benefits and reduces greenhouse gas emissions, the results are affected by the methods used to treat the acetone that is co-produced in butanol plants.

Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Liu, J.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

Magnetic Properties of RB66 (R = Gd, Tb, Ho, Er, and Lu)  

SciTech Connect

We report magnetic susceptibility measurements of RB66 (R = Gd, Tb, Ho, Er, and Lu) boron-rich rare earth containing borides down to 50 mK. The data suggest a spin glass low temperature state for RB66 (R = Gd, Tb, Ho, and Er) with the freezing temperatures below 1 K. The magnetic properties appear to be influenced by the anisotropy of the magnetic moments, probably via the crystalline electric field effects.

Kim, Hyunsoo; Budko, Serguei; ATanatar, Makariy; Avdashchenko, D.V.; Matovnikov, A.V.; Mitroshenkov, N.V.; Novikov, V.V.; Prozorov, Ruslan

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

315

STOCK AND DISTRIBUTION OF TOTAL AND CORN-DERIVED SOIL ORGANIC CARBON IN AGGREGATE AND PRIMARY PARTICLE FRACTIONS FOR DIFFERENT LAND USE AND SOIL MANAGEMENT PRACTICES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use, soil management, and cropping systems affect stock, distribution, and residence time of soil organic carbon (SOC). Therefore, SOC stock and its depth distribution and association with primary and secondary particles were assessed in long-term experiments at the North Appalachian Experimental Watersheds near Coshocton, Ohio, through *13C techniques. These measurements were made for five land use and soil management treatments: (1) secondary forest, (2) meadow converted from no-till (NT) corn since 1988, (3) continuous NT corn since 1970, (4) continuous NT corn-soybean in rotation with ryegrass since 1984, and (5) conventional plow till (PT) corn since 1984. Soil samples to 70-cm depth were obtained in 2002 in all treatments. Significant differences in soil properties were observed among land use treatments for 0 to 5-cm depth. The SOC concentration (g C kg*1 of soil) in the 0 to 5-cm layer was 44.0 in forest, 24.0 in meadow, 26.1 in NT corn, 19.5 in NT corn-soybean, and 11.1 i n PT corn. The fraction of total C in corn residue converted to SOC was 11.9% for NT corn, 10.6% for NT corn-soybean, and 8.3% for PT corn. The proportion of SOC derived from corn residue was 96% for NT corn in the 0 to 5-cm layer, and it decreased gradually with depth and was 50% in PT corn. The mean SOC sequestration rate on conversion from PT to NT was 280 kg C ha*1 y*1. The SOC concentration decreased with reduction in aggregate size, and macro-aggregates contained 15 to 35% more SOC concentration than microaggregates. In comparison with forest, the magnitude of SOC depletion in the 0 to 30-cm layer was 15.5 Mg C/ha (24.0%) in meadow, 12.7 Mg C/ha (19.8%) in NT corn, 17.3 Mg C/ha (26.8%) in NT corn-soybean, and 23.3 Mg C/ha (35.1%) in PT corn. The SOC had a long turnover time when located deeper in the subsoil.

Puget, P; Lal, Rattan; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Post, M; Owens, Lloyd

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

A model system for edible vaccination using recombinant avidin produced in corn seed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent studies have shown that transgenic plants can be utilized to produce subunit vaccines that are capable of eliciting protective immune responses. Expressing these subunits in edible plant tissues gives the potential for edible vaccines. Edible vaccines have many benefits over current vaccine technologies including increased safety, stability, economy, and efficacy. In these experiments, we have investigated the possibility of using corn seed as a production system for novel edible vaccines. We established that a model protein (avidin) produced in corn seed could elicit both serum and mucosal immune responses when fed to mice. In addition, we determined that differences in the feeding regime could be exploited to enhance the type of response obtained. Since unprocessed corn seed is not typically used as a human food source, we investigated the effects of processing on the ability of the recombinant avidin to stimulate the immune responses. Finally, we explored the possibility of using the heat-labile enterotoxin subunit B protein from Escherichia coli to potentiate the immune responses.

Bailey, Michele Renee

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Succinic Acid as a Byproduct in a Corn-based Ethanol Biorefinery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MBI endeavored to develop a process for succinic acid production suitable for integration into a corn-based ethanol biorefinery. The project investigated the fermentative production of succinic acid using byproducts of corn mill operations. The fermentation process was attuned to include raw starch, endosperm, as the sugar source. A clean-not-sterile process was established to treat the endosperm and release the monomeric sugars. We developed the fermentation process to utilize a byproduct of corn ethanol fermentations, thin stillage, as the source of complex nitrogen and vitamin components needed to support succinic acid production in A. succinogenes. Further supplementations were eliminated without lowering titers and yields and a productivity above 0.6 g l-1 hr-1was achieved. Strain development was accomplished through generation of a recombinant strain that increased yields of succinic acid production. Isolation of additional strains with improved features was also pursued and frozen stocks were prepared from enriched, characterized cultures. Two recovery processes were evaluated at pilot scale and data obtained was incorporated into our economic analyses.

MBI International

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

1 DISTILLERS BY-PRODUCTS AND CORN STOVER AS FUELS FOR ETHANOL PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Dry-grind ethanol plants have the potential to reduce their operating costs and improve their net energy balances by using biomass as the source of process heat and electricity. We utilized ASPEN PLUS software to model various technology bundles of equipment, fuels and operating activities that are capable of supplying energy and satisfying emissions requirements for dry-grind ethanol plants of 50 and 100 million gallons per year capacity using corn stover, distillers dried grains and solubles (DDGS), or a mixture of corn stover and “syrup ” (the solubles portion of DDGS). In addition to their own requirements, plants producing 50 and 100 million gallons of ethanol are capable of supplying 5-7 or 10-14 MegaWatts of electricity to the grid, respectively. Economic analysis showed favorable rates of return for biomass alternatives compared to conventional plants using natural gas and purchased electricity over a range of conditions. The mixture of corn stover and syrup provided the highest rates of return in general. Factors favoring biomass included a higher premium for low carbon footprint ethanol, higher natural gas prices, lower DDGS prices, lower ethanol

Douglas G. Tiffany; R. Vance Morey; Matt De Kam; Douglas G. Tiffany; R. Vance Morey; Matt De Kam

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Completion report for Well ER-EC-6  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-EC-6 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the DOE's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Nevada Test Site. A 66-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 485.1 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,524.0 meters. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of approximately 434.6 meters prior to installation of the completion string. One completion string with four isolated, slotted intervals was installed in the well. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 33 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 504.4 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Timber Mountain Group, the Paintbrush Group, the Calico Hills Formation, and the Volcanics of Quartz Mountain. Intense hydrothermal alteration was observed below the depth of 640 m. The preliminary geologic interpretation indicates that this site may be located on a buried structural ridge that separates the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes.

M. J. Townsend

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Completion Report for Well ER-12-2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well ER-12-2 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled from November 2002 to January 2003 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit. The overall purpose of the well was to gather subsurface data to better characterize the hydrogeology in the northwestern portion of Yucca Flat. The well was drilled to total measured depth of 2,097.9 meters. The 131.1-centimeter-diameter borehole was left open (i.e., uncased) below the base of the intermediate casing at 901.6 meters. A piezometer string was installed outside the surface casing to a depth of 176.4 meters to monitor a zone of perched water. Data gathered during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters, sidewall core samples from 7 depths, various geophysical logs, and water level measurements. These data indicate that the well penetrated, in descending order, 137.5 meters of Quaternary and Tertiary alluvium, 48.8 meters of Tertiary volcanic rocks, 289.6 meters of Mississippian Chainman Shale, and 1,622.5 meters of Mississippian and Upper Devonian Eleana Formation consisting of shale, argillite, sandstone, quartzite, and limestone. Forty-seven days after the well was drilled the water level inside the main hole was tagged at the depth of 65.43 meters, and the water level inside the piezometer string was tagged at 127.14 meters.

Bechtel Nevada

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deadman corn er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well ER-EC-4 was drilled for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the summer of 1999 as part of the U.S Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 263.7 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,062.8 meters. One completion string with three isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of 228.3 meters, two months after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 35 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 286.5 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well was collared in basalt and penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Thirsty Canyon Group, the Volcanics of Fortymile Canyon, and the Timber Mountain Group. The preliminary geologic interpretation of data from this well helps pinpoint the location of the western margin of the Timber Mountain caldera complex in the southern Nevada volcanic field.

M. J. Townsend

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Mathematical model parameters for describing the particle size spectra of knife-milled corn stover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Particle size distributions of Corn stover (Zea mays L.) created by a knife mill were determined using integral classifying screens with sizes from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, operating at speeds from 250 to 500 rpm, and mass input rates ranging from 1 to 9 kg min_1. Particle distributions were classified using American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) standardised sieves for forage analysis that incorporated a horizontal sieving motion. The sieves were made from machined-aluminium with their thickness proportional to the sieve opening dimensions. A wide range of analytical descriptors that could be used to mathematically represent the range of particle sizes in the distributions were examined. The correlation coefficients between geometric mean length and screen size, feed rate, and speed were 0.980, 0.612, and _0.027, respectively. Screen size and feed rate directly influenced particle size, whereas operating speed had a weak indirect relation with particle size. The Rosin Rammler equation fitted the chopped corn stover size distribution data with coefficient of determination (R2) > 0.978. This indicated that particle size distribution of corn stover was well-fit by the Rosin Rammler function. This can be attributed to the fact that Rosin Rammler expression was well suited to the skewed distribution of particle sizes. Skewed distributions occurred when significant quantities of particles, either finer or coarser, existed or were removed from region of the predominant size. The mass relative span was slightly greater than 1, which indicated that it was a borderline narrow to wide distribution of particle sizes. The uniformity coefficient was corn stover produced fine-skewed mesokurtic particles with 12.7 50.8 mm screens. Size-related parameters, namely, geometric mean length, Rosin Rammler size parameter, median length, effective length, and size guide number, were well predicted at R2 values of 0.981, 0.982, 0.979, 0.950 and 0.978, respectively as a function of knife mill screen size, feed rate, and speed. Results of this analysis of particle sizes could be applied to the selection of knife mill operating parameters to produce a particular size of corn stover chop, and could serve as a guide for the relationships among various analytic descriptors of biomass particle distributions.

Bitra, V.S.P [University of Tennessee; Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Yang, Y.T. [University of Tennessee; Miu, P.I. [University of Tennessee; Igathanathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Pahute Mesa Well Development and Testing Analyses for Wells ER-20-8 and ER-20-4, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Wells ER-20-4 and ER-20-8 were drilled during fiscal year (FY) 2009 and FY 2010 (NNSA/NSO, 2011a and b). The closest underground nuclear test detonations to the area of investigation are TYBO (U-20y), BELMONT (U-20as), MOLBO (U-20ag), BENHAM (U-20c), and HOYA (U-20 be) (Figure 1-1). The TYBO, MOLBO, and BENHAM detonations had working points located below the regional water table. The BELMONT and HOYA detonation working points were located just above the water table, and the cavity for these detonations are calculated to extend below the water table (Pawloski et al., 2002). The broad purpose of Wells ER-20-4 and ER-20-8 is to determine the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater, the geologic formations, groundwater geochemistry as an indicator of age and origin, and the water-bearing properties and hydraulic conditions that influence radionuclide migration. Well development and testing is performed to determine the hydraulic properties at the well and between other wells, and to obtain groundwater samples at the well that are representative of the formation at the well. The area location, wells, underground nuclear detonations, and other features are shown in Figure 1-1. Hydrostratigraphic cross sections A-A’, B-B’, C-C’, and D-D’ are shown in Figures 1-2 through 1-5, respectively.

Greg Ruskauff and Sam Marutzky

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

appear in the syrup refinery through process integration –etc. In many corn refineries, some of the dextrose solutionjet conversion of starch in refineries. Flue gas is used for

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

EFFECTS OF CONVENTIONAL OR BMR CORN SILAGE FED AT TWO LEVELS ON INTAKE, MILK YIELD AND COMPOSITION, AND RUMEN FERMENTATION OF HOLSTEIN DAIRY COW.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of Brown Mid Rib (BMR) vs. conventional corn silage fed at two levels on production… (more)

Edwards, Travis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

ANCCA, an estrogen-regulated AAA+ ATPase coactivator for ER alpha, is required for coregulator occupancy and chromatin modification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for coregulator occupancy and chromatin modification June X.at the ER target chromatin. Moreover, mutations at the ATPco-regulator complexes at chromatin is a process facilitated

Zou, June X; Revenko, Alexey S; Li, Li B; Gemo, Abigael T; Chen, Hong-Wu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,"X",0  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 11.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 11.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Renewable Energy" " "," ",,,"(excluding Wood" "NAICS"," ","Total Onsite",,"and" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Generation","Cogeneration(b)","Other Biomass)(c)","Other(d)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",2.8,1.1,86.8,37.8 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",0.7,0.7,"X",0 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,"X",0 31131," Sugar Manufacturing",0,0,"X",0 3114," Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods ",1.2,1.2,"X",44.1

328

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network: Ohio Sites 1 (Mixed Hay) and 2 (Corn)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this work conducted during 2008–2010 were to evaluate potential beneficial agricultural uses of flue gas desulphurization gypsum (FGDG) in eastern Ohio and to assess the potential for environmental effects of the use of FGDG. Two field experiments were conducted at the eastern Ohio research site, one involving a mixed-grass hay field and the other a corn (Zea mays L.) field. FGDG and mined gypsum product were applied one time at rates of 0.2, 2.0, and 20 megagrams ...

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

329

Recovery of Recombinant and Native Proteins from Rice and Corn Seed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plants are potential sources of valuable recombinant and native proteins that can be purified for pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, and food applications. Transgenic rice and corn germ were evaluated for the production of novel protein products. This dissertation addresses: 1) the extraction and purification of the recombinant protein, human lysozyme (HuLZ), from transgenic rice and 2) the processing of dry-milled corn germ for the production of high protein germ and corn protein concentrate (CPC). The factors affecting the extraction and purification of HuLZ from rice were evaluated. Ionic strength and pH was used to optimize HuLZ extraction and cation exchange purification. The selected conditions, pH 4.5 with 50 mM NaCl, were a compromise between HuLZ extractability and binding capacity, resulting in 90% purity. Process simulation was used to assess the HuLZ purification efficiency and showed that the processing costs were comparable to native lysozyme purification from egg-white, the current predominant lysozyme source. Higher purity HuLZ (95%) could be achieved using pH 4.5 extraction followed by pH 6 adsorption, but the binding capacity was unexpectedly reduced by 80%. The rice impurity, phytic acid, was identified as the potential cause of the unacceptably low capacity. Enzymatic (phytase) treatment prior to adsorption improved purification, implicating phytic acid as the primary culprit. Two processing methods were proposed to reduce this interference: 1) pH 10 extraction followed by pH 4.5 precipitation and pH 6 adsorption and 2) pH 4.5 extraction and pH 6 adsorption in the presence of TRIS counter-ions. Both methods improved the binding capacity from 8.6 mg/mL to >25 mg/mL and maintained HuLZ purity. Processing of dry-milled corn germ to increase protein and oil content was evaluated using germ wet milling. In this novel method, dry-milled germ is soaked and wet processed to produce higher value protein products. Lab-scale and pilot-scale experiments identified soaking conditions that reduced germ starch content, enhanced protein and oil content, and maintained germ PDI (protein dispersibility index). Soaking at neutral pH and 25 degrees C maintained germ PDI and improved CPC yield from defatted germ flour. CPC with greater than 75% protein purity was produced using protein precipitation or membrane filtration.

Wilken, Lisa Rachelle

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Audit Report: ER-B-98-07 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ER-B-98-07 ER-B-98-07 Audit Report: ER-B-98-07 April 6, 1998 Personal Property at the Oak Ridge Operations Office and the Office of Scientific and Technical Information The Oak Ridge Operations Office (Operations Office) and the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) are responsible for safeguarding and controlling personal property in their possession and in the possession of their contractors. Categories of personal property include vehicles, heavy mobile equipment, computers and software, office furniture and equipment, laboratory equipment, security and protection equipment, and shop equipment. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the Operations Office and OSTI adequately safeguarded and properly accounted for personal property in their possession and in the possession

331

Audit Report: ER-B-98-04 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ER-B-98-04 ER-B-98-04 Audit Report: ER-B-98-04 November 24, 1997 Audit Of Selected Government-Funded Grants And Contracts At Princeton University As the cognizant audit agency for Princeton University (Princeton), we audited Princeton's costs claimed under 20 Government-funded, cost-reimbursement grants and contracts (agreements). The Defense Contract Audit Agency had advised us that several Princeton employees, including two principal investigators, were also employed by a commercial business. These 2 principal investigators were responsible for 28 Government-funded agreements at Princeton between October 1, 1986, and December 31, 1996. After becoming aware that Princeton employees were also working at a commercial business, we initiated this audit of the agreements assigned to

332

Audit Report: ER-B-99-02 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ER-B-99-02 ER-B-99-02 Audit Report: ER-B-99-02 January 25, 1999 Small Disadvantaged Business Program at the Chicago Operations Office The Small Business Act (Act) requires that small business concerns owned and controlled by socially or economically disadvantaged individuals have the maximum practicable opportunity to participate in contracts awarded by any Federal agency. Section 8(a) of the Act establishes a program that authorizes the Small Business Administration (SBA) to enter into contracts with other agencies and award subcontracts for performing those contracts to firms enrolled in the 8(a) Program directly to the agencies. Contracts are to be awarded competitively if the anticipated award price of the contract will exceed $3 million and at least two responsible 8(a) firms

333

Audit Report: ER-L-02-01 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ER-L-02-01 ER-L-02-01 Audit Report: ER-L-02-01 February 7, 2002 The Department of Energy's Strategy for Disposal of Plutonium In September 2000, the United States and the Russian Federation entered into an agreement stipulating that each country will irreversibly transform 34 metric tons of weapons-grade plutonium into forms which could not be used for weapons purposes. To meet the United States' commitment, the Department of Energy planned activities at its Savannah River Site; specifically, to immobilize 8.4 metric tons of weapons-grade plutonium and to convert 25.6 metric tons into nuclear reactor fuel. The plan called for the design and construction of three major facilities at Savannah River: the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility, the Plutonium Immobilization

334

Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software - Owens Corning Commercial Energy Calculator (OC-CEC) version 1.1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Owens Corning Commercial Energy Calculator (OC-CEC) version 1.1 Owens Corning Commercial Energy Calculator (OC-CEC) version 1.1 On this page you'll find information about the Owens Corning Commercial Energy Calculator (OC-CEC) version 1.1 qualified computer software (www.buildings.energy.gov/qualified_software.html), which calculates energy and power cost savings that meet federal tax incentive requirements for commercial buildings (www.buildings.energy.gov/commercial/). Date Documentation Received by DOE: 14 August 2007 Statements in quotes are from the software developer. Internal Revenue Code §179D (c)(1) and (d) Regulations Notice 2006-52, Section 6 requirements (1) The name, address, and (if applicable) web site of the software developer; Green Building Studio, Inc. 444 Tenth Street, Suite 300 Santa Rosa, California 95401

335

Impact of Corn Stover Composition on Hemicellulose Conversion during Dilute Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Cellulose Digestibility of the Pretreated Solids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study assessed the impact of corn stover compositional variability on xylose conversion yields during dilute acid pretreatment and on enzymatic cellulose digestibility of the resulting pretreated solids. Seven compositionally-different stovers obtained from various locations throughout the United States were pretreated at three different conditions in triplicate in a pilot-scale continuous reactor. At the same pretreatment severity, a 2-fold increase in monomeric xylose yield and a 1.5-fold increase in enzymatic cellulose digestibility from their lowest values were found. Similar results were observed at the other pretreatment conditions. It was found that xylose conversion yields decreased with increasing acid neutralization capacity or soil content of the corn stover. Xylose yields also increased with increasing xylan content. No other significant correlations between corn stover's component concentrations and conversion yields were found.

Weiss, N. D.; Farmer, J. D.; Schell, D. J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry within the food and kindred products group (SIC 20), using 15 percent of the energy in the entire food industry. After corn, energy is the second largest operating cost for corn wet millers in the United States. A typical corn wet milling plant in the United States spends approximately $20 to $30 million per year on energy, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs and increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy-price volatility. This report shows energy efficiency opportunities available for wet corn millers. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure and production of the corn wet milling industry and the energy used in the milling and refining process. Specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The report draws upon the experiences of corn, wheat and other starch processing plants worldwide for energy efficiency measures. The findings suggest that given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the corn wet milling industry while maintaining the quality of the products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as the applicability of these to different wet milling practices, is needed to assess the feasibility of implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Photometric Observations of the Type Ia SN 2002er in UGC 10743  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extensive light and colour curves for the Type Ia supernova SN 2002er are presented as part of the European Supernova Collaboration. We have collected UBVRI photometry from ten different telescopes covering the phases from 7 days before until 619 days after maximum light. Corrections for the different instrumental systems and the non-thermal spectrum of the supernova (S-corrections) have been applied. With the densely sampled light curves we can make detailed comparisons to other well-observed objects. SN 2002er most closely resembles SN 1996X after maximum, but clearly shows a different colour evolution before peak light and a stronger shoulder in V and R bands compared to other well-observed SNe Ia. In particular, the rise time appears to be longer than what is expected from rise-time vs.decline-rate relation. We use several methods to determine the reddening towards SN 2002er based on the colour evolution at near peak and at late phases. The uvoir (bolometric) light curve shows great similarity with SN 1996X, but also indications of a higher luminosity, longer rise time and a more pronounced shoulder 25 days past maximum. The interpretation of the light curves was done with two independent light curve codes. Both find that given the luminosity of SN 2002er the 56Ni mass exceeds 0.6 Msun with prefered values near 0.7 Msun. Uncertainties in the exact distance to SN 2002er are the most serious limitation of this measurement. The light curve modelling also indicates a high level of mixing of the nickel in the explosion of SN 2002er.

G. Pignata; F. Patat; S. Benetti; S. Blinnikov; W. Hillebrandt; R. Kotak; B. Leibundgut; P. A. Mazzali; P. Meikle; Y. Qiu; P. Ruiz-Lapuente; S. Smartt; E. Sorokina; M. Stritzinger; M. Stehle; M. Turatto; T. Marsh; F. Martin-Luis; N. McBride; J. Mendez; L. Morales-Rueda; D. Narbutis; R. Street

2004-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

338

Measurement of thermal neutron cross section and resonance integral for the {sup 170}Er(n,{gamma}){sup 171}Er reaction by using a {sup 55}Mn monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal neutron cross section and the resonance integral of the reaction {sup 170}Er(n,{gamma}){sup 171}Er were measured by the Cd-ratio method using a {sup 55}Mn monitor as single comparator. Analytical grade MnO{sub 2} and Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder samples with and without a cylindrical 1 mm Cd shield box were irradiated in an isotropic neutron field obtained from three {sup 241}Am-Be neutron sources. The induced activities in the samples were measured with a 120.8% relative efficiency p-type HPGe detector. The correction factors for gamma-ray attenuation (F{sub g}), thermal neutron self-shielding (G{sub th}), and resonance neutron self-shielding (G{sub epi}) effects, and the epithermal neutron spectrum shape factor ({alpha}) were taken into account. The thermal neutron cross section for the (n,{gamma}) reaction in {sup 170}Er has been determined to be 8.00 {+-} 0.56 b, relative to that of the {sup 55}Mn monitor. However, some previously reported experimental results compared to the present result show a large discrepancy ranging from 8.3 to 86%. The present result is, in general, in good agreement with the recently measured values by 9%. According to the definition of Cd cut-off energy at 0.55 eV, the resonance integral obtained is 44.5 {+-} 4.0 b, which is determined relative to the reference integral value of the {sup 55}Mn monitor by using cadmium ratios. The existing experimental data for the resonance integral are distributed between 18 and 43 b. The present resonance integral value agrees only with the measurement of 43 {+-} 5 b by Gillette [Thermal Cross Section and Resonance Integral Studies, ORNL-4155, 15 (1967)] within uncertainty limits.

Yuecel, Haluk [Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEK), Besevler Campus, 06100 Tandogan-Ankara (Turkey); Budak, M. Gueray; Karadag, Mustafa [Gazi University, Gazi Education Faculty, 06500 Teknikokullar-Ankara (Turkey)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

LB-ER-10-06 SC NEPA Tracking Number U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LB-ER-10-06 LB-ER-10-06 SC NEPA Tracking Number U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF SCIENCE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) ENVIRONMENTAL EVALUATION NOTIFICATION FORM Solicitation/Award No. (if applicable): _N"'/c:..A':-:-.,,--:-:--:_-:----;:-=:-;:-;-=:--:--:---:::-:-::---:-_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Organization Name: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, California Title of Proposed UC use of DOE infrastructure and UC's Subsequent Construction and Operation of the Project/Research: Solar Energy Research Center (SERC) Building Total DOE FundinglTotal Project Funding: ~$O::..:..../ $"'54::..:..:...4.:.:.M"-_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ I. Project Description (use additional pages as necessary): A. Proposed ProjecUAction (delineate Federally funded/Non-Federally funded portions)

340

N-acetylation and phosphorylation of Sec complex subunits in the ER membrane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of N-acetylation, however, remains unclear for the acetylation leads to missorting of secretory proteins to the cytosol. These observations led to the conclusion that N- acetylation interferes with ER targeting [5]. Although protein flux across the ER... to the N-terminus (S2, S3, T5, T12) and a second one closer to the transmembrane do- main of Sbh1p (S35, S38) (Table 1). Mutation of S35, but not of S38, to alanine led to complete destabilization of Sbh1p in our hands, and the mutant was one of the few...

Soromani, Christina; Zeng, Naiyan; Hollemeyer, Klaus; Heinzle, Elmar; Klein, Marie-Christine; Tretter, Thomas; Seaman, Matthew N J; Römisch, Karin

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deadman corn er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Magnetic and superconducting phase diagrams in ErNi2B2C  

SciTech Connect

We present measurements of the superconducting upper critical field Hc2(T) and the magneticphasediagram of the superconductor ErNi2B2C made with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The magnetic field was applied in the basal plane of the tetragonal crystal structure. We have found large gapless regions in the superconductingphasediagram of ErNi2B2C, extending between different magnetic transitions. A close correlation between magnetic transitions and Hc2(T) is found, showing that superconductivity is strongly linked to magnetism.

Galvis, J.A.; Crespo, M.; Guillamon, I.; Suderow, Hermann; Vieira, S.; Garcia Hernandez, M.; Budko, Serguei; Canfield, Paul

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

342

Synergistic Enhancement of Cellobiohydrolase Performance on Pretreated Corn Stover by Addition of Xylanase and Esterase Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant increases in the depolymerization of corn stover cellulose by cellobiohydrolase I (Cel7A) from Trichoderma reesei were observed using small quantities of non-cellulolytic cell wall-degrading enzymes. Purified endoxylanase (XynA), ferulic acid esterase (FaeA), and acetyl xylan esterase (Axe1) all enhanced Cel7A performance on corn stover subjected to hot water pretreatment. In all cases, the addition of these activities improved the effectiveness of the enzymatic hydrolysis in terms of the quantity of cellulose converted per milligram of total protein. Improvement in cellobiose release by the addition of the non-cellulolytic enzymes ranged from a 13-84% increase over Cel7A alone. The most effective combinations included the addition of both XynA and Axe1, which synergistically enhance xylan conversions resulting in additional synergistic improvements in glucan conversion. Additionally, we note a direct relationship between enzymatic xylan removal in the presence of XynA and the enhancement of cellulose hydrolysis by Cel7A.

Selig, M. J.; Knoshaug E. P.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Decker, S. R.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Detecting Cellulase Penetration Into Corn Stover Cell Walls by Immuno-Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In general, pretreatments are designed to enhance the accessibility of cellulose to enzymes, allowing for more efficient conversion. In this study, we have detected the penetration of major cellulases present in a commercial enzyme preparation (Spezyme CP) into corn stem cell walls following mild-, moderate- and high-severity dilute sulfuric acid pretreatments. The Trichoderma reesei enzymes, Cel7A (CBH I) and Cel7B (EG I), as well as the cell wall matrix components xylan and lignin were visualized within digested corn stover cell walls by immuno transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using enzyme- and polymer-specific antibodies. Low severity dilute-acid pretreatment (20 min at 100 C) enabled <1% of the thickness of secondary cell walls to be penetrated by enzyme, moderate severity pretreatment at (20 min at 120 C) allowed the enzymes to penetrate {approx}20% of the cell wall, and the high severity (20 min pretreatment at 150 C) allowed 100% penetration of even the thickest cell walls. These data allow direct visualization of the dramatic effect dilute-acid pretreatment has on altering the condensed ultrastructure of biomass cell walls. Loosening of plant cell wall structure due to pretreatment and the subsequently improved access by cellulases has been hypothesized by the biomass conversion community for over two decades, and for the first time, this study provides direct visual evidence to verify this hypothesis. Further, the high-resolution enzyme penetration studies presented here provide insight into the mechanisms of cell wall deconstruction by cellulolytic enzymes.

Donohoe, B. S.; Selig, M. J.; Viamajala, S.; Vinzant, T. B.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

EFFECT OF ANATOMICAL FRACTIONATION ON THE ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF ACID AND ALKALINE PRETREATED CORN STOVER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to concerns with biomass collection systems and soil sustainability there are opportunities to investigate the optimal plant fractions to collect for conversion. An ideal feedstock would require low severity pretreatment to release a maximum amount of sugar during enzymatic hydrolysis. Corn stover fractions were separated by hand and analyzed for glucan, xylan, acid soluble lignin, acid insoluble lignin, and ash composition. The stover fractions were also pretreated with either 0, 0.4, or 0.8% NaOH for 2 hours at room temperature, washed, autoclaved and saccharified. In addition, acid pretreated samples underwent simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) to ethanol. In general, the two pretreatments produced similar trends with cobs, husks, and leaves responding best to the pretreatments, the tops of stalks responding slightly less, and the bottom of the stalks responding the least. For example, corn husks pretreated with 0.8% NaOH released over 90% (standard error of 3.8%) of the available glucan, while only 45% (standard error of 1.1%) of the glucan was produced from identically treated stalk bottoms. Estimates of the theoretical ethanol yield using acid pretreatment followed by SSF were 65% (standard error of 15.9%) for husks and 29% (standard error of 1.8%) for stalk bottoms. This suggests that integration of biomass collection systems to remove sustainable feedstocks could be integrated with the processes within a biorefinery to minimize overall ethanol production costs.

K. B. Duguid; M. D. Montross; C. W. Radtke; C. L. Crofcheck; L. M. Wendt; S. A. Shearer

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Impact of Cell Wall Acetylation on Corn Stover Hydrolysis by Cellulolytic and Xylanolytic Enzymes  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of variously pretreated corn stover samples showed neutral to mildly acidic pretreatments were more effective at removing xylan from corn stover and more likely to maintain the acetyl to xylopyranosyl ratios present in untreated material than were alkaline treatments. Retention of acetyl groups in the residual solids resulted in greater resistance to hydrolysis by endoxylanase alone, although the synergistic combination of endoxylanase and acetyl xylan esterase enzymes permitted higher xylan conversions to be observed. Acetyl xylan esterase alone did little to improve hydrolysis by cellulolytic enzymes, although a direct relationship was observed between the enzymatic removal of acetyl groups and improvements in the enzymatic conversion of xylan present in substrates. In all cases, effective xylan conversions were found to significantly improve glucan conversions achievable by cellulolytic enzymes. Additionally, acetyl and xylan removal not only enhanced the respective initial rates of xylan and glucan conversion, but also the overall extents of conversion. This work emphasizes the necessity for xylanolytic enzymes during saccharification processes and specifically for the optimization of acetyl esterase and xylanase synergies when biomass processes include milder pretreatments, such as hot water or sulfite steam explosion.

Selig, M. J.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Decker, S. R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Effect of pelleting on the recalcitrance and bioconversion of dilute-acid pretreated corn stover  

SciTech Connect

Background: Knowledge regarding the performance of densified biomass in biochemical processes is limited. The effects of densification on biochemical conversion are explored here. Methods: Pelleted corn stover samples were generated from bales that were milled to 6.35 mm. Low-solids acid pretreatment and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation were performed to evaluate pretreatment efficacy and ethanol yields achieved for pelleted and ground stover (6.35 mm and 2 mm) samples. Both pelleted and 6.35-mm ground stover were evaluated using a ZipperClave® reactor under high-solids, process-relevant conditions for multiple pretreatment severities (Ro), followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of the washed, pretreated solids. Results: Monomeric xylose yields were significantly higher for pellets (approximately 60%) than for ground formats (approximately 38%). Pellets achieved approximately 84% of theoretical ethanol yield (TEY); ground stover formats had similar profiles, reaching approximately 68% TEY. Pelleting corn stover was not detrimental to pretreatment efficacy for both low- and high-solids conditions, and even enhanced ethanol yields.

Allison E Ray; Amber Hoover; Gary Gresham

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Modification of Corn Starch Ethanol Refinery to Efficiently Accept Various High-Impact Cellulosic Feedstocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Corn-to-Cellulosic Migration (CCM) pilot facility was to demonstrate the implementation of advanced technologies and methods for conversion of non-food, cellulosic feedstocks into ethanol, assess the economics of the facility and evaluate potential environmental benefits for biomass to fuels conversion. The CCM project was comprised of design, build, and operate phases for the CCM pilot facility as well as research & development, and modeling components. The CCM pilot facility was designed to process 1 tonne per day of non-food biomass and biologically convert that biomass to ethanol at a rate of 70 gallons per tonne. The plant demonstrated throughputs in excess of 1 tonne per day for an extended run of 1400 hours. Although target yields were not fully achieved, the continuous operation validated the design and operability of the plant. These designs will permit the design of larger scale operations at existing corn milling operations or for greenfield plants. EdeniQ, a partner in the project and the owner of the pilot plant, continues to operate and evaluate other feedstocks.

Derr, Dan

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

Structural basis of FFAT Motif-mediated ER targeting Stephen E. Kaiser, Jason H. Brickner1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/FFAT motif/ORP proteins/VAP-33 proteins 2 #12;Introduction The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a multi it is conserved in a large family of Oxysterol Binding Protein Related Proteins (ORPs) (Figure 1A and Supplemental Figure 1A) (Loewen et al., 2003). ORPs are regulators of lipid metabolism that are targeted by their FFAT

Walter, Peter

349

A 94-GHz Cloud Radar System on a NASA High-Altitude ER-2 Aircraft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 94-GHz (W band) Cloud Radar System (CRS) has been developed and flown on a NASA ER-2 high-altitude (20 km) aircraft. The CRS is a fully coherent, polarimetric Doppler radar that is capable of detecting clouds and precipitation from the ...

Lihua Li; Gerald M. Heymsfield; Paul E. Racette; Lin Tian; Ed Zenker

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

PARTICLE FILTERING AND CRAM ER-RAO LOWER BOUND FOR UNDERWATER NAVIGATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PARTICLE FILTERING AND CRAM ´ER-RAO LOWER BOUND FOR UNDERWATER NAVIGATION Rickard Karlsson, Fredrik-mail: {rickard,fredrik}@isy.liu.se Tobias Karlsson Saab Bofors Underwater Systems Box 910 SE-591 29 Motala relying on a dig- ital underwater terrain map and sonar measurements. The method is applicable for both

Gustafsson, Fredrik

351

Validation of Atlantic Ocean Sea Surface Temperatures Measured by the ERS-1 Along Track Scanning Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the period from October 1991 to May 1992 the royal research ship Bransfield made its annual voyage from the United Kingdom to Antarctica and back. Whenever the measurement swath of the Along Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) on the ERS-1 ...

J. P. Thomas; J. Turner

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

LITTLEWOOD-TYPE PROBLEMS ON [0,1] PEtER BoRwEin ... - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LITTLEWOOD-TYPE PROBLEMS ON [0,1]. PEtER BoRwEin, TAm bAs eRD bElyi , AnD u bExA ? bos. ?R????? ' ??????d?f gh ???d kl mopRC ?s C?h?f?t.

353

7016 EXPAnDing tHE fROntiERS Solar Decathlon team, circa 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7016 ­ EXPAnDing tHE fROntiERS #12;Solar Decathlon team, circa 2005 #12;CONCRETE CANOE;Above: ASCE (Class of Spring 1978) - Reunion, circa October 2007 Photo credit: Ralph Wheeler and Bob, then with the written part of the requirement, this added burden represented at least one additional credit hour

Aydilek, Ahmet

354

March 23, 2008 DB:EER Model -1 1 ER to Relational Mapping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 23, 2008 DB:EER Model - 1 1 ER to Relational Mapping #12;March 23, 2008 DB:EER Model - 1 2+ #12;March 23, 2008 DB:EER Model - 1 3 - Introduction In the previous lectures we looked at conceptual into a relational schema. #12;March 23, 2008 DB:EER Model - 1 4 - Mapping Entity Types Mapping of Regular Entity

Adam, Salah

355

Corn Milling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... facilities include processing and storage tanks, screening and sizing equipment, grind mills, high pressure steam boilers, centrifuges, rotary ...

356

Corn Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

starch goes into puddings, jellies and candies. Industrial starches, which include laundry starch, are essential ingredients of baking powder, textile sizing, cosmetics and...

357

Potential impact of Thailand's alcohol program on production, consumption, and trade of cassava, sugarcane, and corn  

SciTech Connect

On the first of May 1980, Thailand's fuel-alcohol program was announced by the Thai government. According to the program, a target of 147 million liters of ethanol would be produced in 1981, from cassava, sugarcane, and other biomasses. Projecting increases in output each year, the target level of ethanol produciton was set at 482 million liters of ethanol for 1986. The proposed amount of ethanol production could create a major shift up in the demand schedule of energy crops such as cassava, sugarcane, and corn. The extent of the adjustments in price, production, consumption, and exports for these energy crops need to be evaluated. The purpose of this study is to assess the potential impact of Thailand's fuel-alcohol program on price, production, consumption, and exports of three potential energy crops: cassava, sugarcane, and corn. Econometric commodity models of cassava, sugarcane, and corn are constructed and used as a method of assessment. The overall results of the forecasting simulations of the models indicate that the fuel-alcohol program proposed by the Thai government will cause the price, production, and total consumption of cassava, sugarcane, and corn to increase; on the other hand, it will cause exports to decline. In addition, based on the relative prices and the technical coefficients of ethanol production of these three energy crops, this study concludes that only cassava should be used to produce the proposed target of ethanol production.

Boonserm, P.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

PIV Measurements in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer within and above a Mature Corn Canopy. Part II: Quadrant-Hole Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quadrant-hole (Q-H) analysis is applied to PIV data acquired just within and above a mature corn canopy. The Reynolds shear stresses, transverse components of vorticity, as well as turbulence production and cascading part of dissipation rates are ...

W. Zhu; R. van Hout; J. Katz

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Green Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 3 Aqueous Extraction of Corn Oil after Fermentation in the Dry Grind Ethanol Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 3 Aqueous Extraction of Corn Oil after Fermentation in the Dry Grind Ethanol Process Processing eChapters Processing 3B39554497A54B0ABD4FC50626B2833A AOCS Press Downloadable pdf ...

360

Effect of xylanase supplementation of cellulase on digestion of corn stover solids prepared by leading pretreatment technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the development of biobased products Corn Soy- beans Sugar- cane, sugar beets Cellulosic material (perennial grass the greatest eutrophication impact of the bioproducts surveyed. Conversely, switchgrass-based ethanol offers for Producing Biofuels: Bioethanol and Biodiesel. Biomass Bioenergy 2005, 29, 426­439. (4) Landis, A. E.; Miller

California at Riverside, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deadman corn er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Feasibility Study for Co-Locating and Integrating Ethanol Production Plants from Corn Starch and Lignocellulosic Feedstocks (Revised)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of the feasibility of co-locating corn-grain-to-ethanol and lignocellulosic ethanol plants and potential savings from combining utilities, ethanol purification, product processing, and fermentation. Although none of the scenarios identified could produce ethanol at lower cost than a straight grain ethanol plant, several were lower cost than a straight cellulosic ethanol plant.

Wallace, R.; Ibsen, K.; McAloon, A.; Yee, W.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Tolerance and weed management systems in imidazolinone tolerant corn (Zea mays L.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of imidazolinone weed management systems and tolerance of imidazolinone tolerant corn to imazapic. Field experiments were conducted in 1997 and 1998 at the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station (TAES) Field Laboratory, near College Station TX, and at TP Farms, near Waller TX. Different imidazolinone herbicide treatments were applied to imidazolinone tolerant corn between the 2- to 3- and 6- to 8- leaf stage at 36 and 72 pa/ha to evaluate weed control, and 72, 105, 140, and 211 g/ha to evaluate the tolerance of imidazolinone tolerant corn. In 1997 at the TAES Field Laboratory control of Palmer amaranth, ivyleaf and entireleaf morningglory, Texas panicle, johnsongrass, common sunflower, and smellmelon were between 73 to 98% with imazapic or imazapyr plus imazethapyr, regardless of rate or application time. In 1998 at the TAES Field Laboratory control of devil's-claw, smellmelon, and johnsongrass ranged between 40 to 95% throughout the season with all imazapic applications. In 1997 at TP Farms near Waller TX effective control of Texas panicum and eclipse was obtained with all imazapic applications at 72 g/ha. Similar trends were observed with yellow nutsedge control. Due to the severe drought experienced in 1998, all weed species except for broadleaf signalgrass disappeared from the plots. Most effective control of yellow nutsedge, Texas panicle, spiny amaranth, and smellmelon occurred with early postemergence (EPOST) applications of imazapic (72 g/ha), while late postemergence (LPOST) applications of imazapic (72 g/ha) provided the highest control of broadleaf signalgrass. Similar herbicide tolerance was observed to both Gist varieties 8326IT and 8396IT. Crop response in these experiments refers to stunting and interveinal chlorosis. Increased crop response levels were observed early in the season, but by the end of the season had significantly decreased. In comparison, higher levels of crop response were observed in 1997 than in 1998, which can be attributed to the environmental conditions observed. Concerning crop height reductions, Gist variety 8326IT was shorter than 8396IT. No differences could be detected in the yields of either variety, when compared to the untreated check and other herbicide treatments.

Thompson, Ann Marie

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Fractionation of phenolic compounds from a purple corn extract and evaluation of antioxidant and antimutagenic activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Qualitative and quantitative analysis of anthocyanins and other phenolic compounds from a purple corn extract was performed. The purple corn extract had cyanidin-3-glucoside, pelargonidin-3-glucoside, peonidin-3-glucoside and its respective acylated anthocyanin-glucosides. Cyadinin-3glucoside was the main constituent (44.4 ?? 4.7%) followed by the acylated cyanidin-3-glucoside (26.9 ?? 8.0%). Other phenolic compounds present in the purple corn corresponded to protocatechuic acid, vanillic acid, and p-coumaric acid. In addition, quercetin derivatives, a hesperitin derivative and pcoumaric and ferulic acid derivatives were found. Fractionation of phenolic compounds yielded two main fractions, an anthocyanin-rich water fraction (WF) and an ethyl acetate fraction (EAF). Evaluation of antimutagenic activity in both fractions revealed higher antimutagenic activity in the ethyl acetate fraction compared to the anthocyanin-rich fraction. On the other hand, antioxidant activity of the anthocyanin-rich fraction was higher compared to the ethyl acetate fraction. Further fractionation of the anthocyanin-rich fraction in a Toyopearl HW40 gel permeation column yielded five sub-fractions which showed no difference in antimutagenic activity except for the water sub-fraction WF-V. All the sub-fractions were active as antimutagens and antioxidants. Further fractionation of the ethyl acetate fraction yielded four sub-fractions that showed to be active as antimutagens and antioxidants. Ethyl acetate sub-fraction EAF-IV was the most active as an antimutagen. HPLC-DAD characterization of that sub-fraction revealed mainly the presence of a quercetin derivative with UV-visible spectral characteristics similar to rutin but with a little longer retention time. The mechanism of antimutagenic action by the phenolic compounds present either in the anthocyanin-rich fraction or the ethyl acetate fraction and sub-fraction EAFIV seems to be a contribution of a direct action on the enzymes involved in the activation of the mutagen and to the scavenging activity of the mutagen nucleophiles, as demonstrated by our assays.

Pedreschi, Romina Paola

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Changes in long-term no-till corn growth and yield under different rates of stover mulch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Received for publication January 4, 2006. Removal of corn (Zea mays L.) stover for biofuel production may affect crop yields by altering soil properties. A partial stover removal may be feasible, but information on appropriate rates of removal is unavailable. We assessed the short-term impacts of stover management on long-term no-till (NT) continuous corn grown on a Rayne silt loam (fine loamy, mixed, active, mesic Typic Hapludults) at Coshocton, Hoytville clay loam (fine, illitic, mesic Mollic Epiaqualfs) at Hoytville, and Celina silt loam (fine, mixed, active, mesic Aquic Hapludalfs) at South Charleston in Ohio, and predicted corn yield from soil properties using principal component analysis (PCA). The study was conducted in 2005 on the ongoing experiments started in May 2004 under 0 (T0), 25 (T25), 50 (T50), 75 (T75), 100 (T100), and 200 (T200)% of stover corresponding to 0, 1.25, 2.50, 3.75, 5.00, and 10.00 Mg ha-1 of stover, respectively. Stover removal promoted early emergence and rapid seedling growth (P Stover management affected corn yield only at the Coshocton site where average grain and stover yields in the T200, T100, T75, and T50 (10.8 and 10.3 Mg ha-1) were higher than those in the T0 and T25 treatments (8.5 and 6.5 Mg ha-1) (P stover removal at rates as low as 50% (2.5 Mg ha-1) decreased crop yields. Soil properties explained 71% of the variability in grain yield and 33% of the variability in stover yield for the Coshocton site. Seventeen months after the start of the experiment, effects of stover management on corn yield and soil properties were site-specific.

Blanco-Canqui, Dr. Humberto [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Lal, Dr. Rattan [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Owens, Lloyd [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY DOW CORNING CORPORATION FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY DOW CORNING CORPORATION FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC26-05NT42344; W(A)-05-002, CH-1266 The Petitioner, Dow Coming Corporation (Dow), was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "Thin Film Packaging Solutions for High Efficiency OLED Lighting Products." The waiver will apply to inventions made by Dow employees and its subcontractors' employees, regardless of tier, except inventions made by subcontractors eligible to retain title to inventions pursuant to P.L. 96-517, as amended, and National Laboratories. The purpose of the cooperative agreement is to develop novel substrate and packaging technology for solid state lighting devices that use Organic Light Emitting Diodes (OLEDs) as the

366

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY CORNING INCORPORATED FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WAIVER WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE CONTRACT NO. B29143; DOE WAIVER NO. W(A)-95-029 The Petitioner, Corning Incorporated, has requested an Advance Waiver of the Government's domestic and foreign rights to inventions made under the above cited research and development contract (R&D Contract). The objective of the R&D Contract issued by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) on behalf of DP-11 is to reduce the costs associated with the manufacturing of large size high quality fused silica transmissive optics utilized in advanced Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) laser systems. The present cost of laser optics used in the ICF laser system is between $1.7/cm 3 to $2.0/cm 3 . After completion of the R&D Contract, it is believed that a 50% reduction in cost for the

367

High Xylose Yields from Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Corn Stover Under Process-Relevant Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Pretreatment experiments were carried out to demonstrate high xylose yields at high solids loadings in two different batch pretreatment reactors under process-relevant conditions. Corn stover was pretreated with dilute sulfuric acid using a 4-l Steam Digester and a 4-l stirred ZipperClave{reg_sign} reactor. Solids were loaded at 45% dry matter (wt/wt) after sulfuric acid catalyst impregnation using nominal particle sizes of either 6 or 18 mm. Pretreatment was carried out at temperatures between 180 and 200 C at residence times of either 90 or 105 s. Results demonstrate an ability to achieve high xylose yields (>80%) over a range of pretreatment conditions, with performance showing little dependence on particle size or pretreatment reactor type. The high xylose yields are attributed to effective catalyst impregnation and rapid rates of heat transfer during pretreatment.

Weiss, N. D.; Nagle, N. J.; Tucker, M. P.; Elander, R. T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Ultrastructure and Sugar Yields from Three Different Pretreatments of Corn Stover  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the Joint BioEnergy Institute ( JBEI) are collaborating to understand how biomass pretreatments with much different deconstruction patterns impact the chemical and ultrastructural features of biomass and its biological conversion to sugars. Dilute sulfuric acid (DA), ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX), and ionic liquid (IL) pretreatments are applied to the same source of corn stover by the BESC, GLBRC, and JBEI, respectively. Common sources of cellulase and other accessory enzymes are then employed to release sugars from the solids left after each pretreatment. The GLBRC applies material balances to each overall pretreatment-hydrolysis system to determine the fates of key biomass constituents and also optimizes enzyme formulations for each substrate using their microplate saccharification system. The BESC

Genomic Science Awardee; Usda-doe Plant; Feedstock Genomics; Charles E. Wyman; Xiadi Gao; Leonardo Da; Costa Sousa; Shishir P. S. Chundawat; Bruce E. Dale

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Action of protein synthesis inhibitors in blocking electrogenic H/sup +/ efflux from corn roots  

SciTech Connect

The block in the electrogenic H/sup +/ efflux produced by protein synthesis inhibitors in corn root tissue can be released or by-passed by addition of fusicoccin or nigericin. The inhibition also lowers cell potential, and the release repolarizes. Associated with the inhibition of H/sup +/ efflux is inhibition of K/sup +/ influx and the growth of the root tip; fusicoccin partially relieves these inhibitions, but nigericin does not. The inhibition of H/sup +/ efflux which arises from blocking the proton channel of the ATPase by oligomycin or N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide can also be partially relieved by fusicoccin, but not by nigericin; the inhibition produced by diethylstilbestrol is not relieved by fusicoccin. The results are discussed in terms of the presumed mode of action of fusicoccin on the plasmalemma ATPase.

Chastain, C.J.; LaFayette, P.R.; Hanson, J.B.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Assessment of Options for the Collection, Handling, and Transport of Corn Stover  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this report, we discuss the logistics and estimate the delivered costs for collecting, handling, and hauling corn stover to an ethanol conversion facility. We compare costs for two conventional baling systems (large round bales and large rectangular bales), a silage-harvest system, and an unprocessed-pickup system. Our results generally indicate that stover can be collected, stored, and hauled for about $43.60 to $48.80/dry ton ($48.10-$53.80/dry Mg) using conventional baling equipment for conversion facilities ranging in size from 500 to 2000 dry tons/day (450-1810 dry Mg/day). These estimates are inclusive of all costs including farmer payments for the stover. Our results also suggest that costs might be significantly reduced with an unprocessed stover pickup system provided more efficient equipment is developed.

Perlack, R.D.

2002-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

371

Land Use and Water Efficiency in Current and Potential Future U.S. Corn and Brazilian Sugarcane Ethanol Systems (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use and Water Efficiency in Current and Potential Future U.S. Corn and Use and Water Efficiency in Current and Potential Future U.S. Corn and Brazilian Sugarcane Ethanol Systems Ethan Warner 1 , Yimin Zhang 1 , Helena Chum 2 , Robin Newmark 1 Biofuels represent an opportunity for improved sustainability of transportation fuels, promotion of rural development, and reduction of GHG emissions. But the potential for unintended consequences, such as competition for land and water, necessitates biofuel expansion that considers the complexities of resource requirements within specific contexts (e.g., technology, feedstock, supply chain, local resource availability). Through technological learning, sugarcane and corn ethanol industries have achieved steady improvements in

372

Correlating Detergent Fiber Analysis and Dietary Fiber Analysis Data for Corn Stover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There exist large amounts of detergent fiber analysis data [neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent fiber (ADF), acid detergent lignin (ADL)] for many different potential cellulosic ethanol feedstocks, since these techniques are widely used for the analysis of forages. Researchers working in the area of cellulosic ethanol are interested in the structural carbohydrates in a feedstock (principally glucan and xylan), which are typically determined by acid hydrolysis of the structural fraction after multiple extractions of the biomass. These so-called dietary fiber analysis methods are significantly more involved than detergent fiber analysis methods. The purpose of this study was to determine whether it is feasible to correlate detergent fiber analysis values to glucan and xylan content determined by dietary fiber analysis methods for corn stover. In the detergent fiber analysis literature cellulose is often estimated as the difference between ADF and ADL, while hemicellulose is often estimated as the difference between NDF and ADF. Examination of a corn stover dataset containing both detergent fiber analysis data and dietary fiber analysis data predicted using near infrared spectroscopy shows that correlations between structural glucan measured using dietary fiber techniques and cellulose estimated using detergent techniques, and between structural xylan measured using dietary fiber techniques and hemicellulose estimated using detergent techniques are high, but are driven largely by the underlying correlation between total extractives measured by fiber analysis and NDF/ADF. That is, detergent analysis data is correlated to dietary fiber analysis data for structural carbohydrates, but only indirectly; the main correlation is between detergent analysis data and solvent extraction data produced during the dietary fiber analysis procedure.

Wolfrum, E. J.; Lorenz, A. J.; deLeon, N.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

TAW-Er:a U.S. DEPARMEENT OF ENERGY EER E PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TAW-Er:a TAW-Er:a U.S. DEPARMEENT OF ENERGY EER E PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DE TERI\ ITNATION RECIPIENT:Bowling Green State University STATE: OH PRO.IECT TITLE : Coasta; Ohio Wind Project Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FG36-06G086096 GF0-09-171 G086096 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1 A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

374

US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DEI'ER1IllNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEI'ER1IllNATION DEI'ER1IllNATION Page I of3 RECIPIENT:Verdant Power, Inc. STATE: NY PROJECT TITLE : Advancement of the Kinetic Hydropower System (KHPS) to DOE TRL 7/8 Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-OOOO293 Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-EEOOO5929 GF0-0005929-OO1 EE5929 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APP .. :NDlX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering, analysis, and dissemination 83.6 S mall-scale research and development, laboratory o peratio ns, and pilot projects 83.16 Researc h activities in aquatic env ironments Information gathering (induding, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits, and audits),

375

Microsoft Word - DOE-ER-0670T_6.09_Final.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ER-0670T ER-0670T UC-402 Science Plan for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) February 1996 United States Department of Energy Office of Energy Research Office of Health and Environmental Research Environmental Sciences Division Washington, DC 20585 ARM Science Plan iii Executive Summary The purpose of this Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Plan is to articulate the scientific issues driving the ARM Program, and to relate them to DOE's programmatic objectives for ARM, based on the experience and scientific progress gained over the past five years. ARM programmatic objectives are to: 1. Relate observed radiative fluxes and radiances in the atmosphere, spectrally resolved and as a function of position and time, to the temperature and composition of the atmosphere, specifically including

376

Audit Report: ER-B-99-06 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Audit Report: ER-B-99-06 April 14, 1999 Bechtel Jacobs Payroll Creation The Oak Ridge Operations Office (Operations Office) awarded a contract to the Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC (Bechtel Jacobs) in December 1997. The terms of the contract require Bechtel Jacobs to create new jobs in the Oak Ridge area with a cumulative payroll of $427 million through Fiscal Year (FY) 2003. In FY 1998, the contract required Bechtel Jacobs to create $11 million in new payroll. The objective of the audit was to determine if Bechtel Jacobs met its commitment to create at least $11 million in new payroll in the Oak Ridge, Tennessee area through September 30, 1998. Audit Report: ER-B-99-06 More Documents & Publications Audit Report: IG-0498 Semiannual Report to Congress: April 1 - September 30, 1999

377

Audit Report: ER-B-00-03 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Audit Report: ER-B-00-03 June 19, 2000 Waste Characterization at Oak Ridge Waste characterization is a series of steps performed to determine the weight, volume, and physical characteristics of radioactive waste. The Department of Energy (Department) uses data obtained from waste characterization to evaluate treatment and disposal options for the waste. The characterization process begins when the generator of the waste prepares a general description of the waste produced. The extent of work performed for the final characterization is dependent on the amount and quality of information provided by the generator and the proposed treatment or disposal option for the waste. Audit Report: ER-B-00-03 More Documents & Publications Audit Report: IG-0434 Audit Report: IG-0426

378

Audit Report: ER-B-98-01 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8-01 8-01 Audit Report: ER-B-98-01 October 23, 1997 Audit of the Deactivation, Decontamination, and Disposal of Surplus Facilities at the Savannah River Site Westinghouse Savannah River Company (Westinghouse) is responsible for managing the Department of Energy's (Department) surplus facilities at the Savannah River Site (Site). In Fiscal Year (FY) 1996, the Site had 162 surplus facilities and anticipated that 118 more would become surplus within the next 5 years. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the Savannah River Operations Office (Operations Office) and Westinghouse had economically and promptly deactivated, decontaminated, and disposed of surplus facilities at the Site. Audit Report: ER-B-98-01 More Documents & Publications Audit Report: IG-0684

379

Audit Report: ER-B-98-02 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Audit Report: ER-B-98-02 October 24, 1997 Audit of Environmental Monitoring and Health Physics Laboratories at the Savannah River Site The Environmental Monitoring and Health Physics Laboratories at the Department of Energy's (Department) Savannah River Site are over 40 years old and are approaching the end of their useful lives. The managing and operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (Westinghouse), and the Savannah River Operations Office (Operations Office) proposed to build two new facilities to replace them. We conducted this audit to determine whether the construction of new laboratories was the most cost-effective alternative to accomplish the site's environmental monitoring and health physics missions. Audit Report: ER-B-98-02

380

Audit Report: ER-B-97-02 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Audit Report: ER-B-97-02 February 14, 1997 Audit of the Department of Energy's Grant for Economic Development at the Mound Plant The downsizing of the Department of Energy's (Department) facilities as a result of the end of the Cold War had a negative impact on communities that were heavily dependent on the Department's operations for economic stability. To lessen the impact, the Department provided financial assistance to local communities through Federal grants and cooperative agreements. The objective of this audit was to determine whether funding provided for economic development at the Mound Plant was used for the Department's intended purposes. Audit Report: ER-B-97-02 More Documents & Publications Audit of Shutdown and Transition of the Mound Plant, IG-0408

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deadman corn er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Audit Report: ER-B-98-05 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Audit Report: ER-B-98-05 December 10, 1997 Audit Of The Department Of Energy's Contracts With Envirocare Of Utah, Inc The Department of Energy (Department) is responsible for protecting human health and the environment by providing an effective and efficient system that treats, stores, and disposes of Departmental waste. The Department disposes of some of its waste at Envirocare of Utah, Inc., (Envirocare) a commercial treatment and disposal facility in Clive, Utah. The audit objective was to determine whether the Department and its contractors were using the most favorable rates available for the disposal of waste at Envirocare. Audit Report: ER-B-98-05 More Documents & Publications Audit Report: IG-0426 Audit Report: IG-0612 Audit Letter Report: OAS-L-09-17

382

The Theory of High Energy Collision Processes - Final Report DOE/ER/40158-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1984, DOE awarded Harvard University a new Grant DE-FG02-84ER40158 to continue their support of Tai Tsun Wu as Principal Investigator of research on the theory of high energy collision processes. This Grant was renewed and remained active continuously from June 1, 1984 through November 30, 2007. Topics of interest during the 23-year duration of this Grant include: the theory and phenomenology of collision and production processes at ever higher energies; helicity methods of QED and QCD; neutrino oscillations and masses; Yang-Mills gauge theory; Beamstrahlung; Fermi pseudopotentials; magnetic monopoles and dyons; cosmology; classical confinement; mass relations; Bose-Einstein condensation; and large-momentum-transfer scattering processes. This Final Report describes the research carried out on Grant DE-FG02-84ER40158 for the period June 1, 1984 through November 30, 2007. Two books resulted from this project and a total of 125 publications.

Wu, Tai, T.

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Notices Docket Numbers: ER11-3935-000. Applicants: CL Power Sales Eight,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Federal Register 2 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 131 / Friday, July 8, 2011 / Notices Docket Numbers: ER11-3935-000. Applicants: CL Power Sales Eight, LLC. Description: CL Power Sales Eight, LLC submits tariff filing per 35.37: CL Power Sales Eight, LLC Triennial MBR Update for the NE Region to be effective 6/30/2011. Filed Date: 06/29/2011. Accession Number: 20110629-5160. Comment Date: 5 p.m. Eastern Time on Monday, August 29, 2011. Docket Numbers: ER11-3936-000. Applicants: CP Power Sales Twenty, LLC. Description: CP Power Sales Twenty, LLC submits tariff filing per 35.37: CP Power Sales Twenty, LLC Triennial MBR Update for the NE Region to be effective 6/30/2011. Filed Date: 06/29/2011. Accession Number: 20110629-5161. Comment Date: 5 p.m. Eastern Time on Monday, August 29, 2011.

384

Sampling and Analysis Plan for Catch Tank 241ER311 Vapor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This tank sampling and analysis plan (TSAF') identifies the sample collection, laboratory analysis, quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) objectives for the characterization of catch tank 241-ER-311 vapor space. Data to be collected under this revision (Revision 2) of the TSAP will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the portable exhauster recently installed for the tank. Vapor samples taken previous to the issuance of this revision shall be analyzed in accordance with Revision 1.

NGUYEN, D.M.

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

Synoptic Circulation and Land Surface Influences on Convection in the Midwest U.S. “Corn Belt” during the Summers of 1999 and 2000. Part I: Composite Synoptic Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Midwest U.S. Corn Belt, the 1999 and 2000 summer seasons (15 June–15 September) expressed contrasting spatial patterns and magnitudes of precipitation (1999: dry; 2000: normal to moist). Distinct from the numerical modeling approach often ...

Andrew M. Carleton; David L. Arnold; David J. Travis; Steve Curran; Jimmy O. Adegoke

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Forming Expectations About 2008 U.S. Corn and Soybean Yields—Application of Crop Weather Models that Incorporate Planting Progress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the current environment of strong domestic and export demand, relatively low world stocks, and historically high prices, the expected size of the 2008 U.S. corn and

Scott Irwin; Darrel Good; Mike Tannura

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 5 Fatty Acids in Corn Oil: Role in Heart Disease Prevention  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 5 Fatty Acids in Corn Oil: Role in Heart Disease Prevention Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

388

Pilot-scale submersed cultivation of R. microsporus var. oligosporus in thin stillage, a dry-grind corn-to-ethanol co-product.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An innovative process to add value to a corn-to-ethanol co-product, Thin stillage, was studied for pilot-scale viability. A 1500L bioreactor was designed, operated, and optimized… (more)

Erickson, Daniel Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Photometric Observations of the Type Ia SN 2002er in UGC 10743  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extensive light and colour curves for the Type Ia supernova SN 2002er are presented as part of the European Supernova Collaboration. We have collected UBVRI photometry from ten different telescopes covering the phases from 7 days before until 619 days after maximum light. Corrections for the different instrumental systems and the non-thermal spectrum of the supernova (S-corrections) have been applied. With the densely sampled light curves we can make detailed comparisons to other well-observed objects. SN 2002er most closely resembles SN 1996X after maximum, but clearly shows a different colour evolution before peak light and a stronger shoulder in V and R bands compared to other well-observed SNe Ia. In particular, the rise time appears to be longer than what is expected from rise-time vs.decline-rate relation. We use several methods to determine the reddening towards SN 2002er based on the colour evolution at near peak and at late phases. The uvoir (bolometric) light curve shows great similarity with SN 199...

Pignata, G; Benetti, S; Blinnikov, S; Hillebrandt, W; Kotak, R; Leibundgut, B; Mazzali, P A; Meikle, P; Qiu, Y; Ruiz-Lapuente, P; Smartt, S; Sorokina, E; Stritzinger, M; Stehle, M; Turatto, M; Marsh, T; Martin-Luis, F; McBride, N; Méndez, J; Morales-Rueda, L; Narbutis, D; Street, R

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

ORP-3 Rescues ER Membrane Expansions Caused by the VAPB-P56S Mutation in Familial ALS .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A mutation in ER membrane protein VAPB is responsible for causing a familial form of ALS (ALS8). The VAPB-P56S mutation causes protein aggregation and a… (more)

Darbyson, Angie L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Sequential Assimilation of ERS-1 SAR Data into a Coupled Land Surface–Hydrological Model Using an Extended Kalman Filter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A first attempt to sequentially assimilate European Space Agency (ESA) Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) estimations of surface soil moisture in the production scheme of a lumped rainfall–runoff model has been ...

C. Francois; A. Quesney; C. Ottlé

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

ER-2 Doppler Radar Investigations of the Eyewall of Hurricane Bonnie during the Convection and Moisture Experiment-3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A persistent, mesoscale region of intense eyewall convection contained within Hurricane Bonnie on 23 August 1998 is examined from multiple observations synthesized from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration ER-2 and DC-8 aircraft. The ...

Gerald M. Heymsfield; Jeffrey B. Halverson; Joanne Simpson; Lin Tian; T. Paul Bui

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Dynamics of the green and red upconversion emissions in Yb3+-Er3+-Codoped Y2O3 nanorods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficient green and red upconversion emission in Y2O3:Yb3+, Er3+ nanorods under 978nm radiation excitation is achieved. Experimental effective lifetimes, luminescent emissions, and nanorod sizes depend strongly ...

O. Meza; L. A. Diaz-Torres; P. Salas; C. Angeles-Chavez; A. Martínez; J. Morales; J. Oliva

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Thermal lens study of thermo-optical properties and concentration quenching of Er3+-doped lead pyrophosphate based glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we have used the thermal lens technique combined with conventional spectroscopy to characterize the thermo-optical properties of Er3+-doped lead pyrophosphate-based glasses. More precisely, we have investigated and quantified experimentally the fluorescence quantum efficiencies of the Er3+ levels, and we describe the role of concentration quenching effects. The fluorescence quantum efficiency of the 4I13/2 level is very high when compared to other phosphate glasses, while that of the green-coupled levels is very small. Other important photonic materials parameters, such as the thermal diffusivity and temperature coefficient of the optical path length change, were obtained and compared with those of other glass systems. The cumulative results obtained here for the Er-doped lead pyrophosphate glass show that this material is a good candidate for photonic applications with a characteristic Er3+ infrared emission around 1550 nm.

Santos, C. C. [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Ceara, Brazil; Rocha, U. [Grupo de Fotônica e Fluidos Complexos, Instituto de Física, Brazil; Guedes, Ilde [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Ceara, Brazil; Vermelho, M. V. D. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Brazil; Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL; Jacinto, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Brazil

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Corn Ethanol.” Paper presented at the 8 th Bio-Energy Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study has been undertaken at the request of the Illinois Department of Commerce and Community Affairs (DCCA) on the twin premises that (1) data and information essential to an informed choice about the corn-to-ethanol cycle are in need of updating, thanks to scientific and technological advances in both corn farming and ethanol production; and (2) generalized national estimates of energy intensities and greenhouse gas (GHG) production are of less relevance than estimates based specifically on activities and practices in the principal domestic corn production and milling region-- the upper Midwest. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) contracted with DCCA to apply the ANL Greenhouse gas, Regulated Emissions and Energy in Transportation (GREET) full-fuel-cycle analysis model with updated information appropriate to corn operations in America’s heartland in an effort to examine the role of corn-feedstock ethanol with respect to GHG emissions given present and near future production technology and practice. Information about these technologies and practices has been obtained from a panel of outside experts consisting of representatives of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, midwestern universities with expertise in corn production and soil emissions, and acknowledged authorities in the field of ethanol plant

Michael Wang; Christopher Saricks

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Influence of Physico-Chemical Changes on Enzymatic Digestibility of Ionic Liquid and AFEX pretreated Corn Stover  

SciTech Connect

Ionic liquid (IL) and ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) pretreatments were studied to develop the first direct side-by-side comparative assessment on their respective impacts on biomass structure, composition, process mass balance, and enzymatic saccharification efficiency. AFEX pretreatment completely preserves plant carbohydrates, whereas IL pretreatment extracts 76% of hemicellulose. In contrast to AFEX, the native crystal structure of the recovered corn stover from IL pretreatment was significantly disrupted. For both techniques, more than 70% of the theoretical sugar yield was attained after 48 h of hydrolysis using commercial enzyme cocktails. IL pretreatment requires less enzyme loading and a shorter hydrolysis time to reach 90% yields. Hemicellulase addition led to significant improvements in the yields of glucose and xylose for AFEX pretreated corn stover, but not for IL pretreated stover. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms of IL and AFEX pretreatment, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each.

Li, Chenlin [Joint Bioenergy Institute; Cheng, Gang [Joint Bioenergy Institute; Kent, Michael S [ORNL; Ong, Markus [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Balan, Venkatesh [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Dale, Bruce E. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; Simmons, Blake [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Modelling the costs of energy crops: A case study of U.S. corn and Brazilian sugar cane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPRG WORKING PAPER High crude oil prices, uncertainties about the consequences of climate change and the eventual decline of conventional oil production raise the prospects of alternative fuels, such as biofuels. This paper describes a simple probabilistic model of the costs of energy crops, drawing on the user's degree of belief about a series of parameters as an input. This forward-looking analysis quantifies the effects of production constraints and experience on the costs of corn and sugar cane, which can then be converted to bioethanol. Land is a limited and heterogeneous resource: the crop cost model builds on the marginal land suitability, which is assumed to decrease as more land is taken into production, driving down the marginal crop yield. Also, the maximum achievable yield is increased over time by technological change, while the yield gap between the actual yield and the maximum yield decreases through improved management practices. The results show large uncertainties in the future costs of producing corn and sugar cane, with a 90% confidence interval of 2.9 to 7.2 $/GJ in 2030 for marginal corn costs, and 1.5 to 2.5 $/GJ in 2030 for marginal sugar cane costs. The influence of each parameter on these costs is examined.

Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope; Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

STABILITY OF DOW CORNING Q2-3183A ANTIFOAM IN IRRADIATED HYDROXIDE SOLUTION  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) examined the stability of Dow Corning Q2-3183A antifoam to radiation and aqueous hydroxide solutions. Initial foam control studies with Hanford tank waste showed the antifoam reduced foaming. The antifoam was further tested using simulated Hanford tank waste spiked with antifoam that was heated and irradiated (2.1 x 10{sup 4} rad/h) at conditions (90 C, 3 M NaOH, 8 h) expected in the processing of radioactive waste through the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at Hanford. After irradiation, the concentration of the major polymer components polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polypropylene glycol (PPG) in the antifoam was determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). No loss of the major polymer components was observed after 24 h and only 15 wt% loss of PDMS was reported after 48 h. The presence of degradation products were not observed by gas chromatography (GC), gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) or high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). G values were calculated from the GPC analysis and tabulated. The findings indicate the antifoam is stable for 24 h after exposure to gamma radiation, heat, and alkaline simulated waste.

White, T; Crawford, C; Burket, P; Calloway, B

2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

399

Response Surface Analysis of Elemental Composition and Energy Properties of Corn Stover During Torrefaction  

SciTech Connect

This research studied the effects of torrefaction temperature (250-250 C) and time (30-120 minutes) on elemental composition and energy properties changes in corn stover. Torrefied material was analyzed for moisture content, moisture-free carbon (%), hydrogen (%), nitrogen (%), sulfur (%), and higher heating value (MJ/kg). Results at 350 C and 120 minutes indicated a steep decrease in moisture content to a final value of about 1.48% - a reduction of about 69%. With respect to carbon content, the increase was about 23%, while hydrogen and sulfur content decreased by about 46.82% and 66.6%, respectively. The hydrogen-to-carbon ratio decreased as torrefaction temperature and time increased, with the lowest value of 0.6 observed at 350 C and 120 minutes. Higher heating value measured at 350 C and 60 minutes increased by about 22% and the maximum degree of carbonization observed was about 1.21. Further, the regression models developed for chemical composition in terms of torrefaction temperature and time adequately described the process with coefficient of determination values (R2) in the range of 0.92-0.99 for the elemental composition and energy properties studied. Response surface plots indicated that increasing both torrefaction temperature and time resulted in decreased moisture content, hydrogen content, and the hydrogen to-carbon ratio, and increased carbon content and higher heating value. This effect was more significant at torrefaction temperatures and times >280 C and >30 minutes.

Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Richard D. Boardman; Christopher T. Wright

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Ethanol production from dry-mill corn starch in a fluidized-bed bioreactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of a high-rate process for the production of fuel ethanol from dry-mill corn starch using fluidized-bed bioreactor (FBR) technology is discussed. Experiments were conducted in a laboratory scale FBR using immobilized biocatalysts. Two ethanol production process designs were considered in this study. In the first design, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation was performed at 35 C using {kappa}-carageenan beads (1.5 mm to 1.5 mm in diameter) of co-immobilized glucoamylase and Zymomonas mobilis. For dextrin feed concentration of 100 g/L, the single-pass conversion ranged from 54% to 89%. Ethanol concentrations of 23 to 36 g/L were obtained at volumetric productivities of 9 to 15 g/L-h. No accumulation of glucose was observed, indicating that saccharification was the rate-limiting step. In the second design, saccharification and fermentation were carried out sequentially. In the first stage, solutions of 150 to 160 g/L dextrins were pumped through an immobilized glucoamylase packed column maintained at 55 C. Greater than 95% conversion was obtained at a residence time of 1 h, giving a product of 165 to 170 g glucose/L. In the second stage, these glucose solutions were fed to the FBR containing Z. mobilis immobilized in {kappa}-carageenan beads. At a residence time of 2 h, 94% conversion and ethanol concentration of 70 g/L was achieved, giving an overall productivity of 23 g/L-h.

Krishnan, M.S.; Nghiem, N.P.; Davison, B.H.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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401

FOEU-iERLY UTILIZED SITES REKEDIAL ACTION PROG%AM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

y ((-' q ' y ((-' q ' c - ,' .* FOEU-iERLY UTILIZED SITES REKEDIAL ACTION PROG%AM ELIMINATION REPORT FORMERERATOOLAND ENGINEERING COMPANY 4555 UEST ADDISON STREET CHICAGO, ILLINOIS NOVEMBER 14, 1989 Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Facility and Site Decommissioning . . CONTENTS Page INTRODU~ION......................... 1 BAcI(GROuND.......................... 1 Site Function. ...................... 1 Site Description ..................... 2 Radiological History and Status .............. 2 ELIMINATION ANALYSIS ..................... 2 REFERENCES .......................... 4 -- -.. I. m -- ELIMINATION REPORT FORMER ERA TOOL AND ENGINEERING COMPANY 4555 WEST ADDISON STREET CHICAGO, ILLINOIS INTRODUCTION

402

Electrically active Er doping in InAs, In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As, and GaAs  

SciTech Connect

The electron concentration in dilute alloys of Er in GaAs, In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As, and InAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy is studied as a function of Er concentration and In content. Using first-principles calculations based on hybrid density functional theory, we attribute an observed increase in conduction electron concentration to Er incorporation on interstitial sites. Er also incorporates on substitutional sites where it is isovalent and electrically inactive. The formation energy of interstitial Er in InAs is significantly smaller than in GaAs, allowing for more electrically active Er in InAs. The results provide insight into characteristics of rare-earth elements as dopants in semiconductors.

Burke, Peter G.; Ismer, Lars; Lu Hong; Frantz, Elan; Janotti, Anderson; Van de Walle, Chris G.; Bowers, John E.; Gossard, Arthur C. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States)

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

403

The {beta}-Decay Properties of Scissors Mode 1{sup +} States in {sup 164}Er  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The beta decay properties of collective I{sup {pi}}K = 1{sup +}1 states in doubly even deformed {sup 164}Er nuclei are investigated in the framework of the rotational invariant random-phase approximation. It is shown that an essential decrease of the rate of the allowed {beta}-decay to the excited 1{sup +}-states as compared with that to the ground state may be due to the orbital nature of the states. The model Hamiltonian includes restoring rotational invariance of the deformed single particle Hamiltonian forces and the spin-spin interactions. The analytical expressions for the Gamov-Teller (G-T) and Fermi (F) decay matrix elements are derived. The single-particle energies were obtained from the Warsaw deformed Woods-Saxon potential with deformation parameter {delta}{sub 2} = 0.24. The numerical results for {beta}{sup +} transition from {sup 164}Tm to {sup 164}Er indicate the importance of using rotational invariant Hamiltonian to explain experimental data.

Yildirim, Z.; Kuliev, A.; Ozkan, S. [Sakarya University, Department of Physics, 54100, Sakarya (Turkey); Guliyev, E. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences, H. Cavid Avenue 33, Baku (Azerbaijan); Institut fur Kernphysik, Technische Universitat Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany)

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

404

Regional Differences in Corn Ethanol Production: Profitability and Potential Water Demands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through the use of a stochastic simulation model this project analyzes both the impacts of the expanding biofuels sector on water demand in selected regions of the United States and variations in the profitability of ethanol production due to location differences. Changes in consumptive water use in the Texas High Plains, Southern Minnesota, and the Central Valley of California, as impacted by current and proposed grain-based ethanol plants were addressed. In addition, this research assesses the potential impacts of technologies to reduce consumptive water use in the production of ethanol in terms of water usage and the economic viability of each ethanol facility. This research quantifies the role of corn ethanol production on water resource availability and identifies the alternative water pricing schemes at which ethanol production is no longer profitable. The results of this research show that the expansion of regional ethanol production and the resulting changes in the regional agricultural landscapes do relatively little to change consumptive water usage in each location. The California Central Valley has the highest potential for increased water usage with annual water usage in 2017 at levels 15% higher than historical estimates, whereas Southern Minnesota and the Texas High Plains are predicted to have increases of less than 5% during the same time period. Although water use by ethanol plants is extremely minor relative to consumptive regional agricultural water usage, technological adaptations by ethanol facilities have the potential to slightly reduce water usage and prove to be economically beneficial adaptations to make. The sensitivity of net present value (NPV) with respect to changes in water price is shown to be extremely inelastic, indicating that ethanol producers have the ability to pay significantly more for their fresh water with little impact on their 10 year economic performance.

Higgins, Lindsey M.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

KNIFE MILL COMMINUTION ENERGY ANALYSIS OF SWITCHGRASS, WHEAT STRAW, AND CORN STOVER AND CHARACTERIZATION OF PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass preprocessing and pretreatment technologies such as size reduction and chemical preconditioning are aimed at reducing the cost of ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass. Size reduction is an energy-intensive biomass preprocessing unit operation. In this study, switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover were chopped in an instrumented knife mill to evaluate size reduction energy and corresponding particle size distribution as determined with a standard forage sieve analyzer. Direct mechanical power inputs were determined using a dedicated data acquisition system for knife mill screen openings from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, rotor speeds between 250 and 500 rpm, and mass feed rates from 1 to 11 kg/min. A speed of 250 rpm gave optimum performance of the mill. Optimum feed rates for 25.4 mm screen and 250 rpm were 7.6, 5.8, and 4.5 kg/min for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover, respectively. Total specific energy (MJ/Mg) was defined as the size reduction energy required to operate the knife mill plus that imparted to the biomass. Effective specific energy was defined as the energy imparted to the biomass. For these conditions, total specific energies were 27.3, 37.9, and 31.9 MJ/Mg and effective specific energies were 10.1, 15.5, and 3.2 MJ/Mg for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover, respectively. These results demonstrated that biomass selection affects the size reduction energy, even for biomass with similar features. Second-order polynomial equations for the total specific energy requirement fitted well (R2 > 0.95) as a function of knife mill screen size, mass feed rate, and speed for biomass materials tested. The Rosin-Rammler equation fitted the cumulative undersize mass of switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover chop passed through ASABE sieves with high R2 (>0.983). Knife mill chopping of switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover resulted in particle size distributions classified as 'well-graded strongly fine-skewed mesokurtic', 'well-graded fine-skewed mesokurtic', and 'well-graded fine-skewed mesokurtic', respectively, for small knife mill screen sizes (12.7 to 25.4 mm) and distributions classified as 'well-graded fine-skewed mesokurtic', 'well-graded strongly fine-skewed mesokurtic', and 'well-graded fine-skewed mesokurtic', respectively, for the large screen size (50.8 mm). Total and effective specific energy values per unit size reduction of wheat straw were greater compared to those for switchgrass. Corn stover resulted in reduced total and effective specific energy per unit size reduction compared to wheat straw for the same operating conditions, but higher total specific energy per unit size reduction and lesser effective specific energy per unit size reduction compared to switchgrass. Data on minimized total specific energy with corresponding particle spectra will be useful for preparing feed material with a knife mill for subsequent grinding with finer size reduction devices.

Bitra, V.S.P. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Igathinathane, C. [North Dakota State University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DE1'ER1vllNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

'ER1vllNATION 'ER1vllNATION RECIPI ENT:Township of Branchburg PROJECT TITLE: Branchburg Solar Page I of2 STATE: NJ Funding Opportunity Announ~~menl Number P rocur~menlln5lrumenf Number- NEPA Control Number- CID Numbn COP 78.10 EEOOO3094 GF()'oo()3094-OO1 0 Bas~d on my review of the Information ~oncerning Ihe proposed action, as NEPA Complian~e Om~er (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA),1 have mad~ th~ following deter-mination : CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 8 5. 1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

407

Biological conversion of biomass to methane corn stover studies. Project report, December 1, 1977-August 1, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of experiments was conducted to determine the performance characteristics of the methane fermentation process using corn stover obtained from the University of Illinois farms and processed through four parallel fermenters each having a capacity of 775 liters. A continuous feed system was employed to determine the conversion efficiency. The dewatering characteristics of the effluents and the quality of the liquid and solid residues were determined. The biodegradability of corn stover is low. Data obtained at a fermentation temperature of 59 +-1/sup 0/C show that only 36 percent of the volatile solids are biodegradable. The first order rate constant for this conversion was found to be 0.25 day/sup -1/. Pretreatment with caustic (NaOH) concentration of 0.30 molar (5 g/100 g dry stover) and a temperature of 115/sup 0/C for one hour increased the biodegradable fraction to 71 percent of the volatile solids. The reactor slurries were easily dewatered by both vacuum filtration and centrifugation. Corn stover does not appear to be attractive economically at the present energy prices. At a chemical cost of $154/tonne ($140/ton), the NaOH pretreatment adds approximately $5.2/tonne to the cost of processing the stover. At a methane yield of 0.25 m/sup 3//kg of solids fed, this adds a total cost of $2/100 m/sup 3/ ($0.57/MCF) for this process alone. Addition of stover acquisition costs ($20/dry tonne of stover), total processing costs without gas cleanup ($21/tonne) and residue disposal ($3/tonne of wet cake), the cost of fuel gas would be in the neighborhood of $9.76/GJ ($10.30/10/sup 6/ Btu).This cost excludes all profit, taxes, etc. associated with private financing. Depending upon financing methods, tax incentives, etc., it may be necessary to add up to an additional $2.00/GJ to the cost of this fuel gas.

Pfeffer, J T; Quindry, G E

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U.S. Midwest Corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this report was peer reviewed by these contributors and their comments have been incorporated. Among key findings is that, for all cases examined on a mass emission per travel mile basis, the corn-to-ethanol fuel cycle for Midwest-produced ethanol utilized as both E85 and E10 outperforms that of conventional (current) and of reformulated (future) gasoline with respect to energy use and greenhouse gas production. In many cases, the superiority of the energy and GHG result is quite pronounced (i.e., well outside the range of model "noise")

Michael Wang Christopher; Michael Wang; Christopher Saricks

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CEN T ER NEPA DETERJ\IINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CEN CEN T ER NEPA DETERJ\IINATION REC)PIENT:Flint Geothermal LLC Page 1 of2 STATE: CO PROJECT TITLE: Recovery Act: Direct Confirmation of Commercial Geothermal Resources in Colorado using Remote Sensing and On·Site Exploration , Testing and Analysis Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number OE-FOA-OOOO109 DE-EEOOO2828 GFO-10-2S1 2828 BasC'd on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, 3S NEPA Compliance Omen (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the (ollowing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits). data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply and

410

u.s. DEPART1IENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EM ENT CEN T ER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EERE PROJECT MANAG EERE PROJECT MANAG EM ENT CEN T ER NEPA DETER1.IINATION RECIPIENT:TEXAS COMPTROLLER OF PUBLIC ACCOUNTS PROJECT TITLE: ARRA SEP CITY OF ADDISON TURBINE PROJECT Page 1 of2 STATE: TX Funding Opportunity AnDouncement Number Proc:urcmentlnstrumcnt Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE·EEOOOO116 EEOOOO116 EE116 Based on my review oftbe informatioll concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authoriud under DOE Order 4Sl.IA), I ban made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including. but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits). dala analysis (including computer modeling). document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

411

EERE PROJECT MAN AGEM ENT CENT ER NEPA DETEIU.IlNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

p-, ** p-, ** ~ , u.s DEPARTMENT OFENFRGY EERE PROJECT MAN AGEM ENT CENT ER NEPA DETEIU.IlNATION RECIPIENT:Simpson College; a SEP ARRA sub-recipient of the Iowa Economic Development Authority PROJECf TITLE: Simpson College Boiler Plant De-Centralization Page 1 of3 STATE: lA Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-OOOOO52 Procurement Instrument Number DE-EEOOOO162 NEPA Control Number em Number GF0-0000162-020 EE162 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed aelion, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 (a) Actions to conserve energy or water, demonstrate potential energy or water conservation, and promote energy

412

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT M ANAGEME T CEN T ER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ANAGEME T CEN ANAGEME T CEN T ER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:Hiawatha CUSD #426 PROJECf TITLE: Hiawatha GUSD #426 Part II Page 1 of2 STATE: IL Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOAOOOOO52 EEOOOO119 GFO-10-349 EE11 9 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical assistance to individuals (such as builders, owners

413

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEM ENT CEN T ER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AII.ol AII.ol ) U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEM ENT CEN T ER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPI ENT :Mass Department of Energy Resources PROJECf TITL E : SunShot Massachusetts Page 1 of2 ST ATE: MA Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number DE· FOA 0000549 DE-EEOOO5692 GFO-OOO5692-OO1 0 Based on my review of the information concerning tbe proposed adion, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order45I.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Oescript ion: A 11 Technical advice and assistance to organlzatlons Technical advice and planning assistance to intemational, national, state, and local organizations. A9 Info rmati on gathering, analys is, and dissemination

414

Audit Report: ER-B-98-07 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Audit Report: ER-B-98-07 April 6, 1998 Personal Property at the Oak Ridge Operations Office and the Office of Scientific and Technical Information The Oak Ridge Operations Office (Operations Office) and the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) are responsible for safeguarding and controlling personal property in their possession and in the possession of their contractors. Categories of personal property include vehicles, heavy mobile equipment, computers and software, office furniture and equipment, laboratory equipment, security and protection equipment, and shop equipment. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the Operations Office and OSTI adequately safeguarded and properly accounted for personal property in their possession and in the possession

415

US. DEPARTMENT OFENERGl: EE RE PROJECT MAN AG EME:-IT CENT ER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OFENERGl: OFENERGl: EE RE PROJECT MAN AG EME:-IT CENT ER NEP."' DETERMINATION REClPIENT:Oregon Department of Energy PROJECT TITLE: Estacada High School Page 1 of2 STI\T[: OR Funding Opportunity Announcement Numbe r Procuremtnllnslrumenl Number NEPA Control Number elo Number DE FDA 0000052 DE·EEOOOQ140 GFO-O000140-009 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEI'A Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.11\), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, [IS APPENDIX ANV NUMBER: Description: 65.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially hannful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

416

DEPARTIIIENT OF ENERGY EE RE PROJECT MANAG EM ENT CENT ER NEPA DETElThIINAIION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Irmo Irmo u.s. DEPARTIIIENT OF ENERGY EE RE PROJECT MANAG EM ENT CENT ER NEPA DETElThIINAIION PROJECT TITl.E: Irma Charing Cross Sidewalk Project ARRA-EECBG Page 1 of2 fJ Wl G) STATE: SC Funding Opportunity Announcement Number PrOCUT£ment Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number EEOOO0950/000 DE-EEOOOO950 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1 A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDlX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conselVe energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation , and promote energy.efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

417

T OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EM ENT CENT ER NEPA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARTJ\ffiN DEPARTJ\ffiN T OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EM ENT CENT ER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:BISON GEAR & ENG PROJECT TITLE; HYPOID GEAR MOTOR PLATFORM Page 1 of2 .; STATE: IL Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number DE-FOA-OOOOO52 EEOOOO1 19 EE119 Based on my review of the infonnation concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (aulhoriud under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following detennination: ex. EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: B5.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially hannful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

418

T OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AGEM ENT CEN T ER NEPA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARTMEN DEPARTMEN T OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AGEM ENT CEN T ER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:Heidtman Steel Products PROJECT TITLE: VVind Energy Industry Equipment Additions I STATE: IL funding Opportunity Announcement Number Pr()(urement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number elD Number DE-FOA-OOOOO52 EEOOOO119 EE119 Based on my review ofthe information concerning the proposed aetion, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Ordcr451.1A),1 have made the following determination: ex, EA, [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 8 1.31 Relocation of machinery and equipment, such as analytical laboratory apparatus, electronic hardware, maintenance equipment, and health and safety equipment, including minor construction necessary for removal and installation,

419

U.S. DEPARTlYIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT M ANAGEMENT CENT ER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

M M ANAGEMENT CENT ER NEPA DETERl\'.ITNATION Page 1 of2 RECIPIENT: The University of Utah STATE: UT PROJECT TITLE : A New Method for Low-cost Production of Titanium Alloys for Reducing Energy Consumption of Mechanical Systems Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-0000560 DE-EE0005761 GF0-0005761-001 G05761 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 45J.lA), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering, analysis, and dissemination Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits, and

420

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EM EN T CEN T ER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EN EN T CEN T ER NEPADETERMINATION RECIPIENT :Hudson Valley Community College; sub Suffolk Community College PROJECf TITLE: Northeast Photovoltaic Regional Training Provider Page 1 of2 STATE: NY Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number elO Number DE-EEOOO2087 DE-EEOOO2087 GF0-0002087-OO3 EE2087 Baud on my review orlhe information concerning tbe propos~ action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1 A), I have made the following determinatio n: ex, EA, [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 1 nform ation gathering, analysis, and dissemination Information gathering (induding, but not limited to, literature surveys, Inventories, site visits, and audits), data analysis (indudlng, but not limited 10, computer modeling). document preparation (including, but not limited to, conceptual design.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deadman corn er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT M ANAGEM ENT CENT ER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

M M ANAGEM ENT CENT ER NEPA DETERl\llNATION RECIPIENT:Texas Engineering Experiment Station Page 1 of2 STATE: TX PROJECT TITLE; Development of a Geological and Geomedlanical Framework for the Analysis of MEQ in EGS Experiments Funding Opportunity Announ('~mtnt Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number DE-FOA.()()O()075 DE-EEOOO2757 GFO-10-278 2757 Based on my review ollhe information concerning the proposw. action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A). I have made tbe following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling). document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

422

Audit Report: ER-B-99-02 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Audit Report: ER-B-99-02 January 25, 1999 Small Disadvantaged Business Program at the Chicago Operations Office The Small Business Act (Act) requires that small business concerns owned and controlled by socially or economically disadvantaged individuals have the maximum practicable opportunity to participate in contracts awarded by any Federal agency. Section 8(a) of the Act establishes a program that authorizes the Small Business Administration (SBA) to enter into contracts with other agencies and award subcontracts for performing those contracts to firms enrolled in the 8(a) Program directly to the agencies. Contracts are to be awarded competitively if the anticipated award price of the contract will exceed $3 million and at least two responsible 8(a) firms

423

FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GRANT DE-FG05-94ER14464  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REPORT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GRANT DE-FG05-94ER14464 INFRARED ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY AND CHEMICAL KINETICS OF FREE RADICALS Principal Investigators: Robert F. Curl and Graham P. Glass Department of Chemistry and Rice Quantum Institute Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (713)348-4816 (713)348-3285 rfcurl@rice.edu gglass@rice.edu November 2004 PROGRAM SCOPE This research was directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of the chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. Work on the reaction of OH with acetaldehyde has been completed and published and work on the reaction of O( 1 D) with CH 4 has been completed and submitted for publication. In the course of our investigation of branching

424

U.S. DEPARTIIIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CEN T ER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARTIIIENT OF ENERGY DEPARTIIIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CEN T ER NEPA DETERl'dINATION RECIPIENT:Sacramento Municipal Utility District PROJECf TITLE: CRED - SMUD: New Hope Dairy STATE: CA Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-OOOO122 Procurement Instrument Number DE-EEOOO3070 NEPA Control Number CID Number o Based on my review oftbe information concerning tbe proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (suCh as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

425

Audit Report: ER-B-99-05 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Audit Report: ER-B-99-05 April 8, 1999 Westinghouse Savannah River Company's Withdrawal of Fees As the operator of the Department's Savannah River Site, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (Westinghouse) receives three types of fees: (1) award fees commensurate with the overall performance rating, (2) Performance Based Incentive (PBI) fees for achieving measurable goals or defined tasks as specified in annual operating plans, and (3) Cost Reduction Incentive Program (CRIP) fees for making improvements in site operations that reduce total contract costs. The Department's Contracting Officer notifies Westinghouse when fees are earned, and Westinghouse withdraws the authorized amounts from the Department's letter-of-credit account. The audit objective was to determine whether Westinghouse withdrew

426

.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EE RE PROJECT MANAGEM ENT CEN T ER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EE EE RE PROJECT MANAGEM ENT CEN T ER NEPA DETERl\IINATION t'age I or L RECIPIENT:Govornor's Energy Office STATE: CO PROJECT TITLE: COLORADO SEP ARRA - Commercial Buildings - Denver Housing Authority Funding Opportunity Announc:ement Number DE-FOA-OOOOO52 Procurement Instrument Number DE-EE0000082 NEPA Control Number GFO-OOOOO82-011 cm Number o Ba~d on my review of the information c:onc:erning the proposed ac:tion, as NEPA Complianc:e Officer (authorized under OOE Order 4St.IA), t haYe made the (allowing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85. 1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

427

u.s. DEPARTlIlENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEM ENT CENT ER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARTlIlENT OF ENERGY DEPARTlIlENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEM ENT CENT ER NEPA DFTFRlIllNATION Page 1 of2 RECIPIENT:City of Cleveland· Division of Engineering & Construction STATE: OH PROJECT TITLE: Cleveland City ARRA·EECBG Act 9 (Lake-to--Lake Bikeway) Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number cm Number OE·EEOOOO705 0 Based on my review oflhe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA), [have made the following determination: CX, EA, E[S APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A11 Technical advice and planning assistance to internaUonal, national, stale, and local organizations, A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including

428

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENT ER NEPA DETERl'dINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CENT CENT ER NEPA DETERl'dINATION RECIPIENT:Ohio Department of Development PROJECT TITLE: SEP ARRA - Targeting Industrial Efficiency - Reliable Castings Corporation Page 1 of2 STATE: OH Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procuremenllnstrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-EEOOOO165 EEOOOO165 GFO-O000165-021 GOO Based on my review arlhe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

429

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EMENT CEN T ER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CEN CEN T ER NEPA DETERl\IINATION Page 1 of2 RECIPIENT:King County PROJECT YWCA Family Village at Issaquah STATE: WA TITLE: Funding Opportunity Announcement Num~r Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-OOOOO13 DE-EEOOOO854 EEO Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 82.1 Modifications of an existing structure to enhance workplace habitability (including, but not limited to: improvements to lighting, radiation shielding, or heatinglventilatingl air conditioning and its instrumentation; and noise reduction ). 82.5 Safety and environmental improvements of a facility, including replacement and upgrade of facility components, that do

430

Final Report 94ER75989 [U.S. DOE-FCCSET-Summer Teaching Enhancement Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final report for the interagency agreement between the Department of Energy and NASA, 94ER75989, titled U.S. DOE-FCCSET-Summer Teaching Enhancement Program. Our goal to enhance the classroom Instruction in the earth and environmental science programs in the secondary schools of the state of Maryland. The participation of 72 teachers of secondary school students were collaborative partners with the 24 local Maryland School System, the Maryland State Department of Education, the University of Maryland, and the Goddard Space Flight Center. The program enabled these teachers the opportunity to attend a four-week program to enhance the teaching of the earth and environmental sciences in the secondary schools of Maryland. Participants learned how earth systems are studied both from the ground station earth monitoring project and continued it during the school year with their students. Each teacher served as an ambassador for earth science teaching enhancement in their respective school and school system.

NONE

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

431

Fermi Surface Evolution Across Multiple Charge Density Wave Transitions in ErTe3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fermi surface (FS) of ErTe{sub 3} is investigated using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Low temperature measurements reveal two incommensurate charge density wave (CDW) gaps created by perpendicular FS nesting vectors. A large {Delta}{sub 1} = 175 meV gap arising from a CDW with c* - q{sub CDW1} {approx} 0.70(0)c* is in good agreement with the expected value. A second, smaller {Delta}{sub 2} = 50 meV gap is due to a second CDW with a* - q{sub CDW2} {approx} 0.68(5)a*. The temperature dependence of the FS, the two gaps and possible interaction between the CDWs are examined.

Moore, R.G.; /SLAC, SSRL /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Brouet, V.; /Orsay, LPS; He, R.; /SLAC, SSRL /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Lu, D.H.; /SLAC, SSRL; Ru, N.; Chu, J.-H.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Shen, Z.-X.; /SLAC, SSRL /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

T OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT M ANAGEM ENT CENT ER NEPA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARThIEN DEPARThIEN T OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT M ANAGEM ENT CENT ER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPI ENT:TEXAS COMPTROLLER OF PUBLIC ACCOUNTS PROJECT TITLE: ARRA SEP CITY OF SEADRI FT Page I of2 STATE: TX Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procunment Instrument Number NEPA Control Number eln Number DE-EEOOOO116 EEOOOO11 6 0 Based on my review o(lhe infonnalion concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized uodu DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits). data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

433

Audit Report: ER-B-99-01 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Audit Report: ER-B-99-01 December 21, 1998 Decontamination and Decommissioning at the East Tennessee Technology Park The East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) contains about 400 buildings with approximately 14.4 million square feet of space. Almost 90 percent of the space is comprised of buildings that are currently undergoing or are planned for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). Departmental policy requires that D&D projects be prioritized based on employee and public health and safety, protection of the environment, compliance with environmental laws and regulations, cost-effectiveness, and future site plans. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the Oak Ridge Operations Office (Operations Office) reduced health, safety, and

434

Completion Report for Model Evaluation Well ER-11-2: Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Model Evaluation Well ER-11-2 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of Nevada Environmental Management Operations at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site). The well was drilled in August 2012 as part of a model evaluation program in the Frenchman Flat area of Nye County, Nevada. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed geologic, hydrogeologic, chemical, and radionuclide data that can be used to test and build confidence in the applicability of the Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit flow and transport models for their intended purpose. In particular, this well was designed to provide data to evaluate the uncertainty in model forecasts of contaminant migration from the upgradient underground nuclear test PIN STRIPE, conducted in borehole U-11b in 1966. Well ER-11-2 will provide information that can be used to refine the Phase II Frenchman Flat hydrostratigraphic framework model if necessary, as well as to support future groundwater flow and transport modeling. The main 31.1-centimeter (cm) hole was drilled to a total depth of 399.6 meters (m). A completion casing string was not set in Well ER-11-2. However, a piezometer string was installed in the 31.1-cm open hole. The piezometer is composed of 7.3-cm stainless-steel tubing hung on 6.0-cm carbon-steel tubing via a crossover sub. The piezometer string was landed at 394.5 m, for monitoring the lower tuff confining unit. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 m, various geophysical logs, water quality (including tritium and other test-related radionuclides) measurements, and water level measurements. The well penetrated 42.7 m of Quaternary and Tertiary alluvium and 356.9 m of Tertiary volcanic rock. The water-level measured in the piezometer string on September 25, 2012, was 353.8 m below ground surface. No tritium above levels detectable by field methods were encountered in this hole. No well development or hydrologic testing was conducted in this well immediately after completion, and future well development, sampling, and hydrologic testing planned for this well will be limited due to the diameter of the piezometer string. The stratigraphy, general lithology, and the water level are as expected, but the section of geology encountered is higher than expected due to faulting. No tritium above the minimum detection limit of the field equipment was detected because the target aquifer (the Topopah Spring aquifer) at Well ER-11-2 is structurally higher than expected and thus unsaturated.

NSTec Underground Test Area and Boreholes Programs and Operations

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

435

Summary of Findings from the Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation (CAFI): Corn Stover Pretreatment  

SciTech Connect

The Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation, with members from Auburn University, Dartmouth College, Michigan State University, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Purdue University, Texas A&M University, the University of British Columbia, and the University of California at Riverside, has developed comparative data on the conversion of corn stover to sugars by several leading pretreatment technologies. These technologies include ammonia fiber expansion pretreatment, ammonia recycle percolation pretreatment, dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment, flowthrough pretreatment (hot water or dilute acid), lime pretreatment, controlled pH hot water pretreatment, and sulfur dioxide steam explosion pretreatment. Over the course of two separate USDA- and DOE-funded projects, these pretreatment technologies were applied to two different corn stover batches, followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of the remaining solids from each pretreatment technology using identical enzyme preparations, enzyme loadings, and enzymatic hydrolysis assays. Identical analytical methods and a consistent material balance methodology were employed to develop comparative sugar yield data for each pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Although there were differences in the profiles of sugar release, with the more acidic pretreatments releasing more xylose directly in the pretreatment step than the alkaline pretreatments, the overall glucose and xylose yields (monomers + oligomers) from combined pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis process steps were very similar for all of these leading pretreatment technologies. Some of the water-only and alkaline pretreatment technologies resulted in significant amounts of residual xylose oligomers still remaining after enzymatic hydrolysis that may require specialized enzyme preparations to fully convert xylose oligomers to monomers.

Elander, R. T.; Dale, B. E.; Holtzapple, M.; Ladisch, M. R.; Lee, Y. Y.; Mitchinson, C.; Saddler, J. N.; Wyman, C. E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Land Use Changes and Consequent CO2 Emissions due to US Corn Ethanol Production: A Comprehensive Analysis* By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are deeply indebted to Dr. Michael Wang for his many contributions to this research. Throughout the process, he has consistently posed excellent questions that have stimulated more thinking and modifications on our part. Also, for this final paper, he provided an excellent set of insightful suggestions and comments that have improved the paper significantly. Of course, the authors are solely responsible for the content of and any errors in the report. **The original April report was revised because in the review process errors were found in the magnitudes of the EU and Brazil ethanol shocks in moving from the 2001 data base to the updated 2006 data base. The impacts of the errors were small. However, we revised the report to reflect the corrected shocks. The model versions posted on the web include the corrected values and are consistent with this report. Executive Summary The basic objective of this research was to estimate land use changes associated with US corn ethanol production up to the 15 billion gallon Renewable Fuel Standard level implied by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. We also used the estimated land use changes to calculate Greenhouse Gas Emissions associated with the corn ethanol production. The main model that was used for the analysis is a special version of the Global Trade

Wallace E. Tyner; Farzad Taheripour; Qianlai Zhuang; Dileep Birur; Uris Baldos

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Radiometric Validation of ERS-1 Along-Track Scanning Radiometer Average Sea Surface Temperature in the Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ERS-1 along-track scanning radiometer (ATSR) provides a half-degree latitude by half-degree longitude average sea surface temperature (ASST) measurement representative of the thermal skin layer of the ocean that is intended for use in global ...

Craig J. Donlon; Ian S. Robinson

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Consistency of Geosat, SSM/I, and ERS-1 Global Surface Wind Speeds—Comparison with In Situ Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors compare wind speed retrieved from the Geosat altimeter, from two Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) microwave radiometers. The SSM/I F08 and SSM/I F10, and from the European Space Agency ERS-1 scatterometer. As ground truth, ship ...

J. Boutin; J. Etcheto

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Octave-spanning supercontinuum generation for an er-doped fiber laser frequency comb at a 1 ghz repetition rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We developed a 1 GHz Er-doped femtosecond fiber laser system providing 2nJ pulses at [equivalence relation symbol]100fs durations and demonstrated octave-spanning supercontinuum generation from 1µm - 2.4µm that is suitable ...

Chao, David

440

The crystal structure of {pi}-ErBO{sub 3}: New single-crystal data for an old problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single crystals of the orthoborate {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} were synthesized from Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} under high-pressure/high-temperature conditions of 2 GPa and 800 {sup o}C in a Walker-type multianvil apparatus. The crystal structure was determined on the basis of single-crystal X-ray diffraction data, collected at room temperature. The title compound crystallizes in the monoclinic pseudowollastonite-type structure, space group C2/c, with the lattice parameters a=1128.4(2) pm, b=652.6(2) pm, c=954.0(2) pm, and {beta}=112.8(1){sup o} (R{sub 1}=0.0124 and wR{sub 2}=0.0404 for all data). -- graphical abstract: The first satisfying single-crystal structure determination of {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} sheds light on the extensively discussed structure of {pi}-orthoborates. The application of light pressure during the solid state synthesis yielded in high-quality crystals, due to pressure-induced crystallization. Research highlights: {yields} High-quality single crystals of {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} were prepared via high-pressure-induced crystallization. {yields} At least five different space groups for the rare-earth {pi}-orthoborates are reported. {yields} {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} is isotypic to the pseudowollastonite-type CaSiO{sub 3}. {yields} Remaining ambiguities regarding the structure of the rare-earth {pi}-orthoborates are resolved.

Pitscheider, Almut [Institut fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kaindl, Reinhard [Institut fuer Mineralogie und Petrographie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Oeckler, Oliver [Department Chemie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Butenandtstrasse 5-13, D-81377 Muenchen (Germany); Huppertz, Hubert, E-mail: Hubert.Huppertz@uibk.ac.a [Institut fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deadman corn er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Evaluation of a Process-Based Agro-Ecosystem Model (Agro-IBIS) across the U.S. Corn Belt: Simulations of the Interannual Variability in Maize Yield  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process-based terrestrial ecosystem model, Agro-IBIS, was used to simulate maize yield in a 13-state region of the U.S. Corn Belt from 1958 to 1994 across a 0.5° terrestrial grid. For validation, county-level census [U.S. Department of ...

Christopher J. Kucharik

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Rapid Changes in Soil Carbon and Structural Properties Due to Stover Removal from No-Till Corn Plots  

SciTech Connect

Harvesting corn (Zea mays L.) stover for producing ethanol may be beneficial to palliate the dependence on fossil fuels and reduce CO2 emissions to the atmosphere, but stover harvesting may deplete soil organic carbon (SOC) and degrade soil structure. We investigated the impacts of variable rates of stover removal from no-till (NT) continuous corn systems on SOC and soil structural properties after 1 year of stover removal in three soils in Ohio: Rayne silt loam (fine-loamy, mixed, active, mesic Typic Hapludults) at Coshocton, Hoytville clay loam (fine, illitic, mesic Mollic Epiaqualfs) at Hoytville, and Celina silt loam (fine, mixed, active, mesic Aquic Hapludalfs) at South Charleston. This study also assessed relationships between SOC and soil structural properties as affected by stover management. Six stover treatments that consisted of removing 100, 75, 50, 25, and 0, and adding 100% of corn stover corresponding to 0 (T0), 1.25 (T1.25), 2.50 (T2.5), 3.75 (T3.75), 5.00 (T5), and 10.00 (T10) Mg haj1 of stover, respectively, were studied for their total SOC concentration, bulk density (>b), aggregate stability, and tensile strength (TS) of aggregates. Effects of stover removal on soil properties were rapid and significant in the 0- to 5-cm depth, although the magnitude of changes differed among soils after only 1 year of stover removal. The SOC concentration declined with increase in removal rates in silt loams but not in clay loam soils. It decreased by 39% at Coshocton and 30% at Charleston within 1 year of complete stover removal. At the same sites, macroaggregates contained 10% to 45% more SOC than microaggregates. Stover removal reduced 94.75-mm macroaggregates and increased microaggregates (P G 0.01). Mean weight diameter (MWD) and TS of aggregates in soils without stover (T0) were 1.7 and 3.3 times lower than those in soils with normal stover treatments (T5) across sites. The SOC concentration was negatively correlated with >b and positively with MWD and LogTS. Stover removal at rates as low as 1.25 Mg haj1 reduced SOC and degraded soil structure even within 1 year, but further monitoring is needed to establish threshold levels of stover removal in relation to changes in soil quality.

Blanco-Canqui, H; Lal, Rattan; Post, W M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Owens, L B.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

AN EAR FOR YOUR QUOTES PATENT CITATIONS AND THE SIZE OF PATENTED INVENTIONS, EVIDENCE FROM HYBRID CORN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper links applications for utility patents between 1985 and 2005 with field trial data on improvements in yields to examine whether citations are a good measure for the size of the “inventive step, ” measured as improvements in yield. These data indicate that a large and robust correlation between citations and the size of improvements. In the most conservative estimates, a 10 percent increase in yields is associated with 1.7 additional citations, implying a 24 percent increase. A small number of highly cited patents appear to be cited mostly to establish the patentability of corn hybrids. Estimates that exclude these patents indicate that a 10 percent in yields is associated with 1.2 additional citations, implying a 34 percent increase. Analyses of claims and renewal data as alternative measures of patent value suggest that citations are in fact the most informative measure for the size of patented inventions.

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Analysis of Well ER-6-2 Testing, Yucca Flat FY 2004 Testing Program, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the analysis of data collected for Well ER-6-2 during fiscal year (FY) 2004 Yucca Flat well development and testing program (herein referred to as the ''testing program''). Participants in Well ER-6-2 field development and hydraulic testing activities were: Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), Bechtel Nevada (BN), Desert Research Institute (DRI), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas-Harry Reid Center (UNLV-HRC). The analyses of data collected from the Well ER-6-2 testing program were performed by the SNJV.

Greg Ruskauff

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

THERMODYNAMIC AND KINETIC MODELING OF ADVANCED NUCLEAR FUELS - FINAL LDRD-ER REPORT  

SciTech Connect

This project enhanced our theoretical capabilities geared towards establishing the basic science of a high-throughput protocol for the development of advanced nuclear fuel that should couple modern computational materials modeling and simulation tools, fabrication and characterization capabilities, and targeted high throughput performance testing experiments. The successful conclusion of this ER project allowed us to upgrade state-of-the-art modeling codes, and apply these modeling tools to ab initio energetics and thermodynamic assessments of phase diagrams of various mixtures of actinide alloys, propose a tool for optimizing composition of complex alloys for specific properties, predict diffusion behavior in diffusion couples made of actinide and transition metals, include one new equation in the LLNL phase-field AMPE code, and predict microstructure evolution during alloy coring. In FY11, despite limited funding, the team also initiated an experimental activity, with collaboration from Texas A&M University by preparing samples of nuclear fuels in bulk forms and for diffusion couple studies and metallic matrices, and performing preliminary characterization.

Turchi, P

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

446

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NFPA DE'fER],llNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DE'fER],llNATION DE'fER],llNATION RECIPIENT:Oklahoma Department of Commerce PROJECf TITLE : OKLAHOMA SEP ANNUAL - PY12 Page I on STATE: OK Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Inst.-ument Number NEPA Control Number CIO Number DE-FOA-OOOO643 NT43203 GFQ-0043203-Q01 Based on my review oflhe Information cODccming the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination : ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A11 Technical advice and assistance to organizations A9 Information gathering, analysis, and dissemination Rational for detennination: Technical advice and planning assistance to international, national, state, and local organizations. Information gathering (induding. but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits, and

447

To: Rebecca Peterson, ERS2014@eia.gov Re: Public Comments on Form EIA-861, ''Annual Electric Power Industry Report''  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

To: Rebecca Peterson, ERS2014@eia.gov To: Rebecca Peterson, ERS2014@eia.gov Re: Public Comments on Form EIA-861, ''Annual Electric Power Industry Report'' From: Volunteer members of the Large Public Power Council Energy Efficiency Working Group (LPPC EEWG) Benchmarking Subcommittee, led by: ï‚· Subcommittee Chair Norman Muraya (Austin Energy) norman.muraya@austinenergy.com, ï‚· Member Tom Gross (Orlando Utilities Commission) tgross@ouc.com, and ï‚· Facilitated by Annika Brink (Alliance to Save Energy/Clean and Efficient Energy Program for Public Power) abrink@ase.org. Over the course of the past year, the LPPC EEWG's Benchmarking Subcommittee has leveraged data from Form EIA-861, Schedule 6 to benchmark the energy efficiency activities and performance of LPPC

448

Completion Report for the Well ER-6-2 Site Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat - Climax Mine  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-6-2 and its satellite hole, Well ER-6-2 No.1, were drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Well ER-6-2 was drilled in two stages in 1993 and 1994; the satellite hole, Well ER-6-2 No.1 was drilled nearby in 1993 but was abandoned. The wells were drilled as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit Number 97, in the northeastern portion of the Nevada Test Site. The wells are located in Yucca Flat, within Area 6 of the Nevada Test Site. The wells provided information regarding the radiological and hydrogeological environment in a potentially down-gradient position from tests conducted in northern and central Yucca Flat. Construction of Well ER-6-2 began with a 1.2-meter-diameter surface conductor hole, which was drilled and cased off to a depth of 30.8 meters below the surface. A 50.8-centimeter diameter surface hole was then rotary drilled to the depth of 578.5 meters and cased off to the depth of 530.4 meters. The hole diameter was then reduced to 27.0 centimeters, and the borehole was advanced to a temporary depth of 611.4 meters. The borehole was conventionally cored to a total depth of 1,045 meters with a diameter of 14.0 centimeters. Borehole sloughing required cementing and re-drilling of several zones. The open-hole completion accesses the lower carbonate aquifer, the CP thrust fault, and the upper clastic confining unit. A fluid level depth of 543.2 meters was most recently measured in the open borehole in September 2007. No radionuclides were encountered during drilling. The satellite hole Well ER-6-2 No.1 was drilled approximately 15.2 meters north of Well ER-6-2 on the same drill pad. This was planned to be used as an observation well during future hydrologic testing at Well ER-6-2; however, the satellite hole was abandoned at the depth of 399 meters due to stuck drill pipe, and was subsequently cemented to the surface. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments in this report are based on composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters, cores taken between the depths of 619.3 and 1,042.4 meters, and geophysical log data. Stratigraphic assignments within the Paleozoic section are based on paleontological analyses. The well was collared in alluvium and at 30.8 meters penetrated Paleozoic carbonate rocks. These consisted of dolostone with minor shale and limestone of the Bonanza King Formation, and limestone with minor quartzite, sandstone, and dolostone assigned to the Guilmette Formation. The borehole reached total depth in a shale unit assigned to the Chainman Shale. The units below the Bonanza King Formation are overturned due to faulting and folding and, therefore, are stratigraphically upside-down.

NSTec Environmental Management

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Analysis of ER-12-3 FY 2005 Hydrologic Testing, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the analysis of data collected for ER-12-3 during the fiscal year (FY) 2005 Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain well development and hydraulic testing program (herein referred to as the ''testing program''). Well ER-12-3 was constructed and tested as a part of the Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99, Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Phase I drilling program during FY 2005. These activities were conducted on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. As shown on Figure 1-1, ER-12-3 is located in central Rainier Mesa, in Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Figure 1-2 shows the well location in relation to the tunnels under Rainier Mesa. The well was drilled to a total depth (TD) of 4,908 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs) (surface elevation 7,390.8 ft above mean sea level [amsl]) in the area of several tunnels mined into Rainier Mesa that were used historically for nuclear testing (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The closest nuclear test to the well location was YUBA (U-12b.10), conducted in the U-12b Tunnel approximately 1,529 ft northeast of the well site. The YUBA test working point elevation was located at approximately 6,642 ft amsl. The YUBA test had an announced yield of 3.1 kilotons (kt) (SNJV, 2006b). The purpose of this hydrogeologic investigation well is to evaluate the deep Tertiary volcanic section below the tunnel level, which is above the regional water table, and to provide information on the section of the lower carbonate aquifer-thrust plate (LCA3) located below the Tertiary volcanic section (SNJV, 2005b). Details on the drilling and completion program are presented in the ''Completion Report for Well ER-12-3 Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa - Shoshone Mountain'' (NNSA/NSO, 2006). Development and hydraulic testing of ER-12-3 took place between June 3 and July 22, 2005. The development objectives included removing residual drilling fluids and improving the hydraulic connection of the well within the lower carbonate aquifer (LCA). The hydraulic testing objectives focused on obtaining further hydrogeologic, geochemical, and radiochemical data for the site. Details on the data collected during the testing program are presented in the report ''Rainier Mesa Well ER-12-3 Data Report for Well Development and Hydraulic Testing'' (SNJV, 2006b). Participants in ER-12-3 testing activities were: Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), Bechtel Nevada (BN), Desert Research Institute (DRI), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture served as the lead contractor responsible for providing site supervision, development and testing services, and waste management services; BN provided construction and engineering support services; DRI provided well logging services and participated in groundwater sampling and laboratory analyses; LANL and LLNL participated in groundwater sampling and laboratory analyses; and the USGS performed laboratory analyses. Analyses of data from the ER-12-3 testing program presented in this document were performed by SNJV except as noted.

Bill Fryer

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DE1'ER.1.nNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

'ER.1.nNATION 'ER.1.nNATION RECIPIENT:Pacific intemational Center for High Technology Research PROJECT TITL.E: Hawaii Renewable Energy Development Venture Page1of4 STATE: HI Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FG36-08G088146 GFO-G088146-005 G088146 Based on my review orthe information concerning tbe proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Ordn451.IA), I hne made tbe following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 8 3.6 Siting, construction (or modification). operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and oonveotionallaboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis);

451

Audit of Work Force Restructuring at the Fernald Environmental Management Project, ER-B-96-01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Inspector General AUDIT OF WORK FORCE RESTRUCTURING AT THE FERNALD ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PROJECT Report Number: ER-B-96-01 Eastern Regional Audit Office Date of Issue: April 23, 1996 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 AUDIT OF WORK FORCE RESTRUCTURING AT THE FERNALD ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PROJECT TABLE OF CONTENTS Page SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 PART I - APPROACH AND OVERVIEW 3 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Scope and Methodology . . . . . . . . 3

452

Luminescence, energy transfer, and upconversion mechanisms of Y2O3nanomaterials doped with Eu3+, Tb3+, Tm3+, Er3+, and Yb3+Ions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Luminescence, energy transfer, and upconversion mechanisms of nanophosphors (Y2O3:Eu3+, Tb3+, Y2O3:Tm3+, Y2O3:Er3+, Yb3+) both in ...

TranKim Anh; Paul Benalloul; Charles Barthou; Lam ThiKieu Giang; Nguyen Vu; LeQuoc Minh

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Evaluation of the ERS Scatterometer-Derived Soil Water Index to Monitor Water Availability and Precipitation Distribution at Three Different Scales in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the capability of the European Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS) scatterometer-derived soil water index (SWI) data to disclose water availability and precipitation distribution in China is investigated. Monthly averaged SWI data for ...

Deming Zhao; Claudia Kuenzer; Congbin Fu; Wolfgang Wagner

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Final Report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-06ER64160 Retrieval of Cloud Properties and Direct Testing of Cloud and Radiation Parameterizations using ARM Observations.  

SciTech Connect

This report briefly summaries the work performed at KNMI under DOE Grant DE-FG02-06ER64160 which, in turn was conducted in support of DOE Grant DE-FG02-90ER61071 lead by E. Clothieux of Penn. State U. The specific work at KNMI revolved around the development and application of the EarthCARE simulator to ground-based multi-sensor simulations.

Donovan, David Patrick [KNMI

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

455

Completion Report for Model Evaluation Well ER-5-5: Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Model Evaluation Well ER-5-5 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of Nevada Environmental Management Operations at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site). The well was drilled in July and August 2012 as part of a model evaluation well program in the Frenchman Flat area of Nye County, Nevada. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed geologic, hydrogeologic, chemical, and radiological data that can be used to test and build confidence in the applicability of the Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit flow and transport models for their intended purpose. In particular, this well was designed to obtain data to evaluate the uncertainty in model forecasts of contaminant migration from the upgradient underground nuclear test MILK SHAKE, conducted in Emplacement Hole U-5k in 1968, which were considered to be uncertain due to the unknown extent of a basalt lava-flow aquifer present in this area. Well ER-5-5 is expected to provide information to refine the Phase II Frenchman Flat hydrostratigraphic framework model, if necessary, as well as to support future groundwater flow and transport modeling. The 31.1-centimeter (cm) diameter hole was drilled to a total depth of 331.3 meters (m). The completion string, set at the depth of 317.2 m, consists of 16.8-cm stainless-steel casing hanging from 19.4-cm carbon-steel casing. The 16.8-cm stainless-steel casing has one slotted interval open to the basalt lava-flow aquifer and limited intervals of the overlying and underlying alluvial aquifer. A piezometer string was also installed in the annulus between the completion string and the borehole wall. The piezometer is composed of 7.3-cm stainless-steel tubing suspended from 6.0-cm carbon-steel tubing. The piezometer string was landed at 319.2 m, to monitor the basalt lava-flow aquifer. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 m, various geophysical logs, preliminary water quality measurements, and water-level measurements. The well penetrated 331.3 m of Quaternary–Tertiary alluvium, including an intercalated layer of saturated basalt lava rubble. No well development or hydrologic testing was conducted in this well immediately after completion; however, a preliminary water level was measured in the piezometer string at the depth of 283.4 m on September 25, 2012. No tritium above the minimum detection limit of the field instruments was detected in this hole. Future well development, sampling, and hydrologic testing planned for this well will provide more accurate hydrologic information for this site. The stratigraphy, general lithology, and water level were as expected, though the expected basalt lava-flow aquifer is basalt rubble and not the dense, fractured lava as modeled. The lack of tritium transport is likely due to the difference in hydraulic properties of the basalt lava-flow rubble encountered in the well, compared to those of the fractured aquifer used in the flow and transport models.

NSTec Underground Test Area and Boreholes Programs and Operations

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

456

10/7/12 The Pow er of Seaw eed -India Real Time -WSJ October 1, 2012, 10:00 AM IST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

needs from green energy. Today, biofuels account for only 3% of total fuel use. India's biofuels target material for biofuel. Green fuels have typically been made from palm oil or corn. But now there's growing evidence that seaweed might fit the bill as a raw material for biofuel, and one Indian entrepreneur

Bhalla, Upinder S.

457

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF) is a facility safety reference document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) environmental restoration activities. The BSAF contains information and guidance for safety analysis documentation required by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for environmental restoration (ER) activities, including: Characterization of potentially contaminated sites. Remedial investigations to identify and remedial actions to clean up existing and potential releases from inactive waste sites Decontamination and dismantlement of surplus facilities. The information is INEL-specific and is in the format required by DOE-EM-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports. An author of safety analysis documentation need only write information concerning that activity and refer to BSAF for further information or copy applicable chapters and sections. The information and guidance provided are suitable for: {sm_bullet} Nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480-23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) with hazards that meet the Category 3 threshold (DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) {sm_bullet} Radiological facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94, Hazard Baseline Documentation) Nonnuclear facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94) that are classified as {open_quotes}low{close_quotes} hazard facilities (DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System). Additionally, the BSAF could be used as an information source for Health and Safety Plans and for Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) for nuclear facilities with hazards equal to or greater than the Category 2 thresholds, or for nonnuclear facilities with {open_quotes}moderate{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} hazard classifications.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Completion Report for Well ER-12-3 Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa - Shoshone Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well ER-12-3 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in March and April 2005 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Rainier Mesa-Shoshone Mountain Corrective Action Unit. The overall purpose of the well was to gather subsurface data to better characterize the hydrogeology of central Rainier Mesa, especially in the older Tertiary volcanic rocks and Paleozoic sedimentary rocks. The main 47.0-centimeter hole was drilled to a depth of 799.2 meters and cased with 33.97-centimeter casing to 743.1 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters, and the well was drilled to a total depth of 1,496.0 meters. The completion string consisted of 13.97-centimeter stainless steel casing, with two slotted intervals open to the lower carbonate aquifer, suspended from 19.37-centimeter carbon steel casing. A piezometer string was installed outside the 33.97-centimeter casing to a depth of 467.1 meters to monitor a zone of perched water within the Tertiary volcanic section. Data gathered during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters (extra cuttings samples were collected from the Paleozoic rocks for paleontological analyses), sidewall core samples from 35 depths, various geophysical logs, and water level measurements. These data indicate that the well penetrated 674.2 meters of Tertiary volcanic rocks and 821.7 meters of Paleozoic dolomite and limestone. Forty-nine days after the well was completed, but prior to well development and testing, the water level inside the main hole was tagged at the depth of 949.1 meters, and the water level inside the piezometer string was tagged at 379.9 meters.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada Corporation

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Direct application of west coast geothermal resources in a wet corn milling plant supplementary analyses and information dissemination. Final report, addendum  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In an extension to the scope of the previous studies, supplementary analyses were to be performed for both plants which would assess the economics of geothermal energy if coal had been the primary fuel rather than oil and gas. The studies include: supplementary analysis for a coal fired wet corn milling plant, supplementary analysis for an East Coast frozen food plant with coal fired boilers, and information dissemination activities.

Not Available

1982-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

460

Nitrogen Fertilizer Management for Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mitigation in Intensive Corn (Maize) Production: An Emissions Reduction Proto col for US Midwest Agriculture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Status: Published Citation: Millar, N; Robertson, GP; Grace, PR; Gehl, RJ; and Hoben, JP. 2010. Nitrogen Fertilizer Management for Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mitigation in Intensive Corn (Maize) Production: An Emissions Reduction Protocol for US Midwest Agriculture. In Journal of Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change,Volume 15, Number 2, 2010, pp. 185-204. Link to Journal Publication: See Journal of Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change.

2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "deadman corn er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Nitrogen Fertilizer Management for Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mitigation in Intensive Corn (Maize) Production: An Emissions Redu ction Protocol for U.S. Midwest Agriculture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Status: Published Citation: Millar, N; Robertson, GP; Grace, PR; Gehl, RJ; and Hoben; JP. 2010. Nitrogen Fertilizer Management for Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mitigation in Intensive Corn (Maize) Production: An Emissions Reduction Protocol for U.S. Midwest Agriculture. In Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Volume 15, Number 2, 2010, pp. 185-204. A peer-reviewed journal article that identifies, describes and analyzes socio-economic factors that may encourage or inhibit farmers from participat...

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

462

Comparative Study of Corn Stover Pretreated by Dilute Acid and Cellulose Solvent-Based Lignocellulose Fractionation: Enzymatic Hydrolysis, Supramolecular Structure, and Substrate Accessibility  

SciTech Connect

Liberation of fermentable sugars from recalcitrant biomass is among the most costly steps for emerging cellulosic ethanol production. Here we compared two pretreatment methods (dilute acid, DA, and cellulose solvent and organic solvent lignocellulose fractionation, COSLIF) for corn stover. At a high cellulase loading [15 filter paper units (FPUs) or 12.3 mg cellulase per gram of glucan], glucan digestibilities of the corn stover pretreated by DA and COSLIF were 84% at hour 72 and 97% at hour 24, respectively. At a low cellulase loading (5 FPUs per gram of glucan), digestibility remained as high as 93% at hour 24 for the COSLIF-pretreated corn stover but reached only {approx}60% for the DA-pretreated biomass. Quantitative determinations of total substrate accessibility to cellulase (TSAC), cellulose accessibility to cellulase (CAC), and non-cellulose accessibility to cellulase (NCAC) based on adsorption of a non-hydrolytic recombinant protein TGC were measured for the first time. The COSLIF-pretreated corn stover had a CAC of 11.57 m{sup 2}/g, nearly twice that of the DA-pretreated biomass (5.89 m{sup 2}/g). These results, along with scanning electron microscopy images showing dramatic structural differences between the DA- and COSLIF-pretreated samples, suggest that COSLIF treatment disrupts microfibrillar structures within biomass while DA treatment mainly removes hemicellulose. Under the tested conditions COSLIF treatment breaks down lignocellulose structure more extensively than DA treatment, producing a more enzymatically reactive material with a higher CAC accompanied by faster hydrolysis rates and higher enzymatic digestibility.

Zhu, Z.; Sathitsuksanoh, N.; Vinzant, T.; Schell, D. J.; McMillian, J. D.; Zhang, Y. H. P.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

The feasibility and profitability of short season corn and sorghum cropping systems on the Texas High Plains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies of experimental cropping systems were conducted at the TAES-USDA Conservation and Production Research Field at Bushland, TX and at the North Plains Research Field near Etter, TX. The study at Bushland was fully irrigated using flood irrigation in level plots with raised borders. The study at Etter was conducted as limited irrigation using sprinkler irrigation equipped with a low energy precision application (LEPA) system. The four experimental cropping systems utilized a 98-day short season corn cultivar (SSC), a 100-day short season sorghum cultivar (SSS), and winter wheat grazed-grain (Wht Grz-Grn) and grain only. The cropping systems were evaluated in terms of attainable yields, irrigation water use, profitability, and feasibility. Conventional cropping systems of continuous full season corn (FSC), continuous full season sorghum (FSS), and continuous wheat grazed-grain and grain only were also included in the study. Compared to conventional cropping systems, the experimental cropping systems did not reduce irrigation, but profitability was increased. The rotation of SSC/Wht/SSS with wheat grazed or non-grazed, was consistently the most profitable rotation under full and limited irrigation. Profitability was obtained by increasing total revenue through improved yields of SSC in rotation with wheat and sorghum when compared to yields of SSC in continuous rotation, by obtaining higher market prices for early harvested SSC, and by realizing the opportunity to graze and obtain grain from wheat planted after SSC. Input costs were reduced by decreased fertilizer, insecticide, and irrigation applications and by reduced to no-tillage operations. Peak irrigation demands were spread more evenly throughout the year, and irrigation scheduling became less critical for optimum yields. Experimental rotations increased management and labor requirements. A greater diversity of machinery was also necessary. Timing of harvesting one crop and planting the next became critical in determining whether a rotation was profitable. The experimental rotation SSC/Wht Grz was not profitable and used the greatest amount of irrigation water. Conventional cropping systems of continuous FSS and continuous Wht Grz-Grn reduced irrigation compared to continuous FSC and all experimental rotations while maintaining profitability.

Vagts, Todd Anthony

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z