National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for deactivation di turbo

  1. Deactivation Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose here is to provide information for specific aspects of project management that apply to deactivation. Overall management of deactivation projects should use a traditional project...

  2. Deactivation Completion and Turnover

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Achieving consensus that deactivation is complete can involve several parties including the deactivation contractor, the Field Office, DOE Headquarters, the post-deactivation contractor, regulators...

  3. Wilson TurboPower | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Logo: Wilson TurboPower Name: Wilson TurboPower Address: 55 Sixth Street Place: Woburn, Massachusetts Zip: 01801 Region: Greater Boston Area Sector: Efficiency Product:...

  4. TurboGenix Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: TurboGenix Inc Place: Brooksville, Florida Product: Manufactures and sells waste heat recovery electric generation systems. References: TurboGenix Inc1 This article is...

  5. LBR deactivation information exchange

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guttenberg, S.

    1998-05-15

    This report contains vugraphs of presentations given at the meeting. The topics covered include the following: FFTF Deactivation Strategy; Sodium Drain and Disposition; Sodium Processing; and Fuel Storage and Disposition.

  6. Mission analysis report - deactivation facilities at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lund, D.P.

    1996-09-27

    This document examines the portion of the Hanford Site Cleanup Mission that deals with facility deactivation. How facilities get identified for deactivation, how they enter EM-60 for deactivation, programmatic alternatives to perform facility deactivation, the deactivation process itself, key requirements and objectives associated with the deactivation process, and deactivation planning are discussed.

  7. Facility deactivation and demolition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cormier, S.L.; Adamowski, S.J.

    1994-12-31

    Today an improperly closed facility can be a liability to its owner, both financially and environmentally. A facility deactivation program must be planned and implemented to decrease liabilities, minimize operating costs, seek to reuse or sell processes or equipment, and ultimately aid in the sale and/or reuse of the facility and property whether or not the building(s) are demolished. These programs should be characterized within the deactivation plan incorporating the following major categories: Utility Usage; Environmental Decontamination; Ongoing Facility Management; Property Management/Real Estate Issues. This paper will outline the many facets of the facility deactivation and demolition programs implemented across the country for clients in the chemical, automotive, transportation, electronic, pharmaceutical, power, natural gas and petroleum industries. Specific emphasis will be placed on sampling and analysis plans, specification preparation, equipment and technologies utilized, ``how clean is clean`` discussions and regulatory guidelines applicable to these issues.

  8. Deactivation of Building 7602

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yook, H.R.; Barnett, J.R.; Collins, T.L.

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored research and development programs in Building 7602 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1984. This work focused on development of advanced technology for processing nuclear fuels. Building 7602 was used for engineering-scale tests using depleted and natural uranium to simulate the nuclear fuel. In April 1994 the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) sent supplemental FY 1994 guidance to ORNL stating that in FY 1995 and beyond, Building 7602 is considered surplus to NE programs and missions and shall be shut down (deactivated) and maintained in a radiologically and industrially safe condition with minimal surveillance and maintenance (S&M). DOE-NE subsequently provided FY 1995 funding to support the deactivation activities. Deactivation of Building 7602 was initiated on October 1, 1994. The principal activity during the first quarter of FY 1995 was removal of process materials (chemicals and uranium) from the systems. The process systems were operated to achieve chemical solution concentrations needed for reuse or disposal of the solutions prior to removal of the materials from the systems. During this phase of deactivation the process materials processed and removed were: (1) Uranyl nitrate solution 30,178 L containing 4490 kg of uranium; (2) Nitric acid (neutralized) 9850 L containing less than 0.013 kg of uranium; (3) Organic solution 3346 L containing 265 kg of uranium; (4) Uranium oxide powder 95 kg; and (5) Miscellaneous chemicals. At the end of December 1994, the process systems and control systems were shut down and deactivated. Disposition of the process materials removed from the process systems in Building 7602 proved to be the most difficult part of the deactivation. An operational stand down and funding reductions at Y-12 prevented planned conversion of the uranyl nitrate solution to depleted uranium oxide powder. This led to disposal of the uranyl nitrate solution as waste.

  9. PFP deactivation project management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogen, D.M.

    1997-07-28

    This document identifies the overall approach for deactivation of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Complex, excluding the vaults, and includes a draft set of End Point Criteria for all buildings being deactivated.

  10. Deactivation Implementation Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-09-29

    As DOE facilities complete mission operations and are declared excess, they pass into a transition phase which ultimately prepares them for disposition. The disposition phase of a facility's life cycle usually includes deactivation, decommissioning, and surveillance and maintenance (S&M) activities.

  11. TurboTech Precision Engineering Private Limited | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TurboTech Precision Engineering Private Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name: TurboTech Precision Engineering Private Limited Place: Bangalore, India Zip: 560 044 Sector:...

  12. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers This fact sheet describes a supercritical carbon ...

  13. Plutonium Processing Plant Deactivated | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Plutonium Processing Plant Deactivated Plutonium Processing Plant Deactivated Hanford, WA The Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility (PUREX), the largest of the Nation's Cold War plutonium processing plants, is deactivated a year ahead of schedule

  14. Electric Turbo Compounding Technology Update | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Injection Shear-Stress Advanced Nozzle (DISSAN) Retrofit and Testing of a Pre-Turbo, Diesel Oxidation Catalyst on a Tier 0, SD60M Freight Locomotive Achieving Over 50% PM ...

  15. Towards Near Real-Time Availability With Enhanced Accuracy Turbo...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Turbo" ARSCL Towards Near Real-Time Availability With Enhanced Accuracy Turbo-ARSCL Project The goal is to speed delivery of the widely-used ARSCL product while improving the ...

  16. Deactivation and Decommissioning | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services » Deactivation and Decommissioning Deactivation and Decommissioning TA-21-286 being demolished TA-21-286 being demolished The EM-LA Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) Team is dedicated to demolishing, deactivating and disposing material from historical buildings at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Current workscope is focused on Technical Area 21 (TA-21), one of the early sites of the Manhattan Project and Cold War-era work conducted at LANL. TA-21 was the location of the

  17. PGDP Deactivation Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GDP Transition » PGDP Deactivation Project PGDP Deactivation Project PGDP Deactivation Project scope major activities: Site Optimization Studies include: - Steam, Air, Nitrogen and Chilled Water Optimization Study - Water Treatment Facility Optimization Study - C-100 Optimization Study - Sewer Evaluation Study Facility Stabilization Preparation and/or removal of nuclear materials and contaminants from facilities. Stabilization activities are performed during early stages of facility

  18. Aerodynamic seal assemblies for turbo-machinery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bidkar, Rahul Anil; Wolfe, Christopher; Fang, Biao

    2015-09-29

    The present application provides an aerodynamic seal assembly for use with a turbo-machine. The aerodynamic seal assembly may include a number of springs, a shoe connected to the springs, and a secondary seal positioned about the springs and the shoe.

  19. Deactivation of methanol synthesis catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, G.W.; Brown, D.M.; Hsiung, T.H.; Lewnard, J.J. (Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States))

    1993-08-01

    A novel methanol synthesis process, the liquid-phase methanol (LPMEOH) process, has been developed and scaled up to a nominal 380 kg/h (10 ton/day) pilot plant. The process is based on a gas-sparged slurry reactor instead of a conventional, fixed-bed reactor. The use of slurry reactors, which are essentially gradientless, greatly facilitated the interpretation and quantification of catalyst deactivation phenomena. With a poison-free, CO-rich feedstream, the rate of deactivation of the Cu/ZnO catalyst increased rapidly with temperature. At constant temperature, in the absence of poisons, the decline with time in the rate constant for methanol synthesis correlated with the loss of BET surface area. Iron carbonyl, nickel carbonyl, and carbonyl sulfide are severe and highly specific poisons for methanol-synthesis catalyst. There was a linear relationship between the catalyst activity loss and the concentration of metal or sulfur on the catalyst.

  20. Project Profile: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers Project Profile: ... Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) SunShot R&D funding opportunity announcement (FOA), are ...

  1. Energy Department Selects Deactivation Contractor for Paducah...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the site for Deactivation and Decommissioning of the former uranium enrichment facilities. ... The Task Order will contain both firm fixed-price and cost reimbursable elements including ...

  2. Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Deactivation Mechanisms of Base MetalZeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials, and Development of Zeolite-Based Hydrocarbon Adsorber Materials Deactivation Mechanisms ...

  3. Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Deactivation Mechanisms of Base MetalZeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials... Deactivation Mechanisms of Base MetalZeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials...

  4. Understanding the Deactivation Mechanisms of Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalysts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Deactivation Mechanisms of CuZeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel Application Understanding the Deactivation Mechanisms of CuZeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel Application To understand ...

  5. Investigation of Sulfur Deactivation on Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalysts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sulfur Deactivation on CuZeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel Application Investigation of Sulfur Deactivation on CuZeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel Application Investigation of Sulfur ...

  6. Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials Deactivation Mechanisms of Base MetalZeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction ... More Documents & Publications Deactivation Mechanisms of Base MetalZeolite Urea Selective ...

  7. Characterization of deactivated bio-oil hydrotreating catalysts...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Characterization of deactivated bio-oil hydrotreating catalysts Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Characterization of deactivated bio-oil hydrotreating catalysts ...

  8. Turbo-generator control with variable valve actuation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vuk, Carl T.

    2011-02-22

    An internal combustion engine incorporating a turbo-generator and one or more variably activated exhaust valves. The exhaust valves are adapted to variably release exhaust gases from a combustion cylinder during a combustion cycle to an exhaust system. The turbo-generator is adapted to receive exhaust gases from the exhaust system and rotationally harness energy therefrom to produce electrical power. A controller is adapted to command the exhaust valve to variably open in response to a desired output for the turbo-generator.

  9. Guides: Design/Engineering for Deactivation & Decommissioning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To ensure development of appropriate levels of engineering detail, DOE-EM’s Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-13) has prepared this guidance for  tailoring a D...

  10. Turbo Compounding: A Technology Whose Time Has Come | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Turbo Compounding: A Technology Whose Time Has Come Turbo Compounding: A Technology Whose Time Has Come 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_vuk.pdf (977.84 KB) More Documents & Publications Electric Turbo Compounding Technology Update Electric Turbo Compounding...A Technology Who's Time Has Come Design and Development of e-Turbo for SUV and Light Truck Applications

  11. FY 2000 Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2001-03-01

    This document describes activities of the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area for the past year.

  12. Direct Visualization of Spray and Combustion Inside a DI-SI Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel, injection timing, and valve deactivation in a DI optical accessible engine with side-mounted, multi-hole injector are investigated using CFD and high-speed imaging of sprays ...

  13. EU Energy Voith Turbo JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    JV Jump to: navigation, search Name: EU Energy & Voith Turbo JV Place: Germany Sector: Wind energy Product: Joint co-operation agreement for the development of the Voith WinDrive...

  14. Project Profile: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exchangers | Department of Energy Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers Project Profile: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers SWRI Logo The Southwest Research Institute (SWRI) and its partners, under the 2012 Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) SunShot R&D funding opportunity announcement (FOA), are developing a supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) power cycle that combines high efficiencies and low costs for modular CSP applications.

  15. N Reactor Deactivation Program Plan. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, J.L.

    1993-12-01

    This N Reactor Deactivation Program Plan is structured to provide the basic methodology required to place N Reactor and supporting facilities {center_dot} in a radiologically and environmentally safe condition such that they can be decommissioned at a later date. Deactivation will be in accordance with facility transfer criteria specified in Department of Energy (DOE) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) guidance. Transition activities primarily involve shutdown and isolation of operational systems and buildings, radiological/hazardous waste cleanup, N Fuel Basin stabilization and environmental stabilization of the facilities. The N Reactor Deactivation Program covers the period FY 1992 through FY 1997. The directive to cease N Reactor preservation and prepare for decommissioning was issued by DOE to WHC on September 20, 1991. The work year and budget data supporting the Work Breakdown Structure in this document are found in the Activity Data Sheets (ADS) and the Environmental Restoration Program Baseline, that are prepared annually.

  16. Metal and coke deactivation of resid hydroprocessing catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartholdy, J.; Cooper, B.

    1993-12-31

    It is well established that residuum hydroprocessing catalysts are deactivated by both coke and metals. The traditional approach has been to relate the initial rapid deactivation with coke laydown and subsequent deactivation with deposition of metals from the residuum. This paper presents evidence of coke and metals deactivation throughout the life of the catalyst. By comparing tests made at constant temperature with tests made at constant conversion it is concluded that the extent of coke deactivation in related to the operating temperature. The extent of coke deactivation has further been estimated by regeneration of a fraction of the catalyst bed.

  17. Deactivation, Decontamination and Decommissioning Project Summaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, David Shane; Webber, Frank Laverne

    2001-07-01

    This report is a compilation of summary descriptions of Deactivation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, and Surveillance and Maintenance projects planned for inactive facilities and sites at the INEEL from FY-2002 through FY-2010. Deactivations of contaminated facilities will produce safe and stable facilities requiring minimal surveillance and maintenance pending further decontamination and decommissioning. Decontamination and decommissioning actions remove contaminated facilities, thus eliminating long-term surveillance and maintenance. The projects are prioritized based on risk to DOE-ID, the public, and the environment, and the reduction of DOE-ID mortgage costs and liability at the INEEL.

  18. Retrofit and Testing of a Pre-Turbo, Diesel Oxidation Catalyst...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Testing of a Pre-Turbo, Diesel Oxidation Catalyst on a Tier 0, SD60M Freight Locomotive Achieving Over 50% PM Reduction Retrofit and Testing of a Pre-Turbo, Diesel Oxidation ...

  19. Design and Development of e-Turbo for SUV and Light Truck Applications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development of e-Turbo for SUV and Light Truck Applications Design and Development of ... More Documents & Publications Design & Development of e-TurboTM for SUV and Light Truck ...

  20. Design & Development of e-TurboTM for SUV and Light Truck Applications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design & Development of e-TurboTM for SUV and Light Truck Applications 2003 DEER ... More Documents & Publications Design and Development of e-Turbo for SUV and Light Truck ...

  1. MHK Technologies/Turbo Ocean Power Generator MadaTech 17 | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Turbo Ocean Power Generator MadaTech 17 < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Turbo Ocean Power Generator MadaTech 17.jpg Technology...

  2. Business Leaders Learn About Paducah Deactivation Project | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Business Leaders Learn About Paducah Deactivation Project Business Leaders Learn About Paducah Deactivation Project April 29, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis Scott Germain, Fluor Federal Services’ Paducah Deactivation Project support and integration manager, illustrates the magnitude of the display cell in one of the process facilities. Scott Germain, Fluor Federal Services' Paducah Deactivation Project support and integration manager, illustrates the magnitude of the display cell in one

  3. Design and Development of e-Turbo for SUV and Light Truck Applications |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Development of e-Turbo for SUV and Light Truck Applications Design and Development of e-Turbo for SUV and Light Truck Applications 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Honeywell Corporation 2004_deer_shahed.pdf (427.61 KB) More Documents & Publications Design & Development of e-TurboTM for SUV and Light Truck Applications SuperTurbocharger Electric Turbo Compounding...A Technology Who's Time Has Come

  4. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet describes a supercritical carbon dioxide turbo-expander and heat exchangers project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. The team, led by the Southwest Research Institute, is working to develop a megawatt-scale s-CO2 hot-gas turbo-expander optimized for the highly transient solar power plant profile. The team is also working to optimize novel printed circuit heat exchangers for s-CO2 applications to drastically reduce their manufacturing costs.

  5. Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance Planning | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance Planning Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance Planning One of the key elements of end-point planning is knowing what the post-deactivation S&M activities will be so that conditions can be established to support them. The post-deactivation S&M plan specifies the surveillance, inspection, and maintenance of the facility in the deactivated state. It should address the activities, the locations in which they will be

  6. Investigating potential light-duty efficiency improvements through simulation of turbo-compounding and waste-heat recovery systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Kevin Dean; Wagner, Robert M; Briggs, Thomas E

    2010-01-01

    Modern diesel engines used in light-duty transportation applications have peak brake thermal efficiencies in the range of 40-42% for high-load operation with substantially lower efficiencies at realistic road-load conditions. Thermodynamic energy and exergy analysis reveals that the largest losses from these engines are due to combustion irreversibility and heat loss to the coolant, through the exhaust, and by direct convection and radiation to the environment. Substantial improvement in overall engine efficiency requires reducing or recovering these losses. Unfortunately, much of the heat transfer either occurs at relatively low temperatures resulting in large entropy generation (such as in the air-charge cooler), is transferred to low-exergy flow streams (such as the oil and engine coolant), or is radiated or convected directly to the environment. While there are significant opportunities for recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler for heavy-duty applications, achieving similar benefits for light-duty applications is complicated by transient, low-load operation at typical driving conditions and competition with the turbocharger and aftertreatment system for the limited thermal resources. We have developed an organic Rankine cycle model using GT-Suite to investigate the potential for efficiency improvement through waste-heat recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler of a light-duty diesel engine. The model is used to examine the effects of efficiency-improvement strategies such as cylinder deactivation, use of advanced materials and improved insulation to limit ambient heat loss, and turbo-compounding on the steady-state performance of the ORC system and the availability of thermal energy for downstream aftertreatment systems. Results from transient drive-cycle simulations are also presented, and we discuss strategies to address operational difficulties associated with transient drive cycles and balancing the thermal requirements of waste-heat recovery

  7. Direct Visualization of Spray and Combustion Inside a DI-SI Engine and Its Implications to Flex-Fuel VVT Operations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fuel, injection timing, and valve deactivation in a DI optical accessible engine with side-mounted, multi-hole injector are investigated using CFD and high-speed imaging of sprays and combustion.

  8. Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning The Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for the disposition of a vast number of facilities at numerous sites around the country which have been declared excess to current mission needs. Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning (252.61 KB) More Documents & Publications

  9. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Deactivation Plan Project Scope and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Plan Project Scope and Objectives Examples Example 6 2.3 MISSION OBJECTIVES Stabilization of plutonium-bearing materials and deactivation/dismantlement of the PFP Complex will result in the virtual elimination of the hazards and risks associated with the facility and will greatly reduce the costs of safe, secure S&M. Using the lessons learned from deactivation projects across the DOE Complex, further improvement on previously applied deactivation methods is anticipated. The major mission

  10. DOE Seeks Deactivation Contractor for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Deactivation Contractor for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant DOE Seeks Deactivation Contractor for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant August 9, 2013 - 5:30pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor, 803-952-8564 bill.taylor@srs.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Request for Task Proposal (RTP) for deactivation activities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. These services are required so that DOE can address the return

  11. Deactivation mechanisms of NOx storage materials arising from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Deactivation mechanisms of NOx storage materials arising from thermal aging and sulfur poisoning Presents the reliationship between Pt particle size and NOx storage performance ...

  12. Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials, and Development of Zeolite-Based Hydrocarbon AdsorberMaterials Deactivation Mechanisms of Base MetalZeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials, and ...

  13. Deactivation Project Begins at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Begins at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Deactivation Project Begins at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant October 21, 2014 - 5:00pm Addthis EM Paducah site lead Jennifer Woodard ...

  14. Removal of Hazards Key to Paducah Site Deactivation | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    preparing the facilities for future work," said Fluor Paducah Deactivation Project (FPDP) Program Manager Bob Smith. "Our team did a great job and finished the project safely." ...

  15. Design & Development of e-TurboTM for SUV and Light Truck Applications |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy & Development of e-TurboTM for SUV and Light Truck Applications Design & Development of e-TurboTM for SUV and Light Truck Applications 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Garrett Engine Boosting Systems 2003_deer_shahed.pdf (477.34 KB) More Documents & Publications Design and Development of e-Turbo for SUV and Light Truck Applications The Potential of Elelcltric Exhaust Gas Turbocharging for HD DIesel Engines SuperTurbocharger

  16. PUREX/UO{sub 3} deactivation project management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washenfelder, D.J.

    1993-12-01

    From 1955 through 1990, the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX) provided the United States Department of Energy Hanford Site with nuclear fuel reprocessing capability. It operated in sequence with the Uranium Trioxide (UO{sub 3}) Plant, which converted the PUREX liquid uranium nitrate product to solid UO{sub 3} powder. Final UO{sub 3} Plant operation ended in 1993. In December 1992, planning was initiated for the deactivation of PUREX and UO{sub 3} Plant. The objective of deactivation planning was to identify the activities needed to establish a passively safe, environmentally secure configuration at both plants, and ensure that the configuration could be retained during the post-deactivation period. The PUREX/UO{sub 3} Deactivation Project management plan represents completion of the planning efforts. It presents the deactivation approach to be used for the two plants, and the supporting technical, cost, and schedule baselines. Deactivation activities concentrate on removal, reduction, and stabilization of the radioactive and chemical materials remaining at the plants, and the shutdown of the utilities and effluents. When deactivation is completed, the two plants will be left unoccupied and locked, pending eventual decontamination and decommissioning. Deactivation is expected to cost $233.8 million, require 5 years to complete, and yield $36 million in annual surveillance and maintenance cost savings.

  17. Deactivation Mechanism of Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalyst Due to Reductive Hydrothermal Aging

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better control for preventing catalyst deactivation resulted from study of and proposed mechanism for deactivation of Cu/zeolite under rich conditions.

  18. Micro-turbo-generator design and fabrication: A preliminary study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiegele, T.G.

    1996-12-31

    The size and weight of portable electronic products are often dictated by the physical characteristics of the power supply system. The design of energy storage systems is therefore critical to market competitiveness. An alternative to energy storage is proposed in this paper which relies on a very small power generation system which converts a pressure difference in a gas into electrical power: a micro-turbo-generator. The design of the micro-turbo-generator involved combining two very different machines, a micro-generator and a micro-turbine, into a single device which could be fabricated within the constraints of current microelectronic processing techniques. Research into power generation on the micro-scale has begun to take place in the form of electromagnetic micro-motor design and fabrication. These variable reluctance machines can be transformed into power generation devices by implementing accurate rotor position sensing, high-speed current switching and a means for inducing rotor motion. This leads to the implementation of a switched reluctance generator, which is well-understood on the macro-scale but has not been attempted on the micro-scale. The most significant hurdle facing researchers is the task of coupling a prime mover, such as a micro-turbine, to the rotor of a power generation device efficiently and effectively while maintaining relative simplicity in the fabrication procedures. The design presented here offers a potential solution to this problem.

  19. TurboGenerator Power Systems{trademark} for distributed generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinstein, C.H.

    1998-12-31

    The AlliedSignal TurboGenerator is a cost effective, environmentally benign, low cost, highly reliable and simple to maintain generation source. Market Surveys indicate that the significant worldwide market exists, for example, the United States Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) which is the uniform research facility for domestic electric utilities, predicts that up to 40% of all new generation could be distributed generation by the year 2006. In many parts of the world, the lack of electric infrastructure (transmission and distribution lines) will greatly expedite the commercialization of distributed generation technologies since central plants not only cost more per kW, but also must have expensive infrastructure installed to deliver the product to the consumer. Small, multi-fuel, modular distributed generation units, such as the TurboGenerator, can help alleviate current afternoon brownouts and blackouts prevalent in many parts of the world. Its simple, one moving part concept allows for low technical skill maintenance and its low overall cost allows for wide spread purchase in those parts of the world where capital is sparse. In addition, given the United States emphasis on electric deregulation and the world trend in this direction, consumers of electricity will now have not only the right to choose the correct method of electric service but also a new cost effective choice from which to choose.

  20. 340 waste handling complex: Deactivation project management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stordeur, R.T.

    1998-06-25

    This document provides an overview of the strategy for deactivating the 340 Waste Handling Complex within Hanford`s 300 Area. The plan covers the period from the pending September 30, 1998 cessation of voluntary radioactive liquid waste (RLW) transfers to the 340 Complex, until such time that those portions of the 340 Complex that remain active beyond September 30, 1998, specifically, the Retention Process Sewer (RPS), can also be shut down and deactivated. Specific activities are detailed and divided into two phases. Phase 1 ends in 2001 after the core RLW systems have been deactivated. Phase 2 covers the subsequent interim surveillance of deactivated and stand-by components during the period of continued RPS operation, through the final transfer of the entire 340 Complex to the Environmental Restoration Contractor. One of several possible scenarios was postulated and developed as a budget and schedule planning case.

  1. Fact #725: April 30, 2012 Cylinder Deactivation is More Prevalent...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cylinder deactivation is a fuel-saving technology that allows a vehicle to shut down some of its cylinders when extra power is not needed like when cruising down the highway at a ...

  2. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Deactivation to Decommissioning Transition

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Decommissioning Transition Example Example 80 1.5 OPERATIONAL TRANSITION AND DEACTIVATION STRATEGY According to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 430.1A Life Cycle Asset Management (LCAM), the life cycle of a facility makes several transitions over the course of it's existence. The typical stages or phases include operation, (standby), deactivation, S&M, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The life cycle phases may occur as a straight through process or with long

  3. Energy Department Selects Deactivation Contractor for Paducah Gaseous

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diffusion Plant | Department of Energy Deactivation Contractor for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Energy Department Selects Deactivation Contractor for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant July 22, 2014 - 5:48pm Addthis News Media Contact Brad Mitzelfelt, (859) 219-4035, brad.mitzelfelt@lex.doe.gov LEXINGTON, Ky. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a Task Order under the Nationwide Environmental Management ID/IQ Unrestricted Contract to Fluor Federal Services, Inc. for

  4. Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective Catalytic

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Reduction Materials, and Development of Zeolite-Based Hydrocarbon AdsorberMaterials | Department of Energy 11 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ace055_peden_2011_o.pdf (1.14 MB) More Documents & Publications Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials, and Development of Zeolite-Based Hydrocarbon Adsorber Materials Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea

  5. Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers at the Savannah River Site imploded the 455-foot-tall K Reactor Cooling Tower in May 2010. The project was completed safely and contributed 36.5 square miles to the site's total footprint reduction. On August 3, 2013, contractors and the Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management successfully completed the explosive demolition of the K-1206-F Fire Water

  6. Two-Stroke Uniflow Turbo-Compound IC Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An evaluation study of a turbo-compounded concept engine consisting of a two-stroke, uniflow, four cylinder air cooled flat-four engine has been completed The concept includes a high pressure ratio supercharger compressor that is powered by an exhaust driven turbine. Downstream of the high pressure turbine is a low pressure power turbine that is geared to the engine crankshaft. The engine cylinders have 360 degree circumferential intake ports with swirl vanes, located at the bottom of the piston stroke. A large single exhaust valve is at the top of the cylinder. The fuel is injected downstream directly into the swirling airflow near the top of the piston stroke. The fuel is ignited by a high energy sparkplug. This engine offers very low fuel consumption in a compact, light weight package, with fuel flexibility.

  7. Glass surface deactivants for sulfur-containing gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farwell, S.O.; Gluck, S.J.

    1980-10-01

    In gas chromatographic technique for measuring reduced sulfur-containing gases in biogenic air fluxes, the major problem seemed to be the irreversible adsorption of the polar sulfur compounds on the glass surfaces of the cryogenic sampling traps. This article discusses the comparative degrees of Pyrex glass surface passivation for over 25 chemical deactivants and their related pretreatment procedures. Since H/sub 2/S was discovered to be the sulfur compound with a consistently lower recovery efficiency than COS, CH/sub 3/SH, CH/sub 3/SCH, CS/sub 2/ or CH/sub 3/SSCH/sub 3/, the percent recovery for H/sub 2/S was employed as the indicator of effectiveness for the various deactivation treatments. Tables are presented summarizing the mean H/sub 2/S recoveries for chlorosilane deactivants and for the mean H/sub 2/S recoveries for different pyrex surface pretreatments with an octadecyltrialkoxysilane deactivation. The general conclusion of this investigation is that the relative degree of passivation for glass surfaces by present deactivation techniques is dependent on the types of analyzed compounds and the nature of the glass surface.

  8. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1991-01-10

    Although promoted cobalt and iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis of gasoline feedstock were first developed more than three decades ago, a major technical problem still limiting the commercial use of these catalysts today is carbon deactivation. This report describes recent progress in a fundamental, three-year investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for FT synthesis, the objectives of which are to: determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation over a range of CO concentrations, CO:H{sub 2} ratios, and temperatures; and model the rates of deactivation of the same catalysts in fixed-bed reactors. To accomplish the above objectives, the project is divided into the following tasks: (1) determine the kinetics of reaction and of carbon deactivation during CO hydrogenation on Fe and Fe/K catalysts coated on monolith bodies. (2) Determine the reactivities and types of carbon deposited during reaction on the same catalysts from temperature-programmed-surface-reaction spectroscopy (TPSR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Determine the types of iron carbides formed at various temperatures and H{sub 2}/CO ratios using x-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy. (3) Develop mathematical deactivation models which include heat and mass transport contributions for FT synthesis is packed-bed reactors. Progress to date is described. 48 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartholomew, C H

    1991-02-14

    Progress is reported for a four-year fundamental investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for FT synthesis, the objectives of which were to (1) determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation and (2) model the global rates of deactivation at the surface of the catalyst for the same catalysts. A computer-automated reactor system to be used in the kinetic and deactivation studies was designed, constructed and tested. Kinetic data for CO hydrogenation on unsupported, unpromoted iron, 99% Fe/1% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and K-promoted 99% Fe/1% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were obtained as functions of temperature, reactant particle pressures and time. The activity/selectivity and kinetic data are consistent with those previously reported for supported, unpromoted and promoted iron. Two kinds of deactivation were observed during FT synthesis on these samples: (1) loss of surface area after reduction of unsupported, unpromoted iron at 400{degree}C and (2) loss of activity with time due to carbon deposition, especially in the case of K-promoted 99% Fe/1% A1{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Deactivation rate data were obtained for CO hydrogenation on promoted Fe as a function of time, temperature, and H{sub 2}/CO ratio. 50 refs., 24 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. PUREX/UO{sub 3} facilities deactivation lessons learned history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamrick, D.G.; Gerber, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    The Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility operated from 1956-1972, from 1983-1988, and briefly during 1989-1990 to produce for national defense at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The Uranium Trioxide (UO{sub 3}) Facility operated at the Hanford Site from 1952-1972, 1984-1988, and briefly in 1993. Both plants were ordered to permanent shutdown by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in December 1992, thus initiating their deactivation phase. Deactivation is that portion of a facility`s life cycle that occurs between operations and final decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). This document details the history of events, and the lessons learned, from the time of the PUREX Stabilization Campaign in 1989-1990, through the end of the first full fiscal year (FY) of the deactivation project (September 30, 1994).

  11. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1990-10-29

    This report describes recent progress in a fundamental, three-year investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for synthesis, the objectives of which are: determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation over a range of CO concentrations, CO:H{sub 2} ratios, and temperatures; model the rates of deactivation of the same catalysts in fixed-bed reactors. During the fourteenth quarter design of software for a computer-automated reactor system to be used in the kinetic and deactivation studies was continued. Further progress was made toward the completion of the control language, control routines, and software for operating this system. Progress was also made towards testing of the system hardware and software. 47 refs.

  12. PUREX/UO{sub 3} facilities deactivation lessons learned: History

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1997-11-25

    In May 1997, a historic deactivation project at the PUREX (Plutonium URanium EXtraction) facility at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State concluded its activities (Figure ES-1). The project work was finished at $78 million under its original budget of $222.5 million, and 16 months ahead of schedule. Closely watched throughout the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex and by the US Department of Defense for the value of its lessons learned, the PUREX Deactivation Project has become the national model for the safe transition of contaminated facilities to shut down status.

  13. Systems and methods for deactivating a matrix converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ransom, Ray M.

    2013-04-02

    Systems and methods are provided for deactivating a matrix conversion module. An electrical system comprises an alternating current (AC) interface, a matrix conversion module coupled to the AC interface, an inductive element coupled between the AC interface and the matrix conversion module, and a control module. The control module is coupled to the matrix conversion module, and in response to a shutdown condition, the control module is configured to operate the matrix conversion module to deactivate the first conversion module when a magnitude of a current through the inductive element is less than a threshold value.

  14. 200 Area Deactivation Project Facilities Authorization Envelope Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DODD, E.N.

    2000-03-28

    Project facilities as required by HNF-PRO-2701, Authorization Envelope and Authorization Agreement. The Authorization Agreements (AA's) do not identify the specific set of environmental safety and health requirements that are applicable to the facility. Therefore, the facility Authorization Envelopes are defined here to identify the applicable requirements. This document identifies the authorization envelopes for the 200 Area Deactivation.

  15. Microsoft Word - 03-PTD-0089 Deactivation EA.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Environmental Assessment Deactivation of the Plutonium Finishing Plant, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Richland, Washington 99352 May 2003 PREDECISIONAL DRAFT This page intentionally left blank. DOE/EA-1469 U.S. Department of Energy Contents Environmental Assessment TC-1 May 2003 Predecisional Draft CONTENTS GLOSSARY

  16. Investigation of Sulfur Deactivation on Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Application | Department of Energy Sulfur Deactivation on Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel Application Investigation of Sulfur Deactivation on Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel Application Investigation of Sulfur Deactivation on Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel Application deer09_cheng.pdf (564.79 KB) More Documents & Publications Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials Sulfur Effect and Performance Recovery of a DOC + CSF +

  17. 100,000 hour design life of turbo compressor packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-05-20

    Many turbomachinery manufacturers and operators typically quote 100,000 hours as a design limit for service life of turbo compressor components. The Pipeline Research Committee initiated this study to review the life limiting criteria for certain critical components and determine if the design target of 100,000 hours can be safely and reliably met or extended with special component management practices. The first phase of the project was to select the turbomachinery components that would be included in the review. Committee members were surveyed with a detailed questionnaire designed to identify critical components based on: high hours (e.g. at or approaching 100,000 hours) the most common engine types operated by the member organizations, and the components of greatest concern from a risk and expense point of view. The selection made covers a wide range of engine types that are of interest to most of the committee companies. This selection represents some 78% of the high hour units operated by the committee and includes components from GE Frame 3 and Frame 5, Solar Saturn, Rolls Royce Avon, and Cooper RT56 engines. The report goes into detail regarding the various damage mechanism which can be the main life limiting factor of the component; creep, fatigue, environmental attack, wear and microstructure instability. For each of the component types selected, the study identifies the life limiting criteria and outlines how the components may be managed for extended life. Many of the selected components can be reliably operated beyond 100,000 hours by following the management practices set out in the report.

  18. Retrofit and Testing of a Pre-Turbo, Diesel Oxidation Catalyst on a Tier 0,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SD60M Freight Locomotive Achieving Over 50% PM Reduction | Department of Energy and Testing of a Pre-Turbo, Diesel Oxidation Catalyst on a Tier 0, SD60M Freight Locomotive Achieving Over 50% PM Reduction Retrofit and Testing of a Pre-Turbo, Diesel Oxidation Catalyst on a Tier 0, SD60M Freight Locomotive Achieving Over 50% PM Reduction Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by

  19. Catalysts deactivation during the hydrotreatment of heavy oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mochida, I.; Zhao, Z.Z.; Sakanishi, K. )

    1988-06-01

    The catalyst deactivation in the repeated hydrotreatments of asphaltene in petroleum residues, coal liquids and their mixture was comparatively studied in the single- and two-stage reactions, using the same commercial Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts in the batch autoclave. The less catalyst deactivation as well as higher performances in the denitrogenation (>80%) and upgrading of coal liquid were obtained in the two-stage hydrotreatment of 390{degree}C-2h and 430{degree}C-2h. The increase of the catalyst weight which causes the decrease of the activity was considerably less in the two-stage reaction. The two-stage hydrotreatment, which allows a combination of best catalysts in the respective stages under most appropriate conditions for their best performances, can be further effective in the upgrading of heavy residual hydrocarbons.

  20. Criticality safety for deactivation of the Rover dry headend process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henrikson, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    The Rover dry headend process combusted Rover graphite fuels in preparation for dissolution and solvent extraction for the recovery of {sup 235}U. At the end of the Rover processing campaign, significant quantities of {sup 235}U were left in the dry system. The Rover Dry Headend Process Deactivation Project goal is to remove the remaining uranium bearing material (UBM) from the dry system and then decontaminate the cells. Criticality safety issues associated with the Rover Deactivation Project have been influenced by project design refinement and schedule acceleration initiatives. The uranium ash composition used for calculations must envelope a wide range of material compositions, and yet result in cost effective final packaging and storage. Innovative thinking must be used to provide a timely safety authorization basis while the project design continues to be refined.

  1. Remote System Technologies for Deactivating Hanford Hot Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berlin, G.; Walton, T.

    2003-02-25

    Remote system technologies are being deployed by Fluor Hanford to help accelerate the deactivation of highly-radioactive hot cell facilities. These technologies offer improved methods for accessing difficult-to-reach spaces and performing tasks such as visual inspection, radiological characterization, decontamination, waste handling, and size reduction. This paper is focused on the application of remote systems in support of deactivation work being performed in several legacy facilities at Hanford (i.e., the 324 and 327 Buildings). These facilities were previously used for fuel fabrication, materials examination, and the development of waste treatment processes. The technologies described in this paper represent significant improvements to Hanford's baseline methods, and may offer benefits to other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites and commercial operations.

  2. Deactivation and Storage Issues Shared by Fossil and Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas S. LaGuardia

    1998-12-31

    The deactivation of a power plant, be it nuclear or fossil fueled, requires that the facility be placed in a safe and stable condition to prevent unacceptable exposure of the public or the environment to hazardous materials until the facility can be decommissioned. The conditions at two Texas plants are examined. These plants are fossil fueled, but their conditions might be duplicated at a nuclear plant.

  3. Computing Conformational Free Energy by Deactivated Morphing | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leadership Computing Facility Computing Conformational Free Energy by Deactivated Morphing Authors: Park S, Lau AY, Roux B. Despite the significant advances in free-energy computations for biomolecules, there exists no general method to evaluate the free-energy difference between two conformations of a macromolecule that differ significantly from each other. A crucial ingredient of such a method is the ability to find a path between different conformations that allows an efficient

  4. Deactivation Mechanisms of Pt/Pd-based Diesel Oxidation Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiebenga, Michelle H.; Kim, Chang H.; Schmieg, Steven J.; Oh, Se H.; Brown, David B.; Kim, Do Heui; Lee, Jong H.; Peden, Charles HF

    2012-04-30

    Currently precious metal-based diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC) containing platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) are most commonly used for the oxidation of hydrocarbon and NO in diesel exhaust hydrocarbon oxidation. The present work has been carried out to investigate the deactivation mechanisms of the DOC from its real-world vehicle operation by coupling its catalytic activity measurements with surface characterization including x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A production Pt-Pd DOC was obtained after being aged on a vehicle driven for 135,000 miles in order to study its deactivation behavior. The performance of the vehicle-aged part was correlated with that of the simulated hydrothermal lab aged sample assuming that Pt-Pd sintering plays a major role in irreversible catalyst deactivation. In addition to the hydrothermal sintering, the deterioration of hydrocarbon and NO oxidation performance was caused by surface poisoning. The role of the various aging factors in determining long-term performance in mobile applications will be discussed.

  5. Kinetics and deactivation of sulfated zirconia catalysts for butane isomerization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fogash, K.B.; Larson, R.B.; Gonzalez, M.R.

    1996-09-15

    Reaction kinetics studies were conducted of n-butane and isobutane isomerization over sulfated zirconia at 423 K. The kinetic data can be described well by a rate expression based on a reversible, bimolecular surface reaction between two adsorbed n-C{sub 4} species, probably through a C{sub 8} intermediate, to produce one i-C{sub 4} species, as well as surface reaction between two adsorbed i-C{sub 4} species to produce one n-C{sub 4} species. This reaction sequence also describes well the rates of C{sub 4}-disproportionation reactions to produce C{sub 3} and C{sub 5} species. The initial rate of catalyst deactivation is faster during n-butane isomerization than during isobutane isomerization, and the longer-term rate of deactivation during n-butane isomerization increases with the pressures of n-butane. The more rapid catalyst deactivation during n-butane isomerization may be related to the formation of n-C{sub 4}-diene species. 25 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1990-10-11

    This report describes recent progress in a fundamental, three-year investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis, the objectives of which are: determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation over a range of CO concentrations, CO:H{sub 2} ratios, and temperatures; model the rates of deactivation of the same catalysts in fixed-bed reactors. During the thirteenth quarter design of software for a computer-automated reactor system to be used in the kinetic and deactivation studies was continued. Further progress was made toward the completion of the control language, control routines, and software for operating this system. Progress was also made on the testing of the system hardware and software. H{sub 2} chemisorption capacities and activity selectivity data were also measured for three iron catalysts promoted with 1% alumina. 47 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Understanding the Deactivation Mechanisms of Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalysts in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Application | Department of Energy Deactivation Mechanisms of Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel Application Understanding the Deactivation Mechanisms of Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel Application To understand the durability of Cu/Zeolite urea-SCR catalysts in diesel applications, the effects of engine and lab aging on catalyst reactivity and material properties were investigated. deer08_cheng.pdf (1.93 MB) More Documents & Publications Deactivation Mechanisms of Base

  8. Application of a catalyst deactivation model for hydrotreating solvent refined coal feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nalitham, R.V.

    1983-10-01

    A simple kinetic model, including a first-order catalyst deactivation rate, is applied to upgrading of coal-derived feedstocks prepared from two solvent refined coal fractions. A catalyst deactivation mechanism is proposed which involves the adsorption and surface reaction of coke precursors on catalytic active sites. The effect of feedstock composition, temperature and pressure on kinetic parameters, and in particular the catalyst deactivation rate, is determined.

  9. PUREX/UO3 Facilities deactivation lessons learned history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1996-09-19

    Disconnecting the criticality alarm permanently in June 1996 signified that the hazards in the PUREX (plutonium-uranium extraction) plant had been so removed and reduced that criticality was no longer a credible event. Turning off the PUREX criticality alarm also marked a salient point in a historic deactivation project, 1 year before its anticipated conclusion. The PUREX/UO3 Deactivation Project began in October 1993 as a 5-year, $222.5- million project. As a result of innovations implemented during 1994 and 1995, the project schedule was shortened by over a year, with concomitant savings. In 1994, the innovations included arranging to send contaminated nitric acid from the PUREX Plant to British Nuclear Fuels, Limited (BNFL) for reuse and sending metal solutions containing plutonium and uranium from PUREX to the Hanford Site tank farms. These two steps saved the project $36.9- million. In 1995, reductions in overhead rate, work scope, and budget, along with curtailed capital equipment expenditures, reduced the cost another $25.6 million. These savings were achieved by using activity-based cost estimating and applying technical schedule enhancements. In 1996, a series of changes brought about under the general concept of ``reengineering`` reduced the cost approximately another $15 million, and moved the completion date to May 1997. With the total savings projected at about $75 million, or 33.7 percent of the originally projected cost, understanding how the changes came about, what decisions were made, and why they were made becomes important. At the same time sweeping changes in the cultural of the Hanford Site were taking place. These changes included shifting employee relations and work structures, introducing new philosophies and methods in maintaining safety and complying with regulations, using electronic technology to manage information, and, adopting new methods and bases for evaluating progress. Because these changes helped generate cost savings and were

  10. Rupture loop annex ion exchange RLAIX vault deactivation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ham, J.E.; Harris, D.L., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    This engineering report documents the deactivation, stabilization and final conditions of the Rupture Loop Annex Ion Exchange (RLAIX) Vault located northwest of the 309 Building`s Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR). Twelve ion exchange columns, piping debris, and column liquid were removed from the vault, packaged and shipped for disposal. The vault walls and floor were decontaminated, and portions of the vault were painted to fix loose contamination. Process piping and drains were plugged, and the cover blocks and rain cover were installed. Upon closure,the vault was empty, stabilized, isolated.

  11. Reoxidation and deactivation of supported cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schanke, D.; Hilmen, A.M.; Bergene, E.

    1995-12-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is an attractive possibility for conversion of natural gas into high quality liquid fuels. Due to its low water-gas shift activity, good activity/selectivity properties and relatively low price, cobalt is the choice of catalytic metal for natural gas conversion via Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. In the cobalt-catalyzed Fischer-Tropsch reaction, oxygen is mainly rejected as water. In this paper we describe the influence of water on supported cobalt catalysts. The deactivation of supported Co catalysts was studied in a fixed-bed reactor using synthesis gas feeds containing varying concentrations of water vapour.

  12. Deactivation mechanisms of NOx storage materials arising from thermal aging and sulfur poisoning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents the reliationship between Pt particle size and NOx storage performance over model catalysts. Novel reaction protocol designed to decouple effects of thermal deactivation and incomplete desulfation.

  13. Deactivation Mechanism of Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalyst Due to Reductive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mechanism of CuZeolite SCR Catalyst Due to Reductive Hydrothermal Aging Deactivation Mechanism of CuZeolite SCR Catalyst Due to Reductive Hydrothermal Aging Better control for ...

  14. De-Alerting and De-Activating Strategic Nuclear Weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KARAS, THOMAS H.

    2001-04-01

    Despite the end of the Cold War, the US and Russia continue to maintain their ICBMs and many SLBMs in a highly alerted state--they are technically prepared to launch the missiles within minutes of a command decision to do so. Some analysts argue that, particularly in light of the distressed condition of the Russian military, these high alert conditions are tantamount to standing on the edge of a nuclear cliff from which we should now step back. They have proposed various bilateral ''de-alerting'' measures, to be taken prior to and outside the context of the formal strategic arms reduction treaty (START) process. This paper identifies several criteria for a stable de-alerting regime, but fails to find de-alerting measures that convincingly satisfy the criteria. However, some de-alerting measures have promise as de-activation measures for systems due for elimination under the START II and prospective START III treaties. Moreover, once these systems are deactivated, a considerable part of the perceived need to keep nuclear forces on high alert as a survivability hedge will be reduced. At the same time, the U.S. and Russia could consider building on their earlier cooperative actions to reduce the risk of inadvertent nuclear war by enhancing their communications links and possibly joining in efforts to improve early warning systems.

  15. Alternative descriptions of catalyst deactivation in aromatization of propane and butane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koshelev, Yu.N.; Vorob`ev, B.L.; Khvorova, E.P.

    1995-08-20

    Deactivation of a zeolite-containing catalyst has been studied in aromatization of propane and butane. Various descriptions of the dependence of the alkane conversion on the coke concentration on the catalyst have been considered, and using a statistical method of estimating the model validity, the most preferable form of the deactivation function has been proposed.

  16. DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT OF E-TURBO FOR SUV AND LIGHT TRUCK APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balis, C; Middlemass, C; Shahed, SM

    2003-08-24

    The purpose of the project is to develop an electronically controlled, electrically assisted turbocharging system, e-Turbo, for application to SUV and light truck class of passenger vehicles. Earlier simulation work had shown the benefits of e-Turbo system on increasing low-end torque and improving fuel economy. This paper will present further data from the literature to show that advanced turbocharging can enable diesel engine downsizing of 10-30% with 6-17% improvement in fuel economy. This is in addition to the fuel economy benefit that a turbocharged diesel engine offers over conventional gasoline engines. E-Turbo is necessary to get acceptable driving characteristics with downsized diesel engines. As a first step towards the development of this technology for SUV/light truck sized diesel engines (4-6 litre displacement), design concepts and hardware were evaluated for a smaller engine (2 litre displacement). It was felt that design and developments issues could be minimized, the concept proven progressively on the bench, on a small engine and then applied to a large Vee engine (one on each bank). After successful demonstration of the concept, large turbomachinery could be designed and built specifically for larger SUV sized diesel engines. This paper presents the results of development of e-Turbo for a 2 litre diesel engine. A detailed comparison of several electric assist technologies including permanent magnet, six-phase induction and conventional induction motor/generator technology was done. A comparison of switched reluctance motor technology was also done although detailed design was not carried out.

  17. DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING PLANNING AND ANALYSIS WITH GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollinger, J; William Austin, W; Larry Koffman, L

    2007-09-17

    From the mid-1950's through the 1980's, the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site produced nuclear materials for the weapons stockpile, for medical and industrial applications, and for space exploration. Although SRS has a continuing defense-related mission, the overall site mission is now oriented toward environmental restoration and management of legacy chemical and nuclear waste. With the change in mission, SRS no longer has a need for much of the infrastructure developed to support the weapons program. This excess infrastructure, which includes over 1000 facilities, will be decommissioned and demolished over the forthcoming years. Dispositioning facilities for decommissioning and deactivation requires significant resources to determine hazards, structure type, and a rough-order-of-magnitude estimate for the decommissioning and demolition cost. Geographic information systems (GIS) technology was used to help manage the process of dispositioning infrastructure and for reporting the future status of impacted facilities.

  18. Commercial experience with facility deactivation to safe storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sype, T.T.; Fischer, S.R.; Lee, J.H. Jr.; Sanchez, L.C.; Ottinger, C.A.; Pirtle, G.J.

    1995-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has shutdown many production reactors; the Department has begun a major effort to also shutdown a wide variety of other nuclear facilities. Because so many facilities are being closed, it is necessary to place many of them into a safe- storage status, i.e., deactivation, before conducting decommissioning- for perhaps as long as 20 years. The challenge is to achieve this safe-storage condition in a cost-effective manner while remaining in compliance with applicable regulations. The DOE Office of Environmental Management, Office of Transition and Management, commissioned a lessons-learned study of commercial experience with safe storage and decommissioning. Although the majority of the commercial experience has been with reactors, many of the lessons learned presented in this document can provide insight into transitioning challenges that Will be faced by the DOE weapons complex.

  19. Fact #923: May 2, 1916 Cylinder Deactivation was Used in More than a

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quarter of New Light Trucks Produced in 2015 | Department of Energy 3: May 2, 1916 Cylinder Deactivation was Used in More than a Quarter of New Light Trucks Produced in 2015 Fact #923: May 2, 1916 Cylinder Deactivation was Used in More than a Quarter of New Light Trucks Produced in 2015 SUBSCRIBE to the Fact of the Week Cylinder deactivation allows the engine to shut down some of its cylinders during light-load operation for greater fuel efficiency. Over the last ten years, less than three

  20. The effect of feedstock additives on FCC catalyst deactivation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, R.; Koon, C.L.; McGhee, B.

    1995-12-31

    Fluid catalytic cracking is a major petroleum refining process and because of this the deactivation of FCC catalysts by coke deposition has been the subject of considerable investigation during the past 50 years. Nevertheless, a lack of understanding of the fundamental understanding of processes leading to coke formation still exists. Basic studies using Zeolites have usually involved excessively high levels of coke deposits compared to normal FCC operation. The present study addresses coke formation at realistic levels of 0.5 to 1.0% w/w using a standard MAT reactor in which concentrations of 1% and 10% of various additives were added to the n-hexadecane feedstock. These additives included, quinoline, phenanthrene, benzofuran, thianaphthene and indene. The coke formed was characterised by mass spectrometry and was significantly aliphatic in nature, the amount formed increasing in the order quinoline, phenanthrene, thianaphthene, benzofuran, indene. Quinoline acts primarily as a poison, whereas the other additives tend to promote coke formation in n-hexadecane cracking.

  1. Deactivation and decommissioning environmental strategy for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Complex Hanford Nuclear Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOPKINS, A.M.

    2003-02-01

    The overall goal of this strategy is to comply with all applicable environmental laws and regulations and/or compliance agreements during Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) stabilization, deactivation, and eventual dismantlement.

  2. Fact #725: April 30, 2012 Cylinder Deactivation is More Prevalent in Light Trucks than Cars

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cylinder deactivation is a fuel-saving technology that allows a vehicle to shut down some of its cylinders when extra power is not needed like when cruising down the highway at a constant speed....

  3. Integrated Project Management Planning for the Deactivation of the Savannah River Site F-Canyon Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, T.G.

    2000-12-01

    This paper explains the planning process that is being utilized by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company to take the F-Canyon Complex facilities from operations to a deactivated condition awaiting final decommissioning.

  4. Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Deactivation and Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D KM-IT) serves as a centralized repository providing a common interface for all D&D related activities.

  5. Conversion of Biomass-Derived Small Oxygenates over HZSM-5 and its Deactivation Mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Gerber, Mark A.; Flake, Matthew D.; Zhang, He; Wang, Yong

    2014-02-28

    HZSM-5 catalyst deactivation was studied using aqueous feed mixtures containing ethanol, ethanol+ acetic acid, ethanol+ethyl acetate, or ethanol+acetaldehyde in a fixed bed reactor at 360°C and 300psig. Compared to ethanol alone experiment, addition of other oxygenates reduced catalyst life in the order of: ethyl acetatedeactivate the catalyst through a pore-blocking mechanism. Acetic acid deactivates the catalyst through an active site poisoning mechanism or strong adsorption of acetate intermediates on the active sites (hydroxyl groups). Ethanol deactivates the catalyst primarily through its pore-blocking mechanism, but the rate of ethanol deactivation is orders of magnitude slower than that of acetaldehyde. Ethyl acetate hydrolyzes to form acetic acid and ethanol which deactivate the catalyst through its respective mechanisms. In addition, each functional group of oxygenates requires different active sites/catalysts and different operating conditions due to competitive adsorptions on active sites for their conversion to the desired products. Therefore, it is necessary to pre-treat the mixture of oxygenates to produce a feed stream containing the same or similar functional group compounds before converting the feed stream to hydrocarbon compounds over HZSM-5 catalyst.

  6. DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING (D AND D) TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the ongoing task of making Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) operations more efficient, this subtask has addressed the need to integrate existing characterization technologies with decontamination technologies in order to provide real-time data on the progress of contamination removal. Specifically, technologies associated with concrete decontamination and/or removal have been examined with the goal of integrating existing technologies and commercializing the resulting hybrid. The Department of Energy (DOE) has estimated that 23 million cubic meters of concrete will require disposition as 1200 buildings undergo the D&D process. All concrete removal to be performed will also necessitate extensive use of characterization techniques. The in-process characterization presents the most potential for improvement and cost-savings as compared to other types. Current methods for in-process characterization usually require cessation of work to allow for radiation surveys to assess the rate of decontamination. Combining together decontamination and characterization technologies would allow for in-process evaluation of decontamination efforts. Since the present methods do not use in-process evaluations for the progress of decontamination, they may allow for ''overremoval'' of materials (removal of contaminated along with non-contaminated materials). Overremoval increases the volume of waste and therefore the costs associated with disposal. Integrating technologies would facilitate the removal of only contaminated concrete and reduce the total volume of radioactive waste, which would be disposed of. This would eventually ensure better productivity and time savings. This project presents a general procedure to integrate the above-mentioned technologies in the form of the Technology Integration Module (TIM) along with combination lists of commercially available decontamination and characterization technologies. The scope of the project has also been expanded by FIU

  7. Study of deactivation and regeneration of catalysts used in the LC-fining of solvent refined coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, C.W. (Auburn Univ., AL); Guin, J.A.; Nalitham, R.; mohsin, A.; Tarrer, A.R.; Potts, J.D.; Hastings, K.E.

    1981-03-29

    Batch experiments as well as results from LC-Fining catalytic upgrading of coal extracts indicate deactivation of the Shell 324 Ni/Mo catalyst in the presence of solvent refined coal (SRC). At increased levels of SRC loading, deactivation increases. The chief cause of catalyst deactivation appears to be coking. The Shell 324 catalyst can be substantially regenerated after the upgrading reaction by medium temperature ashing followed by presulfiding.

  8. Deactivation of Accelerated Engine-Aged and Field-Aged SCR Catalysts and the Role of the DOC

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A technique for accelerated aging of SCR system (DOC -> SCR-> DPF) reveals two deactivation mechanisms and replicates field-aged effects

  9. Catalyst deactivation due to deposition of reaction products in macropores during hydroprocessing of petroleum residuals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khang, S.J.; Mosby, J.F.

    1986-04-01

    A pore-filling model is proposed to describe deactivation of hydroprocessing catalysts of a wide-pore structure in well-mixed and plug-flow reactors where the catalyst pellets are deactivated due to slow and uniform deposition of reaction products (mostly metal compounds) in their macropores. The model based on no mass-transfer restriction in the main channels of the pores incorporates additional active sites created by metal compounds in the deposited layers and has been shown to have two parameters of the similar type of the Thiele modulus. The model along with lumped reaction kinetics is applied for hydroprocessing reactions in trickle-bed reactors and provides reasonable deactivation curves for desulfurization and demetallation reaction when less than 50% of the original pore volume is filled with metal compounds.

  10. Microsoft Word - EOC Deactivation News Release rev. 1 3.20.15 FINAL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deactivated CARLSBAD, N.M., 3/23/2015 4:03 PM (MST) - The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Emergency Operations Center (EOC) has been deactivated after it was determined that an event located within the 16-square mile WIPP Land Withdrawal Area (LWA) had no impact on WIPP operations. At about 1:45 p.m. (MST) today, the WIPP EOC was activated as a precautionary measure after a natural gas pipeline over-pressurized and vented about 420 gallons of mixed liquid natural gas. The event occurred

  11. Use of Xenon Difluoride to Clean Hazardous By-Products in Ion Implanter Source Housings, Turbo Pumps, and Fore-Lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Despres, J.; Chambers, B.; Bishop, S.; Kaim, R.; Letaj, S.; Sergi, S.; Sweeney, J.; Tang, Y.; Wilson, S.; Yedave, S.

    2011-01-07

    This paper describes the use of xenon difluoride to clean deposits in the source housing, source turbo pump, and source turbo pump fore-line of ion implanters. Xenon difluoride has previously been shown to be effective in increasing the lifetime of the ion source{sup 1,2} and this paper presents an extension of the technology to other areas within the tool. Process by-products that are deposited in the source housing, turbo pump, and turbo pump fore-line can not only pose productivity issues, in the case of coatings on insulators, but can also be flammable and toxic in the case of deposits formed within the turbo pump and fore-line. The results presented in this paper detail the initial successful examples of using xenon difluoride to clean these deposits.ATMI has shown that xenon difluoride is capable of cleaning an insulator in an ion implanter. Typically during use an insulator will become increasingly coated with deposits that could lead to productivity problems. By introducing xenon difluoride into the source housing the insulator residues were effectively cleaned in-situ, thereby extending the maintenance interval and resulting in significant consumable savings.Similar deposits that form in the turbo pump and fore-line could not only lead to production problems due to turbo pump failure or fore-line build-up, but pose significant health risks during the ex-situ cleaning process. Through internal testing ATMI has shown that xenon difluoride is able to clean phosphorus and germanium deposits located within a turbo pump. Additionally, testing has demonstrated that the turbo pump fore-line can be cleaned in-situ without the need to remove these components, thereby virtually eliminating the possibility of fires. The cleaning reaction progress and by-products were monitored using FTIR spectrometry and thermocouples.In order to efficiently clean the source housing, turbo pump, and turbo pump fore-line xenon difluoride delivery must be optimized. This paper also

  12. Final deactivation project report on the Integrated Process Demonstration Facility, Building 7602 Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the condition of the Integrated Process Demonstration Facility (Building 7602) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) after completion of deactivation activities by the High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project (HRFDP). This report identifies the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition prior to transfer to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration EM-40 Program. This report provides a history and description of the facility prior to commencing deactivation activities and documents the condition of the building after completion of all deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Plan, remaining hazardous and radioactive materials inventory, radiological controls, Safeguards and Security, and supporting documentation provided in the Office of Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) Turnover package are discussed.

  13. Deactivation and Decommissioning Planning and Analysis with Geographic Information Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollinger, James S.; Koffman, Larry D.; Austin, William E.

    2008-01-15

    From the mid-1950's through the 1980's, the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site produced nuclear materials for the weapons stockpile, for medical and industrial applications, and for space exploration. Although SRS has a continuing defense-related mission, the overall site mission is now oriented toward environmental restoration and management of legacy chemical and nuclear waste. With the change in mission, SRS no longer has a need for much of the infrastructure developed to support the weapons program. This excess infrastructure, which includes over 1000 facilities, will be decommissioned and demolished over the forthcoming years. Dis-positioning facilities for decommissioning and deactivation requires significant resources to determine hazards, structure type, and a rough-order-of-magnitude estimate for the decommissioning and demolition cost. Geographic information systems (GIS) technology was used to help manage the process of dis-positioning infrastructure and for reporting the future status of impacted facilities. Several thousand facilities of various ages and conditions are present at SRS. Many of these facilities, built to support previous defense-related missions, now represent a potential hazard and cost for maintenance and surveillance. To reduce costs and the hazards associated with this excess infrastructure, SRS has developed an ambitious plan to decommission and demolish unneeded facilities in a systematic fashion. GIS technology was used to assist development of this plan by: providing locational information for remote facilities, identifying the location of known waste units adjacent to buildings slated for demolition, and for providing a powerful visual representation of the impact of the overall plan. Several steps were required for the development of the infrastructure GIS model. The first step involved creating an accurate and current GIS representation of the infrastructure data. This data is maintained in a Computer Aided Design

  14. Influence of process conditions and catalyst properties on catalyst deactivation during hydroprocessing of Kuwait vacuum residue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Absi-Halabi, M.; Stanislaus, A.

    1995-12-31

    A comprehensive study of catalyst deactivation during hydroprocessing of Kuwait vacuum residue in trickle-bed reactors was carried out. The influence of selected process and catalyst parameters including temperature, hydrogen pressure, liquid hourly space velocity, presulfiding and catalyst pore size on coke and metals deposition was investigated. Increasing reactor temperature increased both coke and metal deposition on the catalyst, while increasing pressure decreased coke deposition. Vanadium deposition on the other hand increased with increasing pressure. Increasing feed flow rates increased the rate of deactivation by metals, but decreased coke deposition. Catalyst pore size distribution had a significant effect on catalyst deactivation. The rate of deactivation by both coke and metals deposition was found to be higher for catalysts having predominantly narrow pores. Presulfiding of the catalyst reduced coking and led to better distribution of foulant metals within the catalyst pellet. The effect of the studied parameters on surface area and pore volume of the catalyst was determined. Mechanistic arguments will be presented to explain the results.

  15. Planning for closure and deactivation of the EBR-II complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Henslee, S.P.; Poland, H.F.; Wells, P.B.

    1997-07-01

    In January 1994, DOE terminated the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program. Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) prepared a detailed plan to put Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) in a safe condition, including removal of irradiated fueled subassemblies from the plant, transfer of subassemblies, and removal and stabilization of primary and secondary sodium liquid heat transfer metal. The goal of deactivation is to stabilize the EBR-II complex until decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) is implemented, thereby minimizing maintenance and surveillance. Deactivation of a sodium cooled reactor presents unique concerns. Residual sodium in the primary and secondary systems must be either reacted or inerted to preclude concerns with explosive sodium-air reactions. Also, residual sodium on components will effectively solder these items in place, making removal unfeasible. Several special cases reside in the primary system, including primary cold traps, a cesium trap, a cover gas condenser, and systems containing sodium-potassium alloy. The sodium or sodium-potassium alloy in these components must be reacted in place or the components removed. The Sodium Components Maintenance Shop at ANL-W provides the capability for washing primary components, removing residual quantities of sodium while providing some decontamination capacity. Considerations need to be given to component removal necessary for providing access to primary tank internals for D&D activities, removal of hazardous materials, and removal of stored energy sources. ANL-W`s plan for the deactivation of EBR-II addresses these issues, providing for an industrially and radiologically safe complex, requiring minimal surveillance during the interim period between deactivation and D&D. Throughout the deactivation and closure of the EBR-II complex, federal environmental concerns will be addressed, including obtaining the proper permits for facility condition and waste processing and disposal. 2 figs.

  16. Project management plan for the isotopes facilities deactivation project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    Purpose of the deactivation project is to place former isotopes production facilities at ORNL in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition suitable for an extended period of minimum surveillance and maintenance. This management plan was prepared to document project objectives, define organizational relationships and responsibilities, and outline the management control systems. The project has adopted the strategy of deactivating the simple facilities first. The plan provides a road map for the quality assurance program and identifies other documents supporting the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project.

  17. The Role of Phosphorus and Soot on the Deactivation of Diesel Oxidation Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eaton, Scott J; Nguyen, Ke; Bunting, Bruce G; Toops, Todd J

    2009-01-01

    The deactivation of diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) by soot contamination and lube-oil derived phosphorus poisoning is investigated. Pt/CeO2/-Al2O3 DOCs aged using three different protocols developed by the authors and six high mileage field-returned DOCs of similar formulation are evaluated for THC and CO oxidation performance using a bench-flow reactor. Collectively, these catalysts exhibit a variety of phosphorus and soot morphologies contributing to performance deactivation. To isolate and examine the contribution of each deactivation mechanism, performance evaluations are carried out for each DOC ''as received'' and after removal of surface carbon in a high-temperature oxidizing environment. In such a manner the deactivation contribution of soot contamination is de-convoluted from that of phosphorus poisoning. It will be shown that this is accomplished while preserving phosphorus (and to a lesser degree sulfur, calcium and zinc) chemistries and concentrations within the washcoat. Washcoat contaminant information and materials changes are characterized using electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), BET surface area, oxygen storage capacity (OSC), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis, from which the relative severity of each mechanism can be quantified. Results show that soot contamination from diesel exhaust severely degrades THC and CO oxidation performance by acting as a catalyst surface diffusion barrier. This results in a considerable increase of light-off temperatures. In contrast, phosphorus poisoning, which is considered a significant deactivation mechanism in three-way catalysts, is shown to have minimal effect on DOC oxidation performance for the conditions studied here. Material changes include the formation of both Ce(III-IV) and aluminum phosphates which do not significantly hinder the THC and CO oxidation in lean

  18. Using liquid desiccant as a regenerable filter for capturing and deactivating contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slayzak, Steven J.; Anderson, Ren S.; Judkoff, Ronald D.; Blake, Daniel M.; Vinzant, Todd B.; Ryan, Joseph P.

    2007-12-11

    A method, and systems for implementing such method, for purifying and conditioning air of weaponized contaminants. The method includes wetting a filter packing media with a salt-based liquid desiccant, such as water with a high concentration of lithium chloride. Air is passed through the wetted filter packing media and the contaminants in are captured with the liquid desiccant while the liquid desiccant dehumidifies the air. The captured contaminants are then deactivated in the liquid desiccant, which may include heating the liquid desiccant. The liquid desiccant is regenerated by applying heat to the liquid desiccant and then removing moisture. The method includes repeating the wetting with the regenerated liquid desiccant which provides a regenerable filtering process that captures and deactivates contaminants on an ongoing basis while also conditioning the air. The method may include filtration effectiveness enhancement by electrostatic or inertial means.

  19. Measurement and control system for cryogenic helium gas bearing turbo-expander experimental platform based on Siemens PLC S7-300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, J.; Xiong, L. Y.; Peng, N.; Dong, B.; Liu, L. Q.; Wang, P.

    2014-01-29

    An experimental platform for cryogenic Helium gas bearing turbo-expanders is established at the Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences. This turbo-expander experimental platform is designed for performance testing and experimental research on Helium turbo-expanders with different sizes from the liquid hydrogen temperature to the room temperature region. A measurement and control system based on Siemens PLC S7-300 for this turbo-expander experimental platform is developed. Proper sensors are selected to measure such parameters as temperature, pressure, rotation speed and air flow rate. All the collected data to be processed are transformed and transmitted to S7-300 CPU. Siemens S7-300 series PLC CPU315-2PN/DP is as master station and two sets of ET200M DP remote expand I/O is as slave station. Profibus-DP field communication is established between master station and slave stations. The upper computer Human Machine Interface (HMI) is compiled using Siemens configuration software WinCC V6.2. The upper computer communicates with PLC by means of industrial Ethernet. Centralized monitoring and distributed control is achieved. Experimental results show that this measurement and control system has fulfilled the test requirement for the turbo-expander experimental platform.

  20. Extending operating range of a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine via cylinder deactivation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hergart, Carl-Anders; Hardy, William L.; Duffy, Kevin P.; Liechty, Michael P.

    2008-05-27

    An HCCI engine has the ability to operate over a large load range by utilizing a lower cetane distillate diesel fuel to increase ignition delay. This permits more stable operation at high loads by avoidance of premature combustion before top dead center. During low load conditions, a portion of the engines cylinders are deactivated so that the remaining cylinders can operate at a pseudo higher load while the overall engine exhibits behavior typical of a relatively low load.

  1. EM Delivers in Deactivation, Regulatory Milestones, Shipping Progress at Portsmouth Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PIKETON, Ohio – EM’s Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (PPPO) made significant strides in the Portsmouth site’s decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) project in 2014, including deactivation progress in one of the plant’s three main uranium enrichment process buildings, the issuance of two proposed plans for the two Records of Decision (RODs) that will drive D&D work, and a rigorous shipping campaign.

  2. Final Deactivation Project report on the Alpha Powder Facility, Building 3028, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    This report documents the condition of the Alpha Powder Facility (APF), Building 3028, after completion of deactivation activities. Activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition for transfer to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) program are outlined. A history and profile of the facility prior to commencing deactivation activities and a profile of the building after completion of deactivation activities are provided. Turnover items, such as the post-deactivation surveillance and maintenance (S&M) plan, remaining hazardous materials, radiological controls, safeguards and security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided for in the DOE Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) turnover package are discussed.

  3. Di?partment o

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ,Di?partment o f E n e r g y ' ' ' : . ' ~' Washington, DC 20585 ., .* -,, : ', ," FEE 17.,1995' , :' ' , ,,- ',/ 'he Honorable Larry.Guidt ' ' : X 1455 W., 126th Street lawthorne; California 90250 1 _. _ tear.Mayor Guidi: ; ..,, _ ietretary of Energy Hazel O'Leary,has announced a new approach to openness.in :he Department .of Energy (DOE) and its communications wifh,the public: In ; - upport of thts initiative, we are ,p;T.eased to forward the enclosed,,information .,~ -elated to the

  4. Politecnico di Milano | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Politecnico di Milano Jump to: navigation, search Name: Politecnico di Milano Place: Milan, Italy Zip: 20133 Sector: Solar Product: Milan-based technical university. The institute...

  5. Emcore DI Semicon JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Korea (Republic) Product: Emcore and DI Semicon combine forces in a South Korean joint venture to manufacture PV systems. References: Emcore & DI Semicon JV1 This...

  6. INCREASED FLEXIBILITY OF TURBO-COMPRESSORS IN NATURAL GAS TRANSMISSION THROUGH DIRECT SURGE CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. McKee

    2003-05-01

    This preliminary phase 1 report summarizes the background and the work on the ''Increased Flexibility of Turbo-Compressors in Natural Gas Transmission through Direct Surge Control'' project to date. The importance of centrifugal compressors for natural gas transmission is discussed, and the causes of surge and the consequences of current surge control approaches are explained. Previous technology development, including findings from early GMRC research, previous surge detection work, and selected publications, are presented. The project is divided into three Phases to accomplish the project objectives of verifying near surge sensing, developing a prototype surge control system (sensor and controller), and testing/demonstrating the benefits of direct surge control. Specification for the direct surge control sensor and controller developed with guidance from the industry Oversight Committee is presented in detail. Results of CFD modeling conducted to aid in interpreting the laboratory test results are shown and explained. An analysis of the system dynamics identified the data sampling and handling requirements for direct surge control. A detailed design process for surge detection probes has been developed and explained in this report and has been used to prepare drag probes for the laboratory compressor test and the first field test. The surge detection probes prepared for testing have been bench tested and flow tested to determine and calibrate their sensitivity to flow forces as shown in data presented in this report. The surge detection drag probes have been shown to perform as expected and as required to detect approaching surge. Laboratory test results of surge detection in the SwRI centrifugal compressor demonstrated functionality of the surge detection probes and a change in the impeller inlet flow pattern prior to surge. Although the recirculation cannot be detected because of the specific geometry of this compressor, there are changes that indicate the

  7. DEACTIVATION MANAGEMENT

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... In terms of broad concepts, the value of independent oversight is immeasurable. However, advice of an independent review team in attempting to scope and define specific work tasks ...

  8. Fact #923: May 2, 2016 Cylinder Deactivation was Used in More than a Quarter of New Light Trucks Produced in 2015- Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file and dataset for Cylinder Deactivation was Used in More than a Quarter of New Light Trucks Produced in 2015

  9. Final deactivation project report on the Source Development Laboratory, building 3029, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the condition of Building 3029 after completion of deactivation activities as outlined by the DOE Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) guidance documentation. This report outlines the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition for transfer to the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40). This report provides a history and profile of the facility prior to commencing deactivation activities and a profile of the building after completion of deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the post-deactivation surveillance and maintenance (S&M) plan, remaining hazardous materials, radiological controls, safeguards and security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided in the EM-60 turnover package are discussed. Building 3029 will require access to facilitate required S&M activities to maintain the building safety envelope. building 3029 was stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 program, only a minimal S&M effort would be required to maintain the building safety envelope. Other than the minimal S&M activities, the building will be unoccupied and the exterior doors locked to prevent unauthorized access. The building will be entered only to perform the required S&M. 5 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Transportation Efficiency Strategies

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Advanced Technology Vehicles: Overview and Constraints John German, ICCT EIA Energy Conference April 26, 2011 Where Does the Energy Go? http://www.fueleconomy.gov/FEG/atv.shtml Friction reduction Cylinder deactivation DI turbo Aero, tires Variable valves weight High efficient gasoline engine Clean diesel HEV expansion Base engine and vehicle improvements Efficiency/CO2 reduction EV/FCV development for future Fleet tests Research for mass production HCCI No single solution - multi-pronged

  11. REVIEW OF INDUSTRIES AND GOVERNMENT AGENCIES FOR TECHNOLOGIES APPLICABLE TO DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reilkoff, T. E.; Hetland, M. D.; O'Leary, E. M.

    2002-02-25

    The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area's (DDFA's) mission is to develop, demonstrate, and deploy improved deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) technologies. This mission requires that emphasis be continually placed on identifying technologies currently employed or under development in other nuclear as well as nonnuclear industries and government agencies. In support of DDFA efforts to clean up the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) radiologically contaminated surplus facilities using technologies that improve worker safety, reduce costs, and accelerate cleanup schedules, a study was conducted to identify innovative technologies developed for use in nonnuclear arenas that are appropriate for D&D applications.

  12. Feasibility study of air-breathing turbo-engines for horizontal take-off and landing space plane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minoda, M.; Sakata, K.; Tamaki, T.; Saitoh, T.; Yasuda, A.

    1989-01-01

    Various concepts of air-breathing engines (ABEs) that could be used for a horizontal take-off and landing SSTO vehicle are investigated. The performances (with respect to thrust and the specific fuel consumption) of turboengines based on various technologies, including a turbojet with and without afterburner (TJ), turboramjet, and air-turbo-ram jet engines are compared. The mission capabilities of these ABEs for SSTO and TSTO vehicles is examined in terms of the ratio of the effective remaining weight (i.e., the weight on the orbit) to the take-off gross weight, using two-dimensional flight analysis. It was found that the dry TJ with the turbine inlet temperature 2000 C is one of the most promising candidates for the propulsion system of the SSTO vehicle, because of its small weight and high specific impulse. 6 refs.

  13. Controlled Growth of Metal Phthalocyanine on Deactivated Si Surfaces by Selective p-d Orbital Coupling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wagner, Sean R.; Huang, Bing; Park, Changwon; Feng, Jiagui; Yoon, Mina; Zhang, Pengpeng

    2015-08-26

    Poor control of the interactions that govern organic molecular growth continues to hinder the prospect of organic electronic nano- architectures. Particularly, a selective mechanism for tuning the molecule-substrate interaction has been a long sought after goal towards tailored molecular growth. Here, combining scanning tun- neling microscopy and density functional theory we show that by controlling the strength of orbital hybridization between phthalo- cyanine molecules and the deactivated Si surface via the selective p-d orbital coupling, we can tune the molecular ordering and molecular orientation at the hetero-interface. This mechanism offers a novel approach to balance the critical interactions, leading tomorecontrolled long-ranged ordered molecular growth that can be incorporated into modern electronics.less

  14. Growth of metal phthalocyanine on deactivated semiconducting surfaces steered by selective orbital coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Sean R.; Huang, Bing; Park, Changwon; Feng, Jiagui; Yoon, Mina; Zhang, Pengpeng

    2015-08-26

    Poor control of the interactions that govern organic molecular growth continues to hinder the prospect of organic electronic nano- architectures. Particularly, a selective mechanism for tuning the molecule-substrate interaction has been a long sought after goal towards tailored molecular growth. Here, combining scanning tun- neling microscopy and density functional theory we show that by controlling the strength of orbital hybridization between phthalo- cyanine molecules and the deactivated Si surface via the selective p-d orbital coupling, we can tune the molecular ordering and molecular orientation at the hetero-interface. This mechanism offers a novel approach to balance the critical interactions, leading to controlled long-ranged ordered molecular growth that can be incorporated into modern electronics.

  15. Growth of metal phthalocyanine on deactivated semiconducting surfaces steered by selective orbital coupling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wagner, Sean R.; Huang, Bing; Park, Changwon; Feng, Jiagui; Yoon, Mina; Zhang, Pengpeng

    2015-08-26

    Poor control of the interactions that govern organic molecular growth continues to hinder the prospect of organic electronic nano- architectures. Particularly, a selective mechanism for tuning the molecule-substrate interaction has been a long sought after goal towards tailored molecular growth. Here, combining scanning tun- neling microscopy and density functional theory we show that by controlling the strength of orbital hybridization between phthalo- cyanine molecules and the deactivated Si surface via the selective p-d orbital coupling, we can tune the molecular ordering and molecular orientation at the hetero-interface. This mechanism offers a novel approach to balance the critical interactions, leading tomore » controlled long-ranged ordered molecular growth that can be incorporated into modern electronics.« less

  16. System and method of cylinder deactivation for optimal engine torque-speed map operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sujan, Vivek A; Frazier, Timothy R; Follen, Kenneth; Moon, Suk-Min

    2014-11-11

    This disclosure provides a system and method for determining cylinder deactivation in a vehicle engine to optimize fuel consumption while providing the desired or demanded power. In one aspect, data indicative of terrain variation is utilized in determining a vehicle target operating state. An optimal active cylinder distribution and corresponding fueling is determined from a recommendation from a supervisory agent monitoring the operating state of the vehicle of a subset of the total number of cylinders, and a determination as to which number of cylinders provides the optimal fuel consumption. Once the optimal cylinder number is determined, a transmission gear shift recommendation is provided in view of the determined active cylinder distribution and target operating state.

  17. Deactivation of Accelerated Engine-Aged and Field-Aged Fe-Zeolite SCR Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toops, Todd J; Nguyen, Ke; Foster, Adam; Bunting, Bruce G; Hagaman, Edward {Ed} W; Jiao, Jian

    2010-01-01

    A single-cylinder diesel engine with an emissions control system - diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), Fe-zeolite selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst, and diesel particulate filter (DPF) - was used to perform accelerated thermal aging of the SCR catalyst. Cyclic aging is performed at SCR inlet temperatures of 650, 750 and 850 degrees C for up to 50 aging cycles. To assess the validity of the implemented accelerated thermal aging protocol, a field-aged SCR catalyst of similar formulation was also evaluated. The monoliths were cut into sections and evaluated for NO{sub x} performance in a bench-flow reactor. While the rear section of both the field-aged and the accelerated engine-aged SCR catalysts maintained high NO{sub x}conversion, 75-80% at 400 degrees C, the front section exhibited a drastic decrease to only 20-35% at 400 degrees C. This two-tiered deactivation was also observed for field-aged samples that were analyzed in this study. To understand the observed performance changes, thorough materials characterization was performed which revealed two primary degradation mechanisms. The first mechanism is a general Fe-zeolite deterioration which led to surface area losses, dealumination of the zeolite, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystal growth. This degradation accelerated above 750 degrees C, and the effects were generally more severe in the front of the catalyst. The second deactivation mechanism is linked to trace levels of Pt that are suspected to be volatizing from the DOC and depositing on the front section of the SCR catalyst. Chemical evidence of this can be seen in the high levels of NH{sub 3} oxidation (80% conversion at 400 degrees C), which coincides with the decrease in performance.

  18. DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGY FOR THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT COMPLEX, HANFORD NUCLEAR RESERVATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, A.M.; Heineman, R.; Norton, S.; Miller, M.; Oates, L.

    2003-02-27

    Maintaining compliance with environmental regulatory requirements is a significant priority in successful completion of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Nuclear Material Stabilization (NMS) Project. To ensure regulatory compliance throughout the deactivation and decommissioning of the PFP complex, an environmental regulatory strategy was developed. The overall goal of this strategy is to comply with all applicable environmental laws and regulations and/or compliance agreements during PFP stabilization, deactivation, and eventual dismantlement. Significant environmental drivers for the PFP Nuclear Material Stabilization Project include the Tri-Party Agreement; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA); the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA); the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA); the Clean Air Act (CAA), and the Clean Water Act (CWA). Recent TPA negotiation s with Ecology and EPA have resulted in milestones that support the use of CERCLA as the primary statutory framework for decommissioning PFP. Milestones have been negotiated to support the preparation of Engineering Evaluations/Cost Analyses for decommissioning major PFP buildings. Specifically, CERCLA EE/CA(s) are anticipated for the following scopes of work: Settling Tank 241-Z-361, the 232-Z Incinerator, , the process facilities (eg, 234-5Z, 242, 236) and the process facility support buildings. These CERCLA EE/CA(s) are for the purpose of analyzing the appropriateness of the slab-on-grade endpoint Additionally, agreement was reached on performing an evaluation of actions necessary to address below-grade structures or other structures remaining after completion of the decommissioning of PFP. Remaining CERCLA actions will be integrated with other Central Plateau activities at the Hanford site.

  19. An investigation into the reactivity, deactivation, and in situ regeneration of Pt-based catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} under lean burn conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burch, R.; Fornasiero, P.; Southward, B.W.L.

    1999-02-15

    The activity and deactivation characteristics of Pt-based lean burn De-NO{sub x} catalysts have been investigated and the relationships between temperature, nature of reductant (n-octane) and NO{sub 2} concentrations, and the mechanism(s) of deactivation have been examined. The effects of Pt loading and particle size on the activity and deactivation have also been studied. The results show that deactivation of the catalyst is due to site blocking via an unidentified carbonaceous deposit and that the initial surface state of the Pt is crucial. In all cases clean Pt surfaces were found to display an initial period of surprisingly high activity prior to deactivation, the rate of which was inversely related to reaction temperature. Deactivation is proposed to arise from a combination of factors which inhibit adsorption and reaction of n-octane, due to encroachment onto the Pt surface of hydrocarbonaceous species accumulating initially on the support in the vicinity of the Pt/support interface. It is possible that these carbon-containing deposits comprise some form of organonitrogen species. The loss of activity due to this gradual encroachment results in a reduction in the temperature of the Pt particles, leading to a further decrease in reaction and/or desorption rates, and rapid deactivation then ensues. The use of higher Pt loadings leads to enhanced activity at lower temperatures and increased tolerance to the deactivating effects of surface deposition. Catalyst activity and tolerance to deactivation were further enhanced by controlled sintering, which, within certain limits, resulted in excellent, stable low-temperature De-NO{sub x} activity.

  20. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction for deactivation of the PUREX storage tunnel number 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, R.E.

    1999-10-11

    The Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant Storage Tunnel Number 2 (hereafter referred to as the PUREX Tunnel) was built in 1964. Since that time, the PUREX Tunnel has been used for storage of radioactive and mixed waste. In 1991, the PUREX Plant ceased operations and was transitioned to deactivation. The PUREX Tunnel continued to receive PUREX Plant waste material for storage during transition activities. Before 1995, a decision was made to store radioactive and mixed waste in the PUREX Tunnel generated from other onsite sources, on a case-by-case basis. This notice of construction (NOC) describes the activities associated with the reactivation of the PUREX Tunnel ventilation system and the transfer of up to 3.5 million curies (MCi) of radioactive waste to the PUREX Tunnel from any location on the Hanford Site. The unabated total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) estimated for the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI) is 5.6 E-2 millirem (mrem). The abated TEDE conservatively is estimated to account for 1.9 E-5 mrem to the MEI. The following text provides information requirements of Appendix A of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247 (requirements 1 through 18).

  1. Reducing the deactivation of Ni-metal during the catalytic partial oxidation of a surrogate diesel fuel mixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haynes, Daniel J.; Campos, Andrew; Smith, Mark W.; Berry, David A.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Spivey, James J.

    2010-09-01

    Ni catalysts are active and selective for the conversion of hydrocarbon into synthesis gas. However, conventional supported Ni catalysts rapidly deactivate at the high temperatures required for partial oxidation of diesel fuel by sintering and metal vaporization, as well as by carbon deposition and sulfur poisoning. Thus, to reduce deactivation Ni (3 wt%) was substituted into the structures of Ba-hexaaluminate (BNHA) and La–Sr–Zr pyrochlore (LSZN), and their activity was compared to a supported Ni/Al2O3 for the catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) of a surrogate diesel fuel. Characterization by XRD showed a single phase -alumina for the hexaaluminate, while LSZN had a pyrochlore structure with a defect SrZrO3 perovskite phase. Temperature programmed reduction experiments confirmed Ni was reducible in all catalysts. XANES results confirmed that Ni atoms were substituted into the hexaaluminate and pyrochlore structures, as spectra for each catalyst showed different coordination environments for Ni compared to a NiO standard. During CPOX activity tests (T = 900°C and WHSV= 50,000 scc/gcat/h), the LSZN pyrochlore produced stable H2 and CO yields in the presence of 5 wt% 1-methylnaphthalene and 50ppmw dibenzothiophene/n-tetradecane for 2 h, while both Ni/Al2O3 and BNHA catalysts were irreversibly deactivated by this mixture over the same time. Activity loss was strongly linked to carbon formation

  2. Interporto di Padova | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Italy Zip: 35127 Product: Based in Italy, Interporto is a center for the integrated logistics and intermodality. References: Interporto di Padova1 This article is a stub. You...

  3. DI-MGMT-81861 DOE Changes Version | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DI-MGMT-81861 DOE Changes Version DI-MGMT-81861 DOE Changes Version PDF icon DI-MGMT-81861 IPMR DOE Version 20140211 Chgs.pdf More Documents & Publications Integrated Program...

  4. Heating, ventilating, and air conditioning deactivation thermal analysis of PUREX Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, W.W.; Gregonis, R.A.

    1997-08-01

    Thermal analysis was performed for the proposed Plutonium Uranium Extraction Plant exhaust system after deactivation. The purpose of the analysis was to determine if enough condensation will occur to plug or damage the filtration components. A heat transfer and fluid flow analysis was performed to evaluate the thermal characteristics of the underground duct system, the deep-bed glass fiber filter No. 2, and the high-efficiency particulate air filters in the fourth filter building. The analysis is based on extreme variations of air temperature, relative humidity, and dew point temperature using 15 years of Hanford Site weather data as a basis. The results will be used to evaluate the need for the electric heaters proposed for the canyon exhaust to prevent condensation. Results of the analysis indicate that a condition may exist in the underground ductwork where the duct temperature can lead or lag changes in the ambient air temperature. This condition may contribute to condensation on the inside surfaces of the underground exhaust duct. A worst case conservative analysis was performed assuming that all of the water is removed from the moist air over the inside surface of the concrete duct area in the fully developed turbulent boundary layer while the moist air in the free stream will not condense. The total moisture accumulated in 24 hours is negligible. Water puddling would not be expected. The results of the analyses agree with plant operating experiences. The filters were designed to resist high humidity and direct wetting, filter plugging caused by slight condensation in the upstream duct is not a concern. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  5. PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) 241-Z LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT FACILITY DEACTIVATION AND DEMOLITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSTON GA

    2008-01-15

    Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) is proud to submit the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) 241-Z liquid Waste Treatment Facility Deactivation and Demolition (D&D) Project for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2008. The decommissioning of the 241-Z Facility presented numerous challenges, many of which were unique with in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. The majority of the project budget and schedule was allocated for cleaning out five below-grade tank vaults. These highly contaminated, confined spaces also presented significant industrial safety hazards that presented some of the most hazardous work environments on the Hanford Site. The 241-Z D&D Project encompassed diverse tasks: cleaning out and stabilizing five below-grade tank vaults (also called cells), manually size-reducing and removing over three tons of process piping from the vaults, permanently isolating service utilities, removing a large contaminated chemical supply tank, stabilizing and removing plutonium-contaminated ventilation ducts, demolishing three structures to grade, and installing an environmental barrier on the demolition site . All of this work was performed safely, on schedule, and under budget. During the deactivation phase of the project between November 2005 and February 2007, workers entered the highly contaminated confined-space tank vaults 428 times. Each entry (or 'dive') involved an average of three workers, thus equaling approximately 1,300 individual confined -space entries. Over the course of the entire deactivation and demolition period, there were no recordable injuries and only one minor reportable skin contamination. The 241-Z D&D Project was decommissioned under the provisions of the 'Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order' (the Tri-Party Agreement or TPA), the 'Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976' (RCRA), and the 'Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980' (CERCLA). The

  6. Facon Electronica di Facconi Massimo C | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Facon Electronica di Facconi Massimo C Jump to: navigation, search Name: Facon Electronica di Facconi Massimo & C Place: Leno, Italy Zip: 25024 Product: Leno-based electrical...

  7. The Orosomucoid 1 protein is involved in the vitamin D – mediated macrophage de-activation process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gemelli, Claudia; Martello, Andrea; Montanari, Monica; Zanocco Marani, Tommaso; Salsi, Valentina; Zappavigna, Vincenzo; Parenti, Sandra; Vignudelli, Tatiana; Selmi, Tommaso; Ferrari, Sergio; Grande, Alexis

    2013-12-10

    Orosomucoid 1 (ORM1), also named Alpha 1 acid glycoprotein A (AGP-A), is an abundant plasma protein characterized by anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating properties. The present study was designed to identify a possible correlation between ORM1 and Vitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), a hormone exerting a widespread effect on cell proliferation, differentiation and regulation of the immune system. In particular, the data described here indicated that ORM1 is a 1,25(OH)2D3 primary response gene, characterized by the presence of a VDRE element inside the 1 kb sequence of its proximal promoter region. This finding was demonstrated with gene expression studies, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation and luciferase transactivation experiments and confirmed by VDR full length and dominant negative over-expression. In addition, several experiments carried out in human normal monocytes demonstrated that the 1,25(OH)2D3 – VDR – ORM1 pathway plays a functional role inside the macrophage de-activation process and that ORM1 may be considered as a signaling molecule involved in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and remodeling. - Highlights: • ORM1 is a Vitamin D primary response gene. • VD and its receptor VDR are involved in the de-activation process mediated by human resident macrophages. • The signaling pathway VD-VDR-ORM1 plays an important role in the control of macrophage de-activation process. • ORM1 may be defined as a signaling molecule implicated in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and remodeling.

  8. Reducing the deactivation of Ni-metal during the catalytic partial oxidation of a surrogate diesel fuel mixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haynes, Daniel J.; Campos, Andrew; Smith, Mark W.; Berry, David A.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Spivey, James J.

    2010-09-01

    Ni catalysts are active and selective for the conversion of hydrocarbon into synthesis gas. However, conventional supported Ni catalysts rapidly deactivate at the high temperatures required for partial oxidation of diesel fuel by sintering and metal vaporization, as well as by carbon deposition and sulfur poisoning. Thus, to reduce deactivation Ni (3 wt%) was substituted into the structures of Ba-hexaaluminate (BNHA) and La–Sr–Zr pyrochlore (LSZN), and their activity was compared to a supported Ni/Al2O3 for the catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) of a surrogate diesel fuel. Characterization by XRD showed a single phase β-alumina for the hexaaluminate, while LSZN had a pyrochlore structure with a defect SrZrO3 perovskite phase. Temperature programmed reduction experiments confirmed Ni was reducible in all catalysts. XANES results confirmed that Ni atoms were substituted into the hexaaluminate and pyrochlore structures, as spectra for each catalyst showed different coordination environments for Ni compared to a NiO standard. During CPOX activity tests (T = 900 °C and WHSV = 50,000 scc/gcat/h), the LSZN pyrochlore produced stable H2 and CO yields in the presence of 5 wt% 1-methylnaphthalene and 50 ppmw dibenzothiophene/n-tetradecane for 2 h, while both Ni/Al2O3 and BNHA catalysts were irreversibly deactivated by this mixture over the same time. Finally, activity loss was strongly linked to carbon formation.

  9. Idaho Cleanup Project CPP-603A basin deactivation waste management 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croson, D.V.; Davis, R.H.; Cooper, W.B.

    2007-07-01

    The CPP-603A basin facility is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL). CPP-603A operations are part of the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) that is managed by CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (CWI). Once the inventoried fuel was removed from the basins, they were no longer needed for fuel storage. However, they were still filled with water to provide shielding from high activity debris and contamination, and had to either be maintained so the basins did not present a threat to public or worker health and safety, or be isolated from the environment. The CPP-603A basins contained an estimated 50,000 kg (110,200 lbs) of sludge. The sludge was composed of desert sand, dust, precipitated corrosion products, and metal particles from past cutting operations. The sediment also contained hazardous constituents and radioactive contamination, including cadmium, lead, and U-235. An Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA), conducted pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), evaluated the risks associated with deactivation of the basins and the alternatives for addressing those risks. The recommended action identified in the Action Memorandum was to perform interim stabilization of the basins. The sludge in the basins was removed and treated in accordance with the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) and disposed at the INL Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). A Non-Time Critical Removal Action (NTCRA) was conducted under CERCLA to reduce or eliminate other hazards associated with maintaining the facility. The CERCLA NTCRA included removing a small high-activity debris object (SHADO 1); consolidating and mapping the location of debris objects containing Co-60; removing, treating, and disposing of the basin water; and filling the basins with grout/controlled low strength material (CLSM

  10. Final deactivation project report on the High Radiation Level Analytical Facility, Building 3019B at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the condition of the High Radiation Level Analytical Facility (Building 3019B) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) after completion of deactivation activities. This report identifies the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition prior to transfer to the Environmental Restoration EM-40 Program. This document provides a history and description of the facility prior to the commencement of deactivation activities and documents the condition of the building after completion of all deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Plan, remaining hazardous materials inventory, radiological controls, safeguards and security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided in the Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization (EM-60) Turnover package are discussed. Building 3019B will require access to perform required S&M activities to maintain the building safety envelope. Building 3019B was stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 Program, only a minimal S&M effort would be required to maintain the building safety envelope. Other than the minimal S&M activities the building will be unoccupied and the exterior doors locked to prevent unauthorized access. The building will be entered only to perform the required S&M until decommissioning activities begin.

  11. Work plan for the High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    The High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project (HRFDP), commissioned by the US Department of Energy Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program, is to place four primary high-risk surplus facilities with 28 associated ancillary facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition as rapidly and economically as possible. The facilities will be deactivated and left in a condition suitable for an extended period of minimized surveillance and maintenance (S and M) prior to decontaminating and decommissioning (D and D). These four facilities include two reactor facilities containing spent fuel. One of these reactor facilities also contains 55 tons of sodium with approximately 34 tons containing activated sodium-22, 2.5 tons of lithium hydride, approximately 100 tons of potentially contaminated lead, and several other hazardous materials as well as bulk quantities of contaminated scrap metals. The other two facilities to be transferred include a facility with a bank of hot cells containing high levels of transferable contamination and also a facility containing significant quantities of uranyl nitrate and quantities of transferable contamination. This work plan documents the objectives, technical requirements, and detailed work plans--including preliminary schedules, milestones, and conceptual FY 1996 cost estimates--for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This plan has been developed by the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program of Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (Energy Systems) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO).

  12. On the nature of the deactivation of supported palladium nanoparticle catalysts in the decarboxylation of fatty acids.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ping, E. W.; Pierson, J.; Wallace, R.; Miller, J. T.; Fuller, T. F.; Jones, C. W.

    2011-04-15

    Supported palladium catalysts are effective catalysts for the hydrogen-free decarboxylation of fatty acids. However, the catalysts deactivate severely after one use. Here, the recyclability of a well-defined, mesoporous silica-supported palladium nanoparticle catalyst is evaluated in the batch decarboxylation of stearic acid at 300 C under inert atmosphere, producing n-heptadecane. The nature of the catalyst deactivation is examined in detail via an array of characterization techniques. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) demonstrates that little palladium surface oxidation occurs over the course of the reaction, and a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) suggests negligible particle sintering or agglomeration. Physisorption and chemisorption measurements demonstrate substantial loss in total surface area and porosity as well as accessible palladium surface area with these losses attributed to significant organic deposition on the catalyst, as verified via thermogravimetric analysis. High temperature calcination is applied to combust and remove these residues, but resultant nanoparticle agglomeration is significant. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and solid dissolution followed by organic extraction methodologies demonstrate that the carbonaceous deposits are not coke but rather strongly adsorbed reactants and products. Detrimental coke formation, as suggested by prior literature, is verified to be absent, as extraction of the surface-deposited organic species yields nearly complete recovery of the total surface area, pore volume, and active palladium surface area. Furthermore, the regenerated catalyst exhibits a corresponding significant recovery of decarboxylation activity.

  13. Adsorption and Deactivation Characteristics of Cu/ZnO-Based Catalysts for Methanol Synthesis from Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natesakhawat, Sittichai; Ohodnicki, Paul R; Howard, Bret H; Lekse, Jonathan W; Baltrus, John P; Matranga, Christopher

    2013-07-09

    The adsorption and deactivation characteristics of coprecipitated Cu/ZnO-based catalysts were examined and correlated to their performance in methanol synthesis from CO₂ hydrogenation. The addition of Ga₂O₃ and Y₂O₃ promoters is shown to increase the Cu surface area and CO₂/H₂ adsorption capacities of the catalysts and enhance methanol synthesis activity. Infrared studies showed that CO₂ adsorbs spontaneously on these catalysts at room temperature as both monoand bi-dentate carbonate species. These weakly bound species desorb completely from the catalyst surface by 200 °C while other carbonate species persist up to 500 °C. Characterization using N₂O decomposition, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis clearly indicated that Cu sintering is the main cause of catalyst deactivation. Ga and Y promotion improves the catalyst stability by suppressing the agglomeration of Cu and ZnO particles under pretreatment and reaction conditions.

  14. Turbo-exhaust cleaner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holste, M.R.

    1980-01-29

    A method and means for improving the efficiency of movablepiston internal combustion engines and reducing the pollution of the environment produced by their operation are described. The exhaust gases from the engine are compressed and afterburnt, and this resulting heat energy is converted to mechanical energy in a gas turbine connected to the engine shaft. Details of preferred combustion chambers and of a preferred unit combining compressors and turbines are also given. In one embodiment of the invention, a piston engine is arranged for stratified charging and the power stroke is adjusted to deliver exhaust gases at high pressure. In order to increase the efficiency of the gas turbine, portions of the turbine can be coated with a catalytic material.

  15. Parametric and kinetic studies on deactivation and regeneration of hydrotreating catalysts in solvent refined coal upgrading process and an evaluation of the liquid vaporization effects on hydrotreater performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nalitham, R.V.

    1983-01-01

    Catalysts used in hydrotreating the solvent refined coal were rapidly deactivated during the initial stages of processing. The major cause of deactivation appears to be the deposition of carbonaceous material on the catalyst. A simulated aging technique involving a series of reactions on the same batch of catalyst and a model compound activity test were developed and used to study the effects of process conditions, feedstock characteristics, catalyst properties, and catalyst pretreatment on initial catalyst deactivation. The variables shown to increase the rate of deactivation are: increased catalyst loading, high reaction temperature, low hydrogen pressure, unsulfiding the catalyst, and high concentrations of preasphaltenes and insoluble organic matter in the feedstock. The loss in catalyst surface area during the aging process was substantial, being as high as 95%. A simple kinetic model, including a first-order catalyst deactivation rate, was applied to upgrading of two-coal derived feedstocks. A catalyst deactivation mechanism was proposed which involves the adsorption and surface reaction of coke precursors on catalytic active sites. Catalyst regeneration of aged catalysts from the LC-Finer and the ITSL process has been accomplished through oxidative treatment followed by presulfiding. A parametric study has been performed to identify the optimum regeneration conditions. The degree of regeneration appears to be dependent on the feed material and reaction history of the catalyst. Liquid vaporization affects the hydrotreater performance significantly. The hydrotreater is simulated to study the effects of the solvent volatility, hydrogen flow rate, feed concentration, temperature, and pressure. A gradientless reactor system was designed, built, and used to verify the key result ofthe simulation study.

  16. NREL: Energy Analysis - Nicholas DiOrio

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Selected publications Pratt,J., P. Axelrad, K. Larson, B. Lesage, R. Gerren, and N. DiOrio. "Satellite Clock Bias Estimation for iGPS." GPS Solutions 17 (2013): 381-89. Bershenyi, ...

  17. Balance of Plant System Analysis and Component Design of Turbo-Machinery for High Temperature Gas Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Ronald G.; Wang, Chun Yun; Kadak, Andrew; Todreas, Neil; Mirick, Bradley; Demetri, Eli; Koronowski, Martin

    2004-08-30

    power conversion system have been verified with an industry-standard general thermal-fluid code Flownet. With respect to the dynamic model, bypass valve control and inventory control have been used as the primary control methods for the power conversion system. By performing simulation using the dynamic model with the designed control scheme, the combination of bypass and inventory control was optimized to assure system stability within design temperature and pressure limits. Bypass control allows for rapid control system response while inventory control allows for ultimate steady state operation at part power very near the optimum operating point for the system. Load transients simulations show that the indirect, three-shaft arrangement gas turbine power conversion system is stable and controllable. For the indirect cycle the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) is the interface between the reactor and the turbomachinery systems. As a part of the design effort the IHX was identified as the key component in the system. Two technologies, printed circuit and compact plate-fin, were investigated that have the promise of meeting the design requirements for the system. The reference design incorporates the possibility of using either technology although the compact plate-fin design was chosen for subsequent analysis. The thermal design and parametric analysis with an IHX and recuperator using the plate-fin configuration have been performed. As a three-shaft arrangement, the turbo-shaft sets consist of a pair of turbine/compressor sets (high pressure and low pressure turbines with same-shaft compressor) and a power turbine coupled with a synchronous generator. The turbines and compressors are all axial type and the shaft configuration is horizontal. The core outlet/inlet temperatures are 900/520 C, and the optimum pressure ratio in the power conversion cycle is 2.9. The design achieves a plant net efficiency of approximately 48%.

  18. Exclusive e+e-, di-photon and di-jet production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terashi, Koji; /Rockefeller U.

    2007-05-01

    Results from studies on exclusive production of electron-position pair, di-photon, and dijet production at CDF in proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron are presented. THe first observation and cross section measurements of exclusive e{sup +}e{sup -} and di-jet production in hadron-hadron collisions are emphasized.

  19. Ponte di Archimede International S P A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ponte di Archimede International S P A Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ponte di Archimede International S P A Address: Viale Libert IS 515 Place: Messina Zip: 98121 Region: Italy...

  20. Batteries & Fuel Cells - Research Thrust Leader > Frank DiSalvo...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Frank DiSalvo fjd3@cornell.edu Research The DiSalvo Group's research focuses on the synthesis, characterization and potential applications of new solid state materials. Current...

  1. Distributed Solar Power Ltd Di S P | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Power Ltd Di S P Jump to: navigation, search Name: Distributed Solar Power Ltd (Di.S.P) Place: Yokneam, Israel Zip: 20692 Sector: Solar Product: Distributed Solar Power...

  2. DEACTIVATION COMPLETION AND TURNOVER Deactivation Completion...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... records the stated condition will be placed in the space or system file folder. WP-xx-xxx Work Plans written to perform activities to support closeout of specific end-points or ...

  3. THE DEACTIVATION DECONTAMINATION & DECOMMISSIONING OF THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) A FORMER PLUTONIUM PROCESSING FACILITY AT DOE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHARBONEAU, S.L.

    2006-02-01

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) was constructed as part of the Manhattan Project during World War II. The Manhattan Project was developed to usher in the use of nuclear weapons to end the war. The primary mission of the PFP was to provide plutonium used as special nuclear material (SNM) for fabrication of nuclear devices for the war effort. Subsequent to the end of World War II, the PFP's mission expanded to support the Cold War effort through plutonium production during the nuclear arms race and later the processing of fuel grade mixed plutonium-uranium oxide to support DOE's breeder reactor program. In October 1990, at the close of the production mission for PFP, a shutdown order was prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) in Washington, DC and issued to the Richland DOE field office. Subsequent to the shutdown order, a team from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) analyzed the hazards at PFP associated with the continued storage of certain forms of plutonium solutions and solids. The assessment identified many discrete actions that were required to stabilize the different plutonium forms into stable form and repackage the material in high integrity containers. These actions were technically complicated and completed as part of the PFP nuclear material stabilization project between 1995 and early 2005. The completion of the stabilization project was a necessary first step in deactivating PFP. During stabilization, DOE entered into negotiations with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the State of Washington and established milestones for the Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) of the PFP. The DOE and its contractor, Fluor Hanford (Fluor), have made great progress in deactivating, decontaminating and decommissioning the PFP at the Hanford Site as detailed in this paper. Background information covering the PFP D&D effort includes descriptions of negotiations with the State of Washington concerning consent-order milestones

  4. Di-hadron production at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anefalos Pereira, Sergio; et. al.,

    2014-10-01

    Semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) has been used extensively in recent years as an important testing ground for QCD. Studies so far have concentrated on better determination of parton distribution functions, distinguishing between the quark and antiquark contributions, and understanding the fragmentation of quarks into hadrons. Hadron pair (di-hadron) SIDIS provides information on the nucleon structure and hadronization dynamics that complement single hadron SIDIS. Di-hadrons allow the study of low- and high-twist distribution functions and Dihadron Fragmentation Functions (DiFF). Together with the twist-2 PDFs ( f1, g1, h1), the Higher Twist (HT) e and hL functions are very interesting because they offer insights into the physics of the largely unexplored quark-gluon correlations, which provide access into the dynamics inside hadrons. The CLAS spectrometer, installed in Hall-B at Jefferson Lab, has collected data using the CEBAF 6 GeV longitudinally polarized electron beam on longitudinally polarized solid NH3 targets. Preliminary results on di-hadron beam-, target- and double-spin asymmetries will be presented.

  5. Criticality Safety Lessons Learned in a Deactivation and Decommissioning Environment [A Guide for Facility and Project Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NIRIDER, L.T.

    2003-08-06

    This document was designed as a reference and a primer for facility and project managers responsible for Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) processes in facilities containing significant inventories of fissionable materials. The document contains lessons learned and guidance for the development and management of criticality safety programs. It also contains information gleaned from occurrence reports, assessment reports, facility operations and management, NDA program reviews, criticality safety experts, and criticality safety evaluations. This information is designed to assist in the planning process and operational activities. Sufficient details are provided to allow the reader to understand the events, the lessons learned, and how to apply the information to present or planned D&D processes. Information is also provided on general lessons learned including criticality safety evaluations and criticality safety program requirements during D&D activities. The document also explores recent and past criticality accidents in operating facilities, and it extracts lessons learned pertinent to D&D activities. A reference section is included to provide additional information. This document does not address D&D lessons learned that are not pertinent to criticality safety.

  6. Structural and Functional Analysis of Two New Positive Allosteric Modulators of GluA2 Desensitization and Deactivation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timm, David E.; Benveniste, Morris; Weeks, Autumn M.; Nisenbaum, Eric S.; Partin, Kathryn M.

    2011-10-14

    At the dimer interface of the extracellular ligand-binding domain of {alpha}-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors a hydrophilic pocket is formed that is known to interact with two classes of positive allosteric modulators, represented by cyclothiazide and the ampakine 2H,3H,6aH-pyrrolidino(2,1-3',2')1,3-oxazino(6',5'-5,4)benzo(e)1,4-dioxan-10-one (CX614). Here, we present structural and functional data on two new positive allosteric modulators of AMPA receptors, phenyl-1,4-bis-alkylsulfonamide (CMPDA) and phenyl-1,4-bis-carboxythiophene (CMPDB). Crystallographic data show that these compounds bind within the modulator-binding pocket and that substituents of each compound overlap with distinct moieties of cyclothiazide and CX614. The goals of the present study were to determine (1) the degree of modulation by CMPDA and CMPDB of AMPA receptor deactivation and desensitization; (2) whether these compounds are splice isoform-selective; and (3) whether predictions of mechanism of action could be inferred by comparing molecular interactions between the ligand-binding domain and each compound with those of cyclothiazide and CX614. CMPDB was found to be more isoform-selective than would be predicted from initial binding assays. It is noteworthy that these new compounds are both more potent and more effective and may be more clinically relevant than the AMPA receptor modulators described previously.

  7. Safe and Effective Deactivation of Metallic Sodium Filled Scrap and Cold Traps From Sodium-cooled Nuclear Reactor D and D - 12176

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nester, Dean; Crocker, Ben; Smart, Bill

    2012-07-01

    As part of the Plateau Remediation Project at US Department of Energy's Hanford, Washington site, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) contracted with IMPACT Services, LLC to receive and deactivate approximately 28 cubic meters of sodium metal contaminated debris from two sodium-cooled research reactors (Enrico Fermi Unit 1 and the Fast Flux Test Facility) which had been stored at Hanford for over 25 years. CHPRC found an off-site team composed of IMPACT Services and Commodore Advanced Sciences, Inc., with the facilities and technological capabilities to safely and effectively perform deactivation of this sodium metal contaminated debris. IMPACT Services provided the licensed fixed facility and the logistical support required to receive, store, and manage the waste materials before treatment, and the characterization, manifesting, and return shipping of the cleaned material after treatment. They also provided a recycle outlet for the liquid sodium hydroxide byproduct resulting from removal of the sodium from reactor parts. Commodore Advanced Sciences, Inc. mobilized their patented AMANDA unit to the IMPACT Services site and operated the unit to perform the sodium removal process. Approximately 816 Kg of metallic sodium were removed and converted to sodium hydroxide, and the project was accomplished in 107 days, from receipt of the first shipment at the IMPACT Services facility to the last outgoing shipment of deactivated scrap metal. There were no safety incidents of any kind during the performance of this project. The AMANDA process has been demonstrated in this project to be both safe and effective for deactivation of sodium and NaK. It has also been used in other venues to treat other highly reactive alkali metals, such as lithium (Li), potassium (K), NaK and Cesium (Cs). (authors)

  8. Di-interstitial defect in silicon revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Londos, C. A.; Antonaras, G.; Chroneos, A.; Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BP

    2013-11-21

    Infrared spectroscopy was used to study the defect spectrum of Cz-Si samples following fast neutron irradiation. We mainly focus on the band at 533 cm{sup ?1}, which disappears from the spectra at ?170 C, exhibiting similar thermal stability with the Si-P6 electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum previously correlated with the di-interstitial defect. The suggested structural model of this defect comprises of two self-interstitial atoms located symmetrically around a lattice site Si atom. The band anneals out following a first-order kinetics with an activation energy of 0.88 0.3 eV. This value does not deviate considerably from previously quoted experimental and theoretical values for the di-interstitial defect. The present results indicate that the 533 cm{sup ?1} IR band originates from the same structure as that of the Si-P6 EPR spectrum.

  9. Basic ReseaRch DiRections

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Basic ReseaRch DiRections for User Science at the National Ignition Facility Report on the National Nuclear Security Administration - Office of Science Workshop on Basic Research Directions on User Science at the National Ignition Facility BASIC RESEARCH DIRECTIONS FOR USER SCIENCE AT THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY Report on the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) - Office of Science (SC) Workshop on Basic Research Directions on User Science at the National Ignition Facility Chairs:

  10. Acid-base properties, deactivation, and in situ regeneration of condensation catalysts for synthesis of methyl methacrylate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gogate, M.R.; Spivey, J.J.; Zoeller, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    Condensation reaction of a propionate with formaldehyde is a novel route for synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA). The reaction mechanism involves a proton abstraction from the propionate on the basic sites and activation of the aliphatic aldehyde on the acidic sites of the catalyst. The acid-base properties of ternary V-Si-P oxide catalysts and their relation to the NWA yield in the vapor phase condensation of formaldehyde with propionic anhydride has been studied for the first time. Five different V-Si-P catalysts with different atomic ratios of vanadium, silicon, and phosphorous were synthesized, characterized, and tested in a fixed-bed microreactor system. A V-Si-P 1:10:2.8 catalyst gave the maximum condensation yield of 56% based on HCHO fed at 300{degrees}C and 2 atm and at a space velocity of 290 cc/g cat{center_dot}h. A parameter called the ``q-ratio`` has been defined to correlate the condensation yields to the acid-base properties. The correlation of q-ratio with the condensation yield shows that higher q-ratios are more desirable. The long-term deactivation studies on the V-Si-P 1: 10:2.8 catalyst at 300{degrees}C and 2 atm and at a space velocity of 290 cc/g cat{center_dot}h show that the catalyst activity drops by a factor of nearly 20 over a 180 h period. The activity can be restored to about 78% of the initial activity by a mild oxidative regeneration at 300{degrees}C and 2 atm. The performance of V-Si-P catalyst has been compared to a Ta/SiO{sub 2} catalyst. The Ta- catalyst is more stable and has a higher on-stream catalyst life.

  11. ORISE: Recent Graduate Research Experiences - Nicholas DiLucia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nicholas DiLucia Computer engineer utilizes skills from NETL to update lab website Nicholas DiLucia Nicholas DiLucia returned to the National Energy and Technology Laboratory for the fourth year in a row to engage in website development. His previous internship experiences at the lab helped him succeed in courses at the Univ. of Pittsburgh, where he graduated in April 2012. When Nicholas DiLucia graduated from the Univ. of Pittsburgh in April 2012, he was excited to have a place to go to develop

  12. Kathy DiBennardi | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kathy DiBennardi Executive Secretary Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Building 240 - Wkstn. 4D11 Argonne IL, 60439 630-252-8600 dibennar

  13. TianDi Growth Capital | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Venture capital investor interested in projects in Wind energy, Electric vehicles, Energy-efficient lighting, Biodiesel and Clean water. References: TianDi Growth Capital1...

  14. DiTour 3.1

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-06-30

    There is a need for software that allows a tour guide to present different tracks of slides and then return to the default slide show automatically upon completion. A mobile solution is needed for trade shows. DiTour is an iPad/iPhone app that pulls presentation content from a website, stores it on the device and presents it on a connected display. A tour guide can select a track to present and it will automatically return tomore » the default track after a timeout. It offers a mobile solution which is ideal for trade shows.« less

  15. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING OF REACTOR VESSELS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiersma, B.; Serrato, M.; Langton, C.

    2010-11-10

    The R- and P-reactor vessels at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). D&D activities will consist primarily of physically isolating and stabilizing the reactor vessel by filling it with a grout material. The reactor vessels contain aluminum alloy materials, which pose a concern in that aluminum corrodes rapidly when it comes in contact with the alkaline grout. A product of the corrosion reaction is hydrogen gas and therefore potential flammability issues were assessed. A model was developed to calculate the hydrogen generation rate as the reactor is being filled with the grout material. Three options existed for the type of grout material for D&D of the reactor vessels. The grout formulation options included ceramicrete (pH 6-8), a calcium aluminate sulfate (CAS) based cement (pH 10), or Portland cement grout (pH 12.4). Corrosion data for aluminum in concrete were utilized as input for the model. The calculations considered such factors as the surface area of the aluminum components, the open cross-sectional area of the reactor vessel, the rate at which the grout is added to the reactor vessel, and temperature. Given the hydrogen generation rate, the hydrogen concentration in the vapor space of the reactor vessel above the grout was calculated. This concentration was compared to the lower flammability limit for hydrogen. The assessment concluded that either ceramicrete or the CAS grout may be used to safely grout the P-reactor vessel. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Portland cement grout, on the other hand, for the same range of process parameters did not provide a margin of safety against the accumulation of flammable gas in the reactor vessel during grouting operations in the P-reactor vessel. Therefore, it was recommended that this grout not be utilized for this task. On the other hand, the R-reactor vessel

  16. Anion-controlled assembly of silver-di(aminophenyl)sulfone coordinatio...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Anion-controlled assembly of silver-di(aminophenyl)sulfone coordination polymers: ... Title: Anion-controlled assembly of silver-di(aminophenyl)sulfone coordination polymers: ...

  17. Development of an SI DI Ethanol Optimized Flex Fuel Engine Using...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an SI DI Ethanol Optimized Flex Fuel Engine Using Advanced Valvetrain Development of an SI DI Ethanol Optimized Flex Fuel Engine Using Advanced Valvetrain Presentation given at the ...

  18. Turbo Power Systems Inc formerly Turbo Genset Inc | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    products for power generation and power conditioning - specifically solutions for the Distributed Generation, Combined Heat and Power (CHP) and Power Quality markets....

  19. Underwater slow current turbo generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wracsaricht, L.J.

    1981-12-15

    A self-contained electrical generating device for placement in a naturally flowing stream. The generating device converts the kinetic energy generated by fluid flow or gravity contained within the flowing stream whether river or ocean current into useful electric energy using blade configuration and placement to maximize the usable energy. The present invention also using auxiliary means to increase the rate of flow of the fluid by the blades of the generator thus increasing the energy capable of conversion. The rotor and the stator are located radially outwardly from the rotating hub of the generating system and are supported by spoke like legs thus greatly reducing any resistance to water flow, minimizing the disturbance to the flowing stream and maximizing the relative linear velocity between the rotor and the stator.

  20. Turbo Dynamics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    auditsweatherization; Engineeringarchitecturaldesign;Installation; Maintenance and repair;Manufacturing; Research and development;Retail product sales and...

  1. Isoliquiritigenin induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating arachidonic acid metabolic network and the deactivation of PI3K/Akt in human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ying; Zhao, Haixia; Wang, Yuzhong; Zheng, Hao; Yu, Wei; Chai, Hongyan; Zhang, Jing; Falck, John R.; Guo, Austin M.; Yue, Jiang; Peng, Renxiu; Yang, Jing

    2013-10-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA)-derived eicosanoids and its downstream pathways have been demonstrated to play crucial roles in growth control of breast cancer. Here, we demonstrate that isoliquiritigenin, a flavonoid phytoestrogen from licorice, induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating multiple key enzymes in AA metabolic network and the deactivation of PI3K/Akt in human breast cancer. Isoliquiritigenin diminished cell viability, 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, and clonogenic ability in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231cells, and induced apoptosis as evidenced by an analysis of cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation, flow cytometry and hoechst staining. Furthermore, isoliquiritigenin inhibited mRNA expression of multiple forms of AA-metabolizing enzymes, including phospholipase A2 (PLA2), cyclooxygenases (COX)-2 and cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4A, and decreased secretion of their products, including prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), without affecting COX-1, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP), and leukotriene B{sub 4} (LTB{sub 4}). In addition, it downregulated the levels of phospho-PI3K, phospho-PDK (Ser{sup 241}), phospho-Akt (Thr{sup 308}), phospho-Bad (Ser{sup 136}), and Bcl-x{sub L} expression, thereby activating caspase cascades and eventually cleaving poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Conversely, the addition of exogenous eicosanoids, including PGE{sub 2}, LTB{sub 4} and a 20-HETE analog (WIT003), and caspase inhibitors, or overexpression of constitutively active Akt reversed isoliquiritigenin-induced apoptosis. Notably, isoliquiritigenin induced growth inhibition and apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts in nude mice, together with decreased intratumoral levels of eicosanoids and phospho-Akt (Thr{sup 308}). Collectively, these data suggest that isoliquiritigenin induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating AA metabolic

  2. ORISE: Recent Graduate Research Experiences - Nicholas DiLucia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... grade due to the prior exposure to C, a very similar programming language to JAVA. This time around, DiLucia will not be headed back to a classroom, since he already graduated. ...

  3. Reducing the Particulate Emission Numbers in DI Gasoline Engines |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy the Particulate Emission Numbers in DI Gasoline Engines Reducing the Particulate Emission Numbers in DI Gasoline Engines Formation of droplets was minimized through optimization of fuel vaporization and distribution avoiding air/fuel zones richer than stoichiometric and temperatures that promote particle formation deer10_klindt.pdf (866.03 KB) More Documents & Publications Bosch Powertrain Technologies Vehicle Emissions Review - 2012 Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and

  4. Xiang Ge Li La Xian Mai Di He Hydro Power Development Co Ltd...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Xiang Ge Li La Xian Mai Di He Hydro Power Development Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Xiang Ge Li La Xian Mai Di He Hydro Power Development Co., Ltd. Place: Yunnan...

  5. ParaDiS-FEM dislocation dynamics simulation code primer (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ParaDiS-FEM dislocation dynamics simulation code primer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ParaDiS-FEM dislocation dynamics simulation code primer You are accessing a ...

  6. Microsoft Word - SWPF-15-DI-001_R1_Construction Turnover to C...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Construction Turnover to Testing and Commissioning Oversight SWPF-15-DI-001, Rev. 1 September, 2015 SWPF-15-DI-001 Revision 1 Page 3 of 29 REV A Internal Review by DOE Construction ...

  7. Mechanisms of Selective Cleavage of C-O Bonds in Di-aryl Ethers...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Selective Cleavage of C-O Bonds in Di-aryl Ethers in Aqueous Phase Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Mechanisms of Selective Cleavage of C-O Bonds in Di-aryl Ethers in ...

  8. Record of the facility deactivation, decommissioning, and material disposition (D and D) workshop: A new focus for technology development, opportunities for industry/government collaboration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedick, R.C.; Bossart, S.J.; Hart, P.W.

    1995-07-01

    This workshop was held at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) in Morgantown, West Virginia, on July 11--12, 1995. The workshop sought to establish a foundation for continued dialogue between industry and the DOE to ensure that industry`s experiences, lessons learned, and recommendations are incorporated into D and D program policy, strategy, and plans. The mission of the D and D Focus Area is to develop improved technologies, processes and products, to characterize, deactivate, survey, maintain, decontaminate, dismantle, and dispose of DOE surplus structures, buildings, and contents. The target is a five-to-one return on investment through cost avoidance. The cornerstone of the D and D focus area activities is large-scale demonstration projects that actually decontaminate, decommission, and dispose of a building. The aim is to demonstrate innovative D and D technologies as part of an ongoing DOE D and D project. OTD would pay the incremental cost of demonstrating the innovative technologies. The goal is to have the first demonstration project completed within the next 2 years. The intent is to select projects, or a project, with visible impact so all of the stakeholders know that a building was removed, and demonstrate at a scale that is convincing to the customers in the EM program so they feel comfortable using it in subsequent D and D projects. The plan is to use a D and D integrating contractor who can then use the expertise in this project to use in jobs at other DOE sites.

  9. Deactivation & Decommissioning Knowledge Management Information...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The D&D Knowledge Management Information Tool (KM-IT) is a web-based information tool to ... The D&D KM-IT has been developed through the application of state-of-the-art web ...

  10. Ryo Wakabayashi > Graduate Student - DiSalvo Group > Researchers, Postdocs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Graduates > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell Ryo Wakabayashi Graduate Student - DiSalvo Group rhw224@cornell.edu

  11. dI UNIVERSITY OF NEV\DA SYSTEM

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    g3t4 6 dI UNIVERSITY OF NEV\DA SYSTEM tw ?r@ D O E / D P / O 1 2 6 3 - 2 0 L , n z l t P ' " WATER RESOURCES CENTER itf.l This report was prepared as an aecount of work sponsore$ by the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Department of Energy, nor any of their employees, mal assumes any legal liability or responsib usefulness of any informationr apparatus' I that its use would not infringe privately speeifie eommereial produetr proeesst ufacturen, or

  12. Synthesis and study of conjugated polymers containing Di- or Triphenylamine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukwattanasinitt, M.

    1996-06-21

    This thesis consists of two separate parts. The first part addresses the synthesis and study of conjugated polymers containing di- or triphenylamine. Two types of polymers: linear polymers and dendrimers, were synthesized. The polymers were characterized by NMR, IR, UV, GPC, TGA and DSC. Electronic and optical properties of the polymers were studied through the conductivity measurements and excitation- emission spectra. the second part of this thesis deals with a reaction of electron-rich acetylenes with TCNE. The discovery of the reaction from charge transfer complex studies and the investigation of this reaction on various electron-rich acetylenes are presented.

  13. Critical cleaning agents for Di-2-ethylhexyl sebacate.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartley, Mya; Archuleta, Kim M.

    2013-08-01

    It is required that Di-2-ethylhexyl Sebacate oil, also commonly known as Dioctyl Sebacate oil, be thoroughly removed from certain metals, in this case stainless steel parts with narrow, enclosed spaces. Dioctyl Sebacate oil is a synthetic oil with a low compressibility. As such, it is ideally used for high pressure calibrations. The current method to remove the Dioctyl Sebacate from stainless steel parts with narrow, enclosed spaces is a labor-intensive, multi-step process, including a detergent clean, a deionized (DI) water rinse, and several solvent rinses, to achieve a nonvolatile residue of0.04 mg per 50 mL rinse effluent. This study was undertaken to determine a superior detergent/solvent cleaning method for the oil to reduce cleaning time and/or the amount of detergent/solvent used. It was determined that while some detergent clean the oil off the metal better than the current procedure, using only solvents obtained the best result. In addition, it can be inferred, based on elevated temperature test results, that raising the temperature of the oil-contaminated stainless steel parts to approximately 50%C2%B0C will provide for improved cleaning efficacy.

  14. CE Turbo Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    processes (afday) Daily Operation Water Use (afday) Well Field Water Use (afday) Cooling Tower Water use (annual average) (afday) Cooling Tower Water use (summer average) (af...

  15. Zero Emissions Coal Syngas Oxygen Turbo Machinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis Horazak

    2010-12-31

    Siemens Energy, Inc. (formerly Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation) worked with Clean Energy Systems and Florida Turbine Technologies to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of advanced turbines for oxy-fuel based power systems that discharge negligible CO{sub 2} into the atmosphere. The approach builds upon ultra supercritical steam turbine and advanced gas turbine technology with the goal of attaining plant efficiencies above 50% in the 2015 timeframe. Conceptual designs were developed for baseline, near term, and long term oxy-fuel turbine cycles, representing commercial introductions of increasingly advanced thermal conditions and increasing exposure to steam-CO{sub 2} mixtures. An economic analysis and market demand study was performed by Science Applications International Corp. (SAIC), and indicated that long-term oxy-fuel turbine cycles start to look attractive in 2025 when the CO{sub 2} tax is assumed to reach $40/ ton, and by 2030 it has a clear advantage over both IGCC with sequestration and pulverized coal with sequestration. A separate risk analysis of the oxy-fuel combustor, HP turbine, re-heater, and IP turbine of the long-term cycle identified and categorized risks and proposed mitigation measures. In 2007 the program began to focus on a potential oxy-fuel turbine power generation demonstration project in the 2012 -13 time period while still maintaining a link to the requirements of the long-term oxy-syngas cycle. The SGT-900 turbine was identified as the best fit for modification into an intermediate pressure turbine (IPT) for this application. The base metals, bond coats, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), and rotor materials used in the SGT-900 were tested for their ability to operate in the steam- CO{sub 2} environment of the oxy-fuel OFT-900. Test results indicated that these same materials would operate satisfactorily, and the plan, is to use SGT-900materials for the OFT-900. Follow-on programs for corrosion testing and evaluation of crack growth rates in oxy-fuel environments have been proposed to build on these results and provide quantifiable assessments of the effects of oxy-fuel environments on the service lives of turbine components.

  16. Low emission turbo compound engine system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vuk; Carl T.

    2011-05-31

    A diesel or HHCI engine has an air intake and an exhaust for products of combustion. A pair of turbochargers receive the products of combustion in a series relationship and an exhaust aftertreatment device receive the products of combustion from the downstream turbine. A power turbine receives the output from the exhaust aftertreatment device and an EGR system of the power turbine passes a selected portion of the output to a point upstream of the upstream turbocharger compressor. A device adds fuel to the aftertreatment device to regenerate the particulate filter and the power turbine recoups the additional energy. The power turbine may be used to drive accessories or the prime output of the engine.

  17. Advanced Turbo-Charging Research and Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-02-27

    The objective of this project is to conduct analysis, design, procurement and test of a high pressure ratio, wide flow range, and high EGR system with two stages of turbocharging. The system needs to meet the stringent 2010MY emissions regulations at 20% + better fuel economy than its nearest gasoline competitor while allowing equivalent vehicle launch characteristics and higher torque capability than its nearest gasoline competitor. The system will also need to meet light truck/ SUV life requirements, which will require validation or development of components traditionally used only in passenger car applications. The conceived system is termed 'seriessequential turbocharger' because the turbocharger system operates in series at appropriate times and also sequentially when required. This is accomplished using intelligent design and control of flow passages and valves. Components of the seriessequential system will also be applicable to parallel-sequential systems which are also expected to be in use for future light truck/SUV applications.

  18. ParaDiS-FEM dislocation dynamics simulation code primer (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    When we try to perform discrete dislocation dynamics simulations for finite systems such as thin films or cylinders, the ParaDiS code must be extended. First, dislocations need to ...

  19. Frank DiSalvo > Research Thrust Leader - Fuel Cells and Batteries...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Frank DiSalvo Research Thrust Leader - Fuel Cells and Batteries John A. Newman Professor of Physical Science Chemistry and Chemical Biology Research Group Webpage fjd3@cornell.edu...

  20. HD Applications of Significantly Downsized SI Engines Using Alcohol DI for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Knock Avoidance | Department of Energy Applications of Significantly Downsized SI Engines Using Alcohol DI for Knock Avoidance HD Applications of Significantly Downsized SI Engines Using Alcohol DI for Knock Avoidance Direct injection of a second fuel (ethanol or methanol) is explored as a means of avoiding knock in turbocharged, high-compression ratio spark-ignited engines that could replace diesels in certain vocational applications. deer08_blumberg.pdf (163.75 KB) More Documents &

  1. Non-Sooting, Low Flame Temperature Mixing-Controlled DI Diesel Combustion |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Sooting, Low Flame Temperature Mixing-Controlled DI Diesel Combustion Non-Sooting, Low Flame Temperature Mixing-Controlled DI Diesel Combustion 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Sandia National Laboratories 2003_deer_pickett.pdf (538.33 KB) More Documents & Publications Effects of Ambient Density and Temperature on Soot Formation under High-EGR Conditions Fuels and Combustion Strategies for High-Efficiency Clean-Combustion Engines Optical-Engine and Surrogate-Fuels

  2. Boosted di-boson from a mixed heavy stop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, Diptimoy

    2013-12-01

    The lighter mass eigenstate ($\\widetilde{t}_1$) of the two top squarks, the scalar superpartners of the top quark, is extremely difficult to discover if it is almost degenerate with the lightest neutralino ($\\widetilde{\\chi}_1^0$), the lightest and stable supersymmetric particle in the R-parity conserving supersymmetry. The current experimental bound on $\\widetilde{t}_1$ mass in this scenario stands only around 200 GeV. For such a light $\\widetilde{t}_1$, the heavier top squark ($\\widetilde{t}_2$) can also be around the TeV scale. Moreover, the high value of the higgs ($h$) mass prefers the left and right handed top squarks to be highly mixed allowing the possibility of a considerable branching ratio for $\\widetilde{t}_2 \\to \\widetilde{t}_1 h$ and $\\widetilde{t}_2 \\to \\widetilde{t}_1 Z$. In this paper, we explore the above possibility together with the pair production of $\\widetilde{t}_2$ $\\widetilde{t}_2^*$ giving rise to the spectacular di-boson + missing transverse energy final state. For an approximately 1 TeV $\\widetilde{t}_2$ and a few hundred GeV $\\widetilde{t}_1$ the final state particles can be moderately boosted which encourages us to propose a novel search strategy employing the jet substructure technique to tag the boosted $h$ and $Z$. The reconstruction of the $h$ and $Z$ momenta also allows us to construct the stransverse mass $M_{T2}$ providing an additional efficient handle to fight the backgrounds. We show that a 4--5$\\sigma$ signal can be observed at the 14 TeV LHC for $\\sim$ 1 TeV $\\widetilde{t}_2$ with 100 fb$^{-1}$ integrated luminosity.

  3. Potentiality of small DI diesel engines under consideration of emissions and noise control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugihara, K.; Matusi, Y.; Saegusa, S.

    1985-01-01

    The potentiality of direct injection (DI) diesel engines for passenger cars has been examined by comparing the characteristics of fuel consumption, exhaust emissions and noise levels between a turbocharged DI diesel engine and a turbocharged IDI diesel engine with the same displacement, 4 cylinders and 2 liters. It was observed that improved fuel consumption was obtained as the engine load increased, namely, 10 - 15% in the higher load range and 5 - 10% in the partial load range. In comparison to the IDI engine, the exhaust emissions of the DI engine tended to contain two or three times higher NOx and HC, and also about 30% higher particulates. Further, the noise levels of the DI engine were approximately 2 - 4 db (a) higher than those of the IDI engine. It was suggested from these results that in those countries which have stringent emission and noise regulations several years would be required to introduce small, high speed DI diesel engines for passenger cars to meet with these regulations.

  4. Method of dissolving metal oxides with di- or polyphosphonic acid and a redundant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, Earl P.; Chiarizia, Renato

    1996-01-01

    A method of dissolving metal oxides using a mixture of a di- or polyphosphonic acid and a reductant wherein each is present in a sufficient amount to provide a synergistic effect with respect to the dissolution of metal oxides and optionally containing corrosion inhibitors and pH adjusting agents.

  5. Dimeric c-di-GMP is required for post-translational regulation of alginate production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, John C.; Robinson, Howard; Whitfield, Gregory B.; Marmont, Lindsey S.; Yip, Patrick; Neculai, A. Mirela; Lobsanov, Yuri D.; Ohman, Dennis E.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2015-05-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that secretes the exopolysaccharide alginate during infection of the respiratory tract of individuals afflicted with cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Among the proteins required for alginate production, Alg44 has been identified as an inner membrane protein whose bis-(3',5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) binding activity post-translationally regulates alginate secretion. In this study, we report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of the cytoplasmic region of Alg44 in complex with dimeric self-intercalated c-di-GMP and characterize its dinucleotide-binding site using mutational analysis. The structure shows that the c-di-GMP binding region of Alg44 adopts a PilZ domain fold with a dimerization mode not previously observed for this family of proteins. Moreover, calorimetric binding analysis of residues in the c-di-GMP binding site demonstrate that mutation of Arg-17 and Arg-95 alters the binding stoichiometry between c-di-GMP and Alg44 from 2:1 to 1:1. Introduction of these mutant alleles on the P. aeruginosa chromosome show that the residues required for binding of dimeric c-di-GMP in vitro are also required for efficient alginate production in vivo. Our results suggest that the dimeric form of c-di-GMP represents the biologically active signaling molecule needed for the secretion of an important virulence factor produced by P. aeruginosa.

  6. Dimeric c-di-GMP is required for post-translational regulation of alginate production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Whitney, John C.; Robinson, Howard; Whitfield, Gregory B.; Marmont, Lindsey S.; Yip, Patrick; Neculai, A. Mirela; Lobsanov, Yuri D.; Ohman, Dennis E.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2015-05-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that secretes the exopolysaccharide alginate during infection of the respiratory tract of individuals afflicted with cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Among the proteins required for alginate production, Alg44 has been identified as an inner membrane protein whose bis-(3',5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) binding activity post-translationally regulates alginate secretion. In this study, we report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of the cytoplasmic region of Alg44 in complex with dimeric self-intercalated c-di-GMP and characterize its dinucleotide-binding site using mutational analysis. The structure shows that the c-di-GMP binding region of Alg44 adopts a PilZmore » domain fold with a dimerization mode not previously observed for this family of proteins. Moreover, calorimetric binding analysis of residues in the c-di-GMP binding site demonstrate that mutation of Arg-17 and Arg-95 alters the binding stoichiometry between c-di-GMP and Alg44 from 2:1 to 1:1. Introduction of these mutant alleles on the P. aeruginosa chromosome show that the residues required for binding of dimeric c-di-GMP in vitro are also required for efficient alginate production in vivo. Our results suggest that the dimeric form of c-di-GMP represents the biologically active signaling molecule needed for the secretion of an important virulence factor produced by P. aeruginosa.« less

  7. 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2016 Sustainable Transportation Summit 2016 Sustainable Transportation Summit Hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), the first ever Sustainable Transportation Summit will bring together transportation and mobility leaders to discuss the technology, policy, and market innovations that hold the potential to shape the transportation system of the future. Sustainable Transportation, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S.

  8. POST-DEACTIVATION SURVEILLANCE AND MAINTENANCE PLANNING

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Four surveillance entries will be made each year on a quarterly basis beginning in February 1995. Surveillance Entries (4) Man-hours Est. Annual Cost () Operations 160 hrs 9,600 ...

  9. 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The design and production of 3-D scale models that replicate the highly contaminated structures within the nuclear facility would provide a significant improvement in visualization of the work...

  10. Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The "D&D Program Map" presents an integrated overview of DOE’s complex-wide D&D project locations, scope, and issues and includes information on:

  11. FAQS Job Task Analyses- Deactivation and Decommissioning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FAQS Job Task Analyses are performed on the Function Area Qualification Standards. The FAQS Job Task Analyses consists of: Developing a comprehensive list of tasks that define the job such as the duties and responsibilities which include determining their levels of importance and frequency. Identifying and evaluating competencies. Last step is evaluating linkage between job tasks and competencies.

  12. FAQS Job Task Analyses - Deactivation and Decommissioning

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... FAQS Development Team 4 3 E. Demonstrate a familiarity level knowledge of basic operations and D&D fundamentals for utility and other infrastructure systems. FAQS Development Team ...

  13. EM Delivers in Deactivation, Regulatory Milestones, Shipping...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... First Shipment of Compressors Leaves Portsmouth Crane operator Brian Lambert of Fluor-BWXT Portsmouth (FBP), DOE decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) contractor, lowers the ...

  14. Growth of metal phthalocyanine on deactivated semiconducting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Type: Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review Letters Additional Journal ... Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Save to My Library Send to Email Send to Email ...

  15. 209-E _Building_Deactivation_CX.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AEO2016 Levelized Costs 1 August 2016 Levelized Cost and Levelized Avoided Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook 2016 This paper presents average values of levelized costs for generating technologies entering service in 2018, 2022, 1 and 2040 as represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for the Annual Energy Outlook 2016 (AEO2016) Reference case. 2 The levelized costs for generating technologies entering service in 2022 are presented in the body of the

  16. FAQS Qualification Card - Deactivation and Decommissioning |...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and ...

  17. Joint Statement by President Obama and Prime Minister Elio Di Rupo of

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Belgium on the 2014 Nuclear Security Summit | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Joint Statement by President Obama and Prime Minister Elio Di Rupo of Belgium on the 2014 Nuclear Security Summit March 24, 2014 See a fact sheet here. The White House Office of the Press Secretary Belgium and the United States of America are pleased to announce that they have jointly completed the removal of a significant amount of excess highly enriched uranium (HEU) and separated plutonium from

  18. Efficient Emissions Control for Multi-Mode Lean DI Engines | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy 11 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ace031_parks_2011_o.pdf (848.8 KB) More Documents & Publications Hydrocarbon fouling of SCR during Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (PCCI) combustion High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines Efficient Emissions Control for Multi-Mode Lean DI Engines

  19. ULEV potential of a DI/TCI diesel passenger car engine operated on dimethyl ether

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kapus, P.E.; Cartellieri, W.P.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes a feasibility test program on a 2 liter, 4 cylinder DI/TCI passenger car engine operated on the new alternative fuel Dimethyl Ether (DME) with the aim of demonstrating its potential of meeting ULEV (ultra low emission vehicle) emissions (0.2 g/mi NOx in the FTP 75 test cycle) when installed in a full size passenger car. Special attention is drawn to the fuel injection equipment (FIE) as well as combustion system requirements towards the reduction of NOx and combustion noise while keeping energetic fuel consumption at the level of he baseline DI/TCI diesel engine. FIE and combustion system parameters were optimized on the steady state dynamometer by variation of a number of parameters, such as rate of injection, number of nozzle holes, compression ratio, piston bowl shape and exhaust gas recirculation. The paper presents engine test results achieved with DME under various operating conditions and compares these results to those achieved with the diesel version of the same engine.The FTP 75 cycle results were projected from steady state engine maps using a vehicle simulation program taking into account vehicle data and road resistance data of a given vehicle.The cycle results are also compared to actual chassis dynamometer results achieved with the diesel version of the same engine installed in the same vehicle.the passenger car DI/TCI engine adapted for and operated on DME shows very promising results with respect to meeting ULEV NOx emissions without any soot emissions and without the need for a DENOX catalyst. DME fuel consumption on energy basis can be kept very close to the DI diesel value. An oxidation catalyst will be necessary to meet the stringent CO and HC ULEV emission limits.

  20. Azimuthal angle dependence of di-jet production in unpolarized hadron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu Zhun; Schmidt, Ivan [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso (Chile) and Center of Subatomic Physics, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2009-08-04

    We study the azimuthal asymmetry of back-to-back di-jet production in unpolarized hadron scattering, arising from the product of two Boer-Mulders functions, which describe the transverse spin distribution of quarks inside an unpolarized hadron. We find that there is a cos {delta}{phi} angular dependence of the di-jet, with {delta}{phi} the difference of the azimuthal angle of tow jets respectively. In the case of J{sub q}+J{sub q} production, we find that there is a color factor enhancement in the gluonic cross-section due to the multiple initial-/final-state interactions, compared with the result from the standard generalized parton model. We estimate the cos {delta}{phi} asymmetry of the total di-jet production at RHIC, showing that the color factor enhancement in the azimuthal asymmetric cross section of J{sub q}+J{sub q} production will reverse the sign of the asymmetry.

  1. Di-J/psi Studies, Level 3 Tracking and the D0 Run IIb Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vint, Philip John; /Imperial Coll., London

    2009-10-01

    The D0 detector underwent an upgrade to its silicon vertex detector and triggering systems during the transition from Run IIa to Run IIb to maximize its ability to fully exploit Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron. This thesis describes improvements made to the tracking and vertexing algorithms used by the high level trigger in both Run IIa and Run IIb, as well as a search for resonant di-J/{psi} states using both Run IIa and Run IIb data. Improvements made to the tracking and vertexing algorithms during Run IIa included the optimization of the existing tracking software to reduce overall processing time and the certification and testing of a new software release. Upgrades made to the high level trigger for Run IIb included the development of a new tracking algorithm and the inclusion of the new Layer 0 silicon detector into the existing software. The integration of Layer 0 into the high level trigger has led to an improvement in the overall impact parameter resolution for tracks of {approx}50%. The development of a new parameterization method for finding the error associated to the impact parameter of tracks returned by the high level tracking algorithm, in association with the inclusion of Layer 0, has led to improvements in vertex resolution of {approx}4.5 {micro}m. A previous search in the di-J/{psi} channel revealed a unpredicted resonance at {approx}13.7 GeV/c{sup 2}. A confirmation analysis is presented using 2.8 fb{sup -1} of data and two different approaches to cuts. No significant excess is seen in the di-J/{psi} mass spectrum.

  2. Improved di-p-xylylene polymer and apparatus and method for making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jahn, R.K.; Liepins, R.

    Solid di-para-xylyene dimer is sublimed in a sublimation furnace at approximately 100 to 200/sup 0/C and subsequently conducted to a pyrolysis furnace where it is pyrolyzed to the diradical p-xylylene monomer while in the vapor state at approximately 600 degrees C. The diradical monomer is then introduced into a deposition chamber for deposition onto a suitable substrate. The deposition chamber includes electrodes for producing a low pressure plasma through which the diradical monomer passes prior to deposition. The interaction of the diradical monomer with the low pressure plasma results in the formation of poly-p-xylyene film which is exceptionally hard and thermally stable.

  3. Di-22:6-bis(monoacylglycerol)phosphate: A clinical biomarker of drug-induced phospholipidosis for drug development and safety assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Nanjun; Tengstrand, Elizabeth A.; Chourb, Lisa; Hsieh, Frank Y.

    2014-09-15

    The inability to routinely monitor drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) presents a challenge in pharmaceutical drug development and in the clinic. Several nonclinical studies have shown di-docosahexaenoyl (22:6) bis(monoacylglycerol) phosphate (di-22:6-BMP) to be a reliable biomarker of tissue DIPL that can be monitored in the plasma/serum and urine. The aim of this study was to show the relevance of di-22:6-BMP as a DIPL biomarker for drug development and safety assessment in humans. DIPL shares many similarities with the inherited lysosomal storage disorder Niemann–Pick type C (NPC) disease. DIPL and NPC result in similar changes in lysosomal function and cholesterol status that lead to the accumulation of multi-lamellar bodies (myeloid bodies) in cells and tissues. To validate di-22:6-BMP as a biomarker of DIPL for clinical studies, NPC patients and healthy donors were classified by receiver operator curve analysis based on urinary di-22:6-BMP concentrations. By showing 96.7-specificity and 100-sensitivity to identify NPC disease, di-22:6-BMP can be used to assess DIPL in human studies. The mean concentration of di-22:6-BMP in the urine of NPC patients was 51.4-fold (p ≤ 0.05) above the healthy baseline range. Additionally, baseline levels of di-22:6-BMP were assessed in healthy non-medicated laboratory animals (rats, mice, dogs, and monkeys) and human subjects to define normal reference ranges for nonclinical/clinical studies. The baseline ranges of di-22:6-BMP in the plasma, serum, and urine of humans and laboratory animals were species dependent. The results of this study support the role of di-22:6-BMP as a biomarker of DIPL for pharmaceutical drug development and health care settings. - Highlights: • A reliable biomarker of drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) is needed for humans. • Di-22:6-BMP is specific/sensitive for DIPL in animals as published in literatures. • The di-22:6-BMP biomarker can be validated for humans via NPC patients. • DIPL

  4. Di-p-xylylene polymer and method for making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jahn, Randy K.; Liepins, Raimond

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for forming an improved poly-p-xylylene film. Solid di-para-xylylene dimer is sublimed in a sublimation furnace at approximately 100.degree. to 200.degree. C. and subsequently conducted to a pyrolysis furnace where it is pyrolyzed to the diradical p-xylylene monomer while in the vapor state at approximately 600 degrees C. The diradical monomer is then introduced into a deposition chamber for deposition onto a suitable substrate. The deposition chamber includes electrodes for producing a low pressure plasma through which the diradical monomer passes prior to deposition. The interaction of the diradical monomer with the low pressure plasma results in the formation of poly-p-xylylene film which is exceptionally hard and thermally stable.

  5. Cerreto di Spoleto (Umbria-Italy): Seismic amplification at the ENEA local array stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinaldis, Dario

    2008-07-08

    The Nerina valley, where Borgo Cerreto is located, is surrounded by the Apennine mount chain at the top of which lies the historical centre of Cerreto di Spoleto. The study is part of a research project aiming at analysing natural disasters and their impact on the Italian cultural heritage. Within the framework of this research project, local seismic records were analysed for both the carbonate ridge and the bordering alluvial valley. The choice of Cerreto di Spoleto as a test site derives from the analysis of Italian seismic hazard maps, obtained in terms of peak ground velocity and taking into account regional geology. The maps highlight the considerable seismic hazard which characterises the Apennine belt and its possible increase due to the effect of alluvial deposits. To this aim, ENEA installed in the 80's an accelerometric array (CODISMA up to 2000 and, in the following years, ETNA; for more detailed description see [1]. The 14 October event, was recorded both at the roof of CSM and at BCT stations. This is important to check the features observed comparing the FAS of acceleration at CSM and BCT during the 26 September events. Unfortunately the station at CSM basement did not record the above mentioned events but several aftershocks were recorded at each array station. Velocimetric records of both ambient noise and small-magnitude earthquakes were analysed in order to identify amplification conditions. The analysis was carried out in the time domain, through directional energy evaluation, and in the frequency domain, through H/V spectral ratios and spectral ratios with respect to a reference station.

  6. Passionate Technologists Wanted at ASME Turbo Expo|GE Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    who want to learn more about GE and its global Research Centers. For this purpose, the Aero & Thermal Systems groups of GE Global Research and representatives from several GE...

  7. Balance of Plant System Analysis and Component Design of Turbo...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    sets consist of a pair of turbinecompressor sets (high pressure and low pressure turbines with same-shaft compressor) and a power turbine coupled with a synchronous generator....

  8. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander- FY12 Q4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SWRI project, funded by SunShot, for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2012.

  9. Electric Turbo Compounding...A Technology Who's Time Has Come

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs.

  10. Wilson TurboPower Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of heat exchanger technology that was founded to commercialise the research of Prof. David Gordon Wilson from MIT. Coordinates: 42.479195, -71.150604 Show Map Loading map......

  11. Pressure actuated film riding seals for turbo machinery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bidkar, Rahul Anil; Thatte, Azam Mihir; Gibson, Nathan Evan McCurdy; Giametta, Andrew Paul

    2015-08-25

    A seal assembly for a rotary machine is provided. The seal assembly includes multiple sealing device segments disposed circumferentially intermediate to a stationary housing and a rotor. Each of the sealing device segments includes a stator interface element, a shoe plate having an extended portion having one or more labyrinth teeth facing the rotor and a load bearing portion, wherein the shoe plate is configured to generate an aerodynamic force between the shoe plate and the rotor. The sealing device segment further includes a secondary seal configured to be in contact with the stator interface element at a radially outer end and configured to be in contact with an elevated nose section of the extended portion of the shoe plate on a radially inner end; and multiple flexible elements attached to the shoe plate and to the stator interface element.

  12. Optimizing the turbo-roto-compound (TRC) engine. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, J.

    1994-08-15

    Results of multidimensional computations of sprays in a very high pressure constant volume chamber are presented in two parts. Comparisons of computed and measured penetrations of non-vaporizing and vaporizing sprays are presented. A broad range of density ratios (0.005 to 0.243) is covered. It is shown that, provided sufficient numerical resolution is used, the model can adequately reproduce the measurements. Scaling laws for time and distance derived in a previous publication are found to apply also to the sprays over the broad range of density ratios considered. A combustion sub-model that has been used in spark-ignition engines, stratified-charge engines and Diesel engines is included in the model. The combustion sub-model represents low-temperature autoignition and high temperature heat release. Comparisons of computed and measured penetrations of combusting sprays and computed and measured chamber pressures are being made. In this report, only preliminary indicative comparisons of computed and measured chamber pressures for three cases are presented. Agreement of pressures within 5% is shown. The work is ongoing and a detailed report will be presented later.

  13. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    cycle offers higher cycle efficiency when compared with supercritical or superheated steam cycles at temperatures relevant for concentrating solar power (CSP) applications....

  14. Hige Compression Ratio Turbo Gasoline Engine Operation Using Alcohol Enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heywood, John; Jo, Young Suk; Lewis, Raymond; Bromberg, Leslie; Heywood, John

    2015-10-31

    The overall objective of this project was to quantify the potential for improving the performance and efficiency of gasoline engine technology by use of alcohols to suppress knock. Knock-free operation is obtained by direct injection of a second “anti-knock” fuel such as ethanol, which suppresses knock when, with gasoline fuel, knock would occur. Suppressing knock enables increased turbocharging, engine downsizing, and use of higher compression ratios throughout the engine’s operating map. This project combined engine testing and simulation to define knock onset conditions, with different mixtures of gasoline and alcohol, and with this information quantify the potential for improving the efficiency of turbocharged gasoline spark-ignition engines, and the on-vehicle fuel consumption reductions that could then be realized. The more focused objectives of this project were therefore to: Determine engine efficiency with aggressive turbocharging and downsizing and high compression ratio (up to a compression ratio of 13.5:1) over the engine’s operating range; Determine the knock limits of a turbocharged and downsized engine as a function of engine speed and load; Determine the amount of the knock-suppressing alcohol fuel consumed, through the use of various alcohol-gasoline and alcohol-water gasoline blends, for different driving cycles, relative to the gasoline consumed; Determine implications of using alcohol-boosted engines, with their higher efficiency operation, in both light-duty and medium-duty vehicle sectors.

  15. A Fundamental Consideration on NOx Adsorber Technology for DI Diesel Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Howard L.; Huang, Shyan C.; Yu, Robert C.; Wan, C. Z.; Howden, Ken

    2002-10-01

    Diesel engines are far more efficient than gasoline engines of comparable size, and emit less greenhouse gases that have been implicated in global warming. In 2000, the US EPA proposed very stringent emissions standards to be introduced in 2007 along with low sulfur (< 15 ppm) diesel fuel. The California Air Resource Board (CARB) has also established the principle that future diesel fueled vehicles should meet the same low emissions standards as gasoline fueled vehicles and the EPA followed suit with its Tier II emissions regulation. Achieving such low emissions cannot be done through engine development and fuel reformulation alone, and requires application of NOx and particulate matter (PM) aftertreatment control devices. There is a widespread consensus that NOx adsorbers and particulate filter are required in order for diesel engines to meet the 2007 emissions regulations for NOx and PM. In this paper, the key exhaust characteristics from an advanced diesel engine are reviewed. Development of the NOx adsorber technology is discussed. Spectroscopic techniques are applied to understand the underlying chemical reactions over the catalyst surface during NOx trapping and regeneration periods. In-situ surface probes are useful in providing not only thermodynamic and kinetics information required for model development but also a fundamental understanding of storage capacity and degradation mechanisms. The distribution of various nitration/sulfation species is related to surface basicity. Surface displacement reactions of carbonates also play roles in affecting the trapping capability of NOx adsorbers. When ultralow-S fuel is used as a reductant during the regeneration, sulfur induced performance degradation is still observed in an aged catalyst. Other possible sources related to catalyst deactivation include incomplete reduction of surface nitration, coke formation derived from incomplete hydrocarbon burning, and lubricant formulations. Sulfur management and the

  16. Di-photon and photon + b/c production cross sections at Ecm = 1.96- TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gajjar, Anant; /Liverpool U.

    2005-05-01

    Measurements of the di-photon cross section have been made in the central region and are found to be in good agreement with NLO QCD predictions. The cross section of events containing a photon and additional heavy flavor jet have also been measured, as well as the ratio of photon + b to photon + c. The statistically limited sample shows good agreement with Leading Order predictions.

  17. Kinetic and Thermodynamic Investigation of Hydrogen Release from Ethane 1,2-di-amineborane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neiner, Doinita; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Bowden, Mark; Choi, Young Joon; Luedtke, Avery T.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.; Fisher, Allison M.; Szymczak, Nathaniel; Autrey, Thomas

    2011-07-18

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen (H2) release from ethane 1,2-di-amineborane (EDAB, BH3NH2CH2CH2NH2BH3) were measured using Calvet and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), pressure-composition isotherms, and volumetric gas-burette experiments. The results presented here indicate that EDAB releases ~ 9 wt.% H2 at temperatures ranging from 100 C to 200 C in two moderately exothermic steps, approximately -101 kJ/mol H2 and -3.81 kJ/mol H2. Isothermal kinetic analysis shows that EDAB is more stable than ammonia borane (AB) at temperatures lower than 100C; however, the rates of hydrogen release are faster for EDAB than for AB at temperatures higher than 120C. In addition, no volatile impurities in the H2 released by EDAB were detected by mass spectrometry upon heating with 1C/min to 200C in a calorimeter.

  18. Comparative Study of Low-temperature PECVD of Amorphous Silicon using Mono-, Di-, Trisilane and Cyclohexasilane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konstantin Pokhodnya; Joseph Sandstrom; Xuliang Dai; Philip Boudjouk; Douglas L. Schulz

    2009-06-08

    The hydrogenated amorphous silicon a-Si:H films were grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using liquid cyclohexasilane Si{sub 6}H{sub 12} (CHS). The growth rate of a-Si:H was studied as a function of substrate temperatures in the range of 30 C < T < 450 C using deposition conditions that were optimized for monosilane SiH{sub 4}. The same parameters were used for a-Si:H films grown using disilane (Si{sub 2}H{sub 6}) and trisilane (Si{sub 3}H{sub 8}) precursors. It was found that the a-Si:H film growth rate for CHS is lower with respect to those for mono-, di- and trisilane in an Ar plasma. Addition of {approx}10% of H{sub 2} dramatically increases the deposition rate for CHS-based films to {_}nm/min - a 700% increase. The as-deposited films were characterized by FTIR and Raman spectroscopy to probe the hydrogen content and local bonding environment. It was found that the films grown using Ar/H{sub 2} mixtures as carrier gas have a reduced hydrogen content relative to polysilane fragments indicating higher quality amorphous silicon.

  19. Di-boson production and SM SUSY Higgs searches at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elvira, V.Daniel; /Fermilab

    2005-07-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson would be a major success for the Standard Model (SM) and would provide further insights into the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism. This report contains the latest results from the D0 and CDF Tevatron experiments on searches for the SM Higgs produced from gluon fusion with H {yields} WW, and in association with a W boson. It also includes searches for a supersymmetric Higgs in the b{bar b} and {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} decay channels. The study of di-boson production at the Tevatron is important to understand backgrounds in high mass Higgs searches. It also provides a test of the SM through the measurement of the production cross section and the gauge boson self couplings. This paper includes measurements of the WW, W{gamma}, and WZ production cross sections, as well as limits on the anomalous couplings associated with the WW{gamma} and WWZ interactions. The results are based on sets of up to 320 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the D0 and CDF experiments at the {bar p}p Tevatron collider, running at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV.

  20. Seismic model of a progradational carbonate platform, Picco di Vallandro, the Dolomites, northern Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biddle, K.T.; Bush, T.L. ); Schlager, W. ); Rudolph, K.W. )

    1992-01-01

    The authors present a seismic model of a well-exposed carbonate platform-to-basin transition from the Triassic succession at Picco di Vallandro, the Dolomites, northern Italy. The core of this model is a detailed lithologic cross section that represents 1,500 m of stratigraphic section over a distance of 3.5 km. The cross section is based on detailed measured sections, photo interpretation, and careful projection of surface mapping into the plane of section. Samples from the measured sections provide control on velocity and density distribution, and these data were used to generate an impedance model from the cross section. The impedance model was convolved with a zero-phase, 25-Hz peak-frequency wavelet to produce the seismic model. The results illustrate how the platform-to-basin transition might be imaged by conventional seismic reflection data, how the reflections relate to the distribution of lithology and through-going geological surfaces, and how constructive and destructive interference and seismic resolution combine to produce individual reflections.

  1. Functionalization/passivation of porous graphitic carbon with di-tert-amylperoxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, David S.; Gupta, Vipul; Olsen, Rebecca E.; Miller, Alex T.; Davis, Robert C.; Ess, Daniel; Zhu, Zihua; Vail, Michael A.; Dadson, Andrew; Linford, Matthew R.

    2011-11-18

    Porous graphitic carbon (PGC) particles were functionalized/passivated in situ in packed beds at elevated temperature with neat di-tert-amylperoxide (DTAP) in a column oven. The performance of these particles for high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was assayed before and after this chemistry with the following analytes: benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, n-propyl benzene, n-butyl benzene, p-xylene, phenol, 4-methylphenol, phenetole, 3,5-xylenol, and anisole. After the first functionalization/passivation, the retention factors, k, of these compounds decreased by about 5% and the number of theoretical plates (N) increased by ca. 15%. These values of k then remained roughly constant after a second functionalization/ passivation but a further increase in N was noticed. In addition, after each of the reactions, the peak asymmetries decreased by ca. 15%, for a total of ca. 30%. The columns were then subjected twice to methanol at 100 C for 5 h at 1 mL/min. After these stability tests, the values of k remained roughly constant, the number of plates increased, which is favorable, and the asymmetries rose and then declined, where they remained below the initial values for the unfunctionalized columns. Functionalized and unfunctionalized particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and BET measurements, which showed no difference between the functionalized and unfunctionalized materials, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), where ToF-SIMS suggested some chemical differences between the functionalized and unfunctionalized materials. In particular ToF-SIMS suggested that the expected five-carbon fragments from DTAP exist at higher concentrations on DTAP-functionalized PGC. First principle calculations on model graphitic surfaces suggest that the first addition of a DTAP radical to the surface proceeds in an approximately isothermal or slightly favorable fashion, but that subsequent DTAP

  2. Study of di-pion Bottomonium Transitions and Search for the h_b(1P) State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-12-09

    We study inclusive di-pion decays using a sample of 108 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) events recorded with the BABAR detector. We search for the decay mode {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}h{sub b} (1P) and find no evidence for the bottomonium spin-singlet state h{sub b}(1P) in the invariant mass distribution recoiling against the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} system. Assuming the h{sub b}(1P) mass to be 9.900 GeV/c{sup 2}, we measure the upper limit on the branching fraction {Beta}[{Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}h{sub b}(1P)] < 1.2 x 10{sup -4}, at 90% confidence level. We also investigate the {chi}{sub bJ}(2P) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {chi}{sub bJ}(1P), {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(2S), and {Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(1S) di-pion transitions and present an improved measurement of the branching fraction of the {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(2S) decay and of the {Upsilon}(3S) - {Upsilon}(2S) mass difference.

  3. Thermal chemistry of copper(I)-N,N '-di-sec-butylacetamidinate on Cu(110) single-crystal surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma Qiang; Zaera, Francisco; Gordon, Roy G.

    2012-01-15

    The surface chemistry of copper(I)-N,N'-di-sec-butylacetamidinate on Cu(110) single-crystal surfaces has been characterized under ultrahigh vacuum by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A series of thermal stepwise conversions were identified, starting with the partial dissociative adsorption of the copper acetamidinate dimers into a mixture of monomers and dimers on the surface. An early dissociation of a C-N bond leads to the production of N-sec-butylacetamidine, which is detected in TPD experiments in three temperature regimes, the last one centered around 480 K. Butene, and a small amount of butane, is also detected above approximately 500 K, and hydrogen production, an indication of dehydrogenation of surface fragments, is observed at 460, 550 and 670 K. In total, only about 10% of the initial copper(I)-N,N'-di-sec-butylacetamidinate adsorbed monolayer decomposes, and only about {approx}3% of carbon is left behind on the surface after heating to high temperatures. The implications of this surface chemistry to the design of chemical film growth processes using copper acetamidinates as precursors are discussed.

  4. A Search for Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons in the Di-tau Decay Mode in Proton - Anti-proton Collisions at 1.8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Amy Lynn

    2003-09-01

    A search for directly produced Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons has been performed in the di-tau decay channel in 86.3 {+-} 3.5 pb{sup -1} of data collected by CDF during Run1b at the Tevatron. They search for events where one tau decays to an electron and the other tau decays hadronically. They perform a counting experiment and set limits on the cross section for Higgs production in the high tan {beta} region of the m{sub A}-tan {beta} plane. For a benchmark parameter space point where m{sub A} = 100 and tan {beta} = 50, they set a 95% confidence level upper limit at 891 pb compared to the theoretically predicted cross section of 122 pb. For events where the tau candidates are not back-to-back, they utilize a di-tau mass reconstruction technique for the first time on hadron collider data. Limits based on a likelihood binned in di-tau mass from non-back-to-back events alone are weaker than the limits obtained from the counting experiment using the full di-tau sample.

  5. DE-EM-0001971 WIPP M&O D-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING Table of Content D-1 PACKAGING ....................................................................................................... 1 D-2 MARKING ........................................................................................................... 1 DE-EM-0001971 WIPP M&O D-1 PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING D-1 PACKAGING Preservation, packaging, and packing for shipment or mailing of all work delivered

  6. Mechanisms of Selective Cleavage of C-O Bonds in Di-aryl Ethers in Aqueous Phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Jiayue; Zhao, Chen; Mei, Donghai; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2014-01-02

    A novel route for cleaving the C-O aryl ether bonds of p-substituted H-, CH3-, and OH- diphenyl ethers has been explored over Ni/SiO2 catalysts at very mild conditions. The C-O bond of diphenyl ether is cleaved by parallel hydrogenolysis and hydrolysis (hydrogenolysis combined with HO* addition) on Ni. The rates as a function of H2 pressure from 0 to 10 MPa indicate that the rate-determining step is the C-O bond cleavage on Ni. H* atoms compete with the organic reactant for adsorption leading to a maximum in the rate with increasing H2 pressure. In contrast to diphenyl ether, hydrogenolysis is the exclusive route for cleaving an ether C-O bond of di-p-tolyl ether to form p-cresol and toluene. 4,4'-dihydroxydiphenyl ether undergoes sequential surface hydrogenolysis, first to phenol and HOC6H4O* (adsorbed), which is then cleaved to phenol (C6H5O* with added H*) and H2O (O* with two added H*) in a second step. Density function theory supports the operation of this pathway. Notably, addition of H* to HOC6H4O* is less favorable than a further hydrogenolytic C-O bond cleavage. The TOFs of three aryl ethers with Ni/SiO2 in water followed the order 4,4'-dihydroxydiphenyl ether (69 h-1) > diphenyl ether (26 h-1) > di-p-tolyl ether (1.3 h-1), in line with the increasing apparent activation energies, ranging from 93 kJ∙mol-1 (4,4'-dihydroxydiphenyl ether) < diphenyl ether (98 kJ∙mol-1) to di-p-tolyl ether (105 kJ∙mol-1). D.M. thanks the support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computing time was granted by the grand challenge of computational catalysis of the William R

  7. Establishing or Deactivating a RIS for NMMSS Reporting

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    USE CODE TYPE OF INVENTORY CHANGE Updated JULY 2010 * EN, ED, NE, ND, DE, DN, & EE - category change - the quantity of uranium which has changed category as a result of blending, ...

  8. 309 Facility deactivation and decommisioning Criteria Completion Check Lists

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornwell, B.C.

    1996-02-01

    To facilitate and track completion of the 309 Facility turnover criteria completion an Applicability Matrix and Criteria Completion Check Lists were prepared. The applicability matrix documents the required turnover criteria for a given area in the facility or scope of work. The applicable criteria is selected for 16 different areas. For each area a completion checklist is provided to document completion of a requirement by WHC and the Environmental Restoration Contractor.

  9. Catalyst Characterization and Deactivation Mechanisms (Agreements 9130 and 9105)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  10. Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommission...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tech Assistance Savannah River National Laboratory- Assess Adequacy of Process Knowledge ... Gaseous Diffusion Plant and phone discussions were held with personnel at several sites. ...