National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for dba a-weighted decibels

  1. NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    restriction, or job transfer dB decibel dBA decibel A-weighted DOE U.S. Department of Energy EA environmental assessment EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ESA Endangered...

  2. DRAFT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    restriction, or job transfer dB decibel dBA decibel A-weighted DOE U.S. Department of Energy EA environmental assessment EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ESA Endangered...

  3. Microsoft Word - NEPA18_Final.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    River Exhibition of History, Science and Technology CRITFC Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission CWA Clean Water Act dB Decibels dBA A-weighted sound level DCG Derived...

  4. Chapeau Inc dba BluePoint Energy Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to:RAPIDCavalloCerionChannahon, Illinois:Chapeau Inc dba

  5. A weighted CSP approach to cost-optimal planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winckler, Marco Antonio Alba

    A weighted CSP approach to cost-optimal planning Martin COOPER, Marie De ROQUEMAUREL, Pierre REGNIER Rapport IRIT RR-2009-28-FR Summary: For planning to come of age, plans must be judged by a measure global optimality whenever the planning problem has a solution. We code the extraction of an optimal plan

  6. Faster Quantum Walk Search on a Weighted Graph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas G. Wong

    2015-07-27

    A randomly walking quantum particle evolving by Schr\\"odinger's equation searches for a unique marked vertex on the "simplex of complete graphs" in time $\\Theta(N^{3/4})$. In this paper, we give a weighted version of this graph that preserves vertex-transitivity, and we show that the time to search on it can be reduced to nearly $\\Theta(\\sqrt{N})$. To prove this, we introduce two novel extensions to degenerate perturbation theory: an adjustment that distinguishes the weights of the edges, and a method to determine how precisely the jumping rate of the quantum walk must be chosen.

  7. In-Space Transportation Infrastructure Architecture Decisions Using a Weighted Graph Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    and Technology Skolkovo 143025, Russia crawley@skolkovotech.ru Abstract-- The selection of an architecture with nodes corresponding to architecture- technology combinations and edges corresponding to the abilityIn-Space Transportation Infrastructure Architecture Decisions Using a Weighted Graph Approach Peter

  8. A Weighted Interference Estimation Scheme for Interface Switching Wireless Mesh Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Typically, a WMN is a collection of wireless mesh routers and wireless mobile mesh clients. Wireless mesh to wireless mesh routers via either wired or wireless connections. In addition, a small number of wirelessA Weighted Interference Estimation Scheme for Interface Switching Wireless Mesh Networks Yunxia

  9. A Weighted Interference Estimation Scheme for Interface Switching Wireless Mesh Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . A WMN is a collection of stationary wireless mesh routers and mobile mesh clients. Wireless mesh routers mesh routers via traditional Ethernet or wireless connections. Through multi-hop wireless relay, mobileA Weighted Interference Estimation Scheme for Interface Switching Wireless Mesh Networks Yunxia

  10. A Weighted Residual Framework for Formulation and Analysis of Direct Transcription Methods for Optimal Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Baljeet

    2012-02-14

    . I am grateful to my roommates Surinder Pal and Navdeep Singh for making my stay at TAMU much like home. I thank my colleagues and friends, Hrishikesh, Shalom, Luis, Avinash, Roshmik, Parikshit, Sandeep, Abhishek, Xiaoli, Monika and Mrinal...-1 A WEIGHTED RESIDUAL FRAMEWORK FOR FORMULATION AND ANALYSIS OF DIRECT TRANSCRIPTION METHODS FOR OPTIMAL CONTROL A Dissertation by BALJEET SINGH Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment...

  11. Company Nam List any DBA'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pe ____ ____ ____ ____ M(REV1.15) NESS INFO e completed te: If you are l be subject to a completed ( ornia? Yes ase attach a W edit Card only ble for campu Purchase Ord ay. This syste or payments b U ness

  12. Representation of the Fourier transform as a weighted sum of the complex error functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Abrarov; B. M. Quine

    2015-08-05

    In this paper we show that a methodology based on a sampling with the Gaussian function of kind $h\\,{e^{ - {{\\left( {t/c} \\right)}^2}}}/\\left( {{c}\\sqrt \\pi } \\right)$, where ${c}$ and $h$ are some constants, leads to the Fourier transform that can be represented as a weighted sum of the complex error functions. Due to remarkable property of the complex error function, the Fourier transform based on the weighted sum can be significantly simplified and expressed in terms of a damping harmonic series. In contrast to the conventional discrete Fourier transform, this methodology results in a non-periodic wavelet approximation. Consequently, the proposed approach may be useful and convenient in algorithmic implementation.

  13. Changes in Body Image and Sexuality in Rural Breast Cancer Survivors During a Weight Loss and Weight Maintenance Intervention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter, Rebecca

    2015-08-31

    This study evaluated changes in body image dimensions in breast cancer survivors after a weight control trial and predictors of those changes. Postmenopausal rural breast cancer survivors enrolled in an 18-month phone-based weight loss and weight...

  14. Experimental Studies of Ilmenite as a Weighting Material in Oil-based Drilling Fluids for HPHT Operations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jie

    2013-12-06

    ilmenite (5 µm) was introduced to address shortcomings of the traditional weighting materials. The objective of this study is to discuss the performance of oil-based drilling fluids using ilmenite as a weighting material for HPHT applications. Oil...

  15. An evaluation of a weight-lifting belt and back injury prevention training class for fleet service clerks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddell, Cheryl Renee?

    1991-01-01

    AN EVALUATION OF A WEIGHT-LIFTING BELT AND BACK INJURY PREVENTION TRAINING CLASS FOR FLEET SERVICE CLERKS A Thesis by CHERYL RENEE REDDELL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering AN EVALUATION OF A WEIGHT-LIFTING BELT AND BACK INJURY PREVENTION TRAINING CLASS FOR FLEET SERVICE CLERKS A Thesis by Cheryl Rene' Reddell Approved...

  16. 334 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NETWORK AND SERVICE MANAGEMENT, VOL. 8, NO. 4, DECEMBER 2011 Phoenix: A Weight-Based Network Coordinate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Xiaoming

    334 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NETWORK AND SERVICE MANAGEMENT, VOL. 8, NO. 4, DECEMBER 2011 Phoenix with Euclidean distance based NC systems. In this paper, we propose an NC system, so-called Phoenix, which is based on the matrix factorization model. Phoenix introduces a weight to each reference NC and trusts

  17. Vision Industries dba Vision Motor Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin,Village of Wellington,FL LLC Jump to: navigation, search

  18. Ultra Soy of America DBA USA Biofuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York: EnergyU.S. EPAEnergyUltra High Temperature Jump

  19. Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for mass production and that produces high adhesive strength of the ceramic-metal interfaces. Consider the fabrication and use of low-cost AlN as a potential (and...

  20. Denton County Electric Cooperative d/b/a CoServ Electric Smart...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    are occurring, and (3) demonstrate the performance of select distribution automation, load management, and customer systems equipment.3 Equipment Targeted Benefits References...

  1. ORNL: Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates (Agreement ID:23278)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  2. Denton County Electric Cooperative d/b/a CoServ Electric Smart Grid Project

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to: navigation, searchDaimlerDaytonInformationDenton

  3. ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram |RecentSulfonateAFVAGO AG

  4. Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE INDUSTRIALU.S.Leadership onProton Conductivity Low Temperature ProtonTim2

  5. Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE INDUSTRIALU.S.Leadership onProton Conductivity Low Temperature ProtonTim21

  6. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORT FOR LNG DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, LLC (d/b/a OREGON LNG -

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-AA-1 SECTION J APPENDIX A ADVANCE UNDERSTANDINGSELF-NFTA*) FE

  7. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR LNG DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, LLC (D/B/A Oregon LNG) -

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-AA-1 SECTION J APPENDIX A ADVANCE- FE DKT.3365NO.ORDERFE DKT. NO.

  8. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR WALLER LNG SERVICES, LLC D/B/A WALLER POINT LNG -

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-AA-1 SECTION J APPENDIX A ADVANCE- FEORDER 3555 |Venture GlobalFE

  9. Tradespace exploration for space system architectures : a weighted graph framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davison, Peter Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Many systems undergo significant architecture-level change during their lifecycles as a result of exogenous system disturbances (e.g. budget reduction or changes in stakeholder requirements), failure to develop critical ...

  10. Identification of limiting case between DBA and SBDBA (CL break area sensitivity): A new model for the boron injection system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez Gonzalez, R.; Petruzzi, A.; D'Auria, F.; Mazzantini, O.

    2012-07-01

    Atucha-2 is a Siemens-designed PHWR reactor under construction in the Republic of Argentina. Its geometrical complexity and (e.g., oblique Control Rods, Positive Void coefficient) required a developed and validated complex three dimensional (3D) neutron kinetics (NK) coupled thermal hydraulic (TH) model. Reactor shut-down is obtained by oblique CRs and, during accidental conditions, by an emergency shut-down system (JDJ) injecting a highly concentrated boron solution (boron clouds) in the moderator tank, the boron clouds reconstruction is obtained using a CFD (CFX) code calculation. A complete LBLOCA calculation implies the application of the RELAP5-3D{sup C} system code. Within the framework of the third Agreement 'NA-SA - Univ. of Pisa' a new RELAP5-3D control system for the boron injection system was developed and implemented in the validated coupled RELAP5-3D/NESTLE model of the Atucha 2 NPP. The aim of this activity is to find out the limiting case (maximum break area size) for the Peak Cladding Temperature for LOCAs under fixed boundary conditions. (authors)

  11. SBC Long Distance, LLC Original Page 1 d/b/a AT&T Long Distance Effective November 3, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    .42 $3.95 Atlantic Ocean - East Flat $13.95 $13.95 Comoros 6a-12n $9.54 $7.51 Atlantic Ocean - West Flat

  12. Development of computer program ENMASK for prediction of residual environmental masking-noise spectra, from any three independent environmental parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Y.-S.; Liebich, R. E.; Chun, K. C.

    2000-03-31

    Residual environmental sound can mask intrusive4 (unwanted) sound. It is a factor that can affect noise impacts and must be considered both in noise-impact studies and in noise-mitigation designs. Models for quantitative prediction of sensation level (audibility) and psychological effects of intrusive noise require an input with 1/3 octave-band spectral resolution of environmental masking noise. However, the majority of published residual environmental masking-noise data are given with either octave-band frequency resolution or only single A-weighted decibel values. A model has been developed that enables estimation of 1/3 octave-band residual environmental masking-noise spectra and relates certain environmental parameters to A-weighted sound level. This model provides a correlation among three environmental conditions: measured residual A-weighted sound-pressure level, proximity to a major roadway, and population density. Cited field-study data were used to compute the most probable 1/3 octave-band sound-pressure spectrum corresponding to any selected one of these three inputs. In turn, such spectra can be used as an input to models for prediction of noise impacts. This paper discusses specific algorithms included in the newly developed computer program ENMASK. In addition, the relative audibility of the environmental masking-noise spectra at different A-weighted sound levels is discussed, which is determined by using the methodology of program ENAUDIBL.

  13. A WEIGHTED FREQUENCY-DOMAIN LEAST SQUARES APPROACH FOR EQUALIZATION IN DISCRETE MULTITONE SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adali, Tulay

    chosen as the industry modulation standard for asymmetrical digital subscriber line (ADSL) modems [4 the energy and constellation size of each carrier. One implementation of MCM is the Discrete Multitone (DMT) system which uses the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) for modulation [2], [3]. DMT has recently been

  14. The Modular Degree and the Congruence Number of a Weight 2 Cusp Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kani, Ernst

    is equivalent to the Asymptotic Fermat Conjecture; cf. [Fr2], p. 547. Notation In addition to the above is a subring, then SRP denotes the submodule of S2( 0(N)) consisting of the forms g(z) = 2ssinz

  15. Data:Dba74d36-87bb-4a6d-a55b-67d341da9431 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    contentdampacificpowerdocAboutUsRatesRegulationWashingtonApprovedTariffsWAPriceSummary.pdf Source Parent: https:www.pacificpower.netaboutrrwri.html Comments...

  16. FDA--China Seafood Shippers List -Updated 2015 April 10 3007754302 AA Food Inc. dba Lobster Import Export 3625 Placentia Court Chino CA PP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Airfresh Seafoods 2022 45th Street Ct NW Gig Harbor WA PP BMS 3004204585 AIS Aqua Foods, Inc. 239 Morgan Rd

  17. Substitute W-9 form for U.S. companies and individuals If Doing Business As (DBA) or business name of Sole Proprietorship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Sole Proprietorship Legal Name (As registered with the IRS) Business Name Taxpayer Identification taxpayer identification number (or I am waiting for a number to be issued to me), and 2. I am not subject

  18. INTERNATIONAL UNION OF OPERATING ENGINEERS NATIONAL HAZMAT PROGRAM - MILWAUKEE WORM DRIVE CIRCULAR SAW OENHP{number_sign}: 2001-02, VERSION A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-01-05

    Florida International University's (FIU) Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) evaluated five saws for their effectiveness in cutting specially prepared fiberglass-reinforced plywood crates. These crates were built as surrogates for crates that presently hold radioactively contaminated glove boxes at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Los Alamos facility. The Milwaukee worm drive circular saw was assessed on August 14, 2001. During the FIU test of efficacy, a team from the Operating Engineers National Hazmat Program (OENHP) evaluated the occupational safety and health issues associated with this technology. The Milwaukee worm drive circular saw is a hand-held tool with a 7 1/4-inch diameter circular blade for cutting wood. The saw contains a fixed upper and a retractable lower blade guard to prevent access to the blade during use. The unit is operated with an on/off guarded trigger switch; and is supported with a handgrip mounted on top of the saw. An adjustable lever sets the depth of cut. The retractable blade guard permits blind or plunge cuts and protects from blade access during shutdown and blade coast. Kickback, the sudden reaction to a pinched blade, is possible when using this saw and could cause the saw to lift up and out of the work piece toward the operator. Proper work position and firm control of the saw minimizes the potential for a sprain or strain. Care needs to be exercised to support the work piece properly and to not force the tool. Personal noise sampling indicated that one worker was near the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Action Level of 85 decibels (dBA) while the other was at the Action Level with time-weighted averages (TWA's) of 82.7 and 84.6 dBA, respectively. These data are not entirely representative as they were gathered during a simulation and not at the actual worksite. Additional sampling should be conducted on-site, but the workers should wear hearing protection until it is determined that it is no longer necessary. Air sampling was performed while the workers dismantled the fiberglass-reinforced crates. The total nuisance dust sample for the Milwaukee circular saw was 36.07 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m{sup 3}), which is much higher than the OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 15 mg/m{sup 3} and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV) of 10 mg/m{sup 3}. Galson Laboratories considered the fiber analysis void due to the overloading of the filter. The PEL for fiberglass is 1 fiber per cubic centimeter (f/cc).

  19. INTERNATIONAL UNION OF OPERATING ENGINEERS NATIONAL HAZMAT PROGRAM - PORTER-CABLE CIRCULAR SAW OENHP: 2001-04, VERSION A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-01-15

    Florida International University's (FIU) Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) evaluated five saws for their effectiveness in cutting specially prepared fiberglass-reinforced plywood crates. These crates were built as surrogates for crates that presently hold radioactively contaminated glove boxes at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Los Alamos facility. The Porter-Cable circular saw was assessed on August 15-16, 2001 (Porter-Cable No.1 and Porter-Cable No.2, respectively). During the FIU test of efficacy, a team from the Operating Engineers National Hazmat Program (OENHP) evaluated the occupational safety and health issues associated with this technology. The Porter-Cable saw is a straightforward machine for cutting wood of varying thickness. The blade is fully guarded with a fixed upper and a lower retractable guard. The lower guard retracts as the blade engages the work piece. The unit is operated with an on/off guarded trigger switch and is supported with a handgrip mounted near the front of the saw. The saw is equipped with a directional nozzle, which aims sawdust away from the operator and the line of cut. An optional vacuum system, attached to the directional nozzle, is used to remove and collect dust. During the demonstration of Porter-Cable No.1, personal noise sampling indicated that one worker was under and one was at the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Action Level of 85 decibels (dBA) with time-weighted averages (TWA's) of 82.7 and 84.6 dBA, respectively. During the demonstration of Porter-Cable No.2, however, both workers did exceed the Action Level with TWA's of 89.7 and 90.0 dBA. These data are not entirely representative as they were gathered during a simulation and not at the actual worksite. Additional sampling should be conducted on-site, but the workers should wear hearing protection until it is determined that it is no longer necessary. The total nuisance dust sample for Porter-Cable No.1 was 3.53 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m{sup 3}), which is lower than the OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 15 mg/m{sup 3} and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV) of 10 mg/m{sup 3}. Porter-Cable No.2's nuisance dust results yielded a value of 22.05 mg/m{sup 3}, which is over the PEL and TLV. The fiber analysis for the first demonstration yielded 12.9 fibers per cubic centimeter (f/cc), which is much higher than the PEL of 1 f/cc. Galson Laboratories considered the fiber analysis for the second demonstration void due to the overloading of dust on the filter. Kickback, the sudden reaction to a pinched blade, is possible with this saw and could cause the saw to lift up and out of the work piece and toward the operator. Proper work position and firm control of the saw minimizes the potential for a sprain or strain. Care needs to be exercised to support the work piece properly and to not force the tool.

  20. INTERNATIONAL UNION OF OPERATING ENGINEERS NATIONAL HAZMAT PROGRAM - EVOLUTION 180 CIRCULAR SAW OENHP: 2001-03, VERSION A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-01-25

    Florida International University's (FIU) Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) evaluated five saws for their effectiveness in cutting specially prepared fiberglass-reinforced plywood crates. These crates were built as surrogates for crates that presently hold radioactively contaminated gloveboxes at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Los Alamos facility. The Evolution 180 circular saw was assessed on August 14, 2001. During the FIU test of efficacy, a team from the Operating Engineers National Hazmat Program (OENHP) evaluated the occupational safety and health issues associated with this technology. The Evolution 180 is a portable, metal cutting circular saw with a 7-inch diameter blade. The blade is contained within the main housing and has a retractable lower blade guard to prevent operator access to the blade during operation and shutdown. The saw is equipped with a chip collector. The maximum cutting thickness for metal is one-quarter inch and can cut steel tubing and pipe 2 inches in diameter. The unit is operated with an on/off guarded trigger switch and is supported with the hand guide mounted to the side of the saw. An adjustable lever sets the depth of the cut. The machine's circuitry will automatically shut the saw motor off if excessive overload is detected during operation. The one-half hour demonstration involved vertical and horizontal cuts and blade changes. During this process, operators experienced binding of the saw. This caused the blade to become hot, causing the sawdust collected in the chip collector to smoke. Care should be exercised to use the appropriate blade for the application, operator training, and personal protective equipment (PPE). Personal noise sampling indicated that neither worker was over the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Action Level of 85 decibels (dBA) with time-weighted averages (TWA's) of 69.1 and 68.8 dBA. The personal noise sample taken during the special demonstration with the stainless steel plate had a TWA of 69.8 dBA. These data are not entirely representative as they were gathered during a simulation and not at the actual worksite. Additional sampling should be conducted on-site, but the workers should wear hearing protection until it is determined that it is no longer necessary. The total nuisance dust sample for the Evolution 180 circular saw was 3.5 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m{sup 3}), which is lower than the OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 15 mg/m{sup 3} and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV) of 10 mg/m{sup 3}. The fiber analysis yielded 1.74 fibers per cubic centimeter (f/cc), which is above the PEL of 1 f/cc. Although the nuisance dust levels were low, fiberglass dust levels were higher than the PEL. Since fiberglass dust is known to be a strong skin irritant and a possible human carcinogen, the workers should continue to wear appropriate suits and gloves, as well as a full-face air-purifying respirator. The respirator should be equipped with a combination organic vapor and acid gas cartridge in combination with a High Particulate Air (HEPA) filter, since particulate filter, since during the demonstration, the workers complained of an odd smell, which may have been from the breakdown of the fiberglass.

  1. Abstract -In this paper, we examine the performance of a weighted voting classification strategy for human face

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassoun, Mohamad H.

    Combination of Classifiers Scheme for Human Face Recognition Author 1 Anonymous Address Anonymous Address

  2. INTERNATIONAL UNION OF OPERATING ENGINEERS NATIONAL HAZMAT PROGRAM - DEWALT RECIPROCATING SAW OENHP{number_sign}: 2001-01, VERSION A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-01-31

    Florida International University's (FIU) Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) evaluated five saws for their effectiveness in cutting specially prepared fiberglass-reinforced plywood crates. These crates were built as surrogates for crates that presently hold radioactively contaminated glove boxes at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Los Alamos facility. The DeWalt reciprocating saw was assessed on August 13, 2001. During the FIU test of efficacy, a team from the Operating Engineers National Hazmat Program (OENHP) evaluated the occupational safety and health issues associated with this technology. The DeWalt reciprocating saw is a hand-held industrial tool used for cutting numerous materials, including wood and various types of metals depending upon the chosen blade. Its design allows for cutting close to floors, corners, and other difficult areas. An adjustable shoe sets the cut at three separate depths. During the demonstration for the dismantling of the fiberglass-reinforced plywood crate, the saw was used for extended continuous cutting, over a period of approximately two hours. The dismantling operation involved vertical and horizontal cuts, saw blade changes, and material handling. During this process, operators experienced vibration to the hand and arm in addition to a temperature rise on the handgrip. The blade of the saw is partially exposed during handling and fully exposed during blade changes. Administrative controls, such as duty time of the operators and the machine, operator training, and personal protective equipment (PPE), such as gloves, should be considered when using the saw in this application. Personal noise sampling indicated that both workers were exposed to noise levels exceeding the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Action Level of 85 decibels (dBA) with time-weighted averages (TWA's) of 88.3 and 90.6 dBA. Normally, a worker would be placed in a hearing conservation program if his TWA was greater than the Action Level. In this case, however, monitoring was conducted during a simulation, not during the actual work conducted at the worksite. Additional sampling should be conducted at the worksite to determine the actual noise levels for the workers. Until it is determined that the actual TWA's are less than the Action Level, the workers should use PPE. A training program on the proper use and wearing of the selected PPE should be provided to each worker. Nuisance dust monitoring yielded a concentration of 10.69 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m{sup 3}). Although this is less than the OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 15 mg/m{sup 3}, it is above the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV) of 10 mg/m{sup 3}. Fiberglass dust monitoring yielded a fiber count of 1.7 fibers per cubic centimeter (f/cc). This is above the PEL and the TLV of 1.0 f/cc. Therefore, controls should be implemented (engineering or PPE) to reduce the workers' exposure to the dust. Respirators should be used if engineering controls do not sufficiently control the dust or fiberglass generated. Respirators should be equipped with an organic vapor and acid gas cartridge with a High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter, since during the demonstration, the workers complained of an odd smell, which may have been from the breakdown of the fiberglass.

  3. Decision making performance in a combined heat and noise environment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pope, Mattison Scott

    1993-01-01

    This thesis was performed in order to determine the ability to make correct decisions when presented with two stressors under four conditions: controlled (70'F and 65 dBA); heat (105'F and 65 dBA); noise (70'F and 83 dBA); ...

  4. Combination of Indoor and Outdoor Positioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    / passive sensors Accuracy (m ­ km) Application (industry, surveying, navigation) June 24-26, 2008 ETH.00005 Attenuation of various building materials (L1 = 1500 MHz) Stone (1997) Signal Strength in Decibel Watt of GNSS

  5. Investigation of Noise and Durability Performance Trends for Asphaltic Pavement Surface Types: Three-Year Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Qing; Kohler, Erwin R.; Harvey, John T; Ongel, Aybike

    2009-01-01

    retain its permeability longer. Old concrete surfaces withretain its permeability longer. Old concrete surfaces withconcrete, decibel (dB), noise, absorption, macrotexture, microtexture, open-graded, gap-graded, dense- graded, onboard sound intensity, permeability,

  6. Determination of the accuracy of noise dosimeters used for the evaluation of occupational noise exposure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Robert Dalton

    1977-01-01

    , the percentage of permissible exposure would 'oe C/T (100) = 15/360 (100) = 4. 2. In the laboratory test, at the 92 dBA level, a portion of the data is illustrated below: Exposure time, minutes 15 30 45 60 $0 Permissible Exposure 4. 2 8. 3 12. 5 16. 7 g.... VI-2. VI-3. VII. VIII. Results of Lab Test--92 dBA I. ocation. Results of Lab Test--95 dBA Location. Results of' Lab Test--97 dBA Location. Octave Band Analysis of 92, 95, and 97 dBA Locations a* Power Plant. . . . . . Octave Band Analysis...

  7. WHEN IS THE MULTIPLICITY OF A WEIGHT EQUAL TO i? A. D. Berenshtein and A. V. Zelevinskii UDC 519.46

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berenstein, Arkady

    no direct summands of type G 2. If K%,p = i, then PS(1) (~ - P) = i. 3) If S is a simple algebra of type G i e Z+ is even and (~ - I) = ~' imi + rmr/2; Scientific Council of the USSR Academy of Sciences-2663/90/2404-0259512.50 © 1991 Plenum Publishing Corporation 259 #12;3) type G2: I = ~m2, ~ = mini + m2~2, where ml, m 2 e Z

  8. Strengthening Line Management Oversight and Federal Monitoring...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    hazard controls based on preliminary hazards analyses and DBA Preliminary assessment of the appropriate seismic design basis (seismic design category and limit state)...

  9. June 2008 Standards Forum and Standards Actions

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    design basis accidents (DBA) that provide the necessary input to the identification and classification of important safety functions. These classifications (i.e., safety class,...

  10. Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Labor and Pension...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Separation Program General Release and Waiver Labor Standards DOE DBA Desk Guide Davis Bacon Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Semi-Annual Davis-Bacon Enforcement Report Form...

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Working with Sandia: Procurement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Prop & Direct Change Attachments (MS Word) Posters Equal Employment Opportunity Davis-Bacon Wage Poster State DBA Poster Requirements (MS Excel) Safety The construction community...

  12. A DESK GUIDE TO THE DAVIS-BACON ACT

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Therefore, owner-operators of equipment such as bulldozers, backhoes, drilling rigs, welding machines, and similar equipment are covered by DBA provisions. (Reference DOL's...

  13. Information Technology and Clinical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derisi, Joseph

    Operations Manager: TBD Systems, Storage, DBA · Network & Voice · Production Control · Data Center, Incident, Request Management · Process design and deployment · Business Continuity and DR planning

  14. Pulmonary metabolism of dibenz(a,j)acridine: A carcinogenic heterocyclic aromatic: Final report for period September 1, 1982-June 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warshawsky, D.

    1987-07-01

    The metabolism of the carcinogenic N-heterocyclic aromatic, dibenz(a,j)-acridine (DBA) was investigated in the isolated perfused lung (IPL) preparation. A significantly increased rate of metabolism was observed for DBA in benzo(a)-pyrene (BaP) and DBA-pretreated animals. This resulted in marked increases in conjugation, in particular sulfates and thioethers, and the distribution of conjugates and total metabolites in blood and lung. When Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ was coadministered with DBA to the IPL, the rate of metabolism was significantly decreased with respect to control experiments. This resulted in increased distributions of sulfate and thioether conjugates in blood. Spectroscopic analyses and microsomal enzyme analyses were used in the characterization of the four metabolites identified in the lung. The major nonconjugated metabolite was the 3,4 dihydrodiol of DBA and the three minor metabolites were the 4 and 3 phenol of DBA and a dihydroxy compound of DBA. The results indicate that in the lung DBA is metabolized in a manner similar to that of BaP but different from that of dibenzo-(c,g)carbazole. It is, therefore, apparent that the metabolism of N-heterocyclic aromatics are related to the aromaticity of the heteroatom-containing ring and the solubility of compound, as well as the specific enzymes responsible for activation of the compound. 115 refs., 78 figs., 24 tabs.

  15. Mechanistic studies on palladium-catalyzed carbon-nitrogen bond forming reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klingensmith, Liane M. (Liane May)

    2005-01-01

    Precatalyst species present in a solution of Pd?(dba)? and Xantphos were identified as Pd(Xantphos)(dba) and Pd(Xantphos)? by use of ³¹p NMR and independent syntheses. Pd(Xantphos)? was found to form at high ligand ...

  16. Gene networks associated with conditional fear in mice identified using a systems genetics approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    the behavior of A/J and CBA/J intercross mice in theBXH8 BXH9 C3H C57L C58 CAST CBA CE DBA FVB KK LG LPJ MA NODBXH8 BXH9 C3H C57L C58 CAST CBA CE DBA FVB KK LG LPJ MA NOD

  17. Lec. No. Topic Textbook Dates Lab Experiment of the Week 1 Units, Current, Voltage, Power, 1.2; 1.3; Wed Sep 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Division Linear vs. Nonlinear Circuits 3.3 Superposition 3 V-I Equation of Thevenin Circuit,Thevenin 3.6 Mon Nov 28 Spectrum Analysis* 22 Filter Circuits; LPF, HPF Chapter 12 Wed Nov 30 Bode Plots/ Decibel.3; Wed Sep 7 Circuit Topologies: Branch, Node, Series, Kirchoff's Laws 2.1; 2.2; KVL/KCL Examples 2

  18. CNA: Compromise Agreement (2013-SE-1430)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE and CNA International, Inc., d/b/a MC Appliance Corp. entered into a Compromise Agreement to resolve a case involving the distribution in commerce of noncompliant freezers.

  19. STFC External Innovations Impact Funding Schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feb 2015 Dr Vlad Skarda DBA CPhys Knowledge Exchange Manager Science and Technology Facilities Council physics, astronomy, nuclear physics and space science STFC #12;Technology to underpin science Developing knowledge to diverse technological sectors Promote interdisciplinary collaborative research with industry

  20. State Energy Program Notice (10-004A), Energy Efficiency Conservation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Notice (10-005A), and Appliance Rebate Program Notice (10-001A) Guidance on Davis Bacon Act (DBA) requirements for American Reinvestment and Recovery Act of 2009...

  1. Palladium(0)-Catalyzed Intermolecular Amination of Unactivated C[3 over sp]-H Bonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Jun

    Filling out the space: The title reaction of unactivated C[3 over sp]-H bonds using aryl amines as the nitrogen source is disclosed (see scheme; dba=dibenzylideneacetone, Tf=trifluoromethanesulfonyl). Either the C-N ...

  2. 2 Subcontractor 3 Dual Role

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oracle DBA R. Stewart1 Technical Staff L. Anderson1 Technical Staff NRPD Assignment Radiological Control ­ Katie Smith Admin Support ­ Annetta Hendricks SNS Facility Operations Office Sam McKenzie, Site Accelerator/Facility Buildings #12;

  3. Pathogenesis of the Erythroid Failure in Diamond Blackfan Anemia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sieff, Colin A.

    Diamond Blackfan anaemia (DBA) is a severe congenital failure of erythropoiesis. Despite mutations in one of several ribosome protein genes, including RPS19, the cause of the erythroid specificity is still a mystery. We ...

  4. Enterprise Assessments Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    process. In response to EA comments, BNI stated that "Section 6.0 of the Control Selection Process Handbook is a description of the 'DBA' confirmation task. The handbook...

  5. Legal Name: (as it appears on your tax return)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Legal Name: (as it appears on your tax return) Trade Name: (DBA) Mail PURCHASE ORDERS and BIDS to: Mail PAYMENTS to: PO Telephone # (preferably toll free) PO Fax # (preferably toll free) Email address

  6. Intramolecular Heck couplings of unactivated alkyl electrophiles : synthetic and mechanistic studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firmansjah, Luke

    2007-01-01

    A method for the palladium-catalyzed intramolecular Heck coupling of unactivated alkyl bromides and chlorides is described. The optimal catalyst system was composed of Pd2(MeO-dba)3 as the metal source and N-heterocyclic ...

  7. ACOUSTIC STUDY OF THE UD / GAMESA WIND TURBINE PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    /s). Maximum sound power is first produced by the wind turbine at the design wind speed. The study at or above 4.2 m/s) and 108.4 dBA for the design wind condition (hub height winds at or above 9.7 m average sound levels are in the range of 34 to 56 dBA. · The maximum wind turbine sound level under design

  8. Advanced low noise cooling fans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spek, H.F. van der; Nelissen, P.J.M.

    1995-02-01

    The results from an intensive research program show that it is possible to reduce the sound power level of cooling fans by 15 dB(A) by altering blade cord width and swept leading and trailing edge lines. Combination with the reduction of the pressure drop can result in a step of 20 dB(A) and a reduction with 25 percent of the absorbed power. Testing was conducted in accordance with recognized international measuring standards and the results will be presented, including consequences for cooling tower and condenser design.

  9. A proposed system to automatically control audio sound-to-noise levels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neinast, Gary Strickland

    1957-01-01

    for the degree oi' MASTER OP SCIENCE August 1957 Major Sub]eot'f Eleotrioal Engineering A PROPOSED SYSTEM TO AUTOMATICALLY CONTROL AUDIO SOUND-TO-NOISE LEVELS k Thesis QARY S. NEINAST Approved as to style and content by& islay a FBNR o 0 ee e epsx' ne... fxequency shown. This is the sero decibel level that 1s produced by a pure tone of 1000 cycles pex second at an intensity of . 0002 dynes per square centimeter. ~loudas . The Ieudaess of a sousd I ~ the asouut ef feeling ox sensation produced...

  10. The management program at Stetson University is anchored in the behavioral and social sciences and might best be described as an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miles, Will

    and strategic management, entrepreneurship, venture capital studies Robert Boozer, D.B.A., Mississippi State politics Jon Carrick, Ph.D., University of Edinburgh; strategic management, international business Nick and strategic management, cross-cultural management, short-term study abroad programs Grant-funded research

  11. CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT For On-going Construction Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT For On-going Construction Project TO: Deans, Directors, Chairpersons Alarm System UHM 05-537A CONTRACTOR: Biven's Electric, Inc. Dba West Coast Construction SCOPE OF WORK OF CONSTRUCTION FROM 7:30 AM TO 4:30 PM ACCESSIBLE ROUTES: No accessible routes will be affected by this test

  12. Palladium/Tris(tert-butyl)phosphine-Catalyzed Suzuki Cross-Couplings in the Presence of Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lou, Sha

    Dipalladiumtris(dibenzylideneacetone)/tris(tert-butyl)phosphonium tetrafluoroborate/potassium fluoride dihydrate [Pd2(dba)3/[HP(t-Bu)3]BF4/KF?2?H2O] serves as a mild, robust, and user-friendly method for the efficient ...

  13. Mathematics The following is a list of resources compiled by UROP that relate to mathematics undergraduate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaucher, Eric

    Mathematics The following is a list of resources compiled by UROP that relate to mathematics regarding mathematical research, these do give a variety of different perspectives in undergraduate research?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true& db=a9h&AN=28332682&site=ehost-live Brown, D., and Yurekli, O. "Undergraduate Research in Mathematics

  14. Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 123,000 246,000 246,000 185,000 1,320 132,000 132 13,200 1,320 1,320 132

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 123,000 246,000 246,000 185,000 1,320 132,000 132 13,200 1,320 1 BAP BKF BBF IDP DBA Grid Sample Label DOSS Chemical Test 133-3638 38.00 .25 Chemical Test 133-3638

  15. Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 123,000 246,000 246,000 185,000 1,320 132,000 132 13,200 1,320 1,320 132

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 123,000 246,000 246,000 185,000 1,320 132,000 132 13,200 1,320 1 BAP BKF BBF IDP DBA Grid Sample Label DOSS Chemical Test DM.1101.09.WS.Comp01_05.NL2 .41 Chemical Test DM.1101.09.WS

  16. Chemical Analyses 123,000 246,000 246,000 185,000 1,320 132,000 132 13,200 1,320 1,320 132

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemical Analyses 123,000 246,000 246,000 185,000 1,320 132,000 132 13,200 1,320 1,320 132 BBF IDP DBA Grid Sample Label DOSS Chemical Test 133-3642 17.00 0.82 0.56 .78 Chemical Test 133-3642

  17. Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 123,000 246,000 246,000 185,000 1,320 132,000 132 13,200 1,320 1,320 132

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 123,000 246,000 246,000 185,000 1,320 132,000 132 13,200 1,320 1 BAP BKF BBF IDP DBA Grid Sample Label DOSS Chemical Test 133-3385 3.80 .25 Chemical Test 133-3385

  18. Oklahoma State University Licensed as of 06/2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Affordable Design Alta Gracia Holdco, Inc. American Threads by To The Game Antigua Group Inc. AS Camp David Campus Athletics Corporation Cradle Gear Inc. Dupree Sports Emory Group LLC Eskimo Joe's Promotional Products Group Inc. G-III Leather Fashions Inc. (Starter) G-III Leather Fashions Inc. dba G-III Sports Gear

  19. Thursday, December 27, 2012 Federal Processor Permit 1 of 4 NOAA Fisheries Service -Alaska Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HOMER, AK CARROLL, GLEN SHP 5520 COAL POINT TRADING, CO. HOMER, AK HILLSTRAND, JOHN W SHP 5435 COASTAL SMOKERY INC DBA G&G ALASKA SHP 27989 GLOBAL SEAFOODS NORTH AMERICA, LLC KODIAK, AK GLOBAL SEAFOODS NORTH AMERICA, LLC SHP 5335 HOONAH COLD STORAGE HOONAH, AK DIGNON, WILLIAM A SHP 32927 HOONAH COLD STORAGE

  20. A Bayesian Approach to Online Performance Modeling for Database Appliances using Gaussian Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poupart, Pascal

    - tain peak performance for database management systems (DBMS), database administrators (DBAs) need. Accurately predicting response times of DBMS queries is necessary for a DBA to effectively achieve and highly accurate online DBMS performance model that is robust in the face of changing workloads, data

  1. University of Rochester and Related Entities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portman, Douglas

    Nurse Service of Rochester and Monroe County, Inc. Community Care of Rochester subsidiaries of Medicine & Dentistry Strong Memorial Hospital School of Nursing Eastman Institute for Oral Health Health Center, Inc. (dba Meadowbrook Adult Daycare at the Highlands) Rochester BioVentureFaculty Group (URMFG) e

  2. CX-011736: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lutheran University Association, Inc. dba Valparaiso University - Solar Thermal Electrolytic Production of Magnesium from Magnesium Oxide CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/21/2013 Location(s): Indiana Offices(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy

  3. November 9, 1998 NOISE EXPOSURE IN METAL AND NONMETAL MINES AND MILLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    dosimeter samples to determine compliance with the 90 dBA permissible exposure limit (PEL). Most noise dosimeters as the primary instrument for determining compliance. (4) A dosimeter determines the entire shift. The dosimeter is particularly useful for measuring intermittent and variable noise levels

  4. Curriculum Vitae of Dr. T. Grandon Gill Information Systems and Decision Sciences CIS1040

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jank, Wolfgang

    Curriculum Vitae of Dr. T. Grandon Gill Information Systems and Decision Sciences ­ CIS1040 (1980-1982). D.B.A., Management of Information Systems. Harvard Business School (1986-1991). ACADEMIC POSITIONS: 2009- University of South Florida Tampa, FL Professor. Information Systems and Decision Sciences

  5. Student Services Building Bid Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oviedo, Néstor J.

    Student Services Building Bid Results Project No.: 900120 SE2 Signage Merced, CA PROJECT NO Creations Inc. dba Ellis & Ellis Sign Systems Turner Aigns & Graphics J.S. Hackley Architectural Signage, Inc BIDDER E BIDDER F BIDDER G BIDDER H BIDDER I Advertised Estimate: $115,000 Qualified Qualified

  6. Nordyne: Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-01/0210)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Nordyne, LLC d/b/a Garrison Heating and Cooling Products failed to certify various residential central air conditioners and central air conditioning heat pumps as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  7. Nordyne: Order (2010-CE-01/0210)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Nordyne, LLC d/b/a Garrison Heating and Cooling Products to pay a $10,000 civil penalty after finding Nordyne had failed to certify that certain models of central air conditioners and central air conditioning heat pumps comply with the applicable energy conservation standard.

  8. Accelerator Chapter 4: Storage Ring System 4-1 NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    and BPMs, are listed in Section 6.1.1 and in Table 6.1.4. 4.1.2 Preliminary Magnet Design 4.1.2.1 Storage Ring Lattice Magnet Considerations The magnet lattice is designed with a 30-cell DBA (double bend, the required magnetic field quality and alignment tolerances are the two primary considerations in the design

  9. FOREIGN VENDOR REGISTRATION REQUEST TYPE OR PRINT INFORMATION NEATLY. PLEASE REFER TO INSTRUCTIONS FOR MORE INFORMATION.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artemov, Sergei N.

    list below: Enter your nine-digit United States (US) issued Taxpayer Identification Number here: (Do Request New York State (NYS) must obtain correct Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) in order Business As): Enter your DBA name. Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN): Enter your nine-digit Social

  10. Joint ICTP-IAEA Essential Knowledge Workshop on Deterministic Safety Assessment and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    events (PIEs) · DBA acceptance criteria · Design extension conditions (DEC) · Conservative versus best to the design extension conditions as well as an overview of the engineering aspects important to safety, and will be of particular interest to participants from countries introducing nuclear power programmes. TOPICS Week 1

  11. High SO[sub 2] removal efficiency testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blythe, G.

    1993-01-20

    Baseline testing at the base'' site. Tampa Electric Company's (TECo's) Big Bend Station, commenced on September 28 and was completed on October 2. Initial results from this testing were presented in the previous Technical Progress Report, but a more complete discussion is provided in this report. Parametric testing was conducted at the Big Bend site during this quarter to evaluate the effects of dibasic acid (DBA) addition on system SQ removal performance. The parametric tests were conducted from November 2 through 19. A DBA consumption rate test was also conducted, after the parametric tests were completed. The DBA consumption test was conducted from November 21 through 25. Options I and II to the base program were exercised by DOE/PETC at the end of the previous quarter. These options involve testing at Hoosier Energy Rural Electric Cooperative Inc.'s Merom Station and Southwestern Electric Power Company's Pirkey Station, respectively. Testing was conducted at Merom Station during November. Previously, Radian Corporation was the test contractor for EPRI-funded performance additive testing at this site. This EPRI-funded testing involved the equivalent of baseline testing, parametric testing with both DBA and sodium formate performance additives, and an additive consumption test with the DBA additive. The results of the prior testing will be available to support the objectives of this DOE project Consequently, the only testing required at the Merom site was to conduct consumption tests with the sodium formate additive. After a brief baseline repeat test, two sodium formate consumption tests were conducted during the time period from November 11 through 23. Results from the consumption tests are presented and discussed in this report.

  12. High SO{sub 2} removal efficiency testing. Technical progress report, [October 1--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blythe, G.

    1993-01-20

    Baseline testing at the ``base`` site. Tampa Electric Company`s (TECo`s) Big Bend Station, commenced on September 28 and was completed on October 2. Initial results from this testing were presented in the previous Technical Progress Report, but a more complete discussion is provided in this report. Parametric testing was conducted at the Big Bend site during this quarter to evaluate the effects of dibasic acid (DBA) addition on system SO{sub 2} removal performance. The parametric tests were conducted from November 2 through 19. A DBA consumption rate test was also conducted, after the parametric tests were completed. The DBA consumption test was conducted from November 21 through 25. Options I and II to the base program were exercised by DOE/PETC at the end of the previous quarter. These options involve testing at Hoosier Energy Rural Electric Cooperative Inc.`s Merom Station and Southwestern Electric Power Company`s Pirkey Station, respectively. Testing was conducted at Merom Station during November. Previously, Radian Corporation was the test contractor for EPRI-funded performance additive testing at this site. This EPRI-funded testing involved the equivalent of baseline testing, parametric testing with both DBA and sodium formate performance additives, and an additive consumption test with the DBA additive. The results of the prior testing will be available to support the objectives of this DOE project Consequently, the only testing required at the Merom site was to conduct consumption tests with the sodium formate additive. After a brief baseline repeat test, two sodium formate consumption tests were conducted during the time period from November 11 through 23. Results from the consumption tests are presented and discussed in this report.

  13. Criteria for calculating the efficiency of HEPA filters during and after design basis accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergman, W.; First, M.W.; Anderson, W.L.; Gilbert, H.; Jacox, J.W.

    1994-12-01

    We have reviewed the literature on the performance of high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under normal and abnormal conditions to establish criteria for calculating the efficiency of HEPA filters in a DOE nonreactor nuclear facility during and after a Design Basis Accident (DBA). The literature review included the performance of new filters and parameters that may cause deterioration in the filter performance such as filter age, radiation, corrosive chemicals, seismic and rough handling, high temperature, moisture, particle clogging, high air flow and pressure pulses. The deterioration of the filter efficiency depends on the exposure parameters; in severe exposure conditions the filter will be structurally damaged and have a residual efficiency of 0%. Despite the many studies on HEPA filter performance under adverse conditions, there are large gaps and limitations in the data that introduce significant error in the estimates of HEPA filter efficiencies under DBA conditions. Because of this limitation, conservative values of filter efficiency were chosen when there was insufficient data.

  14. Validation of a plant dynamics code for 4S - Test analysis of natural circulation behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sebe, F.; Horie, H.; Matsumiya, H.; Fanning, T. H.

    2012-07-01

    A plant transient dynamics code for a sodium-cooled fast reactor was developed by Toshiba. The code is used to evaluate the safety performance of Super-Safe, Small, and Simple reactor (4S) for Anticipated Operational Occurrences (AOOs), Design Basis Accident (DBA) and Beyond DBA (BDBA). The code is currently undergoing verification and validation (V and V). As one of the validation, test analysis of the Shutdown Heat Removal Test (SHRT)-17 performed in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR)-II was conducted. The SHRT-17 is protected loss of flow test. The purpose of this validation is to confirm capability of the code to simulate natural circulation behavior of the plant. As a result, good agreements are shown between the analytical results and the measured data which were available from instrumented subassembly. The detailed validation result of the natural circulation behavior is described in this paper. (authors)

  15. Evaluation and comparison of occupational noise exposure among workers on offshore and onshore oil well drilling rigs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suarez Garcia, Humberto

    1984-01-01

    Drilling Rig Specifications . . . 47 51 Appendix B: Noise Exposure Data . 54 Appendix C Actual Exposure Time "C" for Onshore Workers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Appendix D Actual Exposure Time "C" for Offshore Workers... . . . . . 19 5. Flow Diagram of the Offshore Survey Procedure. Sound Level Meter and Microphone Assembly. 22 Type 1562-A Sound Level Calibrator. . . . . . . . 24 The Sound Pressure Level Measured in dBA at Approximate Operator Ear Level. 26 Onshore...

  16. High SO{sub 2} removal efficiency testing. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blythe, G.

    1994-04-28

    The project involves testing at six full-scale utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, to evaluate low capital cost upgrades that may allow these systems to achieve up to 98% SO{sub 2} removal efficiency. The upgrades to be evaluated mostly involve using additives in the FGD systems. On the base program, testing was completed at the Tampa Electric Big Bend Station in November 1992. The upgrade option tested was DBA additive. For Option 1, at the Hoosier Energy Merom Station, three upgrade options have been tested: DBA additive, sodium formate additive, and high pH set point operation. Option 2 has involved testing at the Southwestern Electric Power Company Pirkey Station. Both sodium formate and DBA additives were tested as potential upgrade options at Pirkey. On Option 3, for testing at the PSI Energy Gibson Station, a DBA additive performance and consumption test was conducted in late February through mid-March 1994. Preliminary results from these tests are discussed in Section 3 of this progress report. Option 4 is for testing at the Duquesne Light Elrama Station. The FGD system employs magnesium-enhanced lime reagent and venturi absorber modules. An EPRI-funded model evaluation of potential upgrade options for this FGD system, along with a preliminary economic evaluation, determined that the most attractive upgrade options for this site were to increase thiosulfate ion concentrations in the FGD system liquor to lower oxidation percentages and increase liquid-phase sulfite alkalinity, and to increase the venturi absorber pressure drop to improve gas/liquid contacting. Parametric testing of these upgrade options was conducted in late March 1994. Preliminary results from these tests are also discussed in Section 3 of this progress report.

  17. High SO(2) Removal Efficiency Testing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blythe, G.

    1997-10-22

    On the base program, testing was completed at the Tampa Electric Company`s (TECo`s) Big Bend Station in November 1992. The upgrade option tested was DBA additive. Additional testing was conducted at this site during the previous quarter (April through June 1997). Results from that testing were presented in the Technical Progress Report dated July 1997. For Option I, at the Hoosier Energy Merom Station, results from another program co-funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association have been combined with results from DOE-funded testing. Three upgrade options have been tested: DBA additive, sodium formate additive, and high pH set-point operation. All testing was completed by November 1992. There were no activities for this site during the current quarter. Option II involved testing at the Southwestern Electric Power Company Pirkey Station. Both sodium formate and DBA additives were tested as potential upgrade options. All of the testing at this site was completed by May 1993. On Option III, for testing at the PSI Energy Gibson Station, testing with sodium formate additive was completed in early October 1993, and a DBA additive performance and consumption test was completed in March of 1994. There were no efforts for this site during the current quarter. Option IV is for testing at the Duquesne Light Elrama Station. The FGD system employs magnesium-enhanced lime reagent and venturi absorber modules. An EPRI-funded model evaluation of potential upgrade options for this FGD system, along with a preliminary economic evaluation, determined that the most attractive upgrade options for this site were to increase thiosulfate ion concentrations in the FGD system liquor to lower oxidation percentages.

  18. Reduction of Beam Emittance of Pep-X Using Quadruple Bend Achromat Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Min-Huey; Cai, Yunhai; Hettel, Robert; Nosochkov, Yuri; /SLAC

    2009-05-26

    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is studying an option of building a high brightness synchrotron light source machine, PEP-X, in the existing PEP-II tunnel [1, 2]. By replacing 6 arcs of FODO cells of PEPII High Energy Ring (HER) with two arcs of DBA and four arcs of TME and installation of 89.3 m long damping wiggler an ultra low beam emittance of 0.14 nm-rad (including intra-beam scattering) at 4.5 GeV is achieved. In this paper we study the possibility to further reduce the beam emittance by releasing the constraint of the dispersion free in the DBA straight. The QBA (Quadruple Bend Achromat) cell is used to replace the DBA. The ratio of outer and inner bending angle is optimized. The dispersion function in the non-dispersion straight is controlled to compromise with lower emittance and beam size at the dispersion straight. An undulator of period length 23 mm, maximum magnetic field of 1.053 T, and total periods of 150 is used to put in the 30 straights to simulate the effects of these IDs on the beam emittance and energy spread. The brightness including all the ID effects is calculated and compared to the original PEP-X design.

  19. HFBR: Review of the technical specifications against the FSAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, D.V.; Ross, S.B.; Claiborne, E.R.; Darby, J.L.; Clark, R.A.

    1990-01-25

    The purpose of this review is to determine the adequacy of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Technical Specifications for 40 MW operation by comparison with the HFBR Final Safety Analysis Report, particularly the accident analyses chapter. Specifically, the Technical Specifications were compared against the Design Basis Accident (DBA) Analyses presented in the Addendum to the HFBR FSAR for 60 MW Operation. The 60 MW DBA analyses was used since it is more current and complete than the analyses presented in the original FSAR which is considered obsolete. A listing of the required systems and equipment was made for each of the accidents analyzed. Additionally, the Technical Specification instrument setpoints were compared to the DBA analyses parametric values. Also included in this review was a comparison of the Technical Specification Bases against the FSAR and the identification of any differences. The HFBR Operations Procedures Manual (OPM) was also reviewed for any inconsistencies between the FSAR or the Technical Specifications. Upon completion of this review it was determined that the Technical Specifications are well written and the items commented on should not delay the low power restart (40 MW). Additionally, the OPM is also well written and does not require further modification before restart.

  20. The in vivo bioactivation of the teratogen aflatoxin B? by maternal and fetal tissues in C57BL/6 mice 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, David James

    1986-01-01

    tissues of 057BL/6 mice on day 17 of gestation. Significant levels of AFB metabolic activa- tion were observed in placental and fetal tissues. In animals administered a 10 mg/kg AFB dose and sacrificed 2 hours later, placental DNA and fetal liver DNA... in the liver of 057BL/6 and ICR mice, but kidney tissue contained highest adduct levels in DBA/2 and Balb/c mice. TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT. TABLE OF CONTENTS. LIST OF FIGURES vii ABREVIATIONS. CHAPTER I. INTRODUCTION: PERSPECTIVES ON THE PROBLEM...

  1. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Advanced Mixed-Oxide Fuel Assemblies with VIPRE-01 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bingham, Adam R.

    2010-07-14

    heat flux CHFR critical heat flux ratio CLOFA complete loss-of-flow accident CONFU Combined NonFertile and Uranium CR control rod DBA design basis accident DNB departure from nucleate boiling DNBR departure from nucleate boiling ratio DOE Department... height Greek symbols: ? turbulent mixing coefficient Subscripts: As assembly cr control rod fr fuel rod i ?to? cell i it instrument tube k ?from? adjacent cell k k ? i all lateral flow areas, k, connected to cell, i sq square channel tr triangular channel...

  2. The effects of selected sound pressure levels on the color discrimination of red, yellow, and green 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Raymond Bruce

    1972-01-01

    to be 80 &I 8 . pressure levels- it is believed to noise over 130 dB is should be avoided; while there no hazard for levels below 2. Frequency distribution of sound energy- the ear is more susceptible to damage at middle and higher frequencies than... performing test I Blue showed the greatest number of errors with test I after exposure to 95 dBA. 8. 5 P L x Exposure x Test ? in this interaction, yellow and red showed the greatest number of 49 incorrect position placements using test 1 at no noise...

  3. Synthetic Studies of Iriomoteolide-1A Total Synthesis of Alotaketal A and an Antifungal O-Hydroxy-P-Quinone Methide Diterpenoid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jinhua

    2013-11-07

    .00 -10.56 -10.39 -3.86 6.08 -3.48 -5.89 8.80 -0.75 0.10 -3.53 -7.19 4.90 -1.90 -9.89 -2.97 -0.37 -1.87 32 CHAPTER III TOTAL SYNTHESIS OF ALOTAKETAL A* 3.1 Retrosynthesis of Alotaketal A Alotaketal A, isolated by Andersen and co...-Hex cyclohexyl dba dibenzylideneacetone DBU 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene DDQ 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone DEAD diethyl...

  4. High SO{sub 2} removal efficiency testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-10

    Tests were conducted on the Tampa Electric Company`s (TECo) Big Bend Station, Unit 4 flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system to evaluate an option for achieving high sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal efficiencies. The option tested was the addition of dibasic acid (DBA) additive. In addition, the effectiveness of other potential options was simulated with the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI) FGD PRocess Integration and Simulation Model (FGDPRISM) after it was calibrated to the system. An economic analysis was conducted to determine the cost effectiveness of each option considered.

  5. Electronic Funds Transfer Authorization Form 4/2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation Company Name or DBA: Address: City/State/Zip:

  6. Electronic Questionnaire for Investigations Processing (e-QIP) Tip Sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation Company Name or DBA: Address:

  7. Electronic Registration Form - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation Company Name or DBA: Address:ElectronicAbout

  8. Electronic Structure Changes in Supercapacitor Electrodes Observed In

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation Company Name or DBA:

  9. Electronic Structure and Magnetism in Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation Company Name or DBA:Electronic Structure and

  10. Electronic Structure of Cobalt Nanocrystals Suspended in Liquid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation Company Name or DBA:Electronic Structure

  11. Electronic Structure of Cobalt Nanocrystals Suspended in Liquid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation Company Name or DBA:Electronic

  12. A DESK GUIDE TO THE DAVIS-BACON ACT

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s s iof1 of 8 2Seismic ResponseSeider, firstDBA Desk

  13. A Decade of Cleanup Progress at EM's Idaho Site | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s s iof1 of 8 2Seismic ResponseSeider, firstDBA

  14. Criteria for calculating the efficiency of deep-pleated HEPA filters with aluminum separators during and after design basis accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergman, W.; First, M.W.; Anderson, W.L.; Gilbert, H.; Jacox, J.W.

    1995-02-01

    The authors have reviewed the literature on the performance of high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under normal and abnormal conditions to establish criteria for calculating the efficiency of HEPA filters in a DOE nonreactor nuclear facility during and after a Design Basis Accident (DBA). This study is only applicable to the standard deep-pleated HEPA filter with aluminum separators as specified in ASME N509. The literature review included the performance of new filters and parameters that may cause deterioration in the filter performance such as filter age, radiation, corrosive chemicals, seismic and rough handling, high temperature, moisture, particle clogging, high air flow and pressure pulses. The deterioration of the filter efficiency depends on the exposure parameters; in severe exposure conditions the filter will be structurally damaged and have a residual efficiency of 0%. Despite the many studies on HEPA filter performance under adverse conditions, there are large gaps and limitations in the data that introduce significant error in the estimates of HEPA filter efficiencies under DBA conditions. Because of this limitation, conservative values of filter efficiency were chosen when there was insufficient data.

  15. Application of the MELCOR code to design basis PWR large dry containment analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Jesse; Notafrancesco, Allen (USNRC, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, Rockville, MD); Tills, Jack Lee (Jack Tills & Associates, Inc., Sandia Park, NM)

    2009-05-01

    The MELCOR computer code has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories under USNRC sponsorship to provide capability for independently auditing analyses submitted by reactor manufactures and utilities. MELCOR is a fully integrated code (encompassing the reactor coolant system and the containment building) that models the progression of postulated accidents in light water reactor power plants. To assess the adequacy of containment thermal-hydraulic modeling incorporated in the MELCOR code for application to PWR large dry containments, several selected demonstration designs were analyzed. This report documents MELCOR code demonstration calculations performed for postulated design basis accident (DBA) analysis (LOCA and MSLB) inside containment, which are compared to other code results. The key processes when analyzing the containment loads inside PWR large dry containments are (1) expansion and transport of high mass/energy releases, (2) heat and mass transfer to structural passive heat sinks, and (3) containment pressure reduction due to engineered safety features. A code-to-code benchmarking for DBA events showed that MELCOR predictions of maximum containment loads were equivalent to similar predictions using a qualified containment code known as CONTAIN. This equivalency was found to apply for both single- and multi-cell containment models.

  16. Analysis of an Earthquake-Initiated-Transient in a PBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. M. Ougouag; J. Ortensi; H. Hiruta

    2009-05-01

    One of the Design Basis Accidents (DBA) for a Pebble Bed Reactor has been identified as the “Safe shutdown earthquake with core conduction cooling to passive mode of Reactor Cavity Cooling System.” A new methodology to analyze this particular DBA has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During the seismic event the reactor core experiences the densification of the pebbles, which produce small reactivity insertions due to the effective fuel densification. In addition, a decrease in the active core height results in the relative withdrawal of the control rods, which are assumed to remain stationary during the transient. The methodology relies on the dynamic re-meshing of the core during the transient to capture the local packing fraction changes and their corresponding effects on temperature and reactivity. The core re-meshing methodology is based on the velocity profiles of the pebbles in the core, which were obtained with the INL’s pebble mechanics code PEBBLES. The methodology has been added to the coupled code system CYNOD-THERMIX-KONVEK. The reactor power calculation is further improved with the use of the new advanced TRISO fuel model to better approximate the temperatures in the fuel kernels. During the transient the core is brought back to a safe condition by the strong Doppler feedback from local temperature increases.

  17. Final Scientific/Technical Report Carbon Capture and Storage Training Northwest - CCSTNW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Workman, James

    2013-09-30

    This report details the activities of the Carbon Capture and Storage Training Northwest (CCSTNW) program 2009 to 2013. The CCSTNW created, implemented, and provided Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) training over the period of the program. With the assistance of an expert advisory board, CCSTNW created curriculum and conducted three short courses, more than three lectures, two symposiums, and a final conference. The program was conducted in five phases; 1) organization, gap analysis, and form advisory board; 2) develop list serves, website, and tech alerts; 3) training needs survey; 4) conduct lectures, courses, symposiums, and a conference; 5) evaluation surveys and course evaluations. This program was conducted jointly by Environmental Outreach and Stewardship Alliance (dba. Northwest Environmental Training Center – NWETC) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL).

  18. 2010 Honda Civic Hybrid UltraBattery Conversion 5577 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Honda Civic HEV UltraBattery Conversion (VIN JHMFA3F24AS005577). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the AVTA for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the DOE.

  19. 2010 Honda Insight VIN 0141 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler Gray

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Honda Insight HEV (VIN: JHMZE2H78AS010141). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  20. 2010 Toyota Prius VIN 6063 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Toyota Prius HEV (VIN JTDKN3DU5A0006063). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  1. 2010 Toyota Prius VIN 0462 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Toyota Prius HEV (VIN: JTDKN3DU2A5010462). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  2. 2011 Hyundai Sonata 4932 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid HEV (VIN KMHEC4A43BA004932). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the AVTA for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the DOE.

  3. 2010 Ford Fusion VIN 4757 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Ford Fusion HEV (VIN: 3FADP0L34AR144757). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  4. 2010 Honda Insight VIN 1748 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Honda Insight HEV (VIN: JHMZE2H59AS011748). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  5. The BWR lower head response during a large-break LOCA with core damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alammar, M.A. [GPU Nuclear Corp., Parsippany, NJ (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Some of the important issues in severe accident management guidelines development deal with estimating the time to lower head vessel failure after core damage and the time window available for water injection that would prevent vessel failure. These issues are obviously scenario dependent, but bounding estimates are needed. The scenario chosen for this purpose was a design-basis accident (DBA) loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) because it was one of the contributors to the Oyster Creek containment failure frequency. Oyster Creek is a 1930-MW(thermal) boiling water reactor (BWR)-2. The lower head response models have improved since the Three Mile Island unit 2 (TMI-2) vessel investigation project (VIP) results became known, specifically the addition of rapid- and slow-cooling models. These mechanisms were found to have taken place in the TMI-2 lower head during debris cooldown and were important contributors in preventing vessel failure.

  6. 2011 Chevrolet Volt VIN 0815 Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), including testing the PHEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 12,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Chevrolet Volt PHEV (VIN 1G1RD6E48BU100815). The battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation (eTec) dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the AVTA for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the DOE.

  7. Integrated deterministic and probabilistic safety analysis for safety assessment of nuclear power plants

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Di Maio, Francesco; Zio, Enrico; Smith, Curtis; Rychkov, Valentin

    2015-07-06

    The present special issue contains an overview of the research in the field of Integrated Deterministic and Probabilistic Safety Assessment (IDPSA) of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Traditionally, safety regulation for NPPs design and operation has been based on Deterministic Safety Assessment (DSA) methods to verify criteria that assure plant safety in a number of postulated Design Basis Accident (DBA) scenarios. Referring to such criteria, it is also possible to identify those plant Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs) and activities that are most important for safety within those postulated scenarios. Then, the design, operation, and maintenance of these “safety-related” SSCs andmore »activities are controlled through regulatory requirements and supported by Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA).« less

  8. Consider the DME alternative for diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleisch, T.H.; Meurer, P.C.

    1996-07-01

    Engine tests demonstrate that dimethyl ether (DME, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}) can provide an alternative approach toward efficient, ultra-clean and quiet compression ignition (CI) engines. From a combustion point of view, DME is an attractive alternative fuel for CI engines, primarily for commercial applications in urban areas, where ultra-low emissions will be required in the future. DME can resolve the classical diesel emission problem of smoke emissions, which are completely eliminated. With a properly developed DME injection and combustion system, NO{sub x} emissions can be reduced to 40% of Euro II or U.S. 1998 limits, and can meet the future ULEV standards of California. Simultaneously, the combustion noise is reduced by as much as 15 dB(A) below diesel levels. In addition, the classical diesel advantages such as high thermal efficiency, compression ignition, engine robustness, etc., are retained.

  9. Contemporary Mathematics Local Non-injectivity for Weighted Radon Transforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boman, Jan

    Contemporary Mathematics Local Non-injectivity for Weighted Radon Transforms Jan Boman Abstract. A weighted plane Radon transform R is considered, where (x, L) is a smooth positive function. It is proved of smooth positive weight functions. 1. Introduction We shall consider a weighted plane Radon transform (1

  10. A COMPREHENSIVE SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSIS OF DB WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergeron, P.; Wesemael, F.; Dufour, Pierre; Beauchamp, A.; Hunter, C.; Gianninas, A.; Limoges, M.-M.; Dufour, Patrick; Fontaine, G. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Saffer, Rex A. [Strayer University, 234 Mall Boulevard, Suite G-50, King of Prussia, PA 19406 (United States); Ruiz, M. T. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Liebert, James, E-mail: bergeron@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: wesemael@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: gianninas@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: limoges@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: dufourpa@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: fontaine@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: alain.beauchamp@fti-ibis.com, E-mail: chris.hunter@yale.edu, E-mail: rex.saffer@strayer.edu, E-mail: mtruiz@das.uchile.cl [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2011-08-10

    We present a detailed analysis of 108 helium-line (DB) white dwarfs based on model atmosphere fits to high signal-to-noise optical spectroscopy. We derive a mean mass of 0.67 M{sub sun} for our sample, with a dispersion of only 0.09 M{sub sun}. White dwarfs also showing hydrogen lines, the DBA stars, comprise 44% of our sample, and their mass distribution appears similar to that of DB stars. As in our previous investigation, we find no evidence for the existence of low-mass (M < 0.5 M{sub sun}) DB white dwarfs. We derive a luminosity function based on a subset of DB white dwarfs identified in the Palomar-Green Survey. We show that 20% of all white dwarfs in the temperature range of interest are DB stars, although the fraction drops to half this value above T{sub eff} {approx} 20,000 K. We also show that the persistence of DB stars with no hydrogen features at low temperatures is difficult to reconcile with a scenario involving accretion from the interstellar medium, often invoked to account for the observed hydrogen abundances in DBA stars. We present evidence for the existence of two different evolutionary channels that produce DB white dwarfs: the standard model where DA stars are transformed into DB stars through the convective dilution of a thin hydrogen layer and a second channel where DB stars retain a helium atmosphere throughout their evolution. We finally demonstrate that the instability strip of pulsating V777 Her white dwarfs contains no non-variables, if the hydrogen content of these stars is properly accounted for.

  11. Analysis of main steam isolation valve leakage in design basis accidents using MELCOR 1.8.6 and RADTRAD.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salay, Michael; Kalinich, Donald A.; Gauntt, Randall O.; Radel, Tracy E.

    2008-10-01

    Analyses were performed using MELCOR and RADTRAD to investigate main steam isolation valve (MSIV) leakage behavior under design basis accident (DBA) loss-of-coolant (LOCA) conditions that are presumed to have led to a significant core melt accident. Dose to the control room, site boundary and LPZ are examined using both approaches described in current regulatory guidelines as well as analyses based on best estimate source term and system response. At issue is the current practice of using containment airborne aerosol concentrations as a surrogate for the in-vessel aerosol concentration that exists in the near vicinity of the MSIVs. This study finds current practice using the AST-based containment aerosol concentrations for assessing MSIV leakage is non-conservative and conceptually in error. A methodology is proposed that scales the containment aerosol concentration to the expected vessel concentration in order to preserve the simplified use of the AST in assessing containment performance under assumed DBA conditions. This correction is required during the first two hours of the accident while the gap and early in-vessel source terms are present. It is general practice to assume that at {approx}2hrs, recovery actions to reflood the core will have been successful and that further core damage can be avoided. The analyses performed in this study determine that, after two hours, assuming vessel reflooding has taken place, the containment aerosol concentration can then conservatively be used as the effective source to the leaking MSIV's. Recommendations are provided concerning typical aerosol removal coefficients that can be used in the RADTRAD code to predict source attenuation in the steam lines, and on robust methods of predicting MSIV leakage flows based on measured MSIV leakage performance.

  12. DESIGN OF VISIBLE DIAGNOSTIC BEAMLINE FOR NSLS2 STORAGE RING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, W.; Fernandes, H.; Hseuh, H.; Kosciuk, B.; Krinsky, S.; Singh, O.

    2011-03-28

    A visible synchrotron light monitor (SLM) beam line has been designed at the NSLS2 storage ring, using the bending magnet radiation. A retractable thin absorber will be placed in front of the first mirror to block the central x-rays. The first mirror will reflect the visible light through a vacuum window. The light is guided by three 6-inch diameter mirrors into the experiment hutch. In this paper, we will describe design work on various optical components in the beamline. The ultra high brightness NSLS-II storage ring is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It will have 3GeV, 500mA electron beam circulating in the 792m ring, with very low emittance (0.9nm.rad horizontal and 8pm.rad vertical). The ring is composed of 30 DBA cells with 15 fold symmetry. Three damping wigglers will be installed in long straight sections 8, 18 and 28 to lower the emittance. While electrons pass through the bending magnet, synchrotron radiation will be generated covering a wide spectrum. There are other insertion devices in the storage ring which will generate shorter wavelength radiation as well. Synchrotron radiation has been widely used as diagnostic tool to measure the transverse and longitudinal profile. Three synchrotron light beam lines dedicated for diagnostics are under design and construction for the NSLS-II storage ring: two x-ray beam lines (pinhole and CRL) with the source points from Cell 22 BM{_}A (first bending in the DBA cell) and Cell22 three-pole wiggler; the third beam line is using visible part of radiation from Cell 30 BM{_}B (second bending magnet from the cell). Our paper focuses on the design of the visible beam line - SLM.

  13. Hearing Loss After Radiotherapy for Pediatric Brain Tumors: Effect of Cochlear Dose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hua, Chiaho [Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)], E-mail: chia-ho.hua@stjude.org; Bass, Johnnie K. [Rehabilitation Services, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Khan, Raja [Division of Neuro-Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Kun, Larry E.; Merchant, Thomas E. [Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of cochlear dose on sensorineural hearing loss in pediatric patients with brain tumor treated by using conformal radiation therapy (CRT). Patients and Methods: We studied 78 pediatric patients (155 ears) with localized brain tumors treated in 1997-2001 who had not received platinum-based chemotherapy and were followed up for at least 48 months. They were evaluated prospectively by means of serial pure-tone audiograms (250 Hz-8 kHz) and/or auditory brainstem response before and every 6 months after CRT. Results: Hearing loss occurred in 14% (11 of 78) of patients and 11% (17 of 155) of cochleae, with onset most often at 3-5 years after CRT. The incidence of hearing loss was low for a cochlear mean dose of 30 Gy or less and increased at greater than 40-45 Gy. Risk was greater at high frequencies (6-8 kHz). In children who tested abnormal for hearing, average hearing thresholds increased from a less than 25 decibel (dB) hearing level (HL) at baseline to a mean of 46 {+-} 13 (SD) dB HL for high frequencies, 41 {+-} 7 dB HL for low frequencies, and 38 {+-} 6 dB HL for intermediate frequencies. Conclusions: Sensorineural hearing loss is a late effect of CRT. In the absence of other factors, including ototoxic chemotherapy, increase in cochlear dose correlates positively with hearing loss in pediatric patients with brain tumor. To minimize the risk of hearing loss for children treated with radiation therapy, a cumulative cochlear dose less than 35 Gy is recommended for patients planned to receive 54-59.4 Gy in 30-33 treatment fractions.

  14. Adapting an LCD for weight generation in an electro-optic neural processor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamson, Andrew Charles

    2013-01-01

    This thesis discusses adapting and testing an LCD as a weight image display for use in the Hybrid Electro-optical Neural Network (HENN). The HENN project is a proof of concept prototype hybrid neural network that will be ...

  15. PR EPRlNT FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS OF DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING R...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    a weighted low-pass version of the input image from the image itself in order to enhance high-pass character- istics. A variation of the unsharp masking technique is to use a...

  16. 40Ar/39Ar Dating of the Bandelier Tuff and San Diego Canyon Ignimbrite...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    'A' give a weighted mean age of 1.78 &plusmin; 0.07 Ma. Evidence for xenocrystic contamination in the SDC ignimbrites comes from analyses of a correlative air-fall pumice unit...

  17. Semantic Similarity for Adaptive Exploitation of Inter-Query Learning Iker Gondra, and Douglas R. Heisterkamp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heisterkamp, Douglas R.

    - vant images. Distance reweighting is based on updating the weights of a weighted distance metric so that rele- vant images are closer. Some systems incorporate both approaches [6, 7]. Probabilistic feature

  18. NREL is a na*onal laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. A Survey of State-Level Cost and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    equivalent to 0.9% of retail electricity rates when calculated as a weighted-funded by EERE's Solar Energy Technologies Office, and the Na*onal Electricity Delivery Division of the DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability

  19. Applying Compactness Constraints to Seismic Traveltime Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.

    2006-01-01

    Tomographic imaging problems are typically ill-posed and often require the use of regularization techniques to guarantee a stable solution. Minimization of a weighted norm of model length is one commonly used secondary ...

  20. Cleanup of Ilmenite Water-Based Mudcake 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhuo

    2015-08-07

    Micronized ilmenite (FeTiO3) was reported as a weighting material in drilling fluids to avoid the disadvantages of barite and to reduce abrasion of wellbore completion. In this dissertation, coreflood tests were applied for the first time...

  1. Hydrogen Storage - Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    is a significant challenge. On a weight basis, hydrogen has nearly three times the energy content of gasoline (120 MJkg for hydrogen versus 44 MJkg for gasoline). However, on...

  2. Methodology for Rating a Building's Overall Performance based on the ASHRAE/CIBSE/USGBC Performance Measurement Protocols for Commercial Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyojin 1981-

    2012-11-14

    Load Value viii IPMVP International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol IQR Interquartile Range ISO International Organization for Standardization LAeq A-Weighted Equivalent Sound Pressure Level LCeq C-Weighted Equivalent Sound...

  3. Hydrogen Storage- Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Storing enough hydrogen on-board a vehicle to achieve a driving range of greater than 300 miles is a significant challenge. On a weight basis, hydrogen has nearly three times the energy content of...

  4. An evaluation of gender-based weighting factors for internal dosimetry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiars, Joanna Hamilton

    1994-01-01

    This study assesses gender effects on radiation dose weighting factors used in internal dosimetry. A weighting factor represents the relative contribution of a particular organ or tissue to the total detriment due to the effects from uniform whole...

  5. Regularizing Inverse Problems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Fang

    2014-06-26

    inverse problem to optimization problems of minimizing the norm of the data misfit plus a weighted regularization functional that incorporates the a priori information we may have about the original problem. The choices of the regularization functional r(q...

  6. Master Thesis Project Task Distribution and Monitoring in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maguire Jr., Gerald Q.

    to set weights in a weighted round robin distribution algorithm. We conclude that the technology services that will provide a higher degree of transparency, functionality and usability of grid resources

  7. Exposure Evaluation for Benzene, Lead and Noise in Vehicle and Equipment Repair Shops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, Lynn C.

    2013-04-10

    An exposure assessment was performed at the equipment and vehicle maintenance repair shops operating at the U. S. Department of Energy Hanford site, in Richland, Washington. The maintenance shops repair and maintain vehicles and equipment used in support of the Hanford cleanup mission. There are three general mechanic shops and one auto body repair shop. The mechanics work on heavy equipment used in construction, cranes, commercial motor vehicles, passenger-type vehicles in addition to air compressors, generators, and farm equipment. Services include part fabrication, installation of equipment, repair and maintenance work in the engine compartment, and tire and brake services. Work performed at the auto body shop includes painting and surface preparation which involves applying body filler and sanding. 8-hour time-weighted-average samples were collected for benzene and noise exposure and task-based samples were collected for lead dust work activities involving painted metal surfaces. Benzene samples were obtained using 3M™ 3520 sampling badges and were analyzed for additional volatile organic compounds. These compounds were selected based on material safety data sheet information for the aerosol products used by the mechanics for each day of sampling. The compounds included acetone, ethyl ether, toluene, xylene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone, and trichloroethylene. Laboratory data for benzene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone and trichloroethylene were all below the reporting detection limit. Airborne concentrations for acetone, ethyl ether, toluene and xylene were all less than 10% of their occupational exposure limit. The task-based samples obtained for lead dusts were submitted for a metal scan analysis to identify other metals that might be present. Laboratory results for lead dusts were all below the reporting detection limit and airborne concentration for the other metals observed in the samples were less than 10% of the occupational exposure limit. Noise dosimetry sampling was performed on a random basis and was representative of the different work activities within the four shops. Twenty three percent of the noise samples exceeded the occupational exposure limit of 85 decibels for an 8-hour time-weightedaverage. Work activities where noise levels were higher included use of impact wrenches and grinding wheels.

  8. Optimization of La{sub 0.7}Ba{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3-{delta}} complex oxide laser ablation conditions by plume imaging and optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amoruso, S.; Bruzzese, R.; Scotti di Uccio, U.; Aruta, C.; Granozio, F. Miletto; Wang, X.; Maccariello, D.; Maritato, L.; Orgiani, P.

    2010-08-15

    The properties of thin films of complex oxides, such as La{sub 1-x}D{sub x}MnO{sub 3-{delta}} (D=Ba, Ca, Sr, etc.), produced by pulsed laser deposition depend critically on the experimental parameters in which laser ablation is carried out. Here, we report a comparative analysis of the pulsed laser ablation process of La{sub 0.7}Ba{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3-{delta}}, in oxygen background, in the ambient pressure range from 10{sup -2} to 1 mbar, typically employed in pulsed laser deposition of manganites. The laser ablation plume was studied by using time-gated imaging and optical emission spectroscopy techniques. It was found that at a pressure of {approx_equal}10{sup -2} mbar, the plume species arriving at the substrate are characterized by hyperthermal kinetic energy ({approx_equal}10 eV), and high degree of excitation. On the contrary, at larger oxygen pressure (0.1-1 mbar), the velocity of plume species reaching the substrate, and their degree of excitation are much reduced by the confining effects of the background gas. These features explain why an appropriate choice of the experimental conditions in which the deposition process is carried out leads to better quality films, providing helpful indications to improve control over the growth process of both La{sub 1-x}D{sub x}MnO{sub 3-{delta}} and other perovskitic oxides.

  9. Lattice and Collective Effects for PEP-X

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bane, Karl; Cai, Yunhai; Chao, Alex; Hettel, Robert; Huang, Zhirong; Nosochkov, Yuri; Stupakov, Gennady; Wang, Lanfa; Wang, Min-Huey; /SLAC

    2008-05-13

    This is a more comprehensive report of the accelerator physics in the white paper 'PEP-X Light Source at SLAC'. A new light source called 'PEP-X' would reside in the 2.2-km PEP-II tunnel. It has a hybrid lattice where two of its six arcs contain DBA cells that provide a total of 30 straight sections for insertion device beam lines and the remaining arcs contain TME cells for an extremely low emittance. Using 90 meter damping wigglers the horizontal emittance at 4.5 GeV is further reduced to 0.1 nm-rad. Many collective effects including intra-beam scattering, Touschek lifetime, and fast ion instability are studied. We expect that PEP-X will produce photon beams having brightnesses near 10{sup 22} (ph/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1% BW) at 10 keV and 10{sup 21} at 35 keV.

  10. LOW HORIZONTAL BETA FUNCTION IN LONG STRAIGHTS OF THE NSLS-II LATTICE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fanglei, L.; Bengtsson, J.; Guo, W.; Krinsky, S.; Li, Y.; Yang, L.

    2011-03-28

    The NSLS-II storage ring lattice is comprised of 30 DBA cells arranged in 15 superperiods. There are 15 long straight sections (9.3m) for injection, RF and insertion devices and 15 short straights (6.6m) for insertion devices. In the baseline lattice, the short straights have small horizontal and vertical beta functions but the long straights have large horizontal beta function optimized for injection. In this paper, we explore the possibility of maintaining three long straights with large horizontal beta function while providing the other 12 long straights with smaller horizontal beta function to optimize the brightness of insertion devices. Our study considers the possible linear lattice solutions as well as characterizing the nonlinear dynamics. Results are reported on optimization of dynamic aperture required for good injection efficiency and adequate Touschek lifetime. This paper discusses dynamic aperture optimization for the NSLS-II lattice with alternate high and low horizontal beta function in the long straights, which is proposed for the optimization of the brightness of insertion devices. The linear optics is optimized to meet the requirements of lattice function and source properties. Nonlinear optimization for a lattice with working point at (37.18, 16.2) is performed. Considering the realistic magnets errors and physical apertures, we calculate the frequency maps and plot the tune footprint. The results show that the lattice with high-low beta function has adequate dynamic aperture for good injection efficiency and sufficient Touschek lifetime.

  11. Application of the DG-1199 methodology to the ESBWR and ABWR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalinich, Donald A.; Gauntt, Randall O.; Walton, Fotini

    2010-09-01

    Appendix A-5 of Draft Regulatory Guide DG-1199 'Alternative Radiological Source Term for Evaluating Design Basis Accidents at Nuclear Power Reactors' provides guidance - applicable to RADTRAD MSIV leakage models - for scaling containment aerosol concentration to the expected steam dome concentration in order to preserve the simplified use of the Accident Source Term (AST) in assessing containment performance under assumed design basis accident (DBA) conditions. In this study Economic and Safe Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) RADTRAD models are developed using the DG-1199, Appendix A-5 guidance. The models were run using RADTRAD v3.03. Low Population Zone (LPZ), control room (CR), and worst-case 2-hr Exclusion Area Boundary (EAB) doses were calculated and compared to the relevant accident dose criteria in 10 CFR 50.67. For the ESBWR, the dose results were all lower than the MSIV leakage doses calculated by General Electric/Hitachi (GEH) in their licensing technical report. There are no comparable ABWR MSIV leakage doses, however, it should be noted that the ABWR doses are lower than the ESBWR doses. In addition, sensitivity cases were evaluated to ascertain the influence/importance of key input parameters/features of the models.

  12. A valveless pulse combustor with wide operation range and low noise level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohiwa, N.; Yamaguchi, S. (Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya (JP))

    1989-09-01

    The possibility of a valveless pulse combustor with wide range and low noise level was experimentally examined by introducing two practical approaches simultaneously: one is the rich mixture supply outside the flammability limit, instead of the ordinary fuel supply without any primary air; the other is forced secondary air ventilation. An overall evaluation of pulsation limits was also made in terms of the volumetric efficiency of the pulse combustor. Fuel used was a commercial grade gaseous propane. The results show that, under a constant total of equivalence ratios of 0.9, a large turn-down ratio of 9.4-11.5 and a high combustion intensity of 55-67MW/m/sup 3/ could be obtained by setting the rich mixture equivalence ratio equal to 3.0. Also, the proposed valveless pulse combustor could operate more silently than the flapper-valued one by 3-8dB(A), being indicative of noise radiation due to valve flapping.

  13. HIGH SO2 REMOVAL EFFICIENCY TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe; James L. Phillips

    1997-10-15

    This final report describes the results of performance tests at six full-scale wet lime- and limestone-reagent flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The objective of these tests was to evaluate the effectiveness of low capital cost sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal upgrades for existing FGD systems as an option for complying with the provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The upgrade options tested at the limestone-reagent systems included the use of organic acid additives (dibasic acid (DBA) and/or sodium formate) as well as increased reagent ratio (higher excess limestone levels in the recirculating slurry solids) and absorber liquid-to-gas ratio. One system also tested operating at higher flue gas velocities to allow the existing FGD system to treat flue gas from an adjacent, unscrubbed unit. Upgrade options for the one lime-based system tested included increased absorber venturi pressure drop and increased sulfite concentration in the recirculating slurry liquor.

  14. Environmental assessment of air quality, noise and cooling tower drift from the Jersey City Total Energy Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, W.T.; Kolb, J.O.

    1980-06-01

    This assessment covers three specific effects from the operation of the Total Energy (TE) demonstration: (1) air quality from combustion emissions of 600 kW diesel engines and auxiliary boilers fueled with No. 2 distillate oil, (2) noise levels from TE equipment operation, (3) cooling tower drift from two, 2220 gpm, forced-draft cooling towers. For the air quality study, measurements were performed to determine both the combustion emission rates and ground-level air quality at the Demonstration site. Stack analysis of NO/sub x/, SO/sub 2/, CO, particulates, and total hydrocarbons characterized emission rates over a range of operating conditions. Ground-level air quality was monitored during two six-week periods during the summer and winter of 1977. The noise study was performed by measuring sound levels in db(A) in the area within approximately 60 m of the CEB. The noise survey investigated the effects on noise distribution of different wind conditions, time of day or night, and condition of doors - open or closed - near the diesel engines in the CEB. In the cooling tower study, drift emission characteristics were measured to quantify the drift emission before and after cleaning of the tower internals to reduce fallout of large drift droplets in the vicinity of the CEB.

  15. Effects of dietary fat and calorie on immunologic function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barness, L.A.; Carver, J.D.; Friedman, H.; Hsu, K.H.L.

    1986-03-05

    The effect of dietary fat and calories on immunologic function in specific pathogen-free inbred DBA/2 and CBA/J mice was studied. Three diets were modified from control, the AIN-76 purified diet. The high saturated fat diet contained 22.5% coconut oil and 2.5% safflower oil. The high unsaturated fat diet contained 25% safflower oil. Fat was substituted isoclorically for carbohydrate in these two diets. The low calorie diet contained 40% less protein, carbohydrate and fat than control diet; fiber was substituted for these ingredients. Female weanling mice were on the diets for more than 35 days before testing. The natural killer (NK) activity of spleen cells was determined by in vitro cytolysis of /sup 51/Cr-labeled YAC-1 cells. The spleen cells response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) or allogeneic tumor EL-4 cells was measured after immunizing the mice with SRBC or EL-4 cells for 4 or 11 days, respectively. The results showed no significant effect of the low calorie diet on NK activity, anti-SRBC or anti-EL-4 response compared to normal diet. Anti-SRBC plaque response was significantly enhanced (27% higher), while anti-EL-4 response was significantly suppressed (15% less) with high saturated fat diet. NK activity was normal. Mice on high unsaturated fat diet showed suppressed anti-SRBC response (16% less) and anti-EL-4 response (17% less), while NK activity was significantly enhanced (70% higher).

  16. Scanning Tranmission X-ray Microscopic Analysis of Purifed Melanosomes of the Mouse Iris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson,M.; Haraszti, T.; Peterson, G.; Wirick, S.; Jacobsen, C.; John, S.; Grunze, M.

    2006-01-01

    Melanosomes are specialized intracellular membrane bound organelles that produce and store melanin pigment. The composition of melanin and distribution of melanosomes determine the color of many mammalian tissues, including the hair, skin, and iris. However, the presence of melanosomes within a tissue carries potentially detrimental risks related to the cytotoxic indole-quinone intermediates produced during melanin synthesis. In order to study melanosomal molecules, including melanin and melanin-related intermediates, we have refined methods allowing spectromicroscopic analysis of purified melanosomes using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. Here, we present for the first time absorption data for melanosomes at the carbon absorption edge ranging from 284 to 290 eV. High-resolution images of melanosomes at discrete energies demonstrate that fully melanized mature melanosomes are internally non-homogeneous, suggesting the presence of an organized internal sub-structure. Spectra of purified melanosomes are complex, partially described by a predominating absorption band at 288.4 eV with additional contributions from several minor bands. Differences in these spectra were detectable between samples from two strains of inbred mice known to harbor genetically determined melanosomal differences, DBA/2J and C57BL/6J, and are likely to represent signatures arising from biologically relevant and tractable phenomena.

  17. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center final monthly technical report, August 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit this month involved the Trace Element Removal (TER) test block, and the simultaneous testing of the Lime Forced Oxidation process with DBA addition (LDG). Additionally, the second phase of the 1995 Carbon Injection test block began this month with the SDA/PJFF test configuration. At the end of the LDG testing this month, a one-week baseline test was conducted to generate approximately 200 lbs. of magnesium-lime FGD solids for analysis. On the 1.0 MW Post-FGD Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, performance testing was continued this month as measurements were taken for NO{sub x} removal efficiency, residual ammonia slip, and S0{sub 3} generation across the catalysts installed in the reactor. As a result of new directions received from EPRI, this will be the last scheduled month of testing for the SCR unit in 1995. At the completion of this month, the unit will be isolated from the flue gas path and placed in a cold-standby mode for future test activities. This report describes the status of facilities and test facilities at the pilot and mini-pilot plants.

  18. Prediction of number of breached rods following a LBLOCA of Candu plants using a BEPU approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bang, Y. S.; Kim, K.; Seul, K. W.; Woo, S. W.; Han, B. S.

    2012-07-01

    Radioactive doses following design basis accidents (DBA) have been important safety criteria of Candu nuclear power plant and they have been predicted in terms of the number of breached fuel rods. To support the licensing review on this concern, an analysis of LBLOCA has been conducted by using the BEPU method of KINS, KINS-REM. Number of Breached Rods (NBR) following a LBLOCA was predicted at 95 percentile probabilistic upper level in 95 percentile confidence level. Peak Cladding Temperatures (PCT) of the 84 bundles in the core pass 4 were calculated from the 124 MARS code runs in which the uncertainties of 10 major parameters including fuel thermal conductivity and break flow model were implemented. The fuel rod breaching criteria, PCT>1477 K, was used to determine the NBR 95/95. From the calculation, the predicted NBR 95/95 was 1591 rods and the calculated maximum NBR was lower than 2000 rods. Through the further improvements in feedback of the channel power behavior to thermalhydraulic calculation and in channel group modeling, NBR in more reliable level can be expected. (authors)

  19. A Spatio-Temporal Model of House Prices in the US

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holly, Sean; Pesaran, M. Hashem; Yamagata, Takashi

    is calibrated by means of a weighting matrix. For example the (i; j) elements of a weighting matrix, wij, could take a value of 1 if the ith and jth areas/regions/countries are contiguous and zero otherwise1. Of course there are many other forms of contiguity... The long-run relation compatible with the theory can be written most conveniently in the following log-linear form: pit = ?i + ? 0 ixit + uit; i = 1; 2; :::; N ; t = 1; 2; :::; T; (3.1) where pit = log(Pit;h=Pit;g) is the logarithm of real price of housing...

  20. Taxation and Capital Spending Alan J. Auerbach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    of new capital, r is the firm's nominal cost of funds (presumably a weighted average of debt and equity system of capital income taxation is so complex, leading to misallocation and hence effective reductions the object of frequent tax policy initiatives, the most recent being the temporary "bonus depreciation

  1. Exploring the Tradeoff between Waiting Time and Service Cost in Non-Asymptotic Operating Regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srikant, Rayadurgam

    Bin Li, Ozgur Dalkilic and Atilla Eryilmaz Abstract--Motivated by the problem of demand management in smart grids, we study the problem of minimizing a weighted- sum of the mean delay of user demands proposed with asymptotic optimality guarantees. For example, for energy minimization problem in time

  2. 10 February 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    waste wood for energy and to consider better ways to link energy value to purchase price," said material used to generate energy. Yet, the fact that trees have low energy density relative to other fuels for woody biomass on a weight versus energy content basis, the next phase of the work turned to rapid

  3. International Journal of Foundations of Computer Science c World Scientific Publishing Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allauzen, Cyril

    Library): Generality. To generalize the applicability of our algorithms, as much as possible, we defined The Design Principles and Algorithms of a Weighted Grammar Library CYRIL ALLAUZEN allauzen present the software design principles, algorithms, and utilities of a general weighted grammar library

  4. International Journal of Foundations of Computer Science # World Scientific Publishing Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allauzen, Cyril

    Library): Generality. To generalize the applicability of our algorithms, as much as possible, we defined The Design Principles and Algorithms of a Weighted Grammar Library CYRIL ALLAUZEN allauzen present the software design principles, algorithms, and utilities of a general weighted grammar library

  5. Vol. 78, No. 1, 2001 97 Characterization of Extruded Plant Protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , or fatty acids decreases flexibility and barrier properties of plastic films. Starch incorporation copolymer (MCEBC), and plasticized successfully with sorbitol at a weight ratio of 1:1. Physical analyses, sorbitol, and MCEBC exhibited similar elastic properties compared with a 100% MCEBC sheet. Young's modulus

  6. Increased Fuel Mileage Jason Heiser, Brian Philbrick, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowen, James D.

    Increased Fuel Mileage Standards Jason Heiser, Brian Philbrick, and Dereck Mar · Corporate Average Fuel Economy ­ sales weighted average in miles per gallon of a car manufacturer ­ Only the fuel economy by measuring carbon in emissions and is a weighted average of highway and city driving

  7. Determining Empirical Characteristics of Mathematical Expression Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watt, Stephen M.

    . Watt Ontario Research Centre for Computer Algebra Department of Computer Science University of Western corre- sponding to the new mathematical subject classification. We report on the process by which aspects of mathematical expressions by subject classification. We use the notion of a weighted dictionary

  8. A PCT funding formula for England based on faith may be wasting billions1 Mervyn Stone and Jane Galbraith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillas, Serge

    A PCT funding formula for England based on faith may be wasting billions1 Mervyn Stone and Jane by slicing a Treasury cake of £44B. The division was guided by targets given by a weighted capitation formula/science divide will not block future attempts to devise a funding formula based on direct measurement of health

  9. 221A Lecture Notes Path Integral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    221A Lecture Notes Path Integral 1 Feynman's Path Integral Formulation Feynman's formulation to reach a position xf at time tf , you integrate over all possible paths connecting the points with a weight factor given by the classical action for each path. Hence the name path integral. This is it. Note

  10. Weight and volume changing device with liquid metal transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niiyama, Ryuma

    This paper presents a weight-changing device based on the transfer of mass. We chose liquid metal (Ga-In-Tin eutectic) and a bi-directional pump to control the mass that is injected into or removed from a target object. ...

  11. The Wirewalker: A Vertically Profiling Instrument Carrier Powered by Ocean Waves R. PINKEL, M. A. GOLDIN, J. A. SMITH, O. M. SUN, A. A. AJA, M. N. BUI, AND T. HUGHEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jerome A.

    ­time record. The elements of the WW system in- clude a surface buoy, a wire suspended from the buoy, a weight at the end of the wire, and the profiler itself. The wire and weight follow the surface motion of the buoy of the profiler requires much less precision. Buoy- ancy is adjusted simply by adding foam blocks to the structure

  12. Liquid Computing in a Simplified Model of Cortical Layer IV: Learning to Balance a Ball

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maass, Wolfgang

    Probst1,3 , Wolfgang Maass2 , Henry Markram1 , and Marc-Oliver Gewaltig1 1 Blue Brain Project, ´Ecole that the cortical network can robustly learn this task using a supervised learning rule that penalizes the error function is then constructed by readout neurons or action cells which compute a weighted sum of the high

  13. A Comparison of Metallic and Composite Aircraft Wings Using Aerostructural Design Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    A Comparison of Metallic and Composite Aircraft Wings Using Aerostructural Design Optimization In this paper we examine the design of metallic and composite aircraft wings in order to assess how the use of the objective, we obtain a Pareto front of designs by minimiz- ing a weighted combination of the mission fuel

  14. Lecture Notes in Computer Science 1 Data Reduction Using Multiple Models Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obradovic, Zoran

    Lecture Notes in Computer Science 1 Data Reduction Using Multiple Models Integration Aleksandar the models constructed on previously considered data samples. In addition to random sampling, controllable sampling based on the boosting algorithm is proposed, where the models are combined using a weighted voting

  15. On a resource allocation model with infinite horizon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Marcus

    into the model which contains a weight function. The new problem, called now the adapted resource allocationOn a resource allocation model with infinite horizon Valeriya Lykina, Sabine Pickenhain and Marcus 13 44, D-03013 Cottbus, Germany #12;On a Resource Allocation Model with Infinite Horizon Valeriya

  16. Fast-ion D measurements and simulations in quiet plasmas Y. Luo and W. W. Heidbrink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidbrink, William W.

    Fast-ion D measurements and simulations in quiet plasmas Y. Luo and W. W. Heidbrink University deuterium fast ions is measured in magnetohydrodynamics MHD -quiescent, magnetically confined plasmas during neutral beam injection. A weighted Monte Carlo simulation code models the fast-ion D spectra based

  17. Computation and Uses of the Semidiscrete Matrix Decomposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolda, T.G.; O'Leary, D.P.

    1999-06-01

    We derive algorithms for computing a semidiscrete approximation to a matrix in the Frobenius and weighted norms. The approximation is formed as a weighted sum of outer products of vectors whose elements are +/=1 or 0, so the storage required by the approximation is quite small.

  18. Noname manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasnogor, Natalio

    Noname manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor) GP challenge: evolving the energy function by estimation of the structure energy. The energy function used in the best state-of-the-art automatic Prediction) experi- ment is defined as a weighted sum of a set of energy terms designed by experts. We

  19. ORIGINAL PAPER GP challenge: evolving energy function for protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    ORIGINAL PAPER GP challenge: evolving energy function for protein structure prediction Pawel Widera structures. This distinction is made by estimation of the structure energy. The energy function used of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction) experiment is defined as a weighted sum of a set of energy terms

  20. Welding an LHC bending magnet held in place by CERN?s hydraulic press

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    A powerful hydraulic press has been installed at CERN. Rated at 27 000 tonnes, it has enough force to lift a weight equivalent to almost four Eiffel towers. The press is used to hold magnets in place as their casings are welded together or opened up.

  1. Distributed Cooperative Spectrum Sensing based on Weighted Average Wenlin Zhang*, Zheng Wang, Yi Guo, Hongbo Liu, Yingying Chen, Joseph Mitola III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Yi

    develop a weighted soft measurement combining scheme without the centralized fusion center. After the measurement by the energy detector, each secondary user (SU) exchanges their own measurement statistics. In the second stage, SUs report their measurement information to the centralized fusion center, then a global

  2. Batch kernel SOM and related Laplacian methods for social network analysis 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossi, Fabrice

    Large graphs are natural mathematical models for describing the structure of the data in a wide variety on the spectral analysis of the graph. The proposed method is used to explore the structure of a medieval social network modeled through a weighted graph that has been directly built from a large corpus of agrarian

  3. Arc Geometry and Algebra: Foliations, Moduli Spaces, String ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-05-02

    yields a modular operad structure on the homology level. .... 1.4.2 Elements as weighted arc families A weight function wt on an arc family ...... Figure 6. I, the identity and II, the arc family ? yielding the BV operator ..... weighted arc family obtained by scaling all weights of arcs incident to ?i of ? homoge- ..... A careful analysis.

  4. OPTIMAL AND ROBUST DAMPING CONTROL FOR SEMI-ACTIVE VEHICLE SUSPENSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stryk, Oskar von

    . Optimality of the damping control is measured by an objective consisting of a weighted sum of criteria in vehicle comfort and safety can be obtained by electronic control units which continu- ously or discretely. A significant im- provement of the vehicle's suspension can be obtained by adding active components as hydraulic

  5. RESEARCH ARTICLE Predicting Anticancer Drug Responses Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiaole Shirley

    of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard School of Public Health using a weighted model. Using the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE) and Cancer Genome Project (CGP. Author Summary In this study, using the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE) and Cancer Genome Proj- ect

  6. Binary-to-RNS conversion units for moduli {2n Pedro Miguens Matutino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sousa, Leonel

    Binary-to-RNS conversion units for moduli {2n ± 3} Pedro Miguens Matutino Department of Electronics@inesc-id.pt Abstract--In this paper Residue Number Systems (RNS) con- version structures from Binary to RNS modulo {2n Residue Number Systems (RNS) are a good alternative to the conventional arithmetic, based on a weighted

  7. SOLVABILITY FOR ONE-DIMENSIONAL PHASE FIELD SYSTEM ASSOCIATED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakurai, Takafumi

    , which come from a weighted total variation, built in a governing free energy. The main objective from the general measure theory and the general theory of evolution equations governed by time , and then the threshold values 1 and 0 are supposed to indicate the completely oriented phase and the disorder phase

  8. An Efficient Algorithm for Mining Erasable Itemsets Using the Difference of NC-Sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coenen, Frans

    University of Food Industry Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam tuonglecung@gmail.com Bay Vo Ton Duc Thang University: a weight index, a hash table and the "difference" of Node Code Sets (dNC-Sets) to improve the mining time results show that dMERIT+ is more effective than MERIT+ in terms of the runtime. Keywords- data mining

  9. Model-Checking One-Clock Priced Timed Automata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyen, Laurent

    Model-Checking One-Clock Priced Timed Automata Patricia Bouyer1 , Kim G. Larsen2 , and Nicolas, Denmark kgl@cs.aau.dk Abstract. We consider the model of priced (a.k.a. weighted) timed au- tomata, 18, 7]. In particu- lar, as part of this effort, the notion of priced (or weighted) timed automata [4

  10. ModelChecking OneClock Priced Timed Automata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyen, Laurent

    Model­Checking One­Clock Priced Timed Automata Patricia Bouyer 1# , Kim G. Larsen 2## , and Nicolas, Denmark kgl@cs.aau.dk Abstract. We consider the model of priced (a.k.a. weighted) timed au­ tomata, 18, 7]. In particu­ lar, as part of this e#ort, the notion of priced (or weighted) timed automata [4

  11. Neighbor selection for proportional fairness in P2P networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neighbor selection for proportional fairness in P2P networks Mart´in Zubeld´ia, Andr´es Ferragut aim is to achieve through decentralized interactions a weighted proportionally fair allocation. We analyze the desirable properties of such allocation, as well as an ideal proportional reciprocity

  12. SHIFTED JACOBI POLYNOMIALS AND DELANNOY NUMBERS GABOR HETYEI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Jiancheng

    SHIFTED JACOBI POLYNOMIALS AND DELANNOY NUMBERS G´ABOR HETYEI `A la m´emoire de Pierre Leroux Abstract. We express a weigthed generalization of the Delannoy numbers in terms of shifted Jacobi Jacobi polynomials. Another specializa- tion provides a weighted lattice path enumeration model

  13. Lyapunov stability of a singularly perturbed system of two conservation laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Lyapunov stability of a singularly perturbed system of two conservation laws Ying TANG Christophe stability of the complete system is investigated via Lyapunov techniques. A Lyapunov function for the singularly perturbed system is obtained as a weighted sum of two Lyapunov functions of the subsystems

  14. Mechanism Design for Double Auctions with Temporal Constraints Dengji Zhao1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Dongmo

    found that the market clearing problem under this extension can be transformed into a weighted bi an extended double auction model where market clearing is restricted by tem- poral constraints. It is found to the design and analysis of dy- namic double auctions and futures markets. 1 Introduction A double auction

  15. Public Support for Farmland Preservation Programs: Empirical Evidence from Connecticut

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foltz, Jeremy D.

    Public Support for Farmland Preservation Programs: Empirical Evidence from Connecticut by Jeremy D University of Connecticut Abstract: This paper investigates the determinants of household support for a purchase of development rights (PDR) program in Connecticut. A weighted probit model is used to explain

  16. Large Sheet Process Consolidation Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Keith

    2005-12-16

    that with an investment of $776,800, the net present value (NPV) will be $2,386,170 and have a payback of 2.0 yrs. The after tax rate of return will be 67.8% with a weighted return on assets managed of 1035.1%. The recommendation is for the approval of this appropriation...

  17. On Orbits of Operators on Hilbert Space 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Lidia

    2010-10-12

    of the norms is not a sufficient condition to imply hypercyclicity by constructing a weighted bilateral shift that, on one hand, satisfies the orbit-density property (in the sense defined above), but, on the other hand, fails to be hypercyclic. The second major...

  18. Published: December 22, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 782 dx.doi.org/10.1021/cr200274s |Chem. Rev. 2012, 112, 782835

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paik Suh, Myunghyun

    . Hydrogen has an energy density much greater than gasoline and emits no carbon dioxide after burning. Hydrogen is one of the most promising candidates for the replacement of current carbon-based energy sources. On a weight basis, hydrogen has nearly three times higher energy content than gasoline: lower heating values

  19. Complex network analysis of free-energy landscapes , P. De Los Rios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caflisch, Amedeo

    Complex network analysis of free-energy landscapes D. Gfeller , P. De Los Rios , A. Caflisch, is governed by a free-energy surface of high dimensionality and complexity. As an alternative to projections into one or two dimensions, the free-energy surface can be mapped into a weighted network where nodes

  20. Sodium fast reactor gaps analysis of computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbajo, Juan; Jeong, Hae-Yong; Wigeland, Roald; Corradini, Michael; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Thomas, Justin; Wei, Tom; Sofu, Tanju; Ludewig, Hans; Tobita, Yoshiharu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Serre, Frederic

    2011-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of an expert-opinion elicitation activity designed to qualitatively assess the status and capabilities of currently available computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety calculations of advanced sodium fast reactors, and identify important gaps. The twelve-member panel consisted of representatives from five U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, and BNL), the University of Wisconsin, the KAERI, the JAEA, and the CEA. The major portion of this elicitation activity occurred during a two-day meeting held on Aug. 10-11, 2010 at Argonne National Laboratory. There were two primary objectives of this work: (1) Identify computer codes currently available for SFR accident analysis and reactor safety calculations; and (2) Assess the status and capability of current US computer codes to adequately model the required accident scenarios and associated phenomena, and identify important gaps. During the review, panel members identified over 60 computer codes that are currently available in the international community to perform different aspects of SFR safety analysis for various event scenarios and accident categories. A brief description of each of these codes together with references (when available) is provided. An adaptation of the Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) for computational modeling and simulation is described for use in this work. The panel's assessment of the available US codes is presented in the form of nine tables, organized into groups of three for each of three risk categories considered: anticipated operational occurrences (AOOs), design basis accidents (DBA), and beyond design basis accidents (BDBA). A set of summary conclusions are drawn from the results obtained. At the highest level, the panel judged that current US code capabilities are adequate for licensing given reasonable margins, but expressed concern that US code development activities had stagnated and that the experienced user-base and the experimental validation base was decaying away quickly.

  1. Mechanical-biological waste treatment and the associated occupational hygiene in Finland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolvanen, Outi K. . E-mail: outolvan@bytl.jyu.fi; Haenninen, Kari I.

    2006-07-01

    A special feature of waste management in Finland has been the emphasis on the source separation of kitchen biowaste (catering waste); more than two-thirds of the Finnish population participates in this separation. Source-separated biowaste is usually treated by composting. The biowaste of about 5% of the population is handled by mechanical-biological treatment. A waste treatment plant at Mustasaari is the only plant in Finland using digestion for kitchen biowaste. For the protection of their employees, the plant owners commissioned a study on environmental factors and occupational hygiene in the plant area. During 1998-2000 the concentrations of dust, microbes and endotoxins and noise levels were investigated to identify possible problems at the plant. Three different work areas were investigated: the pre-processing and crushing hall, the bioreactor hall and the drying hall. Employees were asked about work-related health problems. Some problems with occupational hygiene were identified: concentrations of microbes and endotoxins may increase to levels harmful to health during waste crushing and in the bioreactor hall. Because employees complained of symptoms such as dry cough and rash or itching appearing once or twice a month, it is advisable to use respirator masks (class P3) during dusty working phases. The noise level in the drying hall exceeded the Finnish threshold value of 85 dBA. Qualitatively harmful factors for the health of employees are similar in all closed waste treatment plants in Finland. Quantitatively, however, the situation at the Mustasaari treatment plant is better than at some Finnish dry waste treatment plants. Therefore is reasonable to conclude that mechanical sorting, which produces a dry waste fraction for combustion and a biowaste fraction for anaerobic treatment, is in terms of occupational hygiene better for employees than combined aerobic treatment and dry waste treatment.

  2. MODULAR AND FULL SIZE SIMPLIFIED BOILING WATER REACTOR DESIGN WITH FULLY PASSIVE SAFETY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Ishii; S. T. Revankar; T. Downar; Y. Xu, H. J. Yoon; D. Tinkler; U. S. Rohatgi

    2003-06-16

    OAK B204 The overall goal of this three-year research project was to develop a new scientific design of a compact modular 200 MWe and a full size 1200 MWe simplified boiling water reactors (SBWR). Specific objectives of this research were: (1) to perform scientific designs of the core neutronics and core thermal-hydraulics for a small capacity and full size simplified boiling water reactor, (2) to develop a passive safety system design, (3) improve and validate safety analysis code, (4) demonstrate experimentally and analytically all design functions of the safety systems for the design basis accidents (DBA) and (5) to develop the final scientific design of both SBWR systems, 200 MWe (SBWR-200) and 1200 MWe (SBWR-1200). The SBWR combines the advantages of design simplicity and completely passive safety systems. These advantages fit well within the objectives of NERI and the Department of Energy's focus on the development of Generation III and IV nuclear power. The 3-year research program was structured around seven tasks. Task 1 was to perform the preliminary thermal-hydraulic design. Task 2 was to perform the core neutronic design analysis. Task 3 was to perform a detailed scaling study and obtain corresponding PUMA conditions from an integral test. Task 4 was to perform integral tests and code evaluation for the DBA. Task 5 was to perform a safety analysis for the DBA. Task 6 was to perform a BWR stability analysis. Task 7 was to perform a final scientific design of the compact modular SBWR-200 and the full size SBWR-1200. A no cost extension for the third year was requested and the request was granted and all the project tasks were completed by April 2003. The design activities in tasks 1, 2, and 3 were completed as planned. The existing thermal-hydraulic information, core physics, and fuel lattice information was collected on the existing design of the simplified boiling water reactor. The thermal-hydraulic design were developed. Based on a detailed integral system scaling analysis, design parameters were obtained and designs of the compact modular 200 MWe SBWR and the full size 1200 MWe SBWR were developed. These reactors are provided with passive safety systems. A new passive vacuum breaker check valve was designed to replace the mechanical vacuum beaker check valve. The new vacuum breaker check valve was based on a hydrostatic head, and was fail safe. The performance of this new valve was evaluated both by the thermal-hydraulic code RELAP5 and by the experiments in a scaled SBWR facility, PUMA. In the core neutronic design a core depletion model was implemented to PARCS code. A lattice design for the SBWR fuel assemblies was performed. Design improvements were made to the neutronics/thermal-hydraulics models of SBWR-200 and SBWR-1200, and design analyses of these reactors were performed. The design base accident analysis and evaluation of all the passive safety systems were completed as scheduled in tasks 4 and 5. Initial conditions for the small break loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) and large break LOCA using REALP5 code were obtained. Small and large break LOCA tests were performed and the data was analyzed. An anticipated transient with scram was simulated using the RELAP5 code for SBWR-200. The transient considered was an accidental closure of the main steam isolation valve (MSIV), which was considered to be the most significant transient. The evaluation of the RELAP5 code against experimental data for SBWR-1200 was completed. In task 6, the instability analysis for the three SBWR designs (SBWR-1200, SBWR-600 and SBWR-200) were simulated for start-up transients and the results were similar. Neither the geysering instability, nor the loop type instability was predicted by RAMONA-4B in the startup simulation following the recommended procedure by GE. The density wave oscillation was not observed at all because the power level used in the simulation was not high enough. A study was made of the potential instabilities by imposing an unrealistically high power ramp in a short time period, as suggested by GE. RAMON

  3. MODEL-BASED HYDROACOUSTIC BLOCKAGE ASSESSMENT AND DEVELOPMENT OF AN EXPLOSIVE SOURCE DATABASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matzel, E; Ramirez, A; Harben, P

    2005-07-11

    We are continuing the development of the Hydroacoustic Blockage Assessment Tool (HABAT) which is designed for use by analysts to predict which hydroacoustic monitoring stations can be used in discrimination analysis for any particular event. The research involves two approaches (1) model-based assessment of blockage, and (2) ground-truth data-based assessment of blockage. The tool presents the analyst with a map of the world, and plots raypath blockages from stations to sources. The analyst inputs source locations and blockage criteria, and the tool returns a list of blockage status from all source locations to all hydroacoustic stations. We are currently using the tool in an assessment of blockage criteria for simple direct-path arrivals. Hydroacoustic data, predominantly from earthquake sources, are read in and assessed for blockage at all available stations. Several measures are taken. First, can the event be observed at a station above background noise? Second, can we establish backazimuth from the station to the source. Third, how large is the decibel drop at one station relative to other stations. These observational results are then compared with model estimates to identify the best set of blockage criteria and used to create a set of blockage maps for each station. The model-based estimates are currently limited by the coarse bathymetry of existing databases and by the limitations inherent in the raytrace method. In collaboration with BBN Inc., the Hydroacoustic Coverage Assessment Model (HydroCAM) that generates the blockage files that serve as input to HABAT, is being extended to include high-resolution bathymetry databases in key areas that increase model-based blockage assessment reliability. An important aspect of this capability is to eventually include reflected T-phases where they reliably occur and to identify the associated reflectors. To assess how well any given hydroacoustic discriminant works in separating earthquake and in-water explosion populations it is necessary to have both a database of reference earthquake events and of reference in-water explosive events. Although reference earthquake events are readily available, explosive reference events are not. Consequently, building an in-water explosion reference database requires the compilation of events from many sources spanning a long period of time. We have developed a database of small implosive and explosive reference events from the 2003 Indian Ocean Cruise data. These events were recorded at some or all of the IMS Indian Ocean hydroacoustic stations: Diego Garcia, Cape Leeuwin, and Crozet Island. We have also reviewed many historical large in-water explosions and identified five that have adequate source information and can be positively associated to the hydrophone recordings. The five events are: Cannekin, Longshot, CHASE-3, CHASE-5, and IITRI-1. Of these, the first two are nuclear tests on land but near water. The latter three are in-water conventional explosive events with yields from ten to hundreds of tons TNT equivalent. The objective of this research is to enhance discrimination capabilities for events located in the world's oceans. Two research and development efforts are needed to achieve this: (1) improvement in discrimination algorithms and their joint statistical application to events, and (2) development of an automated and accurate blockage prediction capability that will identify all stations and phases (direct and reflected) from a given event that will have adequate signal to be used in a discrimination analysis. The strategy for improving blockage prediction in the world's oceans is to improve model-based prediction of blockage and to develop a ground-truth database of reference events to assess blockage. Currently, research is focused on the development of a blockage assessment software tool. The tool is envisioned to develop into a sophisticated and unifying package that optimally and automatically assesses both model and data based blockage predictions in all ocean basins, for all NDC stations, and accounting for refle

  4. CO.sub.2 removal sorbent composition with high chemical stability during multiple cycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Rosencwaig, Shira

    2015-09-22

    Disclosed herein is a clay-alkali-amine CO.sub.2 sorbent composition prepared by integrating a clay substrate, basic alkali salt, and amine liquid. The basic alkali salt is present relative to the clay substrate in a weight ratio of from about 1 part to about 50 parts per 100 parts of the clay substrate. The amine liquid is present relative to a clay-alkali combination in a weight ratio of from about 1 part to about 10 parts per 10 parts of the clay-alkali combination. The clay-alkali-amine C02 sorbent is particularly advantageous for low temperature CO.sub.2 removal cycles in a gas stream having a C02 concentration less than around 2000 ppm and an oxygen concentration around 21%, such as air.

  5. FEM: Feature-enhanced map

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Afonine, Pavel V.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Mustyakimov, Marat; Sobolev, Oleg V.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Turk, Dusan; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Adams, Paul D.

    2015-02-26

    A method is presented that modifies a 2mFobs-DFmodel?A-weighted map such that the resulting map can strengthen a weak signal, if present, and can reduce model bias and noise. The method consists of first randomizing the starting map and filling in missing reflections using multiple methods. This is followed by restricting the map to regions with convincing density and the application of sharpening. The final map is then created by combining a series of histogram-equalized intermediate maps. In the test cases shown, the maps produced in this way are found to have increased interpretability and decreased model bias compared with themore »starting 2mFobs-DFmodel?A-weighted map.« less

  6. Technique for information retrieval using enhanced latent semantic analysis generating rank approximation matrix by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chew, Peter A; Bader, Brett W

    2012-10-16

    A technique for information retrieval includes parsing a corpus to identify a number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. A weighted morpheme-by-document matrix is generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus and based at least in part on a weighting function. The weighted morpheme-by-document matrix separately enumerates instances of stems and affixes. Additionally or alternatively, a term-by-term alignment matrix may be generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. At least one lower rank approximation matrix is generated by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix and/or the term-by-term alignment matrix.

  7. Method of multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenan, Michael R.; Kotula, Paul G.

    2004-01-06

    A method of determining the properties of a sample from measured spectral data collected from the sample by performing a multivariate spectral analysis. The method can include: generating a two-dimensional matrix A containing measured spectral data; providing a weighted spectral data matrix D by performing a weighting operation on matrix A; factoring D into the product of two matrices, C and S.sup.T, by performing a constrained alternating least-squares analysis of D=CS.sup.T, where C is a concentration intensity matrix and S is a spectral shapes matrix; unweighting C and S by applying the inverse of the weighting used previously; and determining the properties of the sample by inspecting C and S. This method can be used to analyze X-ray spectral data generated by operating a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an attached Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS).

  8. Armor systems including coated core materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, Henry S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lillo, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McHugh, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-07-31

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

  9. Coated armor system and process for making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, Henry S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lillo, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McHugh, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2010-11-23

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

  10. Methods of producing armor systems, and armor systems produced using such methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Henry S; Lillo, Thomas M; McHugh, Kevin M

    2013-02-19

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

  11. Armor systems including coated core materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2013-10-08

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

  12. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daniels, Michael A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Heaps, Ronald J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Steffler, Eric D (Idaho Falls, ID); Swank, William D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-08-30

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  13. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Steffler, Eric D.; Swank, W. David

    2013-04-02

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  14. The smallest possible heat engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noah Linden; Sandu Popescu; Paul Skrzypczyk

    2010-10-28

    We construct the smallest possible self contained heat engines; one composed of only two qubits, the other of only a single qutrit. The engines are self-contained as they do not require external sources of work and/or control. They are able to produce work which is used to continuously lift a weight. Despite the dimension of the engine being small, it is still able to operate at the Carnot efficiency.

  15. Control of bed height in a fluidized bed gasification system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mehta, Gautam I. (Greensburg, PA); Rogers, Lynn M. (Export, PA)

    1983-12-20

    In a fluidized bed apparatus a method for controlling the height of the fdized bed, taking into account variations in the density of the bed. The method comprises taking simultaneous differential pressure measurements at different vertical elevations within the vessel, averaging the differential pressures, determining an average fluidized bed density, then periodically calculating a weighting factor. The weighting factor is used in the determination of the actual bed height which is used in controlling the fluidizing means.

  16. Life Cycle Assessment Applied to 95 Representative U.S. Farms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutland, Christopher T.

    2012-10-19

    slightly different approach was proposed by Rossing et al. (1997) to evaluate flower bulb production systems in the Netherlands. They used multi-goal linear programming to optimize ecological objectives subject to a set of environmental, economic... fission, natural gas, coal, woody biomass, herbaceous biomass, hydroelectric, and wind. The CO2 equivalent per million Btu is a weighted average of emission factors, with weights assigned according to the power mix in the area of the farm...

  17. Automated Eukaryotic Gene Structure Annotation Using EVidenceModeler and the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, B J; Salzberg, S L; Zhu, W; Pertea, M; Allen, J E; Orvis, J; White, O; Buell, C R; Wortman, J R

    2007-12-10

    EVidenceModeler (EVM) is presented as an automated eukaryotic gene structure annotation tool that reports eukaryotic gene structures as a weighted consensus of all available evidence. EVM, when combined with the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments (PASA), yields a comprehensive, configurable annotation system that predicts protein-coding genes and alternatively spliced isoforms. Our experiments on both rice and human genome sequences demonstrate that EVM produces automated gene structure annotation approaching the quality of manual curation.

  18. Nonlinear optical and conductive polymeric material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, T.J.; Ijadi-Maghsooodi, S; Yi Pang.

    1993-10-19

    A polymeric material is described which exhibits nonlinear optical properties if undoped and conductive properties if doped. The polymer is prepared by polymerizing diethynylsilane compositions, the resulting polymeric material having a weight average molecular weight between about 20,000 and about 200,000 grams per mole. The polymer is prepared and catalytically polymerized by exposure to a catalyst, such as MoCl[sub 5] or W(CO)[sub 6].

  19. a) 11 1.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Evans

    2013-01-09

    14) A farmer plans to use 180 feet of fencing to enclose a rectangular region, using part of a .... If you are given a complex number with a power, you must simplify it. ...... b) A weight of 4 pounds stretches a certain spring from its natural length of 10 ... 5) The ideal gas law states that the volume V that a gas occupies is directly ...

  20. The midpoint between dipole and parton showers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Höche, Stefan; Prestel, Stefan

    2015-09-28

    We present a new parton-shower algorithm. Borrowing from the basic ideas of dipole cascades, the evolution variable is judiciously chosen as the transverse momentum in the soft limit. This leads to a very simple analytic structure of the evolution. A weighting algorithm is implemented that allows one to consistently treat potentially negative values of the splitting functions and the parton distributions. Thus, we provide two independent, publicly available implementations for the two event generators PYTHIA and SHERPA.

  1. Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leitnaker, James M. (Kingston, TN)

    1981-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 0.015-0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in the alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the Mo content.

  2. Ambient H sub 2 S monitoring in the vicinity of Hawaii's first geothermal power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrow, J.W. ); Thomas, D.M. ); Burkard, H.D. )

    1988-01-01

    In December, 1975, work began on Hawaii's first successful geothermal well in the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano on the Island of Hawaii (Figure 1). By July, 1976, the well, named Hawaii Geothermal Project - A (HGP-A), was complete to a depth of almost 2 km and had encountered a volcanically driven hydrothermal system having a temperature in excess of 358{degrees} C and a fluid chemistry composed of a mixture of seawater, meteoric water, and volcanic volatiles. The principal chemical constituents of the fluid are listed in Table I. Note the relatively high H{sub 2}S concentration which ranged 900 - 1,000 ppmw. During the early testing of the well, the superheated geothermal fluid was allowed to flash at normal atmospheric pressure with steam and noncondensable gases being released unabated into the atmosphere. The high H{sub 2}S and noise (120 dBA) levels and the close proximity of the Leilani Estates residential subdivision were cause for concern and efforts were thus made to mitigate these impacts. Certain elements of the initial test protocol required that the well be allowed to flow freely and unabated. During these periods public notice and prewarning were the most feasible means of mitigation. At other times, the mixed fluid is separated into steam and brine phases with the steam phase being treated with NaOH and then released through a rock muffler. The brine phase is released through a separate muffling system. Chemical treatment of the stream with NaOH converts the H{sub 2}S into a soluble sulfide salt through the following reaction: H{sub 2}S(g) + NaOH {r arrow} NaHS(s) + H{sub 2}O. This paper discusses early flow testing revealed that the well was able to produce a steady flow of approximately 50,000 kg per hour of steam and water at a pressure of 1200 kPA and thus appeared suitable for power generation.

  3. National K-12 Educator Conference; "Earth Then, Earth Now: Our Changing Climate" (July 23-24, 2008)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flammer, Karen; O'Shaughnessy, Tam

    2013-12-11

    With the support of the Department of Energy, the National Science Teachers Association and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Imaginary Lines Inc. (dba Sally Ride Science) delivered a highly successful 2-day conference to 165 K-12 educators on climate change. The event took place on July 23rd and 24th, 2008 at the NOAA facility in Silver Spring, MD. The conference celebrated the 25th anniversary of Dr. Sally Ride’s first flight into space in 1983 and examined how our understanding of Earth has changed in those 25 years. One the first day of the conference, participants heard a keynote talk delivered by Dr. Sally Ride, followed by presentations by well-known climate change scientists: Dr. Richard Somerville, Dr. Inez Fung and Dr. Susan Solomon. These sessions were concurrently webcast and made available to educators who were unable to attend the conference. On the second day of the conference, participants attended breakout sessions where they performed climate change activities (e.g. “Neato Albedo!”, “Greenhouse in a Bottle”, “Shell-Shocked”) that they could take back to their classrooms. Additional break-out sessions on using remote sensing images to illustrate climate change effects on Earth’s surface and how to address the climate change debate, were also offered. During lunch, participants attended an Educator Street Fair and had the opportunity to interact with representatives from NOAA, NASA, the EPA, NEEF and the JASON project. A follow-up evaluation survey was administered to all conference attendees immediately following the conference to evaluate its effectiveness. The results of this survey were overwhelmingly positive. The conference materials: presentation Power Points, workshop handouts and activities were available for teachers to download after the conference from the Sally Ride Science website. In summary, the approximately $55K support for the Department of Energy was used to help plan, deliver and evaluate the “Earth Then, Earth Now: Our Changing Climate”, conference which took place on July 23rd and 24th, 2008 at the NOAA facility in Silver Spring, MD.

  4. Porous and porous-nonporous composites for battery electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herscovici, C.

    1990-04-24

    This patent describes a zinc-bromide electrochemical cell. It comprises: a cathode element comprising a pressure-molded porous composite comprising electrically conductive particulate carbon selected from the group consisting of carbon black, graphite and mixtures thereof having a particle size distribution of 0 to 45 {mu}m and a thermoplastic resin, the carbon and the resin being in a weight ratio from about 1:5 to 1:1; the composite characterized by 80--95% porosity by volume and a pore size diameter distribution from about 5 microns to about 200 microns.

  5. Link between quantum measurement and the i? term in the QFT propagator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roman Sverdlov; Luca Bombelli

    2014-11-15

    Mensky has suggested to account for "continuous measurement" by attaching to a path integral a weight function centered around the classical path that the integral assigns a probability amplitude to. We show that in fact this weight function doesn't have to be viewed as an additional ingredient put in by hand. It can be derived instead from the conventional path integral if the infinitesimal term i\\epsilon\\ in the propagator is made finite; the "classical trajectory" is proportional to the current.

  6. Weighted exponential regression for characterizing radionuclide concentrations in soil depth profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.P.Oertel; J.R.Giles

    2009-11-01

    Characterization of radionuclide concentrations in soil profiles requires accurate evaluation of the depth distribution of the concentrations as measured by gamma emissions. An ongoing study based on 137Cs activity has shown that such concentration data generally follow an exponential trend when the fraction of radioactivity below depth is plotted against the depth. The slope of the exponential regression fit is defined as alpha/rho, the depth profile parameter. A weighted exponential regression procedure has been developed to compute a mean ??? for a group of related soil samples. Regression results from different areas or from different time periods can be used to compare representative radionuclide concentrations for the specified groupings.

  7. Amplitude modulation of wind turbine noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makarewicz, Rufin

    2013-01-01

    Due to swish and thump amplitude modulation, the noise of wind turbines cause more annoyance than other environmental noise of the same average level. The wind shear accounts for the thump modulation (van den Berg effect). Making use of the wind speed measurements at the hub height, as well as at the top and the bottom of the rotor disc (Fig.1), the non-standard wind profile is applied. It causes variations in the A-weighted sound pressure level, LpA. The difference between the maximum and minimum of LpA characterizes thump modulation (Fig.2).

  8. The $g$-factor of light ions for an improved determination of the fine-structure constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yerokhin, V A; Harman, Z; Tupitsyn, I I; Keitel, C H

    2015-01-01

    A weighted difference of the $g$-factors of the H- and Li-like ions of the same element is theoretically studied and optimized in order to maximize the cancelation of nuclear effects between the two charge states. We show that this weighted difference and its combination for two different elements can be used to extract the fine-structure constant from near-future bound-electron $g$-factor experiments with an accuracy improvement by orders of magnitude as compared to its present literature value.

  9. A Graph Bottleneck Inequality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chebotarev, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    For a weighted multidigraph, let $f_{ij}$ be the total weight of spanning converging forests that have vertex $i$ in a tree converging to $j$. We prove that $f_{ij}f_{jk}=f_{ik}f_{jj}$ if and only if every directed path from $i$ to $k$ contains $j$ (a graph bottleneck equality). Otherwise, $f_{ij}f_{jk}inequality). In a companion paper, this inequality provides the foundation for the construction of a new family of graph distances by ensuring the fulfillment of the triangle inequality. This stems from the fact that the graph bottleneck inequality is a multiplicative analogue of the triangle inequality for proximities.

  10. The effect on melanoma risk of genes previously associated with telomere length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iles, Mark M.; Bishop, D. Timothy; Taylor, John C.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Brossard, Myriam; Cust, Anne E.; Dunning, Alison M.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Moses, Eric K.; Akslen, Lars A.; AMFS investigators; Andresen, Per A.; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Azizi, Esther; Bianchi Scarrà, Giovanna; Brown, Kevin M.; D?bniak, Tadeusz; Elder, David E.; Friedman, Eitan; Ghiorzo, Paola; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Gruis, Nelleke A.; Hansson, Johan; Harland, Mark; Helsing, Per; Ho?evar, Marko; Höiom, Veronica; IBD investigators; Ingvar, Christian; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Lang, Julie; Lathrop, G. Mark; Lubi?ski, Jan; Mackie, Rona M.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Molven, Anders; Montgomery, Grant W.; Novakovi?, Srdjan; Olsson, Håkan; Puig, Susana; Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; QMEGA and QTWIN investigators; Radford-Smith, Graham L.; Randerson-Moor, Juliette; SDH Study Group; van der Stoep, Nienke; van Doorn, Remco; Whiteman, David C.; MacGregor, Stuart; Pooley, Karen A.; Ward, Sarah V.; Mann, Graham J.; Amos, Christopher I.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Demenais, Florence; Law, Matthew H.; Newton Bishop, Julia A.; Barrett, Jennifer H.

    2014-01-01

    , by calculating a weighted mean of genotype dosage across the 7 telomere length-associated SNPs. The weights for each SNP were the age- and sex-adjusted effect estimates (log odds ratios) from the telomere meta-analysis (18). We then used this score in a logistic... regression of melanoma risk (see Supplementary Methods). We found a strong association between increased telomere score and increased risk of melanoma (p=8.92x10-9) that was consistent across geographic regions (Figure 1). Categorizing telomere score...

  11. Review times in peer review: quantitative analysis of editorial workflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mrowinski, Maciej J; Fronczak, Piotr; Nedic, Olgica; Ausloos, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    We examine selected aspects of peer review and suggest possible improvements. To this end, we analyse a dataset containing information about 300 papers submitted to the Biochemistry and Biotechnology section of the Journal of the Serbian Chemical Society. After separating the peer review process into stages that each review has to go through, we use a weighted directed graph to describe it in a probabilistic manner and test the impact of some modifications of the editorial policy on the efficiency of the whole process.

  12. Three-Dimensional and Multi-Temporal Dune-Field Pattern Analysis in the Olympia Undae Dune Field, Mars 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Middlebrook, William David

    2015-07-14

    , and dune cross-strata were measured via heads up digitization in a geographic information system (GIS) according to the methods of Ewing et al., 2006 (Figure 4). Every identified primary and secondary dune crestline in HiRISE image ESP_027713... spline with a cell size of 1, a weight of 5 and 12 points per region. The surface was then subtracted from the original DTM to create a raster of dune heights above the interdunal surface. Slope and aspect were calculated using standard ArcGIS...

  13. The Wigner-Fokker-Planck equation: Stationary states and large-time behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anton Arnold; Irene M. Gamba; Maria Pia Gualdani; Stephane Mischler; Clement Mouhot; Christof Sparber

    2012-01-20

    We consider the linear Wigner-Fokker-Planck equation subject to confining potentials which are smooth perturbations of the harmonic oscillator potential. For a certain class of perturbations we prove that the equation admits a unique stationary solution in a weighted Sobolev space. A key ingredient of the proof is a new result on the existence of spectral gaps for Fokker-Planck type operators in certain weighted $L^2$-spaces. In addition we show that the steady state corresponds to a positive density matrix operator with unit trace and that the solutions of the time-dependent problem converge towards the steady state with an exponential rate.

  14. Tools and Methods for Hardening Communication Security of Energy Delivery Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gadgil, Shrirang; Lin, Yow-Jian; Ghosh, Abhrajit; Samtani, Sunil; Kang, Jaewon; Siegell, Bruce; Kaul, Vikram; Unger, John; De Bruet, Andre; Martinez, Catherine; Vermeulen, Gerald; Rasche, Galen; Sternfeld, Scott; Berthier, Robin; Bobba, Rakesh; Campbell, Roy; Sanders, Williams; Lin, Yow-Jian

    2014-06-30

    This document summarizes the research and development work the TT Government Solutions (TTGS), d.b.a. Applied Communication Sciences (ACS), team performed for the Department of Energy Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems (CEDS) program. It addresses the challenges in protecting critical grid control and data communication, including the identification of vulnerabilities and deficiencies of communication protocols commonly used in energy delivery systems (e.g., ICCP, DNP3, C37.118, C12.22), as well as the development of effective means to detect and prevent the exploitation of such vulnerabilities and deficiencies. The team consists of • TT Government Solutions (TTGS), a leading provider of communications solutions that has extensive experience in commercializing communications solutions. TTGS also has deep cyber security research and development expertise supporting a variety of customers. • University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), a leader in the cyber security research for the power grid. UIUC brings unique experience in designing secure communication protocols to this project. • Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), an independent nonprofit that conducts research and development relating to the generation, delivery and use of electricity for the benefit of the public. EPRI brings to this effort its extensive technical expertise and its utility connections, with members representing more than 90 percent of the electricity generated and delivered in the United States. • DTE Energy, the 10th largest electric utility in the US, which helps ensure that this project focuses on the needs of utilities and is rightly positioned to address the needs of the market place. We designed, developed, and demonstrated a modular and extensible ADEC-G (Agent-based, Distributed, Extensible Cybersecurity for the Grid) system for monitoring/detecting abnormal energy delivery systems (EDS) protocol usage and ensuring security coverage. Our approach consists of i. An online system with stateful model based checkers (SMBCs) that helps utilities monitor EDS protocol communication contexts and flag abnormal session behaviors; ii. An offline framework that security tool developers, operators, and auditors can use to verify security properties (leverages formal methods). The modular design of the ADEC-G online system enables its easy extension to cover added protocol features, to introduce new monitoring capabilities, and to apply to additional communication protocols. Its monitoring capabilities and user interface features also facilitate visibilities into ongoing communication patterns and quick grasps of suspicious communication activities. The offline framework provides a platform not only for rigorous validation of security coverage, but also for systematic refinement of checker design leveraging the counter traces generated by the model checking tool. The ADEC-G online monitoring/detection system and the offline validation framework are both operational and have been demonstrated in various settings. The ADEC-G online system has also been integrated into TTGS SecureSmart Managed Security Services offering and been employed to perform security assessment in a section of a utility’s operational network as well as in other Smart Grid security pilot project offerings. TTGS is also in discussions with several system integrators for incorporating the integrated SecureSmart Managed Security Services offering as the cyber security solution for the nce of Operations Technology (OT) and Information Technology (IT).

  15. Rotation-Enabled 7-Degree of Freedom Seismometer for Geothermal Resource Development. Phase 1 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierson, Bob; Laughlin, Darren

    2013-10-29

    Under this Department of Energy (DOE) grant, A-Tech Corporation d.b.a. Applied Technology Associates (ATA), seeks to develop a seven-degree-of-freedom (7-DOF) seismic measurement tool for high-temperature geothermal applications. The Rotational-Enabled 7-DOF Seismometer includes a conventional tri-axial accelerometer, a conventional pressure sensor or hydrophone, and a tri-axial rotational sensor. The rotational sensing capability is novel, based upon ATA's innovative research in rotational sensing technologies. The geothermal industry requires tools for high-precision seismic monitoring of crack formation associated with Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) stimulation activity. Currently, microseismic monitoring is conducted by deploying many seismic tools at different depth levels along a 'string' within drilled observation wells. Costs per string can be hundreds of thousands of dollars. Processing data from the spatial arrays of linear seismometers allows back-projection of seismic wave states. In contrast, a Rotational-Enabled 7-DOF Seismometer would simultaneously measure p-wave velocity, s-wave velocity, and incident seismic wave direction all from a single point measurement. In addition, the Rotational-Enabled 7-DOF Seismometer will, by its nature, separate p- and s-waves into different data streams, simplifying signal processing and facilitating analysis of seismic source signatures and geological characterization. By adding measurements of three additional degrees-of-freedom at each level and leveraging the information from this new seismic observable, it is likely that an equally accurate picture of subsurface seismic activity could be garnered with fewer levels per hole. The key cost savings would come from better siting of the well due to increased information content and a decrease in the number of confirmation wells drilled, also due to the increase in information per well. Improved seismic tools may also increase knowledge, understanding, and confidence, thus removing some current blocks to feasibility and significantly increasing access to potential geothermal sites. During the Phase 1 effort summarized in this final report, the ATA Team modeled and built two TRL 3 proof-of-concept test units for two competing rotational sensor technologies. The two competing technologies were based on ATA's angular rate and angular displacement measurement technologies; Angular rate: ATA's Magnetohydrodynamic Angular Rate Sensor (Seismic MHD); and Angular displacement: ATA's Low Frequency Improved Torsional Seismometer (LFITS). In order to down-select between these two technologies and formulate a go / no go decision, the ATA Team analyzed and traded scientific performance requirements and market constraints against sensor characteristics and components, acquiring field data where possible to validate the approach and publishing results from these studies of rotational technology capability. Based on the results of Phase 1, the ATA Team finds that the Seismic MHD (SMHD) technology is the best choice for enabling rotational seismometry and significant technical potential exists for micro-seismic monitoring using a downhole 7-DOF device based on the SMHD. Recent technical papers and field data confirm the potential of rotational sensing for seismic mapping, increasing confidence that cost-reduction benefits are achievable for EGS. However, the market for geothermal rotational sensing is small and undeveloped. As a result, this report recommends modifying the Phase 2 plan to focus on prototype development aimed at partnering with early adopters within the geothermal industry and the scientific research community. The highest public benefit will come from development and deployment of a science-grade SMHD rotational seismometer engineered for geothermal downhole conditions and an integrated test tool for downhole measurements at active geothermal test sites.

  16. Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Michael G.; Norman, Bourassa; Faulkner, David; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Hotchi, Toshfumi; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Wang, Duo

    2008-04-04

    An improved HVAC system for portable classrooms was specified to address key problems in existing units. These included low energy efficiency, poor control of and provision for adequate ventilation, and excessive acoustic noise. Working with industry, a prototype improved heat pump air conditioner was developed to meet the specification. A one-year measurement-intensive field-test of ten of these IHPAC systems was conducted in occupied classrooms in two distinct California climates. These measurements are compared to those made in parallel in side by side portable classrooms equipped with standard 10 SEER heat pump air conditioner equipment. The IHPAC units were found to work as designed, providing predicted annual energy efficiency improvements of about 36 percent to 42 percent across California's climate zones, relative to 10 SEER units. Classroom ventilation was vastly improved as evidenced by far lower indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations. TheIHPAC units were found to provide ventilation that meets both California State energy and occupational codes and the ASHRAE minimum ventilation requirements; the classrooms equipped with the 10 SEER equipment universally did not meet these targets. The IHPAC system provided a major improvement in indoor acoustic conditions. HVAC system generated background noise was reduced in fan-only and fan and compressor modes, reducing the nose levels to better than the design objective of 45 dB(A), and acceptable for additional design points by the Collaborative on High Performance Schools. The IHPAC provided superior ventilation, with indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations that showed that the Title 24 minimum ventilation requirement of 15 CFM per occupant was nearly always being met. The opposite was found in the classrooms utilizing the 10 SEER system, where the indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations frequently exceeded levels that reflect inadequate ventilation. Improved ventilation conditions in the IHPAC lead to effective removal of volatile organic compounds and aldehydes, on average lowering the concentrations by 57 percent relative to the levels in the 10 SEER classrooms. The average IHPAC to 10 SEER formaldehyde ratio was about 67 percent, indicating only a 33 percent reduction of this compound in indoor air. The IHPAC thermal control system provided less variability in occupied classroom temperature than the 10 SEER thermostats. The average room temperatures in all seasons tended to be slightly lower in the IHPAC classrooms, often below the lower limit of the ASHRAE 55 thermal comfort band. State-wide and national energy modeling provided conservative estimates of potential energy savings by use of the IHPAC system that would provide payback a the range of time far lower than the lifetime of the equipment. Assuming electricity costs of $0.15/kWh, the perclassroom range of savings is from about $85 to $195 per year in California, and about $89 to $250 per year in the U.S., depending upon the city. These modelsdid not include the non-energy benefits to the classrooms including better air quality and acoustic conditions that could lead to improved health and learning in school. Market connection efforts that were part of the study give all indication that this has been a very successful project. The successes include the specification of the IHPAC equipment in the CHPS portable classroom standards, the release of a commercial product based on the standards that is now being installed in schools around the U.S., and the fact that a public utility company is currently considering the addition of the technology to its customer incentive program. These successes indicate that the IHPAC may reach its potential to improve ventilation and save energy in classrooms.

  17. Method of preparation of a CO.sub.2 removal sorbent with high chemical stability during multiple cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Rosencwaig, Shira

    2015-07-14

    Method for the production of a clay-alkali-amine CO.sub.2 sorbent prepared by integrating a clay substrate, basic alkali salt, and amine liquid. The basic alkali salt is present relative to the clay substrate in a weight ratio of from about 1 part to about 50 parts per 100 parts of the clay substrate. The amine liquid is present relative to a clay-alkali combination in a weight ratio of from about 1 part to about 10 parts per 10 parts of the clay-alkali combination. The clay substrate and basic alkali salt may be combined in a solid-solid heterogeneous mixture and followed by introduction of the amine liquid. Alternatively, an alkaline solution may be blended with the amine solution prior to contacting the clay substrate. The clay-alkali-amine CO.sub.2 sorbent is particularly advantageous for low temperature CO.sub.2 removal cycles in a gas stream having a CO.sub.2 concentration less than around 2000 ppm and an oxygen concentration around 21%, such as air. Results are presented illustrating the performance of the clay-alkali-amine CO.sub.2 sorbent compared to a clay-amine sorbent lacking the alkali inclusion.

  18. Apparatus and system for multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keenan, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Kotula, Paul G. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-06-24

    An apparatus and system for determining the properties of a sample from measured spectral data collected from the sample by performing a method of multivariate spectral analysis. The method can include: generating a two-dimensional matrix A containing measured spectral data; providing a weighted spectral data matrix D by performing a weighting operation on matrix A; factoring D into the product of two matrices, C and S.sup.T, by performing a constrained alternating least-squares analysis of D=CS.sup.T, where C is a concentration intensity matrix and S is a spectral shapes matrix; unweighting C and S by applying the inverse of the weighting used previously; and determining the properties of the sample by inspecting C and S. This method can be used by a spectrum analyzer to process X-ray spectral data generated by a spectral analysis system that can include a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an Energy Dispersive Detector and Pulse Height Analyzer.

  19. A recipe for free-energy functionals of polarizable molecular fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravishankar Sundararaman; Kendra Letchworth-Weaver; T A Arias

    2014-02-13

    Classical density-functional theory is the most direct approach to equilibrium structures and free energies of inhomogeneous liquids, but requires the construction of an approximate free-energy functional for each liquid of interest. We present a general recipe for constructing functionals for small-molecular liquids based only on bulk experimental properties and ab initio calculations of a single solvent molecule. This recipe combines the exact free energy of the non-interacting system with fundamental measure theory for the repulsive contribution and a weighted density functional for the short-ranged attractive interactions. We add to these ingredients a weighted polarization functional for the long-range correlations in both the rotational and molecular-polarizability contributions to the dielectric response. We also perform molecular dynamics calculations for the free energy of cavity formation and the high-field dielectric response, and show that our free-energy functional adequately describes these properties (which are key for accurate solvation calculations) for all three solvents in our study: water, chloroform and carbon tetrachloride.

  20. Optoelectronic devices incorporating fluoropolymer compositions for protection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Xuming; Chum, Pak-Wing S.; Howard, Kevin E.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Sumner, William C.; Wu, Shaofu

    2015-12-22

    The fluoropolymer compositions of the present invention generally incorporate ingredients comprising one or more fluoropolymers, an ultraviolet light protection component (hereinafter UV protection component), and optionally one or more additional ingredients if desired. The UV protection component includes a combination of at least one hindered tertiary amine (HTA) compound having a certain structure and a weight average molecular weight of at least 1000. This tertiary amine is used in combination with at least one organic, UV light absorbing compound (UVLA compound) having a weight average molecular weight greater than 500. When the HTA compound and the UVLA compound are selected according to principles of the present invention, the UV protection component provides fluoropolymer compositions with significantly improved weatherability characteristics for protecting underlying materials, features, structures, components, and/or the like. In particular, fluoropolymer compositions incorporating the UV protection component of the present invention have unexpectedly improved ability to resist blackening, coloration, or other de gradation that may be caused by UV exposure. As a consequence, devices protected by these compositions would be expected to have dramatically improved service life. The compositions have a wide range of uses but are particularly useful for forming protective layers in optoelectronic devices.

  1. Ballasted photovoltaic module and module arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Botkin, Jonathan (El Cerrito, CA); Graves, Simon (Berkeley, CA); Danning, Matt (Oakland, CA)

    2011-11-29

    A photovoltaic (PV) module assembly including a PV module and a ballast tray. The PV module includes a PV device and a frame. A PV laminate is assembled to the frame, and the frame includes an arm. The ballast tray is adapted for containing ballast and is removably associated with the PV module in a ballasting state where the tray is vertically under the PV laminate and vertically over the arm to impede overt displacement of the PV module. The PV module assembly can be installed to a flat commercial rooftop, with the PV module and the ballast tray both resting upon the rooftop. In some embodiments, the ballasting state includes corresponding surfaces of the arm and the tray being spaced from one another under normal (low or no wind) conditions, such that the frame is not continuously subjected to a weight of the tray.

  2. Using THELI pipeline in order to reduce Abell 226 multi-band optical images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joveini, R; Roozrokh, A; Taheri, M

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we review THELI (Erben & Schrimer, 2005), an image processing pipeline developed to reduce multi-pointing optical images taken by mosaic CCD cameras. This pipeline works on raw images by removing several instrumental contaminations, implementing photometric calibration and astrometric alignment, and constructing a deep co-added mosaic image complemented by a weight map. We demonstrate the procedure of reducing NGC3923 images from raw data to the final results. We also demonstrate the quality of our data reduction strategy using mag-count and mag-error in mag plots. Emphasis is mainly placed on photometric calibration which is of great interest to us due to our scientific case. Based on the cross-association of the extracted catalogue against a reference catalogue of stellar magnitudes, zero-point calibration is performed. Our data reduction strategy and the method employed for cross-correlating large catalogues is also presented.

  3. Subdominant pseudoultrametric on graphs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dovgoshei, A A; Petrov, E A

    2013-08-31

    Let (G,w) be a weighted graph. We find necessary and sufficient conditions under which the weight w:E(G)?R{sup +} can be extended to a pseudoultrametric on V(G), and establish a criterion for the uniqueness of such an extension. We demonstrate that (G,w) is a complete k-partite graph, for k?2, if and only if for any weight that can be extended to a pseudoultrametric, among all such extensions one can find the least pseudoultrametric consistent with w. We give a structural characterization of graphs for which the subdominant pseudoultrametric is an ultrametric for any strictly positive weight that can be extended to a pseudoultrametric. Bibliography: 14 titles.

  4. Some results on optimum allocation for sampling on two occasions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shimizugawa, Hisako

    1966-01-01

    . Optimum allocation of m and u fcr the estimation of Y when the total oost is fixed to cO + c R . n 21 2. Optimum allocation of m and u. for the estimation of Y when the total cost is fixed to cO + c n, (i. e. , u R n). The minimum variance of y ~ (1/Q...) n a weighted harmonic mean between n and m defined by I I- the relation ? , 8- + ~ n m r ~ the population regression coeffioient p P aud is x assumed to be known. S - ? I: (y -y) S - ? Z (*. -x), 2 1 ? 2 2 1 2 x N 1 . 1 x N-I The estimator y...

  5. Decentralized Coherent Quantum Control Design for Translation Invariant Linear Quantum Stochastic Networks with Direct Coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arash Kh. Sichani; Igor G. Vladimirov; Ian R. Petersen

    2015-09-07

    This paper is concerned with coherent quantum control design for translation invariant networks of identical quantum stochastic systems subjected to external quantum noise. The network is modelled as an open quantum harmonic oscillator and is governed by a set of linear quantum stochastic differential equations. The dynamic variables of this quantum plant satisfy the canonical commutation relations. Similar large-scale systems can be found, for example, in quantum metamaterials and optical lattices. The problem under consideration is to design a stabilizing decentralized coherent quantum controller in the form of another translation invariant quantum system, directly coupled to the plant, so as to minimize a weighted mean square functional of the dynamic variables of the interconnected networks. We consider this problem in the thermodynamic limit of infinite network size and present first-order necessary conditions for optimality of the controller.

  6. The Neutrino Mass Hierarchy from Nuclear Reactor Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emilio Ciuffoli; Jarah Evslin; Xinmin Zhang

    2013-08-14

    10 years from now reactor neutrino experiments will attempt to determine which neutrino mass eigenstate is the most massive. In this letter we present the results of more than seven million detailed simulations of such experiments, studying the dependence of the probability of successfully determining the mass hierarchy upon the analysis method, the neutrino mass matrix parameters, reactor flux models, geoneutrinos and, in particular, combinations of baselines. We show that a recently reported spurious dependence of the data analysis upon the high energy tail of the reactor spectrum can be removed by using a weighted Fourier transform. We determine the optimal baselines and corresponding detector locations. For most values of the CP-violating, leptonic Dirac phase delta, a degeneracy prevents NOvA and T2K from determining either delta or the hierarchy. We determine the confidence with which a reactor experiment can determine the hierarchy, breaking the degeneracy.

  7. Influence of refraction on wind turbine noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makarewicz, Rufin

    2013-01-01

    A semi-empirical method is applied to calculate the time-average sound level of wind turbine noise generation and propagation. Both are affected by wind shear refraction. Under upwind conditions the partially ensonified zone separates the fully ensonified zone (close to the turbine) and the shadow zone (far away from the turbine). Refraction is described in terms of the wind speed linear profile fitted to the power law profile. The rotating blades are treated as a two-dimensional circular source in the vertical plane. Inside the partially ensonified zone the effective A-weighted sound power decreases to zero when the receiver moves from the turbine toward the shadow zone. The presented results would be useful in practical applications to give a quick estimate of the effect of refraction on wind turbine noise.

  8. Arcsecond positions for milliarcsecond VLBI nuclei of extragalactic radio soures. Part 1. 546 sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morabito, D.D.; Preston, R.A.; Slade, M.A.; Jauncey, D.L.

    1981-12-01

    Very long Baseline Interferometry measurements at 2290 MHz on baselines of approximately 10 to the 4th power km between Deep Space Network stations were used to identify sources that are suitable for precision astrometric applications. The use of relatively crude time delay measurements along with fringe frequency measurements to determine the positions of the milliarcsecond nuclei in 546 extragalactic sources with accuracies of generally approximately 1' is described. The calculated positions of the sources and the corresponding uncertainties are presented and the positions are referenced to the equinox of 1950.0 and elliptical aberration terms are included so as to agree with past astronomical convention. The source positions and position uncertainties for sources which were multiply observed were estimated from a weighted average. The reliability of the determined positions was demonstrated by testing the repeatability of multiple observations on the same source and by position comparisons with more accurate radio catalogs.

  9. Opcode counting for performance measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gara, Alan; Satterfield, David L; Walkup, Robert E

    2013-10-29

    Methods, systems and computer program products are disclosed for measuring a performance of a program running on a processing unit of a processing system. In one embodiment, the method comprises informing a logic unit of each instruction in the program that is executed by the processing unit, assigning a weight to each instruction, assigning the instructions to a plurality of groups, and analyzing the plurality of groups to measure one or more metrics. In one embodiment, each instruction includes an operating code portion, and the assigning includes assigning the instructions to the groups based on the operating code portions of the instructions. In an embodiment, each type of instruction is assigned to a respective one of the plurality of groups. These groups may be combined into a plurality of sets of the groups.

  10. Gravity Control by means of Electromagnetic Field through Gas or Plasma at Ultra-Low Pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fran De Aquino

    2013-12-02

    It is shown that the gravity acceleration just above a chamber filled with gas or plasma at ultra-low pressure can be strongly reduced by applying an Extra Low-Frequency (ELF) electromagnetic field across the gas or the plasma. This Gravitational Shielding Effect is related to recent discovery of quantum correlation between gravitational mass and inertial mass. According to the theory samples hung above the gas or the plasma should exhibit a weight decrease when the frequency of the electromagnetic field is decreased or when the intensity of the electromagnetic field is increased. This Gravitational Shielding Effect is unprecedented in the literature and can not be understood in the framework of the General Relativity. From the technical point of view, there are several applications for this discovery; possibly it will change the paradigms of energy generation, transportation and telecommunications.

  11. Smart Onboard Inspection of High Pressure Gas Fuel Cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beshears, D.L.; Starbuck, J.M.

    1999-09-27

    The use of natural gas as an alternative fuel in automotive applications is not widespread primarily because of the high cost and durability of the composite storage tanks. Tanks manufactured using carbon fiber are desirable in weight critical passenger vehicles because of the low density of carbon fiber. The high strength of carbon fiber also translates to a weight reduction because thinner wall designs are possible to withstand the internal pressure loads. However, carbon fiber composites are prone to impact damage that over the life of the storage tank may lead to an unsafe condition for the vehicle operator. A technique that potentially may be a reliable indication of developing hazardous conditions in composite fuel tanks is imbedded fiber optics. The applicability of this technique to onboard inspection is discussed and results from preliminary lab testing indicate that fiber optic sensors can reliably detect impact damage.

  12. A network theory analysis of football strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peña, Javier López

    2012-01-01

    We showcase in this paper the use of some tools from network theory to describe the strategy of football teams. Using passing data made available by FIFA during the 2010 World Cup, we construct for each team a weighted and directed network in which nodes correspond to players and arrows to passes. The resulting network or graph provides a direct visual inspection of a team's strategy, from which we can identify play pattern, determine hot-spots on the play and localize potential weaknesses. Using different centrality measures, we can also determine the relative importance of each player in the game, the `popularity' of a player, and the effect of removing players from the game.

  13. ORLIB: a computer code that produces one-energy group, time- and spatially-averaged neutron cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blink, J.A.; Dye, R.E.; Kimlinger, J.R.

    1981-12-01

    Calculation of neutron activation of proposed fusion reactors requires a library of neutron-activation cross sections. One such library is ACTL, which is being updated and expanded by Howerton. If the energy-dependent neutron flux is also known as a function of location and time, the buildup and decay of activation products can be calculated. In practice, hand calculation is impractical without energy-averaged cross sections because of the large number of energy groups. A widely used activation computer code, ORIGEN2, also requires energy-averaged cross sections. Accordingly, we wrote the ORLIB code to collapse the ACTL library, using the flux as a weighting function. The ORLIB code runs on the LLNL Cray computer network. We have also modified ORIGEN2 to accept the expanded activation libraries produced by ORLIB.

  14. A Proposed Architecture for Continuous Web Monitoring Through Online Crawling of Blogs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naghavi, Mehdi; 10.5121/iju.2012.3102

    2012-01-01

    Getting informed of what is registered in the Web space on time, can greatly help the psychologists, marketers and political analysts to familiarize, analyse, make decision and act correctly based on the society`s different needs. The great volume of information in the Web space hinders us to continuously online investigate the whole space of the Web. Focusing on the considered blogs limits our working domain and makes the online crawling in the Web space possible. In this article, an architecture is offered which continuously online crawls the related blogs, using focused crawler, and investigates and analyses the obtained data. The online fetching is done based on the latest announcements of the ping server machines. A weighted graph is formed based on targeting the important key phrases, so that a focused crawler can do the fetching of the complete texts of the related Web pages, based on the weighted graph.

  15. A Fit to the Galactic Cosmic Ray Hydrogen and Helium Spectra at Voyager 1 at Low Energies and Earth Based Measurements at Much Higher Energies with Identical Rigidity Independent Source Spectra for the Hydrogen and Helium Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, W R

    2015-01-01

    Voyager 1 data from beyond the heliopause provide the first direct measurements of the interstellar cosmic ray spectra below 1 GeVnuc. In this paper we combine these Voyager measurements of H and He nuclei from 3-600 MeVnuc with higher energy measurements at 1 AU from the BESS and PAMELA experiments up to 100 GeVnuc. Using a Weighted Leaky Box Model for propagation in the galaxy, we obtain an excellent fit to these new Voyager observations and the much higher energy spectra up to 100 GeVnuc by using source spectra which are P-2.28, with the exponent independent of rigidity from low to high rigidities; along with a rigidity dependence of the diffusion path length which is P-0.5 at rigidities 1.00 GV, and possibly changing to P1.0 at lower rigidities.

  16. Work extraction and thermodynamics for individual quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Skrzypczyk; Anthony J. Short; Sandu Popescu

    2014-09-26

    Thermodynamics is traditionally concerned with systems comprised of a large number of particles. Here we present a framework for extending thermodynamics to individual quantum systems, including explicitly a thermal bath and work-storage device (essentially a `weight' that can be raised or lowered). We prove that the second law of thermodynamics holds in our framework, and give a simple protocol to extract the optimal amount of work from the system, equal to its change in free energy. Our results apply to any quantum system in an arbitrary initial state, in particular including non-equilibrium situations. The optimal protocol is essentially reversible, similar to classical Carnot cycles, and indeed, we show that it can be used it to construct a quantum Carnot engine.

  17. A semianalytic Fisher matrix for precessing binaries with a single significant spin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. O'Shaughnessy; P. Nepal; A. Lundgren

    2015-09-22

    Gravitational waves from a binary with a single dynamically significant spin, notably including precessing black hole-neutron star (BH-NS) binaries, let us constrain that binary's properties: the two masses and the dominant black hole spin. Based on a straightforward fourier transform of $h(t)$ enabled by the corotating frame, we show the Fisher matrix for precessing binaries can be well-approximated by an extremely simple semianalytic approximation. This approximation can be easily understood as a weighted average of independent information channels, each associated with one gravitational wave harmonic. Generalizing previous studies of nonprecessing binaries to include critical symmetry-breaking precession effects required to understand plausible astrophysical sources, our ansatz can be applied to address how well gravitational wave measurements can address a wide range of astrophysical and fundamental questions. Our approach provides a simple method to assess what parameters gravitational wave detectors can measure, how well, and why.

  18. Effective range from tetramer dissociation data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadizadeh, M R; Tomio, Lauro; Delfino, A; Frederico, T

    2012-01-01

    The shifts in the four-body recombination peaks, due to lowest order range corrections in the zero range results close to the unitary limit, are obtained and used to extract the corresponding effective range of a given atomic system. From the experimental values of the tetramer dissociation positions of an ultracold gas of cesium atoms close to broad Feshbach resonances, the effective ranges are extracted, with a weighted average given by 3.9$\\pm 0.8 R_{{vdW}}$, where $R_{{vdW}}$ is the van der Waals length scale. This result is consistent with the van der Waals potential tail for the $Cs_2$ system. The method can be generally applied to other cold atom experimental setups to determine the corresponding effective range.

  19. Multimedia Content Distribution in Hybrid Wireless using Weighted Clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andronache, Adrian; Rothkugel, Steffen

    2007-01-01

    Fixed infrastructured networks naturally support centralized approaches for group management and information provisioning. Contrary to infrastructured networks, in multi-hop ad-hoc networks each node acts as a router as well as sender and receiver. Some applications, however, requires hierarchical arrangements that-for practical reasons-has to be done locally and self-organized. An additional challenge is to deal with mobility that causes permanent network partitioning and re-organizations. Technically, these problems can be tackled by providing additional uplinks to a backbone network, which can be used to access resources in the Internet as well as to inter-link multiple ad-hoc network partitions, creating a hybrid wireless network. In this paper, we present a prototypically implemented hybrid wireless network system optimized for multimedia content distribution. To efficiently manage the ad-hoc communicating devices a weighted clustering algorithm is introduced. The proposed localized algorithm deals with ...

  20. Cermet anode compositions with high content alloy phase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marschman, S.C.; Davis, N.C.

    1989-10-03

    Cermet electrode compositions comprising NiO-NiFe[sub 2]O[sub 4]-Cu-Ni, and methods for making, are disclosed. Addition of nickel metal prior to formation and densification of a base mixture into the cermet allows for an increase in the total amount of copper and nickel that can be contained in the NiO-NiFe[sub 2]O[sub 4] oxide system. Nickel is present in a base mixture weight concentration of from 0.1% to 10%. Copper is present in the alloy phase in a weight concentration of from 10% to 30% of the densified composition. Such cermet electrodes can be formed to have electrical conductivities well in excess of 100 ohm[sup [minus]1] cm[sup [minus]1]. Other alloy and oxide system cermets having high content metal phases are also expected to be manufacturable in accordance with the invention.

  1. Cermet anode compositions with high content alloy phase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marschman, Steven C. (Richland, WA); Davis, Norman C. (Richland, WA)

    1989-01-01

    Cermet electrode compositions comprising NiO-NiFe.sub.2 O.sub.4 -Cu-Ni, and methods for making, are disclosed. Addition of nickel metal prior to formation and densification of a base mixture into the cermet allows for an increase in the total amount of copper and nickel that can be contained in the NiO-NiFe.sub.2 O.sub.4 oxide system. Nickel is present in a base mixture weight concentration of from 0.1% to 10%. Copper is present in the alloy phase in a weight concentration of from 10% to 30% of the densified composition. Such cermet electrodes can be formed to have electrical conductivities well in excess of 100 ohm.sup.-1 cm.sup.-1. Other alloy and oxide system cermets having high content metal phases are also expected to be manufacturable in accordance with the invention.

  2. Method and apparatus for improving resolution in spectrometers processing output steps from non-ideal signal sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warburton, William K.; Momayezi, Michael

    2006-06-20

    A method and apparatus for processing step-like output signals (primary signals) generated by non-ideal, for example, nominally single-pole ("N-1P ") devices. An exemplary method includes creating a set of secondary signals by directing the primary signal along a plurality of signal paths to a signal summation point, summing the secondary signals reaching the signal summation point after propagating along the signal paths to provide a summed signal, performing a filtering or delaying operation in at least one of said signal paths so that the secondary signals reaching said summing point have a defined time correlation with respect to one another, applying a set of weighting coefficients to the secondary signals propagating along said signal paths, and performing a capturing operation after any filtering or delaying operations so as to provide a weighted signal sum value as a measure of the integrated area QgT of the input signal.

  3. Alcohol-free alkoxide process for containing nuclear waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pope, James M. (Monroeville, PA); Lahoda, Edward J. (Edgewood, PA)

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of containing nuclear waste. A composition is first prepared of about 25 to about 80%, calculated as SiO.sub.2, of a partially hydrolyzed silicon compound, up to about 30%, calculated as metal oxide, of a partially hydrolyzed aluminum or calcium compound, about 5 to about 20%, calculated as metal oxide, of a partially hydrolyzed boron or calcium compound, about 3 to about 25%, calculated as metal oxide, of a partially hydrolyzed sodium, potassium or lithium compound, an alcohol in a weight ratio to hydrolyzed alkoxide of about 1.5 to about 3% and sufficient water to remove at least 99% of the alcohol as an azeotrope. The azeotrope is boiled off and up to about 40%, based on solids in the product, of the nuclear waste, is mixed into the composition. The mixture is evaporated to about 25 to about 45% solids and is melted and cooled.

  4. Interpreting scattering wave functions in the presence of energy-dependent interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Pratt

    2007-11-09

    In scattering theory, the squared relative wave function $|\\phi({\\bf q},{\\bf r})|^2$ is often interpreted as a weight, due to final-state interactions, describing the probability enhancement for emission with asymptotic relative momentum $q$. An equivalence relation also links the integral of the squared wave function over all coordinate space to the density of states. This relation, which plays an important role in understanding two-particle correlation phenomenology, is altered for the case where the potential is energy dependent, as is assumed in various forms of reaction theory. Here, the modification to the equivalence relation is derived, and it is shown that the squared wave function should be augmented by a additional factor if it is to represent the emission enhancement for final-state interactions. Examples with relativistic vector interactions, e.g., the Coulomb interaction, are presented.

  5. U.S. Photovoltaic Prices and Cost Breakdowns. Q1 2015 Benchmarks for Residential, Commercial, and Utility-Scale Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Donald; Davidson, Carolyn; Fu, Ran; Ardani, Kristen; Margolis, Robert

    2015-09-01

    The price of photovoltaic (PV) systems in the United States (i.e., the cost to the system owner) has continued to decline across all major market sectors. This report provides a Q1 2015 update regarding the prices of residential, commercial, and utility scale PV systems, based on an objective methodology that closely approximates the book value of a PV system. Several cases are benchmarked to represent common variations in business models, labor rates, and system architecture choice. We estimate a weighted-average cash purchase price of $3.09/W for residential scale rooftop systems, $2.15/W for commercial scale rooftop systems, $1.77/W for utility scale systems with fixed mounting structures, and $1.91/W for utility scale systems using single-axis trackers. All systems are modeled assuming standard-efficiency, polycrystalline-silicon PV modules, and further assume installation within the United States.

  6. Dispersive estimates for Schrödinger operators in dimension two with obstructions at zero energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Burak Erdogan; William R. Green

    2012-01-10

    We investigate $L^1(\\R^2)\\to L^\\infty(\\R^2)$ dispersive estimates for the Schr\\"odinger operator $H=-\\Delta+V$ when there are obstructions, resonances or an eigenvalue, at zero energy. In particular, we show that the existence of an s-wave resonance at zero energy does not destroy the $t^{-1}$ decay rate. We also show that if there is a p-wave resonance or an eigenvalue at zero energy then there is a time dependent operator $F_t$ satisfying $\\|F_t\\|_{L^1\\to L^\\infty} \\lesssim 1$ such that $$\\|e^{itH}P_{ac}-F_t\\|_{L^1\\to L^\\infty} \\lesssim |t|^{-1}, \\text{for} |t|>1.$$ We also establish a weighted dispersive estimate with $t^{-1}$ decay rate in the case when there is an eigenvalue at zero energy but no resonances.

  7. Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Volume I.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomquist, R. Gordon

    1985-06-01

    The objective was to consolidate and evaluate all geologic, environmental, and legal and institutional information in existing records and files, and to apply a uniform methodology to the evaluation and ranking of sites to allow the making of creditable forecasts of the supply of geothermal energy which could be available in the region over a 20 year planning horizon. A total of 1265 potential geothermal resource sites were identified from existing literature. Site selection was based upon the presence of thermal and mineral springs or wells and/or areas of recent volcanic activity and high heat flow. 250 sites were selected for detailed analysis. A methodology to rank the sites by energy potential, degree of developability, and cost of energy was developed. Resource developability was ranked by a method based on a weighted variable evaluation of resource favorability. Sites were ranked using an integration of values determined through the cost and developability analysis. 75 figs., 63 tabs.

  8. A compact ultra-clean system for deploying radioactive sources inside the KamLAND detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. I. Banks; S. J. Freedman; J. Wallig; N. Ybarrolaza; A. Gando; Y. Gando; H. Ikeda; K. Inoue; Y. Kishimoto; M. Koga; T. Mitsui; K. Nakamura; I. Shimizu; J. Shirai; A. Suzuki; Y. Takemoto; K. Tamae; K. Ueshima; H. Watanabe; B. D. Xu; H. Yoshida; S. Yoshida; A. Kozlov; C. Grant; G. Keefer; A. Piepke; T. Bloxham; B. K. Fujikawa; K. Han; K. Ichimura; H. Murayama; T. O'Donnell; H. M. Steiner; L. A. Winslow; D. A. Dwyer; R. D. McKeown; C. Zhang; B. E. Berger; C. E. Lane; J. Maricic; T. Miletic; M. Batygov; J. G. Learned; S. Matsuno; M. Sakai; G. A. Horton-Smith; K. E. Downum; G. Gratta; Y. Efremenko; O. Perevozchikov; H. J. Karwowski; D. M. Markoff; W. Tornow; K. M. Heeger; J. A. Detwiler; S. Enomoto; M. P. Decowski

    2015-02-12

    We describe a compact, ultra-clean device used to deploy radioactive sources along the vertical axis of the KamLAND liquid-scintillator neutrino detector for purposes of calibration. The device worked by paying out and reeling in precise lengths of a hanging, small-gauge wire rope (cable); an assortment of interchangeable radioactive sources could be attached to a weight at the end of the cable. All components exposed to the radiopure liquid scintillator were made of chemically compatible UHV-cleaned materials, primarily stainless steel, in order to avoid contaminating or degrading the scintillator. To prevent radon intrusion, the apparatus was enclosed in a hermetically sealed housing inside a glove box, and both volumes were regularly flushed with purified nitrogen gas. An infrared camera attached to the side of the housing permitted real-time visual monitoring of the cable's motion, and the system was controlled via a graphical user interface.

  9. Static latching arrangement and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrison, Larry (Manteca, CA)

    1988-01-01

    A latching assembly for use in latching a cable to and unlatching it from a given object in order to move an object from one location to another is disclosed herein. This assembly includes a weighted sphere mounted to one end of a cable so as to rotate about a specific diameter of the sphere. The assembly also includes a static latch adapted for connection with the object to be moved. This latch includes an internal latching cavity for containing the sphere in a latching condition and a series of surfaces and openings which cooperate with the sphere in order to move the sphere into and out of the latching cavity and thereby connect the cable to and disconnect it from the latch without using any moving parts on the latch itself.

  10. A technique for calculating the effective thermal resistance of steel stud walls for code compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, W.C.; Swinton, M.C.; Haysom, J.C. [National Research Council, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    1998-12-31

    Canada`s Model National Energy Codes for Houses and for Buildings contain prescriptive requirements in the form of minimum thermal characteristics of envelope assemblies, including steel stud walls. To assist in the uniform enforcement of these requirements, it was necessary for the codes to prescribe acceptable methods of calculating the thermal resistance of steel and assemblies. The ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals proposes a simple method for predicting the thermal performance of stud walls, which is based on a weighted average of the values predicted by isothermal planes and parallel path calculation methods. The thermal resistance of 2440 mm x 2440 mm (8 ft x 8 ft) wall specimens, with 92 mm (3-5/8 in.) steel studs, was measured in a series of guarded hot box tests. Two stud gauges were evaluated, as well as two stud spacings, with one wood-based and three insulating sheathings. The measurements demonstrated that a weighting of 2:1 (isothermal planes:parallel path) provided an/ accurate prediction of the thermal resistance of walls with steel studs at 406 mm (16 in.) o.c., but that a 1:1 weighting best predicted the thermal resistance of walls with steel studs at 610 mm (24 in.) o.c. These results applied to walls with wood-based sheathing directly applied to the studs, whether or not the walls had insulating sheathing. Finally, the measurements demonstrated that an intermediate weighting of 3:2 best predicted the thermal resistance of walls with insulating sheathing installed directly onto the studs, i.e., without intermediate structural sheathing.

  11. Low-complexity atlas-based prostate segmentation by combining global, regional, and local metrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Qiuliang; Ruan, Dan, E-mail: druan@mednet.ucla.edu [The Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)] [The Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To improve the efficiency of atlas-based segmentation without compromising accuracy, and to demonstrate the validity of the proposed method on MRI-based prostate segmentation application. Methods: Accurate and efficient automatic structure segmentation is an important task in medical image processing. Atlas-based methods, as the state-of-the-art, provide good segmentation at the cost of a large number of computationally intensive nonrigid registrations, for anatomical sites/structures that are subject to deformation. In this study, the authors propose to utilize a combination of global, regional, and local metrics to improve the accuracy yet significantly reduce the number of required nonrigid registrations. The authors first perform an affine registration to minimize the global mean squared error (gMSE) to coarsely align each atlas image to the target. Subsequently, atarget-specific regional MSE (rMSE), demonstrated to be a good surrogate for dice similarity coefficient (DSC), is used to select a relevant subset from the training atlas. Only within this subset are nonrigid registrations performed between the training images and the target image, to minimize a weighted combination of gMSE and rMSE. Finally, structure labels are propagated from the selected training samples to the target via the estimated deformation fields, and label fusion is performed based on a weighted combination of rMSE and local MSE (lMSE) discrepancy, with proper total-variation-based spatial regularization. Results: The proposed method was applied to a public database of 30 prostate MR images with expert-segmented structures. The authors’ method, utilizing only eight nonrigid registrations, achieved a performance with a median/mean DSC of over 0.87/0.86, outperforming the state-of-the-art full-fledged atlas-based segmentation approach of which the median/mean DSC was 0.84/0.82 when applying to their data set. Conclusions: The proposed method requires a fixed number of nonrigid registrations, independent of atlas size, providing desirable scalability especially important for a large or growing atlas. When applied to prostate segmentation, the method achieved better performance to the state-of-the-art atlas-based approaches, with significant improvement in computation efficiency. The proposed rationale of utilizing jointly global, regional, and local metrics, based on the information characteristic and surrogate behavior for registration and fusion subtasks, can be extended naturally to similarity metrics beyond MSE, such as correlation or mutual information types.

  12. All-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S4 data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Agresti, J; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Belczynski, K; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bogenstahl, J; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burmeister, O; Busby, D; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cantley, C A; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Casey, M M; Castaldi, G; Cepeda, C; Chalkey, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chiadini, F; Chin, D; Chin, E; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Clark, J; Cochrane, P; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coward, D; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Croce, R P; Crooks, D R M; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Dalrymple, J; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; De Bra, D; Degallaix, J; Degree, M; Demma, T; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Daz, M; Dickson, J; Di Credico, A; Diederichs, G; Dietz, A; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Dumas, J C; Dupuis, R J; Dwyer, J G; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Fiumara, V; Fotopoulos, N; Franzen, A; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Galdi, V; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gossler, S; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, a C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, J; Gretarsson, A M; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hammer, D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Howell, E; Hoyland, D; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Innerhofer, E; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jackrel, D; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, Peter Ignaz Paul; Kalogera, V; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalili, F Ya; Kim, C; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R K; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lee, B; Lei, M; Leiner, J; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Longo, M; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Marano, S; Marka, S; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matone, L; Matta, V; Mavalvala, a N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McKenzie, K; McNabb, J W C; McWilliams, S; Meier, T; Melissinos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Mikhailov, E; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow Lowry, C; Moylan, A; Mudge, D; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nash, T; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pierro, V; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ramsunder, M; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ribichini, L; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Route, R; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; Sancho de la Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Schediwy, S; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Sidles, J A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Somiya, K; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H; Tanner, D B; Tarallo, M; Taylor, R; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D; Ungarelli, C; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vallisneri, M; Van Den Broeck, C; Varvella, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P; Villar, A; Vorvick, C

    2007-01-01

    We report on an all-sky search with the LIGO detectors for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range 50-1000 Hz and with the frequency's time derivative in the range -1.0E-8 Hz/s to zero. Data from the fourth LIGO science run (S4) have been used in this search. Three different semi-coherent methods of transforming and summing strain power from Short Fourier Transforms (SFTs) of the calibrated data have been used. The first, known as "StackSlide", averages normalized power from each SFT. A "weighted Hough" scheme is also developed and used, and which also allows for a multi-interferometer search. The third method, known as "PowerFlux", is a variant of the StackSlide method in which the power is weighted before summing. In both the weighted Hough and PowerFlux methods, the weights are chosen according to the noise and detector antenna-pattern to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. The respective advantages and disadvantages of these methods are discussed. Observing no evidence of periodic gravitationa...

  13. Conformal perturbation theory and higher spin entanglement entropy on the torus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shouvik Datta; Justin R. David; S. Prem Kumar

    2015-04-10

    We study the free fermion theory in 1+1 dimensions deformed by chemical potentials for holomorphic, conserved currents at finite temperature and on a spatial circle. For a spin-three chemical potential \\mu, the deformation is related at high temperatures to a higher spin black hole in hs[0] theory on AdS_3 spacetime. We calculate the order \\mu^2 corrections to the single interval Renyi and entanglement entropies on the torus using the bosonized formulation. A consistent result, satisfying all checks, emerges upon carefully accounting for both perturbative and winding mode contributions in the bosonized language. The order \\mu^2 corrections involve integrals that are finite but potentially sensitive to contact term singularities. We propose and apply a prescription for defining such integrals which matches the Hamiltonian picture and passes several non-trivial checks for both thermal corrections and the Renyi entropies at this order. The thermal corrections are given by a weight six quasi-modular form, whilst the Renyi entropies are controlled by quasi-elliptic functions of the interval length with modular weight six. We also point out the well known connection between the perturbative expansion of the partition function in powers of the spin-three chemical potential and the Gross-Taylor genus expansion of large-N Yang-Mills theory on the torus. We note the absence of winding mode contributions in this connection, which suggests qualitatively different entanglement entropies for the two systems.

  14. Using phase information to enhance speckle noise reduction in the ultrasonic NDE of coarse grain materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lardner, Timothy; Gachagan, Anthony; Li, Minghui

    2014-02-18

    Materials with a coarse grain structure are becoming increasingly prevalent in industry due to their resilience to stress and corrosion. These materials are difficult to inspect with ultrasound because reflections from the grains lead to high noise levels which hinder the echoes of interest. Spatially Averaged Sub-Aperture Correlation Imaging (SASACI) is an advanced array beamforming technique that uses the cross-correlation between images from array sub-apertures to generate an image weighting matrix, in order to reduce noise levels. This paper presents a method inspired by SASACI to further improve imaging using phase information to refine focusing and reduce noise. A-scans from adjacent array elements are cross-correlated using both signal amplitude and phase to refine delay laws and minimize phase aberration. The phase-based and amplitude-based corrected images are used as inputs to a two-dimensional cross-correlation algorithm that will output a weighting matrix that can be applied to any conventional image. This approach was validated experimentally using a 5MHz array a coarse grained Inconel 625 step wedge, and compared to the Total Focusing Method (TFM). Initial results have seen SNR improvements of over 20dB compared to TFM, and a resolution that is much higher.

  15. Noise-based logic: Binary, multi-valued, or fuzzy, with optional superposition of logic states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laszlo B. Kish

    2008-12-23

    A new type of deterministic (non-probabilistic) computer logic system inspired by the stochasticity of brain signals is shown. The distinct values are represented by independent stochastic processes: independent voltage (or current) noises. The orthogonality of these processes provides a natural way to construct binary or multi-valued logic circuitry with arbitrary number N of logic values by using analog circuitry. Moreover, the logic values on a single wire can be made a (weighted) superposition of the N distinct logic values. Fuzzy logic is also naturally represented by a two-component superposition within the binary case (N=2). Error propagation and accumulation are suppressed. Other relevant advantages are reduced energy dissipation and leakage current problems, and robustness against circuit noise and background noises such as 1/f, Johnson, shot and crosstalk noise. Variability problems are also nonexistent because the logic value is an AC signal. A similar logic system can be built with orthogonal sinusoidal signals (different frequency or orthogonal phase) however that has an extra 1/N type slowdown compared to the noise-based logic system with increasing number of N furthermore it is less robust against time delay effects than the noise-based counterpart.

  16. SANS EXAMINATION OF THE Mg{sub 3}CoNi{sub 2} ALLOY FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE MATERIAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Insani, Andon; Mulyana, Yohanes Anda [Center for Technology of Nuclear Industry Materials-BATAN, Gedung 40, Kawasan Puspiptek, Serpong, Tangerang Selatan 15310, Banten (Indonesia); Suwarno, Hadi [Center for Technology of Nuclear Fuel-BATAN, Gedung 20, Kawasan Puspiptek, Serpong, Tangerang Selatan 15310, Banten (Indonesia)

    2010-06-22

    The nanocrystalline Mg{sub 3}CoNi{sub 2} alloys have been synthesized from Mg, Co and Ni pure metal powder by using a SPEX 8000 High Energy Milling through wet method with its vial and ball made of stainless steel. A weight ratio of ball to sample was set at 8:1 and the milling times were set at 20 and 30 h. SANS measurements were performed in an instrument SMARTer at BATAN using a distances between 1.5, 4 and 13 m and a wavelength, {lambda}, of 0.39 nm. The SANS investigation results showed that the intensity profiles decrease with q and a power law exponent of about 4. It is suggested that surface Porod scattering dominates. The relative intensity decreases with increased hydrogen concentration, indicating a decline in surface area. Hydrogenation leads to significant changes in the scattering curves mainly due to the 1 Mg{sub 2}Ni attice expansion and changes of the Mg{sub 2}Ni-H/Mg{sub 2}Ni phase boundaries and that of the Mg{sub 2}Ni or Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4} grain boundaries. The samples absorb about 3.3 and 1.9 wt% hydrogen with increasing milling time of 20 and 30 h, respectively.

  17. Non-Linear Effects on the Angular Correlation Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Scranton; S. Dodelson

    2000-03-03

    Extracting the three dimensional power spectrum from the 2D distribution of galaxies has become a standard tool of cosmology. This extraction requires some assumptions about the scaling of the power spectrum with redshift; all treatments to date assume a simple power law scaling. In reality, different scales grow at different rates, due to non-linearities. We show that angular surveys are sensitive to a weighted average of the power spectrum over a distribution of redshifts, where the weight function varies with wavenumber. We compute this weight function and show that it is fairly sharply peaked at \\bar{z}, which is a function of k. As long as the extracted power spectrum is understood to be $P(k,\\bar{z})$, the error introduced by non-linear scaling is quantifiable and small. We study these effects in the context of the APM and SDSS photometric surveys. In general the weight matrix is peaked at larger z and is broader for deeper surveys, leading to larger (but still quantifiable) errors due to non-linear scaling. The tools introduced here -- in particular the weight function and effective redshift $\\bar{z}$ -- can also be profitably applied to plan surveys to study the evolution of the power spectrum.

  18. The $^7$Be Solar Neutrino Line: A Reflection of the Central Temperature Distribution of the Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John N. Bahcall

    1994-01-14

    A precise test of the theory of stellar evolution can be performed by measuring the average difference in energy between the neutrino line produced by ${\\rm ^7Be}$ electron capture in the solar interior and the corresponding neutrino line produced in a terrestrial laboratory. This energy shift is calculated to be 1.29~keV (to an accuracy of a few percent) for the dominant ground-state to ground-state transition. The energy shift is approximately equal to the average temperature of the solar core, computed by integrating the temperature over the solar interior with a weighting factor equal to the locally-produced $^7$Be neutrino emission. The characteristic modulation of the ${\\rm ^7Be}$ line shape that would be caused by either vacuum neutrino oscillations or by matter-enhanced (MSW) neutrino oscillations is shown to be small. Other frequently-discussed weak interaction solutions to the solar neutrino problem are also not expected to change significantly the line profile. Therefore, a measurement of the energy shift is a measurement of the central temperature distribution of the sun.

  19. Optical and electronic properties of delafossite CuBO{sub 2}p-type transparent conducting oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruttanapun, Chesta E-mail: krchesta@kmitl.ac.th

    2013-09-21

    CuBO{sub 2} delafossite was prepared by solid state reaction and calcined/sintered at 1005?°C. The optical properties of this p-type transparent conducting oxide were investigated. Its crystal structure, morphology, composition, oxygen decomposition, and optical and electronic properties were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared (UV-VIS-NIR) and fluorescence spectroscopies, Seebeck coefficient, and electrical conductivity measurements. CuBO{sub 2} delafossite possesses a hexagonal space group R3{sup ¯}m. TGA indicated a weight loss of 10%, which was attributed to excess oxygen. The positive Seebeck coefficient confirmed p-type behavior. Emission at 355?nm indicated a direct band type transition, and the UV-VIS-NIR spectrum indicated an optical direct gap of 3.6?eV. Activation energies for carrier production and electrical conduction were 0.147 and 0.58?eV, respectively, indicating the thermal activation of carriers. CuBO{sub 2} delafossite is a p-type transparent conducting oxide with a wide band gap and may have potential in industrial p-type electrodes.

  20. Kernel Regression For Determining Photometric Redshifts From Sloan Broadband Photometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Wang; Y. X. Zhang; C. Liu; Y. H. Zhao

    2007-06-20

    We present a new approach, kernel regression, to determine photometric redshifts for 399,929 galaxies in the Fifth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). In our case, kernel regression is a weighted average of spectral redshifts of the neighbors for a query point, where higher weights are associated with points that are closer to the query point. One important design decision when using kernel regression is the choice of the bandwidth. We apply 10-fold cross-validation to choose the optimal bandwidth, which is obtained as the cross-validation error approaches the minimum. The experiments show that the optimal bandwidth is different for diverse input patterns, the least rms error of photometric redshift estimation arrives at 0.019 using color+eClass as the inputs, the less rms error amounts to 0.020 using ugriz+eClass as the inputs. Here eClass is a galaxy spectra type. Then the little rms scatter is 0.021 with color+r as the inputs.

  1. Continuous process for conversion of coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knudson, Curtis L. (Grand Forks, ND); Willson, Warrack G. (Grand Forks, ND); Baker, Gene G. (Grand Forks, ND); Sondreal, Everett A. (Grand Forks, ND); Farnum, Sylvia A. (Grand Forks, ND)

    1982-01-01

    An improved process for converting coal to liquid and gaseous products wherein the liquid products predominate and wherein reactor, tubing, and valve plugging due to carbonate salt formation is reduced by reacting crushed low-rank coal containing about 12 to 30% by weight of water in a solvent at a temperature in the range of about 455.degree. to 500.degree. C., under about 2000 to 5000 psi pressure of a H.sub.2 /CO mixture for a liquid residence time of about 20 to 60 minutes. The solvent is a fraction of liquid product defined on a weight basis as being made up of about 55% of which distills at less than 250.degree. C./lmm, about 20% of which is soluble in THF, and about 25% of which is carbon polymer and indigenous inorganic matter. The solvent is further defined as containing at least about 5 weight % of partially hydrogenated aromatics and/or fully hydrogenated aromatics and little or no alkylated aromatics or higher alkanes.

  2. Image compression technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

    1997-03-25

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace`s equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image. 16 figs.

  3. Measurement of event shapes in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; De Cecco, S.; De Lorenzo, G.; Dell’Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.

    2011-06-01

    A study of event-shape observables in proton-antiproton collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV is presented. The data for this analysis were recorded by the CDF II Detector at the Tevatron Collider. The variables studied are the transverse thrust and thrust minor, both defined in the plane perpendicular to the beam direction. The observables are measured using energies from unclustered calorimeter cells. In addition to studies of the differential distributions, we present the dependence of event-shape mean values on the leading-jet transverse energy. Data are compared with pythia Tune A and to resummed parton-level predictions that were matched to fixed-order results at next-to-leading-order (NLO) accuracy (NLO+NLL). Predictions from pythia Tune A agree fairly well with the data. However, the underlying event contributes significantly to these observables, making it difficult to make direct comparisons to the NLO+NLL predictions, which do not account for the underlying event. To overcome this difficulty, we introduce a new observable, a weighted difference of the mean values of the thrust and thrust minor, which is less sensitive to the underlying event, allowing for a comparison with NLO+NLL. Both pythia Tune A and the NLO+NLL calculations agree well within the 20% theoretical uncertainty with the data for this observable, indicating that perturbative QCD successfully describes shapes of the hadronic final states.

  4. Construction of an unyielding target for large horizontal impacts.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, Douglas James; Davie, Neil Thomas; Kalan, Robert J.

    2010-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has constructed an unyielding target at the end of its 2000-foot rocket sled track. This target is made up of approximately 5 million pounds of concrete, an embedded steel load spreading structure, and a steel armor plate face that varies from 10 inches thick at the center to 4 inches thick at the left and right edges. The target/track combination will allow horizontal impacts at regulatory speeds of very large objects, such as a full-scale rail cask, or high-speed impacts of smaller packages. The load-spreading mechanism in the target is based upon the proven design that has been in use for over 20 years at Sandia's aerial cable facility. That target, with a weight of 2 million pounds, has successfully withstood impact forces of up to 25 million pounds. It is expected that the new target will be capable of withstanding impact forces of more than 70 million pounds. During construction various instrumentation was placed in the target so that the response of the target during severe impacts can be monitored. This paper will discuss the construction of the target and provide insights on the testing capabilities at the sled track with this new target.

  5. Comparative hazard analysis and toxicological modeling of diverse nanomaterials using the embryonic zebrafish (EZ) metric of toxicity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Harper, Bryan; Thomas, Dennis G.; Chikkagoudar, Satish; Baker, Nathan A.; Tang, Kaizhi; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Lins, Roberto D.; Harper, Stacey

    2015-06-04

    The integration of rapid assays, large data sets, informatics and modeling can overcome current barriers in understanding nanomaterial structure-toxicity relationships by providing a weight-of-the-evidence mechanism to generate hazard rankings for nanomaterials. Here we present the use of a rapid, low-cost assay to perform screening-level toxicity evaluations of nanomaterials in vivo. Calculated EZ Metric scores, a combined measure of morbidity and mortality, were established at realistic exposure levels and used to develop a predictive model of nanomaterial toxicity. Hazard ranking and clustering analysis of 68 diverse nanomaterials revealed distinct patterns of toxicity related to both core composition and outermost surface chemistrymore »of nanomaterials. The resulting clusters guided the development of a predictive model of gold nanoparticle toxicity to embryonic zebrafish. In addition, our findings suggest that risk assessments based on the size and core composition of nanomaterials alone may be wholly inappropriate, especially when considering complex engineered nanomaterials. These findings reveal the need to expeditiously increase the availability of quantitative measures of nanomaterial hazard and broaden the sharing of that data and knowledge to support predictive modeling. In addition, research should continue to focus on methodologies for developing predictive models of nanomaterial hazard based on sub-lethal responses to low dose exposures.« less

  6. Hydrocracking naphthas using mildly steamed, noble metal-containing zeolite beta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickey, K.J. Jr.; Morrison, R.A.

    1989-03-14

    A method is described for hydrocracking a naphtha which comprises contacting the naphtha with a noble metal-containing zeolite beta naphtha hydrocracking catalyst at a pressure of about 0 to about 2000 psig, a temperature of about 400/sup 0/ to about 650/sup 0/F, a hydrogen or hydrocarbon molar ratio of about 0.1 to 1 to about 15 to 1 and a weight hourly space velocity of about 0.5 to about 20. Naphtha hydrocracking activity of the catalyst is enhanced by mild steaming of the zeolite beta catalyst prior to the contacting, the mild steaming being accomplished by steaming the zeolite catalyst in its fresh state under controlled conditions of temperature, time and steam partial pressure so as to initially increase the alpha activity of the catalyst and produce a steamed catalyst having a peak alpha activity, and subsequently reduce the alpha activity from the peak alpha activity to an alpha activity substantially the same as the alpha activity of the fresh catalyst and no more than 25% below the initial alpha activity of the fresh catalyst.

  7. Pileup per particle identification

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bertolini, Daniele; Harris, Philip; Low, Matthew; Tran, Nhan

    2014-10-09

    We propose a new method for pileup mitigation by implementing “pileup per particle identification” (PUPPI). For each particle we first define a local shape ? which probes the collinear versus soft diffuse structure in the neighborhood of the particle. The former is indicative of particles originating from the hard scatter and the latter of particles originating from pileup interactions. The distribution of ? for charged pileup, assumed as a proxy for all pileup, is used on an event-by-event basis to calculate a weight for each particle. The weights describe the degree to which particles are pileup-like and are used tomore »rescale their four-momenta, superseding the need for jet-based corrections. Furthermore, the algorithm flexibly allows combination with other, possibly experimental, probabilistic information associated with particles such as vertexing and timing performance. We demonstrate the algorithm improves over existing methods by looking at jet pT and jet mass. We also find an improvement on non-jet quantities like missing transverse energy.« less

  8. Measurement of event shapes in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; et al

    2011-06-20

    A study of event-shape observables in proton-antiproton collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV is presented. The data for this analysis were recorded by the CDF II Detector at the Tevatron Collider. The variables studied are the transverse thrust and thrust minor, both defined in the plane perpendicular to the beam direction. The observables are measured using energies from unclustered calorimeter cells. In addition to studies of the differential distributions, we present the dependence of event-shape mean values on the leading-jet transverse energy. Data are compared with pythia Tune A and to resummed parton-level predictions that were matched to fixed-order results at next-to-leading-order (NLO)more »accuracy (NLO+NLL). Predictions from pythia Tune A agree fairly well with the data. However, the underlying event contributes significantly to these observables, making it difficult to make direct comparisons to the NLO+NLL predictions, which do not account for the underlying event. To overcome this difficulty, we introduce a new observable, a weighted difference of the mean values of the thrust and thrust minor, which is less sensitive to the underlying event, allowing for a comparison with NLO+NLL. Both pythia Tune A and the NLO+NLL calculations agree well within the 20% theoretical uncertainty with the data for this observable, indicating that perturbative QCD successfully describes shapes of the hadronic final states.« less

  9. A conservative spectral method for the Boltzmann equation with anisotropic scattering and the grazing collisions limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamba, Irene M.; Haack, Jeffrey R.

    2014-08-01

    We present the formulation of a conservative spectral method for the Boltzmann collision operator with anisotropic scattering cross-sections. The method is an extension of the conservative spectral method of Gamba and Tharkabhushanam [17,18], which uses the weak form of the collision operator to represent the collisional term as a weighted convolution in Fourier space. The method is tested by computing the collision operator with a suitably cut-off angular cross section and comparing the results with the solution of the Landau equation. We analytically study the convergence rate of the Fourier transformed Boltzmann collision operator in the grazing collisions limit to the Fourier transformed Landau collision operator under the assumption of some regularity and decay conditions of the solution to the Boltzmann equation. Our results show that the angular singularity which corresponds to the Rutherford scattering cross section is the critical singularity for which a grazing collision limit exists for the Boltzmann operator. Additionally, we numerically study the differences between homogeneous solutions of the Boltzmann equation with the Rutherford scattering cross section and an artificial cross section, which give convergence to solutions of the Landau equation at different asymptotic rates. We numerically show the rate of the approximation as well as the consequences for the rate of entropy decay for homogeneous solutions of the Boltzmann equation and Landau equation.

  10. Sampling Weak Values: A Non-Linear Bayesian Model for Non-Ideal Quantum Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso Botero

    2003-06-11

    A model is proposed for the statistical analysis of arbitrary-strength quantum measurements, based on a picture of "sampling weak values" from different configurations of the system. The model is comprised of two elements: a "local weak value" and a "likelihood factor". The first describes the response of an idealized weak measurement situation where the back-reaction on the system is perfectly controlled. The second assigns a weight factor to possible configurations of the system. The distribution of the data in a measurement of arbitrary strength may the be viewed as the net result of interfering different samples weighted by the likelihood factor, each of which implements a weak measurement of a different local weak value. It is shown that the mean and variance of the data can be connected directly to the means and variances of the sampled weak values. The model is then applied to a situation similar to a phase transition, where the distribution of the data exhibits two qualitatively different shapes as the strength parameter is slightly varied away from a critical value: one below the critical point, where an unusual weak value is resolved, the other above the critical point, where the spectrum of the measured observable is resolved. In the picture of sampling, the transition corresponds to a qualitative change in the sampling profile brought about by the competition between the prior sampling distribution and the likelihood factor.

  11. Convolution inequalities for the Boltzmann collision operator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricardo J. Alonso; Emanuel Carneiro; Irene M. Gamba

    2010-03-28

    We study integrability properties of a general version of the Boltzmann collision operator for hard and soft potentials in $n$-dimensions. A reformulation of the collisional integrals allows us to write the weak form of the collision operator as a weighted convolution, where the weight is given by an operator invariant under rotations. Using a symmetrization technique in $L^p$ we prove a Young's inequality for hard potentials, which is sharp for Maxwell molecules in the $L^2$ case. Further, we find a new Hardy-Littlewood-Sobolev type of inequality for Boltzmann collision integrals with soft potentials. The same method extends to radially symmetric, non-increasing potentials that lie in some $L^{s}_{weak}$ or $L^{s}$. The method we use resembles a Brascamp, Lieb and Luttinger approach for multilinear weighted convolution inequalities and follows a weak formulation setting. Consequently, it is closely connected to the classical analysis of Young and Hardy-Littlewood-Sobolev inequalities. In all cases, the inequality constants are explicitly given by formulas depending on integrability conditions of the angular cross section (in the spirit of Grad cut-off). As an additional application of the technique we also obtain estimates with exponential weights for hard potentials in both conservative and dissipative interactions.

  12. Protein location prediction using atomic composition and global features of the amino acid sequence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cherian, Betsy Sheena, E-mail: betsy.skb@gmail.com [Centre for Bioinformatics, University of Kerala, Kariyavattom Campus, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala (India); Nair, Achuthsankar S. [Centre for Bioinformatics, University of Kerala, Kariyavattom Campus, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala (India)] [Centre for Bioinformatics, University of Kerala, Kariyavattom Campus, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala (India)

    2010-01-22

    Subcellular location of protein is constructive information in determining its function, screening for drug candidates, vaccine design, annotation of gene products and in selecting relevant proteins for further studies. Computational prediction of subcellular localization deals with predicting the location of a protein from its amino acid sequence. For a computational localization prediction method to be more accurate, it should exploit all possible relevant biological features that contribute to the subcellular localization. In this work, we extracted the biological features from the full length protein sequence to incorporate more biological information. A new biological feature, distribution of atomic composition is effectively used with, multiple physiochemical properties, amino acid composition, three part amino acid composition, and sequence similarity for predicting the subcellular location of the protein. Support Vector Machines are designed for four modules and prediction is made by a weighted voting system. Our system makes prediction with an accuracy of 100, 82.47, 88.81 for self-consistency test, jackknife test and independent data test respectively. Our results provide evidence that the prediction based on the biological features derived from the full length amino acid sequence gives better accuracy than those derived from N-terminal alone. Considering the features as a distribution within the entire sequence will bring out underlying property distribution to a greater detail to enhance the prediction accuracy.

  13. Continuous Forest Fire Propagation in a Local Small World Network Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguayo, F; Clerc, J -P; Porterie, B

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a new continuous forest fire model implemented as a weighted local small-world network approach. This new approach was designed to simulate fire patterns in real, heterogeneous landscapes. The wildland fire spread is simulated on a square lattice in which each cell represents an area of the land's surface. The interaction between burning and non-burning cells, in the present work induced by flame radiation, may be extended well beyond nearest neighbors. It depends on local conditions of topography and vegetation types. An approach based on a solid flame model is used to predict the radiative heat flux from the flame generated by the burning of each site towards its neighbors. The weighting procedure takes into account the self-degradation of the tree and the ignition processes of a combustible cell through time. The model is tested on a field presenting a range of slopes and with data collected from a real wildfire scenario. The critical behavior of the spreading process...

  14. Chaos suppression in gas-solid fluidization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pence, D.V.; Beasley, D.E.

    1997-07-01

    The present study examines the effect of an opposing oscillatory flow on local, instantaneous heat transfer and pressure in a laboratory scale gas-fluidized bed. The experimental facility models a Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor (PAFBC), a hybrid combustor concept that couples a pulsed combustor with an atmospheric bubbling fluidized bed. Time-varying data were acquired at eight angular positions around a horizontal cylinder submerged in a monodisperse distribution of particles having a weight mean diameter of 345 {micro}m. Total flow rates employed in the present study ranged from 10 to 40% greater than the flow required for minimum fluidization. Spectral analyses of local, instantaneous heat flux and pressure clearly indicate that the bed hydrodynamics were significantly altered by the opposing secondary flow. The behavior of time-varying local pressure and heat transfer in fluidized beds in the absence of a secondary flow is consistent with deterministic chaos. Kolmogorov entropy estimates from local, instantaneous pressure suggest that the degree of chaotic behavior was substantially suppressed for operating conditions with low primary and secondary flow rates, and a secondary flow forcing frequency of 15 Hz. In contrast, entropy estimates from measurements of local, instantaneous heat transfer suggest no clear indication of chaos suppression for these operating conditions.

  15. THE HARPS-TERRA PROJECT. I. DESCRIPTION OF THE ALGORITHMS, PERFORMANCE, AND NEW MEASUREMENTS ON A FEW REMARKABLE STARS OBSERVED BY HARPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Butler, R. Paul

    2012-06-01

    Doppler spectroscopy has uncovered or confirmed all the known planets orbiting nearby stars. Two main techniques are used to obtain precision Doppler measurements at optical wavelengths. The first approach is the gas cell method, which consists of least-squares matching of the spectrum of iodine imprinted on the spectrum of the star. The second method relies on the construction of a stabilized spectrograph externally calibrated in wavelength. The most precise stabilized spectrometer in operation is the High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS), operated by the European Southern Observatory in La Silla Observatory, Chile. The Doppler measurements obtained with HARPS are typically obtained using the cross-correlation function (CCF) technique. This technique consists of multiplying the stellar spectrum by a weighted binary mask and finding the minimum of the product as a function of the Doppler shift. It is known that CCF is suboptimal in exploiting the Doppler information in the stellar spectrum. Here we describe an algorithm to obtain precision radial velocity measurements using least-squares matching of each observed spectrum to a high signal-to-noise ratio template derived from the same observations. This algorithm is implemented in our software HARPS-TERRA (Template-Enhanced Radial velocity Re-analysis Application). New radial velocity measurements on a representative sample of stars observed by HARPS are used to illustrate the benefits of the proposed method. We show that, compared with CCF, template matching provides a significant improvement in accuracy, especially when applied to M dwarfs.

  16. Physico-chemical fracturing and cleaning of coal. [Treatment with CO/sub 2/ in water at high pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.R.

    1983-09-30

    This invention relates to a method of producing a crushable coal and reducing the metallic values in coal represented by Si, Al, Ca, Na, K, and Mg, which comprises contacting a coal/water mix in a weight ratio of from about 4:1 to 1:6 in the presence of CO/sub 2/ at pressures of about 100 to 1400 psi and a minimum temperature of about 15/sup 0/C for a period of about one or more hours to produce a treated coal/water mix. In the process the treated coal/water mix has reduced values for Ca and Mg of up to 78% over the starting mix and the advantageous CO/sub 2/ concentration is in the range of about 3 to 30 g/L. Below 5 g/L CO/sub 2/ only small effects are observed and above 30 g/L no further special advantages are achieved. The coal/water ratios in the range 1:2 to 2:1 are particularly desirable and such ratios are compatible with coal water slurry applications.

  17. Reliability of natural gas cogeneration systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-01

    Cogeneration systems fueled by natural gas exceed the reliability of most central station power generating units, according to a study conducted by RINC Corporation for Gas Research Institute (GRI). In the study, researchers obtained operating data from 122 natural gas cogeneration units nationwide representing 2,200 megawatts (MW) of capacity and nearly 2 million hours of operating time at 37 facilities. Units were grouped into categories reflecting size (from 60 kilowatts to 100 MW), type of system (gas engine or gas turbine technology), use of emission controls, and type of thermal application. Various types and sizes of gas systems reported average availability factors ranging from 90.0 to 95.8 versus a weighted average of 85.9 percent for fossil-fuel steam, nuclear, and gas-turbine-based central station power generating units. Comparisons are based on study data and data reported by the North American Electric Reliability Council for utility power plants. Gas cogeneration can improve utility operations because as a group the relatively small, dispersed cogeneration units are more reliable than one or more large central station units of similar capacity.

  18. Conversion of Ethanol to Hydrocarbons on Hierarchical HZSM-5 Zeolites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Zhang, He; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-12-15

    This study reports synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity of the nano-size hierarchical HZSM-5 zeolite with high mesoporosity produced via a solvent evaporation procedure. Further, this study compares hierarchical zeolites with conventional HZSM-5 zeolite with similar Si/Al ratios for the ethanol-to-hydrocarbon conversion process. The catalytic performance of the hierarchical and conventional zeolites was evaluated using a fixed-bed reactor at 360 °C, 300 psig, and a weight hourly space velocity of 7.9 h-1. For the low Si/Al ratio zeolite (~40), the catalytic life-time for the hierarchical HZSM-5 was approximately 2 times greater than the conventional HZSM-5 despite its coking amount deposited 1.6 times higher than conventional HZSM-5. For the high Si/Al ratio zeolite (~140), the catalytic life-time for the hierarchical zeolite was approximately 5 times greater than the conventional zeolite and the amount of coking deposited was 2.1 times higher. Correlation was observed between catalyst life time, porosity, and the crystal size of the zeolite. The nano-size hierarchical HZSM-5 zeolites containing mesoporosity demonstrated improved catalyst life-time compared to the conventional catalyst due to faster removal of products, shorter diffusion path length, and the migration of the coke deposits to the external surface from the pore structure.

  19. Standard test method for measurement of 235U fraction using enrichment meter principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the quantitative determination of the fraction of 235U in uranium using measurement of the 185.7 keV gamma-ray produced during the decay of 235U. 1.2 This test method is applicable to items containing homogeneous uranium-bearing materials of known chemical composition in which the compound is considered infinitely thick with respect to 185.7 keV gamma-rays. 1.3 This test method can be used for the entire range of 235U fraction as a weight percent, from depleted (0.2 % 235U) to highly enriched (97.5 % 235U). 1.4 Measurement of items that have not reached secular equilibrium between 238U and 234Th may not produce the stated bias when low-resolution detectors are used with the computational method listed in Annex A2. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations, and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety co...

  20. Cosmological singularity theorems and splitting theorems for N-Bakry-Emery spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woolgar, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We study Lorentzian manifolds with a weight function such that the $N$-Bakry-\\'Emery tensor is bounded below. Such spacetimes arise in the physics of scalar-tensor gravitation theories, including Brans-Dicke theory, theories with Kaluza-Klein dimensional reduction, and low-energy approximations to string theory. In the "pure Bakry-\\'Emery" $N= \\infty$ case with $f$ uniformly bounded above and initial data suitably bounded, cosmological-type singularity theorems are known, as are splitting theorems which determine the geometry of timelike geodesically complete spacetimes for which the bound on the initial data is borderline violated. We extend these results in a number of ways. We are able to extend the singularity theorems to finite $N$-values $N\\in (n,\\infty)$ and $N\\in (-\\infty,1]$. In the $N\\in (n,\\infty)$ case, no bound on $f$ is required, while for $N\\in (-\\infty,1]$ and $N= \\infty$, we are able to replace the boundedness of $f$ by a weaker condition on the integral of $f$ along future-inextendible timel...

  1. Examination of a Junction-Box Adhesion Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2012-08-01

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of its adhesion system. The details of the proposed test will be described, in addition to the preliminary results obtained using representative materials and components. The described discovery experiments examine moisture-cured silicone, foam tape, and hot-melt adhesives used in conjunction with PET or glass module 'substrates.' To be able to interpret the results, a set of material-level characterizations was performed, including thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. PV j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then placed inside an environmental chamber (at 85C, 85% relative humidity). Some systems did not remain attached through the discovery experiments. Observed failure modes include delamination (at the j-box/adhesive or adhesive/substrate interface) and phase change/creep. The results are discussed in the context of the application requirements, in addition to the plan for the formal experiment supporting the proposed modification to the qualification test.

  2. Standard practice for preparation and dissolution of plutonium materials for analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This practice is a compilation of dissolution techniques for plutonium materials that are applicable to the test methods used for characterizing these materials. Dissolution treatments for the major plutonium materials assayed for plutonium or analyzed for other components are listed. Aliquants of the dissolved samples are dispensed on a weight basis when one of the analyses must be highly reliable, such as plutonium assay; otherwise they are dispensed on a volume basis. 1.2 The treatments, in order of presentation, are as follows: Procedure Title Section Dissolution of Plutonium Metal with Hydrochloric Acid 9.1 Dissolution of Plutonium Metal with Sulfuric Acid 9.2 Dissolution of Plutonium Oxide and Uranium-Plutonium Mixed Oxide by the Sealed-Reflux Technique 9.3 Dissolution of Plutonium Oxide and Uranium-Plutonium Mixed Oxides by Sodium Bisulfate Fusion 9.4 Dissolution of Uranium-Plutonium Mixed Oxides and Low-Fired Plutonium Oxide in Beakers 9.5 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be re...

  3. A Calibration to Predict the Concentrations of Impurities in Plutonium Oxide by Prompt Gamma Analysis Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narlesky, Joshua Edward; Kelly, Elizabeth J.

    2015-09-10

    This report documents the new PG calibration regression equation. These calibration equations incorporate new data that have become available since revision 1 of “A Calibration to Predict the Concentrations of Impurities in Plutonium Oxide by Prompt Gamma Analysis” was issued [3] The calibration equations are based on a weighted least squares (WLS) approach for the regression. The WLS method gives each data point its proper amount of influence over the parameter estimates. This gives two big advantages, more precise parameter estimates and better and more defensible estimates of uncertainties. The WLS approach makes sense both statistically and experimentally because the variances increase with concentration, and there are physical reasons that the higher measurements are less reliable and should be less influential. The new magnesium calibration includes a correction for sodium and separate calibration equation for items with and without chlorine. These additional calibration equations allow for better predictions and smaller uncertainties for sodium in materials with and without chlorine. Chlorine and sodium have separate equations for RICH materials. Again, these equations give better predictions and smaller uncertainties chlorine and sodium for RICH materials.

  4. Image compression technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fu, Chi-Yung (San Francisco, CA); Petrich, Loren I. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace's equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image.

  5. Flow Distances on Open Flow Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Liangzhu; Shi, Peiteng; Wang, Jun; Huang, Xiaohan; Zhang, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Open flow network is a weighted directed graph with a source and a sink, depicting flux distributions on networks in the steady state of an open flow system. Energetic food webs, economic input-output networks, and international trade networks, are open flow network models of energy flows between species, money or value flows between industrial sectors, and goods flows between countries, respectively. Flow distances (first-passage or total) between any given two nodes $i$ and $j$ are defined as the average number of transition steps of a random walker along the network from $i$ to $j$ under some conditions. They apparently deviate from the conventional random walk distance on a closed directed graph because they consider the openness of the flow network. Flow distances are explicitly expressed by underlying Markov matrix of a flow system in this paper. With this novel theoretical conception, we can visualize open flow networks, calculating centrality of each node, and clustering nodes into groups. We apply fl...

  6. Derivation of dose conversion factors for tritium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killough, G. G.

    1982-03-01

    For a given intake mode (ingestion, inhalation, absorption through the skin), a dose conversion factor (DCF) is the committed dose equivalent to a specified organ of an individual per unit intake of a radionuclide. One also may consider the effective dose commitment per unit intake, which is a weighted average of organ-specific DCFs, with weights proportional to risks associated with stochastic radiation-induced fatal health effects, as defined by Publication 26 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This report derives and tabulates organ-specific dose conversion factors and the effective dose commitment per unit intake of tritium. These factors are based on a steady-state model of hydrogen in the tissues of ICRP's Reference Man (ICRP Publication 23) and equilibrium of specific activities between body water and other tissues. The results differ by 27 to 33% from the estimate on which ICRP Publication 30 recommendations are based. The report also examines a dynamic model of tritium retention in body water, mineral bone, and two compartments representing organically-bound hydrogen. This model is compared with data from human subjects who were observed for extended periods. The manner of combining the dose conversion factors with measured or model-predicted levels of contamination in man's exposure media (air, drinking water, soil moisture) to estimate dose rate to an individual is briefly discussed.

  7. Carbon-catalyzed gasification of organic feedstocks in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, X.; Matsumura, Y.; Stenberg, J.; Antal, M.J. Jr. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Natural Energy Inst.] [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Natural Energy Inst.

    1996-08-01

    Spruce wood charcoal, macadamia shell charcoal, coal activated carbon, and coconut shell activated carbon catalyze the gasification of organic compounds in supercritical water. Feedstocks studied in this paper include glycerol, glucose, cellobiose, whole biomass feedstocks (depithed bagasse liquid extract and sewage sludge), and representative Department of Defense (DoD) wastes (methanol, methyl ethyl ketone, ethylene glycol, acetic acid, and phenol). The effects of temperature, pressure, reactant concentration, weight hourly space velocity, and the type of catalyst on the gasification of glucose are reported. Complete conversion of glucose (22% by weight in water) to a hydrogen-rich synthesis gas was realized at a weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) of 22.2 h{sup {minus}1} in supercritical water at 600 C, 34.5 MPa. Complete conversions of the whole biomass feeds were also achieved at the same temperature and pressure. The destruction efficiencies for the representative DoD wastes were also high. Deactivation of the carbon catalyst was observed after 4 h of operation without swirl in the entrance region of the reactor, but the carbon gasification efficiency remained near 100% for more than 6 h when a swirl generator was employed in the entrance of the reactor.

  8. A hybrid approach for predicting the distribution of vibro-acoustic energy in complex built-up structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitrii N Maksimov; Gregor Tanner

    2011-04-27

    Finding the distribution of vibro-acoustic energy in complex built-up structures in the mid-to-high frequency regime is a difficult task. In particular, structures with large variation of local wavelengths and/or characteristic scales pose a challenge referred to as the mid-frequency problem. Standard numerical methods such as the finite element method (FEM) scale with the local wavelength and quickly become too large even for modern computer architectures. High frequency techniques, such as statistical energy analysis (SEA), often miss important information such as dominant resonance behaviour due to stiff or small scale parts of the structure. Hybrid methods circumvent this problem by coupling FEM/BEM and SEA models in a given built-up structure. In the approach adopted here, the whole system is split into a number of subsystems which are treated by either FEM or SEA depending on the local wavelength. Subsystems with relative long wavelengths are modelled using FEM. Making a diffuse field assumption for the wave fields in the short wave length components, the coupling between subsystems can be reduced to a weighted random field correlation function. The approach presented results in an SEA-like set of linear equations which can be solved for the mean energies in the short wavelength subsystems.

  9. Method And Aparatus For Improving Resolution In Spectrometers Processing Output Steps From Non-Ideal Signal Sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warburton, William K. (1300 Mills St., Menlo Park, CA 94025); Momayezi, Michael (San Francisco, CA)

    2003-07-01

    A method and apparatus for processing step-like output signals generated by non-ideal, nominally single-pole ("N-1P") devices responding to possibly time-varying, pulse-like input signals of finite duration, wherein the goal is to recover the integrated areas of the input signals. Particular applications include processing step-like signals generated by detector systems in response to absorbed radiation or particles and, more particularly, to digitally processing such step-like signals in high resolution, high rate gamma ray (.gamma.-ray) spectrometers with resistive feedback preamplifiers connected to large volume germanium detectors. Superconducting bolometers can be similarly treated. The method comprises attaching a set of one or more filters to the device's (e.g., preamplifier's) output, capturing a correlated multiple output sample from the filter set in response to a detected event, and forming a weighted sum of the sample values to accurately recover the total area (e.g., charge) of the detected event.

  10. Technical assessment of three layered cement-bonded boards produced from wastepaper and sawdust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuwape, Joseph Adeola [Department of Forestry and Wood Tech, Federal University of Technology, PMB 704 Akure (Nigeria); Fabiyi, James Sunday [Department of Forest Products, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-1132 (United States)], E-mail: jamesreb2004@yahoo.com; Osuntuyi, Edward Olusola [Department of Wood Units, School of Vocational Studies, College of Education, Ikere Ekiti (Nigeria)

    2007-07-01

    The technical properties of three layered cement-bonded boards (CBBs) made from wastepaper and sawdust were investigated. The CBBs were produced at three density levels of 1000, 1200 and 1300 kg/m{sup 3} and at four cement/particle ratios of 2.0:1, 2.5:1, 3.0:1 and 3.5:1 on a weight to weight basis. The technical properties evaluated were modulus of rupture (MOR), modulus of elasticity (MOE), water absorption (WA) and thickness swelling (TS). The MOR values ranged from 4.85 to 11.69 MPa and MOE values ranged from 2.80 to 5.57 GPa. The mean values of WA and TS after 24 h of water soaking of the CBBs ranged from 18.18% to 40.49% and 3.55% to 12.13%, respectively. MOR and MOE of the CBBs increased with increase in board density, but MOR decreased with the increase in cement/particle ratio. On the other hand, WA and TS decreased with increase in board density and cement/particle ratio. CBBs produced from wastepaper and sawdust at cement/particle ratios of 3.0:1 and 3.5:1 are suitable for building construction such as paneling, ceiling and partitioning.

  11. Trial-Run of a Junction-Box Attachment Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. C.; Deibert, S. L.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2014-06-01

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic module manufacturers during product development and manufacturing process control. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp-heat,' 'thermal-cycle,' or 'creep' tests within the IEC qualification protocol is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to a trial-run of the test procedure. The described experiments examine four moisture-cured silicones, four foam tapes, and a hot-melt adhesive used in conjunction with glass, KPE, THV, and TPE substrates. For the purpose of validating the experiment, j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then subjected to aging. The replicate mock-modules were aged in an environmental chamber (at 85 degrees C/85% relative humidity for 1000 hours; then 100 degrees C/<10% relative humidity for 200 hours) or fielded in Golden (CO), Miami (FL), and Phoenix (AZ) for one year. Attachment strength tests, including pluck and shear test geometries, were also performed on smaller component specimens.

  12. U.S. Residential Photovoltaic (PV) System Prices, Q4 2013 Benchmarks: Cash Purchase, Fair Market Value, and Prepaid Lease Transaction Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, C.; James, T. L.; Margolis, R.; Fu, R.; Feldman, D.

    2014-10-01

    The price of photovoltaic (PV) systems in the United States (i.e., the cost to the system owner) has dropped precipitously in recent years, led by substantial reductions in global PV module prices. This report provides a Q4 2013 update for residential PV systems, based on an objective methodology that closely approximates the book value of a PV system. Several cases are benchmarked to represent common variation in business models, labor rates, and module choice. We estimate a weighted-average cash purchase price of $3.29/W for modeled standard-efficiency, polycrystalline-silicon residential PV systems installed in the United States. This is a 46% decline from the 2013-dollar-adjusted price reported in the Q4 2010 benchmark report. In addition, this report frames the cash purchase price in the context of key price metrics relevant to the continually evolving landscape of third-party-owned PV systems by benchmarking the minimum sustainable lease price and the fair market value of residential PV systems.

  13. Graph representation of protein free energy landscape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Minghai; Duan, Mojie; Fan, Jue; Huo, Shuanghong; Han, Li

    2013-11-14

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of protein folding and protein conformational changes are governed by the underlying free energy landscape. However, the multidimensional nature of the free energy landscape makes it difficult to describe. We propose to use a weighted-graph approach to depict the free energy landscape with the nodes on the graph representing the conformational states and the edge weights reflecting the free energy barriers between the states. Our graph is constructed from a molecular dynamics trajectory and does not involve projecting the multi-dimensional free energy landscape onto a low-dimensional space defined by a few order parameters. The calculation of free energy barriers was based on transition-path theory using the MSMBuilder2 package. We compare our graph with the widely used transition disconnectivity graph (TRDG) which is constructed from the same trajectory and show that our approach gives more accurate description of the free energy landscape than the TRDG approach even though the latter can be organized into a simple tree representation. The weighted-graph is a general approach and can be used on any complex system.

  14. Automatic Mesh Adaptivity for Hybrid Monte Carlo/Deterministic Neutronics Modeling of Fusion Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibrahim, Ahmad M; Wilson, P.; Sawan, M.; Mosher, Scott W; Peplow, Douglas E.; Grove, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    Three mesh adaptivity algorithms were developed to facilitate and expedite the use of the CADIS and FW-CADIS hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques in accurate full-scale neutronics simulations of fusion energy systems with immense sizes and complicated geometries. First, a macromaterial approach enhances the fidelity of the deterministic models without changing the mesh. Second, a deterministic mesh refinement algorithm generates meshes that capture as much geometric detail as possible without exceeding a specified maximum number of mesh elements. Finally, a weight window coarsening algorithm decouples the weight window mesh and energy bins from the mesh and energy group structure of the deterministic calculations in order to remove the memory constraint of the weight window map from the deterministic mesh resolution. The three algorithms were used to enhance an FW-CADIS calculation of the prompt dose rate throughout the ITER experimental facility and resulted in a 23.3% increase in the number of mesh tally elements in which the dose rates were calculated in a 10-day Monte Carlo calculation. Additionally, because of the significant increase in the efficiency of FW-CADIS simulations, the three algorithms enabled this difficult calculation to be accurately solved on a regular computer cluster, eliminating the need for a world-class super computer.

  15. On the asymptotics of dimers on tori

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard W. Kenyon; Nike Sun; David B. Wilson

    2015-11-09

    We study asymptotics of the dimer model on large toric graphs. Let $\\mathbb L$ be a weighted $\\mathbb{Z}^2$-periodic planar graph, and let $\\mathbb{Z}^2 E$ be a large-index sublattice of $\\mathbb{Z}^2$. For $\\mathbb L$ bipartite we show that the dimer partition function on the quotient $\\mathbb{L}/(\\mathbb{Z}^2 E)$ has the asymptotic expansion $\\exp[A f_0 + \\text{fsc} + o(1)]$, where $A$ is the area of $\\mathbb{L}/(\\mathbb{Z}^2 E)$, $f_0$ is the free energy density in the bulk, and $\\text{fsc}$ is a finite-size correction term depending only on the conformal shape of the domain together with some parity-type information. Assuming a conjectural condition on the zero locus of the dimer characteristic polynomial, we show that an analogous expansion holds for $\\mathbb{L}$ non-bipartite. The functional form of the finite-size correction differs between the two classes, but is universal within each class. Our calculations yield new information concerning the distribution of the number of loops winding around the torus in the associated double-dimer models.

  16. Pileup per particle identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertolini, Daniele; Harris, Philip; Low, Matthew; Tran, Nhan

    2014-10-09

    We propose a new method for pileup mitigation by implementing “pileup per particle identification” (PUPPI). For each particle we first define a local shape ? which probes the collinear versus soft diffuse structure in the neighborhood of the particle. The former is indicative of particles originating from the hard scatter and the latter of particles originating from pileup interactions. The distribution of ? for charged pileup, assumed as a proxy for all pileup, is used on an event-by-event basis to calculate a weight for each particle. The weights describe the degree to which particles are pileup-like and are used to rescale their four-momenta, superseding the need for jet-based corrections. Furthermore, the algorithm flexibly allows combination with other, possibly experimental, probabilistic information associated with particles such as vertexing and timing performance. We demonstrate the algorithm improves over existing methods by looking at jet pT and jet mass. We also find an improvement on non-jet quantities like missing transverse energy.

  17. Biological Sampling and Analysis in Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Washington: Chemical Analyses for 2007 Puget Sound Biota Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Suslick, Carolynn R.; Johnston, Robert K.

    2008-10-09

    Evaluating spatial and temporal trends in contaminant residues in Puget Sound fish and macroinvertebrates are the objectives of the Puget Sound Ambient Monitoring Program (PSAMP). In a cooperative effort between the ENVironmental inVESTment group (ENVVEST) and Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife, additional biota samples were collected during the 2007 PSAMP biota survey and analyzed for chemical residues and stable isotopes of carbon (?13C) and nitrogen (?15N). Approximately three specimens of each species collected from Sinclair Inlet, Georgia Basin, and reference locations in Puget Sound were selected for whole body chemical analysis. The muscle tissue of specimens selected for chemical analyses were also analyzed for ?13C and ?15N to provide information on relative trophic level and food sources. This data report summarizes the chemical residues for the 2007 PSAMP fish and macro-invertebrate samples. In addition, six Spiny Dogfish (Squalus acanthias) samples were necropsied to evaluate chemical residue of various parts of the fish (digestive tract, liver, embryo, muscle tissue), as well as, a weight proportional whole body composite (WBWC). Whole organisms were homogenized and analyzed for silver, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, lead, zinc, mercury, 19 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, PCB homologues, percent moisture, percent lipids, ?13C, and ?15N.

  18. Trial Run of a Junction-Box Attachment Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.; Deibert, S.; Wohlgemuth, J.

    2014-06-01

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development and manufacturing process control. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires), caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp-heat', 'thermal-cycle', or 'creep' tests within the IEC qualification protocol is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to a trial run of the test procedure. The described experiments examine 4 moisture-cured silicones, 4 foam tapes, and a hot-melt adhesive used in conjunction with glass, KPE, THV, and TPE substrates. For the purpose of validating the experiment, j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then subjected to aging. The replicate mock-modules were aged in an environmental chamber (at 85 deg C/85% relative humidity for 1000 hours; then 100 degrees C/<10% relative humidity for 200 hours) or fielded in Golden, Miami, and Phoenix for 1 year. Attachment strength tests, including pluck and shear test geometries, were also performed on smaller component specimens.

  19. Flexible ocean upwelling pipe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

    1980-01-01

    In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

  20. Deployment, release and recovery of ocean riser pipes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA); Wetmore, Sherman B. (Westminster, CA); McNary, James F. (Santa Ana, CA)

    1980-11-18

    An ocean thermal energy conversion facility includes a long pipe assembly which is supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. Cold water flows to the facility from deep in the ocean. The pipe assembly comprises an elongate pipe construction and a weight connected to the lower end of the construction by a line of selected length. A floatation collar is connected to the construction at its upper end to cause the construction to have positive buoyancy and a center of buoyancy closer to the upper end of the construction than its center of mass. The weight renders the entire pipe assembly negatively buoyant. In the event that support of the pipe assembly should be lost, as by release of the assembly from the facility hull in an emergency, the assembly sinks to the ocean floor where it is moored by the weight. The pipe construction floats submerged above the ocean floor in a substantially vertical attitude which facilitates recovery of the assembly.

  1. Automation and optimization of the design parameters in tactical military pipeline systems. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frick, R.M.

    1988-12-01

    Tactical military petroleum pipeline systems will play a vital role in any future conflict due to an increased consumption of petroleum products by our combined Armed Forces. The tactical pipeline must be rapidly constructed and highly mobile to keep pace with the constantly changing battle zone. Currently, the design of these pipeline system is time consuming and inefficient, which may cause shortages of fuel and pipeline components at the front lines. Therefore, a need for a computer program that will both automate and optimize the pipeline design process is quite apparent. These design needs are satisfied by developing a software package using Advance Basic (IBM DOS) programming language and made to run on an IBM-compatible personal computer. The program affords the user the options of either finding the optimum pump station locations for a proposed pipeline or calculating the maximum operating pressures for an existing pipeline. By automating the design procedure, a field engineer can vary the pipeline length, diameter, roughness, viscosity, gravity, flow rate, pump station pressure, or terrain profile and see how it affects the other parameters in just a few seconds. The design process was optimized by implementing a weighting scheme based on the volume percent of each fuel in the pipeline at any given time.

  2. SU-E-I-76: Matching Primary and Scattered X-Ray Spectra for Use in Calculating the Diagnostic Radiation Index of Protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasciak, A [University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville, TN (United States); Jones, A [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Wagner, L [UT Medical School, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Lightweight lead-free or lead-composite protective garments exploit k-edge interactions to attenuate scattered X-rays. Manufacturers specify the protective value of garments in terms of lead equivalence at a single kVp. This is inadequate, as the protection provided by such garments varies with radiation quality in different use conditions. We present a method for matching scattered X-ray spectra to primary X-ray spectra. The resulting primary spectra can be used to measure penetration through protective garments, and such measurements can be weighted and summed to determine a Diagnostic Radiation Index for Protection (DRIP). Methods: Scattered X-ray spectra from fluoroscopic procedures were modeled using Monte Carlo techniques in MCNP-X 2.7. Data on imaging geometry, operator position, patient size, and primary beam spectra were gathered from clinical fluoroscopy procedures. These data were used to generate scattered X-ray spectra resulting from procedural conditions. Technical factors, including kV and added filtration, that yielded primary X-ray spectra that optimally matched the generated scattered X-ray spectra were identified through numerical optimization using a sequential quadratic programming (SQP) algorithm. Results: The primary spectra generated with shape functions matched the relative flux in each bin of the scattered spectra within 5%, and half and quarter-value layers matched within 0.1%. The DRIP for protective garments can be determined by measuring the penetration through protective garments using the matched primary spectra, then calculating a weighted average according to the expected clinical use of the garment. The matched primary spectra are specified in terms of first and second half-value layers in aluminum and acrylic. Conclusion: Lead equivalence is inadequate for completely specifying the protective value of garments. Measuring penetration through a garment using full scatter conditions is very difficult. The primary spectra determined in this work allow for practical primary penetration measurements to be made with equipment readily available to clinical medical physicists.

  3. Methodological and Practical Considerations for DevelopingMultiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects inCentral America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion,Kristel

    2004-09-02

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) andthe Center for Sustainable Development in the Americas (CSDA) conductedtechnical studies and organized two training workshops to developcapacity in Central America for the evaluation of climate changeprojects. This paper describes the results of two baseline case studiesconducted for these workshops, one for the power sector and one for thecement industry, that were devised to illustrate certain approaches tobaseline setting. Multiproject baseline emission rates (BERs) for themain Guatemalan electricity grid were calculated from 2001 data. Inrecent years, the Guatemalan power sector has experienced rapid growth;thus, a sufficient number of new plants have been built to estimateviable BERs. We found that BERs for baseload plants offsetting additionalbaseload capacity ranged from 0.702 kgCO2/kWh (using a weighted averagestringency) to 0.507 kgCO2/kWh (using a 10th percentile stringency),while the baseline for plants offsetting load-followingcapacity is lowerat 0.567 kgCO2/kWh. For power displaced from existing load-followingplants, the rate is higher, 0.735 kgCO2/kWh, as a result of the age ofsome plants used for meeting peak loads and the infrequency of their use.The approved consolidated methodology for the Clean Development Mechanismyields a single rate of 0.753 kgCO2/kWh. Due to the relatively smallnumber of cement plants in the region and the regional nature of thecement market, all of Central America was chosen as the geographicboundary for setting cement industry BERs. Unfortunately, actualoperations and output data were unobtainable for most of the plants inthe region, and many data were estimated. Cement industry BERs rangedfrom 205 kgCO2 to 225 kgCO2 per metric ton of cement.

  4. Subtask 1.23 - Mercury Removal from Barite the Oil Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Holmes; Carolyn Nyberg; Katie Brandt; Kurt Eylands; Nathan Fiala; Grant Dunham

    2008-09-01

    Drilling muds are used by the oil and gas industry to provide a seal and to float rock chips to the surface during the drilling process. Barite (naturally occurring barium sulfate ore) is commonly used as a weighting agent additive in drilling muds because it is chemically nonreactive and has a high specific gravity (between 4.2 and 4.25 at 20 C). Because of environmental concerns, barite used by the oil and gas industry in the Gulf of Mexico must be certified to contain less than 1 mg/kg of mercury. Faced with these regulations, the U.S. Gulf Coast oil industry has looked to foreign sources of low-mercury barite, primarily India and China. These sources tend to have high-grade barite deposits and relatively inexpensive domestic transportation costs; as of late, however, U.S. purchasers have been forced to pay increasing costs for shipping to U.S. grinding plants. The objective of this project was to demonstrate two mercury removal techniques for high-mercury barite sources. Two barite samples of unique origins underwent processing to reduce mercury to required levels. The chemical treatment with dilute acid removed a portion of the mercury in both barite samples. The desired concentration of 1 mg/kg was achieved in both barite samples. An economic analysis indicates that thermal removal of mercury would not significantly add to the cost of barite processing, making higher-mercury barite a viable alternative to more expensive barite sources that contain lower concentrations of mercury.

  5. Map-likelihood phasing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Bioscience Division, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2001-12-01

    A map-likelihood function is described that can yield phase probabilities with very low model bias. The recently developed technique of maximum-likelihood density modification [Terwilliger (2000 ?), Acta Cryst. D56, 965–972] allows a calculation of phase probabilities based on the likelihood of the electron-density map to be carried out separately from the calculation of any prior phase probabilities. Here, it is shown that phase-probability distributions calculated from the map-likelihood function alone can be highly accurate and that they show minimal bias towards the phases used to initiate the calculation. Map-likelihood phase probabilities depend upon expected characteristics of the electron-density map, such as a defined solvent region and expected electron-density distributions within the solvent region and the region occupied by a macromolecule. In the simplest case, map-likelihood phase-probability distributions are largely based on the flatness of the solvent region. Though map-likelihood phases can be calculated without prior phase information, they are greatly enhanced by high-quality starting phases. This leads to the technique of prime-and-switch phasing for removing model bias. In prime-and-switch phasing, biased phases such as those from a model are used to prime or initiate map-likelihood phasing, then final phases are obtained from map-likelihood phasing alone. Map-likelihood phasing can be applied in cases with solvent content as low as 30%. Potential applications of map-likelihood phasing include unbiased phase calculation from molecular-replacement models, iterative model building, unbiased electron-density maps for cases where 2F{sub o} ? F{sub c} or ?{sub A}-weighted maps would currently be used, structure validation and ab initio phase determination from solvent masks, non-crystallographic symmetry or other knowledge about expected electron density.

  6. Knowledge based ranking algorithm for comparative assessment of post-closure care needs of closed landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sizirici, Banu; Tansel, Berrin; Kumar, Vivek

    2011-06-15

    Post-closure care (PCC) activities at landfills include cap maintenance; water quality monitoring; maintenance and monitoring of the gas collection/control system, leachate collection system, groundwater monitoring wells, and surface water management system; and general site maintenance. The objective of this study was to develop an integrated data and knowledge based decision making tool for preliminary estimation of PCC needs at closed landfills. To develop the decision making tool, 11 categories of parameters were identified as critical areas which could affect future PCC needs. Each category was further analyzed by detailed questions which could be answered with limited data and knowledge about the site, its history, location, and site specific characteristics. Depending on the existing knowledge base, a score was assigned to each question (on a scale 1-10, as 1 being the best and 10 being the worst). Each category was also assigned a weight based on its relative importance on the site conditions and PCC needs. The overall landfill score was obtained from the total weighted sum attained. Based on the overall score, landfill conditions could be categorized as critical, acceptable, or good. Critical condition indicates that the landfill may be a threat to the human health and the environment and necessary steps should be taken. Acceptable condition indicates that the landfill is currently stable and the monitoring should be continued. Good condition indicates that the landfill is stable and the monitoring activities can be reduced in the future. The knowledge base algorithm was applied to two case study landfills for preliminary assessment of PCC performance.

  7. Resolving local ambiguity using semantics of shape.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diegert, Carl F.

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate a new semantic method for automatic analysis of wide-area, high-resolution overhead imagery to tip and cue human intelligence analysts to human activity. In the open demonstration, we find and trace cars and rooftops. Our methodology, extended to analysis of voxels, may be applicable to understanding morphology and to automatic tracing of neurons in large-scale, serial-section TEM datasets. We defined an algorithm and software implementation that efficiently finds all combinations of image blobs that satisfy given shape semantics, where image blobs are formed as a general-purpose, first step that 'oversegments' image pixels into blobs of similar pixels. We will demonstrate the remarkable power (ROC) of this combinatorial-based work flow for automatically tracing any automobiles in a scene by applying semantics that require a subset of image blobs to fill out a rectangular shape, with width and height in given intervals. In most applications we find that the new combinatorial-based work flow produces alternative (overlapping) tracings of possible objects (e.g. cars) in a scene. To force an estimation (tracing) of a consistent collection of objects (cars), a quick-and-simple greedy algorithm is often sufficient. We will demonstrate a more powerful resolution method: we produce a weighted graph from the conflicts in all of our enumerated hypotheses, and then solve a maximal independent vertex set problem on this graph to resolve conflicting hypotheses. This graph computation is almost certain to be necessary to adequately resolve multiple, conflicting neuron topologies into a set that is most consistent with a TEM dataset.

  8. Continuous production of granular or powder Ti, Zr and Hf or their alloy products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, Jack C. (Albany, OR); Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR)

    1993-01-01

    A continuous process for producing a granular metal selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr or Hf under conditions that provide orderly growth of the metal free of halide inclusions comprising: a) dissolving a reducing metal selected from the group consisting of Na, Mg, Li or K in their respective halide salts to produce a reducing molten salt stream; b) preparing a second molten salt stream containing the halide salt of Ti, Zr or Hf; c) mixing and reacting the two molten streams of steps a) and b) in a continuous stirred tank reactor; d) wherein steps a) through c) are conducted at a temperature range of from about 800.degree. C. to about 1100.degree. C. so that a weight percent of equilibrium solubility of the reducing metal in its respective halide salt varies from about 1.6 weight percent at about 900.degree. C. to about 14.4 weight percent at about 1062.degree. C.; and wherein a range of concentration of the halide salt of Ti, Zn or Hf in molten halides of Na, Mg, Li or K is from about 1 to about 5 times the concentration of Na, Mg, Li or K; e) placing the reacted molten stream from step c) in a solid-liquid separator to recover an impure granular metal product by decantation, centrifugation, or filtration; and f) removing residual halide salt impurity by vacuum evaporator or inert gas sweep at temperatures from about 850.degree. C. to 1000.degree. C. or cooling the impure granular metal product to ambient temperature and water leaching off the residual metal halide salt.

  9. Impact of Different Standard Type A7A Drum Closure-Ring Practices on Gasket Contraction and Bolt Closure Distance– 15621

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketusky, E.; Bobbitt, J.

    2015-03-11

    The Department of Energy, the Savannah River National Laboratory, several manufacturers of specification drums, and the United States Department of Transportation (DOT) are collaborating in the development of a guidance document for DOE contractors and vendors who wish to qualify containers to DOT 7A Type A requirements. Currently, the effort is focused on DOT 7A Type A 208-liter (55-gallons) drums with a standard 12-gauge bolted closure ring. The U.S. requirements, contained in Title 49, Part 178.350 “Specification 7A; general packaging, Type A specifies a competent authority review of the packaging is not required for the transport of (Class 7) radioactive material containing less than Type A quantities of radioactive material. For Type AF drums, a 4 ft. regulatory free drop must be performed, such that the drum “suffers maximum damage.” Although the actual orientation is not defined by the specification, recent studies suggest that maximum damage would result from a shallow angle top impact, where kinetic energy is transferred to the lid, ultimately causing heavy damage to the lid, or even worse, causing the lid to come off. Since each vendor develops closure recommendations/procedures for the drums they manufacture, key parameters applied to drums during closing vary based on vendor. As part of the initial phase of the collaboration, the impact of the closure variants on the ability of the drum to suffer maximum damage is investigated. Specifically, closure testing is performed varying: 1) the amount of torque applied to the closure ring bolt; and, 2) stress relief protocol, including: a) weight of hammer; and, b) orientation that the hammer hits the closure ring. After closure, the amount of drum lid gasket contraction and the distance that the closure bolt moves through the closure ring is measured.

  10. Implications of access hole size on tank waste retrieval system design and cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babcock, S.M.; Kwon, D.S.; Burks, B.L.; Stoughton, R.S.; Evans, M.S.

    1994-05-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Robotics Technology Development Program has been investigating the application of robotics technology to the retrieval of waste from single-shell storage tanks for several years. The use of a large, ``long-reach`` manipulator to position and orient a variety of tools and other equipment has been recommended. The objective of this study is to determine the appropriate access hole size for the tank waste retrieval system installation. Previous reports on the impact of access hole size on manipulator performance are summarized. In addition, the practical limitation for access hole size based on structural limitations of the waste storage tanks, the state-of-the-art size limitations for the installation of new risers, the radiation safety implications of various access hole sizes, and overall system cost implications are considered. Basic conclusions include: (1) overall cost of remediation will; be dominated by the costs of the balance of plant and time required to perform the task rather than the cost of manipulator hardware or the cost of installing a riser, (2) the most desirable solution from a manipulator controls point of view is to make the manipulator as stiff as possible and have as high as possible a natural frequency, which implies a large access hole diameter, (3) beyond some diameter; simple, uniform cross-section elements become less advantageous from a weight standpoint and alternative structures should be considered, and (4) additional shielding and contamination control measures would be required for larger holes. Parametric studies summarized in this report considered 3,790,000 1 (1,000,000 gal) tanks, while initial applications are likely to be for 2,840,000 1 (750,000 gal) tanks. Therefore, the calculations should be somewhat conservative, recognizing the limitations of the specific conditions considered.

  11. Heavy and Overweight Vehicle Defects Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL

    2012-12-01

    The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), along with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), has an interest in overweight commercial motor vehicles, how they affect infrastructure, and their impact on safety on the nation s highways. To assist both FHWA and FMCSA in obtaining more information related to this interest, data was collected and analyzed from two separate sources. A large scale nationwide data collection effort was facilitated by the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance as part of a special study on overweight vehicles and an additional, smaller set, of data was collected from the state of Tennessee which included a much more detailed set of data. Over a six-month period, 1,873 Level I inspections were performed in 18 different states that volunteered to be a part of this study. Of the 1,873 inspections, a vehicle out-of-service (OOS) violation was found on 44.79% of the vehicles, a rate significantly higher than the national OOS rate of 27.23%. The main cause of a vehicle being placed OOS was brake-related defects, with approximately 30% of all vehicles having an OOS brake violation. Only about 4% of vehicles had an OOS tire violation, and even fewer had suspension and wheel violations. Vehicle weight violations were most common on an axle group as opposed to a gross vehicle weight violation. About two thirds of the vehicles cited with a weight violation were overweight on an axle group with an average amount of weight over the legal limit of about 2,000 lbs. Data collection is scheduled to continue through January 2014, with more potentially more states volunteering to collect data. More detailed data collections similar to the Tennessee data collection will also be performed in multiple states.

  12. SU-E-I-43: Pediatric CT Dose and Image Quality Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, G; Singh, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To design an approach to optimize radiation dose and image quality for pediatric CT imaging, and to evaluate expected performance. Methods: A methodology was designed to quantify relative image quality as a function of CT image acquisition parameters. Image contrast and image noise were used to indicate expected conspicuity of objects, and a wide-cone system was used to minimize scan time for motion avoidance. A decision framework was designed to select acquisition parameters as a weighted combination of image quality and dose. Phantom tests were used to acquire images at multiple techniques to demonstrate expected contrast, noise and dose. Anthropomorphic phantoms with contrast inserts were imaged on a 160mm CT system with tube voltage capabilities as low as 70kVp. Previously acquired clinical images were used in conjunction with simulation tools to emulate images at different tube voltages and currents to assess human observer preferences. Results: Examination of image contrast, noise, dose and tube/generator capabilities indicates a clinical task and object-size dependent optimization. Phantom experiments confirm that system modeling can be used to achieve the desired image quality and noise performance. Observer studies indicate that clinical utilization of this optimization requires a modified approach to achieve the desired performance. Conclusion: This work indicates the potential to optimize radiation dose and image quality for pediatric CT imaging. In addition, the methodology can be used in an automated parameter selection feature that can suggest techniques given a limited number of user inputs. G Stevens and R Singh are employees of GE Healthcare.

  13. From single-shot towards general work extraction in a quantum thermodynamic framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Gemmer; J. Anders

    2015-06-30

    This paper considers work extraction from a quantum system to a work storage system (or weight) following reference [1]. An alternative approach is here developed that relies on the comparison of subspace dimensions without a need to introduce thermo-majorisation used previously. Optimal single shot work for processes where a weight transfers from (a) a single energy level to another single energy level is then re-derived. In addition we discuss the final state of the system after work extraction and show that the system typically ends in its thermal state, while there are cases where the system is only close to it. The work of formation in the single level transfer setting [1] is also re-derived. The approach presented now allows the extension of the single shot work concept to work extraction (b) involving multiple final levels of the weight. A key conclusion here is that the single shot work for case (a) is appropriate only when a \\emph{resonance} of a particular energy is required. When wishing to identify "work extraction" with finding the weight in a specific available energy or any higher energy a broadening of the single shot work concept is required. As a final contribution we consider transformations of the system that (c) result in general weight state transfers. Introducing a transfer-quantity allows us to formulate minimum requirements for transformations to be at all possible in a thermodynamic framework. We show that choosing the free energy difference of the weight as the transfer-quantity one recovers various single shot results including single level transitions (a), multiple final level transitions (b), and recent results on restricted sets of multi-level to multi-level weight transfers.

  14. SU-E-T-357: Semi-Automated Knowledge-Based Radiation Therapy (KBRT) Planning for Head-And-Neck Cancer (HNC): Can KBRT Plans Achieve Better Results Than Manual Planning?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutzky, C; Grzetic, S; Lo, J; Das, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Knowledge Based Radiation Therapy Treatment (KBRT) planning can be used to semi-automatically generate IMRT plans for new patients using constraints derived from previously manually-planned, geometrically similar patients. We investigate whether KBRT plans can achieve greater dose sparing than manual plans using optimized, organspecific constraint weighting factors. Methods: KBRT planning of HNC radiotherapy cases geometrically matched each new (query) case to one of the 105 clinically approved plans in our database. The dose distribution of the planned match was morphed to fit the querys geometry. Dose-volume constraints extracted from the morphed dose distribution were used to run the IMRT optimization with no user input. In the first version, all constraints were multiplied by a weighting factor of 0.7. The weighting factors were then systematically optimized (in order of OARs with increasing separation from the target) to maximize sparing to each OAR without compromising other OARs. The optimized, second version plans were compared against the first version plans and the clinically approved plans for 45 unilateral/bilateral target cases using the dose metrics: mean, median and maximum (brainstem and cord) doses. Results: Compared to the first version, the second version significantly reduced mean/median contralateral parotid doses (>2Gy) for bilateral cases. Other changes between the two versions were not clinically meaningful. Compared to the original clinical plans, both bilateral and unilateral plans in the second version had lower average dose metrics for 5 of the 6 OARs. Compared to the original plans, the second version achieved dose sparing that was at least as good for all OARs and better for the ipsilateral parotid (bilateral) and oral cavity (bilateral/unilateral). Differences in planning target volume coverage metrics were not clinically significant. Conclusion: HNC-KBRT planning generated IMRT plans with at least equivalent dose sparing to manually generated plans; greater dose sparing was achieved in selected OARs.

  15. Different ways of looking at the force between two nano crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Lange; Fabian Danecker; Gernot Bauer; Nadezda Gribova; Joachim Gross

    2015-03-25

    The potential of mean force (PMF) between two nano crystals (NCs) represents an effective interaction potential that can be used to study the assembly of NCs to various superstructures. For a given temperature, the effective interaction is obtained best from molecular dynamics simulations. Based on a density functional approach, this study proposes three methods of predicting the PMF for any temperature based on a single molecular dynamics simulation for one temperature. The three methods construct the PMF by considering the ligands as an ideal gas, as hard-sphere chains, or as Lennard-Jones interaction sites. To apply this methodology, the density of the interaction centers must be extracted from the simulation data. For the ideal gas model, a straightforward sampling procedure with a fixed lattice in space leads to free energies that are too large in order to consistently explain the simulation data for different temperatures. Naive sampling does not account for the small momenta added to the NCs when coupled to a thermostat. A method is proposed that corrects for the unphysical steps during the simulation. The ideal gas contribution computed for the corrected density is significantly smaller than the one obtained from naive sampling and can thus explain the temperature dependence of the PMF correctly. For the hard-sphere chain model, where a weighted density is used, the correction of the particle density is not essential. However, the PMF calculated based on the corrected density confirms our approach. All three models predict PMF curves in very good agreement with simulation results, but they differ in the number of input parameters and the computational effort. Based on the modeling results, we predict the existence of an additional attractive force at small distances of the NCs - a depletion force.

  16. Nucleon-gold collisions at 200A GeV using tagged d + Au interactions in the PHOBOS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Back, B. B.; Nouicer, R.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A; Stienberg, P.; Ioradnova, A.; et al

    2015-09-23

    Forward calorimetry in the PHOBOS detector has been used to study charged hadron production in d+Au, p+Au, and n+Au collisions at ?sNN =200GeV. The forward proton calorimeter detectors are described and a procedure for determining collision centrality with these detectors is detailed. The deposition of energy by deuteron spectator nucleons in the forward calorimeters is used to identify p+Au and n+Au collisions in the data. A weighted combination of the yield of p+Au and n+Au is constructed to build a reference for Au+Au collisions that better matches the isospin composition of the gold nucleus. The pT and centrality dependence ofmore »the yield of this improved reference system is found to match that of d+Au. The shape of the charged-particle transverse momentum distribution is observed to extrapolate smoothly from p+p¯ to central d+Au as a function of the charged-particle pseudorapidity density. The asymmetry of positively and negatively charged hadron production in p+Au is compared to that of n+Au. No significant asymmetry is observed at midrapidity. In conclusion, these studies augment recent results from experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider facilities to give a more complete description of particle production in p+A and d+A collisions, essential for the understanding the medium produced in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions.« less

  17. Automatic mesh adaptivity for hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic neutronics modeling of difficult shielding problems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ibrahim, Ahmad M.; Wilson, Paul P.H.; Sawan, Mohamed E.; Mosher, Scott W.; Peplow, Douglas E.; Wagner, John C.; Evans, Thomas M.; Grove, Robert E.

    2015-06-30

    The CADIS and FW-CADIS hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques dramatically increase the efficiency of neutronics modeling, but their use in the accurate design analysis of very large and geometrically complex nuclear systems has been limited by the large number of processors and memory requirements for their preliminary deterministic calculations and final Monte Carlo calculation. Three mesh adaptivity algorithms were developed to reduce the memory requirements of CADIS and FW-CADIS without sacrificing their efficiency improvement. First, a macromaterial approach enhances the fidelity of the deterministic models without changing the mesh. Second, a deterministic mesh refinement algorithm generates meshes that capture as muchmore »geometric detail as possible without exceeding a specified maximum number of mesh elements. Finally, a weight window coarsening algorithm decouples the weight window mesh and energy bins from the mesh and energy group structure of the deterministic calculations in order to remove the memory constraint of the weight window map from the deterministic mesh resolution. The three algorithms were used to enhance an FW-CADIS calculation of the prompt dose rate throughout the ITER experimental facility. Using these algorithms resulted in a 23.3% increase in the number of mesh tally elements in which the dose rates were calculated in a 10-day Monte Carlo calculation and, additionally, increased the efficiency of the Monte Carlo simulation by a factor of at least 3.4. The three algorithms enabled this difficult calculation to be accurately solved using an FW-CADIS simulation on a regular computer cluster, eliminating the need for a world-class super computer.« less

  18. Galactic chemical evolution and solar s-process abundances: Dependence on the {sup 13}C-pocket structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisterzo, S.; Travaglio, C.; Gallino, R.; Wiescher, M.; Käppeler, F. E-mail: sarabisterzo@gmail.com

    2014-05-20

    We study the s-process abundances (A ? 90) at the epoch of the solar system formation. Asymptotic giant branch yields are computed with an updated neutron capture network and updated initial solar abundances. We confirm our previous results obtained with a Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) model: (1) as suggested by the s-process spread observed in disk stars and in presolar meteoritic SiC grains, a weighted average of s-process strengths is needed to reproduce the solar s distribution of isotopes with A > 130; and (2) an additional contribution (of about 25%) is required in order to represent the solar s-process abundances of isotopes from A = 90 to 130. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of different internal structures of the {sup 13}C pocket, which may affect the efficiency of the {sup 13}C(?, n){sup 16}O reaction, the major neutron source of the s process. First, keeping the same {sup 13}C profile adopted so far, we modify by a factor of two the mass involved in the pocket; second, we assume a flat {sup 13}C profile in the pocket, and we test again the effects of the variation of the mass of the pocket. We find that GCE s predictions at the epoch of the solar system formation marginally depend on the size and shape of the {sup 13}C pocket once a different weighted range of {sup 13}C-pocket strengths is assumed. We obtain that, independently of the internal structure of the {sup 13}C pocket, the missing solar system s-process contribution in the range from A = 90 to 130 remains essentially the same.

  19. Correlated mixture between adiabatic and isocurvature fluctuations and recent CMB observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrade, Ana Paula A.; Wuensche, Carlos Alexandre; Ribeiro, Andre Luis Batista [Divisao de Astrofisica, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais/MCT, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo (Brazil) and Laboratorio de Astrofisica Teorica e Observacional DCET/UESC, Ilheus, Bahia (Brazil); Divisao de Astrofisica, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais/MCT, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Laboratorio de Astrofisica Teorica e Observacional, DCET/UESC, Ilheus, Bahia (Brazil)

    2005-02-15

    This work presents a reduced {chi}{sub {nu}}{sup 2} test to search for non-Gaussian signals in the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) TT power spectrum of recent CMBR data, Wilkinson Anisotropy Microwave Probe, Arcminute Cosmology Bolometer Array Receiver, and Cosmic Background Imager data sets, assuming a mixed density field including adiabatic and isocurvature fluctuations. We assume a skew positive mixed model with adiabatic inflation perturbations plus additional isocurvature perturbations possibly produced by topological defects. The joint probability distribution used in this context is a weighted combination of Gaussian and non-Gaussian random fields. Results from simulations of CMBR temperature for the mixed field show a distinct signature in CMB power spectrum for very small deviations ({approx}0.1%) from a pure Gaussian field, and can be used as a direct test for the nature of primordial fluctuations. A reduced {chi}{sub {nu}}{sup 2} test applied on the most recent CMBR observations reveals that an isocurvature fluctuations field is not ruled out and indeed permits a very good description for a flat geometry {lambda}-CDM Universe, {chi}{sub 930}{sup 2}{approx}1.5, rather than the simple inflationary standard model with {chi}{sub 930}{sup 2}{approx}2.3. This result may looks is particular discrepant with the reduced {chi}{sup 2} of 1.07 obtained with the same model in Spergel et al. [Astrophys. J. 148, 175 (2003)] for temperature only, however, our work is restricted to a region of the parameter space that does not include the best fit model for TT only of Spergel et al.

  20. Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Aki, Hirohisa; Lai, Judy

    2009-08-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy has launched the commercial building initiative (CBI) in pursuit of its research goal of achieving zero-net-energy commercial buildings (ZNEB), i.e. ones that produce as much energy as they use. Its objective is to make these buildings marketable by 2025 such that they minimize their energy use through cutting-edge, energy-efficiency technologies and meet their remaining energy needs through on-site renewable energy generation. This paper examines how such buildings may be implemented within the context of a cost- or CO2-minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various technologies: photovoltaic modules (PV) and other on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and passive/demand-response technologies. A mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has a multi-criteria objective function is used. The objective is minimization of a weighted average of the building's annual energy costs and CO2 emissions. The MILP's constraints ensure energy balance and capacity limits. In addition, constraining the building's energy consumed to equal its energy exports enables us to explore how energy sales and demand-response measures may enable compliance with the ZNEB objective. Using a commercial test site in northernCalifornia with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find that a ZNEB requires ample PV capacity installed to ensure electricity sales during the day. This is complemented by investment in energy-efficient combined heat and power (CHP) equipment, while occasional demand response shaves energy consumption. A large amount of storage is also adopted, which may be impractical. Nevertheless, it shows the nature of the solutions and costs necessary to achieve a ZNEB. Additionally, the ZNEB approach does not necessary lead to zero-carbon (ZC) buildings as is frequently argued. We also show a multi-objective frontier for the CA example, whichallows us to estimate the needed technologies and costs for achieving a ZC building or microgrid.

  1. Strategic Insights From Playing the Quantum Tic-Tac-Toe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. N. Leaw; S. A. Cheong

    2010-07-21

    In this paper, we perform a minimalistic quantization of the classical game of tic-tac-toe, by allowing superpositions of classical moves. In order for the quantum game to reduce properly to the classical game, we require legal quantum moves to be orthogonal to all previous moves. We also admit interference effects, by squaring the sum of amplitudes over all moves by a player to compute his or her occupation level of a given site. A player wins when the sums of occupations along any of the eight straight lines we can draw in the $3 \\times 3$ grid is greater than three. We play the quantum tic-tac-toe first randomly, and then deterministically, to explore the impact different opening moves, end games, and different combinations of offensive and defensive strategies have on the outcome of the game. In contrast to the classical tic-tac-toe, the deterministic quantum game does not always end in a draw. In contrast also to most classical two-player games of no chance, it is possible for Player 2 to win. More interestingly, we find that Player 1 enjoys an overwhelming quantum advantage when he opens with a quantum move, but loses this advantage when he opens with a classical move. We also find the quantum blocking move, which consists of a weighted superposition of moves that the opponent could use to win the game, to be very effective in denying the opponent his or her victory. We then speculate what implications these results might have on quantum information transfer and portfolio optimization.

  2. Search For the Rare Decay K(L) ---> pi0 pi0 gamma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, David Edward; /Virginia U.

    2006-08-01

    This thesis describes a search for the rare decay K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} using data from the KTeV experiment, using the topology K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sub D}{sup 0}{gamma} (where {pi}{sub D}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}e{sup +}e{sup -}). Due to Bose statistics and the real nature of the photon, the K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} decay can proceed at lowest order only by the Cp conserving direct emission of an E2 photon. The decay vanishes to O(p{sup 4}) in chiral perturbation theory and is a probe of the theory to the sixth order. The primary background to this decay consists of K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sub D}{sup 0} events with one lost photon. The upper limit for the decay K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} presented in this thesis is 2.32 x 10{sup -7} at the 90% confidence level. This upper limit was derived from both 1997 and 1999 data, using a blind analysis. The upper limit was derived from a Feldman-Cousins method, based on a weighted total of 0.53 data events in the signal region with an expected K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sub D}{sup 0} background of 0.37 {+-} 0.28 events. The previous upper limit for this decay was 5.6 x 10{sup -6} at the 90% confidence level.

  3. Automatic mesh adaptivity for CADIS and FW-CADIS neutronics modeling of difficult shielding problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibrahim, A. M.; Peplow, D. E.; Mosher, S. W.; Wagner, J. C.; Evans, T. M.; Wilson, P. P.; Sawan, M. E.

    2013-07-01

    The CADIS and FW-CADIS hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques dramatically increase the efficiency of neutronics modeling, but their use in the accurate design analysis of very large and geometrically complex nuclear systems has been limited by the large number of processors and memory requirements for their preliminary deterministic calculations and final Monte Carlo calculation. Three mesh adaptivity algorithms were developed to reduce the memory requirements of CADIS and FW-CADIS without sacrificing their efficiency improvement. First, a macro-material approach enhances the fidelity of the deterministic models without changing the mesh. Second, a deterministic mesh refinement algorithm generates meshes that capture as much geometric detail as possible without exceeding a specified maximum number of mesh elements. Finally, a weight window coarsening algorithm de-couples the weight window mesh and energy bins from the mesh and energy group structure of the deterministic calculations in order to remove the memory constraint of the weight window map from the deterministic mesh resolution. The three algorithms were used to enhance an FW-CADIS calculation of the prompt dose rate throughout the ITER experimental facility. Using these algorithms resulted in a 23.3% increase in the number of mesh tally elements in which the dose rates were calculated in a 10-day Monte Carlo calculation and, additionally, increased the efficiency of the Monte Carlo simulation by a factor of at least 3.4. The three algorithms enabled this difficult calculation to be accurately solved using an FW-CADIS simulation on a regular computer cluster, obviating the need for a world-class super computer. (authors)

  4. Traction Drive Inverter Cooling with Submerged Liquid Jet Impingement on Microfinned Enhanced Surfaces (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waye, S.; Narumanchi, S.; Moreno, G.

    2014-09-01

    Jet impingement is one means to improve thermal management for power electronics in electric-drive traction vehicles. Jet impingement on microfin-enhanced surfaces further augments heat transfer and thermal performance. A channel flow heat exchanger from a commercial inverter was characterized as a baseline system for comparison with two new prototype designs using liquid jet impingement on plain and microfinned enhanced surfaces. The submerged jets can target areas with the highest heat flux to provide local cooling, such as areas under insulated-gate bipolar transistors and diode devices. Low power experiments, where four diodes were powered, dissipated 105 W of heat and were used to validate computational fluid dynamics modeling of the baseline and prototype designs. Experiments and modeling used typical automotive flow rates using water-ethylene glycol as a coolant (50%-50% by volume). The computational fluid dynamics model was used to predict full inverter power heat dissipation. The channel flow and jet impingement configurations were tested at full inverter power of 40 to 100 kW (output power) on a dynamometer, translating to an approximate heat dissipation of 1 to 2 kW. With jet impingement, the cold plate material is not critical for the thermal pathway. A high-temperature plastic was used that could eventually be injection molded or formed, with the jets formed from a basic aluminum plate with orifices acting as nozzles. Long-term reliability of the jet nozzles and impingement on enhanced surfaces was examined. For jet impingement on microfinned surfaces, thermal performance increased 17%. Along with a weight reduction of approximately 3 kg, the specific power (kW/kg) increased by 36%, with an increase in power density (kW/L) of 12% compared with the baseline channel flow configuration.

  5. An accurate analytic He-H2 potential energy surface from a greatly expanded set of ab initio energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold I. Boothroyd; Peter G. Martin; Michael R. Peterson

    2004-11-01

    The interaction potential energy surface (PES) of He-H2 is of great importance for quantum chemistry, as the simplest test case for interactions between a molecule and a closed-shell atom. It is also required for a detailed understanding of certain astrophysical processes, namely collisional excitation and dissociation of H2 in molecular clouds, at densities too low to be accessible experimentally. A new set of 23703 ab initio energies was computed, for He-H2 geometries where the interaction energy was expected to be non-negligible. These have an estimated rms "random" error of about 0.2 millihartree and a systematic error of about 0.6 millihartree (0.4 kcal/mol). A new analytic He-H2 PES, with 112 parameters, was fitted to 20203 of these new ab initio energies (and to an additional 4862 points generated at large separations). This yielded an improvement by better than an order of magnitude in the fit to the interaction region, relative to the best previous surfaces (which were accurate only for near-equilibrium H2 molecule sizes). This new PES has an rms error of 0.95 millihartree (0.60 kcal/mole) relative to the the 14585 ab initio energies that lie below twice the H2 dissociation energy, and 2.97 millihartree (1.87 kcal/mole) relative to the full set of 20203 ab initio energies (the fitting procedure used a reduced weight for high energies, yielding a weighted rms error of 1.42 millihartree, i.e., 0.89 kcal/mole). These rms errors are comparable to the estimated error in the ab initio energies themselves; the conical intersection between the ground state and the first excited state is the largest source of error in the PES.

  6. Microstructural Stability and Oxidation Resistance of 9-12 Chromium Steels at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dogan, O.N.; Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.; Hawk, J.A.

    2006-05-01

    Various martensitic 9-12 Cr steels are utilized currently in fossil fuel powered energy plants for their good elevated temperature properties such as creep strength, steam side oxidation resistance, fire side corrosion resistance, and thermal fatigue resistance. Need for further improvements on the properties of 9-12 Cr steels for higher temperature (>600oC) use is driven by the environmental concerns (i.e., improve efficiency to reduce emissions and fossil fuel consumption). In this paper, we will discuss the results of the research done to explore new subsitutional solute solution and precipitate hardening mechanisms for improved strength of 9-12 Cr martensitic steels. Stability of the phases present in the steels will be evaluated for various temperature and time exposures. A comparison of microstructural properties of the experimental steels and commercial steels will also be presented.

    The influence of a Ce surface treatment on oxidation behavior of a commercial (P91) and several experimental steels containing 9 to 12 weight percent Cr was examined at 650ºC in flowing dry and moist air. The oxidation behavior of all the alloys without the Ce modification was significantly degraded by the presence of moisture in the air during testing. For instance the weight gain for P91 was two orders of magnitude greater in moist air than in dry air. This was accompanied by a change in oxide scale from the formation of Cr-based scales in dry air to the formation of Fe-based scales in moist air. The Ce surface treatment was very effective in improving the oxidation resistance of the experimental steels in both moist and dry air. For instance, after exposure to moist air at 650ºC for 2000 hours, an experimental alloy with the cerium surface modification had a weight gain three orders of magnitude lower than the alloy without the Ce modification and two orders of magnitude lower than P91. The Ce surface treatment suppressed the formation of Fe-based scales and promoted the formation of more protective Cr-based scales. However, the Ce surface treatment was not effective in improving the resistance of P91. The results are discussed in terms of synergistic effects of constituent alloying elements.

  7. Construction of energy-stable Galerkin reduced order models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalashnikova, Irina; Barone, Matthew Franklin; Arunajatesan, Srinivasan; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf

    2013-05-01

    This report aims to unify several approaches for building stable projection-based reduced order models (ROMs). Attention is focused on linear time-invariant (LTI) systems. The model reduction procedure consists of two steps: the computation of a reduced basis, and the projection of the governing partial differential equations (PDEs) onto this reduced basis. Two kinds of reduced bases are considered: the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) basis and the balanced truncation basis. The projection step of the model reduction can be done in two ways: via continuous projection or via discrete projection. First, an approach for building energy-stable Galerkin ROMs for linear hyperbolic or incompletely parabolic systems of PDEs using continuous projection is proposed. The idea is to apply to the set of PDEs a transformation induced by the Lyapunov function for the system, and to build the ROM in the transformed variables. The resulting ROM will be energy-stable for any choice of reduced basis. It is shown that, for many PDE systems, the desired transformation is induced by a special weighted L2 inner product, termed the %E2%80%9Csymmetry inner product%E2%80%9D. Attention is then turned to building energy-stable ROMs via discrete projection. A discrete counterpart of the continuous symmetry inner product, a weighted L2 inner product termed the %E2%80%9CLyapunov inner product%E2%80%9D, is derived. The weighting matrix that defines the Lyapunov inner product can be computed in a black-box fashion for a stable LTI system arising from the discretization of a system of PDEs in space. It is shown that a ROM constructed via discrete projection using the Lyapunov inner product will be energy-stable for any choice of reduced basis. Connections between the Lyapunov inner product and the inner product induced by the balanced truncation algorithm are made. Comparisons are also made between the symmetry inner product and the Lyapunov inner product. The performance of ROMs constructed using these inner products is evaluated on several benchmark test cases.

  8. New Constraints on Dark Energy from Chandra X-rayObservations of the Largest Relaxed Galaxy Clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, S.W.; Rapetti, D.A.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Schmidt, R.W.; /Heidelberg, Astron. Rechen Inst.; Ebeling, H.; /Inst. Astron., Honolulu; Morris, G.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Fabian, A.C.; /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron.

    2007-06-06

    We present constraints on the mean matter density, {Omega}{sub m}, dark energy density, {Omega}{sub DE}, and the dark energy equation of state parameter, w, using Chandra measurements of the X-ray gas mass fraction (fgas) in 42 hot (kT > 5keV), X-ray luminous, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters spanning the redshift range 0.05 < z < 1.1. Using only the fgas data for the 6 lowest redshift clusters at z < 0.15, for which dark energy has a negligible effect on the measurements, we measure {Omega}{sub m}=0.28{+-}0.06 (68% confidence, using standard priors on the Hubble Constant, H{sub 0}, and mean baryon density, {Omega}{sub b}h{sup 2}). Analyzing the data for all 42 clusters, employing only weak priors on H{sub 0} and {Omega}{sub b}h{sup 2}, we obtain a similar result on {Omega}{sub m} and detect the effects of dark energy on the distances to the clusters at {approx}99.99% confidence, with {Omega}{sub DE}=0.86{+-}0.21 for a non-flat LCDM model. The detection of dark energy is comparable in significance to recent SNIa studies and represents strong, independent evidence for cosmic acceleration. Systematic scatter remains undetected in the f{sub gas} data, despite a weighted mean statistical scatter in the distance measurements of only {approx}5%. For a flat cosmology with constant w, we measure {Omega}{sub m}=0.28{+-}0.06 and w=-1.14{+-}0.31. Combining the fgas data with independent constraints from CMB and SNIa studies removes the need for priors on {Omega}{sub b}h{sup 2} and H{sub 0} and leads to tighter constraints: {Omega}{sub m}=0.253{+-}0.021 and w=-0.98{+-}0.07 for the same constant-w model. More general analyses in which we relax the assumption of flatness and/or allow evolution in w remain consistent with the cosmological constant paradigm. Our analysis includes conservative allowances for systematic uncertainties. The small systematic scatter and tight constraints bode well for future dark energy studies using the f{sub gas} method.

  9. Predicting objective function weights from patient anatomy in prostate IMRT treatment planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Taewoo Hammad, Muhannad; Chan, Timothy C. Y.; Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, 124-100 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 ; Craig, Tim; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 148-150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3S2 ; Sharpe, Michael B.; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 148-150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3S2; Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, 124-100 College Street Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning typically combines multiple criteria into a single objective function by taking a weighted sum. The authors propose a statistical model that predicts objective function weights from patient anatomy for prostate IMRT treatment planning. This study provides a proof of concept for geometry-driven weight determination. Methods: A previously developed inverse optimization method (IOM) was used to generate optimal objective function weights for 24 patients using their historical treatment plans (i.e., dose distributions). These IOM weights were around 1% for each of the femoral heads, while bladder and rectum weights varied greatly between patients. A regression model was developed to predict a patient's rectum weight using the ratio of the overlap volume of the rectum and bladder with the planning target volume at a 1 cm expansion as the independent variable. The femoral head weights were fixed to 1% each and the bladder weight was calculated as one minus the rectum and femoral head weights. The model was validated using leave-one-out cross validation. Objective values and dose distributions generated through inverse planning using the predicted weights were compared to those generated using the original IOM weights, as well as an average of the IOM weights across all patients. Results: The IOM weight vectors were on average six times closer to the predicted weight vectors than to the average weight vector, usingl{sub 2} distance. Likewise, the bladder and rectum objective values achieved by the predicted weights were more similar to the objective values achieved by the IOM weights. The difference in objective value performance between the predicted and average weights was statistically significant according to a one-sided sign test. For all patients, the difference in rectum V54.3 Gy, rectum V70.0 Gy, bladder V54.3 Gy, and bladder V70.0 Gy values between the dose distributions generated by the predicted weights and IOM weights was less than 5 percentage points. Similarly, the difference in femoral head V54.3 Gy values between the two dose distributions was less than 5 percentage points for all but one patient. Conclusions: This study demonstrates a proof of concept that patient anatomy can be used to predict appropriate objective function weights for treatment planning. In the long term, such geometry-driven weights may serve as a starting point for iterative treatment plan design or may provide information about the most clinically relevant region of the Pareto surface to explore.

  10. Use of genomic data in risk assessment case study: II. Evaluation of the dibutyl phthalate toxicogenomic data set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Euling, Susan Y.; White, Lori D.; Kim, Andrea S.; Sen, Banalata; Wilson, Vickie S.; Keshava, Channa; Keshava, Nagalakshmi; Hester, Susan; Ovacik, Meric A.; Ierapetritou, Marianthi G.; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Gaido, Kevin W.

    2013-09-15

    An evaluation of the toxicogenomic data set for dibutyl phthalate (DBP) and male reproductive developmental effects was performed as part of a larger case study to test an approach for incorporating genomic data in risk assessment. The DBP toxicogenomic data set is composed of nine in vivo studies from the published literature that exposed rats to DBP during gestation and evaluated gene expression changes in testes or Wolffian ducts of male fetuses. The exercise focused on qualitative evaluation, based on a lack of available dose–response data, of the DBP toxicogenomic data set to postulate modes and mechanisms of action for the male reproductive developmental outcomes, which occur in the lower dose range. A weight-of-evidence evaluation was performed on the eight DBP toxicogenomic studies of the rat testis at the gene and pathway levels. The results showed relatively strong evidence of DBP-induced downregulation of genes in the steroidogenesis pathway and lipid/sterol/cholesterol transport pathway as well as effects on immediate early gene/growth/differentiation, transcription, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling and apoptosis pathways in the testis. Since two established modes of action (MOAs), reduced fetal testicular testosterone production and Insl3 gene expression, explain some but not all of the testis effects observed in rats after in utero DBP exposure, other MOAs are likely to be operative. A reanalysis of one DBP microarray study identified additional pathways within cell signaling, metabolism, hormone, disease, and cell adhesion biological processes. These putative new pathways may be associated with DBP effects on the testes that are currently unexplained. This case study on DBP identified data gaps and research needs for the use of toxicogenomic data in risk assessment. Furthermore, this study demonstrated an approach for evaluating toxicogenomic data in human health risk assessment that could be applied to future chemicals. - Highlights: ? We evaluate the dibutyl phthalate toxicogenomic data for use in risk assessment. ? We focus on information about the mechanism of action for the developing testis. ? Multiple studies report effects on testosterone and insl3-related pathways. ? We identify additional affected pathways that may explain some testis effects. ? The case study is a template for evaluating toxicogenomic data in risk assessment.

  11. Energy-consumption and carbon-emission analysis of vehicle and component manufacturing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, J. L.; Burnham, A.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

    2010-10-12

    A model is presented for calculating the environmental burdens of the part manufacturing and vehicle assembly (VMA) stage of the vehicle life cycle. The approach is bottom-up, with a special focus on energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions. The model is applied to both conventional and advanced vehicles, the latter of which include aluminum-intensive, hybrid electric, plug-in hybrid electric and all-electric vehicles. An important component of the model, a weight-based distribution function of materials and associated transformation processes (casting, stamping, etc.), is developed from the United States Council for Automotive Research Generic Vehicle Life Cycle Inventory Study. As the approach is bottom-up, numerous transformation process data and plant operational data were extracted from the literature for use in representing the many operations included in the model. When the model was applied to conventional vehicles, reliable estimates of cumulative energy consumption (34 GJ/vehicle) and CO{sub 2} emission (2 tonnes/vehicle) were computed for the VMA life-cycle stage. The numerous data sets taken from the literature permitted the development of some statistics on model results. Because the model explicitly includes a greater coverage of relevant manufacturing processes than many earlier studies, our energy estimates are on the higher end of previously published values. Limitations of the model are also discussed. Because the material compositions of conventional vehicles within specific classes (cars, light duty trucks, etc.) are sensibly constant on a percent-by-weight basis, the model can be reduced to a simple linear form for each class dependent only on vehicle weight. For advanced vehicles, the material/transformation process distribution developed above needs to be adjusted for different materials and components. This is particularly so for aluminum-intensive and electric-drive vehicles. In fact, because of their comparatively high manufacturing energy, batteries required for an electric vehicle can significantly add to the energy burden of the VMA stage. Overall, for conventional vehicles, energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions from the VMA stage are about 4% of their total life-cycle values. They are expected to be somewhat higher for advanced vehicles.

  12. Optimal Technology Investment and Operation in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings with Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler , Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; ,, Hirohisa Aki; Lai, Judy

    2009-05-26

    The US Department of Energy has launched the Zero-Net-Energy (ZNE) Commercial Building Initiative (CBI) in order to develop commercial buildings that produce as much energy as they use. Its objective is to make these buildings marketable by 2025 such that they minimize their energy use through cutting-edge energy-efficient technologies and meet their remaining energy needs through on-site renewable energy generation. We examine how such buildings may be implemented within the context of a cost- or carbon-minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various technologies, such as photovoltaic (PV) on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and passive / demand-response technologies. We use a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has a multi-criteria objective function: the minimization of a weighted average of the building's annual energy costs and carbon / CO2 emissions. The MILP's constraints ensure energy balance and capacity limits. In addition, constraining the building's energy consumed to equal its energy exports enables us to explore how energy sales and demand-response measures may enable compliance with the CBI. Using a nursing home in northern California and New York with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find that a ZNE building requires ample PV capacity installed to ensure electricity sales during the day. This is complemented by investment in energy-efficient combined heat and power equipment, while occasional demand response shaves energy consumption. A large amount of storage is also adopted, which may be impractical. Nevertheless, it shows the nature of the solutions and costs necessary to achieve ZNE. For comparison, we analyze a nursing home facility in New York to examine the effects of a flatter tariff structure and different load profiles. It has trouble reaching ZNE status and its load reductions as well as efficiency measures need to be more effective than those in the CA case. Finally, we illustrate that the multi-criteria frontier that considers costs and carbon emissions in the presence of demand response dominates the one without it.

  13. APBF-DEC NOx Adsorber/DPF Project: SUV / Pick-up Truck Platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, C; Weber, P; Thornton,M

    2003-08-24

    The objective of this project is to determine the influence of diesel fuel composition on the ability of NOX adsorber catalyst (NAC) technology, in conjunction with diesel particle filters (DPFs), to achieve stringent emissions levels with a minimal fuel economy impact. The test bed for this project was intended to be a light-duty sport utility vehicle (SUV) with a goal of achieving light-duty Tier 2-Bin 5 tail pipe emission levels (0.07 g/mi. NOX and 0.01 g/mi. PM). However, with the current US market share of light-duty diesel applications being so low, no US 2002 model year (MY) light-duty truck (LDT) or SUV platforms equipped with a diesel engine and having a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) less than 8500 lb exist. While the current level of diesel engine use is relatively small in the light-duty class, there exists considerable potential for the diesel engine to gain a much larger market share in the future as manufacturers of heavy light-duty trucks (HLDTs) attempt to offset the negative impact on cooperate average fuel economy (CAFE) that the recent rise in market share of the SUVs and LDTs has caused. The US EPA Tier 2 emission standards also contain regulation to prevent the migration of heavy light-duty trucks and SUV's to the medium duty class. This preventive measure requires that all medium duty trucks, SUV's and vans in the 8,500 to 10,000 lb GVWR range being used as passenger vehicles, meet light-duty Tier 2 standards. In meeting the Tier 2 emission standards, the HLDTs and medium-duty passenger vehicles (MDPVs) will face the greatest technological challenges. Because the MDPV is the closest weight class and application relative to the potential upcoming HLDTs and SUV's, a weight class compromise was made in this program to allow the examination of using a diesel engine with a NAC-DPF system on a 2002 production vehicle. The test bed for this project is a 2500 series Chevrolet Silverado equipped with a 6.6L Duramax diesel engine certified to 2002 MY Federal heavy-duty and 2002 MY California medium-duty emission standards. The stock vehicle included cooled air charge (CAC), turbocharger (TC), direct fuel injection (DFI), oxidation catalyst (OC), and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR)

  14. Towards the clinical implementation of iterative low-dose cone-beam CT reconstruction in image-guided radiation therapy: Cone/ring artifact correction and multiple GPU implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Hao, E-mail: steve.jiang@utsouthwestern.edu, E-mail: xun.jia@utsouthwestern.edu; Shi, Feng; Jiang, Steve B.; Jia, Xun, E-mail: steve.jiang@utsouthwestern.edu, E-mail: xun.jia@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Wang, Xiaoyu; Cervino, Laura [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies and Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92037 (United States); Bai, Ti [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 and Institute of Image Processing and Pattern Recognition, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Folkerts, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 and Department of Physics, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92037 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Compressed sensing (CS)-based iterative reconstruction (IR) techniques are able to reconstruct cone-beam CT (CBCT) images from undersampled noisy data, allowing for imaging dose reduction. However, there are a few practical concerns preventing the clinical implementation of these techniques. On the image quality side, data truncation along the superior–inferior direction under the cone-beam geometry produces severe cone artifacts in the reconstructed images. Ring artifacts are also seen in the half-fan scan mode. On the reconstruction efficiency side, the long computation time hinders clinical use in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Methods: Image quality improvement methods are proposed to mitigate the cone and ring image artifacts in IR. The basic idea is to use weighting factors in the IR data fidelity term to improve projection data consistency with the reconstructed volume. In order to improve the computational efficiency, a multiple graphics processing units (GPUs)-based CS-IR system was developed. The parallelization scheme, detailed analyses of computation time at each step, their relationship with image resolution, and the acceleration factors were studied. The whole system was evaluated in various phantom and patient cases. Results: Ring artifacts can be mitigated by properly designing a weighting factor as a function of the spatial location on the detector. As for the cone artifact, without applying a correction method, it contaminated 13 out of 80 slices in a head-neck case (full-fan). Contamination was even more severe in a pelvis case under half-fan mode, where 36 out of 80 slices were affected, leading to poorer soft tissue delineation and reduced superior–inferior coverage. The proposed method effectively corrects those contaminated slices with mean intensity differences compared to FDK results decreasing from ?497 and ?293 HU to ?39 and ?27 HU for the full-fan and half-fan cases, respectively. In terms of efficiency boost, an overall 3.1 × speedup factor has been achieved with four GPU cards compared to a single GPU-based reconstruction. The total computation time is ?30 s for typical clinical cases. Conclusions: The authors have developed a low-dose CBCT IR system for IGRT. By incorporating data consistency-based weighting factors in the IR model, cone/ring artifacts can be mitigated. A boost in computational efficiency is achieved by multi-GPU implementation.

  15. The image quality of ion computed tomography at clinical imaging dose levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, David C., E-mail: dch@oncology.au.dk [Department of Experimental Clinical Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Bassler, Niels [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Sørensen, Thomas Sangild [Department of Computer Science, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus, Denmark and Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Seco, Joao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School,Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Accurately predicting the range of radiotherapy ions in vivo is important for the precise delivery of dose in particle therapy. Range uncertainty is currently the single largest contribution to the dose margins used in planning and leads to a higher dose to normal tissue. The use of ion CT has been proposed as a method to improve the range uncertainty and thereby reduce dose to normal tissue of the patient. A wide variety of ions have been proposed and studied for this purpose, but no studies evaluate the image quality obtained with different ions in a consistent manner. However, imaging doses ion CT is a concern which may limit the obtainable image quality. In addition, the imaging doses reported have not been directly comparable with x-ray CT doses due to the different biological impacts of ion radiation. The purpose of this work is to develop a robust methodology for comparing the image quality of ion CT with respect to particle therapy, taking into account different reconstruction methods and ion species. Methods: A comparison of different ions and energies was made. Ion CT projections were simulated for five different scenarios: Protons at 230 and 330 MeV, helium ions at 230 MeV/u, and carbon ions at 430 MeV/u. Maps of the water equivalent stopping power were reconstructed using a weighted least squares method. The dose was evaluated via a quality factor weighted CT dose index called the CT dose equivalent index (CTDEI). Spatial resolution was measured by the modulation transfer function. This was done by a noise-robust fit to the edge spread function. Second, the image quality as a function of the number of scanning angles was evaluated for protons at 230 MeV. In the resolution study, the CTDEI was fixed to 10 mSv, similar to a typical x-ray CT scan. Finally, scans at a range of CTDEI’s were done, to evaluate dose influence on reconstruction error. Results: All ions yielded accurate stopping power estimates, none of which were statistically different from the ground truth image. Resolution (as defined by the modulation transfer function = 10% point) was the best for the helium ions (18.21 line pairs/cm) and worst for the lower energy protons (9.37 line pairs/cm). The weighted quality factor for the different ions ranged from 1.23 for helium to 2.35 for carbon ions. For the angle study, a sharp increase in absolute error was observed below 45 distinct angles, giving the impression of a threshold, rather than smooth, limit to the number of angles. Conclusions: The method presented for comparing various ion CT modalities is feasible for practical use. While all studied ions would improve upon x-ray CT for particle range estimation, helium appears to give the best results and deserves further study for imaging.

  16. Well-to-wheels energy use and greenhouse gas emissions analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elgowainy, A.; Burnham, A.; Wang, M.; Molburg, J.; Rousseau, A.; Energy Systems

    2009-03-31

    Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory expanded the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model and incorporated the fuel economy and electricity use of alternative fuel/vehicle systems simulated by the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) to conduct a well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis of energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The WTW results were separately calculated for the blended charge-depleting (CD) and charge-sustaining (CS) modes of PHEV operation and then combined by using a weighting factor that represented the CD vehicle-miles-traveled (VMT) share. As indicated by PSAT simulations of the CD operation, grid electricity accounted for a share of the vehicle's total energy use, ranging from 6% for a PHEV 10 to 24% for a PHEV 40, based on CD VMT shares of 23% and 63%, respectively. In addition to the PHEV's fuel economy and type of on-board fuel, the marginal electricity generation mix used to charge the vehicle impacted the WTW results, especially GHG emissions. Three North American Electric Reliability Corporation regions (4, 6, and 13) were selected for this analysis, because they encompassed large metropolitan areas (Illinois, New York, and California, respectively) and provided a significant variation of marginal generation mixes. The WTW results were also reported for the U.S. generation mix and renewable electricity to examine cases of average and clean mixes, respectively. For an all-electric range (AER) between 10 mi and 40 mi, PHEVs that employed petroleum fuels (gasoline and diesel), a blend of 85% ethanol and 15% gasoline (E85), and hydrogen were shown to offer a 40-60%, 70-90%, and more than 90% reduction in petroleum energy use and a 30-60%, 40-80%, and 10-100% reduction in GHG emissions, respectively, relative to an internal combustion engine vehicle that used gasoline. The spread of WTW GHG emissions among the different fuel production technologies and grid generation mixes was wider than the spread of petroleum energy use, mainly due to the diverse fuel production technologies and feedstock sources for the fuels considered in this analysis. The PHEVs offered reductions in petroleum energy use as compared with regular hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). More petroleum energy savings were realized as the AER increased, except when the marginal grid mix was dominated by oil-fired power generation. Similarly, more GHG emissions reductions were realized at higher AERs, except when the marginal grid generation mix was dominated by oil or coal. Electricity from renewable sources realized the largest reductions in petroleum energy use and GHG emissions for all PHEVs as the AER increased. The PHEVs that employ biomass-based fuels (e.g., biomass-E85 and -hydrogen) may not realize GHG emissions benefits over regular HEVs if the marginal generation mix is dominated by fossil sources. Uncertainties are associated with the adopted PHEV fuel consumption and marginal generation mix simulation results, which impact the WTW results and require further research. More disaggregate marginal generation data within control areas (where the actual dispatching occurs) and an improved dispatch modeling are needed to accurately assess the impact of PHEV electrification. The market penetration of the PHEVs, their total electric load, and their role as complements rather than replacements of regular HEVs are also uncertain. The effects of the number of daily charges, the time of charging, and the charging capacity have not been evaluated in this study. A more robust analysis of the VMT share of the CD operation is also needed.

  17. A comparative analysis of OTF, NPS, and DQE in energy integrating and photon counting digital x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: One of the benefits of photon counting (PC) detectors over energy integrating (EI) detectors is the absence of many additive noise sources, such as electronic noise and secondary quantum noise. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that thresholding voltage gains to detect individual x rays actually generates an unexpected source of white noise in photon counters. Methods: To distinguish the two detector types, their point spread function (PSF) is interpreted differently. The PSF of the energy integrating detector is treated as a weighting function for counting x rays, while the PSF of the photon counting detector is interpreted as a probability. Although this model ignores some subtleties of real imaging systems, such as scatter and the energy-dependent amplification of secondary quanta in indirect-converting detectors, it is useful for demonstrating fundamental differences between the two detector types. From first principles, the optical transfer function (OTF) is calculated as the continuous Fourier transform of the PSF, the noise power spectra (NPS) is determined by the discrete space Fourier transform (DSFT) of the autocovariance of signal intensity, and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is found from combined knowledge of the OTF and NPS. To illustrate the calculation of the transfer functions, the PSF is modeled as the convolution of a Gaussian with the product of rect functions. The Gaussian reflects the blurring of the x-ray converter, while the rect functions model the sampling of the detector. Results: The transfer functions are first calculated assuming outside noise sources such as electronic noise and secondary quantum noise are negligible. It is demonstrated that while OTF is the same for two detector types possessing an equivalent PSF, a frequency-independent (i.e., ''white'') difference in their NPS exists such that NPS{sub PC}{>=}NPS{sub EI} and hence DQE{sub PC}{<=}DQE{sub EI}. The necessary and sufficient condition for equality is that the PSF is a binary function given as zero or unity everywhere. In analyzing the model detector with Gaussian blurring, the difference in NPS and DQE between the two detector types is found to increase with the blurring of the x-ray converter. Ultimately, the expression for the additive white noise of the photon counter is compared against the expression for electronic noise and secondary quantum noise in an energy integrator. Thus, a method is provided to determine the average secondary quanta that the energy integrator must produce for each x ray to have superior DQE to a photon counter with the same PSF. Conclusions: This article develops analytical models of OTF, NPS, and DQE for energy integrating and photon counting digital x-ray detectors. While many subtleties of real imaging systems have not been modeled, this work is illustrative in demonstrating an additive source of white noise in photon counting detectors which has not yet been described in the literature. One benefit of this analysis is a framework for determining the average secondary quanta that an energy integrating detector must produce for each x ray to have superior DQE to competing photon counting technology.

  18. Water Extraction from Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce C. Folkedahl; Greg F. Weber; Michael E. Collings

    2006-06-30

    The overall objective of this program was to develop a liquid disiccant-based flue gas dehydration process technology to reduce water consumption in coal-fired power plants. The specific objective of the program was to generate sufficient subscale test data and conceptual commercial power plant evaluations to assess process feasibility and merits for commercialization. Currently, coal-fired power plants require access to water sources outside the power plant for several aspects of their operation in addition to steam cycle condensation and process cooling needs. At the present time, there is no practiced method of extracting the usually abundant water found in the power plant stack gas. This project demonstrated the feasibility and merits of a liquid desiccant-based process that can efficiently and economically remove water vapor from the flue gas of fossil fuel-fired power plants to be recycled for in-plant use or exported for clean water conservation. After an extensive literature review, a survey of the available physical and chemical property information on desiccants in conjunction with a weighting scheme developed for this application, three desiccants were selected and tested in a bench-scale system at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). System performance at the bench scale aided in determining which desiccant was best suited for further evaluation. The results of the bench-scale tests along with further review of the available property data for each of the desiccants resulted in the selection of calcium chloride as the desiccant for testing at the pilot-scale level. Two weeks of testing utilizing natural gas in Test Series I and coal in Test Series II for production of flue gas was conducted with the liquid desiccant dehumidification system (LDDS) designed and built for this study. In general, it was found that the LDDS operated well and could be placed in an automode in which the process would operate with no operator intervention or adjustment. Water produced from this process should require little processing for use, depending on the end application. Test Series II water quality was not as good as that obtained in Test Series I; however, this was believed to be due to a system upset that contaminated the product water system during Test Series II. The amount of water that can be recovered from flue gas with the LDDS is a function of several variables, including desiccant temperature, L/G in the absorber, flash drum pressure, liquid-gas contact method, and desiccant concentration. Corrosion will be an issue with the use of calcium chloride as expected but can be largely mitigated through proper material selection. Integration of the LDDS with either low-grade waste heat and or ground-source heating and cooling can affect the parasitic power draw the LDDS will have on a power plant. Depending on the amount of water to be removed from the flue gas, the system can be designed with no parasitic power draw on the power plant other than pumping loads. This can be accomplished in one scenario by taking advantage of the heat of absorption and the heat of vaporization to provide the necessary temperature changes in the desiccant with the flue gas and precipitates that may form and how to handle them. These questions must be addressed in subsequent testing before scale-up of the process can be confidently completed.

  19. Optimal integrated design of air separation unit and gas turbine block for IGCC systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamath, R.; Grossman, I.; Biegler, L.; Zitney, S.

    2009-01-01

    The Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems are considered as a promising technology for power generation. However, they are not yet in widespread commercial use and opportunities remain to improve system feasibility and profitability via improved process integration. This work focuses on the integrated design of gasification system, air separation unit (ASU) and the gas turbine (GT) block. The ASU supplies oxygen to the gasification system and it can also supply nitrogen (if required as a diluent) to the gas turbine block with minimal incremental cost. Since both GT and the ASU require a source of compressed air, integrating the air requirement of these units is a logical starting point for facility optimization (Smith et al., 1997). Air extraction from the GT can reduce or avoid the compression cost in the ASU and the nitrogen injection can reduce NOx emissions and promote trouble-free operation of the GT block (Wimer et al., 2006). There are several possible degrees of integration between the ASU and the GT (Smith and Klosek, 2001). In the case of 'total' integration, where all the air required for the ASU is supplied by the GT compressor and the ASU is expected to be an elevated-pressure (EP) type. Alternatively, the ASU can be 'stand alone' without any integration with the GT. In this case, the ASU operates at low pressure (LP), with its own air compressor delivering air to the cryogenic process at the minimum energy cost. Here, nitrogen may or may not be injected because of the energy penalty issue and instead, syngas humidification may be preferred. A design, which is intermediate between these two cases, involves partial supply of air by the gas turbine and the remainder by a separate air compressor. These integration schemes have been utilized in some IGCC projects. Examples include Nuon Power Plant at Buggenum, Netherlands (both air and nitrogen integration), Polk Power Station at Tampa, US (nitrogen-only integration) and LGTI at Plaquemine, US (stand-alone). However, there is very little information on systematic assessment of air extraction, nitrogen injection and configuration and operating conditions of the ASU and it is not clear which scheme is optimal for a given IGCC application. In this work, we address the above mentioned problem systematically using mixed-integer optimization. This approach allows the use of various objectives such as minimizing the investment and operating cost or SOx and NOx emissions, maximizing power output or overall efficiency or a weighted combination of these factors. A superstructure is proposed which incorporates all the integration schemes described above. Simplified models for ASU, gas turbine system and steam cycle are used which provide reasonable estimates for performance and cost (Frey and Zhu, 2006). The optimal structural configuration and operating conditions are presented for several case studies and it is observed that the optimal solution changes significantly depending on the specified objective.

  20. Optimal Integrated Design of Air Separation Unit and Gas Turbine Block for IGCC Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravindra S. Kamath; Ignacio E. Grossmann; Lorenz T. Biegler; Stephen E. Zitney

    2009-01-01

    The Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems are considered as a promising technology for power generation. However, they are not yet in widespread commercial use and opportunities remain to improve system feasibility and profitability via improved process integration. This work focuses on the integrated design of gasification system, air separation unit (ASU) and the gas turbine (GT) block. The ASU supplies oxygen to the gasification system and it can also supply nitrogen (if required as a diluent) to the gas turbine block with minimal incremental cost. Since both GT and the ASU require a source of compressed air, integrating the air requirement of these units is a logical starting point for facility optimization (Smith et al., 1997). Air extraction from the GT can reduce or avoid the compression cost in the ASU and the nitrogen injection can reduce NOx emissions and promote trouble-free operation of the GT block (Wimer et al., 2006). There are several possible degrees of integration between the ASU and the GT (Smith and Klosek, 2001). In the case of 'total' integration, where all the air required for the ASU is supplied by the GT compressor and the ASU is expected to be an elevated-pressure (EP) type. Alternatively, the ASU can be 'stand alone' without any integration with the GT. In this case, the ASU operates at low pressure (LP), with its own air compressor delivering air to the cryogenic process at the minimum energy cost. Here, nitrogen may or may not be injected because of the energy penalty issue and instead, syngas humidification may be preferred. A design, which is intermediate between these two cases, involves partial supply of air by the gas turbine and the remainder by a separate air compressor. These integration schemes have been utilized in some IGCC projects. Examples include Nuon Power Plant at Buggenum, Netherlands (both air and nitrogen integration), Polk Power Station at Tampa, US (nitrogen-only integration) and LGTI at Plaquemine, US (stand-alone). However, there is very little information on systematic assessment of air extraction, nitrogen injection and configuration and operating conditions of the ASU and it is not clear which scheme is optimal for a given IGCC application. In this work, we address the above mentioned problem systematically using mixed-integer optimization. This approach allows the use of various objectives such as minimizing the investment and operating cost or SOx and NOx emissions, maximizing power output or overall efficiency or a weighted combination of these factors. A superstructure is proposed which incorporates all the integration schemes described above. Simplified models for ASU, gas turbine system and steam cycle are used which provide reasonable estimates for performance and cost (Frey and Zhu, 2006). The optimal structural configuration and operating conditions are presented for several case studies and it is observed that the optimal solution changes significantly depending on the specified objective.

  1. PMU Data Integrity Evaluation through Analytics on a Virtual Test-Bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olama, Mohammed M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shankar, Mallikarjun [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Power systems are rapidly becoming populated by phasor measurement units (PMUs) in ever increasing numbers. PMUs are critical components of today s energy management systems, designed to enable near real-time wide area monitoring and control of the electric power system. They are able to measure highly accurate bus voltage phasors as well as branch current phasors incident to the buses at which PMUs are equipped. Synchrophasor data is used for applications varying from state estimation, islanding control, identifying outages, voltage stability detection and correction, disturbance recording, and others. However, PMU-measured readings may suffer from errors due to meter biases or drifts, incorrect configurations, or even cyber-attacks. Furthermore, the testing of early PMUs showed a large disparity between the reported values from PMUs provided by different manufacturers, particularly when frequency was off-nominal, during dynamic events, and when harmonic/inter-harmonic content was present. Detection and identification of PMU gross measurement errors are thus crucial in maintaining highly accurate phasor readings throughout the system. In this paper, we present our work in conducting analytics to determine the trustworthiness and worth of the PMU readings collected across an electric network system. By implementing the IEEE 118 bus test case on a virtual test bed (VTB) , we are able to emulate PMU readings (bus voltage and branch current phasors in addition to bus frequencies) under normal and abnormal conditions using (virtual) PMU sensors deployed across major substations in the network. We emulate a variety of failures such as bus, line, transformer, generator, and/or load failures. Data analytics on the voltage phase angles and frequencies collected from the PMUs show that specious (or compromised) PMU device(s) can be identified through abnormal behaviour by comparing the trend of its frequency and phase angle reading with the ensemble of all other PMU readings in the network. If the reading trend of a particular PMU deviates from the weighted average of the reading trends of other PMUs at nearby substations, then it is likely that the PMU is malfunctioning. We assign a weight to each PMU denoting how electric-topology-wise close it is from where the PMU under consideration is located. The closer a PMU is, the higher the weight it has. To compute the closeness between two nodes in the power network, we employ a form of the resistance distance metric. It computes the electrical distance by taking into consideration the underlying topology as well as the physical laws that govern the electrical connections or flows between the network components. The detection accuracy of erroneous PMUs should be improved by employing this metric. We present results to validate the proposed approach. We also discuss the effectiveness of using an end-to-end VTB approach that allows us to investigate different types of failures and their responses as seen by the ensemble of PMUs. The collected data on certain types of events may be amenable to certain types of analysis (e.g., alerting for sudden changes can be done on a small window of data) and hence determine the data analytics architectures is required to evaluate the streaming PMU data.

  2. Reduced Order Modeling for Prediction and Control of Large-Scale Systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalashnikova, Irina; Arunajatesan, Srinivasan; Barone, Matthew Franklin; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Fike, Jeffrey A.

    2014-05-01

    This report describes work performed from June 2012 through May 2014 as a part of a Sandia Early Career Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project led by the first author. The objective of the project is to investigate methods for building stable and efficient proper orthogonal decomposition (POD)/Galerkin reduced order models (ROMs): models derived from a sequence of high-fidelity simulations but having a much lower computational cost. Since they are, by construction, small and fast, ROMs can enable real-time simulations of complex systems for onthe- spot analysis, control and decision-making in the presence of uncertainty. Of particular interest to Sandia is the use of ROMs for the quantification of the compressible captive-carry environment, simulated for the design and qualification of nuclear weapons systems. It is an unfortunate reality that many ROM techniques are computationally intractable or lack an a priori stability guarantee for compressible flows. For this reason, this LDRD project focuses on the development of techniques for building provably stable projection-based ROMs. Model reduction approaches based on continuous as well as discrete projection are considered. In the first part of this report, an approach for building energy-stable Galerkin ROMs for linear hyperbolic or incompletely parabolic systems of partial differential equations (PDEs) using continuous projection is developed. The key idea is to apply a transformation induced by the Lyapunov function for the system, and to build the ROM in the transformed variables. It is shown that, for many PDE systems including the linearized compressible Euler and linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations, the desired transformation is induced by a special inner product, termed the “symmetry inner product”. Attention is then turned to nonlinear conservation laws. A new transformation and corresponding energy-based inner product for the full nonlinear compressible Navier-Stokes equations is derived, and it is demonstrated that if a Galerkin ROM is constructed in this inner product, the ROM system energy will be bounded in a way that is consistent with the behavior of the exact solution to these PDEs, i.e., the ROM will be energy-stable. The viability of the linear as well as nonlinear continuous projection model reduction approaches developed as a part of this project is evaluated on several test cases, including the cavity configuration of interest in the targeted application area. In the second part of this report, some POD/Galerkin approaches for building stable ROMs using discrete projection are explored. It is shown that, for generic linear time-invariant (LTI) systems, a discrete counterpart of the continuous symmetry inner product is a weighted L2 inner product obtained by solving a Lyapunov equation. This inner product was first proposed by Rowley et al., and is termed herein the “Lyapunov inner product“. Comparisons between the symmetry inner product and the Lyapunov inner product are made, and the performance of ROMs constructed using these inner products is evaluated on several benchmark test cases. Also in the second part of this report, a new ROM stabilization approach, termed “ROM stabilization via optimization-based eigenvalue reassignment“, is developed for generic LTI systems. At the heart of this method is a constrained nonlinear least-squares optimization problem that is formulated and solved numerically to ensure accuracy of the stabilized ROM. Numerical studies reveal that the optimization problem is computationally inexpensive to solve, and that the new stabilization approach delivers ROMs that are stable as well as accurate. Summaries of “lessons learned“ and perspectives for future work motivated by this LDRD project are provided at the end of each of the two main chapters.

  3. Beamlet based direct aperture optimization for MERT using a photon MLC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henzen, D. Manser, P.; Frei, D.; Volken, W.; Born, E. J.; Joosten, A.; Lössl, K.; Aebersold, D. M.; Chatelain, C.; Fix, M. K.; Neuenschwander, H.; Stampanoni, M. F. M.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: A beamlet based direct aperture optimization (DAO) for modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) using photon multileaf collimator (pMLC) shaped electron fields is developed and investigated. Methods: The Swiss Monte Carlo Plan (SMCP) allows the calculation of dose distributions for pMLC shaped electron beams. SMCP is interfaced with the Eclipse TPS (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) which can thus be included into the inverse treatment planning process for MERT. This process starts with the import of a CT-scan into Eclipse, the contouring of the target and the organs at risk (OARs), and the choice of the initial electron beam directions. For each electron beam, the number of apertures, their energy, and initial shape are defined. Furthermore, the DAO requires dose–volume constraints for the structures contoured. In order to carry out the DAO efficiently, the initial electron beams are divided into a grid of beamlets. For each of those, the dose distribution is precalculated using a modified electron beam model, resulting in a dose list for each beamlet and energy. Then the DAO is carried out, leading to a set of optimal apertures and corresponding weights. These optimal apertures are now converted into pMLC shaped segments and the dose calculation for each segment is performed. For these dose distributions, a weight optimization process is launched in order to minimize the differences between the dose distribution using the optimal apertures and the pMLC segments. Finally, a deliverable dose distribution for the MERT plan is obtained and loaded back into Eclipse for evaluation. For an idealized water phantom geometry, a MERT treatment plan is created and compared to the plan obtained using a previously developed forward planning strategy. Further, MERT treatment plans for three clinical situations (breast, chest wall, and parotid metastasis of a squamous cell skin carcinoma) are created using the developed inverse planning strategy. The MERT plans are compared to clinical standard treatment plans using photon beams and the differences between the optimal and the deliverable dose distributions are determined. Results: For the idealized water phantom geometry, the inversely optimized MERT plan is able to obtain the same PTV coverage, but with an improved OAR sparing compared to the forwardly optimized plan. Regarding the right-sided breast case, the MERT plan is able to reduce the lung volume receiving more than 30% of the prescribed dose and the mean lung dose compared to the standard plan. However, the standard plan leads to a better homogeneity within the CTV. The results for the left-sided thorax wall are similar but also the dose to the heart is reduced comparing MERT to the standard treatment plan. For the parotid case, MERT leads to lower doses for almost all OARs but to a less homogeneous dose distribution for the PTV when compared to a standard plan. For all cases, the weight optimization successfully minimized the differences between the optimal and the deliverable dose distribution. Conclusions: A beamlet based DAO using multiple beam angles is implemented and successfully tested for an idealized water phantom geometry and clinical situations.

  4. Mississippi State Biodiesel Production Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rafael Hernandez; Todd French; Sandun Fernando; Tingyu Li; Dwane Braasch; Juan Silva; Brian Baldwin

    2008-03-20

    Biodiesel is a renewable fuel conventionally generated from vegetable oils and animal fats that conforms to ASTM D6751. Depending on the free fatty acid content of the feedstock, biodiesel is produced via transesterification, esterification, or a combination of these processes. Currently the cost of the feedstock accounts for more than 80% of biodiesel production cost. The main goal of this project was to evaluate and develop non-conventional feedstocks and novel processes for producing biodiesel. One of the most novel and promising feedstocks evaluated involves the use of readily available microorganisms as a lipid source. Municipal wastewater treatment facilities (MWWTF) in the USA produce (dry basis) of microbial sludge annually. This sludge is composed of a variety of organisms, which consume organic matter in wastewater. The content of phospholipids in these cells have been estimated at 24% to 25% of dry mass. Since phospholipids can be transesterified they could serve as a ready source of biodiesel. Examination of the various transesterification methods shows that in situ conversion of lipids to FAMEs provides the highest overall yield of biodiesel. If one assumes a 7.0% overall yield of FAMEs from dry sewage sludge on a weight basis, the cost per gallon of extracted lipid would be $3.11. Since the lipid is converted to FAMEs, also known as biodiesel, in the in Situ extraction process, the product can be used as is for renewable fuel. As transesterification efficiency increases the cost per gallon drops quickly, hitting $2.01 at 15.0% overall yield. An overall yield of 10.0% is required to obtain biodiesel at $2.50 per gallon, allowing it to compete with soybean oil in the marketplace. Twelve plant species with potential for oil production were tested at Mississippi State, MS. Of the species tested, canola, rapeseed and birdseed rape appear to have potential in Mississippi as winter annual crops because of yield. Two perennial crops were investigated, Chinese tallow tree and tung tree. High seed yields from these species are possible because, there stature allows for a third dimension in yield (up). Harvest regimes have already been worked out with tung, and the large seed makes shedding of the seed with tree shakers possible. While tallow tree seed yields can be mind boggling (12,000 kg seed/ha at 40% oil), genotypes that shed seed easily are currently not known. Efficient methods were developed to isolate polyunsaturated fatty acid methyl esters from bio-diesel. The hypothesis to isolate this class of fatty acids, which are used as popular dietary supplements and prescription medicine (OMACOR), was that they bind transition metal ions much stronger than their harmful saturated analogs. AgBF4 has the highest extraction ability among all the metal ions tested. Glycerol is a key product from the production of biodiesel. It is produced during the transesterification process by cleaving the fatty acids from the glycerol backbone (the fatty acids are used as part of the biodiesel, which is a fatty acid methyl ester). Glycerol is a non-toxic compound with many uses; however, if a surplus exists in the future, more uses for the produced glycerol needs to be found. Another phase of the project was to find an add-on process to the biodiesel production process that will convert the glycerol by-product into more valuable substances for end uses other than food or cosmetics, focusing at present on 1,3-propanediol and lactic acid.All three MSU cultures produced products at concentrations below that of the benchmark microorganisms. There was one notable isolate the caught the eye of the investigators and that was culture J6 due to the ability of this microorganism to co-produce both products and one in particularly high concentrations. This culture with more understanding of its metabolic pathways could prove a useful biological agent for the conversion of glycerol. Heterogeneous catalysis was examined as an alternative to overcome the disadvantages of homogeneous transesterification, such as the presence of salts in the glycer

  5. Epsilon Metal Summary Report FY 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Zumhoff, Mac R.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Windisch, Charles F.; Riley, Brian J.

    2011-09-30

    The Epsilon-metal ({var_epsilon}-metal) phase was selected in FY 2009 as a potential waste form to for immobilizing the noble metals found in the undissolved solids + aqueous stream, and the soluble Tc from ion-exchange process, each resulting from proposed aqueous reprocessing. {var_epsilon}-metal phase is observed in used nuclear fuel and the natural reactors of Oklobono in Gabon, where the long-term corrosion behavior was demonstrated. This makes {var_epsilon}-metal a very attractive waste form. Last fiscal year, {var_epsilon}-metal was successfully fabricated by combining the five-metals, Mo, Ru, Rh, Pd and Re (surrogate for Tc), into pellets followed by consolidation with an arc melter. The arc melter produced fully dense samples with the epsilon structure. However, some chemistry differences were observed in the microstructure that resulted in regions rich in Re and Mo, and others rich in Pd, while Ru and Rh remained fairly constant throughout. This year, thermal stability (air), and corrosion testing of the samples fabricated by arc melting were the main focus for experimental work. Thermal stability was measured with a differential scanning calorimeter - thermogravimetric analyzer, by both ramp heating as well as step heating. There is clear evidence during the ramp heating experiment of an exothermic event + a weight loss peak both beginning at {approx}700 C. Step heating showed an oxidation event at {approx}690 C with minimal weight gain that occurs just before the weight loss event at 700 C. The conclusion being that the e-metal begins to oxidize and then become volatile. These findings are useful for considering the effects of voloxidation process. Three different pellets were subjected to electrochemical testing to study the corrosion behavior of the epsilon-metal phase in various conditions, namely acidic, basic, saline, and inert. Test was done according to an interim procedure developed for the alloy metal waste form. First an open circuit potential was measured, followed by linear polarization sweeps. The linear polarization sweep range was the Tafel equation was fit to the linear polarization sweep data to determine the corrosion rate of each pellet in each test solution. The average calculated corrosion rates of the three pellets according to solution conditions were: -1.91 x 10{sup -4} mm/yr (0.001 M NaOH), -1.48 x 10{sup -3} mm/yr (0.01 M NaCl), -8.77 x 10{sup -4} mm/yr (0.001 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), -2.09 x 10{sup -3} mm/yr (0.001 M NaOH + 0.01 M NaCl), and -1.54 x 10{sup -3} mm/yr (0.001 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 0.01 M NaCl). Three single-pass flow through (SPFT) test were conducted at a flow rate of 10 ml/day, at 90 C, and pH of 2.5, 7.0, and 9.0 for up to 322 days. Results of the tests indicate that dissolution rates were 5 x 10{sup -4} g m{sup 2} d{sup -1} at pH 9.0, 1.2 x 10{sup -4} g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} at pH 7.0, and 2 x 10{sup -4} g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} at pH 2.5. The sample used for the pH 7.0 SPFT test contains extra Re compared to samples used for the other two SPFT test, which came from a single pellet. The corrosion data measured this year indicate that the {var_epsilon}-metal phase is chemically durable. The two chemically different phases, but structurally the same, behave differently during dissolution according to the microstructure changes observed in both the electrochemical and in SPFT test. Characterization of the test specimens after testing suggests that the dissolution is complex and involves oxidative dissolution followed by precipitation of both oxide and metallic phases. These data suggest that the dissolution in the electrochemical and SPFT tests is different; a process that needs further investigation.

  6. NOVEL DENSE MEMBRANE FOR HYDROGEN SEPARATION FOR ENERGY APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandopadhyay, Sukumar; Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Nag, Nagendra

    2013-10-24

    The main objectives of this project are: (1) Characterization of the thermo mechanical properties of the novel dense HTM bulk sample; (2) Development of a correlation among the intrinsic factors (such as grain size and phase distribution), and the extrinsic factors (such as temperature and atmosphere) and the thermo-mechanical properties (such as strengths and stress) to predict the performance of a HTM system (HTM membrane and porous substrate) ; and (3) Evaluation of the stability of the novel HTM membrane and its property correlations after thermal cycling. Based on all results and analysis of the thermo mechanical properties for the HTM cermet bulk samples, several important conclusions were made. The mean ?fs at room temperature is approximately 356 MPa for the HTM cermet. The mean ?fs value decreases to 284 MPa as the temperature increases to 850?C. The Difference difference in atmosphere, such as air or N2, had an insignificant effect on the flexural strength values at 850?C for the HTM cermet. The HTM cermet samples at room temperature and at 500?C fractured without any significant plastic deformation. Whereas, at 850?C, the HTM cermet samples fractured, preceded by an extensive plastic deformation. It seems that the HTM cermet behaves more like an elastic material such as a nonmetal ceramic at the room temperature, and more like a ductile material at increased temperature (850?C). The exothermic peak during the TG/DTA tests centered at 600?C is most likely associated with both the enthalpy change of transformation from the amorphous phase into crystalline zirconia and the oxidation of Pd phase in HTM cermet in air. The endothermic peak centered at 800?C is associated with the dissociation of PdO to Pd for the HTM cermet sample in both inert N2 environment and air. There is a corresponding weight gain as oxidation occurs for palladium (Pd) phase to form palladium oxide (PdO) and there is a weight loss as the unstable PdO is dissociated back to Pd and oxygen. The normal stress and shear stresses from the Mohr?s circle indicate that the residual stress in the HTM cermet sample is mainly as compressive residual stress in the magnitude of -135 to -155 MP, and with very little shear stress (in the magnitude of 10 MPa). The magnitude of change in the normal stress and the shear stress is insignificant in the HTM after 120 thermal cycles. However, the principle normal stress changes from compressive to tensile residual stress and there is a significant increase in the shear stress after 500 thermal cycles. The calculated value based on the equation and the Mohr?s circle is found to be consistent with the experimental value for the as-received HTM cermet samples. At some rotation (?) angle, the residual stress was found to be as tensile stress. Most ceramic material is weak in tension, and develops microscopic cracks. With treatment of 120 thermal cycles between 50?850?C, the HTM- sample exhibited thermally-induced cracks on the surface. Visually observable cracks appeared on the surface of HTM cermet with continuous thermal cycling, after 500 thermal cycles. The XRD powder diffraction analysis indicated an increased amount of crystalline PdO crystalline in HTM cermet after 120 and 500 thermal cycles as compare to the as-received samples. The Pd crystalline peaks were found to significantly decrease in peak intensity with thermal cycling. Higher peak intensity for PdO phase was observed with increased number of thermal cycles. A Monoclinic monoclinic zirconia phase was first identified in the as-received HTM as-received sample. However, with thermal cycling treatment of both 120 and 500 thermal cycles, the M-ZrO2 phase is transformed to the tetragonal YSZ, which is consistent with the thermal analysis results by TG/DTA. Correlations of the microstructural and thermo-mechanical properties of both selected reference material and ANL-3e HTM cermet bulk sample are affected mainly by porosity and microstructural features, such as grain size and pore size/distribution. The Young?s Modulus (E-value), especially, is positivel