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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dba a-weighted decibel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Ultra Soy of America DBA USA Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ultra Soy of America DBA USA Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Ultra Soy of America (DBA USA Biofuels) Place Fort Wayne, Indiana Zip 46898 Sector Biofuels Product An...

2

Vision Industries dba Vision Motor Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vision Motor Corp) Place Santa Monica, California Zip 90405 Product Santa Monica-based electric vehicle manufacturer. References Vision Industries (dba Vision Motor Corp)1...

3

d/b/a MC Applhmcc Corp.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ruteruntionnl, Ii,c,, ruteruntionnl, Ii,c,, d/b/a MC Applhmcc Corp. (fi~ezers) BEFORic: THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Wllshlngton, D.C. 20585 ) ) ) ) ) ) Case Number: 2013-SE-1430 COMPROMlSE AGREEMENT The U.S. Depl'lt'lJUent ofEnel'gy C'DOE' 1 ) Office of the General Counse], Office of Enforcement, initiated this acUon·against CNA International, Inc., d/b/a MC Appliance Coip. ("CNN' or "Respondent)!) pursuant to 10 C.F.R. § 429.122 by Notice ofProposed Civil Penalty. DOE alleged tha~reezer basic model - whiclt Respondent Jtnp01ted and distributed in commerce 1n the lhited States as Magic Chef-b1·and model HMCF7W, foiled to meet the applicable stnndard for maximum energy use. Soe 10 C.P.R. § 430.32(a). Respondent, on behalf of itself and mty pm·ent, sttbsidbwy, division or.othcr related entity, m\<1 DOE, by theh· authorized

4

ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Country United States Headquarters Location Duluth, Minnesota Recovery Act Funding $1,544,004.00 Total Project Value $3,088,007.00 Coverage Area Coverage Map: ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project Coordinates 46.7832731°, -92.1065787° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

5

Denton County Electric Cooperative d/b/a CoServ Electric Smart Grid Project  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d/b/a CoServ Electric Smart Grid Project d/b/a CoServ Electric Smart Grid Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead Denton County Electric Cooperative d/b/a CoServ Electric Country United States Headquarters Location Corinth, Texas Recovery Act Funding $17,205,844.00 Total Project Value $40,966,296.00 Coverage Area Coverage Map: Denton County Electric Cooperative d/b/a CoServ Electric Smart Grid Project Coordinates 33.1540091°, -97.0647322° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

6

Data:Daecbc1d-969a-4dba-825a-165572905dde | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Daecbc1d-969a-4dba-825a-165572905dde Daecbc1d-969a-4dba-825a-165572905dde No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Barnesville, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: 2011/11/01 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial Non-Demand Sector: Commercial Description: This rate is applicable to non-residential customer where the average monthly energy consumption has been demonstrated to be less than 3,000 Kilowatt hours. Subject to Power Cost Adjustment(PCA) Source or reference: Rate Binder # 2 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months):

7

SDI eBusiness, Inc. d/b/a RelightDepot & Navistar International Teaming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SDI eBusiness, Inc. d/b/a RelightDepot & Navistar International SDI eBusiness, Inc. d/b/a RelightDepot & Navistar International Teaming Profile Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

8

DOE/EA-1903 DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY'S  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

03 03 DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY'S ZOND WIND ENERGY PROJECT MANHATTAN, KANSAS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office SEPTEMBER 2013 DOE/EA-1903 DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY'S ZOND WIND ENERGY PROJECT MANHATTAN, KANSAS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office SEPTEMBER 2013 DOE/EA-1903 i September 2013 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS BMPs best management practices CEQ Council on Environmental Quality CFR Code of Federal Regulations DASR digital airport surveillance radar dB decibel dBA decibel A-weighted

9

Data:59530f01-dba6-4dda-9de3-f2626789e9bd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0f01-dba6-4dda-9de3-f2626789e9bd 0f01-dba6-4dda-9de3-f2626789e9bd No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Village of Springville, New York (Utility Company) Effective date: 2010/11/01 End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting (175 Watt Mercury Vapor Vertical Burning) Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: Rate Binder #5B (Illinois State University) Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category:

10

Data:Acb01105-cdda-4a21-ad72-e9d5041dba80 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Acb01105-cdda-4a21-ad72-e9d5041dba80 Acb01105-cdda-4a21-ad72-e9d5041dba80 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Farmers Electric Company, Ltd Effective date: 2012/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial-Three Phase Sector: Residential Description: Less than 50kW Source or reference: Rates Binder A Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

11

Impacts of Dibasic Acid (DBA) Addition on the Performance of a Pilot Vertical Flow Cell: Duke Energy Marshall Steam Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a pilot study conducted to test the potential impact of dibasic acid (DBA) on vertical flow cells (VFCs) constructed to remove selenium and mercury from a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber discharge. VFCs are a passive treatment technology with very low operational and maintenance costs and the potential for order-of-magnitude savings over conventional treatment methods. A full-scale VFC system has been constructed at a power generating facility based on ...

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

12

Data:67639909-6467-41c1-a2fc-8dba36d02da5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6467-41c1-a2fc-8dba36d02da5 6467-41c1-a2fc-8dba36d02da5 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Springfield, Oregon (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: Street Lighting 400 W HPS Opt. 2 L-1 Sector: Lighting Description: Option 2 is a Utility (SUB) owned and installed fixtures. in addition to charges in Option 2, there is a charge of .333% per month for return on investment (plant original cost). Source or reference: http://www.subutil.com/files/static_page_files/A6CFDCA3-94A4-7DCF-40A67DECC1D04974/201204SUBElec.pdf Source Parent:

13

Data:10e3925c-848e-416b-9925-221ead66dba5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c-848e-416b-9925-221ead66dba5 c-848e-416b-9925-221ead66dba5 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Oconomowoc Utilities Effective date: 2007/09/01 End date if known: Rate name: Cp-2 Large Power Time-of-Day Service with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Sector: Industrial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0598 per kilowatt-hour.

14

Data:6138babc-0dba-4be4-905c-21719f8bea33 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

38babc-0dba-4be4-905c-21719f8bea33 38babc-0dba-4be4-905c-21719f8bea33 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Bartholomew County Rural E M C Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Security Lighting Service, High Pressure Sodium Security Light, 250W (Existing Wood Pole) Sector: Lighting Description: Availability Available to any consumer of the Corporation where 120-volt service exists ahead of the meter loop for the use of Security Lighting, subject to the Corporation's Service Rules and Regulations. Customers receiving OSL service using a wood pole owned by the customer prior to May 1, 2000 or owned by the Corporation but required for a use other than OSL service shall receive service under the existing wood pole rate. All other customers shall receive service under the new wood pole rate.

15

Data:3fbb07ae-6dba-4cc1-a8f8-633247684142 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7ae-6dba-4cc1-a8f8-633247684142 7ae-6dba-4cc1-a8f8-633247684142 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Barron, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2009/07/15 End date if known: Rate name: Cp-1 Small Power Service with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Sector: Commercial Description: Application: This rate will be applied to customers for all types of service if their monthly Maximum Measured Demand is in excess of 40 kilowatts (kW) per month for three or more months in a consecutive 12-month period, unless the customer exceeds the application conditions of the Cp-2 schedule. Customers billed on this rate shall continue to be billed on this rate until their monthly Maximum Measured Demand is less than 40 kW per month for 12 consecutive months. The utility shall offer customers billed on this rate a one time option to continue to be billed on this rate for another 12 months if their monthly Maximum Measured Demand is less than 40 kW per month. However, this option shall be offered with the provision that the customer waives all rights to billing adjustments arising from a claim that the bill for service would be less on another rate schedule than under this rate schedule Fixed Monthly Charge includes Commitment to Community Rider: $7.00 per customer per month

16

crd title p1.ai  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS To ensure a more reader-friendly document, the U.S. Department of Energy limited the use of acronyms and abbreviations in this environmental impact statement. Acronyms and abbreviations are defined the first time they are used in each chapter or appendix. The acronyms and abbreviations used in the text of this document are listed below. Acronyms and abbreviations used in tables and figures because of space limitations are listed in footnotes to the tables and figures. BLM Bureau of Land Management CFR Code of Federal Regulations CEQ Council on Environmental Quality CO carbon monoxide dB decibels dBA A-weighted decibels DIRS Document Input Reference System DOE U.S. Department of Energy DNL day-night average noise level

17

crd title p1.ai  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS To ensure a more reader-friendly document, the U.S. Department of Energy limited the use of acronyms and abbreviations in this environmental impact statement. Acronyms and abbreviations are defined the first time they are used in each chapter or appendix. The acronyms and abbreviations used in the text of this document are listed below. Acronyms and abbreviations used in tables and figures because of space limitations are listed in footnotes to the tables and figures. BLM Bureau of Land Management CFR Code of Federal Regulations CEQ Council on Environmental Quality CO carbon monoxide dB decibels dBA A-weighted decibels DIRS Document Input Reference System DOE U.S. Department of Energy DNL day-night average noise level

18

Microsoft Word - Final Enivornmental Assessment.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment Environmental Assessment OF THE UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE LEWES CAMPUS ONSITE WIND ENERGY PROJECT U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy DECEMBER 2010 DOE/EA-1782 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE LEWES CAMPUS ONSITE WIND ENERGY PROJECT U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy DECEMBER 2010 DOE/EA-1782 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ABPP Avian and Bat Protection Plan CFR Code of Federal Regulations BGEPA Bald and Golden Eagle Act dBA A-weighted decibel dB decibel DNREC (Delaware) Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control DOE U.S. Department of Energy (also called the Department) DOI U.S. Department of the Interior

19

Data:Fd51c6e6-851c-43db-a205-fe87d46eab76 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fd51c6e6-851c-43db-a205-fe87d46eab76 Fd51c6e6-851c-43db-a205-fe87d46eab76 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Nebraska Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: 400 W High Pressure Sodium- Wood Sector: Lighting Description: 156 To all night street lighting service (dusk to daylight) from the overhead systems conforming to the District's standard specifications. Wood; Enclosed Electricity is provided through the Village, which obtains electric power from Nebraska Public Power District (NPPD) Source or reference: http://www.nppd.com/assets/municipalstreetlightingservice.pdf

20

Data:E15b0aed-d18c-4682-844e-0361894b3dba | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

aed-d18c-4682-844e-0361894b3dba aed-d18c-4682-844e-0361894b3dba No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Farmers Electric Company, Ltd Effective date: 2012/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Street Lights- 1000W High Pressure Sodium- Existing Wood Pole Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: Rates Binder A Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dba a-weighted decibel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Data:4b818dba-a1cd-41e8-8f1b-36b2c342bc83 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8dba-a1cd-41e8-8f1b-36b2c342bc83 8dba-a1cd-41e8-8f1b-36b2c342bc83 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Mascoutah, Illinois (Utility Company) Effective date: 2011/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: Municipal Street Lighting Service- Rate 6: Mercury Vapor, 11000 Lumen, 250 watts, Class C Sector: Lighting Description: Class C: Mercury Vapor Lamps or Sodium Vapor Lamps on standard overhead concrete pole construction or on existing metal pole construction, owned and operated by utility. Source or reference: Rates Binder 1, Illinois State University Source Parent: Comments

22

Data:5deae483-2d09-4dba-a2a9-aec39f1eaaf5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

deae483-2d09-4dba-a2a9-aec39f1eaaf5 deae483-2d09-4dba-a2a9-aec39f1eaaf5 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of West Point, Mississippi (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Seasonal Demand and Energy Manufacturing- SMSC Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

23

Data:B5195ae6-0a70-4928-b065-dbcb0cfb2dba | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ae6-0a70-4928-b065-dbcb0cfb2dba ae6-0a70-4928-b065-dbcb0cfb2dba No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Lawrenceburg, Tennessee (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting- H 400W (Mongoose) Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

24

Data:D51bf497-5b5e-47d4-bdde-ab5fc8dba8d4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bf497-5b5e-47d4-bdde-ab5fc8dba8d4 bf497-5b5e-47d4-bdde-ab5fc8dba8d4 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Platte-Clay Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: SL - 400 watt HPS/MH Parking Lot Light w/ square Pole Sector: Lighting Description: Available for lighting streets, walkways, or outdoor lighting of public or private areas when such facilities are operated and maintained as an extension of the Cooperative's distribution system. Electric usage will be unmetered. Source or reference: Rate Binder Kelly 11 ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments

25

Data:07ebea2b-96a0-4c1d-ba40-44aa6205e84a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ebea2b-96a0-4c1d-ba40-44aa6205e84a ebea2b-96a0-4c1d-ba40-44aa6205e84a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Tacoma, Washington (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: RS - Schedule A-1 - City of Fircrest - collectively metered apartments Sector: Residential Description: Available for domestic purposes in residences, apartments, duplex houses and multiple family dwellings. Source or reference: www.mytpu.org/customer-service/rates/power-rates/power-rates-schedules.htm Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW):

26

Data:219ab6db-a57e-42dd-b31b-3a52a753096e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

db-a57e-42dd-b31b-3a52a753096e db-a57e-42dd-b31b-3a52a753096e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Ameren Illinois Company Effective date: 2010/11/19 End date if known: Rate name: DS-3 Zone 1 - General Delivery Service 600V to 15kV Sector: Industrial Description: Availability: Service under this Rate is available for any eligible Non-Residential Customer within the territory served by Company that has demand metering installed and a maximum monthly Demand equal to or greater than 150 kilowatts (kW) but less than 1,000 kW as qualified in the Delivery Service Rate Reassignment section.

27

Data:3f6b198d-b007-4de4-b219-3c28dba94bdd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b198d-b007-4de4-b219-3c28dba94bdd b198d-b007-4de4-b219-3c28dba94bdd No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Poudre Valley R E A, Inc Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: IP - Irrigation Sector: Residential Description: These rates are available to consumers for agriculture irrigation services, including wholesale nurseries, three farms, and sod/turf farms. There rates are not available to golf courses, homeowners' associations, or installations where irrigation is incidental to other electrical usage. Rates are subject to the established rules and regulations, tariffs, bylaws and Articles, of Incorporation of the Association.

28

Data:72a32594-a091-45d3-913a-2dba3481d31e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-a091-45d3-913a-2dba3481d31e 4-a091-45d3-913a-2dba3481d31e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: San Bernard Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: 250 W High Pressure Sodium Sector: Lighting Description: Non-standard fixture: $50.00 fixture fee + connect fee Source or reference: http://sbec.coopwebbuilder.com/content/payment-options Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category:

29

Data:Dba28942-ea1c-4fe9-80da-06e91bfb5489 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dba28942-ea1c-4fe9-80da-06e91bfb5489 Dba28942-ea1c-4fe9-80da-06e91bfb5489 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Kings Mountain, North Carolina (Utility Company) Effective date: 2011/07/31 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting Service- 250W High Pressure Sodium- Flood, New Pole w/UG Sector: Lighting Description: Available to individual customer at locations on the City's distribution system. Source or reference: http://www.cityofkm.com/Downloads/billing/Electric_Rates.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

30

Data:C6fe91ce-8828-46bc-9657-694a57dba913 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ce-8828-46bc-9657-694a57dba913 ce-8828-46bc-9657-694a57dba913 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Ameren Illinois Company Effective date: 2010/11/19 End date if known: Rate name: DS-3 and BGS-3 Zone 1 - General Delivery Service 600V or Less Sector: Industrial Description: Availability: Service under this Rate is available for any eligible Non-Residential Customer within the territory served by Company that has demand metering installed and a maximum monthly Demand equal to or greater than 150 kilowatts (kW) but less than 1,000 kW as qualified in the Delivery Service Rate Reassignment section.

31

Data:E5551d6d-0dba-4262-9a7c-4504d80c5ea2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0dba-4262-9a7c-4504d80c5ea2 0dba-4262-9a7c-4504d80c5ea2 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: French Broad Elec Member Corp (Tennessee) Effective date: 2009/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: Street Lighting Service 400 W Mercury Sector: Lighting Description: (existing fixtures only) Plus Wholesale Purchase Power Fuel Charge (Or Credit) and Sales Tax where applicable. Source or reference: http://www.frenchbroademc.com/rateschedule.cfm Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months):

32

Data:A60c81d4-dba7-4901-b1fe-f79ec6bda696 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1d4-dba7-4901-b1fe-f79ec6bda696 1d4-dba7-4901-b1fe-f79ec6bda696 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Richland Electric Coop Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Controlled Water Heater Credit Sector: Residential Description: A $3.00 per month credit will be assessed to customers who qualify. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

33

Data:Dcabad47-7dba-4cc5-8ac4-5e15a5621f44 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dcabad47-7dba-4cc5-8ac4-5e15a5621f44 Dcabad47-7dba-4cc5-8ac4-5e15a5621f44 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Blue Earth, Minnesota (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Industrial Electric (No Rachet) Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: http://www.belw.org/Rate Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

34

Data:E269f569-335e-49db-a972-ed615f31eefb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f569-335e-49db-a972-ed615f31eefb f569-335e-49db-a972-ed615f31eefb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Burlington-Electric, Vermont (Utility Company) Effective date: 2010/03/01 End date if known: Rate name: Street Lighting (SL) Rate 100 Watt Mercury Vapor Sector: Lighting Description: For municipal street lighting on city-accepted streets. Source or reference: https://www.burlingtonelectric.com/ELBO/assets/Tariff%20Sheets%20June%20262009%20revised-1.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh):

35

Data:Bbcced56-2662-4ed0-9dba-bed39e0ac1de | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bbcced56-2662-4ed0-9dba-bed39e0ac1de Bbcced56-2662-4ed0-9dba-bed39e0ac1de No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Salmon River Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2004/02/21 End date if known: Rate name: Single Phase Master Metered (Non Demand) RV Parks (1600-1699 local access) Sector: Residential Description: Service under this schedule is available to master-metered mobile home parks and recreational vehicle (RV) parks. The type of service provided under this schedule is single phase, at the standard voltage available for the premises to be served, supplied through one meter at one point of delivery.

36

Data:995e3b8c-6820-4e27-b1cc-4f560d92dba3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e3b8c-6820-4e27-b1cc-4f560d92dba3 e3b8c-6820-4e27-b1cc-4f560d92dba3 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Electrical Dist No4 Pinal Cnty Effective date: 2009/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Night Light Rate- 175 W Mercury Vapor Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

37

Data:Dba15cce-1778-403e-a9a7-deb7a121e54a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dba15cce-1778-403e-a9a7-deb7a121e54a Dba15cce-1778-403e-a9a7-deb7a121e54a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Newton, North Carolina (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: 2014/07/01 Rate name: Electric Renewable Energy Credit Rider - RECR - 1 - Solar Photovoltaic Energy - Variable Sector: Description: Source or reference: http://www.newtonnc.gov/departments/finance/finance_documents.php Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage

38

Data:594e14c6-1941-44db-a95d-3446e7f25b50 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c6-1941-44db-a95d-3446e7f25b50 c6-1941-44db-a95d-3446e7f25b50 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Lenoir, Tennessee (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.lcub.com/electric/SitePages/erates.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

39

Data:96f2913f-8ba7-421f-bd96-dba51f832143 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f-8ba7-421f-bd96-dba51f832143 f-8ba7-421f-bd96-dba51f832143 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Consumers Energy Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting Nonmetered Memb Owns Coop Repairs MV 400 W Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.consumersenergy.coop/programs.php?pn=Security%20Lights&pl=securitylights Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category:

40

Data:65c87f52-3325-4d8d-ba4d-2b958cf0ccce | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-3325-4d8d-ba4d-2b958cf0ccce 2-3325-4d8d-ba4d-2b958cf0ccce No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Otter Tail Power Co Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Municipal Pumping Service - Secondary Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: https://www.otpco.com/RatesPricing/Documents/PDF Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dba a-weighted decibel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Data:1fb894cb-3e2c-4dba-8e17-dd8dd9321d94 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cb-3e2c-4dba-8e17-dd8dd9321d94 cb-3e2c-4dba-8e17-dd8dd9321d94 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Natchez Trace Elec Power Assn Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting MH 1000 W Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.ntepa.com/ Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Seasonal/Monthly Demand Charge Structures

42

Data:72053874-37f3-4221-b92d-ba7f30301a4b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3874-37f3-4221-b92d-ba7f30301a4b 3874-37f3-4221-b92d-ba7f30301a4b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Town of Wheatland, Wyoming (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: 400W Mercury Vapor Sector: Lighting Description: To consumers within the service territory of the Association, subject to the rules and regulations of the Association and of Regulatory Authorities. Source or reference: http://psc.state.wy.us/htdocs/tariffs/wy_whe1/0001a.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

43

Data:25345c67-a9d6-430d-ba28-a86c7e1a8ffe | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-a9d6-430d-ba28-a86c7e1a8ffe -a9d6-430d-ba28-a86c7e1a8ffe No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Consumers Energy Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting Nonmetered Memb Owns/Repairs HPS 100 W Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.consumersenergy.coop/programs.php?pn=Security%20Lights&pl=securitylights Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring:

44

Data:Ed286f86-4020-47b4-8031-511b01dba216 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

86f86-4020-47b4-8031-511b01dba216 86f86-4020-47b4-8031-511b01dba216 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Atlantic City Electric Co Effective date: 2013/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: SPL Experimental Light Emitting Diode Tear Drop 100 W Sector: Lighting Description: The following rates shall be applied to the kWh Usage for the particular light type and size to determine the monthly charge per light. Source or reference: http://www.atlanticcityelectric.com/_res/documents/NJTariffSectionIV.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months):

45

Data:16dba145-219c-4f5a-bff6-ef13474dee0e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dba145-219c-4f5a-bff6-ef13474dee0e dba145-219c-4f5a-bff6-ef13474dee0e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Algoma Utility Comm Effective date: 2008/05/28 End date if known: Rate name: Residential Service - Optional Time-of-Day Single-Phase 7am-7pm Sector: Residential Description: This rate schedule is optional to all Rg-1, Residential Service customers. Customers that wish to be served on this rate schedule must apply to the utility for service. Once an optional customer begins service on this rate schedule, the customer shall remain on the rate for a minimum of one year. Any customer choosing to be served on this rate schedule waives all rights to billing adjustments arising from a claim that the bill for service would be less on another rate schedule than under this rate schedule. Rg-2 Residential Service Optional TOD $1.00 per customer per month

46

Data:86f51ec1-f494-4663-8dd1-adee245dba1a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ec1-f494-4663-8dd1-adee245dba1a ec1-f494-4663-8dd1-adee245dba1a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Marshfield, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Cp-1 TOD Small Power Optional Time-of-Day Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Sector: Industrial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0515 per kilowatt-hour.

47

Data:Bee82d81-fae0-4d58-bd69-19c5dd6dba2e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bee82d81-fae0-4d58-bd69-19c5dd6dba2e Bee82d81-fae0-4d58-bd69-19c5dd6dba2e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Sumter Electric Member Corp Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting Utility Type Fixtures HPS 400 W Sector: Lighting Description: * Fixed Monthly Charge does not include monthly pole charge rates Source or reference: http://www.sumteremc.com/pdfs/OL-9.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V):

48

Data:Ec9d1804-3594-46e8-a661-7b5dba04c4b3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

04-3594-46e8-a661-7b5dba04c4b3 04-3594-46e8-a661-7b5dba04c4b3 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Calhoun, Georgia (Utility Company) Effective date: 2006/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Security Lights 150 W Utility Type Sector: Lighting Description: Initial charge if a pole must be set for the security light only $150.00. Source or reference: Rate Binder # 2 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

49

Data:84dba7e1-9c77-49a0-9137-9c7b9f9bf573 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dba7e1-9c77-49a0-9137-9c7b9f9bf573 dba7e1-9c77-49a0-9137-9c7b9f9bf573 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Woodruff Electric Coop Corp Effective date: 2012/10/24 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor lighting - Street Lights 400 W MH, Metal pole Sector: Lighting Description: To unmetered automatically controlled outdoor lighting service burning all night. Source or reference: Illinois State University Archive Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V):

50

Data:De7ac964-95f6-4e95-8dba-d55a0f741872 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ac964-95f6-4e95-8dba-d55a0f741872 ac964-95f6-4e95-8dba-d55a0f741872 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Modesto Irrigation District Effective date: 2011/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule FL Flat Rate Service-In Excess of 50% Load Factor 601 - 800 Watt Sector: Commercial Description: Applicability This Schedule is applicable to small, constant, non-metered incidental loads for utilities, communication agencies, state agencies, and applicable special districts where the customer owns and maintains the equipment. The customer must supply equipment wattage to the District. Such loads would include: Cathodic Protection Stations Motor Radial Gates Pressure Point Automatic Watering Systems Flashing Beacons Sign Illumination Communication Power Booster Devices Monthly Usage: 460kWh

51

Data:5cd55dba-e42d-4839-a42e-d318eb83d364 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cd55dba-e42d-4839-a42e-d318eb83d364 cd55dba-e42d-4839-a42e-d318eb83d364 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Groton Dept of Utilities Effective date: 2008/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Street and Area Lighting Service(175 W MH)-Underground Sector: Commercial Description: pplicable to public or private customers for standard street and area lighting installations provided and maintained by the Department to render 4,000 annual hours of lighting. Overhead installation is a light fixture attached to an existing overhead distribution system pole. Underground installation is a light fixture attached to a new pole served from an existing underground distribution system.

52

Data:72a72d79-0a4e-47da-91df-de1dba2c60e4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9-0a4e-47da-91df-de1dba2c60e4 9-0a4e-47da-91df-de1dba2c60e4 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Hermiston, Oregon (Utility Company) Effective date: 2003/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: Small Commercial (C1) Not Over 100 kW) Sector: Commercial Description: Demand Charge. . . . $3.25 per kW for all kW over 15 Source or reference: http://www.hermiston.or.us/node/25 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

53

Data:47dba9df-429b-4171-8a20-aae2ebcd6de3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dba9df-429b-4171-8a20-aae2ebcd6de3 dba9df-429b-4171-8a20-aae2ebcd6de3 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Whitehall Electric Utility Effective date: 2010/02/15 End date if known: Rate name: Athletic Field Lighting- City of Whitehall Sector: Lighting Description: This schedule will be applied to the flood lighting athletic fields for lighting during the evening, off-peak hours. Customer Charge of $500.00 annually, divided by 12 months is $41.6667, and is denoted by the Fixed Monthly Charge. This rate is subject to the Power Cost Adjustment Clause. Source or reference: http://psc.wi.gov/apps40/tariffs/viewfile.aspx?type=electric&id=6490

54

Data:3ee41548-4821-40db-a9de-6a36302c3d29 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1548-4821-40db-a9de-6a36302c3d29 1548-4821-40db-a9de-6a36302c3d29 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: NSTAR Electric Company Effective date: 2012/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: ACUSHNET All Electric School G-6 (22)CLC Sector: Commercial Description: This rate is available only at existing service locations to Customers who were taking service as of February 8, 1980 under an all-electric school rate schedule or under a special contract for all-electric school service. This rate is available for annual service in public and private school buildings where electricity supplies the total energy requirements of the premises served. The design and installation of electrical equipment for space heating, water heating, cooking and other purposes shall be acceptable to the Company. This rate is subject to the Company's printed requirements and the Company's Terms and Conditions - Distribution Service, each as in effect from time to time.

55

Data:7dd089d2-eabd-44db-a185-3414a6eb398e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

89d2-eabd-44db-a185-3414a6eb398e 89d2-eabd-44db-a185-3414a6eb398e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Midwest Electric, Inc Effective date: 2010/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- 100W Sector: Lighting Description: Available to any member where the cooperative's standard lighting unit can be installed, utilizing cooperative's 120 or 240 volt existing secondary or service wires for operation of the lighting unit. This service is available only where there is reasonable assurance that the service and installation will be of a permanent nature as determined by the cooperative. All applications for service shall be in accordance with the provisions set forth in this schedule.

56

Data:1e1dba06-f5bd-4860-b42a-dd3781dd577e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dba06-f5bd-4860-b42a-dd3781dd577e dba06-f5bd-4860-b42a-dd3781dd577e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Dover, Delaware (Utility Company) Effective date: 2008/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Rate F2: Water Pump 2 Service, Contracted Rate, up to 50 HP Motor(s) Sector: Commercial Description: "AVAILABILITY: This rate is available throughout the City of Dover electric service area by contract only. Contract terms will be for a minimum of ten (10) years. Service will be available for water pumps used for emergency fire fighting purposes and related equipment. Service will be supplied through one (1) meter. HP determination will be the total hp of all motors."

57

Data:8c31dba9-331f-4d72-8d9b-7d63193fb4e8 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dba9-331f-4d72-8d9b-7d63193fb4e8 dba9-331f-4d72-8d9b-7d63193fb4e8 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Bonners Ferry, Idaho (Utility Company) Effective date: 2009/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Large Commercial: B3PI Sector: Commercial Description: Note: $10.00 added to Fixed monthly charge if Remote Read Device is used. Source or reference: Rates Binder 1, Illinois State University Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V):

58

Data:Ff620383-84b3-4fd5-a242-61dba685e520 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ff620383-84b3-4fd5-a242-61dba685e520 Ff620383-84b3-4fd5-a242-61dba685e520 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Village of Sauk City, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2008/08/18 End date if known: Rate name: Cp-2 Large Power Time-of-Day Service Transformer Ownership Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Sector: Industrial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0756 per kilowatt-hour.

59

Data:5d4a5055-afa4-489d-ba47-148a272d1ca1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5-afa4-489d-ba47-148a272d1ca1 5-afa4-489d-ba47-148a272d1ca1 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: KEM Electric Coop Inc Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Dual Heat Service Sub-metering RC-1 Sector: Residential Description: Available to all members under the RC-1, SE-1, and GS-1 rates, where electric heat is the primary source of heating, with a backup heating system, also includes installed air conditioning and off-peak water heating, which meets Cooperative specifications. Type of Service The sub-metering of electric heat. The Cooperative will provide sub-meter, meter socket, and C.T. equipment, and load management device necessary to measure and interrupt electric usage. Off-Peak Water Heating Credit $5.00 per month (must use 800 kWh/month on main meter, and be 50 - 100 gallons in size)

60

Data:Ceba555d-ba45-42d0-99bf-2e2d19c6f55f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ceba555d-ba45-42d0-99bf-2e2d19c6f55f Ceba555d-ba45-42d0-99bf-2e2d19c6f55f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Long Island Power Authority Effective date: 2012/03/05 End date if known: Rate name: D188 (Time of Use Residential, Voluntary, Multiple Periods) Sector: Residential Description: *less than 39,000 kilowatt hours (kWh) annually or *12,600 kWh for the months of June through September If your account is billed on a discounted Household Assistance Rate, the rate number is preceded by a "D" and the rate description will include "Household Assistance." Fixed Monthly Charge= Service Charge+(Meter Charge * 30 days/month) .179+(.1*30)=.179+.3=.479

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dba a-weighted decibel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Data:37e3c29a-54a7-4f47-bd70-d81020dba005 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e3c29a-54a7-4f47-bd70-d81020dba005 e3c29a-54a7-4f47-bd70-d81020dba005 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Barron, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2009/07/15 End date if known: Rate name: Ms-1 Street and Security Lighting Service: 400 W MV(Wood Pole-Distribution) Sector: Lighting Description: Application: This schedule will be applied to municipal street lighting and private security lighting. The utility will furnish, install, and maintain all lighting units. Metering: In lieu of metering each lamp unit, the utility will meter one or more of each size and type of lamp unit that operates for a similar time period each month. Each unit of the same size, type and on-time period shall be billed the average amount of energy as used by the metered unit(s) of the same size, type and on-time period. Pole Charges: Wood - Distribution $1.00 per lamp per month Wood- Stand Alone $3.25 per lamp per month Fiberglass $6.25 per lamp per month Steel $8.00 per lamp per month

62

Data:Bf8b38e3-59b1-463d-9a5b-176f1dba622e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e3-59b1-463d-9a5b-176f1dba622e e3-59b1-463d-9a5b-176f1dba622e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: New London Electric&Water Util Effective date: 2009/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Cp-1 Small Power Service with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Sector: Industrial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0699 per kilowatt-hour.

63

Data:0fe694fe-a8c0-4d81-80f7-720c8ec90dba | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fe-a8c0-4d81-80f7-720c8ec90dba fe-a8c0-4d81-80f7-720c8ec90dba No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Columbia River Peoples Ut Dist Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Street and Highway Lighting 400w Mercury Vapor Sector: Lighting Description: Monthly Charge: Includes energy costs only, with the Customer having paid the installation costs and the periodic maintenance costs. Contract Options: For services beyond energy only, the PUD offers standard contracts for maintenance and contracts to finance Customer's street lighting installations. All applicable BPA Power Cost Adjustment charges per Rate Schedule 94 shall apply to all kWh's billed to Customers under this Rate Schedule.

64

Data:60adfee0-07bc-4b8d-ba2f-16fa06374305 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

adfee0-07bc-4b8d-ba2f-16fa06374305 adfee0-07bc-4b8d-ba2f-16fa06374305 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Trico Electric Cooperative Inc Effective date: 2009/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: General Service-GS 3 Three-Phase Sector: Commercial Description: *Applicable for service less than 12,000kw. Subject to tax and power cost adjustment. Source or reference: http://www.trico.coop/images/TRICO_GS3.pdf Source Parent: Comments Energy charge is the sum of the power supply charge and access charge. Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh):

65

Data:48de91f8-0590-4456-b5d8-120d8f2dba47 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

de91f8-0590-4456-b5d8-120d8f2dba47 de91f8-0590-4456-b5d8-120d8f2dba47 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Miami-Cass County Rural E M C Effective date: 2011/10/01 End date if known: Rate name: Security Lights 100 watt high pressure sodium(non-metered) Sector: Lighting Description: The Miami-Cass County Rural Electric Membership Corporation (REMC) shall charge and collect for security lighting service on the following bases of availability, character of service, monthly rate, and tax adjustment. AVAILABILITY: Available to any member of the REMC for continuous year round service for outdoor lighting where 120 volt service exists ahead of the meter loop.

66

Data:0f2b061d-ba46-4f58-9cb3-3bbe865f08bd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b061d-ba46-4f58-9cb3-3bbe865f08bd b061d-ba46-4f58-9cb3-3bbe865f08bd No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: PUD No 1 of Okanogan County Effective date: 2001/03/31 End date if known: Rate name: Area Lighting Schedule 10 - 100w HPS Sector: Lighting Description: Lighting systems under this schedule shall be constructed to District specifications, shall be non-filament type, and shall be unmetered. Applicable: To any existing permanent customer owning the property and having a credit rating acceptable to the District. Requires customer written agreement to pay appropriate monthly rate from this schedule for a minimum period of five years.

67

Data:B6d4f6db-a955-466a-89f4-8ef8fbf46eee | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f6db-a955-466a-89f4-8ef8fbf46eee f6db-a955-466a-89f4-8ef8fbf46eee No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Florence Utility Comm Effective date: 2009/11/30 End date if known: Rate name: Rg-2 Residential Service Optional Time-of-Day Three Phase 8am-8pm with Parallel Generation (20 kW or less) Sector: Residential Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0791 per kilowatt-hour. Parallel Generation (20 kW or less) Net Energy Billing - Available for single-phase and three-phase customers where a part or all of the electrical requirements of the customer are supplied by the customer's generating facilities, where such facilities have a total generating capability of 20 kW or less, where such facilities are connected in parallel with the utility and where such facilities are approved by the utility. Rate: The customer shall be billed monthly on a net energy basis and shall pay the fixed charge and energy charge specified in the rate schedule under which he is served. If, in any month, the customer's bill has a credit balance of $25 or less, the amount shall be credited to subsequent bills until a debit balance is reestablished. If the credit balance is more than $25, the utility shall reimburse the customer by check upon request. Monthly credits shall be computed by taking the net excess kilowatt-hours produced times the sum of the applicable energy charge plus monthly power cost adjustment clause (PCAC). This rate will be applied to residential single-phase and three-phase customers for ordinary household purposes. Single-phase motors may not exceed 5 horsepower individual-rated capacity without utility permission.

68

DOE/EA-1792 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR UNIVERSITY OF MAINE'S  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINAL FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR UNIVERSITY OF MAINE'S DEEPWATER OFFSHORE FLOATING WIND TURBINE TESTING AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT GULF OF MAINE U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office SEPTEMBER 2011 DOE/EA-1792 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR UNIVERSITY OF MAINE'S DEEPWATER OFFSHORE FLOATING WIND TURBINE TESTING AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT GULF OF MAINE U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office SEPTEMBER 2011 DOE/EA-1792 iii September 2011 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS APE area of potential effects CFR Code of Federal Regulations dBA decibel on the A-weighted scale, used to approximate the human ear's response to sound

69

untitled  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BREA POWER II, LLC'S BREA POWER II, LLC'S OLINDA COMBINED CYCLE ELECTRIC GENERATING PLANT FUELED BY WASTE LANDFILL GAS, BREA, CALIFORNIA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory October 2010 DOE/EA-1744 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS CEQA California Environmental Quality Act CFR Code of Federal Regulations CHP combined heat and power CO carbon monoxide dBA A-weighted decibel DOE U.S. Department of Energy (also called the Department) EA environmental assessment EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency kWh kilowatt-hour mmscfd million standard cubic feet of landfill gas per day MW megawatt MWh megawatt-hour NAAQS National Ambient Air Quality Standards NEPA National Environmental Policy Act, as amended NO 2 nitrogen dioxide

70

Microsoft Word - Seattle Steam Draft EA for concurrence-6-16-10-2.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SEATTLE STEAM COMPANY COMBINED HEAT AND POWER AT POST AVENUE IN DOWNTOWN SEATTLE, WASHINGTON U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory June 2010 DOE/EA-1741D DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR SEATTLE STEAM COMPANY COMBINED HEAT AND POWER AT POST AVENUE IN DOWNTOWN SEATTLE, WASHINGTON U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory June 2010 DOE/EA-1741D ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS Btu British thermal unit CFR Code of Federal Regulations CHP combined heat and power CO carbon monoxide dB(A) A-weighted decibel DOE U.S. Department of Energy (also called the Department) EA environmental assessment EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency FR Federal Register NEPA National Environmental Policy Act, as amended

71

EA-1407-FEA-2002.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

07 07 Environmental Assessment for the Proposed TA-16 Engineering Complex Refurbishment and Consolidation at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico April 23, 2002 Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Los Alamos Site Operations Environmental Assessment for the Proposed TA-16 Engineering Complex Refurbishment and Consolidation at LANL DOE OLASO April 23, 2002 iii Acronyms and Terms ac acres AEA Atomic Energy Act of 1954 AM Advanced Manufacturing AOCs areas of concern BACMs best available control measures BAER Burned Area Emergency Rehabilitation (team) BMPs best management practices CFR Code of Federal Regulations CRMP cultural resources management plan dB decibel dBA A-weighted frequency scale

72

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE RHODE ISLAND LFG GENCO, LLC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RHODE ISLAND LFG GENCO, LLC RHODE ISLAND LFG GENCO, LLC COMBINED CYCLE ELECTRICITY GENERATION PLANT FUELED BY LANDFILL GAS JOHNSTON, RHODE ISLAND U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August 2010 DOE/EA-1742 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE RHODE ISLAND LFG GENCO, LLC COMBINED CYCLE ELECTRICITY GENERATION PLANT FUELED BY LANDFILL GAS JOHNSTON, RHODE ISLAND U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August 2010 DOE/EA-1742 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS CFR Code of Federal Regulations CHP combined heat and power dBA A-weighted decibel DOE U.S. Department of Energy (also called the Department) EA environmental assessment EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency MW megawatt NAAQS National Ambient Air Quality Standards

73

untitled  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DRAFT DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR UNIVERSITY OF MAINE'S DEEPWATER OFFSHORE FLOATING WIND TURBINE TESTING AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT GULF OF MAINE U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office MAY 2011 DOE/EA-1792 DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR UNIVERSITY OF MAINE'S DEEPWATER OFFSHORE FLOATING WIND TURBINE TESTING AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT GULF OF MAINE U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office MAY 2011 DOE/EA-1792 iii May 2011 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS APE area of potential effects CFR Code of Federal Regulations dBA decibel on the A-weighted scale, used to approximate the human ear's response to sound DMR Maine Department of Marine Resources

74

Microsoft Word - Draft Ft Yukon Biomass System EA_0220  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOR A COMBINED POWER AND BIOMASS HEATING SYSTEM FORT YUKON, ALASKA U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE In Cooperation with USDA RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE DENALI COMMISSION FEBRUARY 2013 ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS ADEC Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation AFRPA Alaska Forest Resources Practices Act BFE Base Flood Elevation BMP best management practice BTU British Thermal Unit CATG Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments CEQ Council on Environmental Quality CFR Code of Federal Regulations CHP Combined Heat and Power CO carbon monoxide CO 2 carbon dioxide CWA Clean Water Act dBA A-weighted decibel DBH diameter at breast height DOE U.S. Department of Energy EA Environmental Assessment

75

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR A COMBINED POWER AND BIOMASS HEATING SYSTEM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOR A COMBINED POWER AND BIOMASS HEATING SYSTEM FORT YUKON, ALASKA U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE In Cooperation with USDA RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE DENALI COMMISSION APRIL 2013 ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS ADEC Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation AFRPA Alaska Forest Resources Practices Act BFE Base Flood Elevation BMP best management practice BTU British Thermal Unit CATG Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments CEQ Council on Environmental Quality CFR Code of Federal Regulations CHP Combined Heat and Power CO carbon monoxide CO 2 carbon dioxide CWA Clean Water Act dBA A-weighted decibel DBH diameter at breast height DOE U.S. Department of Energy EA Environmental Assessment

76

Applying a Weighting Matrix to the Hierarchical Neural Network Model for Handwritten Thai Character Recognition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a new neural network approach to the off-line handwritten Thai character recognition. This new neural network is a hierarchical neural network; it employs the concept of a weighting matrix in measuring the similarity between the incoming ...

Arit Thammano; Patcharawadee Poolsamran

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Data:A62dfd7d-ba2a-4c2b-b58a-36e0242b7e43 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dfd7d-ba2a-4c2b-b58a-36e0242b7e43 dfd7d-ba2a-4c2b-b58a-36e0242b7e43 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Snohomish County PUD No 1 Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: TIME OF USE GENERAL SERVICE Sector: Commercial Description: This schedule is designed for non-residential customers who can significantly shift their loads throughout the day. Customers must have an average typical monthly load demand exceeding 500 kW. Source or reference: http://www.snopud.com/Site/Content/Documents/rates/ElectricRates040113.pdf Source Parent: Comments The Minimum Charge shall be 50 cents per day plus 2.228 cents

78

Data:E5175eb4-3f7f-42db-a8e1-7eba5e5f7f09 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

eb4-3f7f-42db-a8e1-7eba5e5f7f09 eb4-3f7f-42db-a8e1-7eba5e5f7f09 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Winfield, Kansas (Utility Company) Effective date: 2012/12/01 End date if known: Rate name: Electric rate schedule LIS-4(102, 103), nonjurisdictional electric prepurchase option large general service V2 Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: http://www.winfieldks.org/index.aspx?NID=201 Source Parent: Comments Energy charge: 1.The charge for all prepurchased energy is to be set monthly by the city manager. 2.Fixed transmission and distribution adder: $0.0091 per kwh ($9.10 per mwh) added to each unit of energy sold under this option.

79

A Weighted Point Model for the Thermal Neutron Multiplicity Assay of High-Mass Plutonium Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A weighted point model for thermal neutron multiplicity counting has been developed for the assay of impure plutonium metal samples. Weighting factors are introduced for the spontaneous fission and ({alpha},n) contributions to the doubles and triples rates to account for the variations in neutron multiplication in these samples. The weighting factors are obtained from Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNPX code, which supports the simulation of spontaneous fission sources and can tally the source and detected neutron multiplicity distributions. Systematic behavior of the weighting factors was studied as a function of sample mass and geometry. Simulations were performed to evaluate the potential accuracy of assays performed with weighted point model analysis. Comparisons with experimental data are presented. The possible use of quads rates is explored.

M.S. Krick; W.H. Geist; D.R. Mayo

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Universal Compliance Labs dba EMCE Engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Section 21 - Emissions of Radio Frequency Energy. ... 10-2009 American National Standard for ... characteristics of information technology equipment. ...

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dba a-weighted decibel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A weighting scheme for open information extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the problem of extracting all possible relations among named entities from unstructured text, a task known as Open Information Extraction (Open IE). A state-of-the-art Open IE system consists of natural language processing tools to identify ...

Yuval Merhav

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Former Worker Program - Audiometry (hearing test)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of everyday sounds, along with the measure of their loudness in decibels. Decibels Sound Source 150 Firecracker, rock concert 120 Ambulance siren 110 Chain Saw 100 Snowmobile 95...

83

Supplemental Reply Comments of International Transmission Company d/b/a ITC Transmission  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MISO-IESO-C02-R0 MISO-IESO-C02-R0 Page 2 of 10 2.0 DEFINITIONS Circuit Target Flow(s) - The desired power flow (MW) on a specific circuit(s) of the Interface. Control Band - The maximum targeted Interface Deviation of ± 200 MW, maintained within practical considerations. Interface Deviation - The difference between the Interface Flow and the Interface Schedule. Interface - Collectively, the four circuits that comprise the Ontario-Michigan interconnection (J5D, L4D, L51D, B3N). Interface Control Mode(s) Regulated Mode - The Interface is within operational limitations and retains the ability to maintain the Interface Deviation within the Control Band, as described in Section 3.4.1

84

Denton County Electric Cooperative d/b/a CoServ Electric Smart...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

throughout CoServ Electric's service territory and explores the application of distribution automation and customer systems. The project is aimed at improving customer...

85

A weighted CSP approach to cost-optimal planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For planning to come of age, plans must be judged by a measure of quality, such as the total cost of actions. This paper describes an optimal-cost planner which guarantees global optimality whenever the planning problem has a solution. We code the extraction ... Keywords: Optimal planning, planning graph, soft arc consistency, soft constraints

Martin C. Cooper; Marie de Roquemaurel; Pierre Rgnier

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

IBM Research Report Nonlinear Optimization over a Weighted ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 11, 2008 ... Technion - Israel Institute of Technology ... distribution outside of IBM prior to publication should be limited to peer communications and specific.

87

A Weighted Hybrid Fuzzy Result Merging Model for Metasearch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Result merging of search engine results for metasearch is a well explored area. However most result merging models try to collate document rankings from the search engines whose results are being merged into a single ranking using some mathematical function. ...

Arijit De; Elizabeth D. Diaz

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

A Weighted Freshness Metric for Maintaining Search Engine Local Repository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current search engines maintain a local repository to improve the search efficiency. A crawler is used to periodically poll the remote web pages to update the contents of the local repository. Due to the resource limitations, some local pages may be ...

Jianchao Han; Nick Cercone; Xiaohua Hu

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

SBC Long Distance, LLC Original Page 1 d/b/a AT&T Long Distance Effective November 3, 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.75 Croatia 1p-12m $4.58 $3.70 Azerbaijan 7a-1p $6.37 $5.10 Cuba 4p-10p $5.15 $5.15 Bahamas 1p-2a $3.06 $2* $1.70 Cayman Islands $0.25 Austria $0.12 Central African Republic $1.51 Azerbaijan $0.87 Chad Per Minute Azerbaijan $0.87 Cuba $0.92 Bahamas $0.25 Cyprus $0.56 Bahrain $0.65 Czech Republic $0

Greenberg, Albert

90

Identification of limiting case between DBA and SBDBA (CL break area sensitivity): A new model for the boron injection system  

SciTech Connect

Atucha-2 is a Siemens-designed PHWR reactor under construction in the Republic of Argentina. Its geometrical complexity and (e.g., oblique Control Rods, Positive Void coefficient) required a developed and validated complex three dimensional (3D) neutron kinetics (NK) coupled thermal hydraulic (TH) model. Reactor shut-down is obtained by oblique CRs and, during accidental conditions, by an emergency shut-down system (JDJ) injecting a highly concentrated boron solution (boron clouds) in the moderator tank, the boron clouds reconstruction is obtained using a CFD (CFX) code calculation. A complete LBLOCA calculation implies the application of the RELAP5-3D{sup C} system code. Within the framework of the third Agreement 'NA-SA - Univ. of Pisa' a new RELAP5-3D control system for the boron injection system was developed and implemented in the validated coupled RELAP5-3D/NESTLE model of the Atucha 2 NPP. The aim of this activity is to find out the limiting case (maximum break area size) for the Peak Cladding Temperature for LOCAs under fixed boundary conditions. (authors)

Gonzalez Gonzalez, R.; Petruzzi, A.; D'Auria, F. [San Piero A Grado Nuclear Research Group GRNSPG, Univ. of Pisa, Via Livornese 1291-56122, San Piero a Grado - Pisa (Italy); Mazzantini, O. [Nucleo-electrica Argentina Sociedad Anonima (NA-SA), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

AR Ins. Lic. #245544 CA Ins. Lic. #0633005 d/b/a in CA Seabury & Smith Insurance Program Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

services · Emergency services · Hospitalization · Maternity and newborn care · Mental health/substance abuse treatments · Prescription drugs · Rehabilitative services · Laboratory services · Preventive-swing with the heftiest legislation set for 2014 -- when health insurance will become available to millions of Americans

Miami, University of

92

Data:87b747db-a60a-468b-9521-eb9546bc74ad | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HPS 150w Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable only to outdoor lighting by ballast operated vapor lamp fixtures and poles conforming to Cooperative specifications....

93

Data:3dba1b14-55fc-42b9-b78d-199446bf2904 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b14-55fc-42b9-b78d-199446bf2904 b14-55fc-42b9-b78d-199446bf2904 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Elroy, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Effective date: 2009/01/22 End date if known: Rate name: Cp-2 Large Power Service between 100kW and 500kW Demand Sector: Industrial Description: Power Cost Adjustment Clause - All metered rates shall be subject to a positive or negative power cost adjustment charge equivalent to the amount by which the current cost of power (per kilowatt-hour of sales) is greater or lesser than the base cost of power purchased (per kilowatt-hour of sales). The base cost of power (U) is $0.0510 per kilowatt-hour.

94

Data:Dba521ae-a873-4afa-9c97-9dd95c0de377 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or highways. Source or reference: http:www.cheyennelight.comsitesdefaultfilesclfpelectricity.pdf Assume net metering (buy sell): No Flat rate buy (kWh): Flat rate sell...

95

Data:90dba9a3-88bb-4319-95d6-4ce287aa5770 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Also available for network services including lighting. Special service, such as welding, x-ray, heating and air conditioning is available subject to Department approval....

96

Data:5395d9d2-cc38-4501-957f-04595c0f3dba | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lighting Description: APPLICABILITY: Applicable for street, roadway, and general area lighting service under the provisions of the Company's standard contract for such service....

97

Data:B9d1e634-097c-4dba-9491-2cf368c35db3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Three Phase Sector: Commercial Description: When commercial and industrial Customer's peak demand exceeds 100 kW or more in any two summer months or 200 kW in any two months of...

98

Data:8ab23eb9-edba-4c3d-ba5c-c9527258ef1f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transformer Capacity Charge 1.00 charge for each additional kVA over 30 less demand and energy usage for the month. Source or reference: www.dakotavalley.com Assume net metering...

99

A weighted profile intersection measure for profile-based authorship attribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces a new similarity measure called weighted profile intersection (WPI) for profile-based authorship attribution (PBAA). Authorship attribution (AA) is the task of determining which, from a set of candidate authors, wrote a given document. ...

Hugo Jair Escalante; Manuel Montes-y-Gmez; Thamar Solorio

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

A weighted tag similarity measure based on a collaborative weight model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of measuring semantic relatedness between social tags remains largely open. Given the structure of social bookmarking systems, similarity measures need to be addressed from a social bookmarking systems perspective. We address the fundamental ... Keywords: similarity measures, tag similarity, tag weighting, tagging, vector space model

Gokavarapu Srinivas; Niket Tandon; Vasudeva Varma

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dba a-weighted decibel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Predicting Large-Area Corn Yield with a Weighted Palmer Z-Index  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palmer's z-index, calculated to reflect only the planting-emergence and anthesis-grainfill stages of the growing season, is related with detrended corn yields to produce a predictive model for Illinois corn production. The model is evaluated to ...

Scott A. Isard; William E. Easterling

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

A weighted dominant color descriptor for content-based image retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Color has been extensively used in the process of image retrieval. The dominant color descriptor (DCD) that was proposed by MPEG-7 is a famous case in point. It is based on compactly describing the prominent colors of an image or a region. However, this ... Keywords: Background dominance problem, Dominant color descriptor, Linear Block Algorithm, MPEG-7, Object- and content-based image retrieval, Salient object detection, Semantic feature, Similarity measures

Ahmed Talib; Massudi Mahmuddin; Husniza Husni; Loay E. George

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(EPA 1974, 1978). Some Iowa counties are considering noise ordinances modeled from Missouri county ordinances. These ordinances would limit noise to a certain decibel level and...

104

INTERNATIONAL UNION OF OPERATING ENGINEERS NATIONAL HAZMAT PROGRAM - PORTER-CABLE CIRCULAR SAW OENHP: 2001-04, VERSION A  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Florida International University's (FIU) Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) evaluated five saws for their effectiveness in cutting specially prepared fiberglass-reinforced plywood crates. These crates were built as surrogates for crates that presently hold radioactively contaminated glove boxes at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Los Alamos facility. The Porter-Cable circular saw was assessed on August 15-16, 2001 (Porter-Cable No.1 and Porter-Cable No.2, respectively). During the FIU test of efficacy, a team from the Operating Engineers National Hazmat Program (OENHP) evaluated the occupational safety and health issues associated with this technology. The Porter-Cable saw is a straightforward machine for cutting wood of varying thickness. The blade is fully guarded with a fixed upper and a lower retractable guard. The lower guard retracts as the blade engages the work piece. The unit is operated with an on/off guarded trigger switch and is supported with a handgrip mounted near the front of the saw. The saw is equipped with a directional nozzle, which aims sawdust away from the operator and the line of cut. An optional vacuum system, attached to the directional nozzle, is used to remove and collect dust. During the demonstration of Porter-Cable No.1, personal noise sampling indicated that one worker was under and one was at the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Action Level of 85 decibels (dBA) with time-weighted averages (TWA's) of 82.7 and 84.6 dBA, respectively. During the demonstration of Porter-Cable No.2, however, both workers did exceed the Action Level with TWA's of 89.7 and 90.0 dBA. These data are not entirely representative as they were gathered during a simulation and not at the actual worksite. Additional sampling should be conducted on-site, but the workers should wear hearing protection until it is determined that it is no longer necessary. The total nuisance dust sample for Porter-Cable No.1 was 3.53 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m{sup 3}), which is lower than the OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 15 mg/m{sup 3} and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV) of 10 mg/m{sup 3}. Porter-Cable No.2's nuisance dust results yielded a value of 22.05 mg/m{sup 3}, which is over the PEL and TLV. The fiber analysis for the first demonstration yielded 12.9 fibers per cubic centimeter (f/cc), which is much higher than the PEL of 1 f/cc. Galson Laboratories considered the fiber analysis for the second demonstration void due to the overloading of dust on the filter. Kickback, the sudden reaction to a pinched blade, is possible with this saw and could cause the saw to lift up and out of the work piece and toward the operator. Proper work position and firm control of the saw minimizes the potential for a sprain or strain. Care needs to be exercised to support the work piece properly and to not force the tool.

Unknown

2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

Duke Power Company LLC d/b/a Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC Amended Response to RIS 2007-08, Updated Licensing Submittal Information to Support the Design-Centered Licensing Review Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requested the submittal of updated information regarding combined license (COL) applications for new reactors. In Enclosure 1 to that letter, and in response to question 3(a) of RIS 2007-08, Duke indicated its planning basis reflected an intent to submit the William States Lee III (Lee Nuclear) COL application at approximately the same time as the AP1000 reference plant (R-COL) application in late October 2007. Duke also committed to communicate promptly to the NRC Staff any changes to this planning basis approximately 90 days prior to the application submittal date. In consultation with NuStart, Duke believes it prudent to avoid potential interference between the R-COL application acceptance review and any subsequent (S-COL) application (such as Duke's). Duke and NuStart believe that staggering these applications slightly will ensure more efficient and effective interactions during both R-COL and S-COL acceptance reviews. Accordingly, Duke hereby amends its response to question 3(a) of RIS 2007-08, and intends to submit the Lee Nuclear COL application by mid-December 2007.

Bryan J. Dolan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Ad Hoc Wireless Networking Links  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and batteries Ceramic chip antennas ClearPath disguised antennas [added 11/22/04] Cushcraft Decibel [updated 1/21/04] Do-It-Yourself Wi-Fi ...

107

Performance Characterization - 1999 Toyota RAV4 EV - Inductive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pomona loop and an average sound intensity of 70.3 decibels on the freeway Pomona loop. Wind and road noise play a major part in the increased test readings for the freeway...

108

Audioptimization : global-based acoustic design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acoustic design is a difficult problem, because the human perception of sound depends on such things as decibel level, direction of propagation, and attenuation over time, none of which are tangible or visible. The advent ...

Monks, Michael Christopher, 1958-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

A second field investigation of noise reduction afforded by insert-type hearing protectors  

SciTech Connect

Field testing of noise reduction by earplugs was done. Ten factories and 280 employees took 1400 attenuation tests. User molded, expandable acoustic foam, custom molded, and acoustic wool types of earplugs were evaluated. Workers received protection ranging from about 9 decibels at 125 hertz to 29 decibels at 3150 hertz. Acoustic foam earplugs provided the best hearing protection, and acoustical wool, the least. The authors conclude actual noise protection depends on earplug design.

Edwards, R.G.; Broderson, A.B.; Green, W.W.; Lempert, B.L.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

INTERNATIONAL UNION OF OPERATING ENGINEERS NATIONAL HAZMAT PROGRAM - DEWALT RECIPROCATING SAW OENHP{number_sign}: 2001-01, VERSION A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Florida International University's (FIU) Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) evaluated five saws for their effectiveness in cutting specially prepared fiberglass-reinforced plywood crates. These crates were built as surrogates for crates that presently hold radioactively contaminated glove boxes at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Los Alamos facility. The DeWalt reciprocating saw was assessed on August 13, 2001. During the FIU test of efficacy, a team from the Operating Engineers National Hazmat Program (OENHP) evaluated the occupational safety and health issues associated with this technology. The DeWalt reciprocating saw is a hand-held industrial tool used for cutting numerous materials, including wood and various types of metals depending upon the chosen blade. Its design allows for cutting close to floors, corners, and other difficult areas. An adjustable shoe sets the cut at three separate depths. During the demonstration for the dismantling of the fiberglass-reinforced plywood crate, the saw was used for extended continuous cutting, over a period of approximately two hours. The dismantling operation involved vertical and horizontal cuts, saw blade changes, and material handling. During this process, operators experienced vibration to the hand and arm in addition to a temperature rise on the handgrip. The blade of the saw is partially exposed during handling and fully exposed during blade changes. Administrative controls, such as duty time of the operators and the machine, operator training, and personal protective equipment (PPE), such as gloves, should be considered when using the saw in this application. Personal noise sampling indicated that both workers were exposed to noise levels exceeding the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Action Level of 85 decibels (dBA) with time-weighted averages (TWA's) of 88.3 and 90.6 dBA. Normally, a worker would be placed in a hearing conservation program if his TWA was greater than the Action Level. In this case, however, monitoring was conducted during a simulation, not during the actual work conducted at the worksite. Additional sampling should be conducted at the worksite to determine the actual noise levels for the workers. Until it is determined that the actual TWA's are less than the Action Level, the workers should use PPE. A training program on the proper use and wearing of the selected PPE should be provided to each worker. Nuisance dust monitoring yielded a concentration of 10.69 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m{sup 3}). Although this is less than the OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of 15 mg/m{sup 3}, it is above the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV) of 10 mg/m{sup 3}. Fiberglass dust monitoring yielded a fiber count of 1.7 fibers per cubic centimeter (f/cc). This is above the PEL and the TLV of 1.0 f/cc. Therefore, controls should be implemented (engineering or PPE) to reduce the workers' exposure to the dust. Respirators should be used if engineering controls do not sufficiently control the dust or fiberglass generated. Respirators should be equipped with an organic vapor and acid gas cartridge with a High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter, since during the demonstration, the workers complained of an odd smell, which may have been from the breakdown of the fiberglass.

Unknown

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

How to use the National Cybersecurity Workforce Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Information Security Officer (CISO)/Chief Information Officer (CIO) Computer Network ... Cyber Workforce Planner Database Administrator (DBA ...

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

112

The National Cybersecurity Workforce Framework Interactive ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Cybersecurity Model, Fed CIO Council Matrix ... by the Office of the Chief Information Officer. ... & Awareness Professional Database Administrator (DBA ...

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

113

REVIEW----DOE RESPONSE.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

) ) International Transmission Company ) Docket No. PP-230-4 d/b/a ITCTransmission ) RESPONSE OF PJM INTERCONNECTION, L.L.C. TO ANSWER OF INTERNATIONAL TRANSMISSION COMPANY d/b/a ITCTransmission AND SUPPLEMENTAL COMMENTS ON BEHALF OF THE MIDWEST INDEPENDENT TRANSMISSION SYSTEM OPERATOR, INC. On April 14, 2011, International Transmission Company, d/b/a ITCTransmission ("ITC" or "Applicant") filed an answer

114

Audiometry (hearing test) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Audiometry (hearing test) Audiometry (hearing test) Audiometry (hearing test) The audiogram is an evaluation of how well an individual can hear. Sounds are presented to the individual through earphones during the test. These sounds are presented at different levels of frequency and intensity. The human ear responds to the frequency or pitch of a sound and the intensity or loudness of the sound. The frequency of the sound is measured in Hertz (Hz), and the loudness of the sound is measured in decibels (dB). During the procedure, the responses of the individual are recorded on a graph. An individual has no impairment in hearing if he or she detects the sound that is presented through the earphones in the range of 0 to 25 decibels. The audiogram indicates how much louder (in decibels) the pure tone frequency

115

Energy LNG Development Company, LLC (d/b/a Oregon LNG) FE Docket No. 12--LNG Application For Long-Term Authorization to Export Liquefied Natural Gas to Non-Free Trade Countries Opinion of Counsel Re: In the Matter of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have acted as special counsel to LNG Development Company, LLC ("Oregon LNG"), a Delaware limited liability company. Oregon LNG seeks authorization by filing an application with the office of the Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy (the "Application") to export liquefied natural gas ("LNG") of up to 9.6 mtpa of LNG for a 25-year term from its proposed LNG terminal site in Warenton, Clatsop County, Oregon, to any country that currently has or in the future develops the capacity to import LNG and with which trade is not then prohibited by U.S. law or policy and with which the United States does not then have a Free Trade Agreement requiring the national treatment for trade in natural gas and LNG (the "Proposed Exportation"). This opinion of legal counsel is provided to you in accordance with the requirements of Section 590.202(c) of the U.S. Department of Energy's regulations, 10 C.F.R. 590.202(c) (2011). The law covered by the opinions expressed herein is limited to the laws of the State of Oregon and the Limited Liability Company Act of the State of Delaware. This opinion of legal counsel is to be interpreted in accordance with customary practice as to the matters addressed, the meaning of the language used and the scope and natue of the work we have performed.

Bil Miler

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Service, Tech & Research Corp ... UGI Energy Services, Inc. d.b.a. GASMARK United Gas Management Inc ... Number of states in which marketer is licensed 0.00

117

Casablanca Carlos American Electric Power Transmission Owner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Facilitator) Chantal PJM Interconnection Not Applicable Horstmann John Dayton Power & Light Company (The) Transmission Owner Issermoyer John PPL Electric Utilities Corp. dba PPL Utilities Transmission Owner

Pjm Interconnection Llc; Teleconference Webex Participants; Firstenergy Solutions; Corp Transmission Owner; Boltz Jeff; Firstenergy Solutions; Corp Transmission Owner; Fecho Thomas; Indiana Michigan; Power Company; Transmission Owner; Patten Kevin; Company Transmission Owner

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Minnesota's 8th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grid Projects in Minnesota's 8th congressional district ALLETE Inc., dba Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project Registered Energy Companies in Minnesota's 8th congressional...

119

Testing of coatings for the nuclear industry  

SciTech Connect

Coatings for commercial nuclear power plants need to withstand humidity, radiation exposure, and LOC accident conditions; they also must be decontaminable. Tests for decontaminability, radiation stability, and design-basis-accident (DBA) resistance are described. An irradiation test facility using spent fuel assemblies and a spray loop for simulating a DBA are described. A sample test report sheet is presented. (DLC)

Goldberg, G.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

A DESK GUIDE TO THE DAVIS-BACON ACT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE DBA Desk Guide 06-16-2010 DOE DBA Desk Guide 06-16-2010 A DESK GUIDE TO THE DAVIS-BACON ACT Prevailing Wage Requirements for Contractors on Federal Contracts and DBA-Covered Federally Financed or Assisted Construction Projects Introduction. The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Desk Guide for the use of contractors and subcontractors performing work on construction projects under a federal contract, or under a statute authorizing federal financial assistance, that requires the application of Davis-Bacon Act (DBA or the Act) prevailing wage requirements. This Desk Guide may also be used by grantees, subgrantees, and federal personnel to administer their respective roles and functions with respect to the DBA. The objective of this Desk Guide is to provide simple, non-technical guidance to help

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dba a-weighted decibel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-230-3 International  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-230-3 Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-230-3 International Transmission Company d/b/a ITCTransmission Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-230-3 International Transmission Company d/b/a ITCTransmission Application from International Transmission Company d/b/a ITCTransmission to construct, operate and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada Border. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-230-3 International Transmission Company d/b/a ITCTransmission More Documents & Publications Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-230-3 International Transmission Company d/b/a ITCTransmission Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-2 and PP-230-3 ITC Holdings Corporation Limited Partnership, International Transmission

122

DISCLAIMER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

06 06 Ka-Band ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR) K Widener N Bharadwaj K Johnson February 2012 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research K Widener/N Bharadwaj/K Johnson, February 2012, DOE/SC-ARM/TR-106 iii Acronyms and Abbreviations ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (Climate Research Facility) ARSCL Active Remote Sensing of Clouds C band frequencies between 4 GHz and 8 GHz dB decibel dBi antenna gain referenced to isotropic radiator dBm decibel referenced to 1 mW dBZ reflectivity DMF Data Management Facility DOE U.S. Department of Energy DQO Data Quality Office (ARM) GHz gigahertz (10 9 Hz) Hz hertz Ka band frequencies between 26.5 GHz and 40 GHz

123

DISCLAIMER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

13 13 Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (X/Ka/W-SACR) K Widener N Bharadwaj K Johnson June 2012 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research K Widener/N Bharadwaj/K Johnson, June 2012, DOE/SC-ARM/TR-113 iii Acronyms and Abbreviations AGL above ground level ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (Climate Research Facility) C band frequencies between 4 GHz and 8 GHz dB decibel dBi antenna gain referenced to isotropic radiator dBm decibel referenced to 1 mW dBZ reflectivity DMF Data Management Facility DQO Data Quality Office (ARM) EIKA Extended Interaction Klystron Amplifier GHz gigahertz (10 9 Hz) Hz hertz Ka band frequencies between 26.5 GHz and 40 GHz

124

Modern Methods for Lipid AnalysisChapter 11 Analysis of Steroids by Liquid Chromatography Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization Mass Spectrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern Methods for Lipid Analysis Chapter 11 Analysis of Steroids by Liquid Chromatography Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization Mass Spectrometry Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books 7B3610598EB68717295AAD02DBA4F828

125

Nordyne: Order (2010-CE-01/0210) | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(2010-CE-010210) October 8, 2010 DOE ordered Nordyne, LLC dba Garrison Heating and Cooling Products to pay a 10,000 civil penalty after finding Nordyne had failed to...

126

CNA: Compromise Agreement (2013-SE-1430)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE and CNA International, Inc., d/b/a MC Appliance Corp. entered into a Compromise Agreement to resolve a case involving the distribution in commerce of noncompliant freezers.

127

Current Processing Position Company DOE/FE Docket No.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC 11-161-LNG 2 Cameron LNG, LLC 11-162-LNG 3 Jordan Cove Energy Project, L.P. 12-32-LNG 4 LNG Development Company, LLC (dba Oregon LNG)...

128

Intramolecular Heck couplings of unactivated alkyl electrophiles : synthetic and mechanistic studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method for the palladium-catalyzed intramolecular Heck coupling of unactivated alkyl bromides and chlorides is described. The optimal catalyst system was composed of Pd2(MeO-dba)3 as the metal source and N-heterocyclic ...

Firmansjah, Luke

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

A Long, Contingent Path to Comparative Advantage: Industrial Policy and the Japanese Iron and Steel Industry, 1900-1973  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the British Steel Industry. Cambridge, Massachusetts:Robert W. The U.S. Steel Industry in Recurrent Crisis.Coal By the Japanese Steel Industry. D.B.A. Dissertation,

ELBAUM, BERNARD

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

An enhanced burst-polling based delta dynamic bandwidth allocation scheme for QoS over E-PONs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new burst-polling based delta dynamic bandwidth allocation (DBA) scheme is proposed for quality of services (QoS) using class of services (CoS) in Ethernet passive optical networks (E-PON). The proposed scheme consists of two parts: one is inter scheduling, ... Keywords: dynamic bandwidth allocation (DBA), ethernet passive optical networks (E-PON), quality-of-service (QoS)

Yeon-Mo Yang; Ji-Myong Nho; Byung-Ha Ahn

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Clause XXX  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINAL DAVIS BACON ACT (DBA) CLAUSES AS APPROVED BY FINAL DAVIS BACON ACT (DBA) CLAUSES AS APPROVED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (DOL) FOR USE IN FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS OTHER THAN WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS AND LOAN PROGRAMS November 6, 2009 Clause XXX. Davis Bacon Act and Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act. Definitions: For purposes of this clause, Clause XXX, Davis Bacon Act and Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act, the following definitions are applicable: (1) "Award" means any grant, cooperative agreement or technology investment agreement made with Recovery Act funds by the Department of Energy (DOE) to a Recipient. Such Award must require compliance with the labor standards clauses and wage rate requirements of the Davis-Bacon Act (DBA) for work

132

U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AK-TRIBE-BIRCH CREEK TRIBE DBA DENDUU GWICHIN TRIBAL AK-TRIBE-BIRCH CREEK TRIBE DBA DENDUU GWICHIN TRIBAL GOVERNMENT Location: Tribe AK-TRIBE-BIRCH CREEK TRIBE DBA DENDUU GWICHIN TRIBAL GOVERNMENT AK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Descriptio The Birch Creek Tribal Council of Birch Creek, Alaska, proposes to purchase and install a new generator (approximately 35 kW) for power generation. The generator would be located in an existing school building which is centrally located in the community. The purpose of the generator upgrade is to reduce the amount of diesel used to generate electricity in the community. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21

133

Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-230-3 International  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Permit OE Docket No. PP-230-3 Permit OE Docket No. PP-230-3 International Transmission Company d/b/a ITCTransmission Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-230-3 International Transmission Company d/b/a ITCTransmission Application for Presidential Permit authorizing International Transmission Company to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at teh U.S. - Canada Border. PP-230-3 International Transmission Company More Documents & Publications Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-230-3 International Transmission Company d/b/a ITCTransmission Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-2 and PP-230-3 ITC Holdings Corporation Limited Partnership, International Transmission Company, and DTE Energy Company PP-230-3 International Transmission Company

134

National Grid Energy Efficiency Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Meeting Meeting Christopher A. Cavanagh , PE New Products & Services April 14, 2010 The Future of Energy Video (6) Mins Electricity and Gas Service Areas - US  Distributes electricity to 3.3 million customers  Services 1.1 million customers of Long Island Power Authority (LIPA)  Provides natural gas to 3.5 million customers  Currently owns over 4,000MW of generation *Based on customer numbers; includes the servicing of LIPA's 1.1 million customers Who are we to the Public Service Commissions? One Company with 13 Sets of Local Rates Plus LIPA  Boston Gas Company d/b/a KeySpan Energy Delivery New England  The Brooklyn Union Gas Company d/b/a KeySpan Energy Delivery New York  KeySpan Gas East Corporation d/b/a KeySpan Energy Delivery Long Island

135

Sound | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sound Sound Jump to: navigation, search Improved engineering and appropriate use of setbacks near residents has largely eliminated the problem wind farms had with noise in the 1980s and 1990s. Aerodynamic noise has been reduced by advancing blade design and orienting blades upwind of the turbine tower. A small amount of noise is generated by the mechanical components of the turbine. Modern wind turbines are designed with noise reduction in mind. Sound power levels at the source of a wind turbine are in the range of 90-105 dB(A). Proper setback requirements reduce wind farm sound pressure to background-noise levels. For example, at a distance of 350 meters, the sound pressure level for a wind farm is typically less than 45 dB(A). Rural background sound pressure is typically around 30-45dB(A). Higher wind

136

Achromatic lattice comparison for light sources  

SciTech Connect

The next generation of synchrotron light sources are being designed to support a large number of undulators and require long dispersion-free insertion regions. With less demand for radiation from the dipole magnets, the storage ring cost per undulator beam can be reduced by decreasing the number of dipole magnets and increasing the number of dispersion free straight sections. The two simplest achromatic lattices are the Chasman-Green or double-bend achromatic (DBA) and the three-bend achromat (TBA). The DBA in its simplest form consists of a single horizontally-focussing quadrupole between the two dipole magnets. Since this quadrupole strength is fixed by the achromatic condition, the natural emittance (/var epsilon//sub n/) may vary as the beta functions in the insertion region (IR) are varied. The expanded Chasman-Green (also DBA) uses multiple quadrupoles in the dispersive section to provide emittance control independent of the beta functions in the IR. Although this provides flexibility in the ID beta functions, the horizontal phase advance is constrained to /phi/ /approx equal/ 180/degree/ between approximately the centers of the dipole magnets. If small /var epsilon//sub n/ is required, the horizontal phase advance between the dipoles will be near one and the lattice properties will be dominated by this systematic resonance. The TBA lattice places a third dipole between the DBA dipoles, eliminating the 180/degree/ horizontal phase advance constraint. However, the requirement of small /var epsilon//sub n/ limits the range of tune, since /mu//sub x/ /approx equal/ 1.29 in the dipoles alone for /var epsilon//sub n/ near its minimum value. The minimum emittance is five times smaller for the TBA than for the DBA with the same number of periods and, therefore, its phase advance can be relaxed more than the DBA for the same natural emittance. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Kramer, S.L.; Crosbie, E.A.; Cho, Y.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

LS-145 STANDARD SYMBOLS FOR UNITS OF MEASURE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 STANDARD SYMBOLS FOR UNITS OF MEASURE ____________________________________________________________________________________ AIP IEEE CDR APS ____________________________________________________________________________________ ampere A A A A ampere hour Ah Ah A·h A·h ampere turn At A A At angstrom A · A · Å atmosphere, std atm atm atm atm atomic mass unit amu u amu atomic percent at.% - at.% atomic unit a.u. - a.u. atomic weight at.wt. - at.wt. bar bar bar bar bar British Thermal Unit Btu Btu Btu calorie (cgs) cal cal cal centimeter cm cm cm cm coulomb C C C C cubic centimeter cm 3 cm 3 cm 3 cycles per second Hz, cps, Hz, c/s Hz Hz c/s, c/sec cubic meter m 3 m 3 decibel dB dB dB dB decibel above 1 mW dBm - dBm degree (plane angle) ...°, deg ...° ...°,deg ...°, deg degree Celsius °C °C °C °C degree Fahrenheit °F °F °F °F electromagnetic unit

138

STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Screening Did Not Pass BAE Systems Inc.: CNG-Hybrid Electric Refuse Collection Vehicle $1,200,000.00 $0 Technology dba Gas Technology Institute (GTI) Demonstration of Omnitek-TEDOM 12- liter SESI CNG Engine Demonstration of Omnitek-TEDOM 13- liter SESI CNG Engine in Utility Applications $318,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0

139

MOLECULAR SIEVING ACTION OF THE CELL MEMBRANE DURING GRADUAL OSMOTIC HEMOLYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D.IM NaCI Human CO-Hb, Mouse IM ::: iodoacetamide BALBI cJ+ 1M BALBI cJ - 1M C3H/HeJ + 1M C3H/HeJ - 1M DBA/2J + 1M

MacGregor II, R.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Chemical Analyses 123,000 246,000 246,000 185,000 1,320 132,000 132 13,200 1,320 1,320 132  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Analyses 123,000 246,000 246,000 185,000 1,320 132,000 132 13,200 1,320 1,320 132 BBF IDP DBA Grid Sample Label DOSS Chemical Test 133-3642 17.00 0.82 0.56 .78 Chemical Test 133-3642

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dba a-weighted decibel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 123,000 246,000 246,000 185,000 1,320 132,000 132 13,200 1,320 1,320 132  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 123,000 246,000 246,000 185,000 1,320 132,000 132 13,200 1,320 1 BAP BKF BBF IDP DBA Grid Sample Label DOSS Chemical Test 133-3385 3.80 .25 Chemical Test 133-3385

142

Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 123,000 246,000 246,000 185,000 1,320 132,000 132 13,200 1,320 1,320 132  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 123,000 246,000 246,000 185,000 1,320 132,000 132 13,200 1,320 1 BAP BKF BBF IDP DBA Grid Sample Label DOSS Chemical Test DM.1101.09.WS.Comp01_05.NL2 .41 Chemical Test DM.1101.09.WS

143

Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 123,000 246,000 246,000 185,000 1,320 132,000 132 13,200 1,320 1,320 132  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 123,000 246,000 246,000 185,000 1,320 132,000 132 13,200 1,320 1 BAP BKF BBF IDP DBA Grid Sample Label DOSS Chemical Test 133-3638 38.00 .25 Chemical Test 133-3638

144

Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 32,700 65,300 65,300 49,000 350 35,000 35 3,500 350 350 35  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 32,700 65,300 65,300 49,000 350 35,000 35 3,500 350 350 35 BBF IDP DBA Grid Sample Label DOSS Chemical Test OR.1105.001.1-2.BKT01.NL2 on 4/29/11) Chemical Test OR.1105.001.1-2.BKT01.NL2

145

Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 32,700 65,300 65,300 49,000 350 35,000 35 3,500 350 350 35  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 32,700 65,300 65,300 49,000 350 35,000 35 3,500 350 350 35 BBF IDP DBA Grid Sample Label DOSS Chemical Test 133-3547 7.80 1.7 on 3/8/11) Composite of 2 Yellowfin Tuna Specimens (collected on 3/8/11) Chemical

146

HRSG/SR Revised 07/01/08 Page 1 of 2 HAZARD ASSESSMENT SURVEY & ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HRSG/SR Revised 07/01/08 Page 1 of 2 HAZARD ASSESSMENT SURVEY & ANALYSIS PERSONAL PROTECTIVE is accomplished by surveying the workplace to determine where physical or health hazards are present or likely to noise levels. (>85 dBA 8-hour TWA) Ear muffs or plugs Nuisance dust/mist Welding fumes Asbestos

Eirinaki, Magdalini

147

Optimal selection of robots by using distance based approach method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A deterministic quantitative model based on Distance Based Approach (DBA) method has been developed for evaluation, selection and ranking of robots, which is a concept hitherto not employed in selection problem of this kind. As a significant development ... Keywords: Distance based approach, Optimized selection, Ranking, Robots

Rishi Kumar; R. K. Garg

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

MC Appliance: Order (2012-CE-1508)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE ordered CNA International Inc. d/b/a MC Appliance Corporation to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding MC Appliance had failed to certify that certain models of room air conditioners comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

149

Hearing Loss  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earphones Potentially as Dangerous as Noise from Jet Engines, Earphones Potentially as Dangerous as Noise from Jet Engines, Researchers Find Aug. 29, 2012 - Turning the volume up too high on your headphones can damage the coating of nerve cells, leading to temporary deafness, scientists from the University of Leicester have shown for the first time. Earphones or headphones on personal music players can reach noise levels similar to those of jet engines, the researchers said. Noises louder than 110 decibels are known to cause hearing problems such as temporary deafness and tinnitus (ringing in the ears), but the University of Leicester study is the first time the underlying cell damage has been observed. The study has been published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. University of Leicester researcher Dr Martine Hamann of the Department of Cell Physiology and Pharmacology,

150

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Industrial Hygiene: Programs: Hearing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hearing Conservation Noise sources at the Berkeley Lab are associated with, but not limited to, the Facilities and Engineering shops, mechanical rooms throughout the site, construction projects, and emergency generators. Engineering controls, such as enclosing noise sources (i.e., pumps, generators) and acoustical material (i.e., mechanical room walls and ceilings) are implemented when feasible. EH&S Industrial Hygienists evaluate high noise areas with sound level meters and noise dosimeters to determine if employees need to be enrolled in the Lab's Hearing Conservation Program. Employees enrolled in the Program receive a baseline audiogram and training and annually thereafter. Employees exposed to noise sources in excess of 85 decibels will be enrolled in the Program. Hearing protection must be made available

151

BEFORE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AS America, Inc., AS America, Inc., d/b/a American Standard Brands, Respondent ) ) ) ) ) ) Case Number: 2013-CW-3001 ORDER By the General Counsel, U.S. Department of Energy: 1. In this Order, I adopt the attached Compromise Agreement entered into between the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") and AS America, Inc. d/b/a American Standard Brands ("Respondent"). The Compromise Agreement resolves the case initiated to pursue a civil penalty for violations of the compliance certification requirements located at 10 C.F.R. Part 429. 2. The DOE and Respondent have negotiated the terms of the Compromise Agreement that resolve this matter. A copy of the Compromise Agreement is attached hereto and incorporated by reference. 3. After reviewing the terms of the Compromise Agreement and evaluating the facts

152

Minnesota Power Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power) (Redirected from ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power) Jump to: navigation, search Name Minnesota Power Inc Place Minnesota Utility Id 12647 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL CONTROLLED ACCESS ELECTRIC SERVICE HIGH V Commercial COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL CONTROLLED ACCESS ELECTRIC SERVICE LOW V Commercial COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL DUAL FUEL INTERRUPTIBLE ELECTRIC SERVICE HIGH V

153

BEFORE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Inc. International Inc. d/b/a MC Appliance Corporation (room air conditioners) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) Case Number: 2012-CE-1508 NOTICE OF PROPOSED CIVIL PENALTY Date issued: July 9, 2012 Number of alleged violations: 3650 (365 days, 10 models) Maximum possible assessment: $730,000 Proposed civil penalty: $73,000 The U.S. Depm1ment of Energy ("DOE") Office of the General Counsel, Office of Enforcement, alleges that CNA International Inc. d/b/a MC Appliance Corporation ("MC Appliance") has violated certain provisions of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, 42 U.S.C. § 6291 et seq. ("the Act"), and 10 C.F.R. 429.12. Specifically, DOE alleges: 1. MC Appliance has manufactured 1 a variety of Generations brand room air conditioners

154

BEFORE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AS America, Inc., AS America, Inc., d/b/a American Standard B1·ands (water closets) ) ) ) ) ) Case Number: 2013-CW-3001 NOTICE OF PROPOSED CIVIL PENALTY Date issued: February 19, 2013 Number of alleged violations: 3,650 (IO basic models; 365 days) Maximum possible assessment: $730,000 Proposed civil penalty: $73,000 The U.S. Department of Energy ("DOff') Office of the General Counsel, Office of Enforcement, alleges that AS America, Inc., d/b/a American Standard Brands ("American Standard") has violated certain provisions of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, 42 U.S.C. § 6291 et seq. ("the Act"), and 10 C.F.R. § 429.12. Specifically, DOE alleges: 1. American Standard has manufactured 1 a variety of water closets, including basic models

155

BEFORE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cloud 9 Marketing, Inc. Cloud 9 Marketing, Inc. d/b/a Winix, Inc. (dehumidifiers) ) ) ) ) ) ) Case Number: 2012-CE-3607 NOTICE OF PROPOSED CIVIL PENALTY Date issued: September 6, 2012 Number of alleged violations: 1460 (4 basic models; 365 days) Maximum possible assessment: $292,000 Proposed civil penalty: $29,200 The U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") Office of the General CounseJ, Office of Enforcement, alleges that Cloud 9 Marketing, Inc. d/b/a Winix, Inc. ("Winix") has violated ce11ain provisions of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, 42 U.S.C. § 6291 et seq. ("the Act"), and 10 C.F.R. § 429.12. Specifically, DOE alleges: 1. Winix has manufactured 1 a variety of dehumidifiers, including basic models 2. Winix distributed basic models

156

Industrial SPP Partner Teaming Profile Relight Depot Navistar International  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SDI eBusiness, Inc. d/b/a RelightDepot Navistar International SDI eBusiness, Inc. d/b/a RelightDepot Navistar International 1341 SW 5 th Ave 6025 Urbana Street Boca Raton, FL 33432 Springfield, OH 45502 Business: Energy Efficient Lighting Business: Truck and Engine Manufacturer Ray De Varona James Spaulding, Strategic Sourcing Manager President Dan Benson, Facility Engineer Phone: 888-548-6387 Phone: 740-919-1934 Email: rdevarona@relightdepot.com Email: James.Spaulding@navistar.com Navistar International Lighting Retrofit Project Saves Over $1.1M/year With Instant Payback through First Energy Rebate Program Project Scope RelightDepot was contracted to retrofit all of the lighting at Navistar International's Springfield Assembly

157

BEFORE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International, Inc., International, Inc., d/b/a MC Appliance Corp. (freezers) Issued: July 1, 2013 ) ) ) ) ) Case Number: 2013-SE-1430 NOTICE OF NONCOMPLIANCE DETERMINATION Freezers are covered products subject to federal energy conservation standards as described in 42 U.S.C. § 6295(b) and 10 C.P.R. § 430.32(a). Manufacturers and ptivate labelers are prohibited from distributing covered products in the United States that do not comply with applicable federal energy conservation standards. 10 C.F.R. § 429.102; 42 U.S.C. § 6302. CNA International, Inc., d/b/a MC Appliance Corp. ("CNA") is a private labeler and owns the "Magic Chef, trademark, which CNA uses to distribute freezers in commerce in the United States. TESTING The U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") tested four units o~ freezer basic model-

158

MOTION TO INTERVENE OF THE NEW YORK TRANSMISSION OWNERS PP-230-4 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MOTION TO INTERVENE OF THE NEW YORK TRANSMISSION OWNERS PP-230-4 MOTION TO INTERVENE OF THE NEW YORK TRANSMISSION OWNERS PP-230-4 MOTION TO INTERVENE OF THE NEW YORK TRANSMISSION OWNERS PP-230-4 Pursuant to Rules 212 and 214 of the Rules of Practice and Procedure, 18 C.F.R. §§ 385.212 and 385.214 (2010), Central Hudson Gas & Electric Corporation, Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc., Long Island Power Authority, New York Power Authority, New York State Electric & Gas Corporation, Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation d/b/a National Grid, Orange and Rockland Utilities, Inc., and Rochester Gas and Electric Corporation (referred to herein as the "New York Transmission Owners"), individually and collectively move to intervene in the above-captioned proceeding and request an opportunity to comment on International Transmission Company's d/b/a/ ITCTransmission

159

BEFORE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nordyne, LLC d/b/a Garrison Nordyne, LLC d/b/a Garrison Heating and Cooling Products, Respondent Issued: October 8, 2010 ) ) ) ) ) ) ORDER Case Number: 2010-CE-0110210 By the General Counsel, U.S. Department of Energy: I. In this Order, I adopt the attached Compromise Agreement entered into between the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") and Nordyne, LLC ("Respondent"). The Compromise Agreement resolves the case initiated to pursue a civil penalty for violations of the compliance certification requirements at 10 C.P.R.§ 430.62. 2. The DOE and Respondent have negotiated the terms of the Compromise Agreement that resolve this matter. A copy of the Compromise Agreement is attached hereto and incorporated by reference. 3. After reviewing the terms of the Compromise Agreement and evaluating the

160

CNA International Inc. BEFORE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Inc. International Inc. BEFORE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WASHINGTON, D.C. 20585 Case Number: 2012-CE-1508 d/b/a MC Appliance Corporation, Respondent ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ORDER Issued: August 9, 2012 By the General Counsel, U.S. Department of Energy: I. In this Order, I adopt the attached Compromise Agreement entered into between the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") and CNA International Inc. d/b/a! MC Appliance Corporation ("Respondent"). The Compromise Agreement resolves the case initiated to pursue a civil penalty for violations of the compliance certification requirements located at 10 C.F.R. § 429.12. 2. The DOE and Respondent have negotiated the terms of the Compromise Agreement that resolve this matter. A copy of the Compromise Agreement is attached hereto and

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161

BEFORE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

.Matter of: ) .Matter of: ) ) The Electrical Design, Development and ) Case Number: 2012-SE-5409 Implementation Company d/b/a Teddico, ) Respondent ) ORDER By the General Counsel, U.S. Department of Energy: 1. In this Order, I adopt the attached Compromise Agreement entered into between the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") and The Electrical Design, Development and Implementation Company d/b/a Teddico ("Respondent"). The Compromise Agreement resolves the case initiated to pursue a civil penalty for distributing in commerce in the United States metal halide lamp fixtures that £1iled to meet the applicabJe standard for energy usage. See 10 C.F.R. § 431.326. 2. DOE and Respondent have negotiated the terms of the Compromise Agreement that resolves

162

Criteria for calculating the efficiency of HEPA filters during and after design basis accidents  

SciTech Connect

We have reviewed the literature on the performance of high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under normal and abnormal conditions to establish criteria for calculating the efficiency of HEPA filters in a DOE nonreactor nuclear facility during and after a Design Basis Accident (DBA). The literature review included the performance of new filters and parameters that may cause deterioration in the filter performance such as filter age, radiation, corrosive chemicals, seismic and rough handling, high temperature, moisture, particle clogging, high air flow and pressure pulses. The deterioration of the filter efficiency depends on the exposure parameters; in severe exposure conditions the filter will be structurally damaged and have a residual efficiency of 0%. Despite the many studies on HEPA filter performance under adverse conditions, there are large gaps and limitations in the data that introduce significant error in the estimates of HEPA filter efficiencies under DBA conditions. Because of this limitation, conservative values of filter efficiency were chosen when there was insufficient data.

Bergman, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); First, M.W. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States); Anderson, W.L. [Consultant, LaPlata, MD (United States); Gilbert, H. [Consultant, McLean, VA (United States); Jacox, J.W. [Consultant, Columbus, OH (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Environmental overview of geothermal development: the Geysers-Calistoga KGRA. Volume 3. Noise  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Noise from geothermal resource development at The Geysers-Calistoga Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) will cause community annoyance unless noise-level standards are set and adhered to. Venting of steam is the loudest source of noise and can reach 100 to 125 dBA at 20 to 100 ft; most of the other noise sources fall below 100 dBA and are those usually associated with construction and industrial projects. Enough data exist for assessment and decision making, but it is scattered and must be compiled. In addition, communities must decide on their criteria for noise levels. Residential areas in the Geysers-Calistoga KGRA will require more stringent controls on noise than will the open space of which KGRA is primarily composed. Existing tecnnology can reduce noise levels somewhat, but more effective silencing devices are needed, particularly on steam venting systems.

Leitner, P.

1978-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

164

Motion to Intervene_Department of Energy.DOC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY International Transmission Company d/b/a/ ITCTransmission ) ) Docket No. PP-230-4 MOTION TO INTERVENE OF THE NEW YORK TRANSMISSION OWNERS Pursuant to Rules 212 and 214 of the Rules of Practice and Procedure, 18 C.F.R. §§ 385.212 and 385.214 (2010), Central Hudson Gas & Electric Corporation, Consolidated Edison

165

Hydrogen Removal System in VVER-91/99 Project  

SciTech Connect

The hydrogen removal system has been designed to ensure hydrogen safety during DBA and BDBA. The maximal hydrogen concentrations occur in the containment during severe accidents. The system includes a set of passive autocatalytic recombiners (PAR) located in different areas of the containment. The location and capacity of recombiners have been chosen on the basis of calculation analysis. The calculations have been fulfilled with use of Russian computer best-estimated codes. (authors)

Bezlepkin, V.V.; Ivkov, I.M.; Semashko, S.E.; Svetlov, S.V.; Vardanidze, T.G. [Sankt-Petersburg Institute 'Atomenergoproekt' (SPAEP), Suvorovsky 2a, St-Petersburg, 191036 (Russian Federation); Losch, N. [Framatome ANP, Offenbach am Main (Germany)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Cambridge Danehy Park Wind Turbine Preliminary Project Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.0 100.0 120.0 0 10 20 30 40 Noise Level (dBA) Distance from Wind Turbine (m) SS P20, NP100, and P500 ACambridge Danehy Park Wind Turbine Preliminary Project Assessment Overview MIT Wind Energy Projects 4 / 25 2.5 / 25 Rated Wind Speed (m/s) 13 10 14.5 ~15 12 The above turbines were chosen to provide

167

Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 32,700 65,300 65,300 49,000 350 35,000 35 3,500 350 350 35  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 32,700 65,300 65,300 49,000 350 35,000 35 3,500 350 350 35 BBF IDP DBA Grid Sample Label DOSS Chemical Test OR.1101.001.001.YFT01.NL2 Specimen (collected on 3/7/11) Chemical Test OR.1101.002.001_004.YFT01.NL2

168

Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 32,700 65,300 65,300 49,000 350 35,000 35 3,500 350 350 35  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Analyses (HPLC-UVF) 32,700 65,300 65,300 49,000 350 35,000 35 3,500 350 350 35 BBF IDP DBA Grid Sample Label DOSS Chemical Test 133-3475 8.30 3.9 on 3/16/11) Composite of 1 Red Snapper Specimen (collected on 3/16/11) Chemical Test

169

Induction of murine CYP1A2 gene expression by acenaphthylene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acenaphthylene and related polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are industrial combustion by-products which are also found in cooked foods. Recent studies in this laboratory have shown that acenaphthylene induces Cypla2 gene expression in mice and this study further investigates this induction response. Studies with six genetically-inbred strains of mice have shown that the activity of acenaphthylene (300 mg/kg) as an inducer of CYPlA2-dependent methoxyresorufin 0-demethylase (MROD) was age-and strain-dependent. The results showed that DBA mice, compared to the C57BL/6, C3H, CBA, A/j and SJL strains were most responsive to induction after a single dose of acenaphthylene (300 mg/kg). Hepatic MROD activity in acenaphthylene-treated DBA mice was induced 22-and 4-fold in males and females respectively. In contrast, a <2 to 4-fold induction of ethoxyresorufin 0-deethylase (EROD) activity was observed in both sexes. The other inbred strains had higher basal rates of hepatic MROD activity than the DBA strain, (i.e. C3H, C57BL/6, CBA, A/j and SJL). Differences in induction of MROD activity by acenaphthylene among the strains was primarily due to allelic variation (responsive or non responsive) at the aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) locus. Current studies are focused on further characterizing the strain-specific effects of acenaphthylene and related compounds and the molecular regulation of hepatic CYPlA2 gene expression in male and female DBA mice and other rodent species.

Miggins, John Wesley

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular Classroom Test Bed Title Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular Classroom Test Bed Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2005 Authors Apte, Michael G., Ian S. Buchanan, David Faulkner, William J. Fisk, Chi-Ming Lai, Michael Spears, and Douglas P. Sullivan Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract The primary goals of this research effort were to develop, evaluate, and demonstrate a practical HVAC system for classrooms that consistently provides classrooms with the quantity of ventilation in current minimum standards, while saving energy, and reducing HVAC-related noise levels. This research was motivated by several factors, including the public benefits of energy efficiency, evidence that many classrooms are under-ventilated, and public concerns about indoor environmental quality in classrooms. This project involved the installation and verification of the performance of an Improved Heat Pump Air Conditioning (IHPAC) system, and its comparison, a standard HVAC system having an efficiency of 10 SEER. The project included the verification of the physical characteristics suitable for direct replacement of existing 10 SEER systems, quantitative demonstration of improved energy efficiency, reduced acoustic noise levels, quantitative demonstration of improved ventilation control, and verification that the system would meet temperature control demands necessary for the thermal comfort of the occupants. Results showed that the IHPAC met these goals. The IHPAC was found to be a direct bolt-on replacement for the 10 SEER system. Calculated energy efficiency improvements based on many days of classroom cooling or heating showed that the IHPAC system is about 44% more efficient during cooling and 38% more efficient during heating than the 10 SEER system. Noise reduction was dramatic, with measured A-weighed sound level for fan only operation conditions of 34.3 dB(A), a reduction of 19 dB(A) compared to the 10 SEER system. Similarly, the IHPAC stage-1 and stage-2 compressor plus fan sound levels were 40.8 dB(A) and 42.7 dB(A), reductions of 14 and 13 dB(A), respectively. Thus, the IHPAC is 20 to 35 times quieter than the 10 SEER systems depending upon the operation mode. The IHPAC system met the ventilation requirements and was able to provide consistent outside air supply throughout the study. Indoor CO2 levels with simulated occupancy were maintained below 1000 ppm. Finally temperature settings were met and controlled accurately. The goals of the laboratory testing phase were met and this system is ready for further study in a field test of occupied classrooms

171

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in aModular Classroom Test Bed  

SciTech Connect

The primary goals of this research effort were to develop, evaluate, and demonstrate a practical HVAC system for classrooms that consistently provides classrooms with the quantity of ventilation in current minimum standards, while saving energy, and reducing HVAC-related noise levels. This research was motivated by several factors, including the public benefits of energy efficiency, evidence that many classrooms are under-ventilated, and public concerns about indoor environmental quality in classrooms. This project involved the installation and verification of the performance of an Improved Heat Pump Air Conditioning (IHPAC) system, and its comparison, a standard HVAC system having an efficiency of 10 SEER. The project included the verification of the physical characteristics suitable for direct replacement of existing 10 SEER systems, quantitative demonstration of improved energy efficiency, reduced acoustic noise levels, quantitative demonstration of improved ventilation control, and verification that the system would meet temperature control demands necessary for the thermal comfort of the occupants. Results showed that the IHPAC met these goals. The IHPAC was found to be a direct bolt-on replacement for the 10 SEER system. Calculated energy efficiency improvements based on many days of classroom cooling or heating showed that the IHPAC system is about 44% more efficient during cooling and 38% more efficient during heating than the 10 SEER system. Noise reduction was dramatic, with measured A-weighed sound level for fan only operation conditions of 34.3 dB(A), a reduction of 19 dB(A) compared to the 10 SEER system. Similarly, the IHPAC stage-1 and stage-2 compressor plus fan sound levels were 40.8 dB(A) and 42.7 dB(A), reductions of 14 and 13 dB(A), respectively. Thus, the IHPAC is 20 to 35 times quieter than the 10 SEER systems depending upon the operation mode. The IHPAC system met the ventilation requirements and was able to provide consistent outside air supply throughout the study. Indoor CO2 levels with simulated occupancy were maintained below 1000 ppm. Finally temperature settings were met and controlled accurately. The goals of the laboratory testing phase were met and this system is ready for further study in a field test of occupied classrooms.

Apte, Michael G.; Buchanan, Ian S.; Faulkner, David; Fisk,William J.; Lai, Chi-Ming; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Appendix 10 - Acronyms  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 - Acronyms 0 - Acronyms ACH Automated Clearing House AHE Application Hosting Environment ASAP Automated Standard Application for Payments ASI Authorized Service Interruptions BMIS Business Information System CCB Configuration Control Board CHRIS Corporate Human Resources Information System CFO Chief Financial Officer CIO Chief Information Officer CM Change Management CO Contracting Officer COR Contracting Officers Representative COTS Commercial Off-the-Shelf DBA Database Administrator DEAR Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation DOE Department of Energy ESB Enterprise Service Bus FACTS Federal Agencies' Centralized Trial Balance System FDS Funds Distribution System GSA General Services Administration HQ Headquarters IAE Integrated Acquisition Environment

173

SF 9424-EFT;Electronic Funds Transfer Agreement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

424-EFT (10-2011) 424-EFT (10-2011) Supersedes (11-2009) Issue ELECTRONIC FUNDS TRANSFER AGREEMENT Mail completed form to Sandia National Laboratories, Supplier Data Management, MS-1486, PO BOX 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1486 or Fax: (505) 284-4798. For questions, contact us at: isupplier@sandia.gov. The undersigned Supplier (hereinafter referred to as Supplier) hereby authorizes Sandia Corporation DBA Sandia National Laboratories (hereinafter referred to as Sandia) to make payment for goods and services covered by an

174

Property:Awardee | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Awardee Awardee Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Page. Pages using the property "Awardee" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 44 Tech Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 44 Tech Inc. + A ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project + Amber Kinetics, Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + Amber Kinetics, Inc. + American Transmission Company LLC II Smart Grid Project + American Transmission Company LLC + American Transmission Company LLC Smart Grid Project + American Transmission Company LLC + Atlantic City Electric Company Smart Grid Project + Atlantic City Electric Co + Avista Utilities Smart Grid Project + B Baltimore Gas and Electric Company Smart Grid Project + Baltimore Gas & Electric Co +

175

High Performance, Low Cost Hydrogen Generation from Renewable Energy - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Dr. Katherine Ayers (Primary Contact), Andy Roemer Proton Energy Systems d/b/a Proton OnSite 10 Technology Drive Wallingford, CT 06492 Phone: (203) 678-2190 Email: kayers@protononsite.com DOE Managers HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov GO: Dave Peterson Phone: (720) 356-1747 Email: David.Peterson@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE000276 Subcontractors: * Entegris, Inc., Chaska, MN * The Electrochemical Engine Center at Penn State, University Park, PA * Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN Project Start Date: September 1, 2009

176

Set-Aside EM Nation-Wide Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity Contracts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SET-ASIDE EM NATION-WIDE SET-ASIDE EM NATION-WIDE INDEFINITE DELIVERY/INDEFINITE QUANTITY CONTRACTS Contractor Name Team Members/Principal Subcontractors Clauss Construction AECOM, Inc. Cavanagh Services Group, Inc. EnergX, LLC Dynamic Management Solutions, LLC (DMS) CA - LLC Member Restoration Services, Inc, LLC Member Wastren Advantage, Inc. - LLC Member SAIC Bartlett Services, Inc. Siempelkamp Nuclear Services Gonzales-Stoller Remediation Services, LLC JG Management Systems, Inc. - LLC Member (Protégé) The S.M. Stoller Corporation - LLC Member (Mentor) AET Environmental, Inc. ALS Laboratory Group AquaTierra Associates, Inc. DBA Weiss Assoc. ARCADIS U.S., Inc. AREVA Federal Services, LLC

177

Microsoft Word - 00095397.DOC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

) International Transmission Company ) Docket No. PP-230-4 d/b/a ITC Transmission ) PETITION TO INTERVENE OUT OF TIME AND COMMENTS OF PEPCO HOLDINGS, INC. Pepco Holdings, Inc. ("PHI"), on its own behalf and on behalf of its affiliates Potomac Electric Power Company ("Pepco"), Atlantic City Electric Company ("Atlantic City"), and Delmarva Power & Light Company ("Delmarva") (collectively, the "PHI Companies"), respectfully submits this petition to intervene out of time and comments in support of the March 25, 2011 filing by PJM Interconnection, L.L.C. ("PJM") in the above-captioned proceeding. 1 I. Communications The PHI Companies designate the following individuals to receive service of all filings

178

Inherent controllability in modular ALMRs  

SciTech Connect

As part of recent development efforts on advanced reactor designs ANL has proposed the IFR (Integral Fast Reactor) concept. The IFR concept is currently being applied to modular sized reactors which would be built in multiple power paks together with an integrated fuel cycle facility. It has been amply demonstrated that the concept as applied to the modular designs has significant advantages in regard to ATWS transients. Attention is now being focussed on determining whether or not those advantages deriving from the traits of the IFR can be translated to the operational/DBA (design basis accident) class of transients. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Sackett, J.I.; Sevy, R.H.; Wei, T.Y.C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Source-Term and building-Wake Consequence Modeling for the Godiva IV Reactor at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this work were to evaluate the consequences of a postulated accident to onsite security personnel stationed near the facility during operations of the Godiva IV critical assembly and to identify controls needed to protect these personnel in case of an extreme criticality excursion equivalent to the design-basis accident (DBA). This paper presents the methodology and results of the source-term calculations, building ventilation rates, air concentrations, and consequence calculations that were performed using a multidisciplinary approach with several phenomenology models. Identification of controls needed to mitigate the consequences to near-field receptors is discussed.

Letellier, B.C.; McClure, P.; Restrepo, L.

1999-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

180

Hearing protection for miners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A NIOSH analysis showed that at age 50 approximately 90% of coal miners have a hearing impairment, yet noise included hearing loss is 100% preventable. The article discusses requirements of the MSHA regulations, 30 CFR Part 62 - occupational noise exposure (2000) and a 2008-MSHA document describing technologically achievable and promising controls for several types of mining machinery. Hearing protection is still required for exposure to greater than 90 dBA. These are now commercially available ways to determine how much attenuation an individual gets from a given hearing protector, known as 'fit testing'. 3 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab., 1 photo.

Schulz, T. [Sperian Hearing Protection (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dba a-weighted decibel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR THE PORTABLE ACOUSTIC MONITORING PACKAGE (PAMP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) has been designed to record and monitor acoustic signals in high-pressure natural gas (NG) transmission lines. Of particular interest are the three acoustic signals associated with a pipeline fracture. The system is portable (less than 30 lbm) and can be used at all line pressures up to 1000 psig. The PAMP requires a shut-off valve equipped 1/2 inch NPT access port in the pipeline. It is fully functional over the typical pressure range found in the natural gas transmission pipelines in the West Virginia, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Ohio areas. With the use of the PAMP, a full spectrum of acoustic signals can be recorded and defined in terms of acoustic energy in decibels. To detect natural gas pipeline infringements and leaks, the acoustic energy generated inside the line is monitored with a sensitive pressure-equalized microphone and a step function type {Delta}p transducer. The assembly is mounted on a 1000 psig pipe fitting-tree called the PAMP. The electronics required to record, store and analyze the data are described within this report in the format of an operating manual.

John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

2004-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

182

Criteria for calculating the efficiency of deep-pleated HEPA filters with aluminum separators during and after design basis accidents  

SciTech Connect

The authors have reviewed the literature on the performance of high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under normal and abnormal conditions to establish criteria for calculating the efficiency of HEPA filters in a DOE nonreactor nuclear facility during and after a Design Basis Accident (DBA). This study is only applicable to the standard deep-pleated HEPA filter with aluminum separators as specified in ASME N509. The literature review included the performance of new filters and parameters that may cause deterioration in the filter performance such as filter age, radiation, corrosive chemicals, seismic and rough handling, high temperature, moisture, particle clogging, high air flow and pressure pulses. The deterioration of the filter efficiency depends on the exposure parameters; in severe exposure conditions the filter will be structurally damaged and have a residual efficiency of 0%. Despite the many studies on HEPA filter performance under adverse conditions, there are large gaps and limitations in the data that introduce significant error in the estimates of HEPA filter efficiencies under DBA conditions. Because of this limitation, conservative values of filter efficiency were chosen when there was insufficient data.

Bergman, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); First, M.W. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States); Anderson, W.L. [Anderson (W.L.), LaPlata, MD (United States); Gilbert, H. [Gilbert (H.), McLean, VA (United States); Jacox, J.W. [Jacox (J.W.), Columbus, OH (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Globally Convergent Evolution Strategies and CMA-ES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jan 29, 2012... parents by means of a weighted sum, around which the offsprings are computed by random generation. ... Entry Last Modified: 01/29/2012.

184

Scientific Papers of the Bureau of Standards Volume 22  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A weight burette for the micromeasurement of liquid volumes, S555, p ... measurement of gas volumes without gas connection to a ... Gases in Metals: ...

2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

185

On a class of minimax stochastic programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aug 12, 2003 ... of risk, and ? is a weighting parameter to trade-off mean with risk. Classically, ..... Managing short-term electricity contracts under uncertainty: A...

186

Microsoft Word - MAGIC Travel Information.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

but pleasant, and food is abundant and good. All sheets and towels are provided. Laundry facilities (including soap), a weight room, and DVDs are available. Ship motion...

187

MAXIMIZING NON-MONOTONE SUBMODULAR FUNCTIONS ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Given a weight vector w for the ground set V , and a knapsack of capacity C, the associated ..... The desired map ? is then ?(b) = ? and ?(b?) = ??(b?).

188

The Influence of VIM Crucible Composition, Vacuum Arc Remelting ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ing a weight of 23 kilograms. (50 pounds). The as-cast ingot surface was maintained on all ingots. VIM Ingot Cleanliness. Evaluation. The cleanliness evaluation.

189

North American spot crude oil benchmarks likely diverging due to ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wind Geothermal ... In particular, the Argus Sour Crude Price Index (ASCI), a weighted average of prices for several offshore Gulf of Mexico sour crude grades

190

Surface roughness effects on the solar reflectance of cool asphalt shingles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using a standard solar spectrum as a weighting function. Inmeasured with a Solar Spectrum Reflectometer as discussed ina Devices & Services Solar Spectrum Reflectometer (SSR) set

Berdahl, Paul

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

A Polyhedral Approach to the Single Row Facility Layout Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

problem of arranging facilities on a line, while minimizing a weighted sum of the ..... heuristic, are an essential component of branch-and-cut algorithms. We now.

192

Isotropic Sequence Order Learning in a Closed Loop Behavioural System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

¥ and ¥ S shown in a). Weights increase for V`Yba and decrease for Vdcda (which means that a sequence of events §eSgf

Porr, Bernd

193

Document  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

magnitude of effects anticipated, the spatial and temporal extent of the effects, and recovery potential. Supporting information in the form of a weight-of-evidence discussion also...

194

All General Counsel Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2012 3, 2012 GE Appliances: Order (2012-SE-1403) DOE ordered GE Appliances, a Division of General Electric Company to pay a $63,000 civil penalty after finding GE had privately labeled and distributed in commerce in the U.S. the 4-cubic-foot capacity refrigerator basic model SMR04GAZCS, which includes models SMR04GAZACS and SMR04GAZBCS. October 2, 2012 Winix: Order (2012-CE-3607) DOE ordered Cloud 9 Marketing, Inc. d/b/a Winix, Inc., to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Winix had failed to certify that certain models of dehumidifiers comply with the applicable energy conservation standards. October 2, 2012 Royal Centurion: Order (2012-CE-3608) DOE ordered Royal Centurion, Inc., to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Royal Centurion had failed to certify that certain models of

195

EIS-0377: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Draft Environmental Impact Statement and Notice of Public Hearings EIS-0377: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement and Notice of Public Hearings Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project Western Area Power Administration (Western), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Upper Great Plains Customer Service Region, and the Rural Utilities Service (RUS), U.S. Department of Agriculture, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), U.S. Department of Defense, as cooperating agencies, announce the availability of the Draft Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project (Project) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for public review and comment. Otter Tail Corporation (dba Otter Tail Power Company (OTP)), Central Minnesota Municipal Power Agency, Great River

196

Category:Smart Grid Investment Grant Projects | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Investment Grant Projects Investment Grant Projects Pages in category "Smart Grid Investment Grant Projects" The following 98 pages are in this category, out of 98 total. A ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project American Transmission Company LLC II Smart Grid Project American Transmission Company LLC Smart Grid Project Atlantic City Electric Company Smart Grid Project Avista Utilities Smart Grid Project B Baltimore Gas and Electric Company Smart Grid Project Black Hills Power, Inc. Smart Grid Project Black Hills/Colorado Electric Utility Co. Smart Grid Project Burbank Water and Power Smart Grid Project C CenterPoint Energy Smart Grid Project Central Lincoln People's Utility District Smart Grid Project Central Maine Power Company Smart Grid Project Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power Company Smart Grid Project

197

Nevada's 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2nd congressional district: Energy Resources 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Nevada. Registered Energy Companies in Nevada's 2nd congressional district Arete Power Inc Biodiesel Solutions Inc BlackHawk Fund Brady Power Partners Chapeau Inc dba BluePoint Energy Inc China Recycling Energy Corp CREG Collier Technologies Inc Constellation Operating Services ElectraTherm Inc ElectraTherm, Inc. Empire Geothermal Power LLC Geothermal Development Associates Geothermal Technical Partners Gradient Resources Kodali Inc Lumenergi Magma Energy NV Energy Sierra Pacific Resources NV Energy formerly Sierra Pacific Power Newcore Energy Inc OHm Geothermal Ormat Funding Corp

198

Property:HeadquartersCity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HeadquartersCity HeadquartersCity Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "HeadquartersCity" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 220 kV SSSC device for power flow control (Smart Grid Project) + Catalonia + 4 44 Tech Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + Pittsburgh + A A complete and normalized 61850 substation (Smart Grid Project) + Madrid + ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project + Duluth + AMI (Smart Grid Project) + Kranj + AMIS (Smart Grid Project) + Steyr + AMIS (Smart Grid Project) (Traun, Austria) + Traun + AMIS (Smart Grid Project) (Vöcklabruck, Austria) + Vöcklabruck + Activation of 200 MW refusegenerated CHP upward regulation effect (Smart Grid Project) + Sønderborg +

199

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 16780 of 28,905 results. 71 - 16780 of 28,905 results. Download American Standard: Order (2013-CW-3001) DOE ordered AS America, Inc., d/b/a American Standard Brands to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding American Standard had failed to certify that certain models of water closets comply with the applicable water conservation standards. http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/american-standard-order-2013-cw-3001 Download Barclay Products: Order (2013-CW-3005) DOE ordered Barclay Products, Ltd. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Barclay Products had failed to certify that certain models of water closets comply with the applicable water conservation standards. http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/barclay-products-order-2013-cw-3005 Download MANAGEMENT ALERT: DOE/IG-0891 Allegations Regarding Prohibited Personnel Practices at the Bonneville

200

BEFORE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issued: November 20, 2012 Issued: November 20, 2012 Case Number: 2012-SE-5409 NOTICE OF NONCOMPLIANCE DETERMINATION Metal halide lamp fixtures are covered products subject to federal energy conservation standards as described in 42 U.S.C. §§ 6292(a)(19), 6295(hh) and 10 C.P.R.§ 431.326. Manufacturers and private labelers are prohibited from distributing covered products or equipment that do not comply with the applicable conservation standards. 10 C.P.R.§ 429.102(a)(6); 42 U.S.C. § 6302(a)(5). The Electrical Design, Development and Implementation Company d/b/a Teddico ("Teddico") notified the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") that Teddico had manufactured' and distributed in commerce the following magnetic probe-statt metal halide lamp fixtures ("the Teddico Basic

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dba a-weighted decibel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Compliance Certification Enforcement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 9, 2012 July 9, 2012 MC Appliance: Proposed Penalty (2012-CE-1508) DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that CNA International Inc. d/b/a MC Appliance Corporation failed to certify a variety of room air conditioners as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards. July 9, 2012 Danby Products: Proposed Penalty (2012-CE-1415) DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Danby Products, Inc. failed to certify refrigerators and freezers as compliant with the energy conservation standards. July 9, 2012 Goodman: Proposed Penalty (2012-CE-1509) DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Goodman Manufacturing Company, L.P., failed to certify a various room air conditioners as compliant with the applicable energy conservation

202

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

091 - 25100 of 26,764 results. 091 - 25100 of 26,764 results. Download Teddico: Noncompliance Determination (2012-SE-5409) DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to The Electrical Design, Development and Implementation Company d/b/a Teddico finding that a variety of basic models of magnetic probe-start metal halide lamp fixtures do not comport with the energy conservation standards. http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/teddico-noncompliance-determination-2012-se-5409 Download Examination Report: OAS-RA-13-09 North Carolina State Energy Office - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Funds Provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/examination-report-oas-ra-13-09 Page Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship A 10-Week Summer Internship Program

203

Property:RecoveryFunding | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RecoveryFunding RecoveryFunding Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "RecoveryFunding" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 44 Tech Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 5,000,000 + A ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project + 1,544,004 + Amber Kinetics, Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 4,000,000 + American Transmission Company LLC II Smart Grid Project + 11,444,180 + American Transmission Company LLC Smart Grid Project + 1,330,825 + Atlantic City Electric Company Smart Grid Project + 18,700,000 + Avista Utilities Smart Grid Project + 20,000,000 + B Baltimore Gas and Electric Company Smart Grid Project + 200,000,000 + Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest Division Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 88,821,251 +

204

U.S. Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington, D.C. 20554 Washington, D.C. 20554 In the Matter of: Watermark Designs Holdings, Ltd. d/b/a Watermark Designs, Ltd., Respondent ORDER By the General Counsel, U.S. Department of Energy: Case Number : 2010-C W-1404 1. In this Order, I adopt the attached Compromise Agreement entered into between the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") and Watermark Designs, Ltd. ("Respondent"). The Compromise Agreement resolves the case initiated to pursue a civil penalty for violations of the compliance certification requirements at 10 C.F.R. § 430.62. 2. The DOE and Respondent have negotiated the terms of the Compromise Agreement that resolve this matter. A copy of the Compromise Agreement is attached hereto and incorporated by reference. 3. After reviewing the terms of the Compromise Agreement and evaluating the

205

Low-Cost Large-Scale PEM Electrolysis for Renewable Energy Storage - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Dr. Katherine Ayers (Primary Contact), Chris Capuano Proton Energy Systems d/b/a Proton OnSite 10 Technology Drive Wallingford, CT 06492 Phone: (203) 678-2190 Email: kayers@protononsite.com DOE Manager HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-SC0001338 Subcontractors: * 3M, Minneapolis, MN * University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY Project Start Date: June 19, 2010 (Phase 1) Project End Date: August 18, 2013 (with Phase 2 continuation) Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Project Objectives Demonstrate optimal membrane electrode assembly * (MEA) efficiency through: Refinement of catalyst compositions based on -

206

Category:Smart Grid Projects - Advanced Metering Infrastructure | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Metering Infrastructure Metering Infrastructure Jump to: navigation, search Smart Grid Projects - Advanced Metering Infrastructure category Pages in category "Smart Grid Projects - Advanced Metering Infrastructure" The following 31 pages are in this category, out of 31 total. A ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project B Baltimore Gas and Electric Company Smart Grid Project Black Hills Power, Inc. Smart Grid Project Black Hills/Colorado Electric Utility Co. Smart Grid Project C CenterPoint Energy Smart Grid Project Central Maine Power Company Smart Grid Project Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power Company Smart Grid Project City of Fulton, Missouri Smart Grid Project City of Glendale Water and Power Smart Grid Project City of Quincy, FL Smart Grid Project City of Westerville, OH Smart Grid Project

207

2011 Chevrolet Volt VIN 0815 Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), including testing the PHEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 12,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Chevrolet Volt PHEV (VIN 1G1RD6E48BU100815). The battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation (eTec) dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the AVTA for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the DOE.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 20440 of 31,917 results. 31 - 20440 of 31,917 results. Download Jandy Pool Products: Order (2010-CE-1111) DOE ordered Jandy Pool Products, Inc. to pay a $10,000 civil penalty after finding Jandy Pool Products had failed to certify that certain models of pool heaters comply with the applicable energy conservation standards. http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/jandy-pool-products-order-2010-ce-1111 Download Nordyne: Order (2010-CE-01/0210) DOE ordered Nordyne, LLC d/b/a Garrison Heating and Cooling Products to pay a $10,000 civil penalty after finding Nordyne had failed to certify that certain models of central air conditioners and central air conditioning heat pumps comply with the applicable energy conservation standard. http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/nordyne-order-2010-ce-010210 Download Haier America: Consent Decree (2010)

209

Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact StatementS Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ES-1 ES-1 ES.0 Summary In May 2006, Western Area Power Administration (Western), Rural Utilities Service (RUS), and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) issued the Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement (Draft EIS, DOE/EIS-0377). The Draft EIS described the details of constructing and operating a nominal 600-megawatt (MW), coal-fired, baseload electric generating facility and associated transmission line and substation upgrades, known as the Big Stone II Project (proposed Project). The proposed Project would be constructed by Otter Tail Corporation (dba Otter Tail Power Company (OTP)), Central Minnesota Municipal Power Agency, Great River Energy, Heartland Consumers Power District, Montana-Dakota Utilities Co., Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency, and

210

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 19, 2012 November 19, 2012 This ChargePoint station is located in the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area in Stevenson, WA, -- an area that is adjacent to the city's shops, restaurants, spas and art galleries. | Photo courtesy of Port of Skamania. EV Charging Stations Take Off Across America Finding a charging station is getting more convenient than ever thanks to companies like ChargePoint, which recently finished installing 4,600 charging stations across the United States. October 15, 2012 A portion of the new 141 kilowatt solar photovoltaic energy system at Monterey County's Laurel Yard Complex in Salinas, California. The system is expected to save the county thousands of dollars a year in energy costs. Click here to see a panoramic view of the entire solar array. | Photo courtesy of Santa Cruz Westside Electric, DBA Sandbar.

211

Property:Incentive/Auth9Link | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Auth9Link Auth9Link Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Incentive/Auth9Link Property Type URL Description Url link to authority. Pages using the property "Incentive/Auth9Link" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) N Net Metering (Massachusetts) + http://www.env.state.ma.us/DPU_FileRoom/frmDocketSingleSP.aspx?docknum=11-11 + Net Metering (New York) + http://documents.dps.ny.gov/public/Common/ViewDoc.aspx?DocRefId=%7BFCB13975-E1FE-46B2-83B4-DBA1F0FFFAAA%7D + Q Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Connecticut) + http://en.openei.org/wiki/Renewable_and_Recycled_Energy_Objective_%28North_Dakota%29 + Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Delaware) + http://en.openei.org/wiki/Voluntary_Renewable_Energy_Portfolio_Goal_%28Virginia%29 +

212

Texas's 26th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6th congressional district: Energy Resources 6th congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Texas. US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Texas's 26th congressional district Denton County Electric Cooperative d/b/a CoServ Electric Smart Grid Project Registered Energy Companies in Texas's 26th congressional district Aecom Government Services AGS American Alternative Energy Systems Caprock Roofing ENTECH Energy Financing Inc Entech Inc Entech Solar Inc formerly WorldWater Solar Technologies ExxonMobil Fluor Corp GreenHunter Energy Inc Higher Power Energy LLC InfiniRel Corporation NatEl Paquin Energy and Fuel Power Generating Inc Shermco Industries Inc Sunluz

213

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 - 18510 of 28,905 results. 01 - 18510 of 28,905 results. Download Martin.pdf http://energy.gov/management/downloads/martinpdf Download CNA: Compromise Agreement (2013-SE-1430) DOE and CNA International, Inc., d/b/a MC Appliance Corp. entered into a Compromise Agreement to resolve a case involving the distribution in commerce of noncompliant freezers. http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/cna-compromise-agreement-2013-se-1430 Download U.S. Department of Energy 2003 Annual Report U.S. Department of Energy 2003 Annual Report, Report2003.pdf http://energy.gov/management/downloads/us-department-energy-2003-annual-report Download Scanned_Agreement.pdf http://energy.gov/downloads/scannedagreementpdf Download Policy Flash 2012-53 http://energy.gov/management/downloads/policy-flash-2012-53 Download Memorandum, Protective Force Law Enforcement Authority- May 1,

214

Watermark Designs: Proposed Penalty (2010-CW-1404) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Watermark Designs: Proposed Penalty (2010-CW-1404) Watermark Designs: Proposed Penalty (2010-CW-1404) Watermark Designs: Proposed Penalty (2010-CW-1404) January 25, 2010 DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Watermark Designs Holdings, Ltd. d/b/a/ Watermark Designs, Ltd. failed to certify various showerheads as compliant with the applicable water conservation standards. DOE regulations require a manufacturer (which includes importers) to submit reports certifying that its products have been tested and meet the applicable [energy/water/both] conservation standards. This civil penalty notice advises the company of the potential penalties and DOE's administrative process, including the company's right to a hearing. Watermark Designs: Proposed Penalty (2010-CW-1404) More Documents & Publications

215

Compliance Certification Enforcement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 26, 2010 April 26, 2010 EZ-FLO International: Order (2010-CW-1401) DOE ordered EZ-FLO International, Inc. to pay a $20,000 civil penalty after finding EZ-FLO had failed to certify that certain models of showerhead comply with the applicable water conservation standard. April 26, 2010 Zoe Industries: Order (2010-CW-1405) DOE ordered Zoe Industries, Inc. to pay a $5,000 civil penalty after finding Zoe had failed to certify that certain models of showerheads comply with the applicable water conservation standards. April 21, 2010 Watermark Designs: Order (2010-CW-1404) DOE ordered Watermark Designs Holdings, Ltd. d/b/a Watermark Designs, Ltd. to pay a $135,104 civil penalty after finding Watermark Designs had failed to certify that various models of showerheads comply with the applicable

216

Conservation Standards Enforcement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 20, 2012 November 20, 2012 Teddico: Noncompliance Determination (2012-SE-5409) DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to The Electrical Design, Development and Implementation Company d/b/a Teddico finding that a variety of basic models of magnetic probe-start metal halide lamp fixtures do not comport with the energy conservation standards. November 19, 2012 Hydac: Noncompliance Determination (2012-SE-4107) DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Hydac Technology Corporation finding that a variety of electric motor basic models do not comport with the energy conservation standards. November 7, 2012 YMGI: Order (2011-SCE-1605) DOE ordered YMGI Group LLC to pay a $31,400 civil penalty after finding (1) YMGI had failed to certify that certain models of residential central air

217

CNA: Proposed Penalty (2013-SE-1430) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CNA: Proposed Penalty (2013-SE-1430) CNA: Proposed Penalty (2013-SE-1430) CNA: Proposed Penalty (2013-SE-1430) September 24, 2013 DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that CNA International, Inc., d/b/a MC Appliance Corp. privately labeled and distributed noncompliant freezer Magic Chef model number HMCF7W in the U.S. Federal law subjects manufacturers and private labelers to civil penalties if those parties distribute in the U.S. products that do not meet applicable energy conservation standards. This civil penalty notice advises the company of the potential penalties and DOE's administrative process, including the company's right to a hearing. CNA: Proposed Penalty (2013-SE-1430) More Documents & Publications CNA: Noncompliance Determination (2013-SE-1430) CNA: Compromise Agreement (2013-SE-1430)

218

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NFPA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

"",. "",. u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NFPA DETERMINATION RECIPI[NT: Michigan Biotechnology Institute d/b/a MBt Intemational STATE: MI PROJECT TITLE: Process Improvements to Biomass Pretreatment for Fuels and Chemicals Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-EEOOOO5071 DE-EEOOO5071 GF().{)()()5071.()()1 0 Based on my review ofthe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4SI.IA), I have made the follo,,"ing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 83.6 Siting, construction (or modification). operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research

219

Solar Power Generates Big Savings in Salinas, California | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Generates Big Savings in Salinas, California Power Generates Big Savings in Salinas, California Solar Power Generates Big Savings in Salinas, California October 15, 2012 - 4:40pm Addthis A portion of the new 141 kilowatt solar photovoltaic energy system at Monterey County’s Laurel Yard Complex in Salinas, California. The system is expected to save the county thousands of dollars a year in energy costs. Click here to see a panoramic view of the entire solar array. | Photo courtesy of Santa Cruz Westside Electric, DBA Sandbar. A portion of the new 141 kilowatt solar photovoltaic energy system at Monterey County's Laurel Yard Complex in Salinas, California. The system is expected to save the county thousands of dollars a year in energy costs.

220

CX-003609: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Categorical Exclusion Determination 9: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003609: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cushman North Fork Skokomish Powerhouse CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 08/25/2010 Location(s): Tacoma, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office City of Tacoma, Department of Public Utilities, Light Division (DBA Tacoma Power) would add approximately 3.6 megawatts of generating capacity at an existing dam, Cushman number 2, part of the Cushman Hydroelectric Project (FERC P-460) owned by Tacoma Power by constructing a new two-story 46 feet by 20 feet powerhouse. The new powerhouse would utilize flow that is currently being discharged from a valve at the base of the dam. Electricity from the new powerhouse would be transmitted to an existing overhead

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dba a-weighted decibel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Solar Power Generates Big Savings in Salinas, California | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Power Generates Big Savings in Salinas, California Solar Power Generates Big Savings in Salinas, California Solar Power Generates Big Savings in Salinas, California October 15, 2012 - 4:40pm Addthis A portion of the new 141 kilowatt solar photovoltaic energy system at Monterey County’s Laurel Yard Complex in Salinas, California. The system is expected to save the county thousands of dollars a year in energy costs. Click here to see a panoramic view of the entire solar array. | Photo courtesy of Santa Cruz Westside Electric, DBA Sandbar. A portion of the new 141 kilowatt solar photovoltaic energy system at Monterey County's Laurel Yard Complex in Salinas, California. The system is expected to save the county thousands of dollars a year in energy costs.

222

Nationwide Industries: Proposed Penalty (2011-CW-2803) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nationwide Industries: Proposed Penalty (2011-CW-2803) Nationwide Industries: Proposed Penalty (2011-CW-2803) Nationwide Industries: Proposed Penalty (2011-CW-2803) April 22, 2011 DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Nationwide Industries, Inc. d/b/a Banner Faucets failed to certify a variety of faucets and showerheads as compliant with the applicable water conservation standards. DOE regulations require a manufacturer (which includes importers) to submit reports certifying that its products have been tested and meet the applicable water conservation standards. This civil penalty notice advises the company of the potential penalties and DOE's administrative process, including the company's right to a hearing. Nationwide Industries: Proposed Penalty (2011-CW-2803) More Documents & Publications

223

Denton County Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County Elec Coop, Inc County Elec Coop, Inc (Redirected from Denton County Electric Cooperative d/b/a CoServ Electric) Jump to: navigation, search Name Denton County Elec Coop, Inc Place Corinth, Texas Utility Id 5078 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location TRE NERC ERCOT Yes ISO Ercot Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] SGIC[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Rate Commercial Commercial-TOU (Demand Metered Customers) Commercial Commercial-TOU (Non-Coincident Peak Demand Charge) Commercial Commercial-TOU (Non-Demand Metered Customers) Residential Industrial Rate- TOU Industrial

224

All General Counsel Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 9, 2012 December 9, 2012 Teddico: Order (2012-SE-5409) DOE ordered The Electrical Design, Development and Implementation Company d/b/a Teddico to pay a $18,994 civil penalty after finding Teddico had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. 218 units of a variety of noncompliant metal halide lamp fixtures basic models. December 7, 2012 Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2011-065 This is a request by OWENS CORNING for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-EE0005338. December 5, 2012 Simkar: Noncompliance Determination (2012-SE-5408) DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Simkar Corporation finding that magnetic probe-start and pulse-start basic models of metal halide lamp fixtures do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

225

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 8270 of 26,764 results. 61 - 8270 of 26,764 results. Download September 2012 APM Newsletter http://energy.gov/management/downloads/september-2012-apm-newsletter Download YMGI: Order (2011-SCE-1605) DOE ordered YMGI Group LLC to pay a $31,400 civil penalty after finding (1) YMGI had failed to certify that certain models of residential central air conditioners comply with the applicable energy conservation standards and (2) YMGI had distributed in commerce model TTWC-18K-31B, a through-the-wall air conditioner that does not meet the applicable energy conservation standard. http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/ymgi-order-2011-sce-1605 Download Watermark Designs: Order (2010-CW-1404) DOE ordered Watermark Designs Holdings, Ltd. d/b/a Watermark Designs, Ltd. to pay a $135,104 civil penalty after finding Watermark Designs had failed

226

Help Desk Request  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supplier Information Form Supplier Information Form Date: Revision New Legal Business Name: Interested suppliers may complete and submit a Supplier Information Form to be included into Argonne's vendor database. Suppliers are advised that there is no guarantee that any solicitations or awards will be sent to Supplier by submitting a supplier information form; however in the event a solicitation is sent to the Supplier from an Argonne Procurement Official, then a more formal quotation/offer may be required. Company Website: Address 1 Address 2 City State Zip Code Country D/B/A: (if applicable) If yes, valid thru: Yes No Are you active in Central Contractor Registration (CCR)? IMPORTANT! In order for your company to be loaded into Argonne's vendor database, it will be necessary for you to supply your DUNS number. For more information on DUNS, please go to D&B's website.

227

Property:TotalValue | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TotalValue TotalValue Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "TotalValue" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 44 Tech Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 10,000,000 + A ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project + 3,088,007 + Amber Kinetics, Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 10,000,000 + American Transmission Company LLC II Smart Grid Project + 22,888,360 + American Transmission Company LLC Smart Grid Project + 2,661,650 + Atlantic City Electric Company Smart Grid Project + 37,400,000 + Avista Utilities Smart Grid Project + 40,000,000 + B Baltimore Gas and Electric Company Smart Grid Project + 451,814,234 + Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest Division Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 177,642,503 +

228

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 17630 of 28,905 results. 21 - 17630 of 28,905 results. Download Before the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power Subject: Alternative Transportation Fuels and Vehicles By: Howard Gruenspecht, Deputy Administrator Energy Information Administration http://energy.gov/congressional/downloads/house-energy-and-commerce-subcommittee-energy-and-power-2 Download FOA_FAQ.pdf http://energy.gov/pi/office-policy-and-international-affairs/downloads/foafaqpdf Download Audit Report: IG-0452 Nuclear Material Protection, Control, and Accounting Program http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/audit-report-ig-0452 Download Watermark Designs: Order (2010-CW-1404) DOE ordered Watermark Designs Holdings, Ltd. d/b/a Watermark Designs, Ltd. to pay a $135,104 civil penalty after finding Watermark Designs had failed

229

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

fOSS fOSS IL ENERGY ) Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC ) Lake Charles Exports, LLC ) Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP ) Carib Energy (USA) LLC ) Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC ) Cameron LNG, LLC ) Gulf Coast LNG Export, LLC ) Jordan Cove Energy Project, L.P ) LNG Development Company, LLC (d/b/a Oregon LNG) ) Cheniere Marketing, LLC ) Southern LNG Company, L.L.C. ) Gulf LNG Liquefaction Company, LLC ) CE FLNG, LLC ) Excelerate Liquefaction Sol utions I, LLC ) Golden Pass Products LLC ) ______________________________________ ) PROCEDURAL ORDER BACKGROUND FE Docket No. 10-161-LNG FE Docket No. 11-59-LNG FE Docket No. 11- 128- LNG FE Docket No. 11- 141-LNG FE Docket No. 11- 161- LNG FE Docket No. 11- 162- LNG FE Docket No. 12-05-

230

All General Counsel Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 24, 2013 September 24, 2013 Haier: Proposed Penalty (2011-SE-1408) DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Haier America Trading, L.L.C. privately labeled and distributed noncompliant freezers in the U.S. September 24, 2013 CNA: Proposed Penalty (2013-SE-1430) DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that CNA International, Inc., d/b/a MC Appliance Corp. privately labeled and distributed noncompliant freezer Magic Chef model number HMCF7W in the U.S. September 23, 2013 Hicon: Order (2013-SE-1426) DOE ordered Ningbo Hicon International Industry Company, Ltd. to pay a $1,912,714 civil penalty after finding Hicon had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. 115,126 units of basic model BD-200, a noncompliant freezer. September 20, 2013

231

Development of a Centrifugal Hydrogen Pipeline Gas Compressor - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Francis A. Di Bella, P.E. Concepts ETI, Inc., d.b.a. Concepts NREC 285 Billerica Road, Suite 102 Chelmsford, MA 01824-4174 Phone: (781) 937-4718 Email: fdibella@conceptsnrec.com DOE Managers HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov GO: Katie Randolph Phone: (720) 356-1759 Email: Katie.Randolph@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FG36-08GO18059 Subcontractors: Texas A&M University, College Station, TX HyGen Industries, Eureka, CA Project Start Date: June 1, 2008 Project End Date: May, 2013 Overall Project Objectives Develop and demonstrate an advanced centrifugal * compressor system for high-pressure hydrogen pipeline transport to support DOE's strategic hydrogen

232

CX-006095: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

95: Categorical Exclusion Determination 95: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006095: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alaska-Tribe-Birch Creek Tribe Dba Denduu Gwichin Tribal Government CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07/07/2011 Location(s): Birch Creek, Alaska Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. The Birch Creek Tribal Council of Birch Creek, Alaska, proposes to purchase and install a new generator (approximately 35 kilowatts) for power generation. The generator would be located in an existing school building which is centrally located in the community. The purpose of the generator upgrade is to reduce the amount of diesel used to generate electricity in the community. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-006095.pdf More Documents & Publications

233

All General Counsel Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 21, 2012 November 21, 2012 Teddico: Proposed Penalty (2012-SE-5409) DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that The Electrical Design, Development and Implementation Company d/b/a Teddico manufactured and distributed noncompliant metal halide lamp fixtures with magnetic probe-start ballasts in the U.S. November 20, 2012 Midea: Penalty Notice Withdrawal (2010-SE-0110) DOE withdrew its January 26, 2012 Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty, but retained the right to take further enforcement actions. November 20, 2012 Midea: Proposed Penalty (2010-SE-0110, 2012-SE-1402, 2012-SE-1404) DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Midea America Corp., Hefei Hualing Co., Ltd., and China Refrigeration Industry Co., Ltd. manufactured and distributed noncompliant refrigerator-freezers and

234

Typical Consultants/Vendors used by EOTA for Subject Matter Expert and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Consultants/Vendors used by EOTA for Subject Matter Expert and Consultants/Vendors used by EOTA for Subject Matter Expert and operatioal support Typical Consultants/Vendors used by EOTA for Subject Matter Expert and operatioal support Vendor's Name Contact/Rep Address Work Phone 615 Music Productions, Inc. Steve Hayes or Laura Palmer 1030 16th Ave. South, Nashville, TN 37212 616-244-6515 Adams, James F. James Adams 1217 Brookshire Dr., Bedford, TX 76021 214-674-6868 Adobe Systems Inc. N/A 2750 Barrett Lakes Blvd., Kennesaw, GA 30144 800-833-6687 Atlantech Resellers Inc, DBA CablesAndKits.com Craig Haynie 4555 Atwater Ct Ste ! Buford, GA 21075 877-633-2629 Albuquerque Printing Co Albert Padilla 3838 Bogan Ave.NE, Albq. 87109 505-872-2200 AlphaTRAC, Inc. John Ciolek 8670 Wolff Ct Ste 120 Westminster, CO 80031 303-428-5670 Amazon.com CSR

235

Teddico: Noncompliance Determination (2012-SE-5409) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Teddico: Noncompliance Determination (2012-SE-5409) Teddico: Noncompliance Determination (2012-SE-5409) Teddico: Noncompliance Determination (2012-SE-5409) November 20, 2012 DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to The Electrical Design, Development and Implementation Company d/b/a Teddico finding that a variety of basic models of magnetic probe-start metal halide lamp fixtures do not comport with the energy conservation standards. DOE determined the products were noncompliant based on the company's own testing. Teddico must immediately notify each person (or company) to whom Teddico distributed the noncompliant products that the products do not meet Federal standards. In addition, Teddico must provide to DOE documents and records showing the number of units Teddico distributed and to whom. The

236

Property:HeadquartersState | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HeadquartersState HeadquartersState Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "HeadquartersState" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 44 Tech Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + Pennsylvania + A ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project + Minnesota + Amber Kinetics, Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + California + American Transmission Company LLC II Smart Grid Project + Wisconsin + American Transmission Company LLC Smart Grid Project + Wisconsin + Atlantic City Electric Company Smart Grid Project + New Jersey + Avista Utilities Smart Grid Project + Washington + B Baltimore Gas and Electric Company Smart Grid Project + Maryland + Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest Division Smart Grid Demonstration Project + Washington +

237

Teddico: Proposed Penalty (2012-SE-5409) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proposed Penalty (2012-SE-5409) Proposed Penalty (2012-SE-5409) Teddico: Proposed Penalty (2012-SE-5409) November 21, 2012 DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that The Electrical Design, Development and Implementation Company d/b/a Teddico manufactured and distributed noncompliant metal halide lamp fixtures with magnetic probe-start ballasts in the U.S. Federal law subjects manufacturers and private labelers to civil penalties if those parties distribute in the U.S. products that do not meet applicable energy conservation standards. This civil penalty notice advises the company of the potential penalties and DOE's administrative process, including the company's right to a hearing. Teddico: Proposed Penalty (2012-SE-5409) More Documents & Publications Teddico: Noncompliance Determination (2012-SE-5409)

238

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 5060 of 26,777 results. 51 - 5060 of 26,777 results. Download MC Appliance: Proposed Penalty (2012-CE-1508) DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that CNA International Inc. d/b/a MC Appliance Corporation failed to certify a variety of room air conditioners as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards. http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/mc-appliance-proposed-penalty-2012-ce-1508 Download EA-210 PP&L EnergyPlus Company http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/ea-210-ppl-energyplus-company Download EIS-0390: Notice of Public Meeting and Additional Opportunity for Public Review and Comment Eastern Plains Transmission Project, Colorado and Kansas http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0390-notice-public-meeting-and-additional-opportunity-public-review-and-comment

239

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 2050 of 26,777 results. 41 - 2050 of 26,777 results. Download CNA: Proposed Penalty (2013-SE-1430) DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that CNA International, Inc., d/b/a MC Appliance Corp. privately labeled and distributed noncompliant freezer Magic Chef model number HMCF7W in the U.S. http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/cna-proposed-penalty-2013-se-1430 Download Electricity Advisory Committee Notice of Open Meeting March 6 and 7, 2013: Federal Register Notice Volume 78, No. 26- Feb. 7, 2013 This notice announces a meeting of the Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC). The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of these meetings be... http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/electricity-advisory-committee-notice-open-meeting-march-6-and-7-2013-federal-register

240

CNA: Noncompliance Determination (2013-SE-1430) | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Noncompliance Determination (2013-SE-1430) Noncompliance Determination (2013-SE-1430) CNA: Noncompliance Determination (2013-SE-1430) July 1, 2013 DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to CNA International, Inc., d/b/a MC Appliance Corp. finding that Magic Chef-brand model HMCF7W ("CNA model HMCF7W") does not comport with the energy conservation standards. DOE determined the product was noncompliant based on DOE testing. CNA must immediately notify each person (or company) to whom CNA distributed the noncompliant products that the product does not meet Federal standards. In addition, CNA must provide to DOE documents and records showing the number of units CNA distributed and to whom. The manufacturer and/or private labeler of the product may be subject to civil penalties.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dba a-weighted decibel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 8960 of 31,917 results. 51 - 8960 of 31,917 results. Download Teddico: Order (2012-SE-5409) DOE ordered The Electrical Design, Development and Implementation Company d/b/a Teddico to pay a $18,994 civil penalty after finding Teddico had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. 218 units of a variety of noncompliant metal halide lamp fixtures basic models. http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/teddico-order-2012-se-5409 Download Commercial Refrigerator Door: Order (2013-CE-5351) DOE ordered Commercial Refrigerator Door Company, Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Commercial Refrigerator Door had failed to certify that a variety of models of walk-in cooler and freezer components comply with the applicable energy conservation standards. http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/commercial-refrigerator-door-order-2013-ce-5351

242

EIS-0377: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

77: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental 77: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement and Notice of Public Hearings EIS-0377: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement and Notice of Public Hearings Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project Western Area Power Administration (Western), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Upper Great Plains Customer Service Region, and the Rural Utilities Service (RUS), U.S. Department of Agriculture, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), U.S. Department of Defense, as cooperating agencies, announce the availability of the Draft Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project (Project) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for public review and comment. Otter Tail Corporation (dba Otter Tail Power

243

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 11370 of 31,917 results. 61 - 11370 of 31,917 results. Download Teddico: Noncompliance Determination (2012-SE-5409) DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to The Electrical Design, Development and Implementation Company d/b/a Teddico finding that a variety of basic models of magnetic probe-start metal halide lamp fixtures do not comport with the energy conservation standards. http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/teddico-noncompliance-determination-2012-se-5409 Download DOJ Title Standards for Acquisition http://energy.gov/management/downloads/doj-title-standards-acquisition Article Final Transuranic Waste Shipment Leaves Rocky Flats Cleanup Ahead of Schedule, On Track to Save Taxpayers Billions http://energy.gov/articles/final-transuranic-waste-shipment-leaves-rocky-flats

244

Microsoft Outlook - Memo Style  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reagan, Robert (Bob) R. Reagan, Robert (Bob) R. <ReaganRR@ci.anchorage.ak.us> Sent: Monday, May 13, 2013 2:34 PM To: ERS2014 Cc: Peterson, Rebecca; McArdle, Paul; Booth, William; Paul Jones (pjj@khe.com); Posey, James M. (MLP) Subject: ML&P Comments to EIA on Proposed Form 930 The Municipality of Anchorage d/b/a Municipal Light and Power (ML&P) submits the following comments regarding the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) proposed Form 930. Comment has also been solicited regarding the continuation of other forms, on which ML&P takes no position. ML&P's comments relate specifically to the application of Form 930 to utilities in Alaska, and should not be construed as a position on the value or burden of this form as applied to the rest of the country.

245

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 21340 of 31,917 results. 31 - 21340 of 31,917 results. Download Watermark Designs: Order (2010-CW-1404) DOE ordered Watermark Designs Holdings, Ltd. d/b/a Watermark Designs, Ltd. to pay a $135,104 civil penalty after finding Watermark Designs had failed to certify that various models of showerheads comply with the applicable water conservation standards. http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/watermark-designs-order-2010-cw-1404 Download YMGI: Order (2011-SCE-1605) DOE ordered YMGI Group LLC to pay a $31,400 civil penalty after finding (1) YMGI had failed to certify that certain models of residential central air conditioners comply with the applicable energy conservation standards and (2) YMGI had distributed in commerce model TTWC-18K-31B, a through-the-wall air conditioner that does not meet the applicable energy conservation

246

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

631 - 2640 of 9,640 results. 631 - 2640 of 9,640 results. Download Teddico: Noncompliance Determination (2012-SE-5409) DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to The Electrical Design, Development and Implementation Company d/b/a Teddico finding that a variety of basic models of magnetic probe-start metal halide lamp fixtures do not comport with the energy conservation standards. http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/teddico-noncompliance-determination-2012-se-5409 Article Philadelphia: The City of Energy Savings To help homeowners save money and improve comfort, Philadelphia neighborhoods, nonprofits and the local government are partnering to improve the energy efficiency of the city's homes. http://energy.gov/articles/philadelphia-city-energy-savings Article DOE Award Results in Several Patents, Potential Increased Coal

247

Property:CoverageMap | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CoverageMap CoverageMap Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "CoverageMap" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project + SmartGridMap-ALLETEMNPower.JPG + American Transmission Company LLC II Smart Grid Project + SmartGridMap-AmericanTransmissionII.JPG + American Transmission Company LLC Smart Grid Project + SmartGridMap-AmericanTransmission.JPG + Atlantic City Electric Company Smart Grid Project + SmartGridMap-AtlanticCityElectric.JPG + Avista Utilities Smart Grid Project + SmartGridMap-AvistaUtilities.JPG + B Baltimore Gas and Electric Company Smart Grid Project + SmartGridMap-BaltimoreGasElectric.JPG + Black Hills Power, Inc. Smart Grid Project + SmartGridMap-BlackHills.JPG +

248

2011 Hyundai Sonata 4932 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid HEV (VIN KMHEC4A43BA004932). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the AVTA for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the DOE.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

2010 Ford Fusion VIN 4757 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Ford Fusion HEV (VIN: 3FADP0L34AR144757). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

2010 Honda Insight VIN 0141 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Honda Insight HEV (VIN: JHMZE2H78AS010141). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

2010 Toyota Prius VIN 0462 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Toyota Prius HEV (VIN: JTDKN3DU2A5010462). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

2010 Toyota Prius VIN 6063 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Toyota Prius HEV (VIN JTDKN3DU5A0006063). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

2010 Honda Insight VIN 1748 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Honda Insight HEV (VIN: JHMZE2H59AS011748). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

2010 Honda Civic Hybrid UltraBattery Conversion 5577 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Honda Civic HEV UltraBattery Conversion (VIN JHMFA3F24AS005577). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the AVTA for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the DOE.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center report to the Steering Committee. Final technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Trace Element Removal (TER) test block, and a simultaneous testing of the Lime Forced Oxidation process with DBA addition (LDG). At the end of the month, a series of Duct Injection tests began in a study to determine the efficiencies of alkaline injection for removing trace elements (mercury). On the Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, low temperature performance testing continued this month as measurements were taken for NO{sub x} removal efficiency, residual ammonia slip, and SO{sub 3} generation across the catalysts installed in the SCR reactor. This report describes the status of the facilities and test activities at the pilot and mini-pilot plants.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Final safety analysis report for the irradiated fuels storage facility  

SciTech Connect

A fuel storage facility has been constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant to provide safe storage for spent fuel from two commercial HTGR's, Fort St. Vrain and Peach Bottom, and from the Rover nuclear rocket program. The new facility was built as an addition to the existing fuel storage basin building to make maximum use of existing facilities and equipment. The completed facility provides dry storage for one core of Peach Bottom fuel (804 elements), 1$sup 1$/$sub 2$ cores of Fort St. Vrain fuel (2200 elements), and the irradiated fuel from the 20 reactors in the Rover program. The facility is designed to permit future expansion at a minimum cost should additional storage space for graphite-type fuels be required. A thorough study of the potential hazards associated with the Irradiated Fuels Storage Facility has been completed, indicating that the facility is capable of withstanding all credible combinations of internal accidents and pertinent natural forces, including design basis natural phenomena of a 10,000 year flood, a 175-mph tornado, or an earthquake having a bedrock acceleration of 0.33 g and an amplification factor of 1.3, without a loss of integrity or a significant release of radioactive materials. The design basis accident (DBA) postulated for the facility is a complete loss of cooling air, even though the occurrence of this situation is extremely remote, considering the availability of backup and spare fans and emergency power. The occurrence of the DBA presents neither a radiation nor an activity release hazard. A loss of coolant has no effect upon the fuel or the facility other than resulting in a gradual and constant temperature increase of the stored fuel. The temperature increase is gradual enough that ample time (28 hours minimum) is available for corrective action before an arbitrarily imposed maximum fuel centerline temperature of 1100$sup 0$F is reached. (LK)

Bingham, G.E.; Evans, T.K.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

DESIGN OF VISIBLE DIAGNOSTIC BEAMLINE FOR NSLS2 STORAGE RING  

SciTech Connect

A visible synchrotron light monitor (SLM) beam line has been designed at the NSLS2 storage ring, using the bending magnet radiation. A retractable thin absorber will be placed in front of the first mirror to block the central x-rays. The first mirror will reflect the visible light through a vacuum window. The light is guided by three 6-inch diameter mirrors into the experiment hutch. In this paper, we will describe design work on various optical components in the beamline. The ultra high brightness NSLS-II storage ring is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It will have 3GeV, 500mA electron beam circulating in the 792m ring, with very low emittance (0.9nm.rad horizontal and 8pm.rad vertical). The ring is composed of 30 DBA cells with 15 fold symmetry. Three damping wigglers will be installed in long straight sections 8, 18 and 28 to lower the emittance. While electrons pass through the bending magnet, synchrotron radiation will be generated covering a wide spectrum. There are other insertion devices in the storage ring which will generate shorter wavelength radiation as well. Synchrotron radiation has been widely used as diagnostic tool to measure the transverse and longitudinal profile. Three synchrotron light beam lines dedicated for diagnostics are under design and construction for the NSLS-II storage ring: two x-ray beam lines (pinhole and CRL) with the source points from Cell 22 BM{_}A (first bending in the DBA cell) and Cell22 three-pole wiggler; the third beam line is using visible part of radiation from Cell 30 BM{_}B (second bending magnet from the cell). Our paper focuses on the design of the visible beam line - SLM.

Cheng, W.; Fernandes, H.; Hseuh, H.; Kosciuk, B.; Krinsky, S.; Singh, O.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

258

Search Hanford accessible reports electronically system design description. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Search Hanford Accessible Records Electronically (SHARE) system was produced by a combined team of personnel from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Corrective Action Data Systems (CADS) and Information Resource Management (IRM) Information and Scientific Systems (ISS) organizations. The ESQD Text Evaluation and exchange Tool (ETEXT) prototype was used as a basis for the requirements used to support this design/build effort. TOPIC was used to build the SHARE application. TOPIC is a text search and retrieval software product produced by the Verity Corporation. The TOPIC source code is not provided with the product, and the programs cannot be changed. TOPIC can be customized for special requirements. The software is fully documented. Help messages, menu and screen layouts, command edits and options, and internal system design are all described in the TOPIC documentation. This System Design Description (SDD) will not reiterate the TOPIC documentation and design. Instead, it will focus on the SHARE installation of TOPIC. This SDD is designed to assist the SHARE database/infobase administrator (DBA) in maintaining and supporting the application. It assumes that the assigned DBA is knowledgeable in using the TOPIC product, and is also knowledgeable in using a personal computer (PC), Disk Operating System (DOS) commands, and the document WHC-CM-3-10. SHARE is an Impact Level 4 system, and all activities related to SHARE must conform with the WHC-CM-3-10 procedures for an Impact Level 4 system. The Alternatives Analysis will be treated as a level 3-Q document, to allow for reference by potential future projects.

Gilomen, T.L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

259

Exposure Evaluation for Benzene, Lead and Noise in Vehicle and Equipment Repair Shops  

SciTech Connect

An exposure assessment was performed at the equipment and vehicle maintenance repair shops operating at the U. S. Department of Energy Hanford site, in Richland, Washington. The maintenance shops repair and maintain vehicles and equipment used in support of the Hanford cleanup mission. There are three general mechanic shops and one auto body repair shop. The mechanics work on heavy equipment used in construction, cranes, commercial motor vehicles, passenger-type vehicles in addition to air compressors, generators, and farm equipment. Services include part fabrication, installation of equipment, repair and maintenance work in the engine compartment, and tire and brake services. Work performed at the auto body shop includes painting and surface preparation which involves applying body filler and sanding. 8-hour time-weighted-average samples were collected for benzene and noise exposure and task-based samples were collected for lead dust work activities involving painted metal surfaces. Benzene samples were obtained using 3M 3520 sampling badges and were analyzed for additional volatile organic compounds. These compounds were selected based on material safety data sheet information for the aerosol products used by the mechanics for each day of sampling. The compounds included acetone, ethyl ether, toluene, xylene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone, and trichloroethylene. Laboratory data for benzene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone and trichloroethylene were all below the reporting detection limit. Airborne concentrations for acetone, ethyl ether, toluene and xylene were all less than 10% of their occupational exposure limit. The task-based samples obtained for lead dusts were submitted for a metal scan analysis to identify other metals that might be present. Laboratory results for lead dusts were all below the reporting detection limit and airborne concentration for the other metals observed in the samples were less than 10% of the occupational exposure limit. Noise dosimetry sampling was performed on a random basis and was representative of the different work activities within the four shops. Twenty three percent of the noise samples exceeded the occupational exposure limit of 85 decibels for an 8-hour time-weightedaverage. Work activities where noise levels were higher included use of impact wrenches and grinding wheels.

Sweeney, Lynn C.

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

260

Calibrating Multimodel Forecast Ensembles with Exchangeable and Missing Members Using Bayesian Model Averaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bayesian model averaging (BMA) is a statistical postprocessing technique that generates calibrated and sharp predictive probability density functions (PDFs) from forecast ensembles. It represents the predictive PDF as a weighted average of PDFs ...

Chris Fraley; Adrian E. Raftery; Tilmann Gneiting

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dba a-weighted decibel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

CETA WorkshopNovember 2011-Securing the Next Wave of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... www.salon.com Note: re-code.com is now the website for a weight loss product Page 8. ... and the Network From the Beginning 17 ... Speed Power ...

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

262

Microsoft Word - CSC for Indian Steel Final_2013-8-1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

use is estimated to be coal (42%), coking coal (34%) natural gas (12%), miscellaneous oil (9%), and coke gas (3%). A weighted average emissions factor based on IPCC emissions...

263

The room noise criteria (RNC) metric.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent ANSI S12.2:2008 room noise criteria contains both a survey and an engineering method to specify room noise criteria. The methods use A?weighting and extended NC

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

National and Regional Water and Wastewater Rates For Use in Cost-Benefit Models and Evaluations of Water Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a weighted average of the utilitys rate for its first andsurvey asks about the utilitys rate structure (flat vs.0 for all 41 of the flat-rate utilities, was $0.74 per unit.

Fisher, Diane C.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Melody, Moya

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Holes in the Backstop: Optimal Contracts and the Saga of the US Synthetic Fuels Corporation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reduced dependence on foreign oil in recent years and shouldof demand for foreign oil is a weighted difference of theif X is consumption of foreign oil in the first period,

Gilbert, Richard J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Statistical Extension of the National Hurricane Center 5-Day Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) forecasts for tropical cyclone tracks and wind speeds are extended in time to produce spatially disaggregated probability forecasts for landfall location and intensity, using a weighted bootstrap procedure. ...

Daniel S. Wilks; Charles J. Neumann; Miles B. Lawrence

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Production and analysis of a Southern Ocean state estimate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A modern general circulation model of the Southern Ocean with one-sixth of a degree resolution is optimized to the observed ocean in a weighted least squares sense. Convergence toward the state estimate solution is carried ...

Mazloff, Matthew R

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Probabilistic Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting Using Bayesian Model Averaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bayesian model averaging (BMA) is a statistical way of postprocessing forecast ensembles to create predictive probability density functions (PDFs) for weather quantities. It represents the predictive PDF as a weighted average of PDFs centered on ...

J. Mc Lean Sloughter; Adrian E. Raftery; Tilmann Gneiting; Chris Fraley

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The Role of Demand Response in Default Service Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Pennsylvania use the PJM real-time spot market price tosince the hourly real-time PJM prices are not known untilfive minutes. The hourly PJM price is a weighted average of

Barbose, Galen; Goldman, Chuck; Neenan, Bernie

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Reduced-basis output bound methods for parametrized partial differential equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An efficient and reliable method for the prediction of outputs of interest of partial differential equations with affine parameter dependence is presented. To achieve efficiency we employ the reduced-basis method: a weighted ...

Rovas, Dimitrios V. (Dimitrios Vasileios), 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Theory of Optimal Weighting of Data to Detect Climatic Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A search for climatic change predicted by climate models can easily yield unconvincing results because of climatic noise, the inherent, unpredictable variability of time-averaged atmospheric data. We describe a weighted average of data that ...

Thomas L. Bell

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Molecular Interaction between Botulinum Neurotoxin B and Its...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Interaction between Botulinum Neurotoxin B and Its Protein Receptor Revealed Figure 1 Structure of the HcB-Syt-II complex. a, sA-weighted FO - FC electron density map...

273

The Role of Demand Response in Default Service Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-57661: August 2005. Real-time prices are set every fiveThe hourly PJM real time market price is a weighted averageto estimate real time market prices. New Jersey utilities

Barbose, Galen; Goldman, Charles; Neenan, Bernie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

A competitive iterative procedure using a time-indexed model for ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aug 19, 2013 ... in a real production cell with the objective to minimize a weighted sum of ..... the price of the higher LP bound is paid for by the much longer...

275

A Technique for Estimating Outgoing Longwave Radiation from HIRS Radiance Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new technique for estimating outgoing longwave radiation from observations on the NOAA operational satellites has been developed from a regression analysis of radiation model calculations. The technique consists of a weighted sum of radiance in ...

Robert G. Ellingson; David J. Yanuk; Hai-Tien Lee; Arnold Gruber

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

A functional density-based nonparametric approach for statistical calibration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a new nonparametric functional method is introduced for predicting a scalar random variable Y from a functional random variable X. The resulting prediction has the form of a weighted average of the training data set, where ...

Noslen Hernndez; Rolando J. Biscay; Nathalie Villa-Vialaneix; Isneri Talavera

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

STATE OF CALIFORNIA AREA WEIGHTED AVERAGE CALCULATION WORKSHEET: RESIDENTIAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

there is more than one level of floor, wall, or ceiling insulation in a building, or more than one type of a building feature, material, or construction assembly occur in a building, a weighted average

278

Nonnegative, Conserved Scalar Transport Using Grid-Cell-centered, Spectrally Constrained Blackman Cubics for Applications on a Variable-Thickness Mesh  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A flux-formulated advection scheme is developed based on local, grid-cell-centered cubic polynomials. The coefficients of these polynomials involve a weighted admixture of locally and globally defined derivatives and are subjected to constraints ...

R. J. Yamartino

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Photometric Investigations of Precipitable Water and Optical Depth Wavelength Exponents in an Urban Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A six-channel Volz sunphotometer was used in the St. Louis urban area during Project METROMEX 1976 to monitor aerosol loading and atmospheric precipitable water. A weighted least-square fit of photometric observations to spatially and temporarily ...

Tom Yoksas

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

An Algorithm to Estimate Field Concentrations in the Wake of a Power Plant Complex under Nonsteady Meteorological Conditions from Wind-Tunnel Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highest concentrations of pollutant at ground level are often produced from surface sources with stable or unstable atmospheric conditions and near calm erratic winds. This paper describes a weighted data methodology developed to predict surface ...

K. M. Kothari; R. N. Meroney; R. J. B. Bouwmeester

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dba a-weighted decibel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Solitary lift : redesigning the base and tilter modules to meet customer needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A theoretical investigation towards the redesign of the base and the tilting module of the Solitary Lift prototype improved the machine with a weight reduction of 5.731bs. Besides lighter weight, the other criteria used ...

Vasquez, Elliot B. (Elliot Benjamin), 1982-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Microsoft Word - ITSI award doc 06-D0008 conformed to P00001.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CODE CODE (Hour) PAGE(S) until 04:00 PM local time 12 Oct 2005 X A X B X C D E X X G F X H david.villarreal@langley.af.mil RATING PAGE OF PAGES 7. ISSUED BY (Date) 29-Sep-2006 IMPORTANT - Award will be made on this Form, or on Standard Form 26, or by other authorized official written notice. Previous Edition is Unusable 33-134 STANDARD FORM 33 (REV. 9-97) Prescribed by GSA FAR (48 CFR) 53.214(c) HELEN VAUGHN 1 87 (If other than Item 7) 15A. NAME 16. NAME AND TITLE OF PERSON AUTHORIZED TO AND ADDRESS SIGN OFFER (Type or print) OF OFFEROR AMENDMENT NO. DATE 15B. TELEPHONE NO (Include area code) 17. SIGNATURE 303-858-0965 15C. CHECK IF REMITTANCE ADDRESS IS DIFFERENT FROM ABOVE - ENTER SUCH ADDRESS IN SCHEDULE. 18. OFFER DATE INNOVATIVE TECHNICAL SOLUTIONS, INC. JOHN ENGLAND DBA: ITSI 2730 SHADELANDS DR #100

283

Pending LT LNG Export Apps (12-6-13).xlsx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Current Current Processing Position Company DOE/FE Docket No. 1 Cameron LNG, LLC 11-162-LNG 2 Jordan Cove Energy Project, L.P. 12-32-LNG 3 LNG Development Company, LLC (d/b/a Oregon LNG) 12-77-LNG 4 Cheniere Marketing, LLC 12-97-LNG 5 Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions I, LLC 12-146-LNG 6 Carib Energy (USA) LLC 11-141-LNG 7 Gulf Coast LNG Export, LLC 12-05-LNG 8 Southern LNG Company, L.L.C. 12-100-LNG 9 Gulf LNG Liquefaction Company, LLC 12-101-LNG 10 CE FLNG, LLC 12-123-LNG 11 Golden Pass Products LLC 12-156-LNG 12 Pangea LNG (North America) Holdings, LLC 12-184-LNG 13 Trunkline LNG Export, LLC 13-04-LNG 14 Freeport-McMoRan Energy LLC 13-26-LNG 15 Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC 13-30-LNG 16 Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC 13-42-LNG 17 Venture Global LNG, LLC 13-69-LNG 18 Eos LNG LLC 13-116-LNG 19 Barca LNG LLC

284

Pending Long-Term Applications to Export LNG to Non-FTA Countries - Listed in Order DOE Will Commence Processing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Applications to Export LNG to Non-FTA Countries - Listed in Order DOE Will Commence Processing Long-Term Applications to Export LNG to Non-FTA Countries - Listed in Order DOE Will Commence Processing Order to Be Processed Company DOE/FE Docket No. Date DOE Application Filed FERC Pre-Filing Docket No. Date Applicant Received FERC Approval to Begin Pre-Filing Process 1 Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC 10-161-LNG 12/17/2010 PF11-2 1/5/2011 2 Lake Charles Exports, LLC 11-59-LNG 5/6/2011 PF12-8 4/6/2012 3 Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP 11-128-LNG 10/3/2011 PF12-16 6/26/2012 4 Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC 11-161-LNG 12/19/2011 PF11-2 1/5/2011 5 Cameron LNG, LLC 11-162-LNG 12/21/2011 PF12-13 5/9/2012 6 Jordan Cove Energy Project, L.P. 12-32-LNG 3/23/2012 PF12-7 3/6/2012 7 LNG Development Company, LLC (d/b/a Oregon LNG) 12-77-LNG 7/16/2012 PF12-18

285

Containment integrity of SEP plants under combined loads. [PWR; BWR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because the containment structure is the last barrier against the release of radioactivity, an assessment was undertaken to identify the design weaknesses and estimate the margins of safety for the SEP containments under the postulated, combined loading conditions of a safe shutdown earthquake (SSE) and a design basis accident (DBA). The design basis accident is either a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) or a main steam line break (MSLB). The containment designs analyzed consisted of three inverted light-bulb shaped drywells used in boiling water reactor (BWR) systems, and three steel-lined concrete containments and a spherical steel shell used in pressurized water reactor (PWR) systems. These designs cover a majority of the containment types used in domestic operating plants. The results indicate that five of the seven designs are adequate even under current design standards. For the remaining two designs, the possible design weaknesses identified were buckling of the spherical steel shell and over-stress in both the radial and tangential directions in one of the concrete containments near its base.

Lo, T.; Nelson, T.A.; Chen, P.Y.; Persinko, D.; Grimes, C.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

A POTENTIAL APPLICATION OF UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS TO DOE-STD-3009-94 ACCIDENT ANALYSIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to assess proposed transuranic waste accident analysis guidance and recent software improvements in a Windows-OS version of MACCS2 that allows the inputting of parameter uncertainty. With this guidance and code capability, there is the potential to perform a quantitative uncertainty assessment of unmitigated accident releases with respect to the 25 rem Evaluation Guideline (EG) of DOE-STD-3009-94 CN3 (STD-3009). Historically, the classification of safety systems in a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facility's safety basis has involved how subject matter experts qualitatively view uncertainty in the STD-3009 Appendix A accident analysis methodology. Specifically, whether consequence uncertainty could be larger than previously evaluated so the site-specific accident consequences may challenge the EG. This paper assesses whether a potential uncertainty capability for MACCS2 could provide a stronger technical basis as to when the consequences from a design basis accident (DBA) truly challenges the 25 rem EG.

Palmrose, D E; Yang, J M

2007-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

287

HIGH SO2 REMOVAL EFFICIENCY TESTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report describes the results of performance tests at six full-scale wet lime- and limestone-reagent flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The objective of these tests was to evaluate the effectiveness of low capital cost sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal upgrades for existing FGD systems as an option for complying with the provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The upgrade options tested at the limestone-reagent systems included the use of organic acid additives (dibasic acid (DBA) and/or sodium formate) as well as increased reagent ratio (higher excess limestone levels in the recirculating slurry solids) and absorber liquid-to-gas ratio. One system also tested operating at higher flue gas velocities to allow the existing FGD system to treat flue gas from an adjacent, unscrubbed unit. Upgrade options for the one lime-based system tested included increased absorber venturi pressure drop and increased sulfite concentration in the recirculating slurry liquor.

Gary M. Blythe; James L. Phillips

1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

LOW HORIZONTAL BETA FUNCTION IN LONG STRAIGHTS OF THE NSLS-II LATTICE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NSLS-II storage ring lattice is comprised of 30 DBA cells arranged in 15 superperiods. There are 15 long straight sections (9.3m) for injection, RF and insertion devices and 15 short straights (6.6m) for insertion devices. In the baseline lattice, the short straights have small horizontal and vertical beta functions but the long straights have large horizontal beta function optimized for injection. In this paper, we explore the possibility of maintaining three long straights with large horizontal beta function while providing the other 12 long straights with smaller horizontal beta function to optimize the brightness of insertion devices. Our study considers the possible linear lattice solutions as well as characterizing the nonlinear dynamics. Results are reported on optimization of dynamic aperture required for good injection efficiency and adequate Touschek lifetime. This paper discusses dynamic aperture optimization for the NSLS-II lattice with alternate high and low horizontal beta function in the long straights, which is proposed for the optimization of the brightness of insertion devices. The linear optics is optimized to meet the requirements of lattice function and source properties. Nonlinear optimization for a lattice with working point at (37.18, 16.2) is performed. Considering the realistic magnets errors and physical apertures, we calculate the frequency maps and plot the tune footprint. The results show that the lattice with high-low beta function has adequate dynamic aperture for good injection efficiency and sufficient Touschek lifetime.

Fanglei, L.; Bengtsson, J.; Guo, W.; Krinsky, S.; Li, Y.; Yang, L.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

289

Application of the DG-1199 methodology to the ESBWR and ABWR.  

SciTech Connect

Appendix A-5 of Draft Regulatory Guide DG-1199 'Alternative Radiological Source Term for Evaluating Design Basis Accidents at Nuclear Power Reactors' provides guidance - applicable to RADTRAD MSIV leakage models - for scaling containment aerosol concentration to the expected steam dome concentration in order to preserve the simplified use of the Accident Source Term (AST) in assessing containment performance under assumed design basis accident (DBA) conditions. In this study Economic and Safe Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) RADTRAD models are developed using the DG-1199, Appendix A-5 guidance. The models were run using RADTRAD v3.03. Low Population Zone (LPZ), control room (CR), and worst-case 2-hr Exclusion Area Boundary (EAB) doses were calculated and compared to the relevant accident dose criteria in 10 CFR 50.67. For the ESBWR, the dose results were all lower than the MSIV leakage doses calculated by General Electric/Hitachi (GEH) in their licensing technical report. There are no comparable ABWR MSIV leakage doses, however, it should be noted that the ABWR doses are lower than the ESBWR doses. In addition, sensitivity cases were evaluated to ascertain the influence/importance of key input parameters/features of the models.

Kalinich, Donald A.; Gauntt, Randall O.; Walton, Fotini

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

THE HYADES CLUSTER: IDENTIFICATION OF A PLANETARY SYSTEM AND ESCAPING WHITE DWARFS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, some hot DA-type white dwarfs have been proposed to plausibly be escaping members of the Hyades. We used hydrogen Balmer lines to measure the radial velocities of seven such stars and confirm that three, and perhaps two others, are/were indeed cluster members and one is not. The other candidate Hyad is strongly magnetic and its membership status remains uncertain. The photospheres of at least one quarter of field white dwarf stars are ''polluted'' by elements heavier than helium that have been accreted. These stars are orbited by extended planetary systems that contain both debris belts and major planets. We surveyed the seven classical single Hyades white dwarfs and the newly identified (escaping) Hyades white dwarfs and found calcium in the photosphere of LP 475-242 of type DBA (now DBAZ), thus implying the presence of an orbiting planetary system. The spectrum of white dwarf GD 31, which may be, but probably is not, an escaping member of the Hyades, displays calcium absorption lines; these originate either from the interstellar medium or, less likely, from a gaseous circumstellar disk. If GD 31 was once a Hyades member, then it would be the first identified white dwarf Hyad with a cooling age >340 Myr.

Zuckerman, B.; Xu, S.; Klein, B.; Jura, M., E-mail: ben@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: sxu@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: kleinb@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: jura@astro.ucla.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

291

Microsoft Word - 43C4089A.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10-1 10-1 10. GLOSSARY Term Definition "A-weighted" Scale Assigns a weight to sound frequencies that is related to how sensitive the human ear is to each sound frequency. Frequencies that are less sensitive to the human ear are weighted less than those for which the ear is more sensitive. A-weighted measurements indicate the potential damage a noise might cause to hearing. Ambient Noise Background noise associated with a given environment. Ambient noise is typically formed as a composite of sounds from many near and far sources, with no particular dominant sound. Aquifer Body of rock or sediment that is capable of transmitting groundwater and yielding sufficient quantities of water to wells or springs. Arterial Highway Highway generally characterized by its ability to quickly move a relatively large

292

Improving Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Performance of Modular  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Performance of Modular Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Performance of Modular Classroom HVAC Systems Title Improving Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Performance of Modular Classroom HVAC Systems Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2005 Authors Apte, Michael G., Michael Spears, Chi-Ming Lai, and Derek G. Shendell Conference Name Proceedings of Sustainable Buildings 2005 Conference Pagination 1432-1437 Conference Location Tokyo, Japan, September 27-29, 2005 Abstract The factory-built relocatable classroom (RC) is a dominant force in the school facility construction industry in the United States (U.S.) and elsewhere. It is estimated that there are approximately 650,000 RCs currently occupied in the U.S., housing about 16 million students. RCs receive public attention due to complaints about poor indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Both measured data and anecdotal evidence in California have suggested excessive acoustical noise from heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment as a central factor leading to degraded IEQ. In the U.S., RCs are typically equipped with unitary exterior wall-mount HVAC systems, and interior acoustical noise due to structural and airborne transmission can reach levels of about 58dB(A) with compressor cycling, under unoccupied conditions. Due to these noise levels teachers often simply choose to turn off the HVAC, leading to inadequate ventilation, as well as poor thermal conditioning, and thus to poor indoor air quality. Elevated levels of carbon dioxide and volatile organic compounds including formaldehyde are common. We discuss the acoustic component of our efforts to develop and test energy efficient HVAC systems that address the ventilation, controls, and acoustic requirements necessary to ensure high quality indoor environments in RCs

293

Evaluation of an in vitro toxicogenetic mouse model for hepatotoxicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous studies support the fact that a genetically diverse mouse population may be useful as an animal model to understand and predict toxicity in humans. We hypothesized that cultures of hepatocytes obtained from a large panel of inbred mouse strains can produce data indicative of inter-individual differences in in vivo responses to hepato-toxicants. In order to test this hypothesis and establish whether in vitro studies using cultured hepatocytes from genetically distinct mouse strains are feasible, we aimed to determine whether viable cells may be isolated from different mouse inbred strains, evaluate the reproducibility of cell yield, viability and functionality over subsequent isolations, and assess the utility of the model for toxicity screening. Hepatocytes were isolated from 15 strains of mice (A/J, B6C3F1, BALB/cJ, C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, CAST/EiJ, DBA/2J, FVB/NJ, BALB/cByJ, AKR/J, MRL/MpJ, NOD/LtJ, NZW/LacJ, PWD/PhJ and WSB/EiJ males) and cultured for up to 7 days in traditional 2-dimensional culture. Cells from B6C3F1, C57BL/6J, and NOD/LtJ strains were treated with acetaminophen, WY-14,643 or rifampin and concentration-response effects on viability and function were established. Our data suggest that high yield and viability can be achieved across a panel of strains. Cell function and expression of key liver-specific genes of hepatocytes isolated from different strains and cultured under standardized conditions are comparable. Strain-specific responses to toxicant exposure have been observed in cultured hepatocytes and these experiments open new opportunities for further developments of in vitro models of hepatotoxicity in a genetically diverse population.

Martinez, Stephanie M.; Bradford, Blair U. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Soldatow, Valerie Y. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); CellzDirect/Invitrogen (a part of Life Technologies), Durham, NC 27703 (United States); Kosyk, Oksana; Sandot, Amelia [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Witek, Rafal; Kaiser, Robert; Stewart, Todd; Amaral, Kirsten; Freeman, Kimberly; Black, Chris; LeCluyse, Edward L.; Ferguson, Stephen S. [CellzDirect/Invitrogen (a part of Life Technologies), Durham, NC 27703 (United States); Rusyn, Ivan, E-mail: iir@unc.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Environmental assessment: Raft River geothermal project pilot plant, Cassia County, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The action assessed here is the construction and operation of a 5- to 6-MW(e) (gross) geothermal pilot plant in the Raft River Valley of southern Idaho. This project was originally planned as a thermal test loop using a turbine simulator valve. The test loop facility (without the simulator valve) is now under construction. The current environmental assessment addresses the complete system including the addition of a turbine-generator and its associated switching gear in place of the simulator valve. The addition of the turbine-generator will result in a net production of 2.5 to 3.5 MW(e) with a commensurate reduction in waste heat to the cooling tower and will require the upgrading of existing transmission lines for offsite delivery of generated power. Construction of the facility will require disturbance of approximately 20 ha (50 acres) for the facility itself and approximately 22.5 ha (57 acres) for construction of drilling pads and ponds, pipelines, and roads. Existing transmission lines will be upgraded for the utility system interface. Interference with alternate land uses will be minimal. Loss of wildlife habitat will be acceptable, and US Fish and Wildlife Service recommendations for protection of raptor nesting sites, riparian vegetation, and other important habitats will be observed. During construction, noise levels may reach 100 dBA at 15 m (50 ft) from well sites, but wildlife and local residents should not be significantly affected if extended construction is not carried out within 0.5 km (0.3 miles) of residences or sensitive wildlife habitat. Water use during construction will not be large and impacts on competing uses are unlikely.

Not Available

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Simulation of operational transients in a VVER-1000 nuclear power plant using the RELAP5/MOD3.2 computer program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A RELAP5/MOD3.2 nodalization model of a VVER-1OOO (V-320) nuclear power plant was updated, improved and validated against available experimental data. The data included integrated test results obtained from actual power plant testing. The steady state and the operational transients test data describe the behavior of the Unit 5 of Kozloduy NPP (Bulgaria). The operational transients consisted of a loss of flow caused by the successive trip of two main coolant pumps without reactor scram. A validation process of the developed model has been performed in two stages comprising an initial and a transient validation. The comparison between experimental data and calculation results proved the adequacy of the model and also the code capacity to reproduce main plant parameter evolutions. The plant model was also used for a preliminary analysis of a large break loss of coolant accident (LB LOCA) which is the design basis accident (DBA) for the VVER-1000 plants. Due to the limitations of the utilized code version (unavailability of the redwood model), only the first stage (blowdown) of the accident was investigated. The results have been compared with similar calculations obtained by the Russian specialists with an indigenous thermal-hydraulic code (TECH-M). The comparison showed a good agreement. For the most important calculated parameter (hot spot cladding temperature) an uncertainty analysis using the response surface method was performed. The nodalization model seems to be adequate for the class of transients and accidents investigated, but the inclusion of the reactor specific point kinetics parameters, emergency headwater system model and updating some of the component parameters (e.g. main coolant pump friction) will increase its area of applicability.

Moscalu, Dionisie Radu

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Sodium fast reactor gaps analysis of computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of an expert-opinion elicitation activity designed to qualitatively assess the status and capabilities of currently available computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety calculations of advanced sodium fast reactors, and identify important gaps. The twelve-member panel consisted of representatives from five U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, and BNL), the University of Wisconsin, the KAERI, the JAEA, and the CEA. The major portion of this elicitation activity occurred during a two-day meeting held on Aug. 10-11, 2010 at Argonne National Laboratory. There were two primary objectives of this work: (1) Identify computer codes currently available for SFR accident analysis and reactor safety calculations; and (2) Assess the status and capability of current US computer codes to adequately model the required accident scenarios and associated phenomena, and identify important gaps. During the review, panel members identified over 60 computer codes that are currently available in the international community to perform different aspects of SFR safety analysis for various event scenarios and accident categories. A brief description of each of these codes together with references (when available) is provided. An adaptation of the Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) for computational modeling and simulation is described for use in this work. The panel's assessment of the available US codes is presented in the form of nine tables, organized into groups of three for each of three risk categories considered: anticipated operational occurrences (AOOs), design basis accidents (DBA), and beyond design basis accidents (BDBA). A set of summary conclusions are drawn from the results obtained. At the highest level, the panel judged that current US code capabilities are adequate for licensing given reasonable margins, but expressed concern that US code development activities had stagnated and that the experienced user-base and the experimental validation base was decaying away quickly.

Carbajo, Juan (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Ludewig, Hans (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki-ken, Japan); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki-ken, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d'%C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache %3CU%2B2013%3E CEA, France)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Sociopsychological factors affecting the human response to noise exposure  

SciTech Connect

Community noise is reported to be the most often mentioned undesirable neighborhood condition in a recent US Census survey. Understanding community response to noise involves the measurement of a number of complex acoustic and nonacoustic variables and establishing the chain of relationships between physical exposure, perception, annoyance, and acceptability responses and finally complaint behavior. The perceived loudness of a noise is the most important acoustic parameter influencing annoyance and complaints, and the simple dBA unit can be used to integrate spectral characteristics of complex sounds in community studies. Although energy averaging such as Leq or Ldn can be used to describe multiple noise exposures over time, the variable trade-off relationships between number and level of exposures are somewhat obscured by such summary measures. However, they are still the best available descriptors and, until more accurate ones are developed, can be used to measure community noise environments. Perception of an identical noise exposure can vary according to the physiological noise sensitivity of a person and the activity context in which the noise is heard. Although the acoustic quality of the noise itself usually explains about 10 to 25 per cent of the variability in annoyance responses, sociopsychological variables measured in field studies account for 35 to 50 per cent of the variations in human annoyance responses. Three of the most important nonacoustic factors are the connotative fear effects of the noise signal, the feeling that those responsible for the noise are misfeasant in not reducing the noise, and the feeling that harmful health effects are produced by the noise.

Borsky, P.N.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Mercury and autoimmunity: implications for occupational and environmental health  

SciTech Connect

Mercury (Hg) has long been recognized as a neurotoxicant; however, recent work in animal models has implicated Hg as an immunotoxicant. In particular, Hg has been shown to induce autoimmune disease in susceptible animals with effects including overproduction of specific autoantibodies and pathophysiologic signs of lupus-like disease. However, these effects are only observed at high doses of Hg that are above the levels to which humans would be exposed through contaminated fish consumption. While there is presently no evidence to suggest that Hg induces frank autoimmune disease in humans, a recent epidemiological study has demonstrated a link between occupational Hg exposure and lupus. In our studies, we have tested the hypothesis that Hg does not cause autoimmune disease directly, but rather that it may interact with triggering events, such as genetic predisposition, exposure to antigens, or infection, to exacerbate disease. Treatment of mice that are not susceptible to Hg-induced autoimmune disease with very low doses and short term exposures of inorganic Hg (20-200 {mu}g/kg) exacerbates disease and accelerates mortality in the graft versus host disease model of chronic lupus in C57Bl/6 x DBA/2 mice. Furthermore, low dose Hg exposure increases the severity and prevalence of experimental autoimmune myocarditis (induced by immunization with cardiac myosin peptide in adjuvant) in A/J mice. To test our hypothesis further, we examined sera from Amazonian populations exposed to Hg through small-scale gold mining, with and without current or past malaria infection. We found significantly increased prevalence of antinuclear and antinucleolar antibodies and a positive interaction between Hg and malaria. These results suggest a new model for Hg immunotoxicity, as a co-factor in autoimmune disease, increasing the risks and severity of clinical disease in the presence of other triggering events, either genetic or acquired.

Silbergeld, Ellen K. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)]. E-mail: esilberg@jhsph.edu; Silva, Ines A. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Nyland, Jennifer F. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

MODULAR AND FULL SIZE SIMPLIFIED BOILING WATER REACTOR DESIGN WITH FULLY PASSIVE SAFETY SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

OAK B204 The overall goal of this three-year research project was to develop a new scientific design of a compact modular 200 MWe and a full size 1200 MWe simplified boiling water reactors (SBWR). Specific objectives of this research were: (1) to perform scientific designs of the core neutronics and core thermal-hydraulics for a small capacity and full size simplified boiling water reactor, (2) to develop a passive safety system design, (3) improve and validate safety analysis code, (4) demonstrate experimentally and analytically all design functions of the safety systems for the design basis accidents (DBA) and (5) to develop the final scientific design of both SBWR systems, 200 MWe (SBWR-200) and 1200 MWe (SBWR-1200). The SBWR combines the advantages of design simplicity and completely passive safety systems. These advantages fit well within the objectives of NERI and the Department of Energy's focus on the development of Generation III and IV nuclear power. The 3-year research program was structured around seven tasks. Task 1 was to perform the preliminary thermal-hydraulic design. Task 2 was to perform the core neutronic design analysis. Task 3 was to perform a detailed scaling study and obtain corresponding PUMA conditions from an integral test. Task 4 was to perform integral tests and code evaluation for the DBA. Task 5 was to perform a safety analysis for the DBA. Task 6 was to perform a BWR stability analysis. Task 7 was to perform a final scientific design of the compact modular SBWR-200 and the full size SBWR-1200. A no cost extension for the third year was requested and the request was granted and all the project tasks were completed by April 2003. The design activities in tasks 1, 2, and 3 were completed as planned. The existing thermal-hydraulic information, core physics, and fuel lattice information was collected on the existing design of the simplified boiling water reactor. The thermal-hydraulic design were developed. Based on a detailed integral system scaling analysis, design parameters were obtained and designs of the compact modular 200 MWe SBWR and the full size 1200 MWe SBWR were developed. These reactors are provided with passive safety systems. A new passive vacuum breaker check valve was designed to replace the mechanical vacuum beaker check valve. The new vacuum breaker check valve was based on a hydrostatic head, and was fail safe. The performance of this new valve was evaluated both by the thermal-hydraulic code RELAP5 and by the experiments in a scaled SBWR facility, PUMA. In the core neutronic design a core depletion model was implemented to PARCS code. A lattice design for the SBWR fuel assemblies was performed. Design improvements were made to the neutronics/thermal-hydraulics models of SBWR-200 and SBWR-1200, and design analyses of these reactors were performed. The design base accident analysis and evaluation of all the passive safety systems were completed as scheduled in tasks 4 and 5. Initial conditions for the small break loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) and large break LOCA using REALP5 code were obtained. Small and large break LOCA tests were performed and the data was analyzed. An anticipated transient with scram was simulated using the RELAP5 code for SBWR-200. The transient considered was an accidental closure of the main steam isolation valve (MSIV), which was considered to be the most significant transient. The evaluation of the RELAP5 code against experimental data for SBWR-1200 was completed. In task 6, the instability analysis for the three SBWR designs (SBWR-1200, SBWR-600 and SBWR-200) were simulated for start-up transients and the results were similar. Neither the geysering instability, nor the loop type instability was predicted by RAMONA-4B in the startup simulation following the recommended procedure by GE. The density wave oscillation was not observed at all because the power level used in the simulation was not high enough. A study was made of the potential instabilities by imposing an unrealistically high power ramp in a short time period, as suggested by GE. RAMON

M. Ishii; S. T. Revankar; T. Downar; Y. Xu, H. J. Yoon; D. Tinkler; U. S. Rohatgi

2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

300

Model Predictive Control of HVAC Systems: Implementation and Testing at the University of California, Merced  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costfunctionusedinthisdemonstrationisaweighted sumofpeakelectricaldemandandenergyconsumptionoverthetimestoptimestominimizeacostfunctionthatincludesenergystoptimestominimizeacostfunctionthatincludesenergy

Haves, Phillip

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dba a-weighted decibel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Abstract--This paper analyzes a distribution system load time series through autocorrelation coefficient, power spectral density,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

models [7], [8]. The load model developed in [7] provides different 24-hour load profiles for different seasons. The 24-hour load profile is obtained by a weighted sum of peak loads from different types1 Abstract--This paper analyzes a distribution system load time series through autocorrelation

Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

302

Short communication: ISOFIT - A program for fitting sorption isotherms to experimental data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Isotherm expressions are important for describing the partitioning of contaminants in environmental systems. ISOFIT (Isotherm Fitting Tool) is a software program that fits isotherm parameters to experimental data via the minimization of a weighted sum ... Keywords: Isotherm, Nonlinear regression, Parameter estimation, Particle swarm optimization, Sorption

L. Shawn Matott; Alan J. Rabideau

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

A linear combination of classifiers via rank margin maximization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The method we present aims at building a weighted linear combination of already trained dichotomizers, where the weights are determined to maximize the minimum rank margin of the resulting ranking system. This is particularly suited for real applications ... Keywords: combination of classifiers, margin, ranking

Claudio Marrocco; Paolo Simeone; Francesco Tortorella

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

M. S. Shell 2009 1/10 last modified 5/31/2012 Advanced sampling ChE210D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and ¯wB i can be calculated from a weighted his- togram analysis method (WHAM) procedure of the forward. The WHAM is used to con- struct an estimated crossing probability by weighting of the individual crossing from the WHAM analysis of the crossing probabilities as described above. Figure 2 de- picts

Shell, M. Scott

305

Weight optimisation for iterative distributed model predictive control applied to power networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a weight tuning technique for iterative distributed Model Predictive Control (MPC). Particle Swarm Optimisation (PSO) is used to optimise both the weights associated with disturbance rejection and those associated with achieving consensus ... Keywords: Distributed model predictive control, Multi-agent, Particle swarm optimisation, Power networks, Smart grids, Weight tuning

Paul Mc Namara; Rudy R. Negenborn; Bart De Schutter; Gordon Lightbody

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

inequalities for multivariate homogeneous polynomials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i ? di?1di+1,1 ? i ? n ? 1. We also define a weighted shift operator Shiftc : Rn+ 1 ?? Rn+1,. Shiftc((x0, ..., xn)T )=(c0x1, ..., cn?1xn,0)T . ? gurvits@lanl.gov.

307

Optimal trajectory planning for a redundant mobile manipulator with non-holonomic constraints performing pushpull tasks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work presents a method to generate optimal trajectories for redundant mobile manipulators based on a weighted function that considers simultaneously joint torques, manipulability and preferred joint angle references. This method is applicable to ... Keywords: Mobile Manipulator, Mobile Robot Motion Planning, Mobile Robots, Non Holonomic Constraints, Redundancy, Torque Optimization

Jos p. Puga; Luciano e. Chiang

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Open Ocean Modeling as an Inverse Problem: Tidal Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Classical models of tides in open coastal regions employ ad hoc conditions on the open boundaries instead of reliable sea level data on the coastline in order to achieve a well-posed problem. A weighted variational formulation is described here, ...

A. F. Bennett; P. C. McIntosh

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Weighted Association Rule Mining using weighted support and significance framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We address the issues of discovering significant binary relationships in transaction datasets in a weighted setting. Traditional model of association rule mining is adapted to handle weighted association rule mining problems where each item is allowed ... Keywords: WARM algorithm, Weighted Association Rule Mining, significant relationship, weighted downward closure property, weighted support

Feng Tao; Fionn Murtagh; Mohsen Farid

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Diameter-constrained steiner tree  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given an edge-weighted undirected graph G = (V, E, c, w), where each edge e ? E has a cost c(e) and a weight w(e), a set S ? V of terminals and a positive constant D0, ... Keywords: diameter-constrained steiner tree, fixed topology, fully polynomial time approximation scheme

Wei Ding; Guohui Lin; Guoliang Xue

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Two different approaches for providing QoS in the Internet backbone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares two different approaches for providing QoS in the Internet backbone. The first, denoted as simple approach, is a simple method of Admission Control performed by a weighted-fair-queuing scheduler. This approach guarantees QoS with ... Keywords: DiffServ, Packet, QoS, Teletraffic

P. Giacomazzi; L. Musumeci; G. Saddemi; G. Verticale

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

CSI 5166 ASSIGNMENT 1 Fall 2013 Due: Monday, September 30, 2013, by 6:00pm. You can also drop it off before  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

problem can be modelled as the most-reliable spanning tree problem (MRS tree): Given a weighted graph G a to b can be different than the cost to go from b to a. Consider this problem modeled on a complete directly cycle that visits all of the nodes. Write an ILP to model this problem. 3. [11 marks] Let G

Boyd, Sylvia

313

Non local image denoising using image adapted neighborhoods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years several non-local image denoising methods were proposed in the literature. These methods compute the denoised image as a weighted average of pixels across the whole image (in practice across a large area around the pixel to be denoised). ...

lvaro Pardo

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

An Integral Closure Model for the Vertical Turbulent Flux of a Scalar in a Mixed Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integral closure model is proposed for the vertical turbulent transport of a scalar in a mixed layer. The flux divergences at a given level is related to a vertical integral of a weighting function multiplied by the difference between the ...

Brian H. Fiedler

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

A method for numerical representation of arbitrary boundaries in acoustic wavefront propagation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An enhancement to the application of a wavefront propagation algorithm for underwater acoustics based on the level set method is presented. The presence of discontinuities in the phase space at reflecting boundaries requires the use of specialized differencing techniques to prevent oscillations in the computed solutions of the acoustic phase. A weighted essentially non?oscillatory method is applied for this purpose

Sheri Martinelli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Unicast and multicast QoS routing with soft-constraint logic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a formal model to represent and solve the unicast/multicast routing problem in networks with quality-of-service (QoS) requirements. To attain this, first we translate the network adapting it to a weighted graph (unicast) or and-or ... Keywords: Constraints, Quality of Service (QoS), constraint logic programming (CLP), preferences, routing, soft constraints

Stefano Bistarelli; Ugo Montanari; Francesca Rossi; Francesco Santini

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Armor systems including coated core materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

Chu, Henry S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lillo, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McHugh, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Coated armor system and process for making the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

Chu, Henry S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lillo, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McHugh, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

319

Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

Daniels, Michael A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Heaps, Ronald J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Steffler, Eric D (Idaho Falls, ID); Swank, William D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

320

Armor systems including coated core materials  

SciTech Connect

An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dba a-weighted decibel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Technique for information retrieval using enhanced latent semantic analysis generating rank approximation matrix by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix  

SciTech Connect

A technique for information retrieval includes parsing a corpus to identify a number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. A weighted morpheme-by-document matrix is generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus and based at least in part on a weighting function. The weighted morpheme-by-document matrix separately enumerates instances of stems and affixes. Additionally or alternatively, a term-by-term alignment matrix may be generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. At least one lower rank approximation matrix is generated by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix and/or the term-by-term alignment matrix.

Chew, Peter A; Bader, Brett W

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

322

The smallest possible heat engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct the smallest possible self contained heat engines; one composed of only two qubits, the other of only a single qutrit. The engines are self-contained as they do not require external sources of work and/or control. They are able to produce work which is used to continuously lift a weight. Despite the dimension of the engine being small, it is still able to operate at the Carnot efficiency.

Noah Linden; Sandu Popescu; Paul Skrzypczyk

2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

323

Synchronisation of financial crises  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the European countries report a crisis observation (Denmark, France, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the UK). 6The exchange market pressure index is constructed as a weighted sum of exchange rates, interest rate differentials and changes in reserves... fall in the number of simultaneous crises. This provides a convenient short hand for comparing the coincidence of crises across different asset markets and countries. 3 Critical Values for Concordance Indices Concordance indices for various crisis...

Dungey, Mardi; Jacobs, Jan P A M; Lestano

324

Gravity Control produced by a Thermoionic Current through the Air at Very Low Pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It was observed that samples hung above a thermoionic current exhibit a weight decrease directly proportional to the intensity of the current. The observed phenomenon appears to be absolutely new and unprecedented in the literature and can not be understood in the framework of the general relativity. It is pointed out the possibility that this unexpected effect is connected with a possible correlation between gravity and electromagnetism.

Fran De Aquino

2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

325

Nonlinear optical and conductive polymeric material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polymeric material is described which exhibits nonlinear optical properties if undoped and conductive properties if doped. The polymer is prepared by polymerizing diethynylsilane compositions, the resulting polymeric material having a weight average molecular weight between about 20,000 and about 200,000 grams per mole. The polymer is prepared and catalytically polymerized by exposure to a catalyst, such as MoCl[sub 5] or W(CO)[sub 6].

Barton, T.J.; Ijadi-Maghsooodi, S; Yi Pang.

1993-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

326

Pacific Northwest residential energy survey. Volume 3. Question-by-question results  

SciTech Connect

Tabulations are presented of responses to approximately 105 questions. Results are tabulated by 9 geographic regions: the four states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington; four climate zones in the region; and a weighted Pacific Northwest total. A description of the tabulated data is given in the Introduction. Tabulated data deal with questions on dwelling characteristics; heating and air-conditioning systems; water heating; appliances; demographic and swelling characteristics; and insulation.

None

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 0.015-0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in the alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the Mo content.

Leitnaker, James M. (Kingston, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Nonlinear optical and conductive polymeric material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polymeric material which exhibits nonlinear optical properties if undoped and conductive properties if doped. The polymer is prepared by polymerizing diethynylsilane compositions, the resulting polymeric material having a weight average molecular weight between about 20,000 and about 200,000 grams per mole. The polymer is prepared and catalytically polymerized by exposure to a catalyst, such as MoCl.sub.5 or W(CO).sub.6 /hv.

Barton, Thomas J. (Ames, IA); Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina (Ames, IA); Pang, Yi (Ames, IA)

1993-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

329

Nonlinear optical and conductive polymeric material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polymeric material which exhibits nonlinear optical properties if undoped and conductive properties if doped. The polymer is prepared by polymerizing diethynylsilane compositions, the resulting polymeric material having a weight average molecular weight between about 20,000 and about 200,000 grams per mole. The polymer is prepared and catalytically polymerized by exposure to a catalyst, such as MoCl.sub.5 or W(CO).sub.6 /hv.

Barton, Thomas J. (Ames, IA); Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina (Ames, IA); Pang, Yi (Ames, IA)

1992-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

330

The Complexity of Weighted Boolean #CSP with Mixed Signs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give a complexity dichotomy for the problem of computing the partition function of a weighted Boolean constraint satisfaction problem. Such a problem is parameterized by a set ? of rational functions, each of which assigns a weight to each variable assignment. Our dichotomy extends previous work in which the weight functions were restricted to being non-negative. We represent a weight function as a product of the form (?1) s g, where the polynomial s determines the sign of the weight and the non-negative function g determines its magnitude. We show that the problem of computing the partition function (the sum of the weights of all possible variable assignments) is computable in polynomial time if either every function in ? can be defined by a pure affine magnitude with a quadratic sign polynomial or every function can be defined by a magnitude of product type with a linear sign polynomial. In all other cases, computing the partition function is FP #P-complete.

Andrei Bulatov; Martin Dyer; Leslie Ann Goldberg; Markus Jalsenius; David Richerby

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

TGV32: A 32-channel preamplifier chip for the multiplicity vertex detector at PHENIX  

SciTech Connect

The TGV32, a 32-channel preamplifier-multiplicity discriminator chip for the Multiplicity Vertex Detector (MVD) at PHENIX, is a unique silicon preamplifier in that it provides both an analog output for storage in an analog memory and a weighted summed-current output for conversion to a channel multiplicity count. The architecture and test results of the chip are presented. Details about the design of the preamplifier, discriminator, and programmable digital-analog converters (DACs) performance as well as the process variations are presented. The chip is fabricated in a 1.2-{micro}m, n-well, CMOS process.

Britton, C.L. Jr.; Ericson, M.N.; Frank, S.S. [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

Continuous-Estimator Representation for Monte Carlo Criticality Diagnostics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alternate means of computing diagnostics for Monte Carlo criticality calculations is proposed. Overlapping spherical regions or estimators are placed covering the fissile material with a minimum center-to-center separation of the 'fission distance', which is defined herein, and a radius that is some multiple thereof. Fission neutron production is recorded based upon a weighted average of proximities to centers for all the spherical estimators. These scores are used to compute the Shannon entropy, and shown to reproduce the value, to within an additive constant, determined from a well-placed mesh by a user. The spherical estimators are also used to assess statistical coverage.

Kiedrowski, Brian C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

333

Analysis of relative industrial performance and it's implications for gas demand  

SciTech Connect

The analysis of the U.S. manufacturing sector and the opportunities it presents to the natural gas industry uses a weighted index of 11 economic/financial/market indicators to evaluate the performance of over 300 industries. Output and investment growth appear to be key determinants of industrial energy demand. Industries with high growth and investment potential over the period 1983-1993 are plastic materials and resins, aluminum rolling and drawing, motor vehicle parts, and glass products. Organic chemicals and paper mills exhibit above average potential, while petroleum refining, sugar, and primary aluminum are deemed slow growing industries.

Feldman, S.J.; Rogers, G.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Amplitude modulation of wind turbine noise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to swish and thump amplitude modulation, the noise of wind turbines cause more annoyance than other environmental noise of the same average level. The wind shear accounts for the thump modulation (van den Berg effect). Making use of the wind speed measurements at the hub height, as well as at the top and the bottom of the rotor disc (Fig.1), the non-standard wind profile is applied. It causes variations in the A-weighted sound pressure level, LpA. The difference between the maximum and minimum of LpA characterizes thump modulation (Fig.2).

Makarewicz, Rufin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Chondrocyte outgrowth into a gelatin scaffold in a single impact load model of damage/repair - effect of BMP-2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,11,12]. Each disc, with the articular surface facing down was impacted from a height of 2.5 cm using a weight of 500 g. The approximate impact energy applied to each disc was 0.175 J, impacted at a velocity of approx- imately 0.7 m/s. To ensure constant... , Bessho K, Fujimura K, Okubo Y, Segami N, Iizuka T: Regen- eration of defects in the articular cartilage in rabbit tempo- romandibular joints by bone morphogenetic protein-2. British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 2002, 40:201-206. 11. Bowe EA...

Henson, Frances M D; Vincent, Thea A

2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

336

Noise from cooling towers of power parks  

SciTech Connect

A study is presented of the noise pollution problem for large power parks proposed for the future. Such parks might have an area of about 75 sq. miles, and a generating capacity up to 48000 MW. A comparative analysis has been done for natural and mechanical-draft wet towers as the major sources of acoustic power. Noise radiation from single isolated towers as well as from a dispersed array of towers has been considered for both types of cooling systems. Major noise attenuation effects considered are due to the atmospheric absorption and A- weighting. Conditions of 60F and 70 percent relative humidity in a still atmosphere have been assumed. (auth)

Zakaria, J.; Moore, F.K.

1975-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

337

Field strength correlators in the instanton gas: The importance of the two-instanton contribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The field strength correlators at zero temperature are semi-classically evaluated fitting the random instanton liquid model to lattice data for quenched SU(3) lattice gauge theory. We restrict ourselves to the lowest order in an instanton density expansion necessary to explain the difference between transverse and longitudinal correlation functions. In the instanton-instanton and instanton-antiinstanton contributions the Schwinger line factors neglected in a previous analysis are numerically taken into account in a weighted Monte Carlo evaluation. This leads to different estimates for instanton size and density. A reasonable description of the correlators within the intermediate range from 0.4 fm to 1 fm is obtained.

E. -M. Ilgenfritz; B. V. Martemyanov; M. Muller-Preussker

2000-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

338

Coupled Intermittent Maps Modelling the Statistics of Genomic Sequences: A Network Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics of coupled intermittent maps is used to model the correlated structure of genomic sequences. The use of intermittent maps, as opposed to other simple chaotic maps, is particularly suited for the production of long range correlation features which are observed in the genomic sequences of higher eucaryotes. A weighted network approach to symbolic sequences is introduced and it is shown that coupled intermittent polynomial maps produce degree and link size distributions with power law exponents similar to the ones observed in real genomes. The proposed network approach to symbolic sequences is generic and can be applied to any symbol sequence (artificial or natural).

Astero Provata; Christian Beck

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

339

Groove refinishing tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A groove refinishing tool which utilizes a finishing wheel which is controlled by an air grinder motor. The air grinder motor is mounted on a main body section which is pivotally attached to a shoe element. The shoe element contains guide pins which guide the shoe element on the groove to be refinished. Application of pressure on the main body element compresses a weight counterbalance spring to extend the finishing wheel through the shoe element to refinish the groove surface. A window is provided for viewing the refinishing operation. Milling operations can also be performed by replacing the finishing wheel with a milling wheel.

Kellogg, Harvey J. (Homossassa, FL); Holm, Robert O. (Santa Fe, NM)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Proposed Junction-Box Stress Test (Using an Added Weight) for Use During the Module Qualification (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. Furthermore, there are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the j-box adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to the preliminary results conducted using representative materials and components.

Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S. R.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dba a-weighted decibel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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341

Thermodynamics for individual quantum systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a framework for extending thermodynamics to individual quantum systems, including explicitly a thermal bath and work-storage device (essentially a 'weight' that can be raised or lowered). We then prove that the second law of thermodynamics holds in our framework, and give a simple protocol to extract the optimal amount of work from the system (equal to its change in free energy). Our results apply to any quantum system in an arbitrary initial state, in particular including non-equilibrium situations. The optimal protocol is essentially reversible, similar to classical Carnot cycles, and indeed, we can use it to construct a quantum Carnot engine.

Paul Skrzypczyk; Anthony J. Short; Sandu Popescu

2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

342

AN IBM 7090 FORTRAN PROGRAM FOR ASME UNFIRED PRESSURE VESSEL DESIGN AND PRELIMINARY COST ESTIMATION  

SciTech Connect

An IBM 7090 FORTRAN program was written for the preliminary design and cost estimation of unfired pressure vessels with or without a jacket. Both vessel and jacket designs conform to the 1959 ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section VIII, Unfired Pressure Vessels. Vessels and jackets from 5 in. pipe through 84 in. o.d. and 1/4 in. through 1 1/2 in. in metal thickness may be designed by this program as written. Total vessel cost is the sum of metal and fabrication costs, each on a weight basis. (auth)

Prince, C.E.; Milford, R.P.

1962-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

343

Weighted exponential regression for characterizing radionuclide concentrations in soil depth profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of radionuclide concentrations in soil profiles requires accurate evaluation of the depth distribution of the concentrations as measured by gamma emissions. An ongoing study based on 137Cs activity has shown that such concentration data generally follow an exponential trend when the fraction of radioactivity below depth is plotted against the depth. The slope of the exponential regression fit is defined as alpha/rho, the depth profile parameter. A weighted exponential regression procedure has been developed to compute a mean ??? for a group of related soil samples. Regression results from different areas or from different time periods can be used to compare representative radionuclide concentrations for the specified groupings.

C.P.Oertel; J.R.Giles

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Representative Consumer's Risk Aversion and Efficient Risk-Sharing Rules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consumer as the sum of two components. The first one is a weighted sum of the derivatives of the individual consumers absolute cautiousness, and the second is a positive multiple of the weighted vari- 1We refer to some of these contributions in the rest... , and complete. Denote its strict part by i and symmetric part by ?i, then ?i i ?i for every ?i ? Z?i and every ?i 6? Z?i , and ?i ?i ?i for every ?i 6? Z?i and every ?i 6? Z?i . Thus the random variables ?i for which ui (?i) is not integrable are the least...

Hara, Chiaki; Kuzmics, Christoph

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

345

Proposed changes in interest rate criteria and the amortization method for repayment of federal hydro-power investments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Where review of government policies followed in charging interest on unrepaid investment (32% of total program cost) disclosed those interest rates were less than cost to the US Treasury to borrow funds to finance federal programs, IG recommended consideration of policy changes to recover interest costs on new project more closely to true costs, i.e., perhaps use of a weighted average over entire construction period. Also, a policy to amortize all unrepaid investments on a simultaneous basis should be developed. Comments are appended from the Assistant Secretary for Resource Applications, and from the Director of the Office of Power Regulation, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. (PSB)

Not Available

1981-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

346

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved HVAC system for portable classrooms was specified to address key problems in existing units. These included low energy efficiency, poor control of and provision for adequate ventilation, and excessive acoustic noise. Working with industry, a prototype improved heat pump air conditioner was developed to meet the specification. A one-year measurement-intensive field-test of ten of these IHPAC systems was conducted in occupied classrooms in two distinct California climates. These measurements are compared to those made in parallel in side by side portable classrooms equipped with standard 10 SEER heat pump air conditioner equipment. The IHPAC units were found to work as designed, providing predicted annual energy efficiency improvements of about 36 percent to 42 percent across California's climate zones, relative to 10 SEER units. Classroom ventilation was vastly improved as evidenced by far lower indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations. TheIHPAC units were found to provide ventilation that meets both California State energy and occupational codes and the ASHRAE minimum ventilation requirements; the classrooms equipped with the 10 SEER equipment universally did not meet these targets. The IHPAC system provided a major improvement in indoor acoustic conditions. HVAC system generated background noise was reduced in fan-only and fan and compressor modes, reducing the nose levels to better than the design objective of 45 dB(A), and acceptable for additional design points by the Collaborative on High Performance Schools. The IHPAC provided superior ventilation, with indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations that showed that the Title 24 minimum ventilation requirement of 15 CFM per occupant was nearly always being met. The opposite was found in the classrooms utilizing the 10 SEER system, where the indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations frequently exceeded levels that reflect inadequate ventilation. Improved ventilation conditions in the IHPAC lead to effective removal of volatile organic compounds and aldehydes, on average lowering the concentrations by 57 percent relative to the levels in the 10 SEER classrooms. The average IHPAC to 10 SEER formaldehyde ratio was about 67 percent, indicating only a 33 percent reduction of this compound in indoor air. The IHPAC thermal control system provided less variability in occupied classroom temperature than the 10 SEER thermostats. The average room temperatures in all seasons tended to be slightly lower in the IHPAC classrooms, often below the lower limit of the ASHRAE 55 thermal comfort band. State-wide and national energy modeling provided conservative estimates of potential energy savings by use of the IHPAC system that would provide payback a the range of time far lower than the lifetime of the equipment. Assuming electricity costs of $0.15/kWh, the perclassroom range of savings is from about $85 to $195 per year in California, and about $89 to $250 per year in the U.S., depending upon the city. These modelsdid not include the non-energy benefits to the classrooms including better air quality and acoustic conditions that could lead to improved health and learning in school. Market connection efforts that were part of the study give all indication that this has been a very successful project. The successes include the specification of the IHPAC equipment in the CHPS portable classroom standards, the release of a commercial product based on the standards that is now being installed in schools around the U.S., and the fact that a public utility company is currently considering the addition of the technology to its customer incentive program. These successes indicate that the IHPAC may reach its potential to improve ventilation and save energy in classrooms.

Michael G. Apte, Bourassa Norman, David Faulkner, Alfred T. Hodgson,; Toshfumi Hotchi, Michael Spears, Douglas P. Sullivan, and Duo Wang; Apte, Michael; Apte, Michael G.; Norman, Bourassa; Faulkner, David; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Hotchi, Toshfumi; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Wang, Duo

2008-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

347

Hamiltonian Graphs and the Traveling Salesman Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new characterization of Hamiltonian graphs using f-cutset matrix is proposed. A new exact polynomial time algorithm for the traveling salesman problem (TSP) based on this new characterization is developed. We then define so called ordered weighted adjacency list for given weighted complete graph and proceed to the main result of the paper, namely, the exact algorithm based on utilization of ordered weighted adjacency list and the simple properties that any path or circuit must satisfy. This algorithm performs checking of sub-lists, containing (p-1) entries (edge pairs) for paths and p entries (edge pairs) for circuits, chosen from ordered adjacency list in a well defined sequence to determine exactly the shortest Hamiltonian path and shortest Hamiltonian circuit in a weighted complete graph of p vertices. The procedure has intrinsic advantage of landing on the desired solution in quickest possible time and even in worst case in polynomial time. A new characterization of shortest Hamiltonian tour for a weighted complete graph satisfying triangle inequality (i.e. for tours passing through every city on a realistic map of cities where cities can be taken as points on a Euclidean plane) is also proposed. Finally, we discuss a novel classical algorithm for unstructured search and its effect on any of the NP-Complete problems.

Dhananjay P. Mehendale

2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

348

Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We take the perspective of a microgrid that has installed distribution energy resources (DER) in the form of distributed generation with combined heat and power applications. Given uncertain electricity and fuel prices, the microgrid minimizes its expected annual energy bill for various capacity sizes. In almost all cases, there is an economic and environmental advantage to using DER in conjunction with demand response (DR): the expected annualized energy bill is reduced by 9percent while CO2 emissions decline by 25percent. Furthermore, the microgrid's risk is diminished as DER may be deployed depending on prevailing market conditions and local demand. In order to test a policy measure that would place a weight on CO2 emissions, we use a multi-criteria objective function that minimizes a weighted average of expected costs and emissions. We find that greater emphasis on CO2 emissions has a beneficial environmental impact only if DR is available and enough reserve generation capacity exists. Finally, greater uncertainty results in higher expected costs and risk exposure, the effects of which may be mitigated by selecting a larger capacity.

Siddiqui, Afzal; Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Lai, Judy

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Measuring and Synthesizing Systems in Probabilistic Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Often one has a preference order among the different systems that satisfy a given specification. Under a probabilistic assumption about the possible inputs, such a preference order is naturally expressed by a weighted automaton, which assigns to each word a value, such that a system is preferred if it generates a higher expected value. We solve the following optimal-synthesis problem: given an omega-regular specification, a Markov chain that describes the distribution of inputs, and a weighted automaton that measures how well a system satisfies the given specification under the given input assumption, synthesize a system that optimizes the measured value. For safety specifications and measures that are defined by mean-payoff automata, the optimal-synthesis problem amounts to finding a strategy in a Markov decision process (MDP) that is optimal for a long-run average reward objective, which can be done in polynomial time. For general omega-regular specifications, the solution rests on a new, polynomial-time al...

Chatterjee, Krishnendu; Jobstmann, Barbara; Singh, Rohit

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Apparatus and system for multivariate spectral analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and system for determining the properties of a sample from measured spectral data collected from the sample by performing a method of multivariate spectral analysis. The method can include: generating a two-dimensional matrix A containing measured spectral data; providing a weighted spectral data matrix D by performing a weighting operation on matrix A; factoring D into the product of two matrices, C and S.sup.T, by performing a constrained alternating least-squares analysis of D=CS.sup.T, where C is a concentration intensity matrix and S is a spectral shapes matrix; unweighting C and S by applying the inverse of the weighting used previously; and determining the properties of the sample by inspecting C and S. This method can be used by a spectrum analyzer to process X-ray spectral data generated by a spectral analysis system that can include a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an Energy Dispersive Detector and Pulse Height Analyzer.

Keenan, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Kotula, Paul G. (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

351

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 Characteristics of a Typical Single-Family Home (1) Year Built | Building Equipment Fuel Age (5) Occupants 3 | Space Heating Natural Gas 12 Floorspace | Water Heating Natural Gas 8 Heated Floorspace (SF) 1,934 | Space Cooling 8 Cooled Floorspace (SF) 1,495 | Garage 2-Car | Stories 1 | Appliances Size Age (5) Foundation Concrete Slab | Refrigerator 19 Cubic Feet 8 Total Rooms (2) 6 | Clothes Dryer Bedrooms 3 | Clothes Washer Other Rooms 3 | Range/Oven Full Bathroom 2 | Microwave Oven Half Bathroom 0 | Dishwasher Windows | Color Televisions 3 Area (3) 222 | Ceiling Fans 3 Number (4) 15 | Computer 2 Type Double-Pane | Printer Insulation: Well or Adequate | Note(s): Source(s): 2-Door Top and Bottom Electric Top-Loading Electric 1) This is a weighted-average house that has combined characteristics of the Nation's stock homes. Although the population of homes with

352

Data:11d9c91c-4c68-4831-bd6a-e1ac22d29847 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4c68-4831-bd6a-e1ac22d29847 4c68-4831-bd6a-e1ac22d29847 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Baudette, Minnesota (Utility Company) Effective date: 2011/04/20 End date if known: Rate name: Rate 5 Off Peak Residential Sector: Residential Description: Off-peak rates are for winter months only: Sept 21 - June 20. The other time will be calculated using Rate 1 Residential rates. The monthly fixed charge is a weighted average between the two rates. Source or reference: Rate Binder Kelly 3 ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW):

353

NECDC Word Style Guide (U)  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Cook, A.W. 1 Cook, A.W. 1 Comparison of Modern Methods for Shock Hydrodynamics A.W. Cook Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore California 94551 The accuracy and efficiency of several methods are compared for simulating multi- fluid compressible flows. The methods include a Godunov scheme (Colella, 1985), a Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory method (Jiang and Shu, 1996), an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian algorithm (Marinak et al., 2001) and a compact scheme (Cook and Cabot, 2005). Test problems include a compressible breaking wave, the Shu-Osher problem, the Taylor-Green vortex and decaying turbulence. The compact method employs an artificial bulk viscosity for treating shocks and an artificial shear viscosity for modeling turbulence. The compact method is demonstrated to capture shocks as well

354

Data:60bbd68c-86f7-400b-a280-156c7c97fedd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bbd68c-86f7-400b-a280-156c7c97fedd bbd68c-86f7-400b-a280-156c7c97fedd No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Baudette, Minnesota (Utility Company) Effective date: 2011/04/20 End date if known: Rate name: Rate 6 Off Peak Commercial Sector: Commercial Description: Off-peak rates are for winter months only: Sept 21 - June 20. The other time will be calculated using Rate 2 Commercial rates. The monthly fixed charge is a weighted average between the two rates. Source or reference: Rate Binder Kelly 3 ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW):

355

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optic Distributed Acoustic Sensing for Subsurface Seismic Monitoring Optic Distributed Acoustic Sensing for Subsurface Seismic Monitoring Tom Daley (LBL Geophysics) Abstract: Recent development of commercial distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) has introduced the potential to acquire seismic data with large spatial sampling, using near commodity-type fiber optic cables. We will describe a series of field tests to investigate the characteristics of DAS, with a focus on deep (<3km) borehole deployments. The fibers were deployed as part of a multi-purpose modular borehole monitoring (MBM) scheme. We will show data examples from at least two recent VSP tests (in Alabama and Australia), including comparison to co-deployed and separately deployed borehole geophones, and results from surface deployment in a shallow trench. The seismic sources used include a vibroseis truck and a weight

356

A confirmatory measurement technique for highly enriched uranium  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a confirmatory measurement technique for measuring uranium items in their shipping containers. The measurement consists of a weight verification and the detection of three gamma rays. The weight can be determined very precisely, thus it severely constrains the options of the diverter who might want to imitate the gamma signal with a bogus item. The 185.7-keV gamma ray originates from /sup 235/U, the 1001 keV originates from a daughter of /sup 238/U, and the 2614 keV originates from a daughter of /sup 232/U. These three gamma rays exhibit widely different attenuation properties, they correlate with enrichment and total uranium mass, and they rigorously discriminate against a likely diversion scenario (low-enriched uranium substitution). These four measured quantities, when combined, provide a signature that is very difficult to counterfeit.

Sprinkle, J.K. Jr.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Alcohol-free alkoxide process for containing nuclear waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method of containing nuclear waste. A composition is first prepared of about 25 to about 80%, calculated as SiO.sub.2, of a partially hydrolyzed silicon compound, up to about 30%, calculated as metal oxide, of a partially hydrolyzed aluminum or calcium compound, about 5 to about 20%, calculated as metal oxide, of a partially hydrolyzed boron or calcium compound, about 3 to about 25%, calculated as metal oxide, of a partially hydrolyzed sodium, potassium or lithium compound, an alcohol in a weight ratio to hydrolyzed alkoxide of about 1.5 to about 3% and sufficient water to remove at least 99% of the alcohol as an azeotrope. The azeotrope is boiled off and up to about 40%, based on solids in the product, of the nuclear waste, is mixed into the composition. The mixture is evaporated to about 25 to about 45% solids and is melted and cooled.

Pope, James M. (Monroeville, PA); Lahoda, Edward J. (Edgewood, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

MHK Technologies/SeaRaser buoy seawater pump | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SeaRaser buoy seawater pump SeaRaser buoy seawater pump < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage SeaRaser buoy seawater pump.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Dartmouth Wave Energy Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description SEARASER uses wave displacement to lift a float attached to a piston and uses gravity in the wave s following trough to push the piston back down It is different from other wecs as it is tethered to a weight on the seabed by a single flexible tether but utilises a double acting piston thereby producing volumes of pressurised water in both directions of the piston

359

CX-001708: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

08: Categorical Exclusion Determination 08: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001708: Categorical Exclusion Determination Irma Charing Cross Sidewalk Project American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04/16/2010 Location(s): Irmo, South Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant fund. The Project Activity Sheet titled "Irmo Charing Cross Sidewalk Project" submitted by the Town if Irmo, Richland County, South Carolina, involves the design, engineering, and construction of a 1,065-foot long concrete pedestrian sidewalk. The proposed sidewalk will be 5' wide and 4" thick, with a weight bearing rating of 3,000 pounds-per-square-inch to meet South Carolina Department of

360

Uranium Marketing Annual Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Uranium Marketing Annual Report Uranium Marketing Annual Report With Data for 2012 | Release Date: May 16, 2013 | Next Release Date: May 2014 | full report Previous uranium marketing annual reports Year: 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 Go Uranium purchases and prices Owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors ("civilian owner/operators" or "COOs") purchased a total of 58 million pounds U3O8e (equivalent1) of deliveries from U.S. suppliers and foreign suppliers during 2012, at a weighted-average price of $54.99 per pound U3O8e. The 2012 total of 58 million pounds U3O8e increased 5 percent compared with the 2011 total of 55 million pounds U3O8e. The 2012 weighted-average price of

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reporting » Analytical Dashboards » Nuclear Safety Reporting » Analytical Dashboards » Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard The Nuclear Safety Information (NSI) Dashboard provides a new user interface to the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) to easily identify, organize, and analyze nuclear safety-related events reported into ORPS. The NSI Dashboard displays information developed from occurrence information reported into DOE's ORPS database. Events or conditions associated with nuclear safety are reported into ORPS, assigned unique ORPS reporting criteria and used for trending. ORPS reporting criteria are assigned a weighted value to indicate their relative importance to nuclear safety; associated ORPS reporting criteria are combined in key groups and charted over time to index trends in nuclear

362

Retail Price Changes Lag Spot Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Notes: While EIA cannot claim to explain all of the factors that drive retail gasoline prices, we have had a fair amount of success in exploring the relationship between wholesale and retail prices. In particular, we have looked closely at the "pass-through" of changes in spot prices to the retail market. This graph shows a weighted national average of spot prices for regular gasoline -both conventional and reformulated (shown in red), and EIA's weekly survey price for retail regular (again both conventional and reformulated). As you can see, spot prices tend to be more volatile (and would be even more so on a daily basis), while these changes are smoother by the time they reach the retail pump. Furthermore, by looking at the peaks, you can see the retail prices seem to lag the spot price changes

363

Microsoft Word - P450-2A6.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Highlight -November 2005 Figure 1. Stereo views of σ A -weighted 2|Fo|-|Fc| composite omit electron density maps contoured at 1σ and rendered within 1 Å of the heme and substrate for the P450 2A6 (a) coumarin or (b) methoxsalen complexes. Coumarin and methoxsalen are stabilized by hydrogen bonding with Asn297, which places the carbon atom to be oxidized 3.2 ± 0.13 Å (coumarin) or 3.8 ± 0.09 Å (methoxsalen) from the heme iron. The distances are shown as a red dotted line and the values quoted for distances are the mean and standard deviation for the four molecules in the asymmetric unit. The peptide backbone is represented as a thin gray coil, and side chains are rendered as stick figures with the following colors for atoms: carbons are colored gray for the

364

CX-002583: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

583: Categorical Exclusion Determination 583: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002583: Categorical Exclusion Determination Digital Hadron Calorimeter CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/30/2010 Location(s): Illinois Office(s): Fermi Site Office, Science For the proposed Digital Hadron Calorimeter, Argonne would provide up to 50 cassettes with a weight of approximately 40 pounds each that contain Resistive Plate Chambers as the active element and include a front-end electronic readout. These cassettes would be inserted into the existing hadron calorimeter structure of the CAlorimeter for the LInear Collider Experiment (CALICE) collaboration which is currently located in the Meson Test Beam area. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-002583.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-001736: Categorical Exclusion Determination

365

C:\Forms\2000 forms\DOE F 3430.7c.cdr  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

C (4-86) C (4-86) (All Previous Editions Are Obsolete) U.S. Department of Energy PMRS/PMS PERFORMANCE RATING NAME TOTAL OF WEIGHTED RATING . . TOTAL OF WEIGHTS = SUMMARY RATING SCORE SUMMARY RATING U M FS HS O Item I. INSTRUCTIONS. ELEMENT NUMBER TOTAL SUMMARY RATING LEVELS CRITERIA 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 X X X X X X X X X X = = = = = = = = = = C NC WEIGHTED RATING ELEMENT RATING U=0 M=1 F=2 HS=3 O=4 WT. (Title) 1. 2 1 Indicate the title of each element from the Performance Appraisal Plan, DOE 3430.7; and indicate whether it is critical (C) or noncritical (NC). Assign a weight of to each critical element and to each noncritical element. 1. UNACCEPTABLE (U) 1. MARGINAL (M) 3. FULLY SUCCESSFUL (FS) 4. HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL (HS) 5. OUTSTANDING (O) - One or more critical elements do not meet the "Marginal" standard regardless of total score

366

Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Volume I.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective was to consolidate and evaluate all geologic, environmental, and legal and institutional information in existing records and files, and to apply a uniform methodology to the evaluation and ranking of sites to allow the making of creditable forecasts of the supply of geothermal energy which could be available in the region over a 20 year planning horizon. A total of 1265 potential geothermal resource sites were identified from existing literature. Site selection was based upon the presence of thermal and mineral springs or wells and/or areas of recent volcanic activity and high heat flow. 250 sites were selected for detailed analysis. A methodology to rank the sites by energy potential, degree of developability, and cost of energy was developed. Resource developability was ranked by a method based on a weighted variable evaluation of resource favorability. Sites were ranked using an integration of values determined through the cost and developability analysis. 75 figs., 63 tabs.

Bloomquist, R. Gordon

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Influence of refraction on wind turbine noise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A semi-empirical method is applied to calculate the time-average sound level of wind turbine noise generation and propagation. Both are affected by wind shear refraction. Under upwind conditions the partially ensonified zone separates the fully ensonified zone (close to the turbine) and the shadow zone (far away from the turbine). Refraction is described in terms of the wind speed linear profile fitted to the power law profile. The rotating blades are treated as a two-dimensional circular source in the vertical plane. Inside the partially ensonified zone the effective A-weighted sound power decreases to zero when the receiver moves from the turbine toward the shadow zone. The presented results would be useful in practical applications to give a quick estimate of the effect of refraction on wind turbine noise.

Makarewicz, Rufin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Ballasted photovoltaic module and module arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic (PV) module assembly including a PV module and a ballast tray. The PV module includes a PV device and a frame. A PV laminate is assembled to the frame, and the frame includes an arm. The ballast tray is adapted for containing ballast and is removably associated with the PV module in a ballasting state where the tray is vertically under the PV laminate and vertically over the arm to impede overt displacement of the PV module. The PV module assembly can be installed to a flat commercial rooftop, with the PV module and the ballast tray both resting upon the rooftop. In some embodiments, the ballasting state includes corresponding surfaces of the arm and the tray being spaced from one another under normal (low or no wind) conditions, such that the frame is not continuously subjected to a weight of the tray.

Botkin, Jonathan (El Cerrito, CA); Graves, Simon (Berkeley, CA); Danning, Matt (Oakland, CA)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

369

Effects of applied sewage sludge compost and fluidized bed material on apple seedling growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two waste products, composted sewage sludge and fluidized bed material (FBM, a coal/limestone combustion byproduct) were used as soil amendments for apple seedlings (Malus domestica) grown in the greenhouse. Compost was applied at rates equivalent to 0, 25 and 50 dry metric tons/ha and FBM was applied at levels of 1 and 2 times the soil lime requirement on a weight basis (12.5 and 25.0 metric tons/ha). Plant growth was significantly increased by compost or FBM additions. Tissue Ca was increased by both waste, reflecting the high Ca inputs to the low fertility Arendtsville soil. Potentially high soil Mn levels were reduced by both wastes due to their neutralizing effect on soil pH. Root Cd levels were increased by compost additions even though soil pH was maintained above 6.3. Tissue Zn, Cu and Ni were not consistently affected by waste additions.

Korcak, R.F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Trends in Air Pollution and Mortality An Approach to the Assessment of Unmeasured Confounding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: We propose a method for diagnosing confounding bias under a model that links a spatially and temporally varying exposure and health outcome. We decompose the association into orthogonal components, corresponding to distinct spatial and temporal scales of variation. If the model fully controls for confounding, the exposure effect estimates should be equal at the different temporal and spatial scales. We show that the overall exposure effect estimate is a weighted average of the scale-specific exposure effect estimates. We use this approach to estimate the association between monthly averages of fine particles (PM 2.5) over the preceding 12 months and monthly mortality rates in 113 US counties from 2000 to 2002. We decompose the association between PM 2.5 and mortality into 2 components: (1) the association between national trends in PM 2.5 and mortality; and (2) the association between local trends, defined as county-specific deviations from national trends. This second component

Holly Janes; Francesca Dominici; Scott L. Zeger

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Framework for Link-Level Energy Efficiency Optimization with Informed Transmitter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dramatic increase of network infrastructure comes at the cost of rapidly increasing energy consumption, which makes optimization of energy efficiency (EE) an important topic. Since EE is often modeled as the ratio of rate to power, we present a mathematical framework called fractional programming that provides insight into this class of optimization problems, as well as algorithms for computing the solution. The main idea is that the objective function is transformed to a weighted sum of rate and power. A generic problem formulation for systems dissipating transmit-independent circuit power in addition to transmit-dependent power is presented. We show that a broad class of EE maximization problems can be solved efficiently, provided the rate is a concave function of the transmit power. We elaborate examples of various system models including time-varying parallel channels. Rate functions with an arbitrary discrete modulation scheme are also treated. The examples considered lead to water-filling solutions,...

Isheden, Christian; Jorswieck, Eduard; Fettweis, Gerhard

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

A H-infinity Fault Detection and Diagnosis Scheme for Discrete Nonlinear System Using Output Probability Density Estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a H-infinity fault detection and diagnosis (FDD) scheme for a class of discrete nonlinear system fault using output probability density estimation is presented. Unlike classical FDD problems, the measured output of the system is viewed as a stochastic process and its square root probability density function (PDF) is modeled with B-spline functions, which leads to a deterministic space-time dynamic model including nonlinearities, uncertainties. A weighting mean value is given as an integral function of the square root PDF along space direction, which leads a function only about time and can be used to construct residual signal. Thus, the classical nonlinear filter approach can be used to detect and diagnose the fault in system. A feasible detection criterion is obtained at first, and a new H-infinity adaptive fault diagnosis algorithm is further investigated to estimate the fault. Simulation example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

Zhang Yumin; Lum, Kai-Yew [Temasek Laboratories, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117508 (Singapore); Wang Qingguo [Depa. Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

373

Opcode counting for performance measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods, systems and computer program products are disclosed for measuring a performance of a program running on a processing unit of a processing system. In one embodiment, the method comprises informing a logic unit of each instruction in the program that is executed by the processing unit, assigning a weight to each instruction, assigning the instructions to a plurality of groups, and analyzing the plurality of groups to measure one or more metrics. In one embodiment, each instruction includes an operating code portion, and the assigning includes assigning the instructions to the groups based on the operating code portions of the instructions. In an embodiment, each type of instruction is assigned to a respective one of the plurality of groups. These groups may be combined into a plurality of sets of the groups.

Gara, Alan; Satterfield, David L; Walkup, Robert E

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

374

The Neutrino Mass Hierarchy from Nuclear Reactor Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10 years from now reactor neutrino experiments will attempt to determine which neutrino mass eigenstate is the most massive. In this letter we present the results of more than seven million detailed simulations of such experiments, studying the dependence of the probability of successfully determining the mass hierarchy upon the analysis method, the neutrino mass matrix parameters, reactor flux models, geoneutrinos and, in particular, combinations of baselines. We show that a recently reported spurious dependence of the data analysis upon the high energy tail of the reactor spectrum can be removed by using a weighted Fourier transform. We determine the optimal baselines and corresponding detector locations. For most values of the CP-violating, leptonic Dirac phase delta, a degeneracy prevents NOvA and T2K from determining either delta or the hierarchy. We determine the confidence with which a reactor experiment can determine the hierarchy, breaking the degeneracy.

Emilio Ciuffoli; Jarah Evslin; Xinmin Zhang

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

375

An Infrared Spectral Database for Detection of Gases Emitted by Biomass Burning  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report the construction of a database of infrared spectra aimed at detecting the gases emitted by biomass burning (BB). The project uses many of the methods of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) infrared database, but the selection of the species and special experimental considerations are optimized. Each spectrum is a weighted average derived from 10 or more individual measurements. Each composite has a spectral range from ? 600 cm-1 to ? 6500 cm-1 with an instrumental apodized resolution of 0.11 cm-1. The resolution was chosen to bring out all spectral features, but recognizing that pressure broadening at 760 Torr results in essentially all ro-vibrational lines having these or greater linewidths.

Johnson, Timothy J.; Profeta, Luisa TM; Sams, Robert L.; Griffith, David WT; Yokelson, Robert L.

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

376

Heavy-duty truck population, activity and usage patterns. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the study was to update the heavy-duty truck (HDT) population, activity (e.g., vehicle miles traveled (VMT), numbers of starts and trips, trip duration, etc.), and usage patterns type of service/business (e.g., delivery, construction, etc.), area of operation (i.e., local, short-haul, long-haul) for HDT`s registered and/or operated in California. The population and activity estimates were done on a weight-class-specific basis light-heavy-duty, medium-heavy-duty and heavy-heavy-duty. Population, activity and usage estimates were based primarily on Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) registration data and Truck Inventory and Usage Survey (TIUS) data. In addition to the analysis of existing data (i.e., DMV and TIUS), 42 HDTs were fitted with on-board data loggers that recorded numbers of trips and starts, daily VMT and travel by time-of-day.

Fischer, M.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Bayesian estimation of Zeff in the TEXTOR tokamak from visible bremsstrahlung and CXRS measurements  

SciTech Connect

The determination of Zeff in a fusion plasma is associated with many difficulties. Several diagnostic methods exist for this purpose, each with its specific weaknesses. Here we consider the derivation of Zeff from bremsstrahlung measurements in the visible and from a weighted summation of individual impurity densities, calculated from CXRS intensities. In a first approach towards an improved estimation of Zeff, which is consistent with both measurement sets, we combine in a single model the measurement of visible bremsstrahlung emissivities and carbon densities obtained from CXRS. Together with Zeff, the electron density ne is estimated using a hybrid Gibbs-Metropolis-Hastings MCMC algorithm. Some first results are presented and some improvements in and extensions of the employed model are discussed.

Verdoolaege, G.; Oost, G. van [Nuclear Fusion group, Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Rozier 44, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Ichir, M.M.; Mohammad-Djafari, A. [Laboratoire des Signaux et Systemes (L2S), CNRS-Supelec-UPS, Supelec, Plateau de Moulon, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Hellermann, M.G. von [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

378

Multisource Self-calibration for Sensor Arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calibration of a sensor array is more involved if the antennas have direction dependent gains and multiple calibrator sources are simultaneously present. We study this case for a sensor array with arbitrary geometry but identical elements, i.e. elements with the same direction dependent gain pattern. A weighted alternating least squares (WALS) algorithm is derived that iteratively solves for the direction independent complex gains of the array elements, their noise powers and their gains in the direction of the calibrator sources. An extension of the problem is the case where the apparent calibrator source locations are unknown, e.g., due to refractive propagation paths. For this case, the WALS method is supplemented with weighted subspace fitting (WSF) direction finding techniques. Using Monte Carlo simulations we demonstrate that both methods are asymptotically statistically efficient and converge within two iterations even in cases of low SNR.

Wijnholds, Stefan J; 10.1109/TSP.2009.2022894

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Anti-overrunning device for an internal combustion engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An anti-overrunning device is described for an internal combustion engine, comprising: (a) a carburetor having a venture passage for a fuel and air mixture, (b) a throttle valve in the passage movable to open and closed positions to regulate the effective area of the passage, (c) an actuator including a diaphragm responsive to pneumatic pressure operatively connected to the throttle valve, (d) an inertial pump comprising a housing having a weighted diaphragm mounted on an engine and subject to engine vibrations to develop pneumatic pressure, the inertial pump having an outlet connection to the actuator, and (e) a vibration sensor valve interposed in the outlet connection between the inertial pump and the actuator responsive to excessive vibration of the engine to connect the pump pressure to the actuator to cause movement of the throttle valve in a closing direction to reduce the speed of the engine.

Sejimo, Y.; Tsubai, T.; Tobinai, T.

1989-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

380

Anti-overrunning device for an internal combustion engine  

SciTech Connect

An anti-overrunning device for an internal combustion engine is described, consisting of (a) a carburetor having a venturi passage for a fuel and air mixture, (b) a throttle valve in the passage movable to open and closed positions to regulate the effective area of the passage, (c) an actuator including a diaphragm responsive to pneumatic pressure operatively connected to the throttle valve, (d) an inertial pump comprising a housing having a weighted diaphragm mounted on an engine and subject to engine vibrations to develop pneumatic pressure, the inertial pump having an inlet to receive atmospheric air and an outlet connected to the actuator, and (e) a vibration sensor in communication with the inertial pump inlet responsive to excessive vibration of the engine to connect the inlet to atmosphere to initiate pumping air from the outlet to the actuator to cause movement of the actuator diaphragm and the throttle valve in a closing direction to reduce the speed of the engine.

Sejimo, Y.; Tsubai, T.; Tobinai, T.

1989-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dba a-weighted decibel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Three-dimensional gravity modeling and focusing inversion using rectangular meshes.  

SciTech Connect

Rectangular grid cells are commonly used for the geophysical modeling of gravity anomalies, owing to their flexibility in constructing complex models. The straightforward handling of cubic cells in gravity inversion algorithms allows for a flexible imposition of model regularization constraints, which are generally essential in the inversion of static potential field data. The first part of this paper provides a review of commonly used expressions for calculating the gravity of a right polygonal prism, both for gravity and gradiometry, where the formulas of Plouff and Forsberg are adapted. The formulas can be cast into general forms practical for implementation. In the second part, a weighting scheme for resolution enhancement at depth is presented. Modelling the earth using highly digitized meshes, depth weighting schemes are typically applied to the model objective functional, subject to minimizing the data misfit. The scheme proposed here involves a non-linear conjugate gradient inversion scheme with a weighting function applied to the non-linear conjugate gradient scheme's gradient vector of the objective functional. The low depth resolution due to the quick decay of the gravity kernel functions is counteracted by suppressing the search directions in the parameter space that would lead to near-surface concentrations of gravity anomalies. Further, a density parameter transformation function enabling the imposition of lower and upper bounding constraints is employed. Using synthetic data from models of varying complexity and a field data set, it is demonstrated that, given an adequate depth weighting function, the gravity inversion in the transform space can recover geologically meaningful models requiring a minimum of prior information and user interaction.

Commer, M.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Obesity Management Using Diacylglycerol and Low Glycemic Index Starch in Dogs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Obesity is the most common nutritional disorder in small animal medicine and is closely related to the mortality and morbidity of various diseases. Decreasing the incidence of obesity is considered to be the most important way to maintain health, prevent disease, and contribute to longevity. Diet therapy using low glycemic index starch (LGIS) and diacylglycerol (DAG) may thus be a reasonable obesity management tool without unnecessary food restriction, forced physical activity, and impairment of health. Beagles were prepared for a weight loss study by inducing obesity using a high caloric/human snack food combination. These obese dogs were then fed diets containing either LGIS/HGIS and DAG/TAG for a 10 wk weight loss period. The LGIS groups lost more weight than the high glycemic index starch (HGIS) groups (2% vs 1% per wk) due to lower total diet digestibilities. Even though the dogs had consumed similar amounts of the diets on a weight basis, the amounts of metabolizable energy (ME) ingested overall differed between the two starch types. Diet effects were found for plasma triglyceride (TG) at both wk 1 and 8. Post-prandial TG lowering was observed only with a LGIS/DAG diet combination. LGIS groups showed less decreased post-prandial non esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations compared with HGIS groups at both wk 1 and 8. At both wk 1 and 8, plasma insulin was significantly lower in the LGIS groups although glucose concentrations were similar among all groups. Plasma gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) increased in all groups but tended to be lower in the LGIS groups. Significant time effects were seen in glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) at both wk 1 and 8; however, diet effects were not observed. Plasma adiponectin concentrations were significantly higher in the LGIS/DAG group vs. all other diet groups. Significantly lower plasma leptin concentrations were found, especially in the LGIS/DAG group. Combinations of LGI starch and oils decreased uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) mRNA gene expression in the small intestine compared with the combinations of HGI starch and oils. These findings indicate that the LGIS/DAG combination beneficially supports more efficient and healthy weight loss in dogs along with improvement in biochemical and hormonal biomarkers. This combination may be preferred for healthy canine weight loss and to help prevent obesity related diseases.

Nagaoka, Daisuke

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Econometric Analyses of Public Water Demand in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two broad surveys of community- level water consumption and pricing behavior are used to answer questions about water demand in a more flexible and dynamic context than is provided in the literature. Central themes of price representation, aggregation, and dynamic adjustment tie together three econometric demand analyses. The centerpiece of each analysis is an exogenous weighted price representation. A model in first-differences is estimated by ordinary least squares using data from a personally-conducted survey of Texas urban water suppliers. Annual price elasticity is found to vary with weather and income, with a value of -0.127 at the data mean. The dynamic model becomes a periodic error correction model when the residuals of 12 static monthly models are inserted into the difference model. Distinct residential, commercial, and industrial variables and historical climatic conditions are added to the integrated model, using new national data. Quantity demanded is found to be periodically integrated with a common stochastic root. Because of this, the structural monthly models must be cointegrated to be consistent, which they appear to be. The error correction coefficient is estimated at -0.187. Demand is found to be seasonal and slow to adjust to shocks, with little or no adjustment in a single year and 90% adjustment taking a decade or more. Residential and commercial demand parameters are found to be indistinguishable. The sources of price endogeneity and historical fixes are reviewed. Ideal properties of a weighted price index are identified. For schedules containing exactly two rates, weighting is equivalent to a distribution function in consumption. This property is exploited to derive empirical weights from the national data, using values from a nonparametric generalization of the structural demand model and a nonparametric cumulative density function. The result is a generalization of the price difference metric to a weighted level-price index. The validity of a uniform weighting is not rejected. The weighted price index is data intensive, but the payoff is increased depth and precision for the economist and accessibility for the practitioner.

Bell, David

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Development and Application of a Habitat Suitability Ranking Model for the New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus)  

SciTech Connect

The New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus) is currently listed as a state threatened species in New Mexico and has been identified as potentially occurring within the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) boundary. We describe the development of a model to identify and rank habitat at LANL that may be suitable for occupation by this species. The model calculates a habitat suitability ranking (HSR) based on total plant cover, plant species composition, total number of plant species, and plant height. Input data for the model is based on the measurement of these variables at known locations where this species has been found within the Jemez Mountains. Model development included the selection of habitat variables, developing a probability distribution for each variable, and applying weights to each variable based on their overall importance in defining the suitability of the habitat. The habitat variables (HV) include plant cover (HV1), grass/forb cover (HV2), plant height (HV3), number of forbs (HV4), number of grasses (HV5), and sedge/rush cover (HV6). Once the HVs were selected, probability values were calculated for each. Each variable was then assigned a ''weighting factor'' to reflect the variables' importance relative to one another with respect to contribution to quality of habitat. The least important variable, sedge/rush cover, was assigned a weight factor of ''1'' with increasing values assigned to each remaining variable as follows: number of forbs = 3, number of grasses = 3, plant height = 5, grass/forb cover = 6, and total plant cover = 7. Based on the probability values and weighting factors, a HSR is calculated as follows: HSR = (P{sub HV1}(7) + P{sub HV2}(6) + P{sub HV3}(5) + P{sub HV4}(3) + P{sub HV5}(3) + P{sub HV6}(1)). Once calculated, the HSR values are placed into one of four habitat categorical groupings by which management strategies are applied.

James Biggs; Mary Mullen; Kathryn Bennett

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

MHK Technologies/TUVALU | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » MHK Technologies/TUVALU < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage TUVALU.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Arlas Invest Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The chain or cable coils in each of the floating cylinders These cylinders rotate inside the main structure The effect would be similar to an inverted Yo Yo when stretching the cord the Yo Yo turns At the other end of the chain or cable a weight or ballast is attached to anchor the system to the sea bed In the case of the buoy both cylinders and the main structure when it rises with the wave the cables stretch the cylinders and cause them to rotate The mechanical energy obtain in the cylinders is converted to electrical energy by means of a generator connected to the transmission

386

I  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prepared for the U.S Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC03-76SF00098 Prepared for the U.S Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC03-76SF00098 1 NEW MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC BACKGROUND RADIATION SPECTRUM GEORGE F. SMOOT, GIOVANNI DE AMICI, STEVE LEVIN, A N D CHRIS WITEBSKY Spaces Sciences Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (ricevuto il 11 Dec 1984) Y Summary. - We have continued our program to measure the long-wavelength spectrum of the cosmic background radiation. Our previous observations were at five wavelengths - 0.33, 0.9, 3.0, 6.3, and 12.0 cm - and had a weighted average value of 2.73 i 0.05 K and deviated from a Planckian spectrum by less than 6%. In August 1984, we repeated our observations a t 3.0, 0.9, and 0.33 cm and made new observations with a radiometer tunable from 1

387

Cost-Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the cost-effectiveness of electric utility rate payerfunded programs to promote demand-side management (DSM) and energy efficiency investments. We develop a conceptual model that relates demand growth rates to accumulated average DSM capital per customer and changes in energy prices, income, and weather. We estimate that model using nonlinear least squares for two different utility samples. Based on the results for the most complete sample, we find that DSM expenditures over the last 18 years have resulted in a central estimate of 1.1 percent electricity savings at a weighted average cost to utilities (or other program funders) of about 6 cents per kWh saved. Econometrically-based policy simulations find that incremental DSM spending by utilities that had no or relatively low levels of average DSM spending per customer in 2006 could produce 14 billion kWh in additional savings at an expected incremental cost to the utilities of about 3 cents per kWh saved.

Toshi H. Arimura; Richard G. Newell; Karen Palmer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

An Ab Initio Approach to the Solar Coronal Heating Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an ab initio approach to the solar coronal heating problem by modelling a small part of the solar corona in a computational box using a 3D MHD code including realistic physics. The observed solar granular velocity pattern and its amplitude and vorticity power spectra, as reproduced by a weighted Voronoi tessellation method, are used as a boundary condition that generates a Poynting flux in the presence of a magnetic field. The initial magnetic field is a potential extrapolation of a SOHO/MDI high resolution magnetogram, and a standard stratified atmosphere is used as a thermal initial condition. Except for the chromospheric temperature structure, which is kept fixed, the initial conditions are quickly forgotten because the included Spitzer conductivity and radiative cooling function have typical timescales much shorter than the time span of the simulation. After a short initial start up period, the magnetic field is able to dissipate 3-4 10^6 ergs cm^{-2} s^{-1} in a highly intermittent corona, maintaining an average temperature of $\\sim 10^6$ K, at coronal density values for which emulated images of the Transition Region And Coronal Explorer(TRACE) 171 and 195 pass bands reproduce observed photon count rates.

B. V. Gudiksen; . Nordlund

2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

389

Developing and Qualifying Parameters for Closure Welding Overpacks Containing Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

Fluor engineers developed a Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) technique and parameters, demonstrated requisite weld quality, and successfully closure-welded packaged spent nuclear fuel (SNF) overpacks at the Hanford Site. This paper reviews weld development and qualification activities associated with the overpack closure-welding and provides a summary of the production campaign. The primary requirement of the closure weld is to provide leak-tight confinement of the packaged material against release to the environment during interim storage (40-year design term). Required weld quality, in this case, was established through up-front development and qualification, and then verification of parameter compliance during production welding. This approach was implemented to allow for a simpler overpack design and more efficient production operations than possible with approaches using routine post-weld testing and nondestructive examination (NDE). A series of welding trials were conducted to establish the desired welding technique and parameters. Qualification of the process included statistical evaluation and American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section IX testing. In addition, pull testing with a weighted mockup, and thermal calculation/physical testing to identify the maximum temperature the packaged contents would be subject to during welding, was performed. Thirteen overpacks were successfully packaged and placed into interim storage. The closure-welding development activities (including pull testing and thermal analysis) provided the needed confidence that the packaged SNF overpacks could be safely handled and placed into interim storage, and remain leak-tight for the duration of the storage term. (author)

Cannell, G.R.; Goldmann, L.H.; McCormack, R.L. [Hanford Site, Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Current-wave spectra coupling project. Volume II. Hurricane fields and cross sections, surface winds and currents, significant waves and wave spectra for potential OTEC sites: (A) Keahole Point, Hawaii, 100 year hurricane; (B) Punta Tuna, Puerto Rico, 100 year hurricane; (C) New Orleans, Louisiana, 100 year hurricane; (D) West Coast of Florida, 100 year hurricane; and for (E) Hurricane Camille (1969) off Louisiana Coast. Technical support for Volume I. [HURICA1 and HURICA2 codes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume represents the details of the technical development of and the calibration of the two-directional three parameter wave forecasting relationships, which are specially adapted for forecasting hurricane significant wave height, H/sub s/, modal wave period f/sub 0//sup -1/ and the peak of the wave spectrum, S/sub max/. These three parameters lead to the determination of the three-parameter wave spectrum which has been verified by use of hurricane wind generated wave spectra from Hurricane Eloise (1975). The hurricane wind field is still based on the original US Weather Service model as given by Meyers (1954). Hurricane winds, waves and wave spectra data from Hurricane Eloise (1975) published by Withee and Johnson, NOAA (1975), have been used. Although the data is of an analyzed form, the term raw data was used as distinguished from smoothed data. An analysis of the raw data is presented in this volume, and considerable sense of the analysis has been made. A weighted average technique was not used, but could have reduced the scatter in the so-called raw data during the first 2/3 of the storm when the winds and waves were less than gale force and quite variable. There is considerably less variability in the wind and wave data when the wind reaches gale force, and these are the data for which the greatest emphasis is given in the analysis. (WHK)

Bretschneider, C.L.; Huang, T.S.; Endo, H.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Carbon-catalyzed gasification of organic feedstocks in supercritical water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spruce wood charcoal, macadamia shell charcoal, coal activated carbon, and coconut shell activated carbon catalyze the gasification of organic compounds in supercritical water. Feedstocks studied in this paper include glycerol, glucose, cellobiose, whole biomass feedstocks (depithed bagasse liquid extract and sewage sludge), and representative Department of Defense (DoD) wastes (methanol, methyl ethyl ketone, ethylene glycol, acetic acid, and phenol). The effects of temperature, pressure, reactant concentration, weight hourly space velocity, and the type of catalyst on the gasification of glucose are reported. Complete conversion of glucose (22% by weight in water) to a hydrogen-rich synthesis gas was realized at a weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) of 22.2 h{sup {minus}1} in supercritical water at 600 C, 34.5 MPa. Complete conversions of the whole biomass feeds were also achieved at the same temperature and pressure. The destruction efficiencies for the representative DoD wastes were also high. Deactivation of the carbon catalyst was observed after 4 h of operation without swirl in the entrance region of the reactor, but the carbon gasification efficiency remained near 100% for more than 6 h when a swirl generator was employed in the entrance of the reactor.

Xu, X.; Matsumura, Y.; Stenberg, J.; Antal, M.J. Jr. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Natural Energy Inst.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Precision electronic speed controller for an alternating-current  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high precision controller for an alternating-current multi-phase electrical motor that is subject to a large inertial load. The controller was developed for and is particularly suitable for controlling, in a neutron chopper system, a heavy spinning rotor that must be rotated in phase-locked synchronism with a reference pulse train that is representative of an ac power supply signal having a meandering line frequency. The controller includes a shaft revolution sensor which provides a feedback pulse train representative of the actual speed of the motor. An internal digital timing signal generator provides a reference signal which is compared with the feedback signal in a computing unit to provide a motor control signal. In the preferred embodiment, the motor control signal is a weighted linear sum of a speed error voltage, a phase error voltage, and a drift error voltage, each of which is computed anew with each revolution of the motor shaft. The stator windings of the motor are driven by two amplifiers which are provided with input signals having the proper quadrature relationship by an exciter unit consisting of a voltage controlled oscillator, a binary counter, a pair of readonly memories, and a pair of digital-to-analog converters.

Bolie, Victor W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

EFFECTS OF AN ATOMIC EXPLOSION ON UNDERGROUND AND BASEMENT TYPES OF HOME SHELTERS  

SciTech Connect

Underground earth-covered shelters were exposed G to a 16.4-kt, 300-ft tower shot at ranges of 1230 ft (one), 1450 ft (one), 1860 ft (five), and 3506 ft (one). Two types of basement shelters were constructed in each of the test houses at 3500 and 7500 ft. Instrumentation was by gammaradiation badges, paraffin cubes, and nylon swatches. Attempts were made to measure permanent deflections of concrete roof slabs. Mannequins were placed in several shelters for purposes of demonstration and observation of blast-caused movement. A weighted mannequin in the underground shelter at 1230 it was broken in half; an unweighted one (child size) was thrown to the floor. All other mannequins remained in place, undamaged. Paraffin cubes and nylon swntches showed no evidence of thermal damage. Fallout conditions made it impossible to determine initial gamma-radiation quantities. There was no cracking or permanent deflection of the concrete roof slabs. Except for a wood-covered, trench type shelter, which partially failed because of faulty construction, the shelters showed no blast damage. Thermal energy entering the shelters probably would not have caused skin burns to human occupants. Adequacy of the shelters under full design loads could not be determined because pressures were lower than expected, but the shelter designs were structurally acceptable under test pressures received. (auth)

Byrnes, J.B.

1953-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Cosmological singularities in Bakry-mery spacetimes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider spacetimes consisting of a manifold with Lorentzian metric and a weight function or scalar field. These spacetimes admit a Bakry-\\'Emery-Ricci tensor which is a natural generalization of the Ricci tensor. We impose an energy condition on the Bakry-\\'Emery-Ricci tensor and obtain singularity theorems of a cosmological type, both for zero and for positive cosmological constant. That is, we find conditions under which every timelike geodesic is incomplete. These conditions are given by "open" inequalities, so we examine the borderline (equality) cases and show that certain singularities are avoided in these cases only if the geometry is rigid; i.e., if it splits as a Lorentzian product or, for a positive cosmological constant, a warped product, and the weight function is constant along the time direction. Then the product case is future timelike geodesically complete while, in the warped product case, worldlines of conformally static observers are complete. Our results answer a question posed by J Case. We then apply our results to the cosmology of scalar-tensor gravitation theories. We focus on the Brans-Dicke family of theories in 4 spacetime dimensions, where we obtain "Jordan frame" singularity theorems for big bang singularities.

Gregory J Galloway; Eric Woolgar

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

395

Human comfort and auxiliary control considerations in passive solar structures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy consumption and human comfort implications of various passive solar and energy conservation strategies are investigated for single-family, one-story, slab-on-grade residences in Albuquerque, NM and Washington, DC. The building energy analysis computer program BLAST is used to perform annual dynamic heating and cooling load calculations for a building in which the glazing area, glazing location, and thermal mass are varied systematically. The impacts on building performance of forced-flow ventilative cooling and nighttime and weekday thermostat setpoint adjustments are investigated. The results indicate that the annual heating and cooling loads are highly sensitive to glazing area, glazing location, and thermostatic controls. Annual cooling loads are substantially reduced by increased thermal mass in the walls. In contrast, annual heating loads are fairly insensitive to increased thermal mass in the walls, unless very large areas of south glazing are involved. BLAST calculates the air temperatures (T/sub a/) and mean radiant temperatures (T/sub mr/) in each zone for every hour of the year; a weighted average of T/sub a/ and T/sub mr/ is used to evaluate comfort conditions under various circumstances.

Place, W.; Kammerud, R.; Andersson, B.; Curtis, B.; Carroll, W.; Christensen, C.; Hannifan, M.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Standard test method for measurement of 235U fraction using enrichment meter principle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers the quantitative determination of the fraction of 235U in uranium using measurement of the 185.7 keV gamma-ray produced during the decay of 235U. 1.2 This test method is applicable to items containing homogeneous uranium-bearing materials of known chemical composition in which the compound is considered infinitely thick with respect to 185.7 keV gamma-rays. 1.3 This test method can be used for the entire range of 235U fraction as a weight percent, from depleted (0.2 % 235U) to highly enriched (97.5 % 235U). 1.4 Measurement of items that have not reached secular equilibrium between 238U and 234Th may not produce the stated bias when low-resolution detectors are used with the computational method listed in Annex A2. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations, and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety co...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

DEVELOPING AND QUANTIFYING PARAMETERS FOR CLOSURE WELDING OVERPACKS CONTAINING RESEARCH REACTOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect

Fluor engineers developed a Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) technique and parameters, demonstrated requisite weld quality and successfully closure-welded packaged spent nuclear fuel (SNF) overpacks at the Hanford Site. This paper reviews weld development and qualification activities associated with the overpack closure-welding and provides a summary of the production campaign. The primary requirement of the closure weld is to provide leaktight confinement of the packaged material against release to the environment during interim storage (40-year design term). Required weld quality, in this case, was established through up-front development and qualification, and then verification of parameter compliance during production welding. This approach was implemented to allow for a simpler overpack design and more efficient production operations than possible with approaches using routine post-weld testing and nondestructive examination (NDE). . A series of welding trials were conducted to establish the desired welding technique and parameters. Qualification of the process included statistical evaluation and American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section IX testing. In addition, pull testing with a weighted mockup, and thermal calculation/physical testing to identify the maximum temperature the packaged contents would be subject to during welding, was performed. Thirteen overpacks were successfully packaged and placed into interim storage. The closure-welding development activities (including pull testing and thermal analysis) provided the needed confidence that the packaged SNF overpacks could be safely handled and placed into interim storage, and remain leaktight for the duration of the storage term.

CANNELL GR

2007-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

398

The structure and intensity of energy use: Trends in five OECD nations  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines trends in the structure and intensity of final energy demand in five OECD nations between 1973 and 1988. Our focus is on primary energy use, which weights fuels by their thermal content and multiplies district heat and electricity by factors of 1.15 and 3.24 to approximate the losses that occur in the conversion and distribution of these energy carriers. Grouch in the level of energy-using activities, given 1973 energy intensities (energy use per unit of activity), would have raised primary energy use by 46% in the US, 42% in Norway, 33% in Denmark, 37% in West Germany, and 53% in Japan. Reductions in end-use energy intensities, given 1973 activity levels, would have reduced primary energy use by 19% in the US, 3% in Norway, 20% in Denmark, 15% in West Germany, and l4% in Japan. Growth in national income parallelled increases in a weighted index of energy-using activities in the US, West Germany, and Denmark but substantially outstripped activity growth in Norway and Japan. We conclude that changes in the structure of a nation's economy may lead to substantial changes in its energy/GDP ratio that are unrelated to changes in the technical efficiency of energy utilization. Similarly, changes in energy intensities may be greater or less than the aggregate change in the energy/GDP ratio of a given country, a further warning that this ratio may be an unreliable indicator of technical efficiency.

Howarth, R.B.; Schipper, L. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Andersson, B. (Stockholm School of Economics (Sweden))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

The structure and intensity of energy use: Trends in five OECD nations. Revision  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines trends in the structure and intensity of final energy demand in five OECD nations between 1973 and 1988. Our focus is on primary energy use, which weights fuels by their thermal content and multiplies district heat and electricity by factors of 1.15 and 3.24 to approximate the losses that occur in the conversion and distribution of these energy carriers. Grouch in the level of energy-using activities, given 1973 energy intensities (energy use per unit of activity), would have raised primary energy use by 46% in the US, 42% in Norway, 33% in Denmark, 37% in West Germany, and 53% in Japan. Reductions in end-use energy intensities, given 1973 activity levels, would have reduced primary energy use by 19% in the US, 3% in Norway, 20% in Denmark, 15% in West Germany, and l4% in Japan. Growth in national income parallelled increases in a weighted index of energy-using activities in the US, West Germany, and Denmark but substantially outstripped activity growth in Norway and Japan. We conclude that changes in the structure of a nation`s economy may lead to substantial changes in its energy/GDP ratio that are unrelated to changes in the technical efficiency of energy utilization. Similarly, changes in energy intensities may be greater or less than the aggregate change in the energy/GDP ratio of a given country, a further warning that this ratio may be an unreliable indicator of technical efficiency.

Howarth, R.B.; Schipper, L. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Andersson, B. [Stockholm School of Economics (Sweden)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The structure and intensity of energy use: Trends in five OECD nations  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines trends in the structure and intensity of final energy demand in five OECD nations between 1973 and 1988. Our focus is on primary energy use, which weights fuels by their thermal content and multiplies district heat and electricity by factors of 1.15 and 3.24 to approximate the losses that occur in the conversion and distribution of these energy carriers. Growth in the level of energy-using activities, given 1973 energy intensities (energy use per unit of activity), would have raised primary energy use by 47% in the US, 44% in Norway, 33% in Denmark, 37% in West Germany, and 54% in Japan. Reductions in end-use energy intensities, given 1973 activity levels, would have reduced primary energy use by 20% in the US, 3% in Norway, 20% in Denmark, 17% in West Germany, and 14% in Japan. Growth in national income parallelled increases in a weighted index of energy-using activities in the US, West Germany, and Denmark but substantially outstripped activity growth in Norway and Japan. We conclude that changes in the structure of a nation's economy may lead to substantial changes in its energy/GDP ratio that are unrelated to changes in the technical efficiency of energy utilization. Similarly, changes in energy intensities may be greater or less than the aggregate change in the energy/GDP ratio of a given country, a further warning that this ratio may be an unreliable indicator of technical efficiency.

Howarth, R.B.; Schipper, L.; Andersson, B.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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401

The structure and intensity of energy use: Trends in five OECD nations  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines trends in the structure and intensity of final energy demand in five OECD nations between 1973 and 1988. Our focus is on primary energy use, which weights fuels by their thermal content and multiplies district heat and electricity by factors of 1.15 and 3.24 to approximate the losses that occur in the conversion and distribution of these energy carriers. Growth in the level of energy-using activities, given 1973 energy intensities (energy use per unit of activity), would have raised primary energy use by 47% in the US, 44% in Norway, 33% in Denmark, 37% in West Germany, and 54% in Japan. Reductions in end-use energy intensities, given 1973 activity levels, would have reduced primary energy use by 20% in the US, 3% in Norway, 20% in Denmark, 17% in West Germany, and 14% in Japan. Growth in national income parallelled increases in a weighted index of energy-using activities in the US, West Germany, and Denmark but substantially outstripped activity growth in Norway and Japan. We conclude that changes in the structure of a nation`s economy may lead to substantial changes in its energy/GDP ratio that are unrelated to changes in the technical efficiency of energy utilization. Similarly, changes in energy intensities may be greater or less than the aggregate change in the energy/GDP ratio of a given country, a further warning that this ratio may be an unreliable indicator of technical efficiency.

Howarth, R.B.; Schipper, L.; Andersson, B.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Water adsorption on aggregates of spherical aerosol nano particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A three dimensional integral equation is developed in order to compute water adsorption onto aggregates of spherical aerosol nano particles. The integral equation is derived from molecular density functional theory, with a weighted density approximation and a direct correlation function interpolation rule. Only required inputs are the direct correlation functions of the uniform fluid or gas at both high-density and low-density limits. The equation has been tested on argon adsorption onto a graphite planer substrate; the result corresponds well with previous simulation work. Adsorption of both noble gas and water onto a single spherical nano particle and aggregates of spherical nano particles has been computed with the developed equation. For the adsorption of a single spherical substrate, layer structure has been found, the adsorption shows a transition property when substrate size increases and when the substrate size is over 100?? the adsorption is nearly the same as that of a planer substrate. For adsorption of aggregates of spherical nano particles, not only much strong adsorption appears but also adsorption property changes with different configurations of spherical nano particles.

Nie, Chu

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Integrating Flux Balance Analysis into Kinetic Models to Decipher the Dynamic Metabolism of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 sequentially utilizes lactate and its waste products (pyruvate and acetate) during batch culture. To decipher MR-1 metabolism, we integrated genome-scale flux balance analysis (FBA) into a multiple-substrate Monod model to perform the dynamic flux balance analysis (dFBA). The dFBA employed a static optimization approach (SOA) by dividing the batch time into small intervals (i.e.,,400 mini-FBAs), then the Monod model provided time-dependent inflow/ outflow fluxes to constrain the mini-FBAs to profile the pseudo-steady-state fluxes in each time interval. The mini-FBAs used a dual-objective function (a weighted combination of maximizing growth rate and minimizing overall flux) to capture trade-offs between optimal growth and minimal enzyme usage. By fitting the experimental data, a bi-level optimization of dFBA revealed that the optimal weight in the dual-objective function was time-dependent: the objective function was constant in the early growth stage, while the functional weight of minimal enzyme usage increased significantly when lactate became scarce. The dFBA profiled biologically meaningful dynamic MR-1 metabolisms: 1. the oxidative TCA cycle fluxes increased initially and then decreased in the late growth stage; 2. fluxes in the pentose phosphate pathway and gluconeogenesis were stable in the exponential growth period; and 3. the glyoxylate shunt was up-regulated when acetate became the main carbon source for MR-1 growth.

Xueyang Feng; You Xu; Yixin Chen; Yinjie J. Tang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Estimation of uncertain material parameters using modal test data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analytical models of wind turbine blades have many uncertainties, particularly with composite construction where material properties and cross-sectional dimension may not be known or precisely controllable. In this paper the authors demonstrate how modal testing can be used to estimate important material parameters and to update and improve a finite-element (FE) model of a prototype wind turbine blade. An example of prototype blade is used here to demonstrate how model parameters can be identified. The starting point is an FE model of the blade, using best estimates for the material constants. Frequencies of the lowest fourteen modes are used as the basis for comparisons between model predictions and test data. Natural frequencies and mode shapes calculated with the FE model are used in an optimal test design code to select instrumentation (accelerometer) and excitation locations that capture all the desired mode shapes. The FE model is also used to calculate sensitivities of the modal frequencies to each of the uncertain material parameters. These parameters are estimated, or updated, using a weighted least-squares technique to minimize the difference between test frequencies and predicted results. Updated material properties are determined for axial, transverse, and shear moduli in two separate regions of the blade cross section: in the central box, and in the leading and trailing panels. Static FE analyses are then conducted with the updated material parameters to determine changes in effective beam stiffness and buckling loads.

Veers, P.S.; Laird, D.L.; Carne, T.G.; Sagartz, M.J.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Flexible ocean upwelling pipe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Standard practice for preparation and dissolution of plutonium materials for analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This practice is a compilation of dissolution techniques for plutonium materials that are applicable to the test methods used for characterizing these materials. Dissolution treatments for the major plutonium materials assayed for plutonium or analyzed for other components are listed. Aliquants of the dissolved samples are dispensed on a weight basis when one of the analyses must be highly reliable, such as plutonium assay; otherwise they are dispensed on a volume basis. 1.2 The treatments, in order of presentation, are as follows: Procedure Title Section Dissolution of Plutonium Metal with Hydrochloric Acid 9.1 Dissolution of Plutonium Metal with Sulfuric Acid 9.2 Dissolution of Plutonium Oxide and Uranium-Plutonium Mixed Oxide by the Sealed-Reflux Technique 9.3 Dissolution of Plutonium Oxide and Uranium-Plutonium Mixed Oxides by Sodium Bisulfate Fusion 9.4 Dissolution of Uranium-Plutonium Mixed Oxides and Low-Fired Plutonium Oxide in Beakers 9.5 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be re...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Flexible and robust strategies for waste management in Sweden  

SciTech Connect

Treatment of solid waste continues to be on the political agenda. Waste disposal issues are often viewed from an environmental perspective, but economic and social aspects also need to be considered when deciding on waste strategies and policy instruments. The aim of this paper is to suggest flexible and robust strategies for waste management in Sweden, and to discuss different policy instruments. Emphasis is on environmental aspects, but social and economic aspects are also considered. The results show that most waste treatment methods have a role to play in a robust and flexible integrated waste management system, and that the waste hierarchy is valid as a rule of thumb from an environmental perspective. A review of social aspects shows that there is a general willingness among people to source separate wastes. A package of policy instruments can include landfill tax, an incineration tax which is differentiated with respect to the content of fossil fuels and a weight based incineration tax, as well as support to the use of biogas and recycled materials.

Finnveden, Goeran [Division of Environmental Strategies Research - fms, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: goran.finnveden@infra.kth.se; Bjoerklund, Anna [Division of Environmental Strategies Research - fms, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Reich, Marcus Carlsson [Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, SE-106 48 Stockholm (Sweden); Eriksson, Ola [Technology and Built Environment, University of Gaevle, SE-801 76 Gaevle (Sweden); Soerbom, Adrienne [Department of Sociology, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Modeling and Analysis of the Role of Fast-Response Energy Storage in the Smart Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractThe large short time-scale variability of renewable energy resources presents significant challenges to the reliable operation of power systems. This variability can be mitigated by deploying fast-ramping generators. However, these generators are costly to operate and produce environmentally harmful emissions. Fast-response energy storage devices, such as batteries and flywheels, provide an environmentally friendly alternative, but are expensive and have limited capacity. To study the environmental benefits of storage, we introduce a slotted-time dynamic residual dc power flow model with the prediction error of the difference between the generation (including renewables) and the load as input and the fast-ramping generation and the storage (charging/discharging) operation as the control variables used to ensure that the demand is satisfied (as much as possible) in each time slot. We assume the input prediction error sequence to be i.i.d. zero-mean random variables. The optimal power flow problem is then formulated as an infinite horizon average-cost dynamic program with the cost function taken as a weighted sum of the average fast-ramping generation and the loss of load probability. We find the optimal policies at the two extremes of the cost function weights and propose a two-threshold policy for the general case. We also obtain refined analytical results under the assumption of Laplace distributed prediction error and corroborate this assumption using simulated wind power generation data from NREL. I.

Han-i Su; Abbas El Gamal

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Hyperspectral remote sensing of plant biochemistry using Bayesian model averaging with variable and band selection  

SciTech Connect

Model specification remains challenging in spectroscopy of plant biochemistry, as exemplified by the availability of various spectral indices or band combinations for estimating the same biochemical. This lack of consensus in model choice across applications argues for a paradigm shift in hyperspectral methods to address model uncertainty and misspecification. We demonstrated one such method using Bayesian model averaging (BMA), which performs variable/band selection and quantifies the relative merits of many candidate models to synthesize a weighted average model with improved predictive performances. The utility of BMA was examined using a portfolio of 27 foliage spectralchemical datasets representing over 80 species across the globe to estimate multiple biochemical properties, including nitrogen, hydrogen, carbon, cellulose, lignin, chlorophyll (a or b), carotenoid, polar and nonpolar extractives, leaf mass per area, and equivalent water thickness. We also compared BMA with partial least squares (PLS) and stepwise multiple regression (SMR). Results showed that all the biochemicals except carotenoid were accurately estimated from hyerspectral data with R2 values > 0.80.

Zhao, Kaiguang; Valle, Denis; Popescu, Sorin; Zhang, Xuesong; Malick, Bani

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

Measurement of Event Shapes in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at Center-of-Mass Energy 1.96 TeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of event shape observables in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV is presented. The data for this analysis were recorded by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. The variables studied are the transverse thrust and thrust minor, both defined in the plane perpendicular to the beam direction. The observables are measured using energies from unclustered calorimeter cells. In addition to studies of the differential distributions, we present the dependence of event shape mean values on the leading jet transverse energy. Data are compared with pythia Tune A and to resummed parton level predictions that were matched to fixed order results at NLO accuracy (NLO+NLL). Predictions from pythia Tune A agree fairly well with the data. However, the underlying event contributes significantly to these observables, making it difficult to make direct comparisons to the NLO+NLL predictions, which do not account for the underlying event. To overcome this difficulty, we introduce a new observable, a weighted difference of the mean values of the thrust and thrust minor, which is less sensitive to the underlying event, allowing for a comparison with NLO+NLL. Both pythia Tune A and the NLO+NLL calculations agree well within the 20% theoretical uncertainty with the data for this observable, indicating that perturbative QCD successfully describes shapes of the hadronic final states.

Aaltonen, T.; Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Security assessment of power systems including energy storage. Progress report, January 1--March 31, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based on system response data provided by the Bonneville Power Administration, it has been confirmed that 10 MW is an adequate capacity for the IC unit which is proposed for supplementary damping of the West Coast intertie, for the degree of damping which BPA considers as adequate. Some preliminary investigations have shown that IC units, with appropriate controls, should be capable of preventing the buildup of torsional oscillations in turbogenerators connected to series compensated transmission lines (subsynchronous resonance). The implementation of an adequate ''white noise'' generator has allowed confirmation of an analog simulation of a power system with load variations. Autocorrelation estimates of signals measured on this simulation indicate that machine rotor angle dynamics should be readily identifiable, but dynamics due to exciters and governors are probably not identifiable. Likelihood functions (as a weighted sum of squares of residuals produced by a Kalman filter) appear to attain maximum value for the ''true'' parameters of the system, but the computational burden of doing dynamic estimation in a point estimation problem is prohibitive. The use of canonical forms for system linearized dynamics is being investigated, with the prospect of formulating point estimation type algorithms.

Carroll, D.P.; Triezenberg, D.M.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Physico-chemical fracturing and cleaning of coal. [Treatment with CO/sub 2/ in water at high pressure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a method of producing a crushable coal and reducing the metallic values in coal represented by Si, Al, Ca, Na, K, and Mg, which comprises contacting a coal/water mix in a weight ratio of from about 4:1 to 1:6 in the presence of CO/sub 2/ at pressures of about 100 to 1400 psi and a minimum temperature of about 15/sup 0/C for a period of about one or more hours to produce a treated coal/water mix. In the process the treated coal/water mix has reduced values for Ca and Mg of up to 78% over the starting mix and the advantageous CO/sub 2/ concentration is in the range of about 3 to 30 g/L. Below 5 g/L CO/sub 2/ only small effects are observed and above 30 g/L no further special advantages are achieved. The coal/water ratios in the range 1:2 to 2:1 are particularly desirable and such ratios are compatible with coal water slurry applications.

Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.R.

1983-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

413

External flow radiators for reduced space powerplant temperatures. Technical information report  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear space powerplants can operate at temperatures below 900 K and use stainless steel construction without a weight penalty if new radiator concepts can achieve radiator weights of 1-3 kg/m{sup 2}. Conventional tube-and-fin radiators weight about 10 kg/m{sup 2} because of heavy tube walls to prevent meteroid puncture. Radiator designs that do not require meteroid protection are possible; they operate with fluids of low vapor pressure that can be exposed directly to space in external-flow radiators. An example is the {open_quotes}rotating disk radiator{close_quotes} in which centrifugal force drives a liquid film radially outward across a thin rotating metal disk; meteroid punctures cause no loss of fluid other than from evaporation, which can be small. An even lighter concept is the liquid drop radiator in which heat is radiated directly from moving liquid drops. Such radiator concepts look practical, and they may be much easier to develop than the high-temperature, refractory-metal power systems necessitated by conventional radiators.

Elliott, D.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Final report of Project 617, the Energy Saver  

SciTech Connect

The Project work was begun in January of 1995 and was completed in May of 1996. The authors performed a broad value engineering study to examine all parts and functions to lower costs, improve functioning and safety. The results of the Phase 1 work was a total redesign of the original Energy Saver resulting in two components instead of three, a weight of four pounds versus the original fourteen pounds and a reduction from 21 pieces to 10 pieces. The manufactured cost dropped from $350 to $175. Based on these improvements the Value Improvement Project has been successful. The second generation unit was named the BROIL-MASTER and has been registered under the Provisional Application (Patent) Program. The authors performed a technical analysis to determine the potential energy savings of applications identified and collect data on host product gas consumption, payback period, and other cost/saving relationships. The industrial search for energy project applications for the authors design was not successful. Seven Broil-Master demonstration projects have been successfully completed. The Broil-Master has received certification from the American Gas Association and UL approval is due by the end of July. The Restaurant Equipment Test Center of Pacific Gas and Electric is interested in testing the Broil-Master sometime in 1996. The Broil-Master was shown at an International Restaurant Equipment Show in September, 1995 and the National Restaurant Show in May, 1996. The authors now have under way four tests with chains and several other tests pending.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

415

Extracting work from quantum systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the task of extracting work from quantum systems in the resource theory perspective of thermodynamics, where free states are arbitrary thermal states, and allowed operations are energy conserving unitary transformations. Taking as our work storage system a 'weight' we prove the second law and then present simple protocols which extract average work equal to the free energy change of the system - the same amount as in classical thermodynamics. Crucially, for systems in 'classical' states (mixtures of energy eigenstates) our protocol works on a single copy of the system. This is in sharp contrast to previous results, which showed that in case of almost-deterministic work extraction, collective actions on multiple copies are necessary to extract the free energy. This establishes the fact that free energy is a meaningful notion even for individual systems in classical states. However, for non-classical states, where coherences between energy levels exist, we prove that collective actions are necessary, so long as no external sources of coherence are used.

Paul Skrzypczyk; Anthony J. Short; Sandu Popescu

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

416

A hybrid approach for predicting the distribution of vibro-acoustic energy in complex built-up structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Finding the distribution of vibro-acoustic energy in complex built-up structures in the mid-to-high frequency regime is a difficult task. In particular, structures with large variation of local wavelengths and/or characteristic scales pose a challenge referred to as the mid-frequency problem. Standard numerical methods such as the finite element method (FEM) scale with the local wavelength and quickly become too large even for modern computer architectures. High frequency techniques, such as statistical energy analysis (SEA), often miss important information such as dominant resonance behaviour due to stiff or small scale parts of the structure. Hybrid methods circumvent this problem by coupling FEM/BEM and SEA models in a given built-up structure. In the approach adopted here, the whole system is split into a number of subsystems which are treated by either FEM or SEA depending on the local wavelength. Subsystems with relative long wavelengths are modelled using FEM. Making a diffuse field assumption for the wave fields in the short wave length components, the coupling between subsystems can be reduced to a weighted random field correlation function. The approach presented results in an SEA-like set of linear equations which can be solved for the mean energies in the short wavelength subsystems.

Dmitrii N Maksimov; Gregor Tanner

2010-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

417

BMC Health Services Research BioMed Central Study protocol A randomised trial of an internet weight control resource: The UK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003 Kirk et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article: verbatim copying and redistribution of this article are permitted in all media for any purpose, provided this notice is preserved along with the article's original URL. Background: Obesity treatment is notoriously unsuccessful and one of the barriers to successful weight loss reported by patients is a lack of social support. The Internet offers a novel and fast approach to the delivery of health information, enabling 24-hour access to help and advice. However, much of the health information available on the Internet is unregulated or not written by qualified health professionals to provide unbiased information. The proposed study aims to compare a web-based weight loss package with traditional dietary treatment of obesity in participants. The project aims to deliver high quality information to the patient and to evaluate the effectiveness of this information, both in terms of weight loss outcomes and cost-effectiveness. Methods: This study is a randomised controlled trial of a weight loss package against usual care provided within General Practice (GP) surgeries in Leeds, UK. Participants will be recruited via posters placed in participating practices. A target recruitment figure of 220 will enable 180 people to be recruited (allowing for 22 % dropout). Participants agreeing to take part in the study will be

Weight Control Trial [isrctn; Sara Fl Kirk; Emma L Harvey; Aine Mcconnon; Jennie E Pollard; Darren C Greenwood; James D Thomas; Joan K Ransley Open Access; Jennie E Pollard; Darren C Greenwood; James D Thomas; Joan K Ransley

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

THE EFFECTS OF HALIDE MODIFIERS ON THE SORPTION KINETICS OF THE LI-MG-N-H SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of different transition metal halides (TiCl{sub 3}, VCl{sub 3}, ScCl{sub 3} and NiCl{sub 2}) on the sorption properties of the 1:1 molar ratio of LiNH{sub 2} to MgH{sub 2} are investigated. The modified mixtures were found to contain LiNH{sub 2}, MgH{sub 2} and LiCl. TGA results showed that the hydrogen desorption temperature was reduced with the modifier addition in this order: TiCl{sub 3} > ScCl{sub 3} > VCl{sub 3} > NiCL{sub 2}. Ammonia release was not significantly reduced resulting in a weight loss greater than the theoretical hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The isothermal sorption kinetics of the modified systems showed little improvement after the first dehydrogenation cycle over the unmodified system but showed drastic improvement in rehydrogenation cycles. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy identified the cycled material to be composed of LiH, MgH{sub 2}, Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} and Mg{sub 3}N{sub 2}.

Anton, D.; Gray, J.; Price, C.; Lascola, R.

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

419

Biological Sampling and Analysis in Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Washington: Chemical Analyses for 2007 Puget Sound Biota Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluating spatial and temporal trends in contaminant residues in Puget Sound fish and macroinvertebrates are the objectives of the Puget Sound Ambient Monitoring Program (PSAMP). In a cooperative effort between the ENVironmental inVESTment group (ENVVEST) and Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife, additional biota samples were collected during the 2007 PSAMP biota survey and analyzed for chemical residues and stable isotopes of carbon (?13C) and nitrogen (?15N). Approximately three specimens of each species collected from Sinclair Inlet, Georgia Basin, and reference locations in Puget Sound were selected for whole body chemical analysis. The muscle tissue of specimens selected for chemical analyses were also analyzed for ?13C and ?15N to provide information on relative trophic level and food sources. This data report summarizes the chemical residues for the 2007 PSAMP fish and macro-invertebrate samples. In addition, six Spiny Dogfish (Squalus acanthias) samples were necropsied to evaluate chemical residue of various parts of the fish (digestive tract, liver, embryo, muscle tissue), as well as, a weight proportional whole body composite (WBWC). Whole organisms were homogenized and analyzed for silver, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, lead, zinc, mercury, 19 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, PCB homologues, percent moisture, percent lipids, ?13C, and ?15N.

Brandenberger, Jill M.; Suslick, Carolynn R.; Johnston, Robert K.

2008-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

420

Construction of an unyielding target for large horizontal impacts.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has constructed an unyielding target at the end of its 2000-foot rocket sled track. This target is made up of approximately 5 million pounds of concrete, an embedded steel load spreading structure, and a steel armor plate face that varies from 10 inches thick at the center to 4 inches thick at the left and right edges. The target/track combination will allow horizontal impacts at regulatory speeds of very large objects, such as a full-scale rail cask, or high-speed impacts of smaller packages. The load-spreading mechanism in the target is based upon the proven design that has been in use for over 20 years at Sandia's aerial cable facility. That target, with a weight of 2 million pounds, has successfully withstood impact forces of up to 25 million pounds. It is expected that the new target will be capable of withstanding impact forces of more than 70 million pounds. During construction various instrumentation was placed in the target so that the response of the target during severe impacts can be monitored. This paper will discuss the construction of the target and provide insights on the testing capabilities at the sled track with this new target.

Ammerman, Douglas James; Davie, Neil Thomas; Kalan, Robert J.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

3.5 D temperature model of a coal stockpile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Overproduced coal mines that are not sold should remain in coal stock sites. If these coal stockpiles remain at the stock yards over a certain period of time, a spontaneous combustion can be started. Coal stocks under combustion threat can cost too much economically to coal companies. Therefore, it is important to take some precautions for saving the stockpiles from the spontaneous combustion. In this research, a coal stock which was 5 m wide, 10 m long, and 3 m in height, with a weight of 120 tons, was monitored to observe internal temperature changes with respect to time under normal atmospheric conditions. Internal temperature measurements were obtained at 20 points distributed all over the two layers in the stockpile. Temperatures measured by a specially designed mechanism were then stored into a computer every 3 h for a period of 3 months. Afterward, this dataset was used to delineate 3.5 D temporal temperature distribution models for these two levels, and they were used to analyze and interpret what was seen in these models to derive some conclusions. It was openly seen, followed, and analyzed that internal temperature changes in the stockpile went up to 31{sup o}C by 3.5 D models created for this research.

Ozdeniz, A.H.; Corumluoglu, O.; Kalayci, I.; Sensogut, C. [Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey). Dept. of Mining Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Use of benthic invertebrate community structure and the sediment quality triad to evaluate metal-contaminated sediment in the upper Clark Fork River, Montana  

SciTech Connect

The upper Clark Fork River, above Flathead River, is contaminated with large amounts of As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Mn, and Zn ores from past mining activities. The contaminated area extends from the Butte and Anaconda area to at least 230 km downstream to Milltown Reservoir. Both the upper Clark Fork River and Milltown Reservoir have been designated as US Environmental Protection Agency Superfund sites because of metal-contaminated bottom sediments. The authors evaluated the impacts of past mining activities on the Clark Fork River ecosystem using benthic invertebrate community assessment, residue chemistry, and toxicity testing. Oligochaeta and Chironomidae generally accounted for over 90% of the benthic invertebrate community in the soft sediment depositional areas. Taxa of Oligochaeta and Chironomidae were predominantly pollution tolerant. Higher numbers of Chironomidae genera were present at stations with higher concentrations of metals in sediment identified as toxic by the amphipod Hyalella azteca in 28-d exposures. Frequency of mouthpart deformities in genera of Chironomidae was low and did not correspond to concentrations of metals in sediment. Total abundance of organisms/m[sup 2] did not correspond to concentrations of metals in the sediment samples. Chemical analyses, laboratory toxicity tests, and benthic community evaluations all provide evidence of metal-induced degradation to aquatic communities in both the reservoir and the river. Using a weight-of-evidence approach--the Sediment Quality Triad--provided good concurrence among measures of benthic community structure, sediment chemistry, and laboratory toxicity.

Canfield, T.J.; Kemble, N.E.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Dwyer, F.J.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Fairchild, J.F. (National Biological Survey, Columbia, MO (United States). Midwest Science Center)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Vehicle systems design optimization study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The optimization of an electric vehicle layout requires a weight distribution in the range of 53/47 to 62/38 in order to assure dynamic handling characteristics comparable to current production internal combustion engine vehicles. It is possible to achieve this goal and also provide passenger and cargo space comparable to a selected current production sub-compact car either in a unique new design or by utilizing the production vehicle as a base. Necessary modification of the base vehicle can be accomplished without major modification of the structure or running gear. As long as batteries are as heavy and require as much space as they currently do, they must be divided into two packages - one at front under the hood and a second at the rear under the cargo area - in order to achieve the desired weight distribution. The weight distribution criteria requires the placement of batteries at the front of the vehicle even when the central tunnel is used for the location of some batteries. The optimum layout has a front motor and front wheel drive. This configuration provides the optimum vehicle dynamic handling characteristics and the maximum passsenger and cargo space for a given size vehicle.

Gilmour, J. L.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Comparative physiology and transcriptional networks underlying the heat shock response in Populus trichocarpa, Arabidopsis thaliana and Glycine max  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The heat shock response continues to be layered with additional complexity as interactions and crosstalk among heat shock proteins (HSPs), the reactive oxygen network and hormonal signalling are discovered. However, comparative analyses exploring variation in each of these processes among species remain relatively unexplored. In controlled environment experiments, photosynthetic response curves were conducted from 22 to 42 C and indicated that temperature optimum of light-saturated photosynthesis was greater for Glycine max relative to Arabidopsis thaliana or Populus trichocarpa. Transcript profiles were taken at defined states along the temperature response curves, and inferred pathway analysis revealed species-specific variation in the abiotic stress and the minor carbohydrate raffinose/galactinol pathways. A weighted gene co-expression network approach was used to group individual genes into network modules linking biochemical measures of the antioxidant system to leaf-level photosynthesis among P. trichocarpa, G. max and A. thaliana. Network-enabled results revealed an expansion in the G. max HSP17 protein family and divergence in the regulation of the antioxidant and heat shock modules relative to P. trichocarpa and A. thaliana. These results indicate that although the heat shock response is highly conserved, there is considerable species-specific variation in its regulation.

Weston, David [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Karve, Abhijit A [ORNL; Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Jawdy, Sara [ORNL; Allen, Sara M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

A Search for TeV Gamma-Ray Burst Emission with the Milagro Observatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Milagro telescope monitors the northern sky for 100 GeV - 100 TeV transient emission through continuous very high energy wide-field observations. The large effective area and low energy threshold of Milagro allow it to detect very high energy gamma-ray burst emission with much higher sensitivity than previous instruments, and a fluence sensitivity at TeV energies comparable to dedicated gamma-ray burst satellites at keV-MeV energies. Observation of gamma-ray burst emission at TeV energies could place important constraints on gamma-ray burst progenitor and emission models. This study details the development of a weighted analysis technique; the implementation of this technique to perform a real time search for TeV transients of 40 seconds to 3 hours duration in the Milagro data; and the results from more than one year of observation. Between May 2nd, 2001, and May 22nd, 2002, no TeV transients of 40 seconds to 3 hours duration were observed. Upper limits on both observed and emitted high energy gamma-ray burst emission are presented.

Miguel F. Morales

2003-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

426

Preliminary evaluation of alternative waste form solidification processes. Volume II. Evaluation of the processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Volume II presents engineering feasibility evaluations of the eleven processes for solidification of nuclear high-level liquid wastes (HHLW) described in Volume I of this report. Each evaluation was based in a systematic assessment of the process in respect to six principal evaluation criteria: complexity of process; state of development; safety; process requirements; development work required; and facility requirements. The principal criteria were further subdivided into a total of 22 subcriteria, each of which was assigned a weight. Each process was then assigned a figure of merit, on a scale of 1 to 10, for each of the subcriteria. A total rating was obtained for each process by summing the products of the subcriteria ratings and the subcriteria weights. The evaluations were based on the process descriptions presented in Volume I of this report, supplemented by information obtained from the literature, including publications by the originators of the various processes. Waste form properties were, in general, not evaluated. This document describes the approach which was taken, the developent and application of the rating criteria and subcriteria, and the evaluation results. A series of appendices set forth summary descriptions of the processes and the ratings, together with the complete numerical ratings assigned; two appendices present further technical details on the rating process.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Demountable solar oven  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A demountable solar oven includes a principal base upon which is mounted a secondary supporting base collar which contains the essential operating parts and which supports two removable arms at their base whose upper end form diametrically opposed pivots for receiving the appropriately disposed pivots of the cooking chamber. The food basket provided with similarly diametrically opposed pivots is disposed interiorly of the cooking chamber and by virtue of a weight disposed at the bottom thereof the wire basket always maintains a horizontal position irrespective of the angle of the oven itself. A transparent hemispherical cover including a shadow box indicator is disposed over the oven in the direction of the sun and a series of individual plate reflectors are hinged together by means of pins, a certain number of which pins are utilized to attach the reflectors to the oven rim. Adjustable feet are disposed at the bottom of the supporting base for adjusting the vertical position of the oven and a level indicator as well as rotationally directional indicators are provided for determining the position of the oven as desired. The disassembled parts occupy a minimum space and various of the parts can be disposed together for the disassembled unit to occupy a very small space.

Erwin, S.F.

1983-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

428

Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance metrics of airflow, sound, and combustion product capture efficiency (CE) were measured for a convenience sample of fifteen cooking exhaust devices, as installed in residences. Results were analyzed to quantify the impact of various device- and installation-dependent parameters on CE. Measured maximum airflows were 70% or lower than values noted on product literature for 10 of the devices. Above-the-cooktop devices with flat bottom surfaces (no capture hood) including exhaust fan/microwave combination appliances were found to have much lower CE at similar flow rates, compared to devices with capture hoods. For almost all exhaust devices and especially for rear-mounted downdraft exhaust and microwaves, CE was substantially higher for back compared with front burner use. Flow rate, and the extent to which the exhaust device extends over the burners that are in use, also had a large effect on CE. A flow rate of 95 liters per second (200 cubic feet per minute) was necessary, but not sufficient, to attain capture efficiency in excess of 75% for the front burners. A-weighted sound levels in kitchens exceeded 57 dB when operating at the highest fan setting for all 14 devices evaluated for sound performance.

Singer, Brett C.; Delp, William W.; Apte, Michael G.; Price, Philip N.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Ocean tide energy converter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A tide motor energy source includes a tidal piston with a valved chamber. The piston drives a hydraulic ram to generate electrical power through a pressure accumulator and hydraulic motor. The ram can be locked hydraulically to enable the tidal piston to be held fixed at a desired elevation and the valves in the chamber permit it to be filled with water or air. The piston with its chamber filled with air at its low tide position and then released for controlled ascent while submerged acts as a submerged float for driving the ram upwardly while the tide runs in during one phase of its operation. The piston with its chamber filled with water while locked at its highest position as the tide begins to run out, and then released to fall under control, acts as a weight suspended in air after the water level drops below the piston for driving the ram downwardly during the second phase of its operation. The rising and falling motion of the tidal piston is used as the energy source.

Rainey, D.E.

1980-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

430

Examination of a Junction-Box Adhesion Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of its adhesion system. The details of the proposed test will be described, in addition to the preliminary results obtained using representative materials and components. The described discovery experiments examine moisture-cured silicone, foam tape, and hot-melt adhesives used in conjunction with PET or glass module 'substrates.' To be able to interpret the results, a set of material-level characterizations was performed, including thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. PV j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then placed inside an environmental chamber (at 85C, 85% relative humidity). Some systems did not remain attached through the discovery experiments. Observed failure modes include delamination (at the j-box/adhesive or adhesive/substrate interface) and phase change/creep. The results are discussed in the context of the application requirements, in addition to the plan for the formal experiment supporting the proposed modification to the qualification test.

Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Examination of a Junction-Box Adhesion Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp heat' IEC qualification test is proposed to verify the basic robustness of its adhesion system. The details of the proposed test will be described, in addition to the preliminary results obtained using representative materials and components. The described discovery experiments examine moisture-cured silicone, foam tape, and hot-melt adhesives used in conjunction with PET or glass module 'substrates.' To be able to interpret the results, a set of material-level characterizations was performed, including thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic mechanical analysis. PV j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then placed inside an environmental chamber (at 85C, 85% relative humidity). Some systems did not remain attached through the discovery experiments. Observed failure modes include delamination (at the j-box/adhesive or adhesive/substrate interface) and phase change/creep. The results are discussed in the context of the application requirements, in addition to the plan for the formal experiment supporting the proposed modification to the qualification test.

Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Automatic Mesh Adaptivity for Hybrid Monte Carlo/Deterministic Neutronics Modeling of Fusion Energy Systems  

SciTech Connect

Three mesh adaptivity algorithms were developed to facilitate and expedite the use of the CADIS and FW-CADIS hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques in accurate full-scale neutronics simulations of fusion energy systems with immense sizes and complicated geometries. First, a macromaterial approach enhances the fidelity of the deterministic models without changing the mesh. Second, a deterministic mesh refinement algorithm generates meshes that capture as much geometric detail as possible without exceeding a specified maximum number of mesh elements. Finally, a weight window coarsening algorithm decouples the weight window mesh and energy bins from the mesh and energy group structure of the deterministic calculations in order to remove the memory constraint of the weight window map from the deterministic mesh resolution. The three algorithms were used to enhance an FW-CADIS calculation of the prompt dose rate throughout the ITER experimental facility and resulted in a 23.3% increase in the number of mesh tally elements in which the dose rates were calculated in a 10-day Monte Carlo calculation. Additionally, because of the significant increase in the efficiency of FW-CADIS simulations, the three algorithms enabled this difficult calculation to be accurately solved on a regular computer cluster, eliminating the need for a world-class super computer.

Ibrahim, Ahmad M [ORNL; Wilson, P. [University of Wisconsin; Sawan, M. [University of Wisconsin; Mosher, Scott W [ORNL; Peplow, Douglas E. [ORNL; Grove, Robert E [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Screened non-bonded interactions in native proteins manipulate optimal paths for robust residue communication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A protein structure is represented as a network of residues whereby edges are determined by intra-molecular contacts. We introduce inhomogeneity into these networks by assigning each edge a weight that is determined by amino-acid pair potentials. Two methodologies are utilized to calculate the average path lengths (APLs) between pairs: To minimize (i) the maximum weight in the strong APL, and (ii) the total weight in the weak APL. We systematically screen edges that have higher than a cutoff potential and calculate the shortest APLs in these reduced networks, while keeping chain connectivity. Therefore, perturbations introduced at a selected region of the residue network propagate to remote regions only along the non-screened edges that retain their ability to disseminate the perturbation. The shortest APLs computed from the reduced homogeneous networks with only the strongest few non-bonded pairs closely reproduce the strong APLs from the weighted networks. The rate of change in the APL in the reduced residue network as compared to its randomly connected counterpart remains constant until a lower bound. Upon further link removal, this property shows an abrupt increase, towards a random coil behavior. Under different perturbation scenarios, diverse optimal paths emerge for robust residue communication.

Ali Rana Atilgan; Deniz Turgut; Canan Atilgan

2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

434

Successful Application of Oak Ridge SMARTSHELF Item Monitoring and CAVIS Weight Sensor Technologies Installed at Kurchatov Institute  

SciTech Connect

The U.S./Russian Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC&A) program has been active since 1994. In 1997, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)1, in cooperation, and through contract, with the Russian Research Centre-Kurchatov Institute (KI), under the MPC&A program, installed the jointly developed Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12)2 SmartShelf and Continuous Automated Vault Inventory (CAVIS) technologies for providing constant unattended monitoring of stored nuclear material(s) of interest. SmartShelf is an item monitoring system, and the CAVIS weight sensor technology is a weight monitoring system for stored nuclear materials. Benefits derived from use of these two technologies are a reduction of inventory frequency, a reduction of operational cost, and minimization of worker exposure to nuclear materials during routine physical inventories. SmartShelf and CAVIS are still in service at KI and have proven how beneficial these reliable and long-life technologies can be for MC&A application in any nuclear facility. This paper will address the technologies and their application at KI, including the current operational status and potential applications, as well as address the derived benefits of these technologies in terms of system reliability, inventory assurance, worker safety, and cost efficiency.

Randolph, John David [ORNL] [ORNL; Pickett, Chris A [ORNL] [ORNL; Singh, Surinder Paul [ORNL] [ORNL; Bell, Zane W [ORNL] [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Using the Standard Solar Model to Constrain Composition and S-Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While standard solar model (SSM) predictions depend on approximately 20 input parameters, SSM neutrino flux predictions are strongly correlated with a single model output parameter, the core temperature $T_c$. Consequently, one can extract physics from solar neutrino flux measurements while minimizing the consequences of SSM uncertainties, by studying flux ratios with appropriate power-law weightings tuned to cancel this $T_c$ dependence. We re-examine an idea for constraining the primordial C+N content of the solar core from a ratio of CN-cycle $^{15}$O to pp-chain $^8$B neutrino fluxes, showing that nonnuclear SSM uncertainties in the ratio are small and effectively governed by a single parameter, the diffusion coefficient. We point out that measurements of both CN-I cycle neutrino branches -- $^{15}$O and $^{13}$N $\\beta$-decay -- could in principle lead to separate determinations of the core C and N abundances, due to out-of-equilibrium CN-cycle burning in the cooler outer layers of the solar core. Finally, we show that the strategy of constructing "minimum uncertainty" neutrino flux ratios can also test other properties of the SSM. In particular, we demonstrate that a weighted ratio of $^7$Be and $^8$B fluxes constrains a product of S-factors to the same precision currently possible with laboratory data.

Aldo Serenelli; Carlos Pena-Garay; W. C. Haxton

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

436

A Cross-correlation method to search for gravitational wave bursts with AURIGA and Virgo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a method to search for transient GWs using a network of detectors with different spectral and directional sensitivities: the interferometer Virgo and the bar detector AURIGA. The data analysis method is based on the measurements of the correlated energy in the network by means of a weighted cross-correlation. To limit the computational load, this coherent analysis step is performed around time-frequency coincident triggers selected by an excess power event trigger generator tuned at low thresholds. The final selection of GW candidates is performed by a combined cut on the correlated energy and on the significance as measured by the event trigger generator. The method has been tested on one day of data of AURIGA and Virgo during September 2005. The outcomes are compared to the results of a stand-alone time-frequency coincidence search. We discuss the advantages and the limits of this approach, in view of a possible future joint search between AURIGA and one interferometric detector.

AURIGA Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

437

The accuracy of fast phylogenetic methods for large datasets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Whole-genome phylogenetic studies require various sources of phylogenetic signals to produce an accurate picture of the evolutionary history of a group of genomes. In particular, sequence-based reconstruction will play an important role, especially in resolving more recent events. But using sequences at the level of whole genomes means working with very large amounts of datalarge numbers of sequencesas well as large phylogenetic distances, so that reconstruction methods must be both fast and robust as well as accurate. We study the accuracy, convergence rate, and speed of several fast reconstruction methods: neighbor-joining, Weighbor (a weighted version of neighbor-joining), greedy parsimony, and a new phylogenetic reconstruction method based on diskcovering and parsimony search (DCM-NJ+MP). Our study uses extensive simulations based on random birth-death trees, with controlled deviations from ultrametricity. We find that Weighbor, thanks to its sophisticated handling of probabilities, outperforms other methods for short sequences, while our new method is the best choice for sequence lengths above 100. For very large sequence lengths, all four methods have similar accuracy, so that the speed of neighbor-joining and greedy parsimony makes them the two methods of choice. 1

Luay Nakhleh; Bernard M. E; Moret Usman Roshan; Katherine St; John Jerry; Sun Tandy Warnow

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Marine gas turbine programs at AlliedSignal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Work has been continuing at AlliedSignal Turbines, located in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S.A., on the integration of their gas turbine programs with those of Textron Lycoming since the merger of the Lycoming gas turbine operations into the AlliedSignal Turbines Group about a year and a half ago. Although much of the gas turbine business and development programs are aimed at the aircraft markets, the industrial and marine gas turbine product area is also receiving significant attention in this combined organization. Of particular importance is the marine market, where the TF40 marine gas turbine is a key element. The TF40 is based on a tested turbine core engine with over ten million hours of operating experience. The compact TF40 gas turbine offers one of the highest power-to-weight ratios in its class. With a length of 1422 mm and a weight of 600 kg without a gearbox, the TF40 can produce 3432 kW boost rating for yachts and military craft and 2984 kW at maximum continuous rating for fast ferries. This paper describes the specifications and variations of the different versions being offered by the company.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Quantum probabilities of composite events in quantum measurements with multimode states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The problem of defining quantum probabilities of composite events is considered. This problem is of high importance for the theory of quantum measurements and for quantum decision theory that is a part of measurement theory. We show that the Luders probability of consecutive measurements is a transition probability between two quantum states and that this probability cannot be treated as a quantum extension of the classical conditional probability. The Wigner distribution is shown to be a weighted transition probability that cannot be accepted as a quantum extension of the classical joint probability. We suggest the definition of quantum joint probabilities by introducing composite events in multichannel measurements. The notion of measurements under uncertainty is defined. We demonstrate that the necessary condition for the mode interference is the entanglement of the composite prospect together with the entanglement of the composite statistical state. As an illustration, we consider an example of a quantum game. A special attention is payed to the application of the approach to systems with multimode states, such as atoms, molecules, quantum dots, or trapped Bose-condensed atoms with several coherent modes.

V. I. Yukalov; D. Sornette

2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

440

Effect of selected aldehydes on the growth and fermentation of ethanologenic Escherichia coli  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bioethanol production from lignocellulosic raw-materials requires the hydrolysis of carbohydrate polymers into a fermentable syrup. During the hydrolysis of hemicellulose with dilute acid, a variety of toxic compounds are produced such as soluble aromatic aldehydes from lignin and furfural from pentose destruction. In this study, the authors have investigated the toxicity of representative aldehydes (furfural, 5-hydroxymethlyfurfural, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, syringaldehyde, and vanillin) as inhibitors of growth and ethanol production by ethanologenic derivatives of Escherichia coli B (strains K011 and LY01). Aromatic aldyhydes were at least twice as toxic as furfural of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural on a weight basis. The toxicities of all aldehydes (and ethanol) except furfural were additive when tested in binary combinations. In all cases, combinations with furfural were unexpectedly toxic. Although the potency of these aldehydes was directly related to hydrophobicity indicating a hydrophobic site of action, none caused sufficient membrane damage to allow the leakage of intracellular magnesium even when present at sixfold the concentrations required for growth inhibition. Of the aldehydes tested, only furfural strongly inhibited ethanol production in vitro. A comparison with published results for other microorganisms indicates that LY01 is equivalent or more resistant than other biocatalysts to the aldehydes examined in this study.

Zaldivar, J.; Ingram, L.O. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Cell Science; Martinez, A. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Cell Science]|[Univ. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico). Inst. de Biotecnologia

1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

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441

On the asymptotics of dimers on tori  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study asymptotics of the dimer model on large toric graphs. Let L be a weighted Z^2-periodic planar graph, and let W be a large-index sublattice of Z^2. For L bipartite we show that the dimer partition function on the quotient L/W has the asymptotic expansion exp[A f_0 + fsc + o(1)], where A is the area of L/W, f_0 is the free energy density in the bulk, and fsc is a finite-size correction term depending only on the conformal shape of the domain together with some parity-type information. Assuming a conjectural condition on the zero locus of the dimer characteristic polynomial, we show that an analogous expansion holds for L non-bipartite. The functional form of the finite-size correction differs between the two classes, but is universal within each class. Our calculations yield new information concerning the distribution of the number of loops winding around the torus in the associated double-dimer models.

Richard W. Kenyon; Nike Sun; David B. Wilson

2013-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

442

THE AFFECTS OF HALIDE MODIFIERS ON THE SORPTION KINETICS OF THE LI-MG-N-H SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this present work, the affects of different transition metal halides (TiCl{sub 3}, VCl{sub 3}, ScCl{sub 3} and NiCl{sub 2}) on the sorption properties of the 1:1 molar ratio of LiNH{sub 2} to MgH{sub 2} are investigated. The modified mixtures were found to contain LiNH{sub 2}, MgH{sub 2} and LiCl. TGA results showed that the hydrogen desorption temperature was reduced with the modifier addition in this order: TiCl{sub 3}>ScCl{sub 3}>VCl{sub 3}>NiCl{sub 2}. Ammonia release was not significantly reduced resulting in a weight loss greater than the theoretical hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The isothermal sorption kinetics of the modified systems showed little improvement after the first dehydrogenation cycle over the unmodified system but showed drastic improvement in rehydrogenation cycles. XRD and Raman spectroscopy identified the cycled material to be composed of LiH, MgH{sub 2}, Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} and Mg{sub 3}N{sub 2}.

Erdy, C.; Gray, J.; Lascola, R.; Anton, D.

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

443

Deployment, release and recovery of ocean riser pipes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ocean thermal energy conversion facility includes a long pipe assembly which is supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. Cold water flows to the facility from deep in the ocean. The pipe assembly comprises an elongate pipe construction and a weight connected to the lower end of the construction by a line of selected length. A floatation collar is connected to the construction at its upper end to cause the construction to have positive buoyancy and a center of buoyancy closer to the upper end of the construction than its center of mass. The weight renders the entire pipe assembly negatively buoyant. In the event that support of the pipe assembly should be lost, as by release of the assembly from the facility hull in an emergency, the assembly sinks to the ocean floor where it is moored by the weight. The pipe construction floats submerged above the ocean floor in a substantially vertical attitude which facilitates recovery of the assembly.

Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA); Wetmore, Sherman B. (Westminster, CA); McNary, James F. (Santa Ana, CA)

1980-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

444

New Techniques to Characterize and Remove Water-Based Drilling Fluids Filter Cake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Filter cake characterization is very important in drilling and completion operations. Heterogeneity of the filter cake plays a key role in the design of chemical treatments needed to remove the filter cake. The objectives of this study are to characterize the filter cake under static and dynamic conditions, evaluate the using of polylactic acid and chelating agents to remove calcium carbonate-based filter cake, assess glycolic acid to remove Mn3O4-based filter cake, and evaluate ilmenite as a weighting material for water-based drilling fluid. In order to characterize the filter cake, computer tomography (CT) was used in combination with the scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) to analyze the filter cake. A modified HPHT filter cell was developed to perform the filtration tests. A see-through-cell was used to check the compatibility of different chemicals that were used to remove the filter cake. The results obtained from the CT scan showed that the filter cake was heterogeneous and contained two layers with different properties under static and dynamic conditions. Under static conditions, the formation of filter cake changed from compression to buildup; while under dynamic conditions, the filter cake was formed under continuous buildup. Polylactic acid was used as a component of the drilling fluid components and the results obtained showed that the drill-in fluid had stable rheological properties up to 250?F over 24 hrs. The removal efficiency of the filter cake was nearly 100% and the return permeability was about 100% for Indiana limestone and Berea sandstone cores, when using a weight ratio of polylactic acid to calcium carbonate 3 to 1. GLDA (pH 3.3) and HEDTA (pH 4) can be used to remove the filter cake in one step without using ?-amylase enzyme solutions. GLDA (20 wt% in a 200 g solution and pH of 3.3) and HEDTA (20 wt% in a 200 g solution and pH 4) had 100% removal efficiency of the filter cake using Indiana limestone and Berea sandstone cores. Chelate solutions, GLDA (pH of 3.3 - 13) and HEDTA (pH of 4 and 7) were incompatible with ?-amylase enzyme solutions over a wide range of temperatures. CT results showed that no formation damage was observed when using chelating agents as a breaker to remove the calcium carbonate filter cake. Manganese tetraoxide-based filter cake had a removal efficiency of 85% after 20 hrs soaking with glycolic acid (5 wt%) after soaking with ?-amylase for 24 hrs, and 89% after reaction with acid mixture (1 wt% HCl and 7 wt% glycolic acid) for 16 hrs. for both methods, the retained permeability was 100% for Indiana limestone cores and 120% for Berea sandstone cores, which indication maximum productivity of these formations. Ilmenite-based filter cake was ideal for HPHT applications, 0.2 in. thickness and 12 cm3 filtrate under dynamic conditions. The filtrate volume was reduced by adding a minor amount of CaCO3 solids that improved the particles packing. No sag problem was observed when using the micronized ilmenite in water-based drilling fluids. Ilmenite has a negative zeta potential in alkaline media and had a stable dispersion in water at pH > 7.

Elkatatny, Salaheldin Mahmoud

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices Title Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-5265E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Singer, Brett C., William W. Delp, Michael G. Apte, and Phillip N. Price Journal Indoor Air Volume 22 Issue 3 Pagination 224-234 Date Published 06/2012 Keywords carbon monoxide, natural gas burners, nitrogen dioxide, range hood, task ventilation, unvented combustion, indoor environment group, Range Hood Test Facility Abstract The performance metrics of airflow, sound, and combustion product capture efficiency (CE) were measured for a convenience sample of fifteen cooking exhaust devices, as installed in residences. Results were analyzed to quantify the impact of various device- and installation-dependent parameters on CE. Measured maximum airflows were 70% or lower than values noted on product literature for 10 of the devices. Above-the-cooktop devices with flat bottom surfaces (no capture hood) - including exhaust fan/microwave combination appliances - were found to have much lower CE at similar flow rates, compared to devices with capture hoods. For almost all exhaust devices and especially for rear-mounted downdraft exhaust and microwaves, CE was substantially higher for back compared with front burner use. Flow rate, and the extent to which the exhaust device extends over the burners that are in use, also had a large effect on CE. A flow rate of 95 liters per second (200 cubic feet per minute) was necessary, but not sufficient, to attain capture efficiency in excess of 75% for the front burners. A-weighted sound levels in kitchens exceeded 57 dB when operating at the highest fan setting for all 14 devices evaluated for sound performance.

446

Improved constraints on dark energy from Chandra X-ray observations of the largest relaxed galaxy clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present constraints on the mean matter density, Omega_m, dark energy density, Omega_de, and the dark energy equation of state parameter, w, using Chandra measurements of the X-ray gas mass fraction (fgas) in 42 hot (kT>5keV), X-ray luminous, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters spanning the redshift range 0.05energy has a negligible effect on the measurements, we measure Omega_m=0.28+-0.06 (68% confidence, using standard priors on the Hubble Constant, H_0, and mean baryon density, Omega_bh^2). Analyzing the data for all 42 clusters, employing only weak priors on H_0 and Omega_bh^2, we obtain a similar result on Omega_m and detect the effects of dark energy on the distances to the clusters at ~99.99% confidence, with Omega_de=0.86+-0.21 for a non-flat LCDM model. The detection of dark energy is comparable in significance to recent SNIa studies and represents strong, independent evidence for cosmic acceleration. Systematic scatter remains undetected in the fgas data, despite a weighted mean statistical scatter in the distance measurements of only ~5%. For a flat cosmology with constant w, we measure Omega_m=0.28+-0.06 and w=-1.14+-0.31. Combining the fgas data with independent constraints from CMB and SNIa studies removes the need for priors on Omega_bh^2 and H_0 and leads to tighter constraints: Omega_m=0.253+-0.021 and w=-0.98+-0.07 for the same constant-w model. More general analyses in which we relax the assumption of flatness and/or allow evolution in w remain consistent with the cosmological constant paradigm. Our analysis includes conservative allowances for systematic uncertainties. The small systematic scatter and tight constraints bode well for future dark energy studies using the fgas method. (Abridged)

S. W. Allen; D. A. Rapetti; R. W. Schmidt; H. Ebeling; G. Morris; A. C. Fabian

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

An experimental evaluation of the instrumented flux synthesis method for the real-time estimation of reactivity. Final report  

SciTech Connect

One method of determining the flux density is flux synthesis which approximates the flux in the core by linear combinations of precomputed shape functions. In traditional flux synthesis, the unknown mixing coefficients are determined using a weighted residual method of solving the diffusion equation. In the instrumented synthesis method, the mixing coefficients are determined using count rates from neutron detectors in the core. In this way the mixing coefficients are linked to conditions in the reactor. Using the synthesized flux, kinetics parameters, notably reactivity, can be calculated in real time. An experimental evaluation has been performed in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor, MITR-II. Detector measurements have been collected using fission chambers placed at the periphery of the core. The reactor was put into a number of various conditions, both static and transient, and data were collected using a digital acquisition system for later combination with shape functions. Transients included increasing power, decreasing power, and a reactor scram. The shape functions were generated using Version 3.0 of the QUARTZ code, a quadratic nodal diffusion theory code in triangular-Z geometry. Supernodal analysis algorithms have been added to the original program, along with subroutines to guarantee diagonal dominance of the leakage matrix in the finite difference or quadratic current approximations in the coarse mesh. The agreement between coarse mesh and fine mesh in all cases is excellent, with finite difference coarse mesh solutions generally slightly better. The synthesis method has been shown to accurately reflect the changes from an initial condition by combining representative flux shapes. It can be concluded that, with proper calibration of the measurement system and inclusion of representative flux shapes, the instrumented synthesis method will properly predict the flux in the core under a number of conditions.

Hughes, J.C.; Henry, A.F.; Lanning, D.D.; Bernard, J.A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has launched the commercial building initiative (CBI) in pursuit of its research goal of achieving zero-net-energy commercial buildings (ZNEB), i.e. ones that produce as much energy as they use. Its objective is to make these buildings marketable by 2025 such that they minimize their energy use through cutting-edge, energy-efficiency technologies and meet their remaining energy needs through on-site renewable energy generation. This paper examines how such buildings may be implemented within the context of a cost- or CO2-minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various technologies: photovoltaic modules (PV) and other on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and passive/demand-response technologies. A mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has a multi-criteria objective function is used. The objective is minimization of a weighted average of the building's annual energy costs and CO2 emissions. The MILP's constraints ensure energy balance and capacity limits. In addition, constraining the building's energy consumed to equal its energy exports enables us to explore how energy sales and demand-response measures may enable compliance with the ZNEB objective. Using a commercial test site in northernCalifornia with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find that a ZNEB requires ample PV capacity installed to ensure electricity sales during the day. This is complemented by investment in energy-efficient combined heat and power (CHP) equipment, while occasional demand response shaves energy consumption. A large amount of storage is also adopted, which may be impractical. Nevertheless, it shows the nature of the solutions and costs necessary to achieve a ZNEB. Additionally, the ZNEB approach does not necessary lead to zero-carbon (ZC) buildings as is frequently argued. We also show a multi-objective frontier for the CA example, whichallows us to estimate the needed technologies and costs for achieving a ZC building or microgrid.

Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Aki, Hirohisa; Lai, Judy

2009-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

449

Conversion of atactic polypropylene waste to fuel oil. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A stable, convenient thermal pyrolysis process was demonstrated on a large scale pilot plant. The process successfully converted high viscosity copolymer atactic polypropylene to predominantly liquid fuels which could be burned in commercial burners. Energy yield of the process was very high - in excess of 93% including gas phase heating value. Design and operating data were obtained to permit design of a commercial size atactic conversion plant. Atactic polypropylene can be cracked at temperatures around 850/sup 0/F and residence time of 5 minutes. The viscosity of the cracked product increases with decrease in time/temperature. A majority of the pyrolysis was carried out at a pressure of 50 psig. Thermal cracking of atactic polypropylene is seen to result in sigificant coke formation (0.4% to 0.8% on a weight of feed basis) although the coke levels were of an order of magnitude lower than those obtained during catalytic cracking. The discrepancy between batch and continuous test data can be atrributed to lowered heat transfer and diffusion rates. Oxidative pyrolysis is not seen as a viable commercial alternative due to a significant amount of water formation. However, introduction of controlled quantities of oxygen at lower temperatures to affect change in feedstock viscosity could be considered. It is essential to have a complete characterization of the polymer composition and structure in order to obtain useful and duplicable data because the pyrolysis products and probably the pyrolysis kinetics are affected by introduction of abnormalities into the polymer structure during polymerization. The polymer products from continuous testing contained an olefinic content of 80% or higher. This suggests that the pyrolysis products be investigated for use as olefinic raw materials. Catalytic cracking does not seem to result in any advantage over the Thermal Cracking process in terms of reaction rates or temperature of operation.

Bhatia, J.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Benefits analysis for the production of fuels and chemicals using solar thermal energy. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerous possibilities exist for using high temperature solar thermal energy in the production of various chemicals and fuels (Sun Fuels). Research and development activities have focused on the use of feedstocks such as coal and biomass to provide synthesis gas, hydrogen, and a variety of other end-products. A Decision Analysis technique geared to the analysis of Sun Fuels options was developed. Conventional scoring methods were combined with multi-attribute utility analysis in a new approach called the Multi-Attribute Preference Scoring (MAPS) system. MAPS calls for the designation of major categories of attributes which describe critical elements of concern for the processes being examined. The six major categories include: Process Demonstration; Full-Scale Process, Feedstock; End-Product Market; National/Social Considerations; and Economics. MAPS calls for each attribute to be weighted on a simple scale for all of the candidate processes. Next, a weight is assigned to each attribute, thus creating a multiplier to be used with each individual value to derive a comparative weighting. Last, each of the categories of attributes themselves are weighted, thus creating another multiplier, for use in developing an overall score. With sufficient information and industry input, each process can be ultimately compared using a single figure of merit. After careful examination of available information, it was decided that only six of the 20 candidate processes were adequately described to allow a complete MAPS analysis which would allow direct comparisons for illustrative purposes. These six processes include three synthesis gas processes, two hydrogen and one ammonia. The remaining fourteen processes were subjected to only a partial MAPS assessment.

None

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Search For the Rare Decay K(L) ---> pi0 pi0 gamma  

SciTech Connect

This thesis describes a search for the rare decay K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} using data from the KTeV experiment, using the topology K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sub D}{sup 0}{gamma} (where {pi}{sub D}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}e{sup +}e{sup -}). Due to Bose statistics and the real nature of the photon, the K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} decay can proceed at lowest order only by the Cp conserving direct emission of an E2 photon. The decay vanishes to O(p{sup 4}) in chiral perturbation theory and is a probe of the theory to the sixth order. The primary background to this decay consists of K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sub D}{sup 0} events with one lost photon. The upper limit for the decay K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} presented in this thesis is 2.32 x 10{sup -7} at the 90% confidence level. This upper limit was derived from both 1997 and 1999 data, using a blind analysis. The upper limit was derived from a Feldman-Cousins method, based on a weighted total of 0.53 data events in the signal region with an expected K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sub D}{sup 0} background of 0.37 {+-} 0.28 events. The previous upper limit for this decay was 5.6 x 10{sup -6} at the 90% confidence level.

Smith, David Edward; /Virginia U.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Knowledge based ranking algorithm for comparative assessment of post-closure care needs of closed landfills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Post-closure care (PCC) activities at landfills include cap maintenance; water quality monitoring; maintenance and monitoring of the gas collection/control system, leachate collection system, groundwater monitoring wells, and surface water management system; and general site maintenance. The objective of this study was to develop an integrated data and knowledge based decision making tool for preliminary estimation of PCC needs at closed landfills. To develop the decision making tool, 11 categories of parameters were identified as critical areas which could affect future PCC needs. Each category was further analyzed by detailed questions which could be answered with limited data and knowledge about the site, its history, location, and site specific characteristics. Depending on the existing knowledge base, a score was assigned to each question (on a scale 1-10, as 1 being the best and 10 being the worst). Each category was also assigned a weight based on its relative importance on the site conditions and PCC needs. The overall landfill score was obtained from the total weighted sum attained. Based on the overall score, landfill conditions could be categorized as critical, acceptable, or good. Critical condition indicates that the landfill may be a threat to the human health and the environment and necessary steps should be taken. Acceptable condition indicates that the landfill is currently stable and the monitoring should be continued. Good condition indicates that the landfill is stable and the monitoring activities can be reduced in the future. The knowledge base algorithm was applied to two case study landfills for preliminary assessment of PCC performance.

Sizirici, Banu, E-mail: bsy3@case.edu [Case Western Reserve University, Civil Engineering Department, 2104 Adelbert Road, Bingham Bld. Room: 216, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Tansel, Berrin; Kumar, Vivek [Florida International University, Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Miami, FL (United States)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

Production of hydrogen and coproducts from coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Between the TGA and CPU data, a number of general conclusions have been developed, regarding both selection of catalysts and selection of the most effective and economic approaches to scaled-up process development. (Hauserman, 1992) These conclusions are in an order that is not meant to imply relative importance. (1) Impregnation of Wyodak coal with KOH, at a potassium-to-fixed carbon ratio of around 0.2 or greater, roughly doubles the gasification reaction rate in fluidized beds of limestone. Soluble potassium, in any convenient form, is recommended as a rate-enhancing catalyst, subject to supply costs and efficiency of recovery by leaching. (2) In a fluidized bed of taconite, the reaction rate enhancement by potassium impregnation appears at least as great as in a limestone bed. (3) Reactivity coefficients defined by continuous test results are a different but closely related property and are substantially lower than standard TGA-determined reactivities. (4) The most useful result from the CPU is determination of specific capacities, defined as pounds per hour of fixed carbon converted per volume of reaction vessel. (5) Potassium impregnation clearly enhances reaction rates, but in a practical process will require an efficient leaching step for potassium recovery to be economically viable. (6) Earlier TGA results suggest that a weight ratio of potassium to fixed carbon (FC) of roughly 0.4 will give maximum reactivity enhancement. (7) For these CPU tests, control over the actual degree of potassium impregnation during feed impregnation proved more difficult than expected, apparently leaving a lot of the KOH catalyst free (non-ion exchanged) and subject to segregation during handling and feeding, as well as in the gasifier itself.

Hauserman, W.B.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Production of hydrogen and coproducts from coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Between the TGA and CPU data, a number of general conclusions have been developed, regarding both selection of catalysts and selection of the most effective and economic approaches to scaled-up process development. (Hauserman, 1992) These conclusions are in an order that is not meant to imply relative importance. (1) Impregnation of Wyodak coal with KOH, at a potassium-to-fixed carbon ratio of around 0.2 or greater, roughly doubles the gasification reaction rate in fluidized beds of limestone. Soluble potassium, in any convenient form, is recommended as a rate-enhancing catalyst, subject to supply costs and efficiency of recovery by leaching. (2) In a fluidized bed of taconite, the reaction rate enhancement by potassium impregnation appears at least as great as in a limestone bed. (3) Reactivity coefficients defined by continuous test results are a different but closely related property and are substantially lower than standard TGA-determined reactivities. (4) The most useful result from the CPU is determination of specific capacities, defined as pounds per hour of fixed carbon converted per volume of reaction vessel. (5) Potassium impregnation clearly enhances reaction rates, but in a practical process will require an efficient leaching step for potassium recovery to be economically viable. (6) Earlier TGA results suggest that a weight ratio of potassium to fixed carbon (FC) of roughly 0.4 will give maximum reactivity enhancement. (7) For these CPU tests, control over the actual degree of potassium impregnation during feed impregnation proved more difficult than expected, apparently leaving a lot of the KOH catalyst free (non-ion exchanged) and subject to segregation during handling and feeding, as well as in the gasifier itself.

Hauserman, W.B.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Heavy and Overweight Vehicle Defects Interim Report  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), along with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), has an interest in overweight commercial motor vehicles, how they affect infrastructure, and their impact on safety on the nation s highways. To assist both FHWA and FMCSA in obtaining more information related to this interest, data was collected and analyzed from two separate sources. A large scale nationwide data collection effort was facilitated by the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance as part of a special study on overweight vehicles and an additional, smaller set, of data was collected from the state of Tennessee which included a much more detailed set of data. Over a six-month period, 1,873 Level I inspections were performed in 18 different states that volunteered to be a part of this study. Of the 1,873 inspections, a vehicle out-of-service (OOS) violation was found on 44.79% of the vehicles, a rate significantly higher than the national OOS rate of 27.23%. The main cause of a vehicle being placed OOS was brake-related defects, with approximately 30% of all vehicles having an OOS brake violation. Only about 4% of vehicles had an OOS tire violation, and even fewer had suspension and wheel violations. Vehicle weight violations were most common on an axle group as opposed to a gross vehicle weight violation. About two thirds of the vehicles cited with a weight violation were overweight on an axle group with an average amount of weight over the legal limit of about 2,000 lbs. Data collection is scheduled to continue through January 2014, with more potentially more states volunteering to collect data. More detailed data collections similar to the Tennessee data collection will also be performed in multiple states.

Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Prioritizing material recovery for end-of-life printed circuit boards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Material recovery driven by composition, choice of ranking, and weighting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Economic potential for new recycling technologies quantified for several metrics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Indicators developed for materials incurring high eco-toxicity costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Methodology useful for a variety of stakeholders, particularly policy-makers. - Abstract: The increasing growth in generation of electronic waste (e-waste) motivates a variety of waste reduction research. Printed circuit boards (PCBs) are an important sub-set of the overall e-waste stream due to the high value of the materials contained within them and potential toxicity. This work explores several environmental and economic metrics for prioritizing the recovery of materials from end-of-life PCBs. A weighted sum model is used to investigate the trade-offs among economic value, energy saving potentials, and eco-toxicity. Results show that given equal weights for these three sustainability criteria gold has the highest recovery priority, followed by copper, palladium, aluminum, tin, lead, platinum, nickel, zinc, and silver. However, recovery priority will change significantly due to variation in the composition of PCBs, choice of ranking metrics, and weighting factors when scoring multiple metrics. These results can be used by waste management decision-makers to quantify the value and environmental savings potential for recycling technology development and infrastructure. They can also be extended by policy-makers to inform possible penalties for land-filling PCBs or exporting to the informal recycling sector. The importance of weighting factors when examining recovery trade-offs, particularly for policies regarding PCB collection and recycling are explored further.

Wang Xue, E-mail: xxw6590@rit.edu [Golisano Institute for Sustainability, Rochester Institute of Technology, 111 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Gaustad, Gabrielle, E-mail: gabrielle.gaustad@rit.edu [Golisano Institute for Sustainability, Rochester Institute of Technology, 111 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

Heavy metals processing near-net-forming summary progress report  

SciTech Connect

This study utilized a converging-diverging nozzle to spray-form an alloy having a weight percent composition of 49.6% iron, 49.6% tungsten, and 0.8% carbon into samples for analysis. The alloy was a surrogate that displayed metallurgical characteristics similar to the alloys used in the heavy metals processing industry. US DOE facilities are evaluating advanced technologies which can simplify component fabrication, reduce handling steps, and minimize final machining. The goal of producing net-shaped components can be approached from several directions. In spray forming, molten metal is converted by a nozzle into a plume of fine droplets which quickly cool in flight and solidify against a substrate. The near-final dimension product that is formed receives additional benefits from rapid solidification. This single-step processing approach would aid the heavy metals industry by streamlining fabrication, improving production yields, and minimizing the generation of processing wastes. This Program effort provided a large selection of as-sprayed specimens. These samples were sprayed with gas-to-metal mass ratios ranging from 0.8:1 to 4:1. Samples targeted for analysis were produced from different spray conditions. Metallography on some samples revealed areas that were fully dense and homogeneous at 5,000X. These areas averaged grain sizes of 1 micron diameter. Other samples when viewed at 2,000X were highly segregated in the 10 micron diameter range. Deposit efficiencies of greater than 90% were demonstrated using the untailored spray system. Discharge gases were analyzed and two categories of particles were identified. One category of particle had a chemical composition characteristic of the alloy being sprayed and the second type of particle had a chemical composition characteristic of the ceramics used in the spray system component fabrication. Particles ranged in size from 0.07 to 3 microns in diameter. 8 refs., 67 figs., 20 tabs.

Watson, L.D. [Custom Spray Technologies, Inc., Rigby, ID (United States); Thompson, J.E. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

ON THE AGE AND BINARITY OF FOMALHAUT  

SciTech Connect

The nearby (d = 7.7 pc) A3V star Fomalhaut is orbited by a resolved dusty debris disk and a controversial candidate extrasolar planet. The commonly cited age for the system (200 {+-} 100 Myr) from Barrado y Navascues et al. relied on a combination of isochronal age plus youth indicators for the K4V common proper-motion system TW PsA. TW PsA is 1.{sup 0}96 away from Fomalhaut and was first proposed as a companion by Luyten, but the physicality of the binarity is worth testing with modern data. I demonstrate that TW PsA is unequivocally a physical stellar companion to Fomalhaut, with true separation 0.280{sup +0.019}{sub -.012} pc (57.4{sup +3.9}{sub -2.5} kAU) and sharing velocities within 0.1 {+-} 0.5 km s{sup -1}-consistent with being a bound system. Hence, TW PsA should be considered 'Fomalhaut B'. Combining modern H-R diagram constraints with four sets of evolutionary tracks, and assuming the star was born with protosolar composition, I estimate a new isochronal age for Fomalhaut of 450 {+-} 40 Myr and mass of 1.92 {+-} 0.02 M{sub Sun }. Various stellar youth diagnostics are re-examined for TW PsA. The star's rotation, X-ray emission, and Li abundances are consistent with approximate ages of 410, 380, and 360 Myr, respectively, yielding a weighted mean age of 400 {+-} 70 Myr. Combining the independent ages, I estimate a mean age for the Fomalhaut-TW PsA binary of 440 {+-} 40 Myr. The older age implies that substellar companions of a given mass are approximately 1 mag fainter at IR wavelengths than previously assumed.

Mamajek, Eric E., E-mail: emamajek@ctio.noao.edu [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Methodological and Practical Considerations for DevelopingMultiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects inCentral America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) andthe Center for Sustainable Development in the Americas (CSDA) conductedtechnical studies and organized two training workshops to developcapacity in Central America for the evaluation of climate changeprojects. This paper describes the results of two baseline case studiesconducted for these workshops, one for the power sector and one for thecement industry, that were devised to illustrate certain approaches tobaseline setting. Multiproject baseline emission rates (BERs) for themain Guatemalan electricity grid were calculated from 2001 data. Inrecent years, the Guatemalan power sector has experienced rapid growth;thus, a sufficient number of new plants have been built to estimateviable BERs. We found that BERs for baseload plants offsetting additionalbaseload capacity ranged from 0.702 kgCO2/kWh (using a weighted averagestringency) to 0.507 kgCO2/kWh (using a 10th percentile stringency),while the baseline for plants offsetting load-followingcapacity is lowerat 0.567 kgCO2/kWh. For power displaced from existing load-followingplants, the rate is higher, 0.735 kgCO2/kWh, as a result of the age ofsome plants used for meeting peak loads and the infrequency of their use.The approved consolidated methodology for the Clean Development Mechanismyields a single rate of 0.753 kgCO2/kWh. Due to the relatively smallnumber of cement plants in the region and the regional nature of thecement market, all of Central America was chosen as the geographicboundary for setting cement industry BERs. Unfortunately, actualoperations and output data were unobtainable for most of the plants inthe region, and many data were estimated. Cement industry BERs rangedfrom 205 kgCO2 to 225 kgCO2 per metric ton of cement.

Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion,Kristel

2004-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

460

An interim report on the materials and selection criteria analysis for the Compact Ignition Tokamak Toroidal Field Coil Turn-to-Turn Insulation System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design criteria for the Compact Ignition Tokamak, Toroidal-Field (TF) Coil, Turn-to-Turn Insulation System require an insulation sheet and bonding system that will survive cryogenic cycling in a radiation environment and maintain structural integrity during exposure to the significant compressive and shear loads associated with each operating cycle. For thermosetting resin systems, a complex interactive dependency exists between optimum peak value, in-service property performance capabilities of candidate generic materials; key handling and processing parameters required to achieve their optimum in-service property performance as an insulation system; and suitability of their handling and processing parameters as a function of design configuration and assembly methodology. This dependency is assessed in a weighted study matrix in which two principal programmatic approaches for the development of the TF Coil Subassembly Insulation System have been identified. From this matrix study, two viable approaches to the fabrication of the insulation sheet were identified: use of a press-formed sheet bonded in place with epoxy for mechanical bonding and tolerance take-up and formation of the insulation sheet by placement of dry cloth and subsequent vacuum pressure impregnation. Laboratory testing was conducted to screen a number of combinations of resins and hardeners on a generic basis. These combinations were chosen for their performance in similar applications. Specimens were tested to screen viscosity, thermal-shock tolerance, and cryogenic tolerance. Cryogenic shock and cryogenic temperature proved to be extremely lethal to many combinations of resin, hardener, and cure. Two combinations survived: a heavily flexibilized bisphenol A resin with a flexibilized amine hardener and a bisphenol A resin with cycloaliphatic amine hardener. 7 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

Campbell, V.W.; Dooley, J.B.; Hubrig, J.G.; Janke, C.J.; McManamy, T.J.; Welch, D.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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