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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "db duct burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

ASU nitrogen sweep gas in hydrogen separation membrane for production of HRSG duct burner fuel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to the use of low pressure N2 from an air separation unit (ASU) for use as a sweep gas in a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) to increase syngas H2 recovery and make a near-atmospheric pressure (less than or equal to about 25 psia) fuel for supplemental firing in the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) duct burner.

Panuccio, Gregory J.; Raybold, Troy M.; Jamal, Agil; Drnevich, Raymond Francis

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

2

Design and Evaluation of a High Temperature Burner Duct Recuperator System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W) has completed a program to design, construct, install, and field test a ceramic-based high-temperature burner-duct-recuperator (HTBDR) in an industrial setting. The unit was capable of operating in corrosive, high...

Parks, W. P.; DeBellis, C. L.; Kneidel, K.

3

Latest developments and application of DB Riley's low NOx CCV{reg{underscore}sign} burner technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent developments in DB Riley (DBR) low NOx burner technology and the application of this technology in coal fired utility boilers are discussed. Since the promulgation of the Clean Air Act Amendment in 1990, DBR has sold nearly 1,500 Controlled Combustion Venturi (CCV{reg{underscore}sign}) burners on pulverized coal fired utility boilers reducing NOx emissions 50--70% from uncontrolled levels. This technology has been retrofitted on boiler designs ranging in size and type from 50 MW front wall fired boilers to 1,300 MW opposed fired cell type boilers. In DBR's latest version of the CCV{reg{underscore}sign} burner, a second controlled flow air zone was added to enhance NOx control capability. Other developments included improved burner air flow measurement accuracy and several mechanical design upgrades such as new coal spreader designs for 3 year wear life. Test results of the CCV{reg{underscore}sign} dual air zone burner in DBR's 100 million Btu/hr (29 MW) coal burner test facility are presented. In the test program, coals from four utility boiler sites were fired to provide a range of coal properties. A baseline high volatile bituminous coal was also fired to provide a comparison with 1992 test data for the CCV{reg{underscore}sign} single register burner. The tests results showed that the second air zone enhanced NOx reduction capability by an additional 20% over the single register design. Computational fluid dynamic (DFD) modeling results of the CCV{reg{underscore}sign} dual air zone burner are also presented showing near field mixing patterns conducive to low NOx firing. DBR was recently awarded Phase IV of the Low Emission Boiler System (LEBS) program by the US Department of Energy to build a proof of concept facility representing the next major advancement in pulverized coal burning technology. A key part of winning that award were test results of the CCV{reg{underscore}sign} dual air zone burner with advanced air staging and coal reburning in a 100 million Btu/hr (20 MW) U-fired slagging combustor test facility. These results showed NOx emissions of less than 0.2 lb/million Btu (0.086 g/MJ) while converting the coal ash into an inert, non-leachable solid. This results is an 80% reduction in NOx emissions from currently operating U-fired slagging boilers.

Penterson, C.; Ake, T.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Latest developments and application of DB Riley`s low NOx CCV{reg_sign} burner technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent developments in DB Riley (DBR) low NO{sub x} burner technology and the application of this technology in coal fired utility boilers are discussed. Since the promulgation of the Clean Air Act Amendment in 1990, DBR has sold nearly 1500 Controlled Combustion Venturi (CCV{reg_sign}) burners on pulverized coal fired utility boilers reducing NOx emissions 50 - 70% from uncontrolled levels. This technology has been retrofitted on boiler designs ranging in size and type from 50 MW front wall fired boilers to 1300 MW opposed fired cell type boilers. In DBR`s latest version of the CCV{reg_sign} burner, a second controlled flow air zone was added to enhance NO{sub x} control capability. Other developments included improved burner air flow measurement accuracy and several mechanical design upgrades such as new coal spreader designs for 3 year wear life. Test results of the CCV{reg_sign} dual air zone burner in DBR`s 100 million Btu/hr (29 MW) coal burner test facility are presented. In the test program, coals from four utility boiler sites were fired to provide a range of coal properties. A baseline high volatile bituminous coal was also fired to provide a comparison with 1992 test data for the CCV{reg_sign} single register burner. The test results showed that the second air zone enhanced NO{sub x} reduction capability by an additional 20% over the single register design. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling results of the CCV{reg_sign} dual air zone burner are also presented showing near field mixing patterns conducive to low NO{sub x} firing.

Penterson, C.; Ake, T. [DB Riley, Inc., Worcester, MA (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Startup burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A startup burner for rapidly heating a catalyst in a reformer, as well as related methods and modules, is disclosed.

Zhao, Jian Lian (Belmont, MA); Northrop, William F. (Ann Arbor, MI); Bosco, Timothy (Dallas, TX); Rizzo, Vincent (Norfolk, MA); Kim, Changsik (Lexington, MA)

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

6

Front Burner- Issue 15  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 15 addresses the DOE eSCRM Program and Secure Online Shopping.

7

Rotary Burner Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The subject technology, the Calcpos Rotary Burner (CRB), is a burner that is proposed to reduce energy consumption and emission levels in comparison to currently available technology. burners are used throughout industry to produce the heat that is required during the refining process. Refineries seek to minimize the use of energy in refining while still meeting EPA regulations for emissions.

Paul Flanagan

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

8

Combustor burner vanelets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present application provides a burner for use with a combustor of a gas turbine engine. The burner may include a center hub, a shroud, a pair of fuel vanes extending from the center hub to the shroud, and a vanelet extending from the center hub and/or the shroud and positioned between the pair of fuel vanes.

Lacy, Benjamin (Greer, SC); Varatharajan, Balachandar (Loveland, OH); Kraemer, Gilbert Otto (Greer, SC); Yilmaz, Ertan (Albany, NY); Zuo, Baifang (Simpsonville, SC)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

9

MINIMIZATION OF NO EMISSIONS FROM MULTI-BURNER COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An initial testing campaign was carried out during the summer of 2000 to evaluate the impact of multiburner firing on NOx emissions. Extensive data had been collected during the Fall of 1999 and Spring of 2000 using a single pulverized-coal (PC) burner, and this data collection was funded by a separate Department of Energy program, the Combustion 2000 Low Emission Boiler System (LEBS) project under the direction of DB Riley. This single-burner data was thus available for comparison with NOx emissions obtained while firing three burners at the same overall load and operating conditions. A range of operating conditions were explored that were compatible with single-burner data, and thus the emission trends as a function of air staging, burner swirl and other parameters will be described below. In addition, a number of burner-to-burner operational variations were explored that provided interesing insight on their potential impact on NOx emissions. Some of these variations include: running one burner very fuel rich while running the others fuel lean; varying the swirl of a single burner while holding others constant; increasing the firing rate of a single burner while decreasing the others. In general, the results to date indicated that multiburner firing yielded higher NOx emissions than single burner firing at the same fuel rate and excess air. At very fuel rich burner stoichiometries (SR < 0.75), the difference between multiple and single burners became indistinguishable. This result is consistent with previous single-burner data that showed that at very rich stoichiometries the NOx emissions became independent of burner settings such as air distributions, velocities and burner swirl.

E.G.Eddings; A. Molina; D.W. Pershing; A.F. Sarofim; K.A. Davis; M.P. Heap; T.H. Fletcher; H. Zhang

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Pulverized coal burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A burner is described having lower emissions and lower unburned fuel losses by implementing a transition zone in a low NO{sub x} burner. The improved burner includes a pulverized fuel transport nozzle surrounded by the transition zone which shields the central oxygen-lean fuel devolatilization zone from the swirling secondary combustion air. The transition zone acts as a buffer between the primary and the secondary air streams to improve the control of near-burner mixing and flame stability by providing limited recirculation regions between primary and secondary air streams. These limited recirculation regions transport evolved NO{sub x} back towards the oxygen-lean fuel pyrolysis zone for reduction to molecular nitrogen. Alternate embodiments include natural gas and fuel oil firing. 8 figs.

Sivy, J.L.; Rodgers, L.W.; Koslosy, J.V.; LaRue, A.D.; Kaufman, K.C.; Sarv, H.

1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

11

Pulverized coal burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A burner having lower emissions and lower unburned fuel losses by implementing a transition zone in a low NO.sub.x burner. The improved burner includes a pulverized fuel transport nozzle surrounded by the transition zone which shields the central oxygen-lean fuel devolatilization zone from the swirling secondary combustion air. The transition zone acts as a buffer between the primary and the secondary air streams to improve the control of near-burner mixing and flame stability by providing limited recirculation regions between primary and secondary air streams. These limited recirculation regions transport evolved NO.sub.x back towards the oxygen-lean fuel pyrolysis zone for reduction to molecular nitrogen. Alternate embodiments include natural gas and fuel oil firing.

Sivy, Jennifer L. (Alliance, OH); Rodgers, Larry W. (Canton, OH); Koslosy, John V. (Akron, OH); LaRue, Albert D. (Uniontown, OH); Kaufman, Keith C. (Canton, OH); Sarv, Hamid (Canton, OH)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Burner control system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A burner control apparatus for use with a furnace installation that has an operating control to produce a request for burner operation, a flame sensor to produce a signal when flame is present in the monitored combustion chamber, and one or more devices for control of ignition and/or fuel flow. The burner control apparatus comprises lockout apparatus for de-energizing the control apparatus, a control device for actuating the ignition and/or fuel control devices, and a timing circuit that provides four successive and partially overlapping timing intervals of precise relation, including a purge timing interval, a pilot ignition interval, and a main fuel ignition interval. The present invention further includes a burner control system which verifies the proper operation of certain sensors in a burner or furnace including particularly the air flow sensor. Additionally, the present system also prevents an attempt to ignite a burner if a condition is detected which indicates that the air flow sensor has been bypassed or wedged in the actuated position.

Cade, P.J.

1981-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

13

Lensing duct  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A lensing duct to condense (intensify) light using a combination of front surface lensing and reflective waveguiding is described. The duct tapers down from a wide input side to a narrow output side, with the input side being lens-shaped and coated with an antireflective coating for more efficient transmission into the duct. The four side surfaces are uncoated, preventing light from escaping by total internal reflection as it travels along the duct (reflective waveguiding). The duct has various applications for intensifying light, such as in the coupling of diode array pump light to solid state lasing materials, and can be fabricated from inexpensive glass and plastic. 3 figures.

Beach, R.J.; Benett, W.J.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

14

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic duct system Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mitigation of Acoustic Resonance using Electrically Shunted Loudspeakers Summary: and resistor. Experimental application to a closed acoustic duct results in 14 dB pressure...

15

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic ducts Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mitigation of Acoustic Resonance using Electrically Shunted Loudspeakers Summary: and resistor. Experimental application to a closed acoustic duct results in 14 dB pressure...

16

Front Burner - Issue 18 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Front Burner - Issue 18 Front Burner - Issue 18 The Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 18 addresses keeping kids safe on the Internet, cyber crime, and DOE Cyber awareness and...

17

Front Burner - Issue 13 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 Front Burner - Issue 13 The Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 13 contained a message from the Associate Chief Information Officer (ACIO) for Cybersecurity informing readers...

18

Front Burner - Issue 14 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 Front Burner - Issue 14 The Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 14 addresses the 2013 National Cybersecurity Awareness Month (NCSAM) Campaign and Phishing Scams. Cybersecurity...

19

Oil burner nozzle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oil burner nozzle for use with liquid fuels and solid-containing liquid fuels. The nozzle comprises a fuel-carrying pipe, a barrel concentrically disposed about the pipe, and an outer sleeve retaining member for the barrel. An atomizing vapor passes along an axial passageway in the barrel, through a bore in the barrel and then along the outer surface of the front portion of the barrel. The atomizing vapor is directed by the outer sleeve across the path of the fuel as it emerges from the barrel. The fuel is atomized and may then be ignited.

Wright, Donald G. (Rockville Center, NY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Radial lean direct injection burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A burner for use in a gas turbine engine includes a burner tube having an inlet end and an outlet end; a plurality of air passages extending axially in the burner tube configured to convey air flows from the inlet end to the outlet end; a plurality of fuel passages extending axially along the burner tube and spaced around the plurality of air passage configured to convey fuel from the inlet end to the outlet end; and a radial air swirler provided at the outlet end configured to direct the air flows radially toward the outlet end and impart swirl to the air flows. The radial air swirler includes a plurality of vanes to direct and swirl the air flows and an end plate. The end plate includes a plurality of fuel injection holes to inject the fuel radially into the swirling air flows. A method of mixing air and fuel in a burner of a gas turbine is also provided. The burner includes a burner tube including an inlet end, an outlet end, a plurality of axial air passages, and a plurality of axial fuel passages. The method includes introducing an air flow into the air passages at the inlet end; introducing a fuel into fuel passages; swirling the air flow at the outlet end; and radially injecting the fuel into the swirling air flow.

Khan, Abdul Rafey; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "db duct burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Catalyzed Ceramic Burner Material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Catalyzed combustion offers the advantages of increased fuel efficiency, decreased emissions (both NOx and CO), and an expanded operating range. These performance improvements are related to the ability of the catalyst to stabilize a flame at or within the burner media and to combust fuel at much lower temperatures. This technology has a diverse set of applications in industrial and commercial heating, including boilers for the paper, food and chemical industries. However, wide spread adoption of catalyzed combustion has been limited by the high cost of precious metals needed for the catalyst materials. The primary objective of this project was the development of an innovative catalyzed burner media for commercial and small industrial boiler applications that drastically reduce the unit cost of the catalyzed media without sacrificing the benefits associated with catalyzed combustion. The scope of this program was to identify both the optimum substrate material as well as the best performing catalyst construction to meet or exceed industry standards for durability, cost, energy efficiency, and emissions. It was anticipated that commercial implementation of this technology would result in significant energy savings and reduced emissions. Based on demonstrated achievements, there is a potential to reduce NOx emissions by 40,000 TPY and natural gas consumption by 8.9 TBtu in industries that heavily utilize natural gas for process heating. These industries include food manufacturing, polymer processing, and pulp and paper manufacturing. Initial evaluation of commercial solutions and upcoming EPA regulations suggests that small to midsized boilers in industrial and commercial markets could possibly see the greatest benefit from this technology. While out of scope for the current program, an extension of this technology could also be applied to catalytic oxidation for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Considerable progress has been made over the course of the grant period in accomplishing these objectives. Our work in the area of Pd-based, methane oxidation catalysts has led to the development of highly active catalysts with relatively low loadings of Pd metal using proprietary coating methods. The thermal stability of these Pd-based catalysts were characterized using SEM and BET analyses, further demonstrating that certain catalyst supports offer enhanced stability toward both PdO decomposition and/or thermal sintering/growth of Pd particles. When applied to commercially available fiber mesh substrates (both metallic and ceramic) and tested in an open-air burner, these catalyst-support chemistries showed modest improvements in the NOx emissions and radiant output compared to uncatalyzed substrates. More significant, though, was the performance of the catalyst-support chemistries on novel media substrates. These substrates were developed to overcome the limitations that are present with commercially available substrate designs and increase the gas-catalyst contact time. When catalyzed, these substrates demonstrated a 65-75% reduction in NOx emissions across the firing range when tested in an open air burner. In testing in a residential boiler, this translated into NOx emissions of <15 ppm over the 15-150 kBtu/hr firing range.

Barnes, Amy S., Dr.

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

22

Burner ignition system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electronic ignition system for a gas burner is battery operated. The battery voltage is applied through a DC-DC chopper to a step-up transformer to charge a capacitor which provides the ignition spark. The step-up transformer has a significant leakage reactance in order to limit current flow from the battery during initial charging of the capacitor. A tank circuit at the input of the transformer returns magnetizing current resulting from the leakage reactance to the primary in succeeding cycles. An SCR in the output circuit is gated through a voltage divider which senses current flow through a flame. Once the flame is sensed, further sparks are precluded. The same flame sensor enables a thermopile driven main valve actuating circuit. A safety valve in series with the main gas valve responds to a control pressure thermostatically applied through a diaphragm. The valve closes after a predetermined delay determined by a time delay orifice if the pilot gas is not ignited.

Carignan, Forest J. (Bedford, MA)

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

23

Criterion for burner design in thermal weed control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A covered infrared burner was designed and constructed so that it could be compared to an open-flame burner. Two covered burners, a high configuration and a low configuration, were constructed. A low configuration covered infrared burner, high...

Gonzalez, Telca Marisa

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

RENEWABLES RESEARCH Boiler Burner Energy System Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RENEWABLES RESEARCH Boiler Burner Energy System Technology (BBEST) for Firetube Boilers PIER Renewables Research September 2010 The Issue Researchers at Altex Technologies Corporation in Sunnyvale, industrial combined heat and power (CHP) boiler burner energy system technology ("BBEST"). Their research

25

Front Burner - Issue 16 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 Front Burner - Issue 16 The Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 16 addresses Malware, the Worst Passwords of 2013, and the Flat Stanley and Stop.Think.Connect. Campaign....

26

Uniform-burning matrix burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Computer simulation was used in the development of an inward-burning, radial matrix gas burner and heat pipe heat exchanger. The burner and exchanger can be used to heat a Stirling engine on cloudy days when a solar dish, the normal source of heat, cannot be used. Geometrical requirements of the application forced the use of the inward burning approach, which presents difficulty in achieving a good flow distribution and air/fuel mixing. The present invention solved the problem by providing a plenum with just the right properties, which include good flow distribution and good air/fuel mixing with minimum residence time. CFD simulations were also used to help design the primary heat exchanger needed for this application which includes a plurality of pins emanating from the heat pipe. The system uses multiple inlet ports, an extended distance from the fuel inlet to the burner matrix, flow divider vanes, and a ring-shaped, porous grid to obtain a high-temperature uniform-heat radial burner. Ideal applications include dish/Stirling engines, steam reforming of hydrocarbons, glass working, and any process requiring high temperature heating of the outside surface of a cylindrical surface.

Bohn, Mark S. (Golden, CO); Anselmo, Mark (Arvada, CO)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Coleman Two Burner Stove The Coleman Matchlight 2-Burner Propane Stove is especially designed for outdoor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coleman Two Burner Stove The Coleman Matchlight 2-Burner Propane Stove is especially designed-burner propane stove has a high-pressure regulator that ensures a constant flame regardless of weather propane stove has a removable nickel-chrome-plated grate that makes for easy cleaning. The aluminized

Walker, Lawrence R.

28

Hollow lensing duct  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hollow lensing duct to condense (intensify) light using a combination of focusing using a spherical or cylindrical lens followed by reflective waveguiding. The hollow duct tapers down from a wide input side to a narrow output side, with the input side consisting of a lens that may be coated with an antireflective coating for more efficient transmission into the duct. The inside surfaces of the hollow lens duct are appropriately coated to be reflective, preventing light from escaping by reflection as it travels along the duct (reflective waveguiding). The hollow duct has various applications for intensifying light, such as in the coupling of diode array pump light to solid state lasing materials.

Beach, Raymond J. (Livermore, CA); Honea, Eric C. (Sunol, CA); Bibeau, Camille (Dublin, CA); Mitchell, Scott (Tracy, CA); Lang, John (Pleasanton, CA); Maderas, Dennis (Pleasanton, CA); Speth, Joel (San Ramon, CA); Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Low-Emissions Burner Technology using Biomass-Derived Liquid...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emissions Burner Technology using Biomass-Derived Liquid Fuels Low-Emissions Burner Technology using Biomass-Derived Liquid Fuels This factsheet describes a project that developed...

30

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Integrated with Burners for Packaged...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Integrated with Burners for Packaged Boilers Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Integrated with Burners for Packaged Boilers Providing Clean, Low-Cost,...

31

SEP Success Story: Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

SEP Success Story: Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste SEP Success Story: Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste...

32

Porous radiant burners having increased radiant output  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Means and methods for enhancing the output of radiant energy from a porous radiant burner by minimizing the scattering and increasing the adsorption, and thus emission of such energy by the use of randomly dispersed ceramic fibers of sub-micron diameter in the fabrication of ceramic fiber matrix burners and for use therein.

Tong, Timothy W. (Tempe, AZ); Sathe, Sanjeev B. (Tempe, AZ); Peck, Robert E. (Tempe, AZ)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation is to characterize the operation of fan powered infrared burner (PIR) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions and develop design guidelines for appliances in containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance. During this period, experimental setup with optical and electronic instrumentation that is necessary for measuring the radiant heat output and the emission gas output of the burner has been established. The radiation measurement instrument, an FTIR, has been purchased and installed in the porous burner experimental system. The radiation measurement capability of the FTIR was tested and found to be satisfactory. A standard blackbody source, made by Graseby Infrared, was employed to calibrate the FTIR. A collection duct for emission gas measurement was fabricated and connected to the existing Horiba gas analyzer. Test runs are being conducted for flue gas analysis. A number of published research papers on modeling of porous burners were reviewed. The physical mechanism and theoretical analysis of the combustion process of the PIR burner was formulated. The numerical modeling, and implementation of a PIR burner code at CAU`s computing facility is in progress.

Bai, T.; Yeboah, Y.D.; Sampath, R.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Diesel fuel burner for diesel emissions control system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A burner for use in the emissions system of a lean burn internal combustion engine. The burner has a special burner head that enhances atomization of the burner fuel. Its combustion chamber is designed to be submersed in the engine exhaust line so that engine exhaust flows over the outer surface of the combustion chamber, thereby providing efficient heat transfer.

Webb, Cynthia C.; Mathis, Jeffrey A.

2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

35

Reverberatory screen for a radiant burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to porous mat gas fired radiant burner panels utilizing improved reverberatory screens. The purpose of these screens is to boost the overall radiant output of the burner relative to a burner using no screen and the same fuel-air flow rates. In one embodiment, the reverberatory screen is fabricated from ceramic composite material, which can withstand higher operating temperatures than its metallic equivalent. In another embodiment the reverberatory screen is corrugated. The corrugations add stiffness which helps to resist creep and thermally induced distortions due to temperature or thermal expansion coefficient differences. As an added benefit, it has been unexpectedly discovered that the corrugations further increase the radiant efficiency of the burner. In a preferred embodiment, the reverberatory screen is both corrugated and made from ceramic composite material.

Gray, Paul E. (North East, MD)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Silane-propane ignitor/burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A silane propane burner for an underground coal gasification process which is used to ignite the coal and to controllably retract the injection point by cutting the injection pipe. A narrow tube with a burner tip is positioned in the injection pipe through which an oxidant (oxygen or air) is flowed. A charge of silane followed by a supply of fuel, such as propane, is flowed through the tube. The silane spontaneously ignites on contact with oxygen and burns the propane fuel.

Hill, Richard W. (Livermore, CA); Skinner, Dewey F. (Livermore, CA); Thorsness, Charles B. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Silane-propane ignitor/burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A silane propane burner for an underground coal gasification process which is used to ignite the coal and to controllably retract the injection point by cutting the injection pipe. A narrow tube with a burner tip is positioned in the injection pipe through which an oxidant (oxygen or air) is flowed. A charge of silane followed by a supply of fuel, such as propane, is flowed through the tube. The silane spontaneously ignites on contact with oxygen and burns the propane fuel.

Hill, R.W.; Skinner, D.F. Jr.; Thorsness, C.B.

1983-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

38

Burners and combustion apparatus for carbon nanomaterial production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides improved burners, combustion apparatus, and methods for carbon nanomaterial production. The burners of the invention provide sooting flames of fuel and oxidizing gases. The condensable products of combustion produced by the burners of this invention produce carbon nanomaterials including without limitation, soot, fullerenic soot, and fullerenes. The burners of the invention do not require premixing of the fuel and oxidizing gases and are suitable for use with low vapor pressure fuels such as those containing substantial amounts of polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The burners of the invention can operate with a hot (e.g., uncooled) burner surface and require little, if any, cooling or other forms of heat sinking. The burners of the invention comprise one or more refractory elements forming the outlet of the burner at which a flame can be established. The burners of the invention provide for improved flame stability, can be employed with a wider range of fuel/oxidizer (e.g., air) ratios and a wider range of gas velocities, and are generally more efficient than burners using water-cooled metal burner plates. The burners of the invention can also be operated to reduce the formation of undesirable soot deposits on the burner and on surfaces downstream of the burner.

Alford, J. Michael (Lakewood, CO); Diener, Michael D. (Denver, CO); Nabity, James (Arvada, CO); Karpuk, Michael (Boulder, CO)

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

39

Burners and combustion apparatus for carbon nanomaterial production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides improved burners, combustion apparatus, and methods for carbon nanomaterial production. The burners of the invention provide sooting flames of fuel and oxidizing gases. The condensable products of combustion produced by the burners of this invention produce carbon nanomaterials including without limitation, soot, fullerenic soot, and fullerenes. The burners of the invention do not require premixing of the fuel and oxidizing gases and are suitable for use with low vapor pressure fuels such as those containing substantial amounts of polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The burners of the invention can operate with a hot (e.g., uncooled) burner surface and require little, if any, cooling or other forms of heat sinking. The burners of the invention comprise one or more refractory elements forming the outlet of the burner at which a flame can be established. The burners of the invention provide for improved flame stability, can be employed with a wider range of fuel/oxidizer (e.g., air) ratios and a wider range of gas velocities, and are generally more efficient than burners using water-cooled metal burner plates. The burners of the invention can also be operated to reduce the formation of undesirable soot deposits on the burner and on surfaces downstream of the burner.

Alford, J. Michael; Diener, Michael D; Nabity, James; Karpuk, Michael

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

40

Advanced Duct Sealing Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Duct leakage has been identified as a major source of energy loss in residential buildings. Most duct leakage occurs at the connections to registers, plenums or branches in the duct system. At each of these connections a method of sealing the duct system is required. Typical sealing methods include tapes or mastics applied around the joints in the system. Field examinations of duct systems have typically shown that these seals tend to fail over extended periods of time. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been testing sealant durability for several years. Typical duct tape (i.e. fabric backed tapes with natural rubber adhesives) was found to fail more rapidly than all other duct sealants. This report summarizes the results of duct sealant durability testing of five UL 181B-FX listed duct tapes (three cloth tapes, a foil tape and an Oriented Polypropylene (OPP) tape). One of the cloth tapes was specifically developed in collaboration with a tape manufacturer to perform better in our durability testing. The first test involved the aging of common ''core-to-collar joints'' of flexible duct to sheet metal collars, and sheet metal ''collar-to-plenum joints'' pressurized with 200 F (93 C) air. The second test consisted of baking duct tape specimens in a constant 212 F (100 C) oven following the UL 181B-FX ''Temperature Test'' requirements. Additional tests were also performed on only two tapes using sheet metal collar-to-plenum joints. Since an unsealed flexible duct joint can have a variable leakage depending on the positioning of the flexible duct core, the durability of the flexible duct joints could not be based on the 10% of unsealed leakage criteria. Nevertheless, the leakage of the sealed specimens prior to testing could be considered as a basis for a failure criteria. Visual inspection was also documented throughout the tests. The flexible duct core-to-collar joints were inspected monthly, while the sheet metal collar-to-plenum joints were inspected weekly. The baking test specimens were visually inspected weekly, and the durability was judged by the observed deterioration in terms of brittleness, cracking, flaking and blistering (the terminology used in the UL 181B-FX test procedure).

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "db duct burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Duct Tape Durability Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Duct leakage is a major source of energy loss in residential buildings. Most duct leakage occurs at the connections to registers, plenums, or branches in the duct system. At each of these connections, a method of sealing the duct system is required. Typical sealing methods include tapes or mastics applied around the joints in the system. Field examinations of duct systems have shown that taped seals tend to fail over extended periods of time. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been testing sealant durability for several years using accelerated test methods and found that typical duct tape (i.e., cloth-backed tapes with natural rubber adhesives) fails more rapidly than other duct sealants. This report summarizes the results of duct sealant durability testing over two years for four UL 181B-FX listed duct tapes (two cloth tapes, a foil tape and an Oriented Polypropylene (OPP) tape). One of the cloth tapes was specifically developed in collaboration with a tape manufacturer to perform better in our durability testing. The tests involved the aging of common ''core-to-collar joints'' of flexible duct to sheet metal collars. Periodic air leakage tests and visual inspection were used to document changes in sealant performance. After two years of testing, the flex-to-collar connections showed little change in air leakage, but substantial visual degradation from some products. A surprising experimental result was failure of most of the clamps used to mechanically fasten the connections. This indicates that the durability of clamps also need to be addressed ensure longevity of the duct connection. An accelerated test method developed during this study has been used as the basis for an ASTM standard (E2342-03).

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

T-method duct design. Part 4: Duct leakage theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies have shown that duct leakage depends on the method of duct fabrication, method of sealing, workmanship, and static pressure differential. An equation that describes leakage as a function of leakage class and static pressure is presented in the Duct Design chapter of the 1993 ASHRAE Handbook. This equation is used to calculate the leakage rate through a unit of duct surface for constant duct static pressure. However, the static pressure of a leaking duct does not remain constant. This process is described by a differential equation. The magnitude of duct leakage for a straight duct depends on internal static pressure and varies uniformly along its length (assumption). Fittings in a system cause sudden changes in static pressure; therefore, duct leakage depends on fitting locations. There are two approaches for duct system leakage calculation: (1) Accurate -- For accurate duct leakage calculations, the duct system is divided into single sections between fittings and the leakage rate and pressure loss for each section calculated by the weighing factor method. (2) Approximate -- For most applications, duct leakage can be calculated by approximate formulas based on the average static pressure in a duct section. Leakage calculation requires dividing the system into sections between each fitting. This paper, the fourth in a series on T-method duct design, discusses the theory of calculating air leakage from/into a single duct to incorporate duct leakage into the optimization and simulation calculation procedures.

Tsal, R.J.; Varvak, L.P. [NETSAL and Associates, Fountain Valley, CA (United States); Behls, H.F. [Behls and Associates, Arlington Heights, IL (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

CHP Integrated with Burners for Packaged Boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to engineer, design, fabricate, and field demonstrate a Boiler Burner Energy System Technology (BBEST) that integrates a low-cost, clean burning, gas-fired simple-cycle (unrecuperated) 100 kWe (net) microturbine (SCMT) with a new ultra low-NOx gas-fired burner (ULNB) into one compact Combined Heat and Power (CHP) product that can be retrofit on new and existing industrial and commercial boilers in place of conventional burners. The Scope of Work for this project was segmented into two principal phases: (Phase I) Hardware development, assembly and pre-test and (Phase II) Field installation and demonstration testing. Phase I was divided into five technical tasks (Task 2 to 6). These tasks covered the engineering, design, fabrication, testing and optimization of each key component of the CHP system principally, ULNB, SCMT, assembly BBEST CHP package, and integrated controls. Phase I work culminated with the laboratory testing of the completed BBEST assembly prior to shipment for field installation and demonstration. Phase II consisted of two remaining technical tasks (Task 7 and 8), which focused on the installation, startup, and field verification tests at a pre-selected industrial plant to document performance and attainment of all project objectives. Technical direction and administration was under the management of CMCE, Inc. Altex Technologies Corporation lead the design, assembly and testing of the system. Field demonstration was supported by Leva Energy, the commercialization firm founded by executives at CMCE and Altex. Leva Energy has applied for patent protection on the BBEST process under the trade name of Power Burner and holds the license for the burner currently used in the product. The commercial term Power Burner is used throughout this report to refer to the BBEST technology proposed for this project. The project was co-funded by the California Energy Commission and the Southern California Gas Company (SCG), a division of Sempra Energy. These match funds were provided via concurrent contracts and investments available via CMCE, Altex, and Leva Energy The project attained all its objectives and is considered a success. CMCE secured the support of GI&E from Italy to supply 100 kW Turbec T-100 microturbines for the project. One was purchased by the project’s subcontractor, Altex, and a second spare was purchased by CMCE under this project. The microturbines were then modified to convert from their original recuperated design to a simple cycle configuration. Replacement low-NOx silo combustors were designed and bench tested in order to achieve compliance with the California Air Resources Board (CARB) 2007 emission limits for NOx and CO when in CHP operation. The converted microturbine was then mated with a low NOx burner provided by Altex via an integration section that allowed flow control and heat recovery to minimize combustion blower requirements; manage burner turndown; and recover waste heat. A new fully integrated control system was designed and developed that allowed one-touch system operation in all three available modes of operation: (1) CHP with both microturbine and burner firing for boiler heat input greater than 2 MMBtu/hr; (2) burner head only (BHO) when the microturbine is under service; and (3) microturbine only when boiler heat input requirements fall below 2 MMBtu/hr. This capability resulted in a burner turndown performance of nearly 10/1, a key advantage for this technology over conventional low NOx burners. Key components were then assembled into a cabinet with additional support systems for generator cooling and fuel supply. System checkout and performance tests were performed in the laboratory. The assembled system and its support equipment were then shipped and installed at a host facility where final performance tests were conducted following efforts to secure fabrication, air, and operating permits. The installed power burner is now in commercial operation and has achieved all the performance goals.

Castaldini, Carlo; Darby, Eric

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

44

Low NO.sub.x burner system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low NO.sub.x burner system for a furnace having spaced apart front and rear walls, comprises a double row of cell burners on each of the front and rear walls. Each cell burner is either of the inverted type with a secondary air nozzle spaced vertically below a coal nozzle, or the non-inverted type where the coal nozzle is below the secondary air port. The inverted and non-inverted cells alternate or are provided in other specified patterns at least in the lower row of cells. A small percentage of the total air can be also provided through the hopper or hopper throat forming the bottom of the furnace, or through the boiler hopper side walls. A shallow angle impeller design also advances the purpose of the invention which is to reduce CO and H.sub.2 S admissions while maintaining low NO.sub.x generation.

Kitto, Jr., John B. (North Canton, OH); Kleisley, Roger J. (Plain Twp., Stark County, OH); LaRue, Albert D. (Summit, OH); Latham, Chris E. (Knox Twp., Columbiana County, OH); Laursen, Thomas A. (Canton, OH)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Fuel burner and combustor assembly for a gas turbine engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel burner and combustor assembly for a gas turbine engine has a housing within the casing of the gas turbine engine which housing defines a combustion chamber and at least one fuel burner secured to one end of the housing and extending into the combustion chamber. The other end of the fuel burner is arranged to slidably engage a fuel inlet connector extending radially inwardly from the engine casing so that fuel is supplied, from a source thereof, to the fuel burner. The fuel inlet connector and fuel burner coact to anchor the housing against axial movement relative to the engine casing while allowing relative radial movement between the engine casing and the fuel burner and, at the same time, providing fuel flow to the fuel burner. For dual fuel capability, a fuel injector is provided in said fuel burner with a flexible fuel supply pipe so that the fuel injector and fuel burner form a unitary structure which moves with the fuel burner.

Leto, Anthony (Franklin Lakes, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Particle deposition in ventilation ducts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 {micro}m were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on the experimental measurements was applied to evaluate particle losses in supply and return duct runs. Model results suggest that duct losses are negligible for particle sizes less than 1 {micro}m and complete for particle sizes greater than 50 {micro}m. Deposition to insulated ducts, horizontal duct floors and bends are predicted to control losses in duct systems. When combined with models for HVAC filtration and deposition to indoor surfaces to predict the ultimate fates of particles within buildings, these results suggest that ventilation ducts play only a small role in determining indoor particle concentrations, especially when HVAC filtration is present. However, the measured and modeled particle deposition rates are expected to be important for ventilation system contamination.

Sippola, Mark R.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Refinery burner simulation design architecture summary.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the architectural design for a high fidelity simulation of a refinery and refinery burner, including demonstrations of impacts to the refinery if errors occur during the refinery process. The refinery burner model and simulation are a part of the capabilities within the Sandia National Laboratories Virtual Control System Environment (VCSE). Three components comprise the simulation: HMIs developed with commercial SCADA software, a PLC controller, and visualization software. All of these components run on different machines. This design, documented after the simulation development, incorporates aspects not traditionally seen in an architectural design, but that were utilized in this particular demonstration development. Key to the success of this model development and presented in this report are the concepts of the multiple aspects of model design and development that must be considered to capture the necessary model representation fidelity of the physical systems.

Pollock, Guylaine M.; McDonald, Michael James; Halbgewachs, Ronald D.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Safety Topic: Bunsen Burners and Hotplates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a medium to medium-high setting of the hot plate to heat most liquids, including water. Do not use the high setting to heat low-boiling liquids. The hot plate surface can reach a maximum temperature of 540 °C · Do.med.cornell.edu/ehs/updates/bunsen_burner_safety.htm #12;Hot Plate Procedures · Use only heat-resistant, borosilicate glassware, and check for cracks

Cohen, Robert E.

49

PULSE DRYING EXPERIMENT AND BURNER CONSTRUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non steady impingement heat transfer is measured. Impingement heating consumes 130 T-BTU/Yr in paper drying, but is only 25% thermally efficient. Pulse impingement is experimentally shown to enhance heat transfer by 2.8, and may deliver thermal efficiencies near 85%. Experimental results uncovered heat transfer deviations from steady theory and from previous investigators, indicating the need for further study and a better theoretical framework. The pulse burner is described, and its roll in pulse impingement is analyzed.

Robert States

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Coal-water mixture fuel burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention represents an improvement over the prior art by providing a rotating cup burner arrangement for use with a coal-water mixture fuel which applies a thin, uniform sheet of fuel onto the inner surface of the rotating cup, inhibits the collection of unburned fuel on the inner surface of the cup, reduces the slurry to a collection of fine particles upon discharge from the rotating cup, and further atomizes the fuel as it enters the combustion chamber by subjecting it to the high shear force of a high velocity air flow. Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide for improved combustion of a coal-water mixture fuel. It is another object of the present invention to provide an arrangement for introducing a coal-water mixture fuel into a combustion chamber in a manner which provides improved flame control and stability, more efficient combustion of the hydrocarbon fuel, and continuous, reliable burner operation. Yet another object of the present invention is to provide for the continuous, sustained combustion of a coal-water mixture fuel without the need for a secondary combustion source such as natural gas or a liquid hydrocarbon fuel. Still another object of the present invention is to provide a burner arrangement capable of accommodating a coal-water mixture fuel having a wide range of rheological and combustion characteristics in providing for its efficient combustion. 7 figs.

Brown, T.D.; Reehl, D.P.; Walbert, G.F.

1985-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

51

Advanced Burners and Combustion Controls for Industrial Heat Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ADVANCED BURNERS AND COMBUSTION CONTROLS FOR INDUSTRIAL HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEMS J.L.FERRI GTE PRODUCTS CORPORATION TOWANDA, PA ABSTRACT When recuperators are installed on indus trial furnaces, burners and ratio control systems must... recuperators by demonstrating their technical and economi cal feasibility in well monitored field installations (1). During the contract, it became evident to GTE that a systems approach (recuperator, burner, and con troIs) is necessary to be accepted...

Ferri, J. L.

52

Cornice Duct System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SYNERGETICS, INC., has designed, developed, and tested an air handling duct system that integrates the air duct with the cornice trim of interior spaces. The device has the advantage that the normal thermal losses from ducts into unconditioned attics and crawl spaces can be totally eliminated by bringing the ducts internal to the conditioned space. The following report details work conducted in the second budget period to develop the Cornice Duct System into a viable product for use in a variety of residential or small commercial building settings. A full-scale prototype has been fabricated and tested in a laboratory test building at the Daylighting Facility at North Carolina State University., Based on the results of that testing, the prototype design as been refined, fabricated, installed, and extensively tested in a residential laboratory house. The testing indicates that the device gives substantially superior performance to a standard air distribution system in terms of energy performance and thermal comfort. Patent Number US 6,511,373 B2 has been granted on the version of the device installed and tested in the laboratory house. (A copy of that patent is attached.) Refinements to the device have been carried through two additional design iterations, with a particular focus on reducing installation time and cost and refining the air control system. These new designs have been fabricated and tested and show substantial promise. Based on these design and testing iterations, a final design is proposed as part of this document. That final design is the basis for a continuation in part currently being filed with the U.5, Patent office.

Wayne Place; Chuck Ladd

2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

53

The Front Burner Cybersecurity The ACIO for Cybersecurity  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Special Edition of The Front Burner Cybersecurity The ACIO for Cybersecurity Issue No. 13 October 2012 National Cybersecurity Awareness Month October 2012 The Department of Energy...

54

Enhanced Combustion Low NOx Pulverized Coal Burner  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For more than two decades, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has developed a range of low cost, in-furnace technologies for NOx emissions control for the domestic U.S. pulverized coal fired boiler market. This includes ALSTOM's internally developed TFS 2000 firing system, and various enhancements to it developed in concert with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). As of 2004, more than 200 units representing approximately 75,000 MWe of domestic coal fired capacity have been retrofit with ALSTOM low NOx technology. Best of class emissions range from 0.18 lb/MMBtu for bituminous coals to 0.10 lb/MMBtu for subbituminous coals, with typical levels at 0.24 lb/MMBtu and 0.13 lb/MMBtu, respectively. Despite these gains, NOx emissions limits in the U.S. continue to ratchet down for new and existing (retrofit) boiler equipment. If enacted, proposed Clear Skies legislation will, by 2008, require an average, effective, domestic NOx emissions rate of 0.16 lb/MMBtu, which number will be reduced to 0.13 lb/MMBtu by 2018. Such levels represent a 60% and 67% reduction, respectively, from the effective 2000 level of 0.40 lb/MMBtu. Low cost solutions to meet such regulations, and in particular those that can avoid the need for a costly selective catalytic reduction system (SCR), provide a strong incentive to continue to improve low NOx firing system technology to meet current and anticipated NOx control regulations. In light of these needs, ALSTOM, in cooperation with the DOE, is developing an enhanced combustion, low NOx pulverized coal burner which, when integrated with ALSTOM's state-of-the-art, globally air staged low NOx firing systems, will provide a means to achieve less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx at less than 3/4 the cost of an SCR with low to no impact on balance of plant issues when firing a high volatile bituminous coal. Such coals can be more economic to fire than subbituminous or Powder River Basin (PRB) coals, but are more problematic from a NOx control standpoint as existing firing system technologies do not provide a means to meet current or anticipated regulations absent the use of an SCR. The DOE/ALSTOM program performed large pilot scale combustion testing in ALSTOM's Industrial Scale Burner Facility (ISBF) at its U.S. Power Plant Laboratories facility in Windsor, Connecticut. During this work, the near-field combustion environment was optimized to maximize NOx reduction while minimizing the impact on unburned carbon in ash, slagging and fouling, corrosion, and flame stability/turn-down under globally reducing conditions. Initially, ALSTOM utilized computational fluid dynamic modeling to evaluate a series of burner and/or near field stoichiometry controls in order to screen promising design concepts in advance of the large pilot scale testing. The third and final test, to be executed, will utilize several variants of the best nozzle tip configuration and compare performance with 3 different coals. The fuels to be tested will cover a wide range of coals commonly fired at US utilities. The completion of this work will provide sufficient data to allow ALSTOM to design, construct, and demonstrate a commercial version of an enhanced combustion low NOx pulverized coal burner. A preliminary cost/performance analysis of the developed enhanced combustion low NOx burner applied to ALSTOM's state-of-the-art TFS 2000 firing system was performed to show that the burner enhancements is a cost effective means to reduce NOx.

Ray Chamberland; Aku Raino; David Towle

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

55

Turbine Burners: Flameholding in Accelerating Flow W. A. Sirignano1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Turbine Burners: Flameholding in Accelerating Flow W. A. Sirignano1 , D. Dunn-Rankin2 , F. Liu3 B, Irvine Abstract A review of turbine-burner research and some relevant background issues is presented. Previous work on thermal cycle analysis for augmentative combustion in the passages of the turbine

Liu, Feng

56

Residential oil burners with low input and two stages firing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The residential oil burner market is currently dominated by the pressure-atomized, retention head burner. At low firing rates pressure atomizing nozzles suffer rapid fouling of the small internal passages, leading to bad spray patterns and poor combustion performance. To overcome the low input limitations of conventional burners, a low pressure air-atomized burner has been developed watch can operate at fining rates as low as 0.25 gallons of oil per hour (10 kW). In addition, the burner can be operated in a high/low fining rate mode. Field tests with this burner have been conducted at a fixed input rate of 0.35 gph (14 kW) with a side-wall vented boiler/water storage tank combination. At the test home, instrumentation was installed to measure fuel and energy flows and record trends in system temperatures. Laboratory efficiency testing with water heaters and boilers has been completed using standard single purpose and combined appliance test procedures. The tests quantify benefits due to low firing rates and other burner features. A two stage oil burner gains a strong advantage in rated efficiency while maintaining capacity for high domestic hot water and space heating loads.

Butcher, T.; Krajewski, R.; Leigh, R. [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

Advanced oil burner for residential heating -- development report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of advanced oil burner concepts has long been a part of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) oil heat research program. Generally, goals of this work include: increased system efficiency, reduced emissions of soot and NO{sub x}, and the practical extension of the firing rate range of current burners to lower input rates. The report describes the results of a project at BNL aimed at the development of air atomized burners. Two concepts are discussed. The first is an air atomizer which uses air supplied at pressures ranging from 10 to 20 psi and requiring the integration of an air compressor in the system. The second, more novel, approach involves the use of a low-pressure air atomizing nozzle which requires only 8-14 inches of water air pressure for fuel atomization. This second approach requires the use of a fan in the burner instead of a compressor although the fan pressure is higher than with conventional, pressure atomized retention head burners. In testing the first concept, high pressure air atomization, a conventional retention head burner was modified to accept the new nozzle. In addition, the burner head was modified to reduce the flow area to maintain roughly 1 inch of water pressure drop across the head at a firing rate of 0.25 gallons of oil per hour. The burner ignited easily and could be operated at low excess air levels without smoke. The major disadvantage of this burner approach is the need for the air compressor as part of the system. In evaluating options, a vane-type compressor was selected although the use of a compressor of this type will lead to increased burner maintenance requirements.

Butcher, T.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation ...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building...

59

J.R. Simplot: Burner Upgrade Project Improves Performance and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Company saved energy and money by increasing the efficiency of the steam system in its potato processing plant in Caldwell, Idaho. J.R. Simplot: Burner Upgrade Project Improves...

60

Advanced Petrochemical Process Heating with the Pyrocore Burner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

natural gas or refinery process gas and designed to take full advantage of the Pyrocore burner's radiant heat transfer characteristics. This will result in a process heater with design and performance attributes that will be attractive to users...ADVANCED PETROCHEMICAL PROCESS HEATING WITH THE PYROCORE BURNER WAYNE V. KRILL ANDREW C. MINDEN LESLIE W. DONALDSON, JR. Vice President Project Engineer Manager, Process Systems Research Alzeta Corporation Alzeta Corporation Gas Research...

Krill, W. V.; Minden, A. C.; Donaldson, L. W. Jr.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "db duct burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Sealing ducts to save energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large amounts of energy are wasted when heat leaks through ductwork located in uninsulated spaces. The Electric Power Research INstitute recently did a study that accurately measured these losses, then substantially reduced them by sealing the leaky ductwork. Six homes in the Pacific Northwest with significant duct leakage to the outside were selected for the study. The homes had electric resistance or heat pump, forced-air heating systems with a major portion of the supply and return ductwork in crawl spaces, attics, garages, etc. Measurements of duct leakage and heating system efficiency were done on all the homes before starting the duct sealing. Retrofitting included finding holes, gaps, cracks and disconnected joints in supply and return ducts as well as in plenums. When necessary, plenums were cut open for repairs. Leaks were sealed with Latex mastic and fiberglass tape. Outside ducts were covered or wrapped with insulation. Unducted returns were sealed with duct board. In some cases, leakage was corrected by merely reconnecting ducts and boots.

Siuru, B.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Advanced burner test reactor preconceptual design report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to expand the use of nuclear energy to meet increasing global energy demand, to address nuclear waste management concerns and to promote non-proliferation. Implementation of the GNEP requires development and demonstration of three major technologies: (1) Light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel separations technologies that will recover transuranics to be recycled for fuel but not separate plutonium from other transuranics, thereby providing proliferation-resistance; (2) Advanced Burner Reactors (ABRs) based on a fast spectrum that transmute the recycled transuranics to produce energy while also reducing the long term radiotoxicity and decay heat loading in the repository; and (3) Fast reactor fuel recycling technologies to recover and refabricate the transuranics for repeated recycling in the fast reactor system. The primary mission of the ABR Program is to demonstrate the transmutation of transuranics recovered from the LWR spent fuel, and hence the benefits of the fuel cycle closure to nuclear waste management. The transmutation, or burning of the transuranics is accomplished by fissioning and this is most effectively done in a fast spectrum. In the thermal spectrum of commercial LWRs, some transuranics capture neutrons and become even heavier transuranics rather than being fissioned. Even with repeated recycling, only about 30% can be transmuted, which is an intrinsic limitation of all thermal spectrum reactors. Only in a fast spectrum can all transuranics be effectively fissioned to eliminate their long-term radiotoxicity and decay heat. The Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) is the first step in demonstrating the transmutation technologies. It directly supports development of a prototype full-scale Advanced Burner Reactor, which would be followed by commercial deployment of ABRs. The primary objectives of the ABTR are: (1) To demonstrate reactor-based transmutation of transuranics as part of an advanced fuel cycle; (2) To qualify the transuranics-containing fuels and advanced structural materials needed for a full-scale ABR; and (3) To support the research, development and demonstration required for certification of an ABR standard design by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The ABTR should also address the following additional objectives: (1) To incorporate and demonstrate innovative design concepts and features that may lead to significant improvements in cost, safety, efficiency, reliability, or other favorable characteristics that could promote public acceptance and future private sector investment in ABRs; (2) To demonstrate improved technologies for safeguards and security; and (3) To support development of the U.S. infrastructure for design, fabrication and construction, testing and deployment of systems, structures and components for the ABRs. Based on these objectives, a pre-conceptual design of a 250 MWt ABTR has been developed; it is documented in this report. In addition to meeting the primary and additional objectives listed above, the lessons learned from fast reactor programs in the U.S. and worldwide and the operating experience of more than a dozen fast reactors around the world, in particular the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II have been incorporated into the design of the ABTR to the extent possible.

Chang, Y. I.; Finck, P. J.; Grandy, C.; Cahalan, J.; Deitrich, L.; Dunn, F.; Fallin, D.; Farmer, M.; Fanning, T.; Kim, T.; Krajtl, L.; Lomperski, S.; Moisseytsev, A.; Momozaki, Y.; Sienicki, J.; Park, Y.; Tang, Y.; Reed, C.; Tzanos, C; Wiedmeyer, S.; Yang, W.; Chikazawa, Y.; JAEA

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

63

STATE OF CALIFORNIA DUCT LEAKAGE TEST COMPLETELY NEW OR REPLACEMENT DUCT SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATE OF CALIFORNIA DUCT LEAKAGE TEST ­ COMPLETELY NEW OR REPLACEMENT DUCT SYSTEM CEC- CF-4R TESTING CF-4R-MECH-20 Duct Leakage Test ­ Completely New or Replacement Duct System (Page 1 of 3) Site, and also for completely new or replacement duct systems in existing dwellings. For existing dwellings

64

Articulated transition duct in turbomachine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Turbine systems are provided. A turbine system includes a transition duct comprising an inlet, an outlet, and a duct passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The duct passage includes an upstream portion and a downstream portion. The upstream portion extends from the inlet between an inlet end and an aft end. The downstream portion extends from the outlet between an outlet end and a head end. The turbine system further includes a joint coupling the aft end of the upstream portion and the head end of the downstream portion together. The joint is configured to allow movement of the upstream portion and the downstream portion relative to each other about or along at least one axis.

Flanagan, James Scott; McMahan, Kevin Weston; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; Pentecost, Ronnie Ray

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

65

Dual-water mixture fuel burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A coal-water mixture (CWM) burner includes a conically shaped rotating cup into which fuel comprised of coal particles suspended in a slurry is introduced via a first, elongated inner tube coupled to a narrow first end portion of the cup. A second, elongated outer tube is coaxially positioned about the first tube and delivers steam to the narrow first end of the cup. The fuel delivery end of the inner first tube is provided with a helical slot on its lateral surface for directing the CWM onto the inner surface of the rotating cup in the form of a uniform, thin sheet which, under the influence of the cup's centrifugal force, flows toward a second, open, expanded end portion of the rotating cup positioned immediately adjacent to a combustion chamber. The steam delivered to the rotating cup wets its inner surface and inhibits the coal within the CWM from adhering to the rotating cup. A primary air source directs a high velocity air flow coaxially about the expanded discharge end of the rotating cup for applying a shear force to the CWM in atomizing the fuel mixture for improved combustion. A secondary air source directs secondary air into the combustion chamber adjacent to the outlet of the rotating cup at a desired pitch angle relative to the fuel mixture/steam flow to promote recirculation of hot combustion gases within the ignition zone for increased flame stability.

Brown, Thomas D. (Finleyville, PA); Reehl, Douglas P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Walbert, Gary F. (Library, PA)

1986-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

66

Enhanced Combustion Low NOx Pulverized Coal Burner  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For more than two decades, Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom) has developed a range of low cost, infurnace technologies for NOx emissions control for the domestic U.S. pulverized coal fired boiler market. This includes Alstom's internally developed TFS 2000{trademark} firing system, and various enhancements to it developed in concert with the U.S. Department of Energy. As of the date of this report, more than 270 units representing approximately 80,000 MWe of domestic coal fired capacity have been retrofit with Alstom low NOx technology. Best of class emissions range from 0.18 lb/MMBtu for bituminous coal to 0.10 lb/MMBtu for subbituminous coal, with typical levels at 0.24 lb/MMBtu and 0.13 lb/MMBtu, respectively. Despite these gains, NOx emissions limits in the U.S. continue to ratchet down for new and existing boiler equipment. On March 10, 2005, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR). CAIR requires 25 Eastern states to reduce NOx emissions from the power generation sector by 1.7 million tons in 2009 and 2.0 million tons by 2015. Low cost solutions to meet such regulations, and in particular those that can avoid the need for a costly selective catalytic reduction system (SCR), provide a strong incentive to continue to improve low NOx firing system technology to meet current and anticipated NOx control regulations. The overall objective of the work is to develop an enhanced combustion, low NOx pulverized coal burner, which, when integrated with Alstom's state-of-the-art, globally air staged low NOx firing systems will provide a means to achieve: Less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx emissions when firing a high volatile Eastern or Western bituminous coal, Less than 0.10 lb/MMBtu NOx emissions when firing a subbituminous coal, NOx reduction costs at least 25% lower than the costs of an SCR, Validation of the NOx control technology developed through large (15 MWt) pilot scale demonstration, and Documentation required for economic evaluation and commercial application. During the project performance period, Alstom performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and large pilot scale combustion testing in its Industrial Scale Burner Facility (ISBF) at its U.S. Power Plant Laboratories facility in Windsor, Connecticut in support of these objectives. The NOx reduction approach was to optimize near-field combustion to ensure that minimum NOx emissions are achieved with minimal impact on unburned carbon in ash, slagging and fouling, corrosion, and flame stability/turn-down. Several iterations of CFD and combustion testing on a Midwest coal led to an optimized design, which was extensively combustion tested on a range of coals. The data from these tests were then used to validate system costs and benefits versus SCR. Three coals were evaluated during the bench-scale and large pilot-scale testing tasks. The three coals ranged from a very reactive subbituminous coal to a moderately reactive Western bituminous coal to a much less reactive Midwest bituminous coal. Bench-scale testing was comprised of standard ASTM properties evaluation, plus more detailed characterization of fuel properties through drop tube furnace testing and thermogravimetric analysis. Bench-scale characterization of the three test coals showed that both NOx emissions and combustion performance are a strong function of coal properties. The more reactive coals evolved more of their fuel bound nitrogen in the substoichiometric main burner zone than less reactive coal, resulting in the potential for lower NOx emissions. From a combustion point of view, the more reactive coals also showed lower carbon in ash and CO values than the less reactive coal at any given main burner zone stoichiometry. According to bench-scale results, the subbituminous coal was found to be the most amenable to both low NOx, and acceptably low combustibles in the flue gas, in an air staged low NOx system. The Midwest bituminous coal, by contrast, was predicted to be the most challenging of the three coals, with the Western bituminous coal predicted to beh

David Towle; Richard Donais; Todd Hellewell; Robert Lewis; Robert Schrecengost

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

67

Flame quality monitor system for fixed firing rate oil burners  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for determining and indicating the flame quality, or efficiency of the air-fuel ratio, in a fixed firing rate heating unit, such as an oil burning furnace, is provided. When the flame brightness falls outside a preset range, the flame quality, or excess air, has changed to the point that the unit should be serviced. The flame quality indicator output is in the form of lights mounted on the front of the unit. A green light indicates that the flame is about in the same condition as when the burner was last serviced. A red light indicates a flame which is either too rich or too lean, and that servicing of the burner is required. At the end of each firing cycle, the flame quality indicator goes into a hold mode which is in effect during the period that the burner remains off. A yellow or amber light indicates that the burner is in the hold mode. In this mode, the flame quality lights indicate the flame condition immediately before the burner turned off. Thus the unit can be viewed when it is off, and the flame condition at the end of the previous firing cycle can be observed.

Butcher, Thomas A. (Pt. Jefferson, NY); Cerniglia, Philip (Moriches, NY)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

OPTIMIZATION OF COAL PARTICLE FLOW PATTERNS IN LOW NOX BURNERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is well understood that the stability of axial diffusion flames is dependent on the mixing behavior of the fuel and combustion air streams. Combustion aerodynamic texts typically describe flame stability and transitions from laminar diffusion flames to fully developed turbulent flames as a function of increasing jet velocity. Turbulent diffusion flame stability is greatly influenced by recirculation eddies that transport hot combustion gases back to the burner nozzle. This recirculation enhances mixing and heats the incoming gas streams. Models describing these recirculation eddies utilize conservation of momentum and mass assumptions. Increasing the mass flow rate of either fuel or combustion air increases both the jet velocity and momentum for a fixed burner configuration. Thus, differentiating between gas velocity and momentum is important when evaluating flame stability under various operating conditions. The research efforts described herein are part of an ongoing project directed at evaluating the effect of flame aerodynamics on NO{sub x} emissions from coal fired burners in a systematic manner. This research includes both experimental and modeling efforts being performed at the University of Arizona in collaboration with Purdue University. The objective of this effort is to develop rational design tools for optimizing low NO{sub x} burners. Experimental studies include both cold-and hot-flow evaluations of the following parameters: primary and secondary inlet air velocity, coal concentration in the primary air, coal particle size distribution and flame holder geometry. Hot-flow experiments will also evaluate the effect of wall temperature on burner performance.

Jost O.L. Wendt; Gregory E. Ogden; Jennifer Sinclair; Stephanus Budilarto

2001-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

69

High Efficiency Burners by Retrofit - A Simple Inexpensive Way to Improve Combustion Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Existing direct fired process heaters and steam boilers can have their efficiencies remarkably improved, and thus cut the fuel bill, by conversion from conventional type natural draft burners to high intensity, "forced draft" type burners...

Rogers, W. T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Slurry burner for mixture of carbonaceous material and water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is intended to overcome the limitations of the prior art by providing a fuel burner particularly adapted for the combustion of carbonaceous material-water slurries which includes a stationary high pressure tip-emulsion atomizer which directs a uniform fuel into a shearing air flow as the carbonaceous material-water slurry is directed into a combustion chamber, inhibits the collection of unburned fuel upon and within the atomizer, reduces the slurry to a collection of fine particles upon discharge into the combustion chamber, and regulates the operating temperature of the burner as well as primary air flow about the burner and into the combustion chamber for improved combustion efficiency, no atomizer plugging and enhanced flame stability.

Nodd, D.G.; Walker, R.J.

1985-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

71

Development of an air-atomized oil burner  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new concept for the design of a residential oil burner is presented involving a low pressure, air atomizing nozzle. Advantages of this approach, relative to conventional, pressure atomized burners include: ability to operate at very low excess air levels without smoke, ability to operate at low (and possibly variable) rates, reduced boiler fouling, and low NO{sub x}. The nozzle used is a low pressure, airblast atomizer which can achieve fuel spray drop sizes similar to conventional nozzles and very good combustion performance with air pressure as low as 5 inches of water (1.24 kPa). A burner head has been developed for this nozzle and combustion test results are presented in a wide variety of equipment including cast iron and steel boilers, warm air furnaces, and water heaters over the firing rate range 0.25 gph to 1.0 gph (10 to 41 kW). Beyond the nozzle and combustion head the burner system must be developed and two approaches have been taken. The first involves a small, brushless DC motor/fan combination which uses high fan speed to achieve air pressures from 7 to 9 inches of water (1.74 to 2.24 kPa). Fuel is delivered to the atomizer at less than 1 psig (6.9 kPa) using a solenoid pump and flow metering orifice. At 0.35 gph (14 kW) the electric power draw of this burner is less than 100 watts. In a second configuration a conventional motor is used with a single stage fan which develops 5 to 6 inches of water pressure (1.24 to 1.50 kPa) at similar firing rates. This burner uses a conventional type fuel pump and metering orifice to deliver fuel. The fuel pump is driven by the fan motor, very much like a conventional burner. This second configuration is seen as more attractive to the heating industry and is now being commercialized. Field tests with this burner have been conducted at 0.35 gph (14 kW) with a side-wall vented boiler/water storage tank combination.

Butcher, T.A.; Celebi, Y.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Development of quick repairing technique for ceramic burner in hot stove of blast furnace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Refractories of ceramic burner in hot stoves at Wakayama No. 4 blast furnace were damaged. There are only three hot stoves, so repairing must be done in a short. Therefore, a quick repairing technique for ceramic burners has been developed, and two ceramic burners were repaired in just 48 hours.

Kondo, Atsushi; Doura, Kouji; Nakamura, Hirofumi [Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd., Wakayama (Japan). Wakayama Steel Works

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

Achieving Airtight Ducts in Manufactured Housing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

correlated with achieving CFM25OUT=3% in mastic sealed systems, but less reliably with taped systems. Cost for achieving duct tightness goals range from $4 to $8 including duct testing on the assembly line...

McIlvaine, J.; Beal, D.; Moyer, N.; Chasar, D.; Chandra, S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

STATE OF CALIFORNIA DUCT LEAKAGE TEST COMPLETELY NEW OR REPLACEMENT DUCT SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATE OF CALIFORNIA DUCT LEAKAGE TEST ­ COMPLETELY NEW OR REPLACEMENT DUCT SYSTEM CEC- CF-6R Leakage Test ­ Completely New or Replacement Duct System (Page 1 of 3) Site Address: Enforcement Agency new or replacement duct systems in existing dwellings. For existing dwellings, a completely new

75

Measurements of Smoke Characteristics in HVAC Ducts   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The characteristics of smoke traveling in an HVAC duct have been observed along with the response of selected duct smoke detectors. The simulated HVAC system consists of a 9 m long duct, 0.45 m in diameter. An exhaust fan is placed at one end...

Wolin, Steven D; Ryder, Noah L; Leprince, Frederic; Milke, James; Mowrer, Frederick; Torero, Jose L

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

BURNER DEVELOPMENT AND OPERABILITY ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH STEADY FLOWING SYNGAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BURNER DEVELOPMENT AND OPERABILITY ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH STEADY FLOWING SYNGAS FIRED COMBUSTORS-Mu¨nchen, Garching, Germany This article addresses the impact of syngas fuel composition on combustor blowout, flash flashback mechanisms are present in swirling flows, and the key thermophysical properties of a syngas

Lieuwen, Timothy C.

77

Fire suppression efficiency screening using a counterflow cylindrical burner  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design and validation of a counterflow cylindrical burner for fire suppression efficiency screening are described. The stability limits of the burner were mapped using various fuel (propane) and oxidizer (air) flows. The stability envelopes compared favorably with those reported in the literature. The apparatus was characterized using inert gases (argon, helium, and nitrogen), and the relative fire suppression efficiency ranking of these three gases was found to be commensurate with that from cup-burner tests. For liquid suppression experiments, a piezoelectric droplet generator was used to form droplets (<100 {micro}m). Water was used as a representative liquid suppressant to study the feasibility of using such a burner for screening liquid agents. Extinction was facilitated with the addition of water droplets, and the effect of water became more pronounced when its application rate was increased. Suppression experiments using water with and without nitrogen dilution in the oxidizer stream were also performed. Flame extinction due to the combined effect of water and nitrogen dilution was demonstrated.

Yang, J.C.; Donnelly, M.K.; Prive, N.; Grosshandler, W.L.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

CALIFORNIA ENERGY Residential Duct Placement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

through the integrated design, construction, and operation of building systems. The Integrated Energy Systems Integrated Design of Commercial Building Ceiling Systems Integrated Design of Residential Ducting;#12;ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The products and outcomes presented in this report are part of the Integrated Design

79

Study of the Effects of Ambient Conditions Upon the Performance of Fan Powered, Infrared Natural Gas Burners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation was to characterize the operation of a fan-powered, infrared burner (IR burner) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions, develop numerical model to simulate the burner performances, and provide design guidelines for appliances containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance.

Clark Atlanta University

2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

80

VARIABLE FIRING RATE OIL BURNER USING PULSE FUEL FLOW CONTROL.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The residential oil burner market is currently dominated by the pressure-atomized retention head burner, which has an excellent reputation for reliability and efficiency. In this burner, oil is delivered to a fuel nozzle at pressures from 100 to 150 psi. In addition, to atomizing the fuel, the small, carefully controlled size of the nozzle exit orifice serves to control the burner firing rate. Burners of this type are currently available at firing rates of more than 0.5 gallons-per-hour (70,000 Btu/hr). Nozzles have been made for lower firing rates, but experience has shown that such nozzles suffer rapid fouling of the necessarily small passages, leading to bad spray patterns and poor combustion performance. Also, traditionally burners and the nozzles are oversized to exceed the maximum demand. Typically, this is figured as follows. The heating load of the house on the coldest day for the location is considered to define the maximum heat load. The contractor or installer adds to this to provide a safety margin and for future expansion of the house. If the unit is a boiler that provides domestic hot water through the use of a tankless heating coil, the burner capacity is further increased. On the contrary, for a majority of the time, the heating system is satisfying a much smaller load, as only rarely do all these demands add up. Consequently, the average output of the heating system has to be much less than the design capacity and this is accomplished by start and stop cycling operation of the system so that the time-averaged output equals the demand. However, this has been demonstrated to lead to overall efficiencies lower than the steady-state efficiency. Therefore, the two main reasons for the current practice of using oil burners much larger than necessary for space heating are the unavailability of reliable low firing rate oil burners and the desire to assure adequate input rate for short duration, high draw domestic hot water loads. One approach to solve this problem is to develop a burner, which can operate at two firing rates, with the lower rate being significantly lower than 0.5 gallons per hour. This paper describes the initial results of adopting this approach through a pulsed flow nozzle. It has been shown that the concept of flow modulation with a small solenoid valve is feasible. Especially in the second configuration tested, where the Lee valve was integrated with the nozzle, reasonable modulation in flow of the order of 1.7 could be achieved. For this first prototype, the combustion performance is still not quite satisfactory. Improvements in operation, for example by providing a sharp and positive shut-off so that there is no flow under low pressures with consequent poor atomization could lead to better combustion performance. This could be achieved by using nozzles that have shut off or check valves for example. It is recommended that more work in cooperation with the valve manufacturer could produce a technically viable system. Marketability is of course a far more complex problem to be addressed once a technically viable product is available.

KRISHNA,C.R.; BUTCHER,T.A.; KAMATH,B.R.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "db duct burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

OPTIMIZATION OF COAL PARTICLE FLOW PATTERNS IN LOW NOX BURNERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed research is directed at evaluating the effect of flame aerodynamics on NO{sub x} emissions from coal fired burners in a systematic manner. This fundamental research includes both experimental and modeling efforts being performed at the University of Arizona in collaboration with Purdue University. The objective of this effort is to develop rational design tools for optimizing low NO{sub x} burners to the kinetic emissions limit (below 0.2 lb./MMBTU). Experimental studies include both cold and hot flow evaluations of the following parameters: flame holder geometry, secondary air swirl, primary and secondary inlet air velocity, coal concentration in the primary air and coal particle size distribution. Hot flow experiments will also evaluate the effect of wall temperature on burner performance. Cold flow studies will be conducted with surrogate particles as well as pulverized coal. The cold flow furnace will be similar in size and geometry to the hot-flow furnace but will be designed to use a laser Doppler velocimeter/phase Doppler particle size analyzer. The results of these studies will be used to predict particle trajectories in the hot-flow furnace as well as to estimate the effect of flame holder geometry on furnace flow field. The hot-flow experiments will be conducted in a novel near-flame down-flow pulverized coal furnace. The furnace will be equipped with externally heated walls. Both reactors will be sized to minimize wall effects on particle flow fields. The cold-flow results will be compared with Fluent computation fluid dynamics model predictions and correlated with the hot-flow results with the overall goal of providing insight for novel low NO{sub x} burner geometry's.

Jost O.L. Wendt; Gregory E. Ogden; Jennifer Sinclair; Stephanus Budilarto

2001-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

82

Downhole burner systems and methods for heating subsurface formations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas burner assembly for heating a subsurface formation includes an oxidant conduit, a fuel conduit, and a plurality of oxidizers coupled to the oxidant conduit. At least one of the oxidizers includes a mix chamber for mixing fuel from the fuel conduit with oxidant from the oxidant conduit, an igniter, and a shield. The shield includes a plurality of openings in communication with the oxidant conduit. At least one flame stabilizer is coupled to the shield.

Farmayan, Walter Farman (Houston, TX); Giles, Steven Paul (Damon, TX); Brignac, Jr., Joseph Phillip (Katy, TX); Munshi, Abdul Wahid (Houston, TX); Abbasi, Faraz (Sugarland, TX); Clomburg, Lloyd Anthony (Houston, TX); Anderson, Karl Gregory (Missouri City, TX); Tsai, Kuochen (Katy, TX); Siddoway, Mark Alan (Katy, TX)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced burner test Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

POWER Vol. 21, No. 1, JanuaryFebruary 2005 Summary: each test sequence. IV. Blowout Phenomenology A. Piloted Burner In this section, we describe... attachment to nonattachment at...

84

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide burner fuel Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tennessee Technological University Collection: Engineering 51 An Atomized Spray Vortex Incinerator for Burning Dilute Siudge* Summary: of the burner gases with the sludge....

85

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide burner reactors Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Design 85 (2010) 14881491 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Summary: subcritical advanced burner reactor, Nuclear technology 162 (2008). 9 M. Kotschenreuther,...

86

Measure Guideline: Sealing and Insulating of Ducts in Existing Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document begins with a discussion on potential cost and performance benefits of duct sealing and insulating. It continues with a review of typical duct materials and components and the overall procedures for assessing and improving the duct system.

Aldrich, R.; Puttagunta, S.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Compression effects on pressure loss in flexible HVAC ducts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Determine Flow Resistance of HVAC Air Ducts and Fittings.Pressure Loss in Flexible HVAC Ducts Bass Abushakra, Ph.D.to Determine Flow Resistance of HVAC Air Ducts and Fittings.

Abushakra, Bass; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Double-duct liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An internal combustion, liquid metal (LM) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) engine and an alternating current (AC) magnetohydrodynamic generator, are used in combination to provide useful AC electric energy output. The engine design has four pistons and a double duct configuration, with each duct containing sodium potassium liquid metal confined between free pistons located at either end of the duct. The liquid metal is forced to flow back and forth in the duct by the movement of the pistons, which are alternatively driven by an internal combustion process. In the MHD generator, the two LM-MHD ducts pass in close proximity through a Hartmann duct with output transformer. AC power is produced by operating the engine with the liquid metal in the two generator ducts always flowing in counter directions. The amount of liquid metal maintained in the ducts may be varied. This provides a variable stroke length for the pistons. The engine/generator provides variable AC power at variable frequencies that correspond to the power demands of the vehicular propulsion. Also the engine should maintain nearly constant efficiency throughout the range of power usage. Automobiles and trucks could be powered by the invention, with no transmission or power converter devices being required.

Haaland, Carsten M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Double-duct liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An internal combustion, liquid metal (LM) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) engine and an alternating current (AC) magnetohydrodynamic generator, are used in combination to provide useful AC electric energy output. The engine design has-four pistons and a double duct configuration, with each duct containing sodium potassium liquid metal confined between free pistons located at either end of the duct. The liquid metal is forced to flow back and forth in the duct by the movement of the pistons, which are alternatively driven by an internal combustion process. In the MHD generator, the two LM-MHD ducts pass in close proximity through a Hartmann duct with output transformer. AC power is produced by operating the engine with the liquid metal in the two generator ducts always flowing in counter directions. The amount of liquid metal maintained in the ducts may be varied. This provides a variable stroke length for the pistons. The engine/generator provides variable AC power at variable frequencies that correspond to the power demands of the vehicular propulsion. Also the engine should maintain nearly constant efficiency throughout the range of power usage. Automobiles and trucks could be powered by the invention, with no transmission or power converter devices being required.

Haaland, Carsten M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

DEVELOPMENT OF A LOW PRESSURE, AIR ATOMIZED OIL BURNER WITH HIGH ATOMIZER AIR FLOW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes technical advances made to the concept of a low pressure, air atomized oil burner for home heating applications. Currently all oil burners on the market are of the pressure atomized, retention head type. These burners have a lower firing rate limit of about 0.5 gallons per hour of oil, due to reliability problems related to small flow passage sizes. High pressure air atomized burners have been shown to be one route to avoid this problem but air compressor cost and reliability have practically eliminated this approach. With the low pressure air atomized burner the air required for atomization can be provided by a fan at 5--8 inches of water pressure. A burner using this concept, termed the Fan-Atomized Burner or FAB has been developed and is currently being commercialized. In the head of the FAB, the combustion air is divided into three parts, much like a conventional retention head burner. This report describes development work on a new concept in which 100% of the air from the fan goes through the atomizer. The primary advantage of this approach is a great simplification of the head design. A nozzle specifically sized for this concept was built and is described in the report. Basic flow pressure tests, cold air velocity profiles, and atomization performance have been measured. A burner head/flame tube has been developed which promotes a torroidal recirculation zone near the nozzle for flame stability. The burner head has been tested in several furnace and boiler applications over the tiring rate range 0.2 to 0.28 gallons per hour. In all cases the burner can operate with very low excess air levels (under 10%) without producing smoke. Flue gas NO{sub x} concentration varied from 42 to 62 ppm at 3% 0{sub 2}. The concept is seen as having significant potential and planned development efforts are discussed.

BUTCHER,T.A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Integration of HVAC System Design with Simplified Duct Distribution...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Integration of HVAC System Design with Simplified Duct Distribution - Building America Top Innovation Integration of HVAC System Design with Simplified Duct Distribution - Building...

92

Experimental and numerical analysis of isothermal turbulent flows in interacting low NOx burners in coal-fired furnaces   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coal firing power stations represent the second largest source of global NOx emissions. The current practice of predicting likely exit NOx levels from multi-burner furnaces on the basis of single burner test rig data has been proven inadequate...

Cvoro, Valentina

93

Slurry burner for mixture of carbonaceous material and water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A carbonaceous material-water slurry burner includes a high pressure tip-emulsion atomizer for directing a carbonaceous material-water slurry into a combustion chamber for burning therein without requiring a support fuel or oxygen enrichment of the combustion air. Introduction of the carbonaceous material-water slurry under pressure forces it through a fixed atomizer wherein the slurry is reduced to small droplets by mixing with an atomizing air flow and directed into the combustion chamber. The atomizer includes a swirler located immediately adjacent to where the fuel slurry is introduced into the combustion chamber and which has a single center channel through which the carbonaceous material-water slurry flows into a plurality of diverging channels continuous with the center channel from which the slurry exits the swirler immediately adjacent to an aperture in the combustion chamber. The swirler includes a plurality of slots around its periphery extending the length thereof through which the atomizing air flows and by means of which the atomizing air is deflected so as to exert a maximum shear force upon the carbonaceous material-water slurry as it exits the swirler and enters the combustion chamber. A circulating coolant system or boiler feed water is provided around the periphery of the burner along the length thereof to regulate burner operating temperature, eliminate atomizer plugging, and inhibit the generation of sparklers, thus increasing combustion efficiency. A secondary air source directs heated air into the combustion chamber to promote recirculation of the hot combustion gases within the combustion chamber.

Nodd, Dennis G. (West Mifflin, PA); Walker, Richard J. (Bethel Park, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

REAL TIME FLAME MONITORING OF GASIFIER BURNER AND INJECTORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is submitted to the United States Department of Energy in partial fulfillment of the contractual requirements for Phase I of the project titled, ''Real Time Flame Monitoring of Gasifier Burner and Injectors'', under co-operative agreement number DE-FS26-02NT41585. The project is composed of three one-year budget periods. The work in each year is divided into separate Tasks to facilitate project management, orderly completion of all project objectives, budget control, and critical path application of personnel and equipment. This Topical Report presents results of the Task 1 and 2 work. The 2 D optical sensor was developed to monitor selected UV and visible wavelengths to collect accurate flame characterization information regarding mixing, flame shape, and flame rich/lean characteristic. Flame richness, for example, was determined using OH and CH intensity peaks in the 300 to 500 nanometer range of the UV and visible spectrum. The laboratory burner was operated over a wide range of air to fuel ratio conditions from fuel rich to fuel lean. The sooty oxygen enriched air flames were established to test the sensor ability to characterize flame structures with substantial presence of hot solid particles emitting strong ''black body radiation''. The knowledge gained in these experiments will be very important when the sensor is used for gasifier flame analyses. It is expected that the sensor when installed on the Global Energy gasifier will be exposed to complex radiation patterns. The measured energy will be a combination of spectra emitted by the combusting gases, hot solid particulates, and hot walls of the gasifier chamber. The ability to separate flame emissions from the ''black body emissions'' will allow the sensor to accurately determine flame location relative to the gasifier walls and the injectors, as well as to analyze the flame's structure and condition. Ultimately, this information should enable the gasification processes to be monitored and controlled and as a result increase durability and efficiency of the gasifier. To accomplish goals set for Task 2 GTI will utilize the CANMET Coal Gasification Research facility. The Entrained Coal Gasifier Burner Test Stand has been designed and is currently under construction in the CANMET Energy Technology Center (CETC), the research and technology arm of Natural Resources Canada (NRCan). This Gasifier Burner Stand (GBS) is a scaled-down mock-up of a working gasifier combustion system that can provide the flexible platform needed in the second year of the project to test the flame sensor. The GBS will be capable of simulating combustion and gasification processes occurring in commercial gasifiers, such as Texaco, Shell, and Wabash River.

James Servaites; Serguei Zelepouga; David Rue

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Industrial pulverized coal low-NO{sub x} burner. Phase 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arthur D. Little, Inc., jointly with its university partner, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and its industrial partner, Hauck Manufacturing Corporation, is developing a low NO{sub x} pulverized coal burner for use in industrial processes, including those which may require preheated air or oxygen enrichment. The design of the burner specifically addresses the critical performance requirements of industrial systems, namely: high heat release rates, short flames, even heat flux distribution, and high combustion efficiency. The design is applicable to furnaces, industrial boilers, and cement kilns. The development program for this burner includes a feasibility analysis, performance modelling, development of the burner prototype design, and assessment of the economic viability of the burner. The Phase 1 activities covered by this report consisted of three principal tasks: preliminary burner design; fluid flow/combustion modelling and analyses; and market evaluation. The preliminary design activities included the selection of a design coal for the Phase 1 design, preliminary design layout, and preliminary sizing of the burner components. Modelling and analysis were conducted for the coal pyrolysis zone, the rich combustion zone and the lean bumout zone. Both chemical kinetics and one-dimensional coal combustion modelling were performed. The market evaluation included a review of existing industrial coal use, identification of potential near- and long-term markets and an assessment of the optimum burner sizes.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

CFCC radiant burner assessment. Final report, April 1, 1992--July 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to identify methods of improving the performance of gas-fired radiant burners through the use of Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCCs). Methods have been identified to improve the price and performance characteristics of the porous surface burner. Results are described.

Schweizer, S.; Sullivan, J.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Low NOx burner retrofits and enhancements for a 518 MW oil and gas fired boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low NOx oil/gas burners originally supplied to Jacksonville Electric Authority, Northside No. 3 .500 MW unit, were based on a duplex air register design with lobed spray oil atomizers providing additional fuel staging. Although the burners could meet the targeted NOx levels of 0.3 and 0.2 lbs/10{sup 6} BTU on oil and gas respectively. There was insufficient margin on these NOx levels to enable continuous low NOx operation to be achieved. Further burner development was undertaken based on improved aerodynamic control within the burner design to give an approximate 25% improvement in NOx emission reduction thus providing an adequate operating margin. This `RoBTAS` (Round Burner with Tilted Air Supply) burner design based on techniques developed successfully for front wall coal firing applications achieved the required NOx reductions in full scale firing demonstrations on both heavy fuel oil and natural gas firing. The paper describes the development work and the subsequent application of the `RoBTAS` burners to the Northside No. 3 boiler. The burner will also be test fired on Orimulsion fuel and thus the comparison between heavy fuel oil firing and Orimulsion firing under ultra low NOx conditions will be made.

King, J.J. [Jacksonville Electric Authority, FL (United States); Allen, J.W.; Beal, P.R. [International Combustion Ltd., Derby (United Kingdom). Rolls-Royce Industrial Power Group

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Full-scale demonstration Low-NO sub x Cell trademark Burner retrofit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Low-NO{sub x} Cell{trademark} Burner operates on the principle of staged combustion. The lower burner of each two-nozzle cell is modified to accommodate all the fuel input previously handled by two nozzles. Secondary air, less than theoretically required for complete combustion, is introduced to the lower burner. The remainder of secondary air is directed to the upper port'' of each cell to complete the combustion process. B W/EPRI have thoroughly tested the LNCB{trademark} at two pilot scales (6 million Btu per hour and 100 million Btu per hour), and tested a single full-scale burner in a utility boiler. Combustion tests at two scales have confirmed NO{sub x} reduction with the low-NO{sub x} cell on the order of 50% relative to the standard cell burner at optimum operating conditions. The technology is now ready for full unit, full-scale demonstration.

Not Available

1992-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

99

Tips: Air Ducts | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the walls, floors, and ceilings; it carries the air from your home's furnace and central air conditioner to each room. Ducts are made of sheet metal, fiberglass, or other...

100

INTERIOR DUCT SYSTEM DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, AND PERFORMANCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By removing air distribution and conditioning equipment from unconditioned spaces, homeowners stand to benefit substantially with respect to both energy savings and indoor air quality. Duct leakage introduces: Greater heating and cooling loads from air at extreme temperatures and humidity levels; Outside air and air from unconditioned spaces that may contain air borne contaminants, combustion gases, pollen, mold spores, and/or particles of building materials; and Higher whole-house infiltration/exfiltration rates. Exemplary studies conducted since 1990 have demonstrated the prevalence of duct leakage throughout the United States and measured energy savings of approximately 20% during both heating and cooling seasons from leakage reduction. These all dealt with duct leakage to and/or from unconditioned spaces. In the building science community, leakage within the conditioned space is generally presumed to eliminate the negative consequences of duct leakage with the exception of possibly creating pressure imbalances in the house which relates to higher infiltration and/or exfiltration. The practical challenges of isolating ducts and air handlers from unconditioned spaces require builders to construct an air-tight environment for the ducts. Florida Solar Energy Center researchers worked with four builders in Texas, North Carolina, and Florida who build a furred-down chase located either in a central hallway or at the edges of rooms as an architectural detail. Some comparison homes with duct systems in attics and crawl spaces were included in the test group of more than 20 homes. Test data reveals that all of the duct/AHU systems built inside the conditioned space had lower duct leakage to unconditioned spaces than their conventional counterparts; however, none of the homes was completely free of duct leakage to unconditioned spaces. Common problems included wiring and plumbing penetrations of the chase, failure to treat the chase as an air tight space, and misguided fresh air inlet design. Improvements were implemented by the Texas builder and retested in July. Results showed a 36% reduction in duct leakage, significant enough to warrant the builder adopting the new sealing procedure.

Janet E.R. Mcllvaine; David Beal; Philip Fairey

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "db duct burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Process and apparatus for igniting a burner in an inert atmosphere  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

According to this invention there is provided a process and apparatus for the ignition of a pilot burner in an inert atmosphere without substantially contaminating the inert atmosphere. The process includes the steps of providing a controlled amount of combustion air for a predetermined interval of time to the combustor then substantially simultaneously providing a controlled mixture of fuel and air to the pilot burner and to a flame generator. The controlled mixture of fuel and air to the flame generator is then periodically energized to produce a secondary flame. With the secondary flame the controlled mixture of fuel and air to the pilot burner and the combustion air is ignited to produce a pilot burner flame. The pilot burner flame is then used to ignited a mixture of main fuel and combustion air to produce a main burner flame. The main burner flame then is used to ignite a mixture of process derived fuel and combustion air to produce products of combustion for use as an inert gas in a heat treatment process.

Coolidge, Dennis W. (Katy, TX); Rinker, Franklin G. (Perrysburg, OH)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Low NOx modifications on front-fired pulverized coal fuel burners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Burner optimizations and modifications were performed on Public Service of New Hampshire`s Schiller Units 4, 5, and 6. These are Foster-Wheeler 50 MWg pulverized coal and No.6 fuel oil-fired boilers with six burners each. Burner optimizations consisted of fuel flow, primary air, secondary air testing and balancing. Burner modifications consisted of the addition of circumferentially and radially staged flame stabilizers, circumferentially-staged coal spreaders, and modifications to the existing pulverized coal pipe. NO{sub x} emissions on Unit 6 of .41 lb/mmBtu were achieved at optimized burner settings at full load with all burners in service and without the use of overfire air or bias firing. This represented a 50% NO{sub x} reduction from the average pre-modification baseline NO{sub x} emissions of .81 lb/mmBtu prior to the optimizations and burner modification program. NO{sub x} emissions as low as .38 lb/mmBtu were achieved with the use of overfire air. There was essentially no quantifiable change in LOIs (baseline LOIs averaged 40%). Furnace excess O{sub 2} as low as 1.2% was achieved with CO emissions of less than 200 ppm. Total installed costs including the overfire air system were approximately $7/kW.

Owens, B.; Hitchko, M. [Public Service of New Hampshire, Manchester, NH (United States); Broderick, R.G. [RJM Corp., Ridgefield, CT (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

An Energy Analysis of the Catalytic Combustion Burner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Heating technologies for energy efficiency Vol.III-1-3 An Energy Analysis of the Catalytic Combustion Burner Qingshan Dong Postgraduate Shihong. Zhang Ph. D. Professor Zhiyin Duan Postgraduate Qi Zhou... for energy efficiency Vol.III-1-3 Tab. 1 Compositions of natural gas Compositions CH4 C2H6 C3H8 i-C4H10 n-C4H10 CO2 N2 O2 Volume fraction (%) 93.908 0.951 0.198 0.012 0.011 2.657 1.894 0.369 Lower heating value (kJ Nm-3) 35906 64397 93244 122857...

Dong, Q.; Zhang, S.; Duan, Z.; Zhou, Q.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Hydrodynamic Modeling, Optimization and Performance Assessment for Ducted and Non-ducted Tidal Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turbines by Michael Robert Shives B.Eng., Carleton University, 2008 A Thesis Submitted in Partial Hydrodynamic Modeling, Optimization and Performance Assessment for Ducted and Non-ducted Tidal Turbines examines methods for designing and analyzing kinetic turbines based on blade element momentum (BEM) theory

Victoria, University of

105

Hydrodynamic Modeling, Optimization and Performance Assessment for Ducted and Non-ducted Tidal Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turbines by Michael Robert Shives B.Eng., Carleton University, 2008 A Dissertation Submitted in Partial Hydrodynamic Modeling, Optimization and Performance Assessment for Ducted and Non-ducted Tidal Turbines) #12;iii ABSTRACT This thesis examines methods for designing and analyzing kinetic turbines based

Pedersen, Tom

106

Heat transfer and combustion characteristics of a burner with a rotary regenerative heat exchanger  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have developed a Rotary Regenerative Combustion (RRX) System, which is coupled with a compact high efficiency regenerative air heat exchanger and a combustion burner. This system contributes to saving energy of fuel firing industrial furnaces and decreases NO{sub x} emission. This technology can be considered as a solution of greenhouse problem. This paper, discusses a compact high efficiency regenerative air heat exchanger in comparison with the existing types of regenerative burners and reverse firing with high momentum fuel jet (with motive fluid) in the furnace. This burner is compact in size, with high fuel efficiency, low NOx emission, easy to operate, and reliable, based on the results of field tests and commercial operations. The authors can say that the RRX system is a regenerative burner of the second generation.

Hirose, Yasuo; Kaji, Hitoshi; Arai, Norio

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Tips: Air Ducts | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButler Tina Butler Tina-Butler.jpg Tina L.Ducts Tips: Air Ducts

108

Potential Flow Calculations of Axisymmetric Ducted Wind Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An incompressible potential-flow vortex method has been constructed to analyze the flow field of a ducted

Widnall, Sheila

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

109

Development, Application and Performance of Venturi Register L. E. A. Burner System for Firing Oil and Gas Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPMENT, APPLICATION AND PERFORMANCE OF VENTURI REGISTER L. E. A. BURNER SYSTEM FOR FIRING OIL AND GAS FUELS A. D. Cawte CEA Combustion, Inc. Stamford, Connecticut INTRODUCTION The effect of reducing excess air as a means of curtailing..., extensive investigation work was undertaken us ing the water analog model techniques developed by Associated British Combustion for burner design. The development work resulted in the burner design known today as the Venturi Register, LEA (low excess air...

Cawte, A. D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Handover Performance of HVAC Duct Based Indoor Wireless Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Handover Performance of HVAC Duct Based Indoor Wireless Networks A. E. Xhafa, P. Sonthikorn, and O in indoor wireless net- works (IWN) that use heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) ducts.e., new call blocking and handover dropping probabilities, of an IWN that uses HVAC ducts are up to 6

Stancil, Daniel D.

111

Long Range Passive UHF RFID System Using HVAC Ducts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVITED P A P E R Long Range Passive UHF RFID System Using HVAC Ducts To provide a potential communications channel, HVAC ducts can function as electromagnetic waveguides; a 30-m read range has been-conditioning (HVAC) ducts as a potential communication channel between passive ultrahigh-frequency (UHF) radio

Hochberg, Michael

112

Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fam powered, infrared, natural gas burners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation is to characterize the operation of a fan powered infrared burner (PIR burner) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions and develop design guidelines for appliances containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance. The fan powered infrared burner is a technology introduced more recently in the residential and commercial markets. It is a surface combustor that elevates the temperature of the burner head to a radiant condition. A variety of metallic and ceramic materials are used for the burner heads. It has been demonstrated that infrared burners produce low CO and NO{sub x} emissions in a controlled geometric space. This project consists of both experimental research and numerical analysis. To conduct the experiments, an experimental setup has been developed and installed in the Combustion Laboratory at Clerk Atlanta University (CAU). This setup consists of a commercial deep fat fryer that has been modified to allow in-situ radiation measurements on the surface of the infrared burner via a view port installed on the side wall of the oil vat. Proper instrumentation including fuel/air flow rate measurement, exhaust gas emission measurement, and radiation measurement has been developed. The project is progressing well. The scheduled tasks for this period of time were conducted smoothly. Specifically: 1. Baseline experimental study at CAU has been completed. The data are now under detailed analysis and will be reported in next quarterly report. 2. Theoretical formulation and analysis of the PIR burner performance model are continuing. Preliminary results have been obtained.

Bai, Tiejun

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

LBNL -45423 Stopping Duct Quacks: Longevity of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of heating and cooling residential buildings (Energy Information Administration (EIA) 1997). The air amount of energy (30- 40%) being lost from the duct system instead of going to heating or cooling the conditioned space. In addition, a system with more supply leakage than return leakage causes a greater penalty

114

CALIFORNIA ENERGY Homeowners Benefits To Ducts In  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency is improved through the integrated design, construction, and operation of building systems of Small Commercial HVAC Systems Integrated Design of Commercial Building Ceiling Systems Integrated Design of the Integrated Design of Residential Ducting & Air Flow Systems research project. The reports are a result

115

Reducing Uncertainty for the DeltaQ Duct Leakage Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal distribution system couples the HVAC components to the building envelope, and shares many properties of the buildings envelope including moisture, conduction and most especially air leakage performance. Duct leakage has a strong influence on air flow rates through building envelopes (usually resulting in much greater flows than those due to natural infiltration) because unbalanced duct air flows and leaks result in building pressurization and depressurization. As a tool to estimate this effect, the DeltaQ duct leakage test has been developed over the past several years as an improvement to existing duct pressurization tests. It focuses on measuring the air leakage flows to outside at operating conditions that are required for envelope infiltration impacts and energy loss calculations for duct systems. The DeltaQ test builds on the standard envelope tightness blower door measurement techniques by repeating the tests with the system air handler off and on. The DeltaQ test requires several assumptions to be made about duct leakage and its interaction with the duct system and building envelope in order to convert the blower door results into duct leakage at system operating conditions. This study examined improvements to the DeltaQ test that account for some of these assumptions using a duct system and building envelope in a test laboratory. The laboratory measurements used a purpose-built test chamber coupled to a duct system typical of forced air systems in US homes. Special duct leaks with controlled air-flow were designed and installed into an airtight duct system. This test apparatus allowed the systematic variation of the duct and envelope leakage and accurate measurement of the duct leakage flows for comparison to DeltaQ test results. This paper will discuss the laboratory test apparatus design, construction and operation, the various analysis techniques applied to the calculation procedure and present estimates of uncertainty in measured duct leakage.

Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Particle deposition in ventilation ducts: Connectors, bends anddeveloping flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In ventilation duct flow the turbulent flow profile is commonly disturbed or not fully developed and these conditions are likely to influence particle deposition to duct surfaces. Particle deposition rates at eight S-connectors, in two 90{sup o} duct bends and in two ducts where the turbulent flow profile was not fully developed were measured in a laboratory duct system with both galvanized steel and internally insulated ducts with hydraulic diameters of 15.2 cm. In the steel duct system, experiments with nominal particle diameters of 1, 3, 5, 9 and 16 {micro}m were conducted at each of three nominal air speeds: 2.2, 5.3 and 9.0 m/s. In the insulated duct system, deposition of particles with nominal diameters of 1, 3, 5, 8 and 13 {micro}m was measured at nominal air speeds of 2.2, 5.3 and 8.8 m/s. Fluorescent techniques were used to directly measure the deposition velocities of monodisperse fluorescent particles to duct surfaces. Deposition at S-connectors, in bends and in straight ducts with developing turbulence was often greater than deposition in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence for equal particle sizes, air speeds and duct surface orientations. Deposition rates at all locations were found to increase with an increase in particle size or air speed. High deposition rates at S-connectors resulted from impaction and these rates were nearly independent of the orientation of the S-connector. Deposition rates in the two 90{sup o} bends differed by more than an order of magnitude in some cases, probably because of the difference in turbulence conditions at the bend inlets. In straight steel ducts where the turbulent flow profile was developing, the deposition enhancement relative to fully developed turbulence generally increased with air speed and decreased with downstream distance from the duct inlet. This enhancement was greater at the duct ceiling and wall than at the duct floor. In insulated ducts, deposition enhancement was less pronounced overall than in steel ducts. Trends that were observed in steel ducts were present, but weaker, in insulated ducts.

Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Development of a Low Pressure, Air Atomized Oil Burner with High Atomizer Air Flow: Progress Report FY 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes technical advances made to the concept of a low pressure, air atomized oil burner for home heating applications. Currently all oil burners on the market are of the pressure atomized, retention head type. These burners have a lower firing rate limit of about 0.5 gallons per hour of oil, due to reliability problems related to small flow passage sizes. High pressure air atomized burners have been shown to be one route to avoid this problem but air compressor cost and reliability have practically eliminated this approach. With the low pressure air atomized burner the air required for atomization can be provided by a fan at 5-8 inches of water pressure. A burner using this concept, termed the Fan-Atomized Burner or ''FAB'' has been developed and is currently being commercialized. In the head of the FAB, the combustion air is divided into three parts, much like a conventional retention head burner. This report describes development work on a new concept in which 100% of the air from the fan goes through the atomizer. The primary advantage of this approach is a great simplification of the head design. A nozzle specifically sized for this concept was built and is described in the report. Basic flow pressure tests, cold air velocity profiles, and atomization performance have been measured. A burner head/flame tube has been developed which promotes a toroidal recirculation zone near the nozzle for flame stability. The burner head has been tested in several furnace and boiler applications over the firing rate range 0.2 to 0.28 gallons per hour. In all cases the burner can operate with very low excess air levels (under 10%) without producing smoke. Flue gas NO{sub x} concentration varied from 42 to 62 ppm at 3% O{sub 2}. The concept is seen as having significant potential and planned development efforts are discussed.

Butcher, T.A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Infrared burner is a surface combustor that elevates the temperature of the burner head to a radiant condition. Applications of radiant burners includes boilers, air heaters, deep fat fryers, process heaters, and immersion heaters. On reason for the present interest in this type of burner is its low NO{sub x} emissions, which is attributed to the fact that a large proportion of the combustion heat is given out as radiation from the burner surface, which results in relatively low gas temperature in the combustion zone compared to that of a conventional free-flame burner. As a consequence, such burners produce less NO{sub x}, mainly by the so-called prompt-NO mechanism. A porous radiant burner testing facility was built, consisting of spectral radiance as well as flue gas composition measurements. Measurement capabilities were tested using methane; results were consistent with literature.

Bai, Tiejun; Yeboah, Y.D.; Sampath, R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly technical progress report describes work performed under DOE Grant No. DE-FG22-94MT94011 during the period September 1, 1996 to December 31, 1996 which covers the nineth quarter of the project. The objective of this investigation is to characterize the operation of a fan powered infrared burner (IR burner) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions and develop design guidelines for appliances containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance. The fan powered infrared burner is a technology introduced more recently in the residential and commercial markets. It is a surface combustor that elevates the temperature of the burner head to a radiant condition. A variety of metallic and ceramic materials are used for the burner heads. It has been demonstrated that infrared burners produce low CO and NO{sub x} emissions in a controlled geometric space. As the environmental regulations become more stringent, infrared burners are receiving increasing interests.

Bai, T.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Thermionic-cogeneration-burner assessment study. Second quarterly technical progress report, January-March 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance analysis work continued with the completion of the programming of the mathematical model and with the start of a series of parametric analyses. Initial studies predict that approximately 25 to 30% of the heat contained in the flue gas can be passed through the thermionic converters (TEC) and then be converted at 12 to 15% efficiency into electrical power. This results in up to 17 kWe per 1 million Btu/h burner firing rate. This is a 4 to 10 percent energy saving over power produced at the utility. The thermal burner design and construction have been completed, as well as initial testing on the furnace and preheat systems. The following industries are still considered viable options for use of the thermionic cogeneration burner: chlor-alkali, alumina-aluminum, copper refining, steel and gray iron, industries using resistance heating, electrolytic industries and electrochemical industries. Information gathered on these industries is presented.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "db duct burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Impact fracture behavior of HT9 duct  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ferritic alloys are known to undergo a ductile-brittle transition as the test temperature is decreased. This inherent problem has limited their applications to reactor component materials subjected to low neutron exposures. However, the excellent resistance to void swelling exhibited by these alloys has led to choosing the materials as candidate materials for fast and fusion reactor applications. Despite the ductile-brittle transition problem, results show that the materials exhibit superior resistance to fracture under very high neutron fluences at irradiation temperatures above 380{degrees}C. Impact testing on FFTF duct sections of HT9 indicates that HT9 ducts have adequate fracture toughness at much higher temperatures for handling operations at room temperature and refueling operations.

Huang, F.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

An evolution of nozzle design: The low NOx burner experience at the Baldwin Power Station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Illinois Power Company (IPC) installed low NO{sub x} burners on Baldwin Unit 3 in the Spring of 1994. Although the NO{sub x} reduction performance of these burners has been outstanding, IPC suffered catastrophic nozzle failure in the first 8 weeks of operation. The nozzles were then modified and later, replaced. Within 1 week of operation, 2 of the new nozzles also failed. This paper traces the development of the original nozzle, the influences-of other nozzle failures on its design, the determination of the cause of the original and subsequent failures, and the current state of the nozzles.

Forney, D.W. [Illinois Power Co., Decatur, IL (United States); Murray, D.G. [Rolls Royce Industrial Power, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States); Beal, P.R. [Rolls-Royce Industrial Power, Inc., Derby (United Kingdom)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Gas-phase and catalytic combustion in heat-recirculating burners Jeongmin Ahn, Craig Eastwood, Lars Sitzki* and Paul D. Ronney  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Gas-phase and catalytic combustion in heat-recirculating burners Jeongmin Ahn, Craig Eastwood title: Extinction limits in excess enthalpy burners To be published in Proceedings of the Combustion-phase and catalytic combustion in heat-recirculating burners Jeongmin Ahn, Craig Eastwood, Lars Sitzki* and Paul D

124

Establishing criteria for the design of a combination parallel and cross-flaming covered burner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

it with the two open flame practices. This evaluation was performed by moving the burners over an area that would monitor the temperatures at specified heights and locations. Temperatures were measured using thermocouples placed at heights 7-mm, 150-mm, and 300...

Stark, Christopher Charles

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Note LPSC 07-37 The TMSR as Actinide Burner and Thorium Breeder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note LPSC 07-37 The TMSR as Actinide Burner and Thorium Breeder E. Merle-Lucotte, D. Heuer, C. Le actinides. Studies [1] have thus been done on the Molten Salt Breeder Reactor (MSBR) [2] of Oak-Ridge to re fluoride salt LiF- ThF4 with 28%- mole 232 Th. This reflector, corresponding to a fertile blanket

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

126

Measurement and analysis of heating of paper with gas-fired infrared burner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Gas-fired IR heaters produce combustion on the burner surface by ignition of a pre-mixed air and fuel streams. The combustion raises the surface temperature to ranges of 800-1,100°C to emit radiation, mainly in the medium IR range, which has a...

Husain, Abdullah Nadir

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Low NO sub x /SO sub x Burner retrofit for utility cyclone boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cyclone furnaces operate with high excess air and at high temperature. The heat release during combustion is very high and as a result the boiler volume is much smaller than would be found in a conventional pc-fired system. The Marion Unit 1 boiler, at the level of the cyclone entry, has a small cross-section; about 5-feet in depth and about 20-feet in width. A boiler schematic showing the LNS Burner and relative location of the superheater region and overfire air ports is shown in Figure 1. The LNS Burner's combustion process is fundamentally different from that of the cyclone, and the combustion products are also different. The LNS Burner products enter the boiler as hot, fuel-rich gases. Additional overfire air must be added to complete this combustion step with care taken to avoid the formation of thermal NO{sub x}. If done correctly, S0{sub 2} is controlled and significant NO{sub x} reductions are achieved. Because of the small boiler volume, flow modelling was found to be necessary to insure that adequate mixing of LNS Burner combustion products with air can be accomplished to achieve NO{sub x} emissions goals. Design requirements for the air injection system for the Marion boiler were developed using FLUENT, a commercially available computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. A series of runs were made to obtain a design for final air injection that met the process design goals as closely as possible.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Simulation of Nitrogen Emissions in a Premixed Hydrogen Flame Stabilized on a Low Swirl Burner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of fuels such as pure hydrogen and hydrogen-seeded hydrocarbon mixtures. However, many hydrogen-rich fuels in the context of a laboratory-scale low swirl burner fueled with a lean hydrogen-air mixture at atmospheric of burning lean hydrogen or hydrogen-enriched lean hydrocar- bon fuels (e.g., [2­5]). For these fuels

Bell, John B.

129

air duct work: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Distribution System Efficiency to Climate, Duct Location, Air Leakage and Insulation Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: 1 LBNL 43371 Sensitivity of...

130

DOE Challenge Home Technical Training - Ducts in Conditioned...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Energy Challenge Home program: Design Options for Locating Ducts within Conditioned Space. challengehometechnicaltraining.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE Zero Energy...

131

Aerodynamic design considerations for a free-flying ducted propeller  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design philosophy for a free-flying vehicle powered by a ducted propeller is presented from an aerodynamic viewpoint. Airframe design concentrates on duct inlet lip curvature, diffuser angle, and methods of vehicle control. Wind tunnel test results are given to evaluate two inlet designs, two exit designs, and the effect of external appendages such as a camera pod or a forebody. Finally, a simple, analytic method of ducted propeller blade design is presented and the results compared with an existing ducted propeller blade. 14 refs., 28 figs., 2 tabs.

Weir, R.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Leaf seal for transition duct in turbine system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbine system is disclosed. In one embodiment, the turbine system includes a transition duct. The transition duct includes an inlet, an outlet, and a passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The transition duct further includes an interface member for interfacing with a turbine section. The turbine system further includes a leaf seal contacting the interface member to provide a seal between the interface member and the turbine section.

Flanagan, James Scott; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Dillard, Daniel Jackson; Pentecost, Ronnie Ray

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

133

Flexible metallic seal for transition duct in turbine system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbine system is disclosed. In one embodiment, the turbine system includes a transition duct. The transition duct includes an inlet, an outlet, and a passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The transition duct further includes an interface member for interfacing with a turbine section. The turbine system further includes a flexible metallic seal contacting the interface member to provide a seal between the interface member and the turbine section.

Flanagan, James Scott; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Dillard, Daniel Jackson; Pentecost, Ronnie Ray

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

134

Buried and Encapsulated Ducts - Building America Top Innovation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

photo of worker blowing insulation on ducts in an attic. Ductwork installed in unconditioned attics can significantly increase the heating and cooling costs of homes, resulting in...

135

Evaluation of friction loss in flexible and galvanized duct  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/d ratios ranging from 1 to 5. Statistical analysis of the data indicated that there was a difference in the equivalent length mean data and that the interaction between r/d ratio and duct size, r/d ratio and duct type, and duct type and duct size.... . . 51 APPENDIX F ADC STANDARD REPORTING FORMS ()E AND ()E(M). . . 55 APPENDIX G EQUATIONS UTILIZED TO CONVERT FRICTION LOSS DATA TO EQUIVALENT LENGTHS APPENDIX H 58 RESULTS FROM AIR FLOW VOLUME REPRODUCIBILITY TEST. APPENDIX I 61 DATA...

Zimmermann, Carlos Michael Alberto

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Buried and Encapsulated Ducts, Jacksonville, Florida (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ductwork installed in unconditioned attics can significantly increase the overall heating and cooling costs of residential buildings. In fact, estimated duct thermal losses for single-family residential buildings with ductwork installed in unconditioned attics range from 10% to 45%. In a study of three single-story houses in Florida, the Building America research team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) investigated the strategy of using buried and/or encapsulated ducts (BED) to reduce duct thermal losses in existing homes. The BED strategy consists of burying ducts in loose-fill insulation and/or encapsulating them in closed cell polyurethane spray foam (ccSPF) insulation. There are three possible combinations of BED strategies: (1) buried ducts; (2) encapsulated ducts (with ccSPF); and (3) buried and encapsulated ducts. The best solution for each situation depends on the climate, age of the house, and the configuration of the HVAC system and attic. For new construction projects, the team recommends that ducts be both encapsulated and buried as the minimal planning and costs required for this will yield optimal energy savings. The encapsulated/buried duct strategy, which utilizes ccSPF to address condensation concerns, is an approach that was developed specifically for humid climates.

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

CONTROL OF POLLUTANT EMISSIONS IN NATURAL GAS DIFFUSION FLAMES BY USING CASCADE BURNERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this exploratory research project is to control the pollutant emissions of diffusion flames by modifying the air infusion rate into the flame. The modification was achieved by installing a cascade of venturis around the burning gas jet. The basic idea behind this technique is controlling the stoichiometry of the flame through changing the flow dynamics and rates of mixing in the combustion zone with a set of venturis surrounding the flame. A natural gas jet diffusion flame at burner-exit Reynolds number of 5100 was examined with a set of venturis of specific sizes and spacing arrangement. The thermal and composition fields of the baseline and venturi-cascaded flames were numerically simulated using CFD-ACE+, an advanced computational environment software package. The instantaneous chemistry model was used as the reaction model. The concentration of NO was determined through CFD-POST, a post processing utility program for CFD-ACE+. The numerical results showed that, in the near-burner, midflame and far-burner regions, the venturi-cascaded flame had lower temperature by an average of 13%, 19% and 17%, respectively, and lower CO{sub 2} concentration by 35%, 37% and 32%, respectively, than the baseline flame. An opposite trend was noticed for O{sub 2} concentration; the cascaded flame has higher O{sub 2} concentration by 7%, 26% and 44%, in average values, in the near-burner, mid-flame and far-burner regions, respectively, than in the baseline case. The results also showed that, in the near-burner, mid-flame, and far-burner regions, the venturi-cascaded flame has lower NO concentrations by 89%, 70% and 70%, in average values, respectively, compared to the baseline case. The numerical results substantiate that venturi-cascading is a feasible method for controlling the pollutant emissions of a burning gas jet. In addition, the numerical results were useful to understand the thermo-chemical processes involved. The results showed that the prompt-NO mechanism plays an important role besides the conventional thermal-NO mechanism. The computational results of the present study need to be validated experimentally.

Dr. Ala Qubbaj

2001-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

138

Development of a 16-MW sub th coal-water/heavy oil burner for front-wall firing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Canadian program of coal-water fuel (CWF) technology development has included the demonstration of commercial burners for CWF in both coal and oil-designed utility boilers. The demonstrations clearly showed that these burners were prototypes, and were, in fact, modified oil burners that were mismatched to the rheological properties of the CWF. As the demonstrations were proceeding, a simultaneous research program was undertaken in which the basic principles governing atomization and combustion of CWF were studied. Results from the fundamental studies which led to the development of a novel prototype dual fuel CWF/oil burner are described. In the various stages of development, the burner was scaled up from 1.5 MW{sub th} to an industrial scale of 16 MS{sub th} for demonstration in a 20-MW{sub (e)} oil-designed industrial utility boiler and for a single-burner commercial operation in an oil designed package steam boiler. A summary of the burner performance in these demonstrations is also given in this paper.

Thambimuthu, K.V.; Whaley, H. (EMR Canada/CANMET, Ottawa (CA)); Bennet, A.; Jonasson, K.A. (NRC Canada, Ottawa (CA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Low NO sub x /SO sub x Burner retrofit for utility cyclone boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate the LNS Burner as retrofitted to the host cyclone boiler for effective low-cost control of NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions while firing a bituminous coal. The LNS Burner employs a simple, innovative combustion process to burn pulverized coal at high temperatures and provides effective, low-cost control of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions. The coal ash contains sulfur and is removed in the form of molten slag and flyash. Cyclone-fired boiler units are typically older units firing high-sulfur bituminous coals at very high temperatures which results in very high NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions. The addition of conventional emission control equipment, such as wet scrubbers, to these older cyclone units in order to meet current and future environmental regulations is generally not economic. Further, the units are generally not compatible with low sulfur coal switching for S0{sub 2} control or selective catalytic reduction technologies for NO{sub x} control. Because the LNS Burner operates at the same very high temperatures as a typical cyclone boiler and produces a similar slag product, it may offer a viable retrofit option for cyclone boiler emission control. This was confirmed by the Cyclone Boiler Retrofit Feasibility Study carried out by TransAlta and an Operating Committee formed of cyclone boiler owners in 1989. An existing utility cyclone boiler, was then selected for the evaluation of the cost and performance study. It was concluded that the LNS Burner retrofit would be a cost-effective option for control of cyclone boiler emissions. A full-scale demonstration of the LNS Burner retrofit was selected in October 1988 as part of the DOE's Clean Coal Technology Program Round II.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Results of initial operation of the Jupiter Oxygen Corporation oxy-fuel 15 MWth burner test facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Jupiter Oxygen Corporation (JOC), in cooperation with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), constructed a 15 MWth oxy-fuel burner test facility with Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPRTM) to test high flame temperature oxy-fuel combustion and advanced carbon capture. Combustion protocols include baseline air firing with natural gas, oxygen and natural gas firing with and without flue gas recirculation, and oxygen and pulverized coal firing with flue gas recirculation. Testing focuses on characterizing burner performance, determining heat transfer characteristics, optimizing CO2 capture, and maximizing heat recovery, with an emphasis on data traceability to address retrofit of existing boilers by directly transforming burner systems to oxy-fuel firing.

Thomas Ochs, Danylo Oryshchyn, Rigel Woodside, Cathy Summers, Brian Patrick, Dietrich Gross, Mark Schoenfield, Thomas Weber and Dan O'Brien

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "db duct burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Slow sound in lined flow ducts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the acoustic propagation in lined flow duct with a purely reactive impedance at the wall. This reacting liner has the capability to reduce the speed of sound, and thus to enhance the interaction between the acoustic propagation and the low Mach number flow ($M\\simeq0.3$). At the lower frequencies, there are typically 4 acoustic or hydrodynamic propagating modes, with 3 of them propagating in the direction of the flow. Above a critical frequency, there are only 2 propagating modes that all propagate in the direction of the flow. From the exact 2D formulation an approximate 1D model is developed to study the scattering of acoustic waves in a straight duct with varying wall impedance. This simple system, with a uniform flow and with a non-uniform liner impedance at the wall, permits to study the scattering between regions with different waves characteristics. Several situations are characterized to show the importance of negative energy waves, strong interactions between acoustic and hydrodynamic mod...

Auregan, Yves

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

RATIONALE FOR MEASURING DUCT LEAKAGE FLOWS IN LARGE COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Some duct sections operate at high static pressures (e.g., 100 to 2,500 Pa), but other sections leakage flows is to assume that an average duct static pressure applies to every leak. A third important2 ), central HVAC systems continuously supply heated or cooled air to conditioned spaces through

Diamond, Richard

143

Compression effects on pressure loss in flexible HVAC ducts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of compression on pressure drop in flexible, spiral wire helix core ducts used in residential and light commercial applications. Ducts of 6 inches, 8 inches and 10 inches (150, 200 and 250 mm) nominal diameters were tested under different compression configurations following ASHRAE Standard 120-1999--Methods of Testing to Determine Flow Resistance of HVAC Air Ducts and Fittings. The results showed that the available published references tend to underestimate the effects of compression. The study demonstrated that moderate compression in flexible ducts, typical of that often seen in field installations, could increase the pressure drop by a factor of four, while further compression could increase the pressure drop by factors close to ten. The results proved that the pressure drop correction factor for compressed ducts cannot be independent of the duct size, as suggested by ASHRAE Fundamentals, and therefore a new relationship was developed for better quantification of the pressure drop in flexible ducts. This study also suggests potential improvements to ASHRAE Standard 120-1999 and provides new data for duct design.

Abushakra, Bass; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Duct thermal performance models for large commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the potential for significant energy savings by reducing duct leakage or other thermal losses from duct systems in large commercial buildings, California Title 24 has no provisions to credit energy-efficient duct systems in these buildings. A substantial reason is the lack of readily available simulation tools to demonstrate the energy-saving benefits associated with efficient duct systems in large commercial buildings. The overall goal of the Efficient Distribution Systems (EDS) project within the PIER High Performance Commercial Building Systems Program is to bridge the gaps in current duct thermal performance modeling capabilities, and to expand our understanding of duct thermal performance in California large commercial buildings. As steps toward this goal, our strategy in the EDS project involves two parts: (1) developing a whole-building energy simulation approach for analyzing duct thermal performance in large commercial buildings, and (2) using the tool to identify the energy impacts of duct leakage in California large commercial buildings, in support of future recommendations to address duct performance in the Title 24 Energy Efficiency Standards for Nonresidential Buildings. The specific technical objectives for the EDS project were to: (1) Identify a near-term whole-building energy simulation approach that can be used in the impacts analysis task of this project (see Objective 3), with little or no modification. A secondary objective is to recommend how to proceed with long-term development of an improved compliance tool for Title 24 that addresses duct thermal performance. (2) Develop an Alternative Calculation Method (ACM) change proposal to include a new metric for thermal distribution system efficiency in the reporting requirements for the 2005 Title 24 Standards. The metric will facilitate future comparisons of different system types using a common ''yardstick''. (3) Using the selected near-term simulation approach, assess the impacts of duct system improvements in California large commercial buildings, over a range of building vintages and climates. This assessment will provide a solid foundation for future efforts that address the energy efficiency of large commercial duct systems in Title 24. This report describes our work to address Objective 1, which includes a review of past modeling efforts related to duct thermal performance, and recommends near- and long-term modeling approaches for analyzing duct thermal performance in large commercial buildings.

Wray, Craig P.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Evaluation of Fluid Conduction and Mixing within a Subassembly of the Actinide Burner Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RELAP5-3D code is being considered as a thermal-hydraulic system code to support the development of the sodium-cooled Actinide Burner Test Reactor as part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership. An evaluation was performed to determine whether the control system could be used to simulate the effects of non-convective mechanisms of heat transport in the fluid, including axial and radial heat conduction and subchannel mixing, that are not currently represented with internal code models. The evaluation also determined the relative importance of axial and radial heat conduction and fluid mixing on peak cladding temperature for a wide range of steady conditions and during a representative loss-of-flow transient. The evaluation was performed using a RELAP5-3D model of a subassembly in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, which was used as a surrogate for the Actinide Burner Test Reactor.

Cliff B. Davis

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Method for reducing NOx during combustion of coal in a burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An organically complexed nanocatalyst composition is applied to or mixed with coal prior to or upon introducing the coal into a coal burner in order to catalyze the removal of coal nitrogen from the coal and its conversion into nitrogen gas prior to combustion of the coal. This process leads to reduced NOx production during coal combustion. The nanocatalyst compositions include a nanoparticle catalyst that is made using a dispersing agent that can bond with the catalyst atoms. The dispersing agent forms stable, dispersed, nano-sized catalyst particles. The catalyst composition can be formed as a stable suspension to facilitate storage, transportation and application of the catalyst nanoparticles to a coal material. The catalyst composition can be applied before or after pulverizing the coal material or it may be injected directly into the coal burner together with pulverized coal.

Zhou, Bing (Cranbury, NJ); Parasher, Sukesh (Lawrenceville, NJ); Hare, Jeffrey J. (Provo, UT); Harding, N. Stanley (North Salt Lake, UT); Black, Stephanie E. (Sandy, UT); Johnson, Kenneth R. (Highland, UT)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Low NO sub x /SO sub x Burner retrofit for utility cyclone boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work on process design was deferred pending a restart of the mainstream project activities. LNS Burner design effort was focussed mainly on the continued development of the slag screen model. Documentation of the LNS Burner thermal model also continued. Balance of plant engineering continued on the P ID's for the fuel preparation building HVAC system, lighter oil, limestone/fuel additive handling system, instrument and service air and fire protection systems. Work began on the preparation of system and sub-system descriptions. Schematic connection and wiring drawings and diagrams for the fuel handling system, flame scanner/igniter system and DCS control modification for the lighter oil pumps and Unit 1 circulating water pumps were completed.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Orimulsion in low NO{sub x} burner based combustion systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential of Orimulsion (a bitumen in water emulsion) as a suitable fuel for power generation boilers has been established subject to full recognition being given to the environmental aspects of its application. An important factor is the control of NO{sub x} emissions from the combustion process. Work on NO{sub x} control when firing Orimulsion has inevitably been based on the techniques utilized for low NO{sub x} fuel oil combustion. This fundamental work has indicated the different performance characteristics of these two fuels when fired in similar low NO{sub x} burner configurations. Nevertheless it has been demonstrated that Orimulsion can achieve similar, and perhaps even improved, low NO{sub x} performance when compared to heavy (No. 6) fuel oil, and can be used with equal flexibility to that of heavy fuel oil in low NO{sub x} combustion systems based on both burner and in furnace staging techniques.

Allen, J.W.; Beal, P. [International Combustion Ltd., Derby (United Kingdom). Rolls-Royce Industrial Power Group

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

149

Pollutant Exposures from Natural Gas Cooking Burners: A Simulation-Based Assessment for Southern California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residential natural gas cooking burners (NGCBs) can emit substantial quantities of pollutants and they are typically used without venting. The objective of this study is to quantify pollutant concentrations and occupant exposures resulting from NGCB use in California homes. A mass balance model was applied to estimate time-dependent pollutant concentrations throughout homes and the "exposure concentrations" experienced by individual occupants. The model was applied to estimate nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), and formaldehyde (HCHO) concentrations for one week each in summer and winter for a representative sample of Southern California homes. The model simulated pollutant emissions from NGCBs, NO{sub 2} and CO entry from outdoors, dilution throughout the home, and removal by ventilation and deposition. Residence characteristics and outdoor concentrations of CO and NO{sub 2} were obtained from available databases. Ventilation rates, occupancy patterns, and burner use were inferred from household characteristics. Proximity to the burner(s) and the benefits of using venting range hoods were also explored. Replicate model executions using independently generated sets of stochastic variable values yielded estimated pollutant concentration distributions with geometric means varying less than 10%. The simulation model estimates that in homes using NGCBs without coincident use of venting range hoods, 62%, 9%, and 53% of occupants are routinely exposed to NO{sub 2}, CO, and HCHO levels that exceed acute health-based standards and guidelines. NGCB use increased the sample median of the highest simulated 1-hr indoor concentrations by 100, 3000, and 20 ppb for NO{sub 2}, CO, and HCHO, respectively. Reducing pollutant exposures from NGCBs should be a public health priority. Simulation results suggest that regular use of even moderately effective venting range hoods would dramatically reduce the percentage of homes in which concentrations exceed health-based standards.

Logue, Jennifer M.; Klepeis, Neil E.; Lobscheid, Agnes B.; Singer, Brett C.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Coal Particle Flow Patterns for O2 Enriched, Low NOx Burners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project involved a systematic investigation examining the effect of near-flame burner aerodynamics on standoff distance and stability of turbulent diffusion flames and the resultant NO{sub x} emissions from actual pulverized coal diffusion flames. Specifically, the scope of the project was to understand how changes in near-flame aerodynamics and transport air oxygen partial pressure can influence flame attachment and coal ignition, two properties essential to proper operation of low NO{sub x} burners. Results from this investigation utilized a new 2M tall, 0.5m in diameter combustor designed to evaluate near-flame combustion aerodynamics in terms of transport air oxygen partial pressure (Po{sub 2}), coal fines content, primary fuel and secondary air velocities, and furnace wall temperature furnish insight into fundamental processes that occur during combustion of pulverized coal in practical systems. Complementary cold flow studies were conducted in a geometrically similar chamber to analyze the detailed motion of the gas and particles using laser Doppler velocimetry. This final technical report summarizes the key findings from our investigation into coal particle flow patterns in burners. Specifically, we focused on the effects of oxygen enrichment, the effect of fines, and the effect of the nozzle velocity ratio on the resulting flow patterns. In the cold flow studies, detailed measurements using laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) were made to determine the details of the flow. In the hot flow studies, observations of flame stability and measurements of NO{sub x} were made to determine the effects of the flow patterns on burner operation.

Jennifer Sinclair Curtis

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Development of a new duct leakage test: DeltaQ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Duct leakage is a key factor in determining energy losses from forced air heating and cooling systems. Several studies (Francisco and Palmiter 1997 and 1999, Andrews et al. 1998, and Siegel et al. 2001) have shown that the duct system efficiency cannot be reliably determined without good estimates of duct leakage. Specifically, for energy calculations, it is the duct leakage air flow to outside at operating conditions that is required. Existing test methods either precisely measure the size of leaks (but not the flow through them at operating conditions), or measure these flows with insufficient accuracy. The DeltaQ duct leakage test method was developed to provide improved estimates of duct leakage during system operation. In this study we developed the analytical calculation methods and the test procedures used in the DeltaQ test. As part of the development process, we have estimated uncertainties in the test method (both analytically and based on field data) and designed automated test procedures to increase accuracy and reduce the contributions of operator errors in performing field tests. In addition, the test has been evaluated in over 100 houses by several research teams to show that it can be used in a wide range of houses and to aid in finding limits or problems in field applications. The test procedure is currently being considered by ASTM as an update of an existing duct leakage standard.

Walker,I.S.; Sherman,M.H.; Wempen, J.; Wang, D.; McWilliams, J.A.; Dickerhoff, D.J.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Evaluation of gas-reburning and low NO sub x burners on a wall fired boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low NO{sub x} burners operate on the principle of delayed mixing between the coal fuel and burner air, so that less NO{sub x} is formed. Gas reburning is a combustion modification technique that consists of firing 80--85 percent of the fuel corresponding to the total heat release in the lower furnace. Reduction of NO{sub x} to molecular nitrogen (N{sub 2}) is accomplished via the downstream injection of the remaining fuel requirement in the form of natural gas (which also reduces the total SO{sub x} emissions). In a third stage, burnout air is injected at the lower temperatures in the upper furnace to complete the combustion process without generating significant additional NO{sub x}. The specific goal of this project is to demonstrate NO{sub x} emission reductions of 75 percent or more as a result of combing Low NO{sub x} Burners and Gas Reburning on a utility boiler having the design characteristics mentioned above. A Host Site Agreement has been signed by EER and a utility company in the State of Colorado: Public Service Company of Colorado (Cherokee Unit No. 3, 172 MW{sub e}) front wall fired boiler near Denver.

Not Available

1992-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Large eddy simulation of forced ignition of an annular bluff-body burner  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The optimization of the ignition process is a crucial issue in the design of many combustion systems. Large eddy simulation (LES) of a conical shaped bluff-body turbulent nonpremixed burner has been performed to study the impact of spark location on ignition success. This burner was experimentally investigated by Ahmed et al. [Combust. Flame 151 (2007) 366-385]. The present work focuses on the case without swirl, for which detailed measurements are available. First, cold-flow measurements of velocities and mixture fractions are compared with their LES counterparts, to assess the prediction capabilities of simulations in terms of flow and turbulent mixing. Time histories of velocities and mixture fractions are recorded at selected spots, to probe the resolved probability density function (pdf) of flow variables, in an attempt to reproduce, from the knowledge of LES-resolved instantaneous flow conditions, the experimentally observed reasons for success or failure of spark ignition. A flammability map is also constructed from the resolved mixture fraction pdf and compared with its experimental counterpart. LES of forced ignition is then performed using flamelet fully detailed tabulated chemistry combined with presumed pdfs. Various scenarios of flame kernel development are analyzed and correlated with typical flow conditions observed in this burner. The correlations between, velocities and mixture fraction values at the sparking time and the success or failure of ignition, are then further discussed and analyzed. (author)

Subramanian, V.; Domingo, P.; Vervisch, L. [CORIA-CNRS and INSA de Rouen, Technopole du Madrillet, BP 8, 76801 Saint-Etienne-du-Rouvray (France)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

MINIMIZATION OF NO EMISSIONS FROM MULTI-BURNER COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal continues to be one of the principal energy sources for electric power generation in the United States. One of the biggest environmental challenges involved with coal utilization is the reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) formed during coal combustion. The most economical method of NO{sub x} abatement in coal combustion is through burner modification. Air-staging techniques have been widely used in the development of low-NO{sub x} pulverized coal burners, promoting the conversion of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2} by delaying the mixing in the fuel-rich zone near the burner inlet. Previous studies have looked at the mechanisms of NO{sub x} evolution at relatively low temperatures where primary pyrolysis is dominant, but data published for secondary pyrolysis in the pulverized coal furnace are scarce. In this project, the nitrogen evolution behavior during secondary coal pyrolysis will be explored. The end result will be a complete model of nitrogen evolution and NO{sub x} precursor formation due to primary and secondary pyrolysis.

E.G. Eddings; A. Molina; D.W. Pershing; A.F. Sarofim; K.A. Davis; M.P. Heap; T.H. Fletcher; H. Zhang

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Sensitivity of forced air distribution system efficiency to climate, duct location, air leakage and insulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Location, Air Leakage and Insulation Iain S. Walker Energy4 Duct Insulation, Location and Leakageinsulation

Walker, Iain

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low N0x Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler NOX emissions and to a lesser degree, due to coal replacement, SO2 emissions. The project involved combining Gas Reburning with Low NOX Burners (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired electric utility boiler to determine if high levels of NO, reduction (70VO) could be achieved. Sponsors of the project included the U.S. Depatiment of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation. The GR-LNB demonstration was petformed on Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit #3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW~ wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado bituminous, low-sulfur coal. It had a baseline NO, emission level of 0.73 lb/1 OG Btu using conventional burners. Low NOX burners are designed to yield lower NOX emissions than conventional burners. However, the NOX control achieved with this technique is limited to 30-50Y0. Also, with LNBs, CO emissions can increase to above acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce NO, in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. This technology involves the introduction of' natural gas into the hot furnace flue gas stream. When combined, GR and LNBs minimize NOX emissions and maintain acceptable levels of CO emissions. A comprehensive test program was completed, operating over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved, providing substantial data. Measurements were taken to quantify reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability and factors influencing costs. The GR-LNB technology achieved good NO, emission reductions and the goals of the project were achieved. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was achieved at an average gas heat input of 18%. The performance goal of 70/40 reduction was met on many test runs, but at a higher reburn gas heat input. S02 emissions, based on coal replacement, were reduced by 18%.

None

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Method and apparatus for duct sealing using a clog-resistant insertable injector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming a duct access region through one side of a previously installed air duct, wherein the air duct has an air flow with an air flow direction by inserting an aerosol injector into a previously installed air duct through the access region. The aerosol injector includes a liquid tube having a liquid tube orifice for ejecting a liquid to be atomized; and a propellant cap. The method is accomplished by aligning the aerosol injector with the direction of air flow in the duct; activating an air flow within the duct; and spraying a sealant through the aerosol injector to seal the duct in the direction of the air flow.

Wang, Duo (Albany, CA); Modera, Mark P. (Piedmont, CA)

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

158

Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation is to characterize the operation of fan powered infrared (PIR) burner at various barometric pressures (operating altitude) and gas compositions and develop design guidelines for appliances containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance. In this program, the theoretical basis for the behavior of PIR burners will be established through analysis of the combustion, heat and mass transfer, and other related processes that determine the performance of PIR burners. Based on the results of this study, a burner performance model for radiant output will be developed. The model will be applied to predict the performance of the selected burner and will also be modified and improved through comparison with experimental results. During this period, laboratory facilities that are necessary for conducting this research are completed. The student research assistants have started working in the laboratory. The selection of the test burner has completed. The preparation and instrumentation of this test burner is underway. The theoretical analysis and modeling of the fundamental combustion process of the PIR burner is progressing well. A study of the existing models are being conducted, which will yield specific direction and recommendations for the new model to be developed.

Bai, Tiejun

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

A ``NEW'' APPROACH TO ACTIVE NOISE CONTROL IN DUCTS 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fail to quiet. There exists a potential for reducing acoustic pollution by attenuating fan and blower of acoustic feedback which is prevalent in duct systems; see [3]. A natural approach to these adaptive schemes

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

160

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Webinar: Ducts in Conditioned Space  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Challenge Home is a blueprint for zero energy ready homes.  When we make that statement – it’s impossible to justify huge thermal losses from ducts in unconditioned spaces.  That’s why one of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "db duct burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Improved Wireless Performance from Mode Scattering in Ventilation Ducts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as an in-building wireless infrastructure, prior work has developed an empirical model of the power loss duct systems. Specifically, they found that the power loss due to a signal that passes through multiple

Stancil, Daniel D.

162

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Webinar: Ducts in Conditioned Space...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

America research program its and partners have worked out the kinks on a toolkit of duct design strategies. In this session you'll learn the pros and cons of these strategies so...

163

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile ? Ducts...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

being adopted by builders across the country. Far too many homes are constructed with HVAC equipment and ductwork located in a vented crawlspace or a vented attic. Moving ducts...

164

STATE OF CALIFORNIA SPACE CONDITIONING SYSTEMS, DUCTS AND FANS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, crawl- space, etc.) Duct R-value Heating Load (Btu/hr) Heating Capacity (Btu/hr) Equip Type (package Load (Btu/hr) Cooling Capacity (Btu/hr) 1. If project is new construction, see Footnotes to Standards

165

BETTER DUCT SYSTEMS FOR HOME HEATING AND COOLING.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a series of six guides intended to provide a working knowledge of residential heating and cooling duct systems, an understanding of the major issues concerning efficiency, comfort, health, and safety, and practical tips on installation and repair of duct systems. These guides are intended for use by contractors, system designers, advanced technicians, and other HVAC professionals. The first two guides are also intended to be accessible to the general reader.

ANDREWS,J.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

WAVE PROPAGATION in the HOT DUCT of VHTR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In VHTR, helium from the reactor vessel is conveyed to a power conversion unit through a hot duct. In a hypothesized Depressurized Conduction Cooldown event where a rupture of the hot duct occurs, pressure waves will be initiated and reverberate in the hot duct. A numerical model is developed to quantify the transients and the helium mass flux through the rupture for such events. The flow path of the helium forms a closed loop but only the hot duct is modeled in this study. The lower plum of the reactor vessel and the steam generator are treated as specified pressure and/or temperature boundary to the hot duct. The model is based on the conservation principles of mass, momentum and energy, and on the equations of state for helium. The numerical solution is based on the method of characteristics with specified time intervals with a predictor and corrector algorithm. The rupture sub-model gives reasonable results. Transients induced by ruptures with break area equaling 20%, 10%, and 5% of the duct cross-sectional area are described.

Richard Schultz; Jim C. P. Liou

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Measure Guideline: Buried and/or Encapsulated Ducts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Buried and/or encapsulated ducts (BEDs) are a class of advanced, energy-efficiency strategies intended to address the significant ductwork thermal losses associated with ducts installed in unconditioned attics. BEDs are ducts installed in unconditioned attics that are covered in loose-fill insulation and/or encapsulated in closed cell polyurethane spray foam insulation. This Measure Guideline covers the technical aspects of BEDs as well as the advantages, disadvantages, and risks of BEDs compared to other alternative strategies. This guideline also provides detailed guidance on installation of BEDs strategies in new and existing homes through step-by-step installation procedures. This Building America Measure Guideline synthesizes previously published research on BEDs and provides practical information to builders, contractors, homeowners, policy analysts, building professions, and building scientists. Some of the procedures presented here, however, require specialized equipment or expertise. In addition, some alterations to duct systems may require a specialized license. Persons implementing duct system improvements should not go beyond their expertise or qualifications. This guideline provides valuable information for a building industry that has struggled to address ductwork thermal losses in new and existing homes. As building codes strengthen requirements for duct air sealing and insulation, flexibility is needed to address energy efficiency goals. While ductwork in conditioned spaces has been promoted as the panacea for addressing ductwork thermal losses, BEDs installations approach - and sometimes exceed - the performance of ductwork in conditioned spaces.

Shapiro, C.; Zoeller, W.; Mantha, P.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Integrating ducts into the conditioned space: Successes and challenges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In residential and light commercial construction in the United States, heating and cooling ducts are often located outside the thermal or pressure boundary of the conditioned space. This location is selected for aesthetic and space requirement reasons. Typical duct locations include attics, above dropped ceilings, crawlspaces, and attached garages. A wide body of literature has found that distribution system conduction and air leakage can cause 30-40% energy losses before cooling and heating air reaches the conditioned space. Recent innovative attempts at locating ducts in the conditioned space have had mixed results in terms of improving duct efficiency. Some of these strategies include cathedralizing attics (sealing and insulating at the attic roofline) and locating ducts in interstitial spaces. This paper reviews modeling studies that suggest substantial savings could be realized from these strategies and presents field measurements which reveal that construction planning and execution errors can prevent these strategies from being widely applied or from being effective when they are applied. These types of problems will need to be overcome for effective integration of ducts into the conditioned space.

Siegel, Jeffrey; Walker, Iain

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low N0x Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler emissions that comprise acid rain precursors, especially NOX. The project involved operating gas reburning technology combined with low NO, burner technology (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired utility boiler. Low NOX burners are designed to create less NOX than conventional burners. However, the NO, control achieved is in the range of 30-60-40, and typically 50%. At the higher NO, reduction levels, CO emissions tend to be higher than acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce the level of NO. in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. When combined, GR and LNBs work in harmony to both minimize NOX emissions and maintain an acceptable level of CO emissions. The demonstration was performed at Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit 3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW. wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado bituminous, low-sulfur coal and had a pre GR-LNB baseline NOX emission of 0.73 lb/1 Oe Btu. The target for the project was a reduction of 70 percent in NOX emissions. Project sponsors included the U.S. Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER). EER conducted a comprehensive test demonstration program over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved. Intensive measurements were taken to quantify the reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability, and all factors influencing costs. The results showed that GR-LNB technology achieved excellent emission reductions. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was somewhat less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was achieved at an average gas heat input of 180A. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at higher gas heat inputs. The impact on boiler equipment was determined to be very minimal. Toward the end of the testing, the flue gas recirculation (used to enhance gas penetration into the furnace) system was removed and new high pressure gas injectors were installed. Further, the low NOX burners were modified and gave better NO. reduction performance. These modifications resulted in a similar NO, reduction performance (64%) at a reduced level of gas heat input (-13Yo). In addition, the OFA injectors were re-designed to provide for better control of CO emissions. Although not a part of this project, the use of natural gas as the primary fuel with gas reburning was also tested. The gas/gas reburning tests demonstrated a reduction in NOX emissions of 43% (0.30 lb/1 OG Btu reduced to 0.17 lb/1 OG Btu) using 7% gas heat input. Economics are a key issue affecting technology development. Application of GR-LNB requires modifications to existing power plant equipment and as a result, the capital and operating costs depend largely on site-specific factors such as: gas availability at the site, gas to coal delivered price differential, sulfur dioxide removal requirements, windbox pressure, existing burner throat diameters, and reburn zone residence time available. Based on the results of this CCT project, EER expects that most GR-LNB installations will achieve at least 60% NOX control when firing 10-15% gas. The capital cost estimate for installing a GR-LNB system on a 300 MW, unit is approximately $25/kW. plus the cost of a gas pipeline (if required). Operating costs are almost entirely related to the differential cost of the natural gas compared to coal.

None

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Low Emissions Burner Technology for Metal Processing Industry using Byproducts and Biomass Derived Liquid Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research and development efforts produced low-emission burner technology capable of operating on natural gas as well as crude glycerin and/or fatty acids generated in biodiesel plants. The research was conducted in three stages (1) Concept definition leading to the design and development of a small laboratory scale burner, (2) Scale-up to prototype burner design and development, and (3) Technology demonstration with field vefiication. The burner design relies upon the Flow Blurring (FB) fuel injection based on aerodynamically creating two-phase flow near the injector exit. The fuel tube and discharge orifice both of inside diameter D are separated by gap H. For H < 0.25D, the atomizing air bubbles into liquid fuel to create a two-phase flow near the tip of the fuel tube. Pressurized two-phase fuel-air mixture exits through the discharge orifice, which results in expansion and breakup of air bubbles yielding a spray with fine droplets. First, low-emission combustion of diesel, biodiesel and straight VO (soybean oil) was achieved by utilizing FB injector to yield fine sprays for these fuels with significantly different physical properties. Visual images for these baseline experiments conducted with heat release rate (HRR) of about 8 kW illustrate clean blue flames indicating premixed combustion for all three fuels. Radial profiles of the product gas temperature at the combustor exit overlap each other signifying that the combustion efficiency is independent of the fuel. At the combustor exit, the NOx emissions are within the measurement uncertainties, while CO emissions are slightly higher for straight VO as compared to diesel and biodiesel. Considering the large variations in physical and chemical properties of fuels considered, the small differences observed in CO and NOx emissions show promise for fuel-flexible, clean combustion systems. FB injector has proven to be very effective in atomizing fuels with very different physical properties, and it offers a path forward to utilize both fossil and alternative liquid fuels in the same combustion system. In particular, experiments show that straight VO can be cleanly combusted without the need for chemical processing or preheating steps, which can result in significant economic and environmental benefits. Next, low-emission combustion of glycerol/methane was achieved by utilizing FB injector to yield fine droplets of highly viscous glycerol. Heat released from methane combustion further improves glycerol pre-vaporization and thus its clean combustion. Methane addition results in an intensified reaction zone with locally high temperatures near the injector exit. Reduction in methane flow rate elongates the reaction zone, which leads to higher CO emissions and lower NOx emissions. Similarly, higher air to liquid (ALR) mass ratio improves atomization and fuel pre-vaporization and shifts the flame closer to the injector exit. In spite of these internal variations, all fuel mixes of glycerol with methane produced similar CO and NOx emissions at the combustor exit. Results show that FB concept provides low emissions with the flexibility to utilize gaseous and highly viscous liquid fuels, straight VO and glycerol, without preheating or preprocessing the fuels. Following these initial experiments in quartz combustor, we demonstrated that glycerol combustion can be stably sustained in a metal combustor. Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) measurements in glycerol/methane flames resulted in flow-weighted Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) of 35 to 40 ?m, depending upon the methane percentage. This study verified that lab-scale dual-fuel burner using FB injector can successfully atomize and combust glycerol and presumably other highly viscous liquid fuels at relatively low HRR (<10 kW). For industrial applications, a scaled-up glycerol burner design thus seemed feasible.

Agrawal, Ajay; Taylor, Robert

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

171

Evaluation of gas-reburning and low NO sub x burners on a wall fired boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This clean coal technology project will demonstrate a combination of two developed technologies to reduce both NO{sub x} and (to some extent) SO{sub x} emissions: Gas reburning and low NO{sub x} burners. The demonstrations will be conducted on a pre-NSPS utility boiler representative of US boilers that contribute significantly to the inventory of acid rain precursor emissions: a wall fired unit. Low NO{sub x} burners operate on the principle of delayed mixing between the coal fuel and burner air, so that less NO{sub x} is burned. Gas reburning is a combustion modification technique that consists of firing 80--85 percent of the fuel corresponding to the total heat release in the lower furnace. Reduction of NO{sub x} to molecular nitrogen (N{sub 2}) is accomplished via the downstream injection of the remaining fuel requirement in the form of natural gas (which also reduces the total SO{sub x} emissions). In a third stage, burnout air is injected at lower temperatures in the upper furnace to complete the combustion process without generating significant additional NO{sub x}. The specific goal of this project is to demonstrate NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emission reductions of 75 percent or more as a result of combining LNB and GR to a utility boiler having the design characteristics mentioned above. A Host Site Agreement has been signed by EER and a utility company in the State of Colorado: Public Service Company of Colorado (Cherokee Unit No. 3, 172 MW{sub e}) front wall fired boiler near Denver.

Not Available

1991-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

172

Development and validation of a combustion model for a fuel cell off-gas burner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development and Validation of a Combustion Model for a Fuel Cell Off-Gas Burner W. Tristan Collins A low-emissions power generator comprising a solid oxide fuel cell coupled to a gas turbine has been developed by Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems. As part... of chemical energy in the fuel to electricity. A prototype commer- cial system developed by Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems Limited (RRFCS), consisting of a combined solid oxide fuel cell and gas turbine (SOFC hybrid) cycle, has the goal of high cycle ef#2...

Collins, William Tristan

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

173

Hot repair of ceramic burner on hot blast stoves at USS/Kobe`s {number_sign}3 blast furnace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the 1992 reline of the No. 3 blast furnace, three new stoves were constructed. The design of the stoves, equipped with internal ceramic burners, was for providing a hot blast temperature of 2,000 F at a wind rate of 140,000 SCFM. After 3 years the performance had deteriorated so the burners were cleaned. When a second cleaning did not improve the performance of No. 3 blast furnace, it was decided to repair the refractory while still hot. The paper describes the hot repair procedures, taking a stove off for repairs, maintenance heat up during repairs, two stove operation, stove commissioning, repair of a ceramic burner, and wet gas prevention.

Bernarding, T.F.; Chemorov, M.; Shimono, S.; Phillips, G.R.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

Combustion characteristics and NOx emissions of two kinds of swirl burners in a 300-MWe wall-fired pulverized-coal utility boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements were performed in a 300-MWe wall-fired pulverized-coal utility boiler. Enhanced ignition-dual register (EI-DR) burners and centrally fuel rich (CFR) swirl coal combustion burners were installed in the bottom row of the furnace during experiments. Local mean concentrations of O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2} and NOx gas species, gas temperatures, and char burnout were determined in the region of the two types of burners. For centrally fuel rich swirl coal combustion burners, local mean CO concentrations, gas temperatures and the temperature gradient are higher and mean concentrations of O{sub 2} and NOx along the jet flow direction in the burner region are lower than for the enhanced ignition-dual register burners. Moreover, the mean O{sub 2} concentration is higher and the gas temperature and mean CO concentration are lower in the side wall region. For centrally fuel rich swirl coal combustion burners in the bottom row, the combustion efficiency of the boiler increases from 96.73% to 97.09%, and NOx emission decreases from 411.5 to 355 ppm at 6% O{sub 2} compared to enhanced ignition-dual register burners and the boiler operates stably at 110 MWe without auxiliary fuel oil.

Li, Z.Q.; Jing, J.P.; Chen, Z.C.; Ren, F.; Xu, B.; Wei, H.D.; Ge, Z.H. [Harbin Institute for Technology, Harbin (China). School for Energy Science & Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly technical progress report, September 1--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation is to characterize the operation of fan powered infrared(PIR) burner at various barometric pressures (operating altitude) and gas compositions and develop design guidelines for appliances containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance. In this program, the theoretical basis for the behavior of PIR burners will be established through analysis of the combustion, heat and mass transfer, and other related processes which determine the performance of PIR burners. Based on the results of this study, a first order model of the performance of the burner, including radiant output will be developed. The model will be applied to predict the performance of the selected burner and modified through comparison with test results. Concurrently, an experimental setup will be devised and built. This experimental rig will be a modified appliance, capable of measuring the heat and combustion product output, as well as providing a means by which the radiant heat output can be measured. The burner will be selected from an existing commercial appliance, a commercial deep fat fryer, and will be of a scale that will be compatible with the laboratory facilities in the Combustion Laboratory at Clark Atlanta University. Theoretical analysis and formulation of the PIR burner performance model has been started and the development of the test facilities and experimental setup has also been initiated. These are described.

Bai, T.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Full-scale demonstration Low-NO{sub x} Cell{trademark} Burner retrofit. Quarterly report No. 6, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Low-NO{sub x} Cell{trademark} Burner operates on the principle of staged combustion. The lower burner of each two-nozzle cell is modified to accommodate all the fuel input previously handled by two nozzles. Secondary air, less than theoretically required for complete combustion, is introduced to the lower burner. The remainder of secondary air is directed to the upper ``port`` of each cell to complete the combustion process. B&W/EPRI have thoroughly tested the LNCB{trademark} at two pilot scales (6 million Btu per hour and 100 million Btu per hour), and tested a single full-scale burner in a utility boiler. Combustion tests at two scales have confirmed NO{sub x} reduction with the low-NO{sub x} cell on the order of 50% relative to the standard cell burner at optimum operating conditions. The technology is now ready for full unit, full-scale demonstration.

Not Available

1992-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

177

Measure Guideline: Optimizing the Configuration of Flexible Duct Junction Boxes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This measure guideline offers additional recommendations to heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system designers for optimizing flexible duct, constant-volume HVAC systems using junction boxes within Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) Manual D guidance (Rutkowski, H. Manual D -- Residential Duct Systems, 3rd edition, Version 1.00. Arlington, VA: Air Conditioning Contractors of America, 2009.). IBACOS used computational fluid dynamics software to explore and develop guidance to better control the airflow effects of factors that may impact pressure losses within junction boxes among various design configurations (Beach, R., Prahl, D., and Lange, R. CFD Analysis of Flexible Duct Junction Box Design. Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, submitted for publication 2013). These recommendations can help to ensure that a system aligns more closely with the design and the occupants' comfort expectations. Specifically, the recommendations described herein show how to configure a rectangular box with four outlets, a triangular box with three outlets, metal wyes with two outlets, and multiple configurations for more than four outlets. Designers of HVAC systems, contractors who are fabricating junction boxes on site, and anyone using the ACCA Manual D process for sizing duct runs will find this measure guideline invaluable for more accurately minimizing pressure losses when using junction boxes with flexible ducts.

Beach, R.; Burdick, A.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Modeling Population Exposures to Pollutants Emitted from Natural Gas Cooking Burners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We developed a physics-based data-supported model to investigate indoor pollutant exposure distributions resulting from use of natural gas cooking appliances across households in California. The model was applied to calculate time-resolved indoor concentrations of CO, NO2 and formaldehyde resulting from cooking burners and entry with outdoor air. Exposure metrics include 1-week average concentrations and frequency of exceeding ambient air quality standards. We present model results for Southern California (SoCal) using two air-exchange scenarios in winter: (1) infiltration-only, and (2) air exchange rate (AER) sampled from lognormal distributions derived from measurements. In roughly 40percent of homes in the SoCal cohort (N=6634) the 1-hour USEPA NO2 standard (190 ?g/m3) was exceeded at least once. The frequency of exceeding this standard was largely independent of AER assumption, and related primarily to building volume, emission rate and amount of burner use. As expected, AER had a more substantial impact on one-week average concentrations.

Lobscheid, Agnes; Singer, Brett C.; Klepeis, Neil E.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Swozzle based burner tube premixer including inlet air conditioner for low emissions combustion  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A burner for use in a combustion system of a heavy-duty industrial gas turbine includes a fuel/air premixer having an air inlet, a fuel inlet, and an annular mixing passage. The fuel/air premixer mixes fuel and air into a uniform mixture for injection into a combustor reaction zone. The burner also includes an inlet flow conditioner disposed at the air inlet of the fuel/air premixer for controlling a radial and circumferential distribution of incoming air. The pattern of perforations in the inlet flow conditioner is designed such that a uniform air flow distribution is produced at the swirler inlet annulus in both the radial and circumference directions. The premixer includes a swozzle assembly having a series of preferably air foil shaped turning vanes that impart swirl to the airflow entering via the inlet flow conditioner. Each air foil contains internal fuel flow passages that introduce natural gas fuel into the air stream via fuel metering holes that pass through the walls of the air foil shaped turning vanes. By injecting fuel in this manner, an aerodynamically clean flow field is maintained throughout the premixer. By injecting fuel via two separate passages, the fuel/air mixture strength distribution can be controlled in the radial direction to obtain optimum radial concentration profiles for control of emissions, lean blow outs, and combustion driven dynamic pressure activity as machine and combustor load are varied.

Tuthill, Richard Sterling (Bolton, CT); Bechtel, II, William Theodore (Scotia, NY); Benoit, Jeffrey Arthur (Scotia, NY); Black, Stephen Hugh (Duanesburg, NY); Bland, Robert James (Clifton Park, NY); DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne (Scotia, NY); Meyer, Stefan Martin (Troy, NY); Taura, Joseph Charles (Clifton Park, NY); Battaglioli, John Luigi (Glenville, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Multi-ported, internally recuperated burners for direct flame impingement heating applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A direct flame impingement method and apparatus employing at least one multi-ported, internally recuperated burner. The burner includes an innermost coaxial conduit having a first fluid inlet end and a first fluid outlet end, an outermost coaxial conduit disposed around the innermost coaxial conduit and having a combustion products outlet end proximate the first fluid inlet end of the innermost coaxial conduit and a combustion products inlet end proximate the first fluid outlet end of the innermost coaxial conduit, and a coaxial intermediate conduit disposed between the innermost coaxial conduit and the outermost coaxial conduit, whereby a second fluid annular region is formed between the innermost coaxial conduit and the intermediate coaxial conduit and a combustion products annular region is formed between the intermediate coaxial conduit and the outermost coaxial conduit. The intermediate coaxial conduit has a second fluid inlet end proximate the first fluid inlet end of the innermost coaxial conduit and a second fluid outlet end proximate the combustion products inlet end of the outermost coaxial conduit.

Abbasi, Hamid A. (Naperville, IL); Kurek, Harry (Dyer, IN); Chudnovsky, Yaroslav (Skokie, IL); Lisienko, Vladimir G. (Ekaterinburg, RU); Malikov, German K. (Ekaterinburg, RU)

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "db duct burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The impact of conversion to low-NO{sub x} burners on ash characteristics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A research initiative focusing on the changes in coal-combustion byproducts that result from the conversion of coal-fired boilers to low-NO{sub x} burners has been implemented at the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER). This paper presents selected results from the first such study, the conversion of East Kentucky Power`s 116 MW, wall-fired unit {number_sign}1 at the John Sherman Cooper Station in Pulaski County, Kentucky. Samples of the coal feedstock and fly ash recovered in several downstream collection vessels were collected prior to and following conversion and extensively analyzed. The results presented in this report include total carbon, petrography, mineralogy, particle size, and leaching characteristics. The major changes noted in the fly-ash properties include an increase in carbon content, a slight increase in particle size, and a decrease in glassy components in the ash following conversion. Those changes induced by the conversion to low-NO{sub x} burners are evaluated in terms of the potential impact on the marketability of the fly ash.

Robi, T.L.; Hower, J.C.; Graham, U.M.; Groppo, J.G.; Rathbone, R.F.; Taulbee, D.N. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Medina, S.S. [East Kentucky Power Cooperative, Winchester, KY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

Investigation on Flame Characteristics and Burner Operability Issues of Oxy-Fuel Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxy-fuel combustion has been used previously in a wide range of industrial applications. Oxy- combustion is carried out by burning a hydrocarbon fuel with oxygen instead of air. Flames burning in this configuration achieve higher flame temperatures which present opportunities for significant efficiency improvements and direct capture of CO{sub 2} from the exhaust stream. In an effort to better understand and characterize the fundamental flame characteristics of oxy-fuel combustion this research presents the experimental measurements of flame stability of various oxyfuel flames. Effects of H{sub 2} concentration, fuel composition, exhaust gas recirculation ratio, firing inputs, and burner diameters on the flame stability of these fuels are discussed. Effects of exhaust gas recirculation i.e. CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O (steam) acting as diluents on burner operability are also presented. The roles of firing input on flame stability are then analyzed. For this study it was observed that many oxy-flames did not stabilize without exhaust gas recirculation due to their higher burning velocities. In addition, the stability regime of all compositions was observed to decrease as the burner diameter increased. A flashback model is also presented, using the critical velocity gradient g{sub F}) values for CH{sub 4}-O{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} flames. The scaling relation (𝐠{sub F} = 𝐜 𝐒{sub 𝐋}{sup 2}/𝛂) for different burner diameters was obtained for various diameter burners. The report shows that results correlated linearly with a scaling value of c =0.0174. The second part of the study focuses on the experimental measurements of the flow field characteristics of premixed CH{sub 4}/21%O{sub 2}/79%N{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}/38%O{sub 2}/72%CO{sub 2} mixtures at constant firing input of 7.5 kW, constant, equivalence ratio of 0.8, constant swirl number of 0.92 and constant Reynolds Numbers. These measurements were taken in a swirl stabilized combustor at atmospheric pressure. The flow field visualization using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) technique is implemented to make a better understanding of the turbulence characteristics of CH{sub 4}/air and CH{sub 4}/38%O{sub 2}/72%CO{sub 2} combustion. The velocity fluctuations, turbulence intensities and local propagation velocities along the combustion chamber have been determined. The turbulent intensities increase as we move away from the combustor axis. CH{sub 4}-38%O{sub 2}-72%CO{sub 2} flames have low radial velocity and turbulent intensity distributions at different axial distances when compared with CH{sub 4}-Air flames.

Choudhuri, Ahsan

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

183

CASE STUDY OF DUCT RETROFIT OF A 1985 HOME AND GUIDELINES FOR ATTIC AND CRAWL SPACE DUCT SEALING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is fully committed to research for developing the information and capabilities necessary to provide cost-effective residential retrofits yielding 50% energy savings within the next several years. Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) is the biggest energy end use in the residential sector, and a significant amount of energy can be wasted through leaky ductwork in unconditioned spaces such as attics and crawl spaces. A detailed duct sealing case study is presented for one house along with nine brief descriptions of other duct retrofits completed in the mixed-humid climate. Costs and estimated energy savings are reported for most of the ten houses. Costs for the retrofits ranged from $0.92/ft2 to $1.80/ft2 of living space and estimated yearly energy cost savings due to the duct retrofits range from 1.8% to 18.5%. Lessons learned and duct sealing guidelines based on these ten houses, as well as close work with the HVAC industry in the mixed-humid climate of East Tennessee, northern Georgia, and south-central Kentucky are presented. It is hoped that the lessons learned and guidelines will influence local HVAC contractors, energy auditors, and homeowners when diagnosing or repairing HVAC duct leakage and will be useful for steering DOE s future research in this area.

Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Bundle duct interaction studies for fuel assemblies. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is known that the wire-wrapped rods and duct in an LMFBR are undergoing a gradual structural distortion from the initially uniform geometry under the combined effects of thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling and creep. These deformations have a significant effect on flow characteristics, thus causing changes in thermal behavior such as cladding temperature and temperature distribution within a bundle. The temperature distribution may further enhance or retard irradiation induced deformation of the bundle. This report summarizes the results of the continuing effort in investigating the bundle-duct interaction, focusing on the need for the large development plant.

Hsia, H.T.S.; Kaplan, S.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Advanced Strategy Guideline: Air Distribution Basics and Duct Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses considerations for designing an air distribution system for an energy efficient house that requires less air volume to condition the space. Considering the HVAC system early in the design process will allow adequate space for equipment and ductwork and can result in cost savings. Principles discussed that will maximize occupant comfort include delivery of the proper amount of conditioned air for appropriate temperature mixing and uniformity without drafts, minimization of system noise, the impacts of pressure loss, efficient return air duct design, and supply air outlet placement, as well as duct layout, materials, and sizing.

Burdick, A.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Variable Speed Drive (VSD) Applications in Dual-Duct Constant Volume Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Models have been developed for static pressure and potential supply fan energy savings by using variable speed drive (VSD) in dual-duct constant volume systems. Experiments have been performed using a full size dual-duct constant volume system...

Joo, I.; Liu, M.; Conger, K.; Wang, G.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Sensitivity of Forced Air Distribution System Efficiency to Climate, Duct Location, Air Leakage and Insulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 94720 This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy......................................................... 5 Figure 4. New plastic flexible ducts in an attic.......................................................................... 6 Figure 5. Combination of plastic insulated flexible duct and added open face glass fiber

188

First archeointensity determinations on Maya incense burners from Palenque temples, Mexico: New data to constrain the Mesoamerica secular  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First archeointensity determinations on Maya incense burners from Palenque temples, Mexico: New´sica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Me´xico D.F., Mexico c Instituto Nacional de Antropologia e Historia, Me´xico D.F., Mexico d Institut Charles Gerhardt, Laboratoire des Agre´gats, Interfaces et Mate

Demouchy, Sylvie

189

Simulation of Nitrogen Emissions in a Low Swirl Burner J. B. Bell, M. S. Day, X. Gao, M. J. Lijewski  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulation of Nitrogen Emissions in a Low Swirl Burner J. B. Bell, M. S. Day, X. Gao, M. J nitrogen emissions. The simulation shows how the cellular burn- ing structures characteristic of lean premixed hydrogen combustion lead to enhancements in the NOx emissions from these flames. Analysis

Bell, John B.

190

Measure Guideline: Summary of Interior Ducts in New Construction, Including an Efficient, Affordable Method to Install Fur-Down Interior Ducts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document illustrates guidelines for the efficient installation of interior duct systems in new housing, including the fur-up chase method, the fur-down chase method, and interior ducts positioned in sealed attics or sealed crawl spaces. This document illustrates guidelines for the efficient installation of interior duct systems in new housing. Interior ducts result from bringing the duct work inside a home's thermal and air barrier. Architects, designers, builders, and new home buyers should thoroughly investigate any opportunity for energy savings that is as easy to implement during construction, such as the opportunity to construct interior duct work. In addition to enhanced energy efficiency, interior ductwork results in other important advantages, such as improved indoor air quality, increased system durability and increased homeowner comfort. While the advantages of well-designed and constructed interior duct systems are recognized, the implementation of this approach has not gained a significant market acceptance. This guideline describes a variety of methods to create interior ducts including the fur-up chase method, the fur-down chase method, and interior ducts positioned in sealed attics or sealed crawl spaces. As communication of the intent of an interior duct system, and collaboration on its construction are paramount to success, this guideline details the critical design, planning, construction, inspection, and verification steps that must be taken. Involved in this process are individuals from the design team; sales/marketing team; and mechanical, insulation, plumbing, electrical, framing, drywall and solar contractors.

Beal, D.; McIlvaine , J.; Fonorow, K.; Martin, E.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Static Pressure Losses in 6, 8, and 10-inch Non-Metallic Flexible Ducts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study measured airflow static pressure losses through non-metallic flexible ducts in compliance with ASHRAE Standard 120-1999, Methods of Testing to Determine Flow Resistance of HVAC Air Ducts and Fittings (ASHRAE 1999). Duct sizes of 6, 8...

Weaver, K.; Culp, C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Improving Control of a Dual-Duct Single-Fan Variable Air Volume Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cold and hot air duct static pressure set points is presented. The paper also explores the interactions between the cold and hot deck temperatures and duct static pressures, and discusses the impact of non-ideal deck temperature settings on duct static...

Wei, G.; Martinez, J.; Minihan, T.; Brundidge, T.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Theoretical Estimates of HVAC Duct Channel Capacity for High-Speed Internet Access  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theoretical Estimates of HVAC Duct Channel Capacity for High-Speed Internet Access Ariton E. Xhafa-conditioning (HVAC) ducts based on multi-carrier transmission that uses M-QAM mod- ulation and measured channel- flections in HVAC ducts). Our work also shows that data rates in excess of 300 Mbps are possible over

Stancil, Daniel D.

194

RF propagation in an HVAC duct system: impulse response characteristics of the channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RF propagation in an HVAC duct system: impulse response characteristics of the channel Pavel V, the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) duct system in buildings is a complex network of hollow at RF and microwave frequencies of com- mon interest. HVAC ducts can be used as a wireless communication

Stancil, Daniel D.

195

Cooling air recycling for gas turbine transition duct end frame and related method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of cooling a transition duct end frame in a gas turbine includes the steps of a) directing cooling air into the end frame from a region external of the transition duct and the impingement cooling sleeve; and b) redirecting the cooling air from the end frame into the annulus between the transition duct and the impingement cooling sleeve.

Cromer, Robert Harold (Johnstown, NY); Bechtel, William Theodore (Scotia, NY); Sutcu, Maz (Niskayuna, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

LBNL-41434. CAN DUCT-TAPE TAKE THE HEAT?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-41434. 1 CAN DUCT-TAPE TAKE THE HEAT? Max Sherman Iain Walker Energy Performance of Buildings sponsor. #12;LBNL-41434. 2 As anyone who has crawled around attics looking at ductwork knows, the sight ratings for sealant longevity existed. To examine this question, LBNL has used laboratory methods

197

Duct Thermal Performance Models for Large Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Technologies Division Indoor Environment Department Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of the U.S. Department) for his assistance in defining the duct surface heat transfer models described in the body of this report

198

CALIFORNIA ENERGY Residential Duct Placement Field Test and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency is improved through the integrated design, construction, and operation of building systems of Small Commercial HVAC Systems Integrated Design of Commercial Building Ceiling Systems Integrated Design of the Integrated Design of Residential Ducting & Air Flow Systems research project. The reports are a result

199

Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly report, April 1, 1996 - June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A porous radiant burner testing facility consisting of a commercial deep-fat fryer, an FTIR based spectral radiance measurement system, a set of flue gas analysis components, and a fuel gas mixing station was constructed. The measurement capabilities of the system were tested using methane and the test results were found to be consistent with the literature. Following the validation of the measurement system, various gas mixtures were tested to study the effect of gas compositions have on burner performance. Results indicated that the emissions vary with fuel gas composition and air/fuel ratio. The maximum radiant efficiency of the burner was obtained close to air/fuel ratio of 1.

Bai, T.; Yeboah, Y.D.; Sampath, R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Mechanical swirler for a low-NO{sub x}, weak-swirl burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a mechanical swirler for generating diverging flow in lean premixed fuel burners. The swirler of the present invention includes a central passage with an entrance for accepting a feed gas, a flow balancing insert that introduces additional pressure drop beyond that occurring in the central passage in the absence of the flow balancing insert, and an exit aligned to direct the feed gas into a combustor. The swirler also has an annular passage about the central passage and including one or more vanes oriented to impart angular momentum to feed gas exiting the annular passage. The diverging flow generated by the swirler stabilizes lean combustion thus allowing for lower production of pollutants, particularly oxides of nitrogen. 16 figs.

Cheng, R.K.; Yegian, D.T.

1999-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "db duct burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Assessment of Startup Fuel Options for the GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Global Nuclear Energy Program (GNEP) includes a program element for the development and construction of an advanced sodium cooled fast reactor to demonstrate the burning (transmutation) of significant quantities of minor actinides obtained from a separations process and fabricated into a transuranic bearing fuel assembly. To demonstrate and qualify transuranic (TRU) fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype is needed. The ABR would necessarily be started up using conventional metal alloy or oxide (U or U, Pu) fuel. Startup fuel is needed for the ABR for the first 2 to 4 core loads of fuel in the ABR. Following start up, a series of advanced TRU bearing fuel assemblies will be irradiated in qualification lead test assemblies in the ABR. There are multiple options for this startup fuel. This report provides a description of the possible startup fuel options as well as possible fabrication alternatives available to the program in the current domestic and international facilities and infrastructure.

Jon Carmack (062056); Kemal O. Pasamehmetoglu (103171); David Alberstein

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis of combustion flames in four-burner impinging entrained-flow gasifier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On a laboratory-scale testing platform of impinging entrained-flow gasifier with four opposed burners, the flame images for diesel combustion and gasification process were measured with a single charge coupled device (CCD) camera. The two-dimensional multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis was employed to investigate the multifractal nature of the flame images. Sound power-law scaling in the annealed average of detrended fluctuations was unveiled when the order $q>0$ and the multifractal feature of flame images were confirmed. Further analyses identified two multifractal parameters, the minimum and maximum singularity $\\alpha_{\\min}$ and $\\alpha_{\\max}$, serving as characteristic parameters of the multifractal flames. These two characteristic multifractal parameters vary with respect to different experimental conditions.

Niu, Miao-Ren; Yan, Zhuo-Yong; Guo, Qing-Hua; Liang, Qin-Feng; Wang, Fu-Chen; Yu, Zun-Hong

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Experiments measuring particle deposition from fully developed turbulent flow in ventilation ducts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Particle deposition in ventilation ducts influences particle exposures of building occupants and may lead to a variety of indoor air quality concerns. Experiments have been performed in a laboratory to study the effects of particle size and air speed on deposition rates of particles from turbulent air flows in galvanized steel and internally insulated ducts with hydraulic diameters of 15.2 cm. The duct systems were constructed of materials typically found in commercial heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. In the steel duct system, experiments with nominal particle sizes of 1, 3, 5, 9 and 16 {micro}m were conducted at each of three nominal air speeds: 2.2, 5.3 and 9.0 m/s. In the insulated duct system, deposition rates of particles with nominal sizes of 1, 3, 5, 8 and 13 {micro}m were measured at nominal air speeds of 2.2, 5.3 and 8.8 m/s. Fluorescent techniques were used to directly measure the deposition velocities of monodisperse fluorescent particles to duct surfaces (floor, wall and ceiling) at two straight duct sections where the turbulent flow profile was fully developed. In steel ducts, deposition rates were higher to the duct floor than to the wall, which were, in turn, greater than to the ceiling. In insulated ducts, deposition was nearly the same to the duct floor, wall and ceiling for a given particle size and air speed. Deposition to duct walls and ceilings was greatly enhanced in insulated ducts compared to steel ducts. Deposition velocities to each of the three duct surface orientations in both systems were found to increase with increasing particle size or air velocity over the ranges studied. Deposition rates measured in the current experiments were in general agreement with the limited observations of similar systems by previous researchers.

Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

A Blueprint for GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor Startup Fuel Fabrication Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this article is to identify the requirements and issues associated with design of GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor Fuel Facility. The report was prepared in support of providing data for preparation of a NEPA Environmental Impact Statement in support the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). One of the GNEP objectives was to reduce the inventory of long lived actinide from the light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The LWR spent fuel contains Plutonium (Pu) -239 and other transuranics (TRU) such as Americium-241. One of the options is to transmute or burn these actinides in fast neutron spectra as well as generate the electricity. A sodium-cooled Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) concept was proposed to achieve this goal. However, fuel with relatively high TRU content has not been used in the fast reactor. To demonstrate the utilization of TRU fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype of ARR was proposed, which would necessarily be started up using weapons grade (WG) Pu fuel. The WG Pu is distinguished by relatively highest proportions of Pu-239 and lesser amount of other actinides. The WG Pu was assumed to be used as the startup fuel along with TRU fuel in lead test assemblies. Because such fuel is not currently being produced in the US, a new facility (or new capability in an existing facility) was being considered for fabrication of WG Pu fuel for the ABR. It was estimated that the facility will provide the startup fuel for 10-15 years and would take 3 to 5 years to construct.

S. Khericha

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Improving Building Envelope and Duct Airtightness of US Dwellings The  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diagnostics Database (ResDB) by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP efficiency programs contributed another 10,000 paired measurements. Eighteen states are represented. The levels of improvement varied slightly from state to state, and also between program types. Larger

206

LABORATORY EVALUATION OF THE DELTA Q TEST FOR DUCT LEAKAGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a residential-size duct system in a controlled laboratory setting, the repeatability and accuracy of the Delta Q test for air leakage in residential duct systems have been measured. More than 100 Delta Q tests were performed. These were compared with results using fan pressurization and also with results of a procedure (Delta Q Plus) that uses leakage hole-size information to select the leakage pressures to be used in the Delta Q algorithm. The average error in supply or return leakage for the fan-pressurization test was 6.4% of system fan flow. For the Delta Q test it was 3.4% of fan flow, while for Delta Q Plus it was 1.9% of fan flow.

ANDREWS,J.W.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Firing microfine coal with a low NOx, RSFC burner in an industrial boiler designed for oil and gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABB Power Plant Laboratories (ABB-PPL) working under a US Department of Energy-Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE-PETC) contract has carried out tests with the Radially Stratified Flame Core (RSFC) burner which was licensed from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who developed and patented the RSFC burner. Tests were carried out in a small industrial boiler, designed for oil and natural gas, located at the Energy and Fuels Research Center of Penn State University who was working as a subcontractor to ABB-PPL. The paper presents results from the long-term testing task in the DOE-PETC program with particular attention being paid to the challenges faced in maintaining high combustion efficiencies while achieving low NOx in a small industrial boiler designed for firing oil or natural gas. The paper will also address the issue of ash management when firing coal in a boiler designed for fuels having essentially no ash.

Thornhock, D.E.; Patel, R.; Borio, R.W. [Combustion Engineering, Inc., Windsor, CT (United States). ABB Power Plant Labs.; Miller, B.G.; Scaroni, A.W. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Energy and Fuels Research Center

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

Simplified configuration for the combustor of an oil burner using a low pressure, high flow air-atomizing nozzle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to clean burning of fuel oil with air. More specifically, to a fuel burning combustion head using a low-pressure, high air flow atomizing nozzle so that there will be a complete combustion of oil resulting in a minimum emission of pollutants. The improved fuel burner uses a low pressure air atomizing nozzle that does not result in the use of additional compressors or the introduction of pressurized gases downstream, nor does it require a complex design. Inventors:

Butcher, Thomas A. (Port Jefferson, NY); Celebi, Yusuf (Middle Island, NY); Fisher, Leonard (Colrain, MA)

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

DB-Netz AG Offices  

High Performance Buildings Database

Hamm, Germany The new office building for DB Netz AG was designed by the collaborative team of Architrav Architects and the Buildings Physics and Technical Building Services group of the University of Karlsruhe. The team developed an energy efficient building concept for the 64,304 sqft office building, located in Hamm, Germany. The design concept of the building is dominated by architectural solutions for ventilation, cooling and lighting. Use of HVAC and electric lighting is minimized as much as possible.

210

MINIMIZATION OF NO EMISSIONS FROM MULTI-BURNER COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reduction of NO{sub x} emission is an important environmental issue in pulverized coal combustion. Final emissions of NO{sub x} are strongly affected by the nitrogen release during devolatilization, which is the first stage of coal combustion. The most cost-effective approach to NO{sub x} reduction is air-staging which can also operate with additional down-stream techniques such as reburning [1]. Air staging promotes the conversion of NO{sub x} precursors (HCN, NH{sub 3}, etc.) to N{sub 2} by delaying the oxygen supply to the greatest extent when those nitrogen species are released during devolatilization. Such a delay gives the primary volatiles a chance to undergo secondary reactions, including tar cracking and soot formation. Secondary reactions of volatiles largely determine the fate of the ultimate NO{sub x} production from pyrolysis, therefore a detailed investigation into the transformation of nitrogen species during secondary reactions and effects of soot on nitrogen release is critical for design and implementation of new pollution control strategies. Current nitrogen models (including the CPD model at BYU) only simulate the nitrogen release during primary pyrolysis, which happens at low temperatures. This project helps to build a nitrogen release model that accounts for secondary reactions and the effects of soot at temperatures relevant to industrial burners.

E.G. Eddings; A. Molina; D.W. Pershing; A.F. Sarofim; K.A. Davis; M.P. Heap; T.H. Fletcher; H. Zhang

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

MINIMIZATION OF NO EMISSIONS FROM MULTI-BURNER COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reduction of NO{sub x} emission is an important environmental issue in pulverized coal combustion. The most cost-effective approach to NO{sub x} reduction is air-staging which can also operate with additional down-stream techniques such as reburning [1]. Air staging promotes the conversion of NO{sub x} precursors (HCN, NH{sub 3}, etc.) to N{sub 2} by delaying the oxygen supply to the greatest extent when those nitrogen species are released during devolatilization. Such a delay gives the primary volatiles a chance to undergo secondary reactions, including tar cracking and soot formation. Secondary reactions of volatiles largely determine the fate of the ultimate NO{sub x} production from pyrolysis, therefore a detailed investigation into the transformation of nitrogen species during secondary reactions and effects of soot on nitrogen release is critical for design and implementation of new pollution control strategies. Current nitrogen models (including the CPD model at BYU) only simulate the nitrogen release during primary pyrolysis, which happens at low temperatures. This project helps to build a nitrogen release model that accounts for secondary reactions and the effects of soot at temperatures relevant to industrial burners.

E.G. Eddings; A. Molina; D.W. Pershing; A.F. Sarofim; K.A. Davis; M.P. Heap; T.H. Fletcher; H. Zhang

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Oxy-Combustion Burner and Integrated Pollutant Removal Research and Development Test Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high flame temperature oxy-combustion test facility consisting of a 5 MWe equivalent test boiler facility and 20 KWe equivalent IPR® was constructed at the Hammond, Indiana manufacturing site. The test facility was operated natural gas and coal fuels and parametric studies were performed to determine the optimal performance conditions and generated the necessary technical data required to demonstrate the technologies are viable for technical and economic scale-up. Flame temperatures between 4930-6120F were achieved with high flame temperature oxy-natural gas combustion depending on whether additional recirculated flue gases are added to balance the heat transfer. For high flame temperature oxy-coal combustion, flame temperatures in excess of 4500F were achieved and demonstrated to be consistent with computational fluid dynamic modeling of the burner system. The project demonstrated feasibility and effectiveness of the Jupiter Oxygen high flame temperature oxy-combustion process with Integrated Pollutant Removal process for CCS and CCUS. With these technologies total parasitic power requirements for both oxygen production and carbon capture currently are in the range of 20% of the gross power output. The Jupiter Oxygen high flame temperature oxy-combustion process has been demonstrated at a Technology Readiness Level of 6 and is ready for commencement of a demonstration project.

Mark Schoenfield; Manny Menendez; Thomas Ochs; Rigel Woodside; Danylo Oryshchyn

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

213

Hemodynamic characterization of chronic bile duct-ligated rats: effect of pentobarbital sodium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Systemic and splanchnic hemodynamics of the chronic bile duct-ligated rat were characterized by radioactive microspheres. Conscious and pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized, bile duct-ligated and sham-operated rats had cardiac output and regional organ blood flows determined. The conscious bile duct-ligated rat compared with the sham-operated showed a hyperdynamic circulation with an increased cardiac output and portal tributary blood flow. Pentobarbital sodium anesthesia induced marked hemodynamic changes in both sham-operated and bile duct-ligated rats. The latter group was especially sensitive to its effects; thus, comparison of cardiac output and portal tributary blood flow between anesthetized bile duct-ligated and sham-operated rats showed no significant differences. The authors conclude that the rat with cirrhosis due to chronic bile duct ligation is an excellent model for hemodynamic investigations but should be studied in the conscious state, since pentobarbital sodium anesthesia eliminated the hyperdynamic circulation.

Lee, S.S.; Girod, C.; Braillon, A.; Hadengue, A.; Lebrec, D.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Q. For the 2005 Standards there is a new compliance credit for "ducts buried in attic insulation." What must be done to qualify for that credit?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Q. For the 2005 Standards there is a new compliance credit for "ducts buried in attic insulation installation of insulation and duct sealing. When taking the buried duct credit, a minimum of R-30 insulation-4.2 duct insulation. Only the portions of duct runs that are directly on or within 3.5 inches

215

Comparative Study: CFD ?P Versus Measured ?P for 30% Flexible Ducts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

very close comparison with measured results. Flexible ducts can be installed in a variety of configurations with different compression. A configuration was specified for this study which focused on 30% compressed 5 foot-long flexible duct and 2... foot-long circular ducts placed on both ends. A CFD model was built and simulations were run under different volumetric air flows. The static pressure drop for those conditions were analyzed and displayed. The final CFD model is tuned until...

Ugursal, A.; Culp, C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

E-Print Network 3.0 - amplatzer duct occluder Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University Collection: Engineering 33 VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS FOR TRAINING CRITICAL SKILLS IN LAPAROSCOPIC SURGERY Summary: duct...

217

E-Print Network 3.0 - assembly duct irradiated Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The "perfect... 71100-draft copy: do not quote 1 of 30 New Technologies for Residential HVAC Ducts Burke Treidler... February 1995 Executive Summary There are many problems with...

218

Economizer Applications in Dual-Duct Air-Handling Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.E.R.O. These homes were constructed by over a dozen different builders. In this paper data from 310 of these homes is presented. These homes have featured better envelopes and windows, interior and/or duct systems with adequate returns, fan integrated positive....1 Maximum HERS 90.3 89.9 Figure 5 HERS Scores for FL H.E.R.O. Homes SF MF Sample Size, n 164 146 Average ACH50 4.5 5.2 Median ACH50 4.4 5.3 Minimum ACH50 2.1 2.2 Maximum ACH50 8.6 8...

Joo, I.; Liu, M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Strati?ed shear ?ow: experiments in an inclined duct  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is a fundamental problem in fluid mechanics with important implications across a wide diversity of applications from mixing in the oceans and atmosphere down to scales † Email address for correspondence: colinrmeyer@gmail.com. 2 C. R. Meyer and P. F... force produces a constant acceleration on each layer (Thorpe 1968) implying that U ? 2gAt sin ?. Over the time it takes for fluid to transit the duct t ? L/U this acceleration would produce a layer kinetic energy (per unit mass) U2 ? gAL sin ?...

Meyer, Colin R.; Linden, P.F.

2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

220

Low NO{sub x}/SO{sub x} Burner retrofit for utility cyclone boilers. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cyclone furnaces operate with high excess air and at high temperature. The heat release during combustion is very high and as a result the boiler volume is much smaller than would be found in a conventional pc-fired system. The Marion Unit 1 boiler, at the level of the cyclone entry, has a small cross-section; about 5-feet in depth and about 20-feet in width. A boiler schematic showing the LNS Burner and relative location of the superheater region and overfire air ports is shown in Figure 1. The LNS Burner`s combustion process is fundamentally different from that of the cyclone, and the combustion products are also different. The LNS Burner products enter the boiler as hot, fuel-rich gases. Additional overfire air must be added to complete this combustion step with care taken to avoid the formation of thermal NO{sub x}. If done correctly, S0{sub 2} is controlled and significant NO{sub x} reductions are achieved. Because of the small boiler volume, flow modelling was found to be necessary to insure that adequate mixing of LNS Burner combustion products with air can be accomplished to achieve NO{sub x} emissions goals. Design requirements for the air injection system for the Marion boiler were developed using FLUENT, a commercially available computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. A series of runs were made to obtain a design for final air injection that met the process design goals as closely as possible.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "db duct burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

PRELIMINARY DATA CALL REPORT ADVANCED BURNER REACTOR START UP FUEL FABRICATION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide data for preparation of a NEPA Environmental Impact Statement in support the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). One of the GNEP objectives is to reduce the inventory of long lived actinide from the light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The LWR spent fuel contains Plutonium (Pu) -239 and other transuranics (TRU) such as Americium-241. One of the options is to transmute or burn these actinides in fast neutron spectra as well as generate the electricity. A sodium-cooled Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) concept has been proposed to achieve this goal. However, fuel with relatively high TRU content has not been used in the fast reactor. To demonstrate the utilization of TRU fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype of ARR is proposed, which would necessarily be started up using weapons grade (WG) Pu fuel. The WG Pu is distinguished by relatively highest proportions of Pu-239 and lesser amount of other actinides. The WG Pu will be used as the startup fuel along with TRU fuel in lead test assemblies. Because such fuel is not currently being produced in the US, a new facility (or new capability in an existing facility) is being considered for fabrication of WG Pu fuel for the ABR. This report is provided in response to ‘Data Call’ for the construction of startup fuel fabrication facility. It is anticipated that the facility will provide the startup fuel for 10-15 years and will take to 3 to 5 years to construct.

S. T. Khericha

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

D. E. Shropshire

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Numerical simulation of laminar flow in a curved duct  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes numerical simulations that were performed to study laminar flow through a square duct with a 900 bend. The purpose of this work was two fold. First, an improved understanding was desired of the flow physics involved in the generation of secondary vortical flows in three-dimensions. Second, adaptive gridding techniques for structured grids in three- dimensions were investigated for the purpose of determining their utility in low Reynolds number, incompressible flows. It was also of interest to validate the commercial computer code CFD-ACE. Velocity predictions for both non-adaptive and adaptive grids are compared with experimental data. Flow visualization was used to examine the characteristics of the flow though the curved duct in order to better understand the viscous flow physics of this problem. Generally, moderate agreement with the experimental data was found but shortcomings in the experiment were demonstrated. The adaptive grids did not produce the same level of accuracy as the non-adaptive grid with a factor of four more grid points.

Lopez, A.R.; Oberkampf, W.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Flexible Duct Junction Box Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IBACOS explored the relationships between pressure and physical configurations of flexible duct junction boxes by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to predict individual box parameters and total system pressure, thereby ensuring improved HVAC performance. Current Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) guidance (Group 11, Appendix 3, ACCA Manual D, Rutkowski 2009) allows for unconstrained variation in the number of takeoffs, box sizes, and takeoff locations. The only variables currently used in selecting an equivalent length (EL) are velocity of air in the duct and friction rate, given the first takeoff is located at least twice its diameter away from the inlet. This condition does not account for other factors impacting pressure loss across these types of fittings. For each simulation, the IBACOS team converted pressure loss within a box to an EL to compare variation in ACCA Manual D guidance to the simulated variation. IBACOS chose cases to represent flows reasonably correlating to flows typically encountered in the field and analyzed differences in total pressure due to increases in number and location of takeoffs, box dimensions, and velocity of air, and whether an entrance fitting is included. The team also calculated additional balancing losses for all cases due to discrepancies between intended outlet flows and natural flow splits created by the fitting. In certain asymmetrical cases, the balancing losses were significantly higher than symmetrical cases where the natural splits were close to the targets. Thus, IBACOS has shown additional design constraints that can ensure better system performance.

Beach, R.; Prahl, D.; Lange, R.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Static Pressure Loss in 12”, 14”, and 16” Non-metallic Flexible Duct  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study was conducted to determine the effects of compression on pressure drops in non-metallic flexible duct. Duct sizes of 12”, 14” and 16” diameters were tested at a five different compression ratios (maximum stretch, 4%, 15%, 30% and 45...

Cantrill, David Lee

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

A Laboratory Method For Measuring The Ozone Emission From In-duct Air Cleaners.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Emission rate, HVAC air cleaners, electrostatic precipitators, coronas, standard test method 1 Introduction Subchapter 8.7). However, in-duct air cleaners including electronic air cleaners, electrostatic precipitators of an ozone analyzer. Viner et al. (1992) studied commercial in-duct electrostatic precipitators and observed

Siegel, Jeffrey

227

Interior Duct Wall Pressure Downstream of a Low-Speed Scott C. Morris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interior Duct Wall Pressure Downstream of a Low-Speed Rotor Scott C. Morris , David B. Stephens The region downstream of a ducted rotor has been experimentally investigated in terms of its wake the description of the flow field and wall pressure in the region downstream of the rotor. Measurements involving

Alonso, Juan J.

228

96 ASHRAE Transactions: Research Current duct design methods for variable air volume  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.Hourlyairflowrequirements, part-load fan characteristics, and duct static pressure control are incorporated into the problem airflow. Fan power is also influ- enced if static pressure at the end of the longest duct line for effective, energy-efficient, and comfortable heating, ventilat- ing, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems

229

Sealing Ducts in Large Commercial Buildings with Aerosolized Sealant M. P. Modera, O. Brzozowski**  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-42414 1 Sealing Ducts in Large Commercial Buildings with Aerosolized Sealant Particles M. P buildings is on the order of 10 kWh/m2 per year (1 kWh/ft2 ). We have tested, in two large commercial technology is capable of sealing the leaks in a large commercial building duct system within a reasonable

230

Multi-carrier Signal Transmission through HVAC Ducts: Experimental Results for Channel Capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-carrier Signal Transmission through HVAC Ducts: Experimental Results for Channel Capacity, for the first time, experimental results on channel capacity of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC through a building HVAC duct system demonstrate the ability to transmit with a spectral efficiency of 3

Stancil, Daniel D.

231

Seamless Handover in Buildings Using HVAC Ducts: A New System Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seamless Handover in Buildings Using HVAC Ducts: A New System Architecture Ariton E. Xhafa, Paisarn-- In this paper, we present an innovative solution to the handover problem in multi-story buildings using HVAC of the indoor wireless networks that use the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) ducts

Stancil, Daniel D.

232

Ducted Turbine Blade Optimization Using Numerical Simulation Michael Shives and Curran Crawford  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ducted Turbine Blade Optimization Using Numerical Simulation Michael Shives and Curran Crawford analysis and optimization of ducted turbines. The model is similar to standard blade element momentum. This eliminates many assumptions used in applying the typical blade element momentum (BEM) theory to a turbine

Pedersen, Tom

233

LBNL# 40102 Field Investigation of Duct System Performance in California Light Commercial Buildings 1 of 26  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL# 40102 Field Investigation of Duct System Performance in California Light Commercial Buildings 1 of 26 Field Investigation of Duct System Performance in California Light Commercial Buildings Wm performance in fifteen systems located in eight northern California buildings. Abstract Light commercial

234

Beat phenomenon at the arrival of a guided mode in a semi-infinite acoustic duct  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This eigen value problem has an infinite discrete number of solutions N (x, y) with the modal wave numbers NBeat phenomenon at the arrival of a guided mode in a semi-infinite acoustic duct P. Gatignola , M at an initial time in the terminal section of a semi-infinite acoustic duct, will undergo dispersion effects

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

235

Oil burners: Crude oil, atomization, and combustion efficiency. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning fuel properties and boiler operations techniques to make maximum use of heavy crude oil, shale oil, and low grade fuels to reduce energy costs in boiler firing. Fuel properties pertain to chemical constituents, viscosity, desulfurization, and processing methods to upgrade the fuels. Operating techniques include atomization, dual-fuel burners, emission characteristics, and cost factors. Combustion efficiency is examined and some citations report on additives or processing techniques to improve the efficiency. The citations also report on studies of health effects in the use of synfuels, mostly as coal liquids to replace oil. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Longevity of Duct Tape in Residential Air Distribution Systems: 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D Joints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper addresses the effectiveness of using duct tape in sealing residential air distribution systems through two laboratory longevity tests. The first test involved the aging of common “core-to-collar joints” of flexible duct to sheet metal...

Abushakra, B.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Study of instabilities and quasi-two-dimensional turbulence in volumetrically heated magnetohydrodynamic flows in a vertical rectangular duct  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

magnetohydrodynamic flows in a vertical rectangular duct N. Vetcha, S. Smolentsev, M. Abdou, and R. Moreau Citation in a vertical rectangular duct N. Vetcha,1 S. Smolentsev,1,a) M. Abdou,1 and R. Moreau2 1 Mechanical

Abdou, Mohamed

238

Application of an ASHRAE 152-2004 Duct Model for Simulating Code-Compliant 2000/2001 IECC Residences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

( Eq. 1 )))(1()1( ))(1( 60 ( , , sambspsprrpr inrambr ine cap cap ines cooling ttBCtBCa hhaQ E E QaDE ??+??+ ??+= ? ? Eq. 2 where, Bs = conduction efficiency of supply duct = )) 60 exp( spine s RCQ A... ? ? , Eq. 3 Br = conduction efficiency of return duct = )) 60 exp( rpine r RCQ A ? ? , Eq. 4 as = air leakage efficiency of the duct of supply duct = ( e se Q QQ ? ), Eq. 5...

Haberl, J.S.; Kim, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

IMPACT OF PRESSURE EQUALIZATION SLOT IN FLOW CHANNEL INSERT ON TRITIUM TRANSPORT IN A DCLL-TYPE POLOIDAL DUCT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-TYPE POLOIDAL DUCT H. Zhang, A. Ying, M. Abdou Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Dept., UCLA, Los Angeles, CA

Abdou, Mohamed

240

Relational Database SQL: Querying the Relational DB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: auto-completion and command history Weigang Qiu Relational Database & SQL #12;Relational Database SQLRelational Database SQL: Querying the Relational DB Workshop: the "genome" Database Relational Database & SQL Weigang Qiu Department of Biological Sciences Hunter College BIOL 425 Computational

Qiu, Weigang

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "db duct burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Small (5 million Btu/h) and large (300 million Btu/h) thermal test rigs for coal and coal slurry burner development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NEI International Combustion Ltd. of Derby, England, now operates two thermal test rigs for the development of burners capable of handling coal-water slurries (CWS). A general description of the large rig and its capacity was given. Also, the necessary conversions of the equipment to handle CWS were described. Information on the properties of the CWS was included. This consisted of chemical analysis of the parent coal and the slurry, sieve analysis of a dry sample, and viscosity versus temperature data of the CWS. The process of design development of the burner was outlined. Ten illustrations were presented, including schematic diagrams of equipment and graphs of data.

Allen, J.W.; Beal, P.R.; Hufton, P.F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

7/11/00-draft copy: do not quote 1 of 30 New Technologies for Residential HVAC Ducts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7/11/00-draft copy: do not quote 1 of 30 New Technologies for Residential HVAC Ducts Burke Treidler is not evaluated and HVAC contractors overcome duct system shortcomings by installing oversized equipment Technologies for Residential HVAC Ducts fittings with some use of ductboard. Fittings that snap together were

243

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 53, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2005 335 On the Capacity Limits of HVAC Duct Channel for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of HVAC Duct Channel for High-Speed Internet Access Ariton E. Xhafa, Member, IEEE, Ozan K. Tonguz, Member and experimental channel-capacity estimates of heating, ventilation, and air condi- tioning (HVAC) ducts based suppressed. Our experimental results also show that even in the case of more complex HVAC duct networks (i

Stancil, Daniel D.

244

Evaluation of Gas Reburning & Low NOx Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler Performance and Economics Report Gas Reburning-Low NOx Burner System Cherokee Station Unit 3 Public Service Company of Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler NOX emissions and to a lesser degree, due to coal replacement, SO2 emissions. The project involved combining Gas Reburning with Low NOX Burners (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired electric utility boiler to determine if high levels of NOX reduction (70%) could be achieved. Sponsors of the project included the U.S. Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation. The GR-LNB demonstration was performed on Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit #3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW~ wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado Bituminous, low-sulfur coal. It had a baseline NOX emission level of 0.73 lb/106 Btu using conventional burners. Low NOX burners are designed to yield lower NOX emissions than conventional burners. However, the NOX control achieved with this technique is limited to 30-50%. Also, with LNBs, CO emissions can increase to above acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce NOX in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. This technology involves the introduction of natural gas into the hot furnace flue gas stream. When combined, GR and LNBs minimize NOX emissions and maintain acceptable levels of CO emissions. A comprehensive test program was completed, operating over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved, providing substantial data. Measurements were taken to quantify reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability and factors influencing costs. The GR-LNB technology achieved good NOX emission reductions and the goals of the project were achieved. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was achieved at an average gas heat input of 18Y0. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at a higher reburn gas heat input. S02 emissions, based on coal replacement, were reduced by 18Y0. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at a higher reburn gas heat input. S02 emissions, based on coal replacement, were reduced by 18Y0. Toward the end of the program, a Second Generation gas injection system was installed. Higher injector gas pressures were used that eliminated the need for flue gas recirculation as used in the first generation design. The Second Generation GR resulted in similar NOX reduction performance as that for the First Generation. With an improvement in the LNB performance in combination with the new gas injection system , the reburn gas could be reduced to 12.5% of the total boiler heat input to achieve al 64?40 reduction in NO, emissions. In addition, the OFA injectors were modified to provide for better mixing to lower CO emissions.

None

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Use of freeze-casting in advanced burner reactor fuel design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will detail the modeling of a fast reactor with fuel pins created using a freeze-casting process. Freeze-casting is a method of creating an inert scaffold within a fuel pin. The scaffold is created using a directional solidification process and results in open porosity for emplacement of fuel, with pores ranging in size from 300 microns to 500 microns in diameter. These pores allow multiple fuel types and enrichments to be loaded into one fuel pin. Also, each pore could be filled with varying amounts of fuel to allow for the specific volume of fission gases created by that fuel type. Currently fast reactors, including advanced burner reactors (ABR's), are not economically feasible due to the high cost of operating the reactors and of reprocessing the fuel. However, if the fuel could be very precisely placed, such as within a freeze-cast scaffold, this could increase fuel performance and result in a valid design with a much lower cost per megawatt. In addition to competitive costs, freeze-cast fuel would also allow for selective breeding or burning of actinides within specific locations in fast reactors. For example, fast flux peak locations could be utilized on a minute scale to target specific actinides for transmutation. Freeze-cast fuel is extremely flexible and has great potential in a variety of applications. This paper performs initial modeling of freeze-cast fuel, with the generic fast reactor parameters for this model based on EBR-II. The core has an assumed power of 62.5 MWt. The neutronics code used was Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) transport code. Uniform pore sizes were used in increments of 100 microns. Two different freeze-cast scaffold materials were used: ceramic (MgO-ZrO{sub 2}) and steel (SS316L). Separate models were needed for each material because the freeze-cast ceramic and metal scaffolds have different structural characteristics and overall porosities. Basic criticality results were compiled for the various models. Preliminary results show that criticality is achievable with freeze-cast fuel pins despite the significant amount of inert fuel matrix. Freeze casting is a promising method to achieve very precise fuel placement within fuel pins. (authors)

Lang, A. L.; Yablinsky, C. A.; Allen, T. R. [Dept. of Engineering Physics, Univ. of Wisconsin Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Burger, J.; Hunger, P. M.; Wegst, U. G. K. [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, 8000 Cummings Hall, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Duct leakage impacts on VAV system performance in California large commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the variability of duct leakage impacts on air distribution system performance for typical large commercial buildings in California. Specifically, a hybrid DOE-2/TRNSYS sequential simulation approach was used to model the energy use of a low-pressure terminal-reheat variable-air-volume (VAV) HVAC system with six duct leakage configurations (tight to leaky) in nine prototypical large office buildings (representing three construction eras in three California climates where these types of buildings are common). Combined fan power for the variable-speed-controlled supply and return fans at design conditions was assumed to be 0.8 W/cfm. Based on our analyses of the 54 simulation cases, the increase in annual fan energy is estimated to be 40 to 50% for a system with a total leakage of 19% at design conditions compared to a tight system with 5% leakage. Annual cooling plant energy also increases by about 7 to 10%, but reheat energy decreases (about 3 to 10%). In combination, the increase in total annual HVAC site energy is 2 to 14%. The total HVAC site energy use includes supply and return fan electricity consumption, chiller and cooling tower electricity consumption, boiler electricity consumption, and boiler natural gas consumption. Using year 2000 average commercial sector energy prices for California ($0.0986/kWh and $7.71/Million Btu), the energy increases result in 9 to 18% ($7,400 to $9,500) increases in HVAC system annual operating costs. Normalized by duct surface area, the increases in annual operating costs are 0.14 to 0.18 $/ft{sup 2}. Using a suggested one-time duct sealing cost of $0.20 per square foot of duct surface area, these results indicate that sealing leaky ducts in VAV systems has a simple payback period of about 1.3 years. Even with total leakage rates as low as 10%, duct sealing is still cost effective. This suggests that duct sealing should be considered at least for VAV systems with 10% or more total duct leakage. The VAV system that we simulated had perfectly insulated ducts, and maintained constant static pressure in the ducts upstream of the VAV boxes and a constant supply air temperature at the airhandler. Further evaluations of duct leakage impacts should be carried out in the future after methodologies are developed to deal with duct surface heat transfer effects, to deal with airflows entering VAV boxes from ceiling return plenums (e.g., to model parallel fan-powered VAV boxes), and to deal with static pressure reset and supply air temperature reset strategies.

Wray, Craig P.; Matson, Nance E.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

CryptDB: A Practical Encrypted Relational DBMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CryptDB is a DBMS that provides provable and practical privacy in the face of a compromised database server or curious database administrators. CryptDB works by executing SQL queries over encrypted data. At its core are ...

Popa, Raluca Ada

2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

248

DURABILITY OF VERY LOW CAPACITY PRESSURE ATOMIZED FUEL NOZZLES USED WITH LOW FIRING RATE RESIDENTIAL OIL BURNERS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), working for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), has conducted a preliminary evaluation of the potential of very low fuel input capacity Simplex type pressure atomizing nozzles for use with oil burners designed for residential boilers, furnaces and water heaters. These nozzles under suitable conditions can be sufficiently reliable to enable new heating system designs. This would allow for the design of heating appliances that match the smaller load demands of energy efficient homes built with modern components and architectural systems designed to minimize energy use. When heating systems are installed with excessive capacity, oversized by three to four times the load, the result is a loss of up to ten percent as compared to the rated appliance efficiency. The use of low capacity nozzles in systems designed to closely match the load can thereby result in significant energy savings. BNL investigated the limitations of low flow rate nozzles and designed long-term experiments to see if ways could be determined that would be beneficial to long-term operation at low input capacities without failures. In order to maximize the potential for success the best possible industry practices available were employed. Low flow rate nozzles primarily fail by blockage or partial blockage of internal fuel flow passages inside the nozzle. To prevent any contaminants from entering the nozzle BNL investigated the geometry and critical dimensions and the current sate of the art of fuel filter design. Based on this investigation it was concluded that the best available filters should be more than capable of filtering contaminants from the fuel prior to entering the oil burner itself. This position was indeed validated based on the long-term trials conducted under this study no evidence resulted to change our position. It is highly recommended that these filters rated at 10 microns and with large filter capacity (surface area), should be used with all oil burner installations. The other possible failure mode had been attributed to fuel degradation and this became the main focus of the evaluation. The degradation of fuel usually occurs faster under higher temperature conditions. To preclude this as much as possible controls that provided for a post-purge of combustion airflow after burner shut down were selected. This provided a short period of time where the burner's combustion air blower continues to operate after the flame has gone out. This tends to cool the nozzle and in turn the fuel inside the small flow pathways inside the nozzle components. This study concludes that the use of low capacity nozzles is possible but only when the temperature and thermal mass environment of the combustion chamber result in a relatively ''cool'' condition. This was accomplished in one long-term experiment that essentially operated for a full heating season equivalent with no evidence of nozzle plugging or failure. The nozzle body surface temperature was kept at or below 150 F during the duration of the trial. On the other hand, a second system was studied that ended in a partial nozzle blockage and a system failure. In this ''hot environment'' system the nozzle body temperature reached 210 F. This occurred at close to a full heating season equivalent, yet it still would have resulted in a no-heat complaint by the homeowner.

MCDONALD,R.J.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Preliminary core design studies for the advanced burner reactor over a wide range of conversion ratios.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A consistent set of designs for 1000 MWt commercial-scale sodium-cooled Advance Burner Reactors (ABR) have been developed for both metal and oxide-fueled cores with conversion ratios from breakeven (CR=1.0) to fertile-free (CR=0.0). These designs are expected to satisfy thermal and irradiation damage limits based on the currently available data. The very low conversion ratio designs require fuel that is beyond the current fuel database, which is anticipated to be qualified by and for the Advanced Burned Test Reactor. Safety and kinetic parameters were calculated, but a safety analysis was not performed. Development of these designs was required to achieve the primary goal of this study, which was to generate representative fuel cycle mass flows for system studies of ABRs as part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). There are slight variations with conversion ratio but the basic ABR configuration consists of 144 fuel assemblies and between 9 and 22 primary control assemblies for both the metal and oxide-fueled cores. Preliminary design studies indicated that it is feasible to design the ABR to accommodate a wide range of conversion ratio by employing different assembly designs and including sufficient control assemblies to accommodate the large reactivity swing at low conversion ratios. The assemblies are designed to fit within the same geometry, but the size and number of fuel pins within each assembly are significantly different in order to achieve the target conversion ratio while still satisfying thermal limits. Current irradiation experience would allow for a conversion ratio of somewhat below 0.75. The fuel qualification for the first ABR should expand this experience to allow for much lower conversion ratios and higher bunrups. The current designs were based on assumptions about the performance of high and very high enrichment fuel, which results in significant uncertainty about the details of the designs. However, the basic fuel cycle performance trends such as conversion ratio and mass flow parameters are less sensitive to these parameters and the current results should provide a good basis for static and dynamic system analysis. The conversion ratio is fundamentally a ratio of the macroscopic cross section of U-238 capture to that of TRU fission. Since the microscopic cross sections only change moderately with fuel design and isotopic concentration for the fast reactor, a specific conversion ratio requires a specific enrichment. The approximate average charge enrichment (TRU/HM) is 14%, 21%, 33%, 56%, and 100% for conversion ratios of 1.0, 0.75, 0.50, 0.25, and 0.0 for the metal-fueled cores. The approximate average charge enrichment is 17%, 25%, 38%, 60%, and 100% for conversion ratios of 1.0, 0.75, 0.50, 0.25, and 0.0 for the oxide-fueled core. For the split batch cores, the maximum enrichment will be somewhat higher. For both the metal and oxide-fueled cores, the reactivity feedback coefficients and kinetics parameters seem reasonable. The maximum single control assembly reactivity faults may be too large for the low conversion ratio designs. The average reactivity of the primary control assemblies was increased, which may cause the maximum reactivity of the central control assembly to be excessive. The values of the reactivity coefficients and kinetics parameters show that some values appear to improve significantly at lower conversion ratios while others appear far less favorable. Detailed safety analysis is required to determine if these designs have adequate safety margins or if appropriate design modifications are required. Detailed system analysis data has been generated for both metal and oxide-fueled core designs over the entire range of potential burner reactors. Additional data has been calculated for a few alternative fuel cycles. The systems data has been summarized in this report and the detailed data will be provided to the systems analysis team so that static and dynamic system analyses can be performed.

Hoffman, E. A.; Yang, W. S.; Hill, R. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

250

Device for temporarily closing duct-formers in well completion apparatus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A duct-forming device is disclosed for use in a well completion apparatus of the kind, wherein a bore hole casing is positioned in a bore hole and duct-forming devices of alkali- and acid resistant metal-such as steel-are secured at spaced levels to the casing in alignment with holes machined in the casing wall. In accordance with the invention, a closure device is arranged within the duct-forming device which permits flow of predetermined amounts of liquid, such as acid, from the interior of the casing through the duct-forming device and into the producing formation, while gradually being moved by the liquid into a position in which such fluid flow is prevented. After the fluid flow has been stopped by the closure device and when the formation pressure exceeds the pressure within the duct-forming device and the casing, fluid from the formation then forces the closure device toward and into the casing space to permit thereafter free flow of formation fluid into the duct-forming device and the casing or of pressurized treatment liquid from the casing into the formation. The inventive arrangement permits inter alia the establishment of a sufficient and substantially uniform feeding rate of treatment liquid, such as acid, from the casing into the producing formation through all the duct-formers in preparation for subsequent acidification or other treatments, such as sand fracking.

Zandmer, H.M.; Zandmer, S.M.

1981-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

251

Qualification of Fan Generated Duct Rumble Noise: Part 1: Test Facility(RP 1219)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the transition duct from break in noise from the fan room. The fiberglass insulation on the inside of the box was suspended against the MDF in order to limit any vibration damping that might occur if the insula- tion touched the duct. The duct work continued... mounted to a base. The mounting base was a double steel strut that held the fan and motor assemble together. The mounting base had six vibration isolation springs that it supported by. The four corner springs were 800 lb, 1” isolation springs, the middle...

Kading, J.; Mann, A.; Pate, M.B.

252

Low NO{sub x}/SO{sub x} Burner retrofit for utility cyclone boilers. Quarterly technical progress report, June--September 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate the LNS Burner as retrofitted to the host cyclone boiler for effective low-cost control of NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions while firing a bituminous coal. The LNS Burner employs a simple, innovative combustion process to burn pulverized coal at high temperatures and provides effective, low-cost control of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions. The coal ash contains sulfur and is removed in the form of molten slag and flyash. Cyclone-fired boiler units are typically older units firing high-sulfur bituminous coals at very high temperatures which results in very high NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions. The addition of conventional emission control equipment, such as wet scrubbers, to these older cyclone units in order to meet current and future environmental regulations is generally not economic. Further, the units are generally not compatible with low sulfur coal switching for S0{sub 2} control or selective catalytic reduction technologies for NO{sub x} control. Because the LNS Burner operates at the same very high temperatures as a typical cyclone boiler and produces a similar slag product, it may offer a viable retrofit option for cyclone boiler emission control. This was confirmed by the Cyclone Boiler Retrofit Feasibility Study carried out by TransAlta and an Operating Committee formed of cyclone boiler owners in 1989. An existing utility cyclone boiler, was then selected for the evaluation of the cost and performance study. It was concluded that the LNS Burner retrofit would be a cost-effective option for control of cyclone boiler emissions. A full-scale demonstration of the LNS Burner retrofit was selected in October 1988 as part of the DOE`s Clean Coal Technology Program Round II.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

On the Fundamental Unsteady Fluid Dynamics of Shock-Induced Flows through Ducts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unsteady shock wave propagation through ducts has many applications, ranging from blast wave shelter design to advanced high-speed propulsion systems. The research objective of this study was improved fundamental understanding of the transient flow...

Mendoza, Nicole Renee

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

254

Observations on the Anterior Testicular Ducts in Snakes With Emphasis on Sea Snakes and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Ultrastructure in the Yellow-Bellied Sea Snake, Pelamis platurus David M. Sever* and Layla R. Freeborn Department, Pelamis platurus, only the third such study on snakes. The anterior testicular ducts are similar in his

Sever, David M.

255

E-Print Network 3.0 - air heater duct Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

15542 Fuel-Fired Radiant Heaters - RESERVED 15543 Fuel-Fired Unit Heaters... Electric Heating Cables -RESERVED 15785 Air-to-Air Energy Recovery Units - RESERVED 15815 Metal Ducts...

256

Augmentation of Power Output of Axisymmetric Ducted Wind Turbines by Porous Trailing Edge Disks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents analytical and experimental results that demonstrated that the power output from a ducted wind turbine can be dramatically increased by the addition of a trailing edge device such as a porous disk. In ...

widnall, sheila

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

257

Comparative Analysis of CFD ?P vs. Measured ?P for Compressed Flexible Ducts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission. Comparative Analysis of CFD [Delta]P vs. Measured [Delta]P for Compressed Flexible Ducts Ugursal, Ahmet;Culp, Charles ASHRAE Transactions; 2007...

Ugursal, A.; Culp, C.H.

258

Optimization of supply air temperature reset schedule for a single duct VAV systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a single duct variable air volume (SDVAV) system, the supply air temperature is usually set as a constant value. Since this constant setpoint is selected to satisfy the maximum cooling load conditions, significant reheat will occur once...

Fan, Wenshu

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Energy Conversion for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors/Advanced Burner Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An optimized supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle power converter has been developed for the 100 MWe (250 MWt) Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) eliminating the potential for sodium-water reactions and achieving a small power converter and turbine generator building. Cycle and plant efficiencies of 39.1 and 38.3 %, respectively, are calculated for the ABTR core outlet temperature of 510 deg. C. The ABTR S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle will incorporate Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger{sup TM} units in the Na-to-CO{sub 2} heat exchangers, high and low temperature recuperators, and cooler. A new sodium test facility is being completed to investigate the potential for transient plugging of narrow sodium channels typical of a Na-to-CO{sub 2} heat exchanger under postulated off-normal or accident conditions. (authors)

Sienicki, James J.; Moisseytsev, Anton; Cho, Dae H.; Momozaki, Yoichi; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.; Haglund, Robert C.; Reed, Claude B.; Farmer, Mitchell T. [Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Oil burners: Crude oil, atomization, and combustion efficiency. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning fuel properties and boiler operations techniques to make maximum use of heavy crude oil, shale oil, and low grade fuels to reduce energy costs in boiler firing. Fuel properties pertain to chemical constituents, viscosity, desulfurization, and processing methods to upgrade the fuels. Operating techniques include atomization, dual-fuel burners, emission characteristics, and cost factors. Combustion efficiency is examined and some citations report on additives or processing techniques to improve the efficiency. The citations also report on studies of health effects in the use of synfuels, mostly as coal liquids to replace oil. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "db duct burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Oil burners: Crude oil, atomization, and combustion efficiency. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning fuel properties and boiler operations techniques to make maximum use of heavy crude oil, shale oil, and low grade fuels to reduce energy costs in boiler firing. Fuel properties pertain to chemical constituents, viscosity, desulfurization, and processing methods to upgrade the fuels. Operating techniques include atomization, dual-fuel burners, emission characteristics, and cost factors. Combustion efficiency is examined and some citations report on additives or processing techniques to improve the efficiency. The citations also report on studies of health effects in the use of synfuels, mostly as coal liquids to replace oil. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

DEVELOPMENT OF SELF-TUNING RESIDENTIAL OIL/BURNER - OXYGEN SENSOR ASSESSMENT AND EARLY PROTOTYPE SYSTEM OPERATING EXPERIENCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the first topical report dealing with a new project leading towards the development of a self-tuning residential oil burner. It was initiated under the Statement of Work for the Oil Heat Research and Development Program, for Fiscal Year 1997 as defined in the Combustion Equipment Technology Program, under the management of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In part, this work is based on research reported by BNL in 1990, suggesting various options for developing control strategies in oil heat technology leading to the enhanced efficiency of oil-fired heating systems. BNL has been addressing these concepts in order of priority and technology readiness. The research described in this report is part of an ongoing project and additional work is planned for the future assuming adequate program funding is made available.

MCDONALD,R.J.; BUTCHER,T.A.; KRAJEWSKI,R.F.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

SciDB for Array Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted for USMaterialstheterahertzon HomeScholarshipsSciDB SciDB Screen

264

Building America Case Study: Duct in Conditioned Space in a Dropped Ceiling or Fur-down, Gainesville, Florida (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Forced air distribution systems (duct systems) typically are installed out of sight for aesthetic reasons, most often in unconditioned areas such as an attic or crawlspace. Any leakage of air to or from the duct system (duct leakage) in unconditioned space not only loses energy, but impacts home and equipment durability and indoor air quality. An obvious solution to this problem is to bring the duct system into the interior of the house, either by sealing the area where the ducts are installed (sealed attic or crawlspace) or by building an interior cavity or chase above the ceiling plane (raised ceiling or fur-up chase) or below the ceiling plane (dropped ceiling or fur-down) for the duct system. This case study examines one Building America builder partner's implementation of an inexpensive, quick and effective method of building a fur-down or dropped ceiling chase.

Not Available

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Pressure Losses in 12”, 15” and 16” Non-Metallic Flexible Ducts with Compression and Sag (RP-1333)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

622 ©2009 ASHRAE This paper is based on findings resulting from ASHRAE Research Project RP-1333. ABSTRACT A study was conducted to measure air pressure loss in non- metallic flexible ducts and included 12” (305 mm), 14” (356 mm) and 16” (406 mm...) diameter ducts on a flat surface and also positioned over joists on 24” (610 mm) centers. For this study, flexible duct compression configurations were fully stretched and 4%, 15%, 30% and 45% compressed. Measure- ments were performed at each compression...

Culp, C.H.; Cantrill, D.

266

Duct Leakage Modeling in EnergyPlus and Analysis of Energy Savings from Implementing SAV with InCITeTM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the impact of static pressure reset on HVAC system thermalHVAC control system varies the supply fan airflow to maintain a constant duct static pressure

Wray, Craig

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Low NO{sub x}/SO{sub x} Burner retrofit for utility cyclone boilers. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work on process design was deferred pending a restart of the mainstream project activities. LNS Burner design effort was focussed mainly on the continued development of the slag screen model. Documentation of the LNS Burner thermal model also continued. Balance of plant engineering continued on the P&ID`s for the fuel preparation building HVAC system, lighter oil, limestone/fuel additive handling system, instrument and service air and fire protection systems. Work began on the preparation of system and sub-system descriptions. Schematic connection and wiring drawings and diagrams for the fuel handling system, flame scanner/igniter system and DCS control modification for the lighter oil pumps and Unit 1 circulating water pumps were completed.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Operational results of a low NO{sub x} burner retrofit on a 780 net MW{sub e} PC-fired utility boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project was to comply with state and federal clean air regulations while maintaining operational flexibility and control. This objective was accomplished with the installation of DRB-XCL{reg_sign} burners with a separated overfire air system. The DRB-XCL{reg_sign} burners can consistently achieve 0.5 lbs/10{sup 6} Btu NO{sub x} or less. Even lower NO{sub x} levels can be achieved with the new equipment. However, increased carbon levels affecting stack opacity prevent long-term operation at this level with the existing scrubbing equipment. Final test results indicated that the project goals were met with some exceeded. The results of this project pointed out the numerous interactions of all of the interrelated complex systems in today`s state-of-the-art power plants. The increase in unburned carbon levels affected the wet scrubber and impacted stack plume color. Being one indicator of inefficiency, this item is currently being reviewed to take advantage of further improving operating efficiency. Mechanical reliability of the Babcock & Wilcox DRB-XCL{reg_sign} burner has been good and it is estimated that long-term maintenance costs will be low. Close cooperation between Ohio Edison and B&W contributed positively to the success of this project.

Bryk, S.A.; Cioffi, P.L.; Tucker, T.J. [Babcock & Wilcox, Barberton, OH (United States); Mellody, J.G. [Ohio Edison Co., Akron, OH (United States); Hooks, M.E. [Pennsylvania Power Co., Shippingport, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Evaluation of gas-reburning and low NO{sub x} burners on a wall fired boiler. Technical progress report No. 5, October 1--December 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low NO{sub x} burners operate on the principle of delayed mixing between the coal fuel and burner air, so that less NO{sub x} is formed. Gas reburning is a combustion modification technique that consists of firing 80--85 percent of the fuel corresponding to the total heat release in the lower furnace. Reduction of NO{sub x} to molecular nitrogen (N{sub 2}) is accomplished via the downstream injection of the remaining fuel requirement in the form of natural gas (which also reduces the total SO{sub x} emissions). In a third stage, burnout air is injected at the lower temperatures in the upper furnace to complete the combustion process without generating significant additional NO{sub x}. The specific goal of this project is to demonstrate NO{sub x} emission reductions of 75 percent or more as a result of combing Low NO{sub x} Burners and Gas Reburning on a utility boiler having the design characteristics mentioned above. A Host Site Agreement has been signed by EER and a utility company in the State of Colorado: Public Service Company of Colorado (Cherokee Unit No. 3, 172 MW{sub e}) front wall fired boiler near Denver.

Not Available

1992-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

V-070: Apache CouchDB Multiple Vulnerabilities | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

access files. This can be exploited to disclose the contents of arbitrary files via directory traversal sequences. Only Microsoft Windows versions of Apache CouchDB are affected....

271

Cavitation erosion in blocked flow with a ducted ice-class propeller  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ships that operate in ice often encounter momentary increased propeller cavitation because ice pieces block the flow into the propeller. For ducted propellers, this additional cavitation is more significant than it is for open propellers; ice pieces may become lodged against and within the duct and subject the propeller to longer periods of increased cavitation due to the blocked flow. Associated with this blocked flow is the possibility of cavitation erosion on the propeller. An erosion study, using paint films, was conducted in a cavitation tunnel with a model propeller of the type fitted to the Canadian Marine Drilling Ltd. vessel MV Robert LeMeur. A simulated ice blockage was installed ahead of the propeller model and within the duct. Tests were carried out over a range of advance coefficients for various test conditions. The resulting types of cavitation were documented, the erosion patterns were photographed and comparisons between each test were made.

Doucet, J.M.; Bose, N.; Walker, D. [Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland, St. John`s, Newfoundland (Canada). Ocean Engineering Research Centre; Jones, S.J. [National Research Council of Canada, St. John`s, Newfoundland (Canada). Inst. for Marine Dynamics

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

Nuclear reactor fuel assembly duct-tube-to-inlet-nozzle attachment system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reusable system for removably attaching the lower end 21 of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly duct tube to an upper end 11 of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly inlet nozzle. The duct tube's lower end 21 has sides terminating in locking tabs 22 which end in inwardly-extending flanges 23. The flanges 23 engage recesses 13 in the top section 12 of the inlet nozzle's upper end 11. A retaining collar 30 slides over the inlet nozzle's upper end 11 to restrain the flanges 23 in the recesses 13. A locking nut 40 has an inside threaded portion 41 which engages an outside threaded portion 15 of the inlet nozzle's upper end 11 to secure the retaining collar 30 against protrusions 24 on the duct tube's sides.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Smith, Bob G. (Kennewick, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Initial test results of the limestone injection multistage burner (LIMB) demonstration project. Report for September 1984-April 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses SO/sub 2/ removal efficiency and low-NOx burner performance obtained during short term tests, as well as the impact of LIMB ash on electrostatic precipitator (ESP) performance at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station. Project goals are to demonstrate 50% or more SO/sub 2/ removal at a Ca/S molar stoichiometry of 2.0 and NOx emissions of less than 0.5 lb/million Btu while maintaining boiler operability and reliability. The tests, conducted before September 1987, indicated that 55-60% SO/sub 2/ removal and NOx emissions on the order of 0.48 lb/million Btu are achievable. The increased dust loading of a high-resistivity ash typically limited continuous operation to 2-6 hr. The paper discusses how the LIMB ash gave rise to back corona which, in turn, increased stack opacity to regulated levels. The extension of the project to include humidification of the flue gas is also described as a way to minimize these effects.

Nolan, P.S.; Hendriks, R.V.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gilbert Commonwealth, Southern Research Institute and the American Electric Power Service Corporation have embarked on a program to convert DOE's Duct Injection Test Facility located at the Muskingum River Power Plant of Ohio Power Company to test alternate duct injection technologies. The technologies to be tested include slurry sorbent injection of hydrated lime using dual fluid nozzles, or a rotary atomizer and pneumatic injection of hydrated lime, with flue gas humidification before or after sorbent injection. The literature review and analysis contained in this report is a part of the preparatory effort for the test program.

Gooch, J.P.; Dismukes, E.B.; Dahlin, R.S.; Faulkner, M.G. (Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, AL (United States)); Klett, M.G.; Buchanan, T.L.; Hunt, J.E. (Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States))

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Electric coheating as a means to test duct efficiency: A review and analysis of the literature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent published literature on electric coheating was reviewed in order to assess its suitability for use in a method of test for the efficiency of residential duct systems. Electric coheating is the research use of electric heaters within the heated space to assess the thermal integrity of the building envelope. Information was sought in two primary areas: (1) experimental methodology and (2) accuracy of the coheating method. A variety of experimental variations was found, and the method was judged, on the basis of published data, to be capable of sufficient accuracy for use in duct testing.

Andrews, J.W.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

ERROR REDUCTION IN DUCT LEAKAGE TESTING THROUGH DATA CROSS-CHECKS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One way to reduce uncertainty in scientific measurement is to devise a protocol in which more quantities are measured than are absolutely required, so that the result is over constrained. This report develops a method for so combining data from two different tests for air leakage in residential duct systems. An algorithm, which depends on the uncertainty estimates for the measured quantities, optimizes the use of the excess data. In many cases it can significantly reduce the error bar on at least one of the two measured duct leakage rates (supply or return), and it provides a rational method of reconciling any conflicting results from the two leakage tests.

ANDREWS, J.W.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

277

Nucleonic analysis of a preliminary design for the ETF neutral-beam-injector duct shielding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A nucleonic analysis of the Engineering Test Facility Neutral-Beam-Injector duct shielding has been made using a hybrid Monte Carlo/discrete-ordinates method. This method used Monte Carlo to determine internal and external boundary surface sources for a subsequent discrete-ordinates calculation of the neutron and gamma-ray transport through the shield. The analysis also included determination of the energy and angular distribution of neutrons and gamma rays entering the duct from the torus plasma chamber. Confidence in the hybrid method and the results obtained were provided through a comparison with three-dimensional Monte Carlo results.

Urban, W.T.; Seed, T.J.; Dudziak, D.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

1736 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 51, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2003 Impulse Response of the HVAC Duct as a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the HVAC Duct as a Communication Channel Pavel V. Nikitin, Member, IEEE, Daniel D. Stancil, Senior Member (HVAC) ducts in buildings behave as multimode waveguides when excited at radio frequencies and thus, can of a usual indoor propagation channel. In this paper, we describe physical mechanisms which affect the HVAC

Hochberg, Michael

279

Numerical Analysis of Turbine Blade Cooling Ducts M.J. Noot and R.M.M. Mattheij  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical Analysis of Turbine Blade Cooling Ducts M.J. Noot and R.M.M. Mattheij Eindhoven, The Netherlands March 2, 1998 Abstract The cooling of turbine blades in turbines is enhanced by providing the quality of these cooling ducts. 1 Introduction Gas turbines play an important role in aviation

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

280

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ANTENNAS AND PROPAGATION, VOL. 51, NO. 5, MAY 2003 945 Propagation Model for the HVAC Duct as a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the HVAC Duct as a Communication Channel Pavel V. Nikitin, Member, IEEE, Daniel D. Stancil, Senior Member (HVAC) ducts in buildings are typically hollow metal pipes which can be used as waveguides to carry such a communication system. This paper presents a propagation model for a straight HVAC duct terminated at both ends

Stancil, Daniel D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "db duct burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A Well-Balanced Scheme For Two-Fluid Flows In Variable Cross-Section ducts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, ) p = p(, s, ), h = h(, s, ). (21) Then in these variables the sound speed c satisfies c2 = p = h. (22 of a mixture of two compressible fluids (a gas (1) and a liquid (2), for instance) in a cross-section duct

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

282

Duct System Flammability and Air Sealing Fire Separation Assemblies in the International Residential Code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IBACOS identified two barriers that limit the ability of builders to cost-effectively achieve higher energy efficiency levels in housing. These are (1) the use of duct system materials that inherently achieve airtightness and are appropriately sized for low-load houses and (2) the ability to air seal fire separation assemblies. The issues identified fall into a gray area of the codes.

Rudd, A.; Prahl, D.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Development of an ASHRAE 152-2004 Duct Model for the Single-Family Residential House  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents the results of the development of the duct model based on ASHRAE standard 152-2004 (ASHRAE, 2004) using the DOE-2.1e building energy simulation program. To accomplish this, FUNCTION commands for DOE-2 were used to develop...

Kim, S.; Haberl, J.

284

A COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS OF A DUCTED FAN USED IN VTOL UAV SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conditions. Fan rotor field including secondary flows, tip vortices, blade boundary layers and the wake sys wind tunnel test data. Total pressure measurements and computational predictions of mean flow field shows a significant level of 3D hub separation affecting the overall performance of the ducted fan

Camci, Cengiz

285

Toward a Better Understanding of Ducted Rotor Antitorque and Directional Control in Forward Flight  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Core Automatic Flight Control System (CAFCS) mode. Figure 1 shows a sustained, large-amplitude 1-Hz yaw ABSTRACT Despite decades of very successful yaw-control and anti-torque applications, the aerodynamics dramatic. From a handling-qualities perspective, the ducted rotor provides the loads capacity required

286

Control of Flow Separation in S-ducts via Flow Injection and Suction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with minimum stagnation pressure losses at the compressor face. In some aircraft a straight inletT 1 Research of the curvature of the S-duct centerline lead to cross-stream centrifugal pressure gradients which cause distribution on the engine compressor face. The net effect of the secondary flow and of the diffuser adverse

Debiasi, Marco

287

Cooling air duct and screen arrangement for an air cooled engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a cooling air duct and screen arrangement for an air cooled engine which includes an improved cooling air system for ensuring a supply of relatively clean air for ingestion by the cooling shroud, which consists of: a vertical transverse baffle mounted to the frame and fitting closely against a forward top portion of the shroud and having an edge shaped complementary to and disposed at least closely adjacent the hood. An air duct is mounted to the frame and has an upright rear wall seated against the front of the shroud in an area surrounding the inlet. The air duct further has an upright front wall and a connecting wall joining respective side and bottom edges of the front and rear walls and cooperating therewith to define an upwardly facing opening. A screen is located forwardly of the baffle and has a top and front joined by opposite sides with the top and opposite sides having rear edges mounted against the baffle and with the opposite sides and front having bottom edges engaged with the air duct about the upwardly facing opening wherein the screen is mounted solely to the baffle by connection means including a vertical guide means provided on the forward side of the baffle and flange means formed on the screen and being vertically slidably received in the guide means.

Hoch, J.J.; Stricker, D.K.

1986-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

288

Inspection, Assessment, and Repair of Grouted Ducts in Post-tensioned Bridge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and mitigation methods of voided ducts in PT structures. Although controversy exists on how to best protect PT tendons from corrosion, filling these voids with grout may be one option. An optimized grouting procedure for repairing these voids is needed how best...

Im, Seok Been

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

289

Tracer Gas as a Practical Field Diagnostic Tool for Assessing Duct System Leaks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diagnostic tools for detecting and locating leaks in the air distribution system. The tracer gas tests described are a good complement to these tools in the detection, location, and measurement of duct leakage. Testing for house infiltration once with the air...

Cummings, J. B.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Field Test of Advanced Duct-Sealing Technologies Within the Weatherization Assistance Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field test of an aerosol-spray duct-sealing technology and a conventional, best-practice approach was performed in 80 homes to determine the efficacy and programmatic needs of the duct-sealing technologies as applied in the U.S. Department of Energy Weatherization Assistance Program. The field test was performed in five states: Iowa, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, and Wyoming. The study found that, compared with the best-practice approach, the aerosol-spray technology is 50% more effective at sealing duct leaks and can potentially reduce labor time and costs for duct sealing by 70%, or almost 4 crew-hours. Further study to encourage and promote use of the aerosol-spray technology within the Weatherization Assistance Program is recommended. A pilot test of full production weatherization programs using the aerosol-spray technology is recommended to develop approaches for integrating this technology with other energy conservation measures and minimizing impacts on weatherization agency logistics. In order to allow or improve adoption of the aerosol spray technology within the Weatherization Assistance Program, issues must be addressed concerning equipment costs, use of the technology under franchise arrangements with Aeroseal, Inc. (the holders of an exclusive license to use this technology), software used to control the equipment, safety, and training. Application testing of the aerosol-spray technology in mobile homes is also recommended.

Ternes, MP

2001-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

291

1 | Building America eere.energy.gov Evaluation of Ducted GE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: ­ Impact on space conditioning energy consumption and occupant comfort. ­ Impact on demand response space in a number of configurations and as a demand response asset. · This information is necessary1 | Building America eere.energy.gov Evaluation of Ducted GE Hybrid Heat Pump Water Heater in PNNL

292

Evaluation of gas reburning and low NO{sub x} burners on a wall-fired boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation of Gas Reburning (GR) and Low NO{sub x}, Burners (LNB) has been completed at Public Service Company of Colorado`s Cherokee Station Unit 3. The goal of the demonstration, which was carried out in a US DOE Clean Coal Technology Round 3 Program, was to reduce NO{sub x} emissions by 70%. The reduction was to be achieved from the pre-project level, prior to LNB retrofit. The GR system was supplied by Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) and the LNBs were supplied by the Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation. The project was carried out in three phases in which EER designed the GR system and obtained necessary permits (Phase 1), constructed the system and completed start-up tasks (Phase 2), and evaluated its performance with both Optimization Tests and a Long-Term Demonstration (Phase 3). As directed by the cooperative agreement, environmental monitoring was conducted in each phase. Measurements were taken by plant personnel and an EER Field Testing Team and were divided into two types. ``Compliance Monitoring`` was conducted by plant personnel to satisfy requirements of regulatory agencies, while ``Supplemental Monitoring`` was conducted by EER personnel to develop a database of environmental impacts of the technology and to ensure environmental acceptability of the project. This document presents environmental monitoring data obtained during the Long-Term Testing period, April 27, 1993 to January 27, 1995. During this period, ten months of testing of the GR-LNB system was followed by a modification into a ``second-generation`` GR-LNB system, which was evaluated for six months. Compliance Monitoring was conducted primarily in two areas, air emissions and aqueous discharges.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Evaluation of gas reburning and low NO{sub x} burners on a wall-fired boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation of Gas Reburning (GR) and Low NO{sub x} Burners (LNB) has been completed at Public Service Company of Colorado`s Cherokee Station Unit 3. The goal of the demonstration was to reduce NO{sub x} emissions by 70%. The reduction was to be achieved from the pre-project level prior to LNB retrofit. The GR system was supplied by Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) and the LNBs were supplied by the Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation. The project was carried out in three phases in which EER designed the GR system and obtained necessary permits (Phase 1), constructed the system and completed start-up tasks (Phase 2), and evaluated its performance with both Optimization Tests and a Long-Term Demonstration (Phase 3). As directed by the Cooperative Agreement, environmental monitoring was conducted in each phase. Measurements were taken by plant personnel and an EER Field Testing Team and were divided into two types. ``Compliance Monitoring`` was conducted by plant personnel to satisfy requirements of regulatory agencies, while ``Supplemental Monitoring`` was conducted by EER personnel to develop a database of environmental impacts of the technology and to ensure environmental acceptability of the project. This document presents environmental monitoring data obtained during the Optimization Testing period, November 11, 1992 to April 23, 1993. Compliance Monitoring was conducted primarily in two areas, air emissions and aqueous discharges. The unit is required to meet an SO{sub 2} limit of 1.2 lb/MBtu and an opacity limit of 20 percent (6 minute average). Therefore, the plant monitors flue gas SO{sub 2} and opacity continuously and submits Excess Emissions Reports to the Colorado Air Pollution Control Division on a quarterly basis. Discharge limits for the aqueous effluent from the plant and monitoring requirements are specified by a permit issued by the Colorado Water Quality Control Division.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Development of self-tuning residential oil-burner. Oxygen sensor assessment and early prototype system operating experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the first topical report dealing with a new project leading towards the development of a self-tuning residential oil burner. It was initiated under the Statement of Work for the Oil Heat Research and Development Program, for Fiscal Year 1997 as defined in the Combustion Equipment Technology Program, under the management of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In part, this work is based on research reported by BNL in 1990, suggesting various options for developing control strategies in oil heat technology leading to the enhanced efficiency of oil-fired heating systems. BNL has been addressing these concepts in order of priority and technology readiness. The research described in this report is part of an ongoing project and additional work is planned for the future assuming adequate program funding is made available. BNL has continued to investigate all types of sensor technologies associated with combustion systems including all forms of oxygen measurement techniques. In these studies the development of zirconium oxide oxygen sensors has been considered over the last decade. The development of these sensors for the automotive industry has allowed for cost reductions based on quantity of production that might not have occurred otherwise. This report relates BNL`s experience in testing various zirconium oxide sensors, and the results of tests intended to provide evaluation of the various designs with regard to performance in oil-fired systems. These tests included accuracy when installed on oil-fired heating appliances and response time in cyclic operating mode. An evaluation based on performance criteria and cost factors was performed. Cost factors in the oil heat industry are one of the most critical issues in introducing new technology.

McDonald, R.J.; Butcher, T.A.; Krajewski, R.F.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Evaluation of Polyurethane Nasolacrimal Duct Stents: In Vivo Studies in New Zealand Rabbits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiographic and biological effects of different polyurethane nasolacrimal duct stents in an animal model. Fifteen polyurethane nasolacrimal duct stents (n = 5 mushroom-type stents, n = 5 newly designed S-shaped TearLeader stents without hydrophilic coating, and n = 5 S-shaped TearLeader stents with hydrophilic coating) were implanted in the nasolacrimal ducts of eight unaffected New Zealand rabbits. One nasolacrimal system served as control. Clinical and radiographic follow-up was performed at 1-, 2-, and 4-week intervals, then after a 3-month interval, after which the animals were euthanized. All stents were implanted without major periprocedural complications. The stents proved to be patent by the end of the procedure. During follow-up, all mushroom-type stents were occluded at 4 weeks. None of these stents opened to forced irrigation. Clinically, all rabbits demonstrated severe dacryocystitis. Three out of five TearLeader stents without hydrophilic coating were blocked at 4 weeks; one out of five was open to irrigation. Best results were observed in the stent group with hydrophilic coating. Follow-up dacryocystography demonstrated patent stents in nasolacrimal ducts of all animals after 4 weeks. In only one of five cases, the coated stent became partially occluded after 2 months. These animals were free of clinical symptoms. After 3 months, at least three out of five stents still opened to forced irrigation and only one stent was completely blocked. Dislocation of the stents was not observed. Refinement of the stent surface and stent design improves the results of nasolacrimal duct stenting in this animal model. Implantation of hydrophilic-coated S-shaped stents is highly superior to conventional mushroom-type stents and noncoated stent types. Hydrophilic coating seems to prevent foreign-body reactions, resulting in maximized stent patency.

Wilhelm, K.E., E-mail: wilhelm@uni-bonn.de; Grabolle, B.; Urbach, H. [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Radiology (Germany); Tolba, R. [Clinics of the University of Bonn, Haus fuer Experimentelle Therapie (Germany); Schild, H. [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Radiology (Germany); Paulsen, F. [Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology (Germany)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Achieving New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) Emission Standards Through Integration of Low-NOx Burners with an Optimization Plan for Boiler Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to demonstrate the use of an Integrated Combustion Optimization System to achieve NO{sub X} emission levels in the range of 0.15 to 0.22 lb/MMBtu while simultaneously enabling increased power output. The project plan consisted of the integration of low-NO{sub X} burners and advanced overfire air technology with various process measurement and control devices on the Holcomb Station Unit 1 boiler. The plan included the use of sophisticated neural networks or other artificial intelligence technologies and complex software to optimize several operating parameters, including NO{sub X} emissions, boiler efficiency, and CO emissions. The program was set up in three phases. In Phase I, the boiler was equipped with sensors that can be used to monitor furnace conditions and coal flow to permit improvements in boiler operation. In Phase II, the boiler was equipped with burner modifications designed to reduce NO{sub X} emissions and automated coal flow dampers to permit on-line fuel balancing. In Phase III, the boiler was to be equipped with an overfire air system to permit deep reductions in NO{sub X} emissions. Integration of the overfire air system with the improvements made in Phases I and II would permit optimization of boiler performance, output, and emissions. This report summarizes the overall results from Phases I and II of the project. A significant amount of data was collected from the combustion sensors, coal flow monitoring equipment, and other existing boiler instrumentation to monitor performance of the burner modifications and the coal flow balancing equipment.

Wayne Penrod

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

DEVELOPMENT OF A NOVEL RADIATIVELY/CONDUCTIVELY STABILIZED BURNER FOR SIGNIFICANT REDUCTION OF NOx EMISSIONS AND FOR ADVANCING THE MODELING AND UNDERSTANDING OF PULVERIZED COAL COMBUSTION AND EMISSIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the proposed study was the study and analysis of, and design recommendations for, a novel radiatively-conductively stabilized combustion (RCSC) process for pulverized coal, which, based on our prior studies with both fluid fuels and pulverized coal, holds a high promise to reduce NO{sub x} production significantly. We have primarily engaged in continuing and improving our process modeling and analysis, obtained a large amount of quantitative information about the effects of the major parameters on NO{sub x} production, conducted an extensive exergy analysis of the process, evaluated the practicalities of employing the Radiatively-Conductively Stabilized Combustor (RCSC) to large power and heat plants, and improved the experimental facility. Prior experimental work has proven the feasibility of the combustor, but slagging during coal combustion was observed and should be dealt with. The primary outcomes and conclusions from the study are: (1) we developed a model and computer program that represents the pulverized coal combustion in the RCSC, (2) the model predicts that NO{sub x} emissions can be reduced by a number of methods, detailed in the report. (3) the exergy analysis points out at least a couple of possible ways to improve the exergetic efficiency in this combustor: increasing the effectiveness of thermal feedback, and adjusting the combustor mixture exit location, (4) because of the low coal flow rates necessitated in this study to obtain complete combustion in the burner, the size of a burner operating under the considered conditions would have to be up to an order of magnitude, larger than comparable commercial burners, but different flow configurations of the RCSC can yield higher feed rates and smaller dimensions, and should be investigated. Related to this contract, eleven papers were published in journals and conference proceedings, and ten invited presentations were given at university and research institutions, as well as at the Gordon Conference on Modern Development in Thermodynamics. The results obtained are very encouraging for the development of the RCSC as a commercial burner for significant reduction of NO{sub x} emissions, and highly warrants further study and development.

Noam Lior; Stuart W. Churchill

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

A COMPREHENSIVE SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSIS OF DB WHITE DWARFS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a detailed analysis of 108 helium-line (DB) white dwarfs based on model atmosphere fits to high signal-to-noise optical spectroscopy. We derive a mean mass of 0.67 M{sub sun} for our sample, with a dispersion of only 0.09 M{sub sun}. White dwarfs also showing hydrogen lines, the DBA stars, comprise 44% of our sample, and their mass distribution appears similar to that of DB stars. As in our previous investigation, we find no evidence for the existence of low-mass (M < 0.5 M{sub sun}) DB white dwarfs. We derive a luminosity function based on a subset of DB white dwarfs identified in the Palomar-Green Survey. We show that 20% of all white dwarfs in the temperature range of interest are DB stars, although the fraction drops to half this value above T{sub eff} {approx} 20,000 K. We also show that the persistence of DB stars with no hydrogen features at low temperatures is difficult to reconcile with a scenario involving accretion from the interstellar medium, often invoked to account for the observed hydrogen abundances in DBA stars. We present evidence for the existence of two different evolutionary channels that produce DB white dwarfs: the standard model where DA stars are transformed into DB stars through the convective dilution of a thin hydrogen layer and a second channel where DB stars retain a helium atmosphere throughout their evolution. We finally demonstrate that the instability strip of pulsating V777 Her white dwarfs contains no non-variables, if the hydrogen content of these stars is properly accounted for.

Bergeron, P.; Wesemael, F.; Dufour, Pierre; Beauchamp, A.; Hunter, C.; Gianninas, A.; Limoges, M.-M.; Dufour, Patrick; Fontaine, G. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Saffer, Rex A. [Strayer University, 234 Mall Boulevard, Suite G-50, King of Prussia, PA 19406 (United States); Ruiz, M. T. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Liebert, James, E-mail: bergeron@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: wesemael@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: gianninas@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: limoges@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: dufourpa@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: fontaine@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: alain.beauchamp@fti-ibis.com, E-mail: chris.hunter@yale.edu, E-mail: rex.saffer@strayer.edu, E-mail: mtruiz@das.uchile.cl [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

299

Page 1 of 11 The Value of IBM's DB2 Utilities and Tools in 2011 The Value of IBM's DB2 Utilities and Tools in 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 of 11 The Value of IBM's DB2 Utilities and Tools in 2011 The Value of IBM's DB2 Utilities The Value of IBM's DB2 Utilities and Tools in 2011 Table of Contents I. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.................................................................................... 5 IV. UTILITY PERFORMANCE AND TOTAL COST OF OWNERSHIP

300

CO-FIRING COAL: FEEDLOT AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND CLB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intensive animal feeding operations create large amounts of animal waste that must be safely disposed of in order to avoid environmental degradation. Cattle feedlots and chicken houses are two examples. In feedlots, cattle are confined to small pens and fed a high calorie grain-diet diet in preparation for slaughter. In chicken houses, thousands of chickens are kept in close proximity. In both of these operations, millions of tons of manure are produced every year. The manure could be used as a fuel by mixing it with coal in a 90:10 blend and firing it in an existing coal suspension fired combustion systems. This technique is known as co-firing, and the high temperatures produced by the coal will allow the biomass to be completely combusted. Reburn is a process where a small percentage of fuel called reburn fuel is injected above the NO{sub x} producing, conventional coal fired burners in order to reduce NO{sub x}. The manure could also be used as reburn fuel for reducing NO{sub x} in coal fired plants. An alternate approach of using animal waste is to adopt the gasification process using a fixed bed gasifier and then use the gases for firing in gas turbine combustors. In this report, the cattle manure is referred to as feedlot biomass (FB) and chicken manure as litter biomass (LB). The report generates data on FB and LB fuel characteristics. Co-firing, reburn, and gasification tests of coal, FB, LB, coal: FB blends, and coal: LB blends and modeling on cofiring, reburn systems and economics of use of FB and LB have also been conducted. The biomass fuels are higher in ash, lower in heat content, higher in moisture, and higher in nitrogen and sulfur (which can cause air pollution) compared to coal. Small-scale cofiring experiments revealed that the biomass blends can be successfully fired, and NO{sub x} emissions will be similar to or lower than pollutant emissions when firing coal. Further experiments showed that biomass is twice or more effective than coal when used in a reburning process. Computer simulations for coal: LB blends were performed by modifying an existing computer code to include the drying and phosphorus (P) oxidation models. The gasification studies revealed that there is bed agglomeration in the case of chicken litter biomass due to its higher alkaline oxide content in the ash. Finally, the results of the economic analysis show that considerable fuel cost savings can be achieved with the use of biomass. In the case of higher ash and moisture biomass, the fuel cost savings is reduced.

Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thein; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan; Senthil Arumugam; Kevin Heflin

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "db duct burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Wednesday, 06 October, 2010 Contrasting the efficiency of radiation belt losses caused by ducted and non-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-ducted transmissions originating from NPM34 generated electron flux enhancements. While the waves originating from that the enhancements from NPM are at least 50 times smaller than those from NWC. This37 suggests that lower latitude

Otago, University of

302

PARTICULATE CHARACTERIZATION AND ULTRA LOW-NOx BURNER FOR THE CONTROL OF NO{sub x} AND PM{sub 2.5} FOR COAL FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to the serious challenge facing coal-fired electric utilities with regards to curbing their NO{sub x} and fine particulate emissions, Babcock and Wilcox and McDermott Technology, Inc. conducted a project entitled, ''Particulate Characterization and Ultra Low-NO{sub x} Burner for the Control of NO{sub x} and PM{sub 2.5} for Coal Fired Boilers.'' The project included pilot-scale demonstration and characterization of technologies for removal of NO{sub x} and primary PM{sub 2.5} emissions. Burner development and PM{sub 2.5} characterization efforts were based on utilizing innovative concepts in combination with sound scientific and fundamental engineering principles and a state-of-the-art test facility. Approximately 1540 metric tonnes (1700 tons) of high-volatile Ohio bituminous coal were fired. Particulate sampling for PM{sub 2.5} emissions characterization was conducted in conjunction with burner testing. Based on modeling recommendations, a prototype ultra low-NO{sub x} burner was fabricated and tested at 100 million Btu/hr in the Babcock and Wilcox Clean Environment Development Facility. Firing the unstaged burner with a high-volatile bituminous Pittsburgh 8 coal at 100 million Btu/hr and 17% excess air achieved a NO{sub x} goal of 0.20 lb NO{sub 2}/million Btu with a fly ash loss on ignition (LOI) of 3.19% and burner pressure drop of 4.7 in H{sub 2}O for staged combustion. With the burner stoichiometry set at 0.88 and the overall combustion stoichiometry at 1.17, average NO{sub x} and LOI values were 0.14 lb NO{sub 2}/million Btu and 4.64% respectively. The burner was also tested with a high-volatile Mahoning 7 coal. Based on the results of this work, commercial demonstration is being pursued. Size classified fly ash samples representative of commercial low-NO{sub x} and ultra low-NO{sub x} combustion of Pittsburgh 8 coal were collected at the inlet and outlet of an ESP. The mass of size classified fly ash at the ESP outlet was sufficient to evaluate the particle size distribution, but was of insufficient size to permit reliable chemical analysis. The size classified fly ash from the inlet of the ESP was used for detailed chemical analyses. Chemical analyses of the fly ash samples from the ESP outlet using a high volume sampler were performed for comparison to the size classified results at the inlet. For all test conditions the particulate removal efficiency of the ESP exceeded 99.3% and emissions were less than the NSPS limits of {approx}48 mg/dscm. With constant combustion conditions, the removal efficiency of the ESP increased as the ESP voltage and Specific Collection Area (SCA) increased. The associated decrease in particle emissions occurred in size fractions both larger and smaller than 2.5 microns. For constant ESP voltage and SCA, the removal efficiency for the ultra low-NO{sub x} combustion ash (99.4-99.6%) was only slightly less than for the low-NO{sub x} combustion ash (99.7%). The decrease in removal efficiency was accompanied by a decrease in ESP current. The emission of PM{sub 2.5} from the ESP did not change significantly as a result of the change in combustion conditions. Most of the increase in emissions was in the size fraction greater than 2.5 microns, indicating particle re-entrainment. These results may be specific to the coal tested in this program. In general, the concentration of inorganic elements and trace species in the fly ash at the ESP inlet was dependent on the particle size fraction. The smallest particles tended to have higher concentrations of inorganic elements/trace species than larger particles. The concentration of most elements by particle size range was independent of combustion condition and the concentration of soluble ions in the fly ash showed little change with combustion condition when evaluated on a carbon free basis.

Ralph Bailey; Hamid Sarv; Jim Warchol; Debi Yurchison

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

303

Experimental and numerical study of the accuracy of flame-speed measurements for methane/air combustion in a slot burner  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measuring the velocities of premixed laminar flames with precision remains a controversial issue in the combustion community. This paper studies the accuracy of such measurements in two-dimensional slot burners and shows that while methane/air flame speeds can be measured with reasonable accuracy, the method may lack precision for other mixtures such as hydrogen/air. Curvature at the flame tip, strain on the flame sides and local quenching at the flame base can modify local flame speeds and require corrections which are studied using two-dimensional DNS. Numerical simulations also provide stretch, displacement and consumption flame speeds along the flame front. For methane/air flames, DNS show that the local stretch remains small so that the local consumption speed is very close to the unstretched premixed flame speed. The only correction needed to correctly predict flame speeds in this case is due to the finite aspect ratio of the slot used to inject the premixed gases which induces a flow acceleration in the measurement region (this correction can be evaluated from velocity measurement in the slot section or from an analytical solution). The method is applied to methane/air flames with and without water addition and results are compared to experimental data found in the literature. The paper then discusses the limitations of the slot-burner method to measure flame speeds for other mixtures and shows that it is not well adapted to mixtures with a Lewis number far from unity, such as hydrogen/air flames. (author)

Selle, L.; Ferret, B. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, IMFT, Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse (France); CNRS, IMFT, Toulouse (France); Poinsot, T. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, IMFT, Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse (France); CNRS, IMFT, Toulouse (France); CERFACS, Toulouse (France)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Single channel double-duct liquid metal electrical generator using a magnetohydrodynamic device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single channel double-duct liquid metal electrical generator using a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) device. The single channel device provides useful output AC electric energy. The generator includes a two-cylinder linear-piston engine which drives liquid metal in a single channel looped around one side of the MHD device to form a double-duct contra-flowing liquid metal MHD generator. A flow conduit network and drive mechanism are provided for moving liquid metal with an oscillating flow through a static magnetic field to produce useful AC electric energy at practical voltages and currents. Variable stroke is obtained by controlling the quantity of liquid metal in the channel. High efficiency is obtained over a wide range of frequency and power output.

Haaland, Carsten M. (Dadeville, AL); Deeds, W. Edward (Knoxville, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Reducing Thermal Losses and Gains With Buried and Encapsulated Ducts in Hot-Humid Climates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) monitored three houses in Jacksonville, FL, to investigate the effectiveness of encapsulated and encapsulated/buried ducts in reducing thermal losses and gains from ductwork in unconditioned attics. Burying ductwork beneath loose-fill insulation has been identified as an effective method of reducing thermal losses and gains from ductwork in dry climates, but it is not applicable in humid climates where condensation may occur on the outside of the duct jacket. By encapsulating the ductwork in closed cell polyurethane foam (ccSPF) before burial beneath loose-fill mineral fiber insulation, the condensation potential may be reduced while increasing the R-value of the ductwork.

Shapiro, C.; Magee, A.; Zoeller, W.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Single channel double-duct liquid metal electrical generator using a magnetohydrodynamic device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single channel double-duct liquid metal electrical generator using a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) device. The single channel device provides useful output AC electric energy. The generator includes a two-cylinder linear-piston engine which drives liquid metal in a single channel looped around one side of the MHD device to form a double-duct contra-flowing liquid metal MHD generator. A flow conduit network and drive mechanism are provided for moving liquid metal with an oscillating flow through a static magnetic field to produce useful AC electric energy at practical voltages and currents. Variable stroke is obtained by controlling the quantity of liquid metal in the channel. High efficiency is obtained over a wide range of frequency and power output. 5 figs.

Haaland, C.M.; Deeds, W.E.

1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

307

Method and apparatus for duct sealing using a clog-resistant insertable injector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A clog-resistant injector spray nozzle allows relatively unobtrusive insertion through a small access aperture into existing ductwork in occupied buildings for atomized particulate sealing of a ductwork. The spray nozzle comprises an easily cleaned and easily replaced straight liquid tube whose liquid contents are principally propelled by a heated propellant gas, such as heated air. Heat transfer is minimized from the heated propellant gas to the liquid tube until they both exit the injector, thereby greatly reducing the likelihood of nozzle clogging. A method of duct sealing using particles driven by heated propellant gas is described, whereby duct-sealing operations become both faster, and commercially practicable in inhabited commercial and residential buildings.

Wang, Duo (Albany, CA); Modera, Mark P. (Piedmont, CA)

2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

308

Continuous Commissioning® of a Single Fan Dual Duct System in an Office Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

boxes are independent boxes, which are operated in CAV modes. The building continuous commissioning was started on June 2004. It is being commissioned following the approaches used by the Energy Systems Laboratory at Nebraska University, which... in this case include installing VFD on the supply fan and return fan, updating all terminal boxes from CAV modes into VAV modes, resetting duct static pressure and supply air temperature, optimizing outside air intake and installing VFDs on chiller...

Dong, D.; Liu, M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

BayesDB : querying the probable implications of tabular data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BayesDB, a Bayesian database table, lets users query the probable implications of their tabular data as easily as an SQL database lets them query the data itself. Using the built-in Bayesian Query Language (BQL), users ...

Baxter, Jay

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Remote data access and analysis using SciDB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SciDB is an innovative data analysis system that provides fast querying and manipulation of large amounts of time-series, scientific data. This thesis describes the design of a framework that provides a user interface to ...

Anderson, Alan M., M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Hot-film anemometer measurements in adiabatic two-phase flow through a vertical duct  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hot-film anemometer (HFA) probe was used to obtain local measurements of void fraction and bubble frequency in a vertically oriented, high aspect ratio duct containing R-134a under selected adiabatic two-phase flow conditions. Data were obtained along a narrow dimension scan over the range 0.03 {le} {bar Z} {le} 0.80, where {bar Z} is the distance from the wall normalized with the duct spacing dimension. The void fraction profiles displayed large gradients in the near-wall regions and broad maxima near the duct centerline. The trends in the bubble frequency data generally follow those for the local void fraction data. However, the relatively large number of bubbles at higher pressure implies a larger magnitude of the interfacial area concentration, for the same cross-sectional average void fraction. For the two annular flow conditions tested, analysis of the HFA output voltage signal enabled identification of three distinct regions of the flow field; liquid film with dispersed bubbles, interfacial waves, and continuous vapor with dispersed droplets.

Trabold, T.A.; Moore, W.E.; Morris, W.O. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Ducts Sealing Using Injected Spray Sealant, Raleigh, North Carolina (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In multifamily and attached buildings, traditional duct sealing methods are often impractical or costly and disruptive because of the difficulty in accessing leakage sites. In this project, two retrofit duct sealing techniques - manually-applied sealants and injecting a spray sealant, were implemented in several low-rise multi-unit buildings. An analysis on the cost and performance of the two methods are presented. Each method was used in twenty housing units: approximately half of each group of units are single story and the remainder two-story. Results show that duct leakage to the outside was reduced by an average of 59% through the use of manual methods, and by 90% in the units where the injected spray sealant was used. It was found that 73% of the leakage reduction in homes that were treated with injected spray sealant was attributable to the manual sealing done at boots, returns and the air handler. The cost of manually-applying sealant ranged from $275 to $511 per unit and for the injected spray sealant the cost was $700 per unit. Modeling suggests a simple payback of 2.2 years for manual sealing and 4.7 years for the injected spray sealant system. Utility bills were collected for one year before and after the retrofits. Utility bill analysis shows 14% and 16% energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing procedure respectively in heating season whereas in cooling season, energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing were both 16%.

Not Available

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Development of an analytic core flow approximation for a square duct in an oblique magnetic field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The core flow approximation for liquid metal (LM), magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) duct flow is a method that ignores the contributions of viscous forces in the fluid. For a fully developed, steady state flow situation, this approximation leaves the magnetic forces to be balanced only by the pressure gradient and results in a greatly simplified momentum equation. The velocity field predicted by the core flow equations is obtained much more easily than that described by the full solution, which usually requires a numerical approach. For this reason it is desirable to use the core flow method for flow situations in which viscosity has little effect. Developed here is an analytic core flow solution for a square duct in an obliquely incident magnetic field which omits any special treatment of boundary layers. This solution is compared to the full solution method developed in the code MH2D and a parametric comparison is performed. This general analytic approach can be expanded to consider rectangular ducts or walls of different thickness and electrical conductivity. The latter, however, will greatly complicate the equations presented here.

Morley, N.B.; Tillack, M.S.; Abdou, M.A.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

CO-FIRING COAL, FEEDLOT, AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND LFB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intensive animal feeding operations create large amounts of animal waste that must be safely disposed of in order to avoid environmental degradation. Cattle feedlots and chicken houses are two examples. In feedlots, cattle are confined to small pens and fed a high calorie grain diet in preparation for slaughter. In chicken houses, thousands of chickens are kept in close proximity. In both of these operations, millions of tons of manure are produced every year. In this project a co-firing technology is proposed which would use manure that cannot be used for fertilizer, for power generation. Since the animal manure has economic uses as both a fertilizer and as a fuel, it is properly referred to as feedlot biomass (FB) for cow manure, or litter biomass (LB) for chicken manure. The biomass will be used a as a fuel by mixing it with coal in a 90:10 blend and firing it in existing coal fired combustion devices. This technique is known as co-firing, and the high temperatures produced by the coal will allow the biomass to be completely combusted. Therefore, it is the goal of the current research to develop an animal biomass cofiring technology. A cofiring technology is being developed by performing: (1) studies on fundamental fuel characteristics, (2) small scale boiler burner experiments, (3) gasifier experiments, (4) computer simulations, and (5) an economic analysis. The fundamental fuel studies reveal that biomass is not as high a quality fuel as coal. The biomass fuels are higher in ash, higher in moisture, higher in nitrogen and sulfur (which can cause air pollution), and lower in heat content than coal. Additionally, experiments indicate that the biomass fuels have higher gas content, release gases more readily than coal, and less homogeneous. Small-scale boiler experiments revealed that the biomass blends can be successfully fired, and NO{sub x} pollutant emissions produced will be similar to or lower than pollutant emissions when firing coal. This is a surprising result as the levels of N are higher in the biomass fuel than in coal. Further experiments showed that biomass is twice or more effective than coal when used in a reburning process to reduce NO{sub x} emissions. Since crushing costs of biomass fuels may be prohibitive, stoker firing may be cost effective; in order simulate such a firing, future work will investigate the performance of a gasifier when fired with larger sized coal and biomass. It will be a fixed bed gasifier, and will evaluate blends, coal, and biomass. Computer simulations were performed using the PCGC-2 code supplied by BYU and modified by A&M with three mixture fractions for handling animal based biomass fuels in order to include an improved moisture model for handling wet fuels and phosphorus oxidation. Finally the results of the economic analysis show that considerable savings can be achieved with the use of biomass. In the case of higher ash and moisture biomass, the fuel cost savings will be reduced, due to increased transportation costs. A spreadsheet program was created to analyze the fuel savings for a variety of different moisture levels, ash levels, and power plant operating parameters.

Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thien; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan

2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Sensor for Individual Burner Control of Coal Firing Rate, Fuel-Air Ratio and Coal Fineness Correlation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate, cost-efficient monitoring instrumentation has long been considered essential to the operation of power plants. Nonetheless, for the monitoring of coal flow, such instrumentation has been sorely lacking and technically difficult to achieve. With more than half of the electrical power in the United States currently supplied by coal, energy generated by this resource is critical to the US economy. The demand for improvement in this area has only increased as a result of the following two situations: First, deregulation has produced a heightened demand for both reduced electrical cost and improved grid connectivity. Second, environmental concerns have simultaneously resulted in a need for both increased efficiency and reduced carbon and NOx emissions. A potential approach to addressing both these needs would be improvement in the area of combustion control. This would result in a better heat rate, reduced unburned carbon in ash, and reduced NOx emissions. However, before feedback control can be implemented, the ability to monitor coal flow to the burners in real-time must be established. While there are several ''commercially available'' products for real-time coal flow measurement, power plant personnel are highly skeptical about the accuracy and longevity of these systems in their current state of development. In fact, following several demonstration projects of in-situ coal flow measurement systems in full scale utility boilers, it became obvious that there were still many unknown influences on these instruments during field applications. Due to the operational environment of the power plant, it has been difficult if not impossible to sort out what parameters could be influencing the various probe technologies. Additionally, it has been recognized for some time that little is known regarding the performance of coal flow splitters, even where rifflers are employed. Often the coal flow distribution from these splitters remains mal-distributed. There have been mixed results in the field using variable orifices in coal pipes. Development of other coal flow control devices has been limited. An underlying difficulty that, to date, has hindered the development of an accurate instrument for coal flow measurements is the fact that coal flow is characterized by irregular temporal and spatial variation. However, despite the inherent complexity of the dynamic system, the system is in fact deterministic. Therefore, in principle, the coal flow can be deduced from the dynamics it exhibits. Nonetheless, the interactions are highly nonlinear, rendering standard signal processing approaches, which rely on techniques such as frequency decomposition, to be of little value. Foster-Miller, Inc. has developed a methodology that relates the complex variation in such systems to the information of interest. This technology will be described in detail in Section 2. A second concern regarding the current measurement systems is installation, which can be labor-intensive and cost-prohibitive. A process that does not require the pulverizer to be taken off line would be highly desirable. Most microwave and electrostatic methods require drilling up to 20 holes in the pipe, all with a high degree of precision so as to produce a proper alignment of the probes. At least one electrostatic method requires a special spool piece to be fitted into each existing coal pipe. Overall, these procedures are both difficult and very expensive. An alternative approach is pursued here, namely the development of an instrument that relies on an acoustic signal captured by way of a commercial accelerometer. The installation of this type of sensor is both simpler and less invasive than other techniques. An accelerometer installed in a pipe wall need not penetrate through the wall, which means that the system may be able to remain on line during the installation. Further, due to the fact that the Dynamical Instruments technology, unlike other systems, does not rely on uniformity of the air or coal profile, the installation location need not be on a long, straight run

R. Demler

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Energy Savings and Peak Demand Reduction of a SEER 21 Heat Pump vs. a SEER 13 Heat Pump with Attic and Indoor Duct Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes results of experiments that were conducted in an unoccupied 1600 square foot house--the Manufactured Housing (MH Lab) at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC)--to evaluate the delivered performance as well as the relative performance of a SEER 21 variable capacity heat pump versus a SEER 13 heat pump. The performance was evaluated with two different duct systems: a standard attic duct system and an indoor duct system located in a dropped-ceiling space.

Cummings, J.; Withers, C.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Duct injection for SO{sub 2} control, Design Handbook, Volume 1, Process design and engineering guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PETC developed a comprehensive program of coal-related, acid-rain research and development with a major activity area centering on flue gas cleanup and control of SO{sub 2} emissions. Particular emphasis was placed on the retrofit measures for older coal-fired power plants which predate the 1971 New Source Performance Standards. Candidate emission control technologies fall into three categories, depending upon their point of application along the fuel path (i.e., pre, during, or post combustion). The post-combustion, in-duct injection of a calcium-based chemical reagent seemed promising. Preliminary studies showed that reagent injection between the existing air heater and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) could remove between 50-60% of the SO{sub 2} and produce an environmentally safe, dry, solid waste that is easily disposed. Although SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies were less, the estimated capital costs for duct injection technology were low making the economics of duct injection systems seem favorable when compared to conventional wet slurry scrubbers under certain circumstances. With the promulgation of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 came more incentive for the development of low capital cost flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes. A number of technical problems had to be resolved, however, before duct injection technology could be brought to a state of commercial readiness. The Duct Injection Technology Development Program was launched as a comprehensive, four-year research effort undertaken by PETC to develop this new technology. Completed in 1992, this Duct Injection Design Handbook and the three-dimensional predictive mathematical model constitute two primary end products from this development program. The aim of this design handbook and the accompanying math model is to provide utility personnel with sufficient information to evaluate duct injection technology against competing SO{sub 2} emissions reduction strategies for an existing plant.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Energy Efficiency & Environmental News: Duct Cleaning and Indoor Air Quality 1 Florida Energy Extension Service and Gary Cook 2 DUCT CLEANING AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With concern about secondary smoke, dust mites, formaldehyde emissions and bioaerosols, the public has become more aware of indoor air quality problems. Heating, air conditioning and ventilation units as well as associated ductwork can be the sources of mold, fungi and other microbial pollutants as well as particulates of dust, secondary smoke and pieces of dead dust mites. Along with the public’s concern has been the development of businesses directly associated with indoor air quality. Some of these businesses are reputable and supply effective indoor air quality services; others, on the other hand, offer little more than technical jargon and will take advantage of the unwary consumer. Duct cleaning has been an area that has been attracted by both reputable and unscrupulous businesses.

unknown authors

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Applicability of RELAP5-3D for Thermal-Hydraulic Analyses of a Sodium-Cooled Actinide Burner Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Actinide Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) is envisioned as a sodium-cooled, fast reactor that will burn the actinides generated in light water reactors to reduce nuclear waste and ease proliferation concerns. The RELAP5-3D computer code is being considered as the thermal-hydraulic system code to support the development of the ABTR. An evaluation was performed to determine the applicability of RELAP5-3D for the analysis of a sodium-cooled fast reactor. The applicability evaluation consisted of several steps, including identifying the important transients and phenomena expected in the ABTR, identifying the models and correlations that affect the code’s calculation of the important phenomena, and evaluating the applicability of the important models and correlations for calculating the important phenomena expected in the ABTR. The applicability evaluation identified code improvements and additional models needed to simulate the ABTR. The accuracy of the calculated thermodynamic and transport properties for sodium was also evaluated.

C. B. Davis

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Evaluation of gas-reburning and low NO{sub x} burners on a wall fired boiler. Technical progress report number 17, October 1--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this CCT project is to evaluate the use of Gas Reburning and Low NO{sub x} Burners (GR-LNB) for NO{sub x} emission control from a wall fired boiler. Low NO{sub x} burners are designed to delay the mixing of the coal fuel with combustion air to minimize the NO{sub x} formation. With GR, about 80--85% of the coal fuel is fired in the main combustion zone. The balance of the fuel is added downstream as natural gas to create a slightly fuel rich environment in which NO{sub x} is converted to N{sub 2}. The combustion process is completed by over fire air addition. SO{sub x} emissions are reduced to the extent that natural gas replaces sulfur-containing coal. The level of NO{sub x} reduction achievable with 15--20% natural gas is on the order of 50--60%. Thus the emission reduction target of the combination of these two developed technologies is about 70%. This project is being conducted in three phases at the host site, a 172 MW wall fired boiler of Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCo), Cherokee Unit 3 in Denver, Colorado: Phase 1--Design and Permitting; Phase 2--Construction and Start-up; and Phase 3--Operation, Data Collection, Reporting and Disposition. Phase 3 activities during this reporting period involved initiation of the second generation gas reburning parametric testing. This technology utilizes enhanced natural gas and overfire air injectors with elimination of the flue gas recirculation system. The objective is to demonstrate NO{sub x} reductions similar to that of long term testing but with a reduced capital cost requirement through elimination of the FGR system.

NONE

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "db duct burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

Turbulent flame speeds in ducts and the deflagration/detonation transition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A methodology is proposed for determining whether a deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) might occur for flame propagation along a duct with baffles, closed at the ignition end. A flammable mixture can attain a maximum turbulent burning velocity. If this is sufficiently high, a strong shock is formed ahead of the flame. It is assumed that this maximum burning velocity is soon attained and on the basis of previous studies, this value can be obtained for the given conditions. The increase in temperature and pressure of the reactants, due to the shock, further increases the maximum turbulent burning velocity. The gas velocity ahead of the flame is linked to one-dimensional shock wave equations in a numerical analysis. The predicted duct flame speeds with the appropriate maximum turbulent burning velocities are in good agreement with those measured in the slow and fast flame regimes of a range of CH{sub 4}-air and H{sub 2}-air mixtures. DDTs are possible if autoignition of the reactants occurs in the time available, and if the projected flame speed approaches the Chapman-Jouguet velocity at the same temperature and pressure. Prediction of the first condition requires values of the autoignition delay time of the mixture at the shocked temperatures and pressures. Prediction of the second requires values of the laminar burning velocity and Markstein number. With the appropriate values of these parameters, it is shown numerically that there is no DDT with CH{sub 4}-air. With H{sub 2}-air, the onset of DDT occurs close to the values of equivalence ratio at which it has been observed experimentally. The effects of different duct sizes also are predicted, although details of the DDT cannot be predicted. Extension of the study to a wider range of fuels requires more data on their laminar burning velocities and Markstein numbers at higher temperatures and pressures and on autoignition delay times at lower temperatures and pressures. (author)

Bradley, D.; Lawes, M.; Liu, Kexin [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

Building America Case Study: Raised Ceiling Interior Duct System, New Smyrna, Florida (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of BA-PIRC's longtime Habitat for Humanity partners, S.E. Volusia CO (SEVHFH), was interested in building a home to the new Challenge Home standards. SEVHFH routinely builds ENERGY STAR V3.1 homes. The only modification to their design needed to comply with the Challenge Home criteria was the interior duct requirement. Unwilling to incur the added costs of a foam roof deck or wall heights above 8 feet to accommodate a fur-down chase SEVHFH opted to build a fur-up or raised ceiling chase.

Not Available

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

An analysis of fluid flow by electrical analogy as applied to air ducts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 0 10. 0 14. 9 9-4 12. 0 VELOCITY FPM 1600 1460 1570 1300 TOTAL PRESSURE DROP IN. WATER 0 04 0. 10 0 02 o o8 o. o8 TABLE 3 21 PART III ALMQJATING CUHREYZ N. . GAME CALCULATOR APPLIED TO THE TOTAL PiiBSURE DROP METHOD GIVEN... resistance for Section B is then read to be 13. 3$ ohms which gives an R oi' 38 ' 2 ohms. From Figure 4 the velocity is found to be 1400 fpm and duct diameter 14. 9 inches. fhe voltage drop for Section D is read to be 10. 0 volts, giving a total head loss...

Howard, Charles Pinto

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

324

Global modes, receptivity, and sensitivity analysis of diffusion flames coupled with duct  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the performance of the system. These oscillations are a persistent problem. Their comprehension, prediction and control in the design of gas turbines and rocket engines are areas of current research, as reviewed by Lieuwen & Yang (2005); Culick (2006... ,B,C,D and in the online supplementary material. 2. Thermo-acoustic model The thermo-acoustic model consists of a diffusion flame placed in an acoustic duct (figure 1). The acoustic waves cause perturbations in the velocity field. In turn, these Receptivity and sensitivity...

Magri, Luca; Juniper, Matthew P.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Investigation of wall friction in noncircular ducts with a rough liner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Civil ~Rn i , I nd , p. 166, P h Ay, 1DDD 2. R k'*1, R M * i, M*ch d I' G 1 ti A~n 1 Viley and. Sons, Inc. , New York, p. 66, 1950, H *I ci er, P. G. , ~atd, P~, d Ai. ~G* d't'* 19: 127(19rr. 7). O; Johnaon, Guy, Jr. , Determination oi' the ~pandit...INVESTIGATION OZ 7('ALL FRICTION IN NONCIHCULAR DUCTS VIITH A ROUGH LINEH A Thesis John Charles Tyler Submitted. to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Tyler, John Charles

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Topical Report No. 2 is an interim report on the Duct Injection Test Facility being operated for the Department of Energy at Beverly, Ohio. Either dry calcium hydroxide or an aqueous slurry of calcium hydroxide (prepared by slaking quicklime) is injected into a slipstream of flue gas to achieve partial removal of SO{sub 2} from a coal-burning power station. Water injected with the slurry or injected separately from the dry sorbents cools the flue gas and increases the water vapor content of the gas. The addition of water, either in the slurry or in a separate spray, makes the extent of reaction between the sorbent and the SO{sub 2} more complete; the presumption is that water is effective in the liquid state, when it is able to wet the sorbent particles physically, and not especially effective in the vapor state. An electrostatic precipitator collects the combination of suspended solids (fly ash from the boiler and sorbent from the duct injection process). All of the operations are being carried out on the scale of approximately 50,000 acfm of flue gas.

Felix, L.G.; Dismukes, E.B.; Gooch, J.P. (Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, AL (United States)); Klett, M.G.; Demian, A.G. (Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States))

1992-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

327

Determination of the radioactive material and plutonium holdup in ducts and piping in the 324 Building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the measurements Performed to determine the radionuclide content and mass of plutonium in exposed ducts, filters, and piping in the 324 Building at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site in Washington State. This information is needed to characterize facility radiation levels, to verify compliance with criticality safety specifications, and to allow more accurate nuclear material control using nondestructive assay (NDA) methods. Gamma assay techniques typically employed for NDA analysis were used to determine the gamma-emitting isotopes in the ducts, filters, and piping. Passive neutron counting was selected to estimate -the plutonium content because high gamma levels from fission and activation products effectively mask any gamma emissions from plutonium. A high-purity gamma-ray detector Was used to measure the mixed fission and activation radionuclides. A neutron slab detector containing five {sup 3}He proportional counters was used to determine the neutron emission rates and estimate the mass of plutonium present. Both measurement systems followed the methods and procedures routinely used for nuclear waste assay and safeguards measurements.

Haggard, D.L.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Tanner, J.E.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

New Insights for Improving the Designs of Flexible Duct Junction Boxes (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IBACOS explored the relationships between pressure and physical configurations of flexible duct junction boxes by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to predict individual box parameters and total system pressure, thereby ensuring improved HVAC performance. Current Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) guidance (Group 11, Appendix 3, ACCA Manual D, Rutkowski 2009) allows for unconstrained variation in the number of takeoffs, box sizes, and takeoff locations. The only variables currently used in selecting an equivalent length (EL) are velocity of air in the duct and friction rate, given the first takeoff is located at least twice its diameter away from the inlet. This condition does not account for other factors impacting pressure loss across these types of fittings. For each simulation, the IBACOS team converted pressure loss within a box to an EL to compare variation in ACCA Manual D guidance to the simulated variation. IBACOS chose cases to represent flows reasonably correlating to flows typically encountered in the field and analyzed differences in total pressure due to increases in number and location of takeoffs, box dimensions, and velocity of air, and whether an entrance fitting is included. The team also calculated additional balancing losses for all cases due to discrepancies between intended outlet flows and natural flow splits created by the fitting. In certain asymmetrical cases, the balancing losses were significantly higher than symmetrical cases where the natural splits were close to the targets. Thus, IBACOS has shown additional design constraints that can ensure better system performance.

Not Available

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Nuclear reactor fuel assembly duct-tube-to-handling-socket attachment system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reusable system for removably attaching the upper end 10of a nuclear reactor duct tube to the lower end 30 of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly handling socket. A transition ring 20, fixed to the duct tube's upper end 10, has an interior-threaded section 22 with a first locking hole segment 24. An adaptor ring 40, fixed to the handling socket's lower end 30 has an outside-threaded section 42 with a second locking hole segment 44. The inside 22 and outside 42 threaded sections match and can be joined so that the first 24 and second 44 locking hole segments can be aligned to form a locking hole. A locking ring 50, with a locking pin 52, slides over the adaptor ring 40 so that the locking pin 52 fits in the locking hole. A swage lock 60 or a cantilever finger lock 70 is formed from the locking cup collar 26 to fit in a matching groove 54 or 56 in the locking ring 50 to prevent the locking ring's locking pin 52 from backing out of the locking hole.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Smith, Bob G. (Kennewick, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology. Topical report No. 1, Literature review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gilbert Commonwealth, Southern Research Institute and the American Electric Power Service Corporation have embarked on a program to convert DOE`s Duct Injection Test Facility located at the Muskingum River Power Plant of Ohio Power Company to test alternate duct injection technologies. The technologies to be tested include slurry sorbent injection of hydrated lime using dual fluid nozzles, or a rotary atomizer and pneumatic injection of hydrated lime, with flue gas humidification before or after sorbent injection. The literature review and analysis contained in this report is a part of the preparatory effort for the test program.

Gooch, J.P.; Dismukes, E.B.; Dahlin, R.S.; Faulkner, M.G. [Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, AL (United States); Klett, M.G.; Buchanan, T.L.; Hunt, J.E. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

High-Speed Internet Access via HVAC Ducts: A New Approach Daniel D. Stancil, Ozan K. Tonguz, Ariton Xhafa, Ahmet Cepni, and Pavel Nikitin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-Speed Internet Access via HVAC Ducts: A New Approach Daniel D. Stancil, Ozan K. Tonguz, Ariton conditioning (HVAC) ducts for indoor wireless transmission systems and networks. Mea- surements and system to 100 Mbps should be possible, when HVAC system is used in con- junction with OFDM technology. Keywords

Stancil, Daniel D.

332

PASSIVE CONTROL OF PARTICLE DISPERSION IN A PARTICLE-LADEN CIRCULAR JET USING ELLIPTIC CO-ANNULAR FLOW: A MEANS FOR IMPROVING UTILIZATION AND EMISSION REDUCTIONS IN PULVERIZED COAL BURNER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A passive control technology utilizing elliptic co-flow to control the particle flinging and particle dispersion in a particle (coal)-laden flow was investigated using experimental and numerical techniques. Preferential concentration of particles occurs in particle-laden jets used in pulverized coal burner and causes uncontrollable NO{sub x} formation due to inhomogeneous local stoichiometry. This particular project was aimed at characterizing the near-field flow behavior of elliptic coaxial jets. The knowledge gained from the project will serve as the basis of further investigation on fluid-particle interactions in an asymmetric coaxial jet flow-field and thus is important to improve the design of pulverized coal burners where non-homogeneity of particle concentration causes increased NO{sub x} formation.

Ahsan R. Choudhuri

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

EA-1472: Commercial Demonstration fo the Low Nox Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air (LNB/SOFA) Integration System Emission Reduction Technology, Holcolm Station, Sunflower Electric Power Corporation Finnety County, Kansas  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), to analyze the potential impacts of the commercial application of the Low-NOx Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air (LNB/SOFA) integration system to achieve nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions reduction at Sunflower’s Holcomb Unit No. 1 (Holcomb Station), located near Garden City, in Finney County, Kansas. The Holcomb Station would be modified in three distinct phases to demonstrate the synergistic effect of layering NOx control technologies.

334

Evaluation of mixing downstream of tees in duct systems with respect to single point representative air sampling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

improvement in 3 hydraulic diameters needed to achieve COVs below 10%. Without an air blender, the distance downstream of the T-junction for the COVs below 20% increased as the velocity of the sub duct airflow increased. About 95% of the cases achieved COVs...

Kim, Taehong

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

335

Procedure and Application for Determining the Cold Deck and Hot Deck Airflow in a Dual-Duct System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper introduces an innovative method to determine the cold and hot airflow through a dual-duct variable air volume (VAV) system. The actual building load can be identified based on the calculated airflow and temperature for both the cold...

Liu, G.; Mingsheng, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Exploring Maximum Humidity Control and Energy Conservation Opportunities with Single Duct Single Zone Air-Handling Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Humidity control for single-duct single-zone (SDSZ) constant volume air handling units is known to be a challenge. The operation of these systems is governed by space temperature only. Under mild weather conditions, discharge air temperature can get...

Zhou, J.; Wei, G.; Turner, W. D.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

GhostDB: Hiding Data from Prying Eyes Christophe Salperwyck*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

one direction: from public to private. This demonstration shows GhostDB's query processing in action Imagine that you have been entrusted with private data, such as corporate product information, sensitive queries whose result will combine private and public data, but private data must not be revealed, say

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

338

Anti-diabetic and hypolipidemic effects of Sargassum yezoense in db/db mice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sargassum yezoense (SY) treatment improved glucose and lipid impairment in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This pharmacological action is associated with PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} dual activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It decreases the expression of G6Pase for gluconeogenesis in liver. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It increases the expression of UCP3 for lipid metabolism in adipose tissue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There are no significant side effects such as body weight gain and hepatomegaly. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been considered to be desirable targets for metabolic syndrome, even though their specific agonists have several side effects including body weight gain, edema and tissue failure. Previously, we have reported in vitro effects of Sargassum yezoense (SY) and its ingredients, sargaquinoic acid (SQA) and sargahydroquinoic acid (SHQA), on PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} dual transcriptional activation. In this study, we describe in vivo pharmacological property of SY on metabolic disorders. SY treatment significantly improved glucose and lipid impairment in db/db mice model. More importantly, there are no significant side effects such as body weight gain and hepatomegaly in SY-treated animals, indicating little side effects of SY in liver and lipid metabolism. In addition, SY led to a decrease in the expression of G6Pase for gluconeogenesis in liver responsible for lowering blood glucose level and an increase in the expression of UCP3 in adipose tissue for the reduction of total and LDL-cholesterol level. Altogether, our data suggest that SY would be a potential therapeutic agent against type 2 diabetes and related metabolic disorders by ameliorating the glucose and lipid metabolism.

Kim, Su-Nam, E-mail: snkim@kist.re.kr [Natural Medicine Center, KIST Gangneung Institute, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of)] [Natural Medicine Center, KIST Gangneung Institute, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Woojung [Natural Medicine Center, KIST Gangneung Institute, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of)] [Natural Medicine Center, KIST Gangneung Institute, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Gyu-Un [College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women's University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of) [College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women's University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Research Center for Cell Fate Control, Sookmyung Women's University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Kee, E-mail: yksnbk@sookmyung.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women's University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

339

Impact of Ducting on Heat Pump Water Heater Space Conditioning Energy Use and Comfort  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increasing penetration of heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) in the residential sector will offer an important opportunity for energy savings, with a theoretical energy savings of up to 63% per water heater and up to 11% of residential energy use (EIA 2009). However, significant barriers must be overcome before this technology will reach widespread adoption in the Pacific Northwest region and nationwide. One significant barrier noted by the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA) is the possible interaction with the homes’ space conditioning system for units installed in conditioned spaces. Such complex interactions may decrease the magnitude of whole-house savings available from HPWH installed in the conditioned space in cold climates and could lead to comfort concerns (Larson et al. 2011; Kresta 2012). Modeling studies indicate that the installation location of HPWHs can significantly impact their performance and the resultant whole-house energy savings (Larson et al. 2012; Maguire et al. 2013). However, field data are not currently available to validate these results. This field evaluation of two GE GeoSpring HPWHs in the PNNL Lab Homes is designed to measure the performance and impact on the Lab Home HVAC system of a GE GeoSpring HPWH configured with exhaust ducting compared to an unducted GeoSpring HPWH during heating and cooling season periods; and measure the performance and impact on the Lab Home HVAC system of the GeoSpring HPWH with both supply and exhaust air ducting as compared to an unducted GeoSpring HPWH during heating and cooling season periods. Important metrics evaluated in these experiments include water heater energy use, HVAC energy use, whole house energy use, interior temperatures (as a proxy for thermal comfort), and cost impacts. This technical report presents results from the PNNL Lab Homes experiment.

Widder, Sarah H.; Petersen, Joseph M.; Parker, Graham B.; Baechler, Michael C.

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

340

Can pancreatic duct-derived progenitors be a source of islet regeneration?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The regenerative process of the pancreas is of interest because the main pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus is an inadequate number of insulin-producing {beta}-cells. The functional mass of {beta}-cells is decreased in type 1 diabetes, so replacing missing {beta}-cells or triggering their regeneration may allow for improved type 1 diabetes treatment. Therefore, expansion of the {beta}-cell mass from endogenous sources, either in vivo or in vitro, represents an area of increasing interest. The mechanism of islet regeneration remains poorly understood, but the identification of islet progenitor sources is critical for understanding {beta}-cell regeneration. One potential source is the islet proper, via the dedifferentiation, proliferation, and redifferentiation of facultative progenitors residing within the islet. Neogenesis, or that the new pancreatic islets can derive from progenitor cells present within the ducts has been reported, but the existence and identity of the progenitor cells have been debated. In this review, we focus on pancreatic ductal cells, which are islet progenitors capable of differentiating into islet {beta}-cells. Islet neogenesis, seen as budding of hormone-positive cells from the ductal epithelium, is considered to be one mechanism for normal islet growth after birth and in regeneration, and has suggested the presence of pancreatic stem cells. Numerous results support the neogenesis hypothesis, the evidence for the hypothesis in the adult comes primarily from morphological studies that have in common the production of damage to all or part of the pancreas, with consequent inflammation and repair. Although numerous studies support a ductal origin for new islets after birth, lineage-tracing experiments are considered the 'gold standard' of proof. Lineage-tracing experiments show that pancreatic duct cells act as progenitors, giving rise to new islets after birth and after injury. The identification of differentiated pancreatic ductal cells as an in vivo progenitor for pancreatic {beta}-cells has implications for a potentially important, expandable source of new islets for diabetic replenishment therapy.

Xia, Bing [Department of Endocrinology, First Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Hei Long Jiang Province 150001 (China)] [Department of Endocrinology, First Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Hei Long Jiang Province 150001 (China); Zhan, Xiao-Rong, E-mail: xiaorongzhan@sina.com [Department of Endocrinology, First Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Hei Long Jiang Province 150001 (China)] [Department of Endocrinology, First Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Hei Long Jiang Province 150001 (China); Yi, Ran [Department of Endocrinology, First Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Hei Long Jiang Province 150001 (China)] [Department of Endocrinology, First Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Hei Long Jiang Province 150001 (China); Yang, Baofeng [Department of Pharmacology, State Key Laboratory of Biomedicine and Pharmacology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Hei Long Jiang Province 150001 (China)] [Department of Pharmacology, State Key Laboratory of Biomedicine and Pharmacology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Hei Long Jiang Province 150001 (China)

2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "db duct burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Evaluation of gas-reburning and low NO{sub x} burners on a wall fired boiler. Progress report, January 1--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this Clean Coal Technology project is to evaluate the use of Gas Reburning and Low NO{sub x} Burners (GR-LNB) for NO{sub x} emission control from a wall fired boiler. This project is being conducted in three phases at the host site, a 172 MW{sub e} wall fired boiler of Public Service Company of Colorado, Cherokee Unit 3 in Denver, Colorado: Phase I, design and permitting has been completed on June 30, 1992; Phase II, construction and start-up has been completed on September 1991; and Phase III, operation, data collection, reporting and disposition. Phase III activities during this reporting period involved the following: compilation, analysis and assembly of the final report and initiation of restoration activities; restoration of the gas reburning system involving removal of the flue gas recirculation system (permanent Second Generation Gas Reburning); and participants meeting and reburning workshop. Long term testing of the equipment demonstrated an average NO{sub x} reduction of 65% using 18% gas heat input. After removing the flue gas recirculation system, (Second Generation GR), an average NO{sub x} of 64% was achieved using 13% gas heat input. The project goal of 70% reduction was achieved, but no on an average basis due to the load requirements of the utility.

NONE

1996-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Comprehensive report to Congress: Clean Coal Technology program: Evaluation of gas reburning and low-NO sub x burners on a wall-fired boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report briefly describes the Gas Reburning and Low-NO{sub x} Burners technology which is a low-cost technology that can be applied in both retrofit and new applications. This demonstration will be conducted on a utility boiler in Colorado at Cherokee Station {number sign}3; however, the technology is applicable to industrial boilers and other combustion systems. Although this technology is primarily a NO{sub x} reduction technology, some reductions in other emissions will take place. Since 15--20% of the coal is replaced with natural gas, SO{sub 2} and particulate emissions are reduced commensurately. Also the lower carbon-to-hydrogen ratio of natural gas compared to coal reduces CO{sub 2} emissions. The formation of NO{sub x} is controlled by several factors: (1) the amount of nitrogen that is chemically bound in the fuel; (2) the flame temperature; (3) the residence time that combustion products remain at very high temperatures; and (4) the amount of excess oxygen available, especially at the hottest parts of the flame. Decreasing any of these parameters, tends to reduce NO{sub x} formation. 6 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

T-594: IBM solidDB Password Hash Authentication Bypass Vulnerability  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This vulnerability could allow remote attackers to execute arbitrary code on vulnerable installations of IBM solidDB. Authentication is not required to exploit this vulnerability.

344

Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: New Insights for Improving the Designs of Flexible Duct Junction Boxes (Fact Sheet)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

IBACOS explored the relationships between pressure and physical configurations of flexible duct junction boxes by using computational fluid dynamics simulations to predict individual box parameters and total system pressure, thereby ensuring improved HVAC performance.

345

Comparative Testing of the Combined Radiant Barrier and Duct Models in the ESL's Code-Compliant Simulation Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(ESL) % Difference (EnergyGauge) Base Case Figure 9. Supply duct area (% of conditioned space). 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 8000 9000 2% 4% 6% 8% 10% A n n u al Co o l i n g U s e ( k W h ) -20% -10% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% Pe rc e n t a... Figure 15. Supply duct area (% of conditioned space). 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 8000 9000 2% 4% 6% 8% 10% A n n u al Co o l i n g U s e ( k W h ) -20% -10% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% Pe rc e n t a g e Di ffe re n c e ( % ) fro m B a s e...

Kim, S.; Haberl, J. S.

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

346

Particle deposition from turbulent flow: Review of published research and its applicability to ventilation ducts in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews published experimental and theoretical investigations of particle deposition from turbulent flows and considers the applicability of this body of work to the specific case of particle deposition from flows in the ducts of heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Particle deposition can detrimentally affect the performance of HVAC systems and it influences the exposure of building occupants to a variety of air pollutants. The first section of this report describes the types of HVAC systems under consideration and discusses the components, materials and operating parameters commonly found in these systems. The second section reviews published experimental investigations of particle deposition rates from turbulent flows and considers the ramifications of the experimental evidence with respect to HVAC ducts. The third section considers the structure of turbulent airflows in ventilation ducts with a particular emphasis on turbulence investigations that have been used as a basis for particle deposition models. The final section reviews published literature on predicting particle deposition rates from turbulent flows.

Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

March 23, 2008 Databases: Practical DB Design 1 Practical Database Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approach towards development of information system, called, Information System Development Life Cycle. #12 of Information Systems in Organizations + Why Organizations Use DB Systems + Information System Life Cycle System Life Cycle ... Database DBMS Users Users #12;March 23, 2008 Databases: Practical DB Design 8

Adam, Salah

348

CryptDB: A Practical Encrypted Relational DBMS Raluca Ada Popa, Nickolai Zeldovich, and Hari Balakrishnan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CryptDB: A Practical Encrypted Relational DBMS Raluca Ada Popa, Nickolai Zeldovich, and Hari Balakrishnan {raluca, nickolai, hari}@csail.mit.edu ABSTRACT CryptDB is a DBMS that provides provable. When individual users or enterprises store their sensitive data in a DBMS today, they must trust

Sabatini, David M.

349

Chapter 5: The Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Database (dbSNP) of Nucleotide Sequence Variation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 5: The Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Database (dbSNP) of Nucleotide Sequence Variation, and performance of functional studies. The Single Nucleotide Polymorphism database (dbSNP) is a public single-base nucleotide substitutions (also known as single nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs), small

Levin, Judith G.

350

ABSORPTION-DELAY MODELS OF HEAT TRANSPORT R.E. SHOWALTER AND D.B. VISARRAGA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSORPTION-DELAY MODELS OF HEAT TRANSPORT R.E. SHOWALTER AND D.B. VISARRAGA Abstract. A temperature jump in the water traveling through a pipe is delayed by the absorption of heat into the pipe wall transfer, absorption, memory, kinetic models, approximation. 1 #12;2 R.E. SHOWALTER AND D.B. VISARRAGA 1

351

Performance Evaluation of a MongoDB and Hadoop Platform for Scientific Data Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project are using MongoDB, a document oriented NoSQL store. However, there is a limited understanding- laborators are added onto the project over time. MongoDB provides an appropriate data model and query language for this application. However, the project also needs to perform complex statistical data mining

352

Characterization of pipes, drain lines, and ducts using the pipe explorer system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As DOE dismantles its nuclear processing facilities, site managers must employ the best means of disposing or remediating hundreds of miles of potentially contaminated piping and duct work. Their interiors are difficult to access, and in many cases even the exteriors are inaccessible. Without adequate characterization, it must be assumed that the piping is contaminated, and the disposal cost of buried drain lines can be on the order of $1,200/ft and is often unnecessary as residual contamination levels often are below free release criteria. This paper describes the program to develop a solution to the problem of characterizing radioactive contamination in pipes. The technical approach and results of using the Pipe Explorer {trademark} system are presented. The heart of the system is SEA`s pressurized inverting membrane adapted to transport radiation detectors and other tools into pipes. It offers many benefits over other pipe inspection approaches. It has video and beta/gamma detection capabilities, and the need for alpha detection has been addressed through the development of the Alpha Explorer{trademark}. These systems have been used during various stages of decontamination and decommissioning of DOE sites, including the ANL CP-5 reactor D&D. Future improvements and extensions of their capabilities are discussed.

Cremer, C.D.; Kendrick, D.T.; Cramer, E.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

One Component Two Phase Flow in Horizontal and Vertical Ducts: Some Basic Considerations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For a description and analysis of the flow they consider the conservation equations of the two phases separately, but in thermal and mechanical equilibrium, coupled by the itnerface shear forces (two fluid model, drift flux model). Coupling may be weak or strong, depending on Froude and Mach numbers of the flow. The fluid is highly compressible, not because the individual phases move at such speeds that their individual density changes are significant but because evapiration (phase change) results in large density changes of the system at moderate pressure or temperature changes once flashing occurs. The slip between the phases is caused by unequal wall shear stress, acceleration of the fluid or gravitational forces and is hindered by the interface interaction. if they denote by {gamma} the ratio of the liquid density to the vapor density and by {sigma} the ratio of the vapor speed to the liquid speed they find that in horizontal flows {sigma} = {gamma}{sup 1/2} yields the maximum slip (neglecting acceleration effects) that can be reached with no interface force acting (assuming equal friction coefficients for both phases at the wall). If one investigates the conditions of thermodynamic flow similarity between different substances in two phase flow, one finds that the latent heat of vaporization is the principal controlling parameter. Thus, a 5 cm diameter test section in two phase R-114, at room temperature, corresponds to a 30 cm diameter duct in water-steam at boiling conditions at high temperatures such as encountered in geothermal and other power production systems.

Maeder, Paul F.; Dickinson, David A.; Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

DB Climate Change Advisors DBCCA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable Solutions LLC JumpCrow Lake Wind JumpCuttings Analysis AtCycloceanCropsDB

355

Where is DB config stored? | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place: SaltTroyer & AssociatesWestIL NumberPowerWheegoDB config

356

Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage in the Management of Postsurgical Biliary Leaks in Patients with Nondilated Intrahepatic Bile Ducts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose. To assess the feasibility of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) for the treatment of postsurgical biliary leaks in patients with nondilated intrahepatic bile ducts, its efficacy in restoring the integrity of bile ducts, and technical procedures to reduce morbidity. Methods. Seventeen patients out of 936 undergoing PTBD over a 20-year period had a noncholestatic liver and were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent surgery for cancer and suffered a postsurgical biliary leak of 345 ml/day on average; 71% were in poor condition and required permanent nutritional support. An endoscopic approach failed or was excluded due to inaccessibility of the bile ducts. Results. Established biliary leaks and site of origin were diagnosed an average of 21 days (range 1-90 days) after surgery. In all cases percutaneous access to the biliary tree was achieved. An external (preleakage) drain was applied in 7 cases, 9 patients had an external-internal fistula bridging catheter, and 1 patient had a percutaneous hepatogastrostomy. Fistulas healed in an average of 31 days (range 3-118 days ) in 15 of 17 patients (88%) following PTBD. No major complications occurred after drainage. Post-PTBD cholangitis was observed in 6 of 17 patients (35%) and was related to biliary sludge formation occurring mostly when drainage lasted >30 days and was of the external-internal type. Median patient survival was 17.7 months and in all cases the repaired biliary leaks remained healed. Conclusions. PTBD is a feasible, effective, and safe procedure for the treatment of postsurgical biliary leaks. It is therefore a reliable alternative to surgical repair, which entails longer hospitalization and higher costs.

Cozzi, Guido, E-mail: guido.cozzi@istitutotumori.mi.it; Severini, Aldo; Civelli, Enrico; Milella, Marco [National Cancer Institute (Istituto Nazionale Tumori), Department of Radiology, Radiologia 3 Unit (Italy); Pulvirenti, Andrea [National Cancer Institute (Istituto Nazionale Tumori), Department of Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery and Liver Transplantation Unit (Italy); Salvetti, Monica [National Cancer Institute (Istituto Nazionale Tumori), Department of Radiology, Radiologia 3 Unit (Italy); Romito, Raffaele [National Cancer Institute (Istituto Nazionale Tumori), Department of Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery and Liver Transplantation Unit (Italy); Suman, Laura; Chiaraviglio, Francesca [National Cancer Institute (Istituto Nazionale Tumori), Department of Radiology, Radiologia 3 Unit (Italy); Mazzaferro, Vincenzo [National Cancer Institute (Istituto Nazionale Tumori), Department of Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery and Liver Transplantation Unit (Italy)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology. Topical report No. 2, Task 3.1: Evaluation of system performance, Duct Injection Test Facility, Muskingum River Power Plant, Beverly, Ohio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Topical Report No. 2 is an interim report on the Duct Injection Test Facility being operated for the Department of Energy at Beverly, Ohio. Either dry calcium hydroxide or an aqueous slurry of calcium hydroxide (prepared by slaking quicklime) is injected into a slipstream of flue gas to achieve partial removal of SO{sub 2} from a coal-burning power station. Water injected with the slurry or injected separately from the dry sorbents cools the flue gas and increases the water vapor content of the gas. The addition of water, either in the slurry or in a separate spray, makes the extent of reaction between the sorbent and the SO{sub 2} more complete; the presumption is that water is effective in the liquid state, when it is able to wet the sorbent particles physically, and not especially effective in the vapor state. An electrostatic precipitator collects the combination of suspended solids (fly ash from the boiler and sorbent from the duct injection process). All of the operations are being carried out on the scale of approximately 50,000 acfm of flue gas.

Felix, L.G.; Dismukes, E.B.; Gooch, J.P. [Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, AL (United States); Klett, M.G.; Demian, A.G. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

1992-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

358

The BridgeDb framework: standardized access to gene, protein and metabolite identifier mapping services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

addition to the Java API, we provide a REST-based interface.REST) and is suitable for all other programming languages. BridgeDb Java APIAPI. IH improved the Ensembl ETL process and developed the REST

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Argonne Liquid-Metal Advanced Burner Reactor : components and in-vessel system thermal-hydraulic research and testing experience - pathway forward.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This white paper provides an overview and status report of the thermal-hydraulic nuclear research and development, both experimental and computational, conducted predominantly at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne from the early 1970s through the early 1990s was the Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead lab for thermal-hydraulic development of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). During the 1970s and into the mid-1980s, Argonne conducted thermal-hydraulic studies and experiments on individual reactor components supporting the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR). From the mid-1980s and into the early 1990s, Argonne conducted studies on phenomena related to forced- and natural-convection thermal buoyancy in complete in-vessel models of the General Electric (GE) Prototype Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) and Rockwell International (RI) Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR). These two reactor initiatives involved Argonne working closely with U.S. industry and DOE. This paper describes the very important impact of thermal hydraulics dominated by thermal buoyancy forces on reactor global operation and on the behavior/performance of individual components during postulated off-normal accident events with low flow. Utilizing Argonne's LMR expertise and design knowledge is vital to the further development of safe, reliable, and high-performance LMRs. Argonne believes there remains an important need for continued research and development on thermal-hydraulic design in support of DOE's and the international community's renewed thrust for developing and demonstrating the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) reactor(s) and the associated Argonne Liquid Metal-Advanced Burner Reactor (LM-ABR). This white paper highlights that further understanding is needed regarding reactor design under coolant low-flow events. These safety-related events are associated with the transition from normal high-flow operation to natural circulation. Low-flow coolant events are the most difficult to design for because they involve the most complex thermal-hydraulic behavior induced by the dominance of thermal-buoyancy forces acting on the coolants. Such behavior can cause multiple-component flow interaction phenomena, which are not adequately understood or appreciated by reactor designers as to their impact on reactor performance and safety. Since the early 1990s, when DOE canceled the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program, little has been done experimentally to further understand the importance of the complex thermal-buoyancy phenomena and their impact on reactor design or to improve the ability of three-dimensional (3-D) transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and structures codes to model the phenomena. An improved experimental data base and the associated improved validated codes would provide needed design tools to the reactor community. The improved codes would also facilitate scale-up from small-scale testing to prototype size and would facilitate comparing performance of one reactor/component design with another. The codes would also have relevance to the design and safety of water-cooled reactors. To accomplish the preceding, it is proposed to establish a national GNEP-LMR research and development center at Argonne having as its foundation state-of-art science-based infrastructure consisting of: (a) thermal-hydraulic experimental capabilities for conducting both water and sodium testing of individual reactor components and complete reactor in-vessel models and (b) a computational modeling development and validation capability that is strongly interfaced with the experimental facilities. The proposed center would greatly advance capabilities for reactor development by establishing the validity of high-fidelity (i.e., close to first principles) models and tools. Such tools could be used directly for reactor design or for qualifying/tuning of lower-fidelity models, which now require costly experimental qualification for each different type of design

Kasza, K.; Grandy, C.; Chang, Y.; Khalil, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

360

Data:23bc19a5-a508-4ca0-b7da-2d3c1db7db71 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision5af6d400c2d4-4797-b850-d42be48a30cf No revision has been approvedd3c1db7db71 No

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "db duct burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

In Proc. 1996 ACEEE Summer Study, August 1996, Asilomar, CA. Energy Effectiveness of Duct Sealing and Insulation in Two Multifamily Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Norwalk, Connecticut SYNOPSIS This paper discusses field measurements from five apartments in New York1 LBL# 38538 In Proc. 1996 ACEEE Summer Study, August 1996, Asilomar, CA. Energy Effectiveness that were monitored to determine the effect of duct retrofits on energy use. ABSTRACT Energy losses from

362

3D NUMERICAL STUDY OF MHD FLOW IN A RECTANGULAR DUCT WITH A FLOW CHANNEL INSERT Damien Sutevski, Sergey Smolentsev, Neil Morley, Mohamed Abdou  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D NUMERICAL STUDY OF MHD FLOW IN A RECTANGULAR DUCT WITH A FLOW CHANNEL INSERT Damien Sutevski flow channel insert (FCI). We report our first 3D modeling results for an approximately ideally non with the experimental results in the MHD pressure drop, indicating 3D effects may be significant. The new 3D results

Abdou, Mohamed

363

Use of Statistical Approach to Design an Optimal Duct System for On-demand Industrial Exhaust Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and noise generated by moving air. 0.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 8.0 10.0 12.0 14.0 16.0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 8000 Losses (" w.c. /100 ft) versus Air Velocity (FPM) Fig 1 Fig. 1: friction losses in a circular 6? duct in galva- nized....0 14.0 16.0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 8000 Losses?("?w.c.?/100?ft)?versus Air?Velocity?(FPM) ?Range of air velocities = 6500/3,800 = 1.86 ?Maximal practical speed 6,500 FPM ?Minimum transport velocity, for example 3,800 FPM...

Litomisky, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

A 12-MW-scale pilot study of in-duct scrubbing (IDS) using a rotary atomizer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low-cost, moderate-removal efficiency, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technology was selected by the US Department of Energy for pilot demonstration in its Acid Rain Precursor Control Technology Initiative. The process, identified as In-Duct Scrubbing (IDS), applies rotary atomizer techniques developed for lime-based spray dryer FGD while utilizing existing flue gas ductwork and particulate collectors. IDS technology is anticipated to result in a dry desulfurization process with a moderate removal efficiency (50% or greater) for high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. The critical elements for successful application are: (1) adequate mixing of sorbent droplets with flue gas for efficient reaction contact, (2) sufficient residence time to produce a non-wetting product, and (3) appropriate ductwork cross-sectional area to prevent deposition of wet reaction products before particle drying is comple. The ductwork in many older plants, previously modified to meet 1970 Clean Air Act requirements for particulate control, usually meet these criteria. A 12 MW-scale IDS pilot plant was constructed at the Muskingum River Plant of the American Electric Power System. The pilot plant, which operates from a slipstrem attached to the air-preheater outlet duct from the Unit 5 boiler at the Muskingum River Plant (which burns about 4% sulfur coal), is equipped with three atomizer stations to test the IDS concept in vertical and horizontal configurations. In addition, the pilot plant is equipped to test the effect of injecting IDS off- product upstream of the atomizer, on SO{sub 2}and NO{sub x} removals.

Samuel, E.A.; Murphy, K.R.; Demian, A.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Safety, Pharmacokinetic, and Efficacy Studies of Oral DB868 in a First Stage Vervet Monkey Model of Human African Trypanosomiasis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-pyridyl]furan (DB868; CPD-007-10), in the vervet monkey model of first stage HAT. DB868 was well tolerated at a dose up to 30 mg/kg/day for 10 days, a cumulative dose of 300 mg/kg. Mean plasma levels of biomarkers indicative of liver injury (alanine...

Thutia, John K.; Wolf, Kristina K.; Murilla, Grace A.; Liu, Qiang; Mutuku, James N.; Chen, Yao; Bridges, Arlene S.; Mdachi, Raymond E.; Ismail, Mohamed A.; Ching, Shelley; Boykin, David W.; Hall, James E.; Tidwell, Richard R.; Paine, Mary F.; Burn, Reto; Wang, Michael Z.

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

366

RCUT: A Non-Invasive Method for Detection, Location, and Quantification of Radiological Contaminants in Pipes and Ducts - 12514  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiological Characterization Using Tracers (RCUT) is a minimally invasive method for detection and location of residual radiological contamination in pipes and ducts. The RCUT technology utilizes reactive gaseous tracers that dissociate when exposed to gamma and/or beta radiation emitting from a radiological contaminant in a pipe or duct. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) was selected as a tracer for this radiological application, because it is a chemically inert gas that is both nonflammable, nontoxic, and breaks down when exposed to gamma radiation. Laboratory tests demonstrated that the tracer pair of SF{sub 6} and O{sub 2} formed SO{sub 2}F{sub 2} when exposed to a gamma or beta radioactive field, which indicated the presence of radiological contamination. Field application of RCUT involves first injecting the reactive tracers into the pipe to fill the pipe being inspected and allowing sufficient time for the tracer to interact with any contaminants present. This is followed by the injection of an inert gas at one end of the pipe to push the reactive tracer at a known or constant flow velocity along the pipe and then out the exit and sampling port at the end of the pipeline where its concentration is measured by a gas chromatograph. If a radiological contaminant is present in the pipe being tested, the presence of SO{sub 2}F{sub 2} will be detected. The time of arrival of the SO{sub 2}F{sub 2} can be used to locate the contaminant. If the pipe is free of radiological contamination, no SO{sub 2}F{sub 2} will be detected. RCUT and PCUT are both effective technologies that can be used to detect contamination within pipelines without the need for mechanical or human inspection. These methods can be used to detect, locate, and/or estimate the volume of a variety of radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals such as chlorinated solvents, petroleum products, and heavy metals. While further optimization is needed for RCUT, the key first step of identification of a tracer compound appropriate for the application of detecting radioactive pipeline contamination through the detection of decomposition products of SF{sub 6} has been demonstrated. Other tracer gases that will also undergo radiolysis will be considered in the future. The next step for the RCUT development process is conducting laboratory scale tests using short pipelines to define analytical requirements, establish performance boundaries, and develop strategies for lower exposure levels. Studies to identify additional analytical techniques using equipment that is more field rugged than a GC/MS would also be beneficial. (authors)

Bratton, Wesley L.; Maresca, Joseph W. Jr.; Beck, Deborah A. [Vista Engineering Technologies, L.L.C., Richland, WA, 99352 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

An evaluation of methodology for seismic qualification of equipment, cable trays, and ducts in ALWR plants by use of experience data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced Reactor Corporation (ARC) has developed a methodology for seismic qualification of equipment, cable trays and ducts in Advanced Light Water Reactor plants. A Panel (members of which acted as individuals) supported by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has evaluated this methodology. The review approach and observations are included in this report. In general, the Panel supports the ARC methodology with some exceptions and provides recommendations for further improvements. 26 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Bandyopadhyay, K.K.; Kana, D.D.; Kennedy, R.P.; Schiff, A.J.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

http://www-db.in.tum.de/research/projects/StreamGlobe Optimization Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Redundant transmission of data streams Redundant execution of stream transforming operators Transmissionhttp://www-db.in.tum.de/research/projects/StreamGlobe Optimization Techniques: In-network query processing o Distribute query processing operators in the network (query shipping) o Early filtering

Kemper, Alfons

369

Electromagnetic interference shielding reaching 70 dB in steel fiber cement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electromagnetic interference shielding reaching 70 dB in steel fiber cement Sihai Wen, D.D.L. Chung; Silica fume; Shielding 1. Introduction Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding [1­4] is in critical, NY 14260-4400, USA Received 9 January 2002; accepted 14 August 2003 Abstract An electromagnetic

Chung, Deborah D.L.

370

MvirDB: Microbial Database of Protein Toxins, Virulence Factors and Antibiotic Resistance Genes for Bio-Defense Applications  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

MvirDB is a cenntralized resource (data warehouse) comprising all publicly accessible, organized sequence data for protein toxins, virulence factors, and antibiotic resistance genes. Protein entries in MvirDB are annotated using a high-throughput, fully automated computational annotation system; annotations are updated periodically to ensure that results are derived using current public database and open-source tool releases. Tools provided for using MvirDB include a web-based browser tool and BLAST interfaces. MvirDB serves researchers in the bio-defense and medical fields. (taken from page 3 of PI's paper of same title published in Nucleic Acids Research, 2007, Vol.35, Database Issue (Open Source)

Zhou, C. E.; Smith, J.; Lam, M.; Zemla, M. D.; Slezak, T.

371

Evaluation of mixing in three duct configurations and development of a Generic Tee Plenum System (GTPS) for application to single point aerosol sampling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Company, Red}ands, CA) 17 3. 5 industrial Air Blender 3. 6 Interpretation of the model code for the blender . . . 3. 7 Type IV Air Blender 19 3. 8 Example of location of traverse points in circular or non-circular duct (ANSI/I IPS N13. 1...-lll-l, mode-A. COV for particle concentration profiles . . . . . 82 6. 16 Configuration-111-2, mode-B. COV for particle concentration profiles . . . . . 82 FIGURE Page 6. 17 Configuration-111-3, mode-B. COV for particle concentration profiles downstream...

Han, Tae Won

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Ducts Sealing Using Injected Spray Sealant, Raleigh, North Carolina (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealingVehicle1 Closing the Circle: TheDraftforDuctless,Ducts

373

Buried and Encapsulated Ducts, Jacksonville, Florida (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top FiveDepartment of Energy BuildingsBuried and Encapsulated Ducts

374

Data:A01db19a-405a-45db-b4cd-4e1783be5856 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 Nod2db5b31cb44 No revision hasdb5-b05c-76b1be5a4007 Nof7ffd374e No revisionf1f306fd8 No

375

Data:8f51bf9d-0209-4db6-afb7-b2db074e9777 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 No revisione0a2d50bdf No18fed1db58-e7b51f638865 Nod57b1532a58f No revision has been approved

376

Computer Aided Duct Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is designed with a higher static pressure and greater noise and turbulence than is necessary. A computer model helps to resolve these problems, reducing the fan horsepower needed to deliver the air. Computer optimization also reduces noise and the high rate...

Clark, W. H.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Duct and cladding alloy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An austenitic alloy having good thermal stability and resistance to sodium corrosion at 700.degree. C. consists essentially of 35-45% nickel 7.5-14% chromium 0.8-3.2% molybdenum 0.3-1.0% silicon 0.2-1.0% manganese 0-0.1% zirconium 2.0-3.5% titanium 1.0-2.0% aluminum 0.02-0.1% carbon 0-0.01% boron and the balance iron.

Korenko, Michael K. (Rockville, MD)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

A RD micro accelerometer with 6 lg/HHz resolution and 130 dB dynamic range  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A RD micro accelerometer with 6 lg/HHz resolution and 130 dB dynamic range Ugur So¨nmez · Haluk Ku,largeareaMEMSsensors.Theproposedsystem can achieve a minimum of 6.0 lg/HHz noise floor, 3.2 lg bias instability, and a maximum of 130 dB DR at 1 Hz. A FSR of ±20 g is reported for 6.2 lg/HHz noise floor. This range can be increased up to ±40 g

Akin, Tayfun

379

Upgrade Boilers with Energy-Efficient Burners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This revised ITP steam tip sheet on upgrading boilers provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Flex-flame burner and combustion method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combustion method and apparatus which produce a hybrid flame for heating metals and metal alloys, which hybrid flame has the characteristic of having an oxidant-lean portion proximate the metal or metal alloy and having an oxidant-rich portion disposed above the oxidant lean portion. This hybrid flame is produced by introducing fuel and primary combustion oxidant into the furnace chamber containing the metal or metal alloy in a substoichiometric ratio to produce a fuel-rich flame and by introducing a secondary combustion oxidant into the furnace chamber above the fuel-rich flame in a manner whereby mixing of the secondary combustion oxidant with the fuel-rich flame is delayed for a portion of the length of the flame.

Soupos, Vasilios (Chicago, IL); Zelepouga, Serguei (Hoffman Estates, IL); Rue, David M. (Chicago, IL); Abbasi, Hamid A. (Naperville, IL)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "db duct burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

FRONT BURNER - ISSUE 19 | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstruction Management14,2 - In theJulyDepartmentTO: Ex

382

FRONT BURNER - Issue 20 | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstruction Management14,2 - In theJulyDepartmentTO: ExIssue

383

Cybersecurity Front Burner | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents Available for Download January

384

mm-Wave Op-Amps employing simple-Miller compensation, with OIP3/PDC ratios of 211 (10 dB NF) and 144 (6.0 dB NF) at 2 GHz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mm-Wave Op-Amps employing simple-Miller compensation, with OIP3/PDC ratios of 211 (10 dB NF/PDC ratio at fs = 2-3 GHz, compared to state-of-the-art. We address considerations important 1000 mW power dissipation PDC . This very high ratio of output-referred third-order-intercept power

Rodwell, Mark J. W.

385

SciDB DBMS Research at M.I.T. Michael Stonebraker, Jennie Duggan, Leilani Battle, Olga Papaemmanouil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SciDB DBMS Research at M.I.T. Michael Stonebraker, Jennie Duggan, Leilani Battle, Olga Papaemmanouil {stonebraker, jennie, leilani}@csail.mit.edu, olga@cs.brandeis.edu Abstract This paper presents, and the state of the software at the time of publication. In this paper, we consider a collection of research

386

6/11/13 Print Article: Diploma done, mom's next dream: Doctor www.ocregister.com/common/printer/view.php?db=ocregister&id=512074 1/3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6/11/13 Print Article: Diploma done, mom's next dream: Doctor www.ocregister.com/common/printer/view.php: Diploma done, mom's next dream: Doctor www.ocregister.com/common/printer/view.php?db=ocregister&id=512074

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

387

Advanced in-duct sorbent injection for SO{sub 2} control. Topical report number 3, Subtask 2.3: Sorbent optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to develop second-generation duct injection technology as a cost-effective compliance option for the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Specific process performance goals are to achieve 90% SO{sub 2} removal and 60% sorbent utilization efficiency. Research is focused on the Advanced Coolside process, which has shown the potential of achieving these targets. The objective of Subtask 2.3, Sorbent Optimization, was to explore means of improving performance and economics of the Advanced Coolside process through optimizing the sorbent system. Pilot plant tests of commercial and specially prepared hydrated limes showed that the process is relatively insensitive to sorbent source. This can be an important economic advantage, allowing the use of the lowest cost sorbent available at a site. A pilot plant hydration study conducted in cooperation with Dravo Lime Company further indicated the relative insensitivity of process performance to lime source and to lime physical properties. Pilot plant tests indicated that the use of very small amounts of additives in the Advanced Coolside process can improve performance under some circumstances; however, additives are not necessary to exceed process performance targets.

Rosenhoover, W.A.; Maskew, J.T.; Withum, J.A.; Stouffer, M.R.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

In-depth survey report: Control technology for small business: Evaluation of a flexible duct ventilation system for radiator repair, at A-1 Radiator, Reno, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An engineering control evaluation was conducted at a radiator repair shop which operated at a very high level of production. The shop had the potential for high exposures to lead (7439921) because of the high volume of work, the number of radiator repair stations, and repairs to huge radiators for mining equipment. Local exhaust ventilation which utilized adjustable arm elephant trunk exhaust hoods had been installed 18 months prior to the visit. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the local exhaust ventilation (LEV) system to control lead exposures during work operations. Time weighted average personal exposures for lead were at or below the OSHA permissible exposure level for ten of 15 mechanics during a high level of production. The elephant trunk ventilation system was capable of controlling lead fumes while shop doors were open, except at one tank in a corner. Work practices were found to be a source of excessive lead exposure. Emissions from a worker's own soldering and from soldering activity upwind of the worker were a major source of lead exposure. Collapse of flexible portions of ducts could reduce exhaust volume. Dampers also showed a tendency to close automatically.

Sheehy, J.W.; Cooper, T.C.; Hall, R.M.; Meier, R.M.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Data:22824429-7771-47b5-8e7f-4773db5810af | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 No revision5af6d400c2d No529a57c00c098f5e77d9 No6eee65cb81db No revision has6d820ed214bd3db5810af

390

Spectroscopic Analysis of the DAB White Dwarf PG 1115+166: An Unresolved DA + DB Degenerate Binary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A spectroscopic analysis of the DAB white dwarf PG 1115+166 is presented. The observed hydrogen and helium line profiles are shown to be incompatible with model spectra calculated under the assumption of homogeneous or stratified chemical compositions. In contrast, an excellent fit to the optical spectrum of PG 1115+166 can be achieved if the object is interpreted as an unresolved double degenerate composed of a hydrogen-line DA star and a helium-line DB star. The atmospheric parameters obtained from the best fit are Teff=22,090 K and log g=8.12 for the DA star, Teff=16,210 K and log g=8.19 for the DB star. This binary interpretation is consistent with the results recently reported by Burleigh et al. that PG 1115+166 also exhibits radial velocity variations. The implications of this discovery with respect to the DAB spectral class are discussed.

P. Bergeron; James Liebert

2001-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

391

Evaluation of the Repeatability of the Delta Q Duct Leakage Testing TechniqueIncluding Investigation of Robust Analysis Techniques and Estimates of Weather Induced Uncertainty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DeltaQ test is a method of estimating the air leakage from forced air duct systems. Developed primarily for residential and small commercial applications it uses the changes in blower door test results due to forced air system operation. Previous studies established the principles behind DeltaQ testing, but raised issues of precision of the test, particularly for leaky homes on windy days. Details of the measurement technique are available in an ASTM Standard (ASTM E1554-2007). In order to ease adoption of the test method, this study answers questions regarding the uncertainty due to changing weather during the test (particularly changes in wind speed) and the applicability to low leakage systems. The first question arises because the building envelope air flows and pressures used in the DeltaQ test are influenced by weather induced pressures. Variability in wind induced pressures rather than temperature difference induced pressures dominates this effect because the wind pressures change rapidly over the time period of a test. The second question needs to answered so that DeltaQ testing can be used in programs requiring or giving credit for tight ducts (e.g., California's Building Energy Code (CEC 2005)). DeltaQ modeling biases have been previously investigated in laboratory studies where there was no weather induced changes in envelope flows and pressures. Laboratory work by Andrews (2002) and Walker et al. (2004) found biases of about 0.5% of forced air system blower flow and individual test uncertainty of about 2% of forced air system blower flow. The laboratory tests were repeated by Walker and Dickerhoff (2006 and 2008) using a new ramping technique that continuously varied envelope pressures and air flows rather than taking data at pre-selected pressure stations (as used in ASTM E1554-2003 and other previous studies). The biases and individual test uncertainties for ramping were found to be very close (less than 0.5% of air handler flow) to those found in for the pressure station approach. Walker and Dickerhoff also included estimates of DeltaQ test repeatability based on the results of field tests where two houses were tested multiple times. The two houses were quite leaky (20-25 Air Changes per Hour at 50Pa (0.2 in. water) (ACH50)) and were located in the San Francisco Bay area. One house was tested on a calm day and the other on a very windy day. Results were also presented for two additional houses that were tested by other researchers in Minneapolis, MN and Madison, WI, that had very tight envelopes (1.8 and 2.5 ACH50). These tight houses had internal duct systems and were tested without operating the central blower--sometimes referred to as control tests. The standard deviations between the multiple tests for all four houses were found to be about 1% of the envelope air flow at 50 Pa (0.2 in. water) (Q50) that led to the suggestion of this as a rule of thumb for estimating DeltaQ uncertainty. Because DeltaQ is based on measuring envelope air flows it makes sense for uncertainty to scale with envelope leakage. However, these tests were on a limited data set and one of the objectives of the current study is to increase the number of tested houses. This study focuses on answering two questions: (1) What is the uncertainty associated with changes in weather (primarily wind) conditions during DeltaQ testing? (2) How can these uncertainties be reduced? The first question is addressing issues of repeatability. To study this five houses were tested as many times as possible over a day. Weather data was recorded on-site--including the local windspeed. The result from these five houses were combined with the two Bay Area homes from the previous studies. The variability of the tests (represented by the standard deviation) is the repeatability of the test method for that house under the prevailing weather conditions. Because the testing was performed over a day a wide range of wind speeds was achieved following typical diurnal variations of low wind in the early morning and greatest winds in the late afternoon/early

Dickerhoff, Darryl; Walker, Iain

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Four magnetic DB white dwarfs discovered by the Hamburg/ESO survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on seven peculiar faint blue stars found in the course of the Hamburg/ESO survey (HES) which appear to be magnetic white dwarfs (WDs) with non-hydrogen spectra. We show in particular that four of them (HE 0338-3853, HE 0107-0158, HE 0026-2150, and HE 0003-5701) have He I lines split by magnetic fields of roughly 20MG, since the \\pi components of He I 5876 Angstroem and He I 4929 Angstroem can be identified unambiguously in their spectra, and the $\\sigma^+$, $\\sigma^-$ components can be identified in the spectra of two of these stars (HE 0338-3853 and HE 0003-5701). Besides GD 229, these are the first magnetic DB white dwarfs discovered so far. In addition, three further WDs with broad, unidentifiable features have been found: HE 1043-0502, HE 0236-2656, and HE 0330-0002. We argue that in all three of these stars H I can not be responsible for the broad features, and He I most probably not for the features in HE 0236-2656 and HE 0330-0002, while it still remains possible that the broad features of HE 1043-0502 are due to He I.

D. Reimers; S. Jordan; V. Beckmann; N. Christlieb; L. Wisotzki

1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

393

Data:B450787c-60b9-4db5-8d07-40ee55d16e73 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onb5-dcc1fcffd1f2 No revision has38865d08 No revision has been28a07c581c-e2db449df0ab No-4db5-8d07-40ee55d16e73 No

394

Data:5687bd6e-a14f-4fca-a8b6-d9b9782a8db0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3a87dcc95b3da-78f7ef0b79f6 No revisionc8de9b501c3dd65b9388ca No revision has86292db9782a8db0 No

395

Data:A4ddefe0-db39-48c0-ac98-7941b3451e3c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 Nod2db5b31cb44 Noddefe0-db39-48c0-ac98-7941b3451e3c No revision has been approved for this page. It is

396

Data:A5db64c6-671c-4162-b2bf-02711bb09a1c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 Nod2db5b31cb44 Noddefe0-db39-48c0-ac98-7941b3451e3c Noa953-7695737b211e Nodc06e0a868 Nofb9b0e

397

Data:A61af82b-acc0-406d-b5bf-f501ff1b01ee | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 Nod2db5b31cb44 Noddefe0-db39-48c0-ac98-7941b3451e3cf8e56363f No revision has beenf501ff1b01ee No

398

Data:A64044db-dd8c-4dbb-9ec5-98b3d4e872cf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 Nod2db5b31cb44 Noddefe0-db39-48c0-ac98-7941b3451e3cf8e56363f No revision hasfe535dd99ec5-98b3d4e872cf

399

Data:A66adac6-ddb6-4529-ae34-db5b20cd220e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 Nod2db5b31cb44 Noddefe0-db39-48c0-ac98-7941b3451e3cf8e56363f No revisione903b17d302cd18f90e356b

400

Data:A7824421-5cd3-42b5-ae3d-b02b8cf33032 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 Nod2db5b31cb44f-4cd6-87d8-e9253aab8d9c No revision hasf32924 Noda8782 No revisionae3d-b02b8cf33032 No

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "db duct burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Data:8c43f069-bcc9-447a-90af-4a6e7db5d8e7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 No revisione0a2d50bdf No18fed1db5 No30e696c No revision has beena6e7db5d8e7 No revision has been

402

Data:9d2b5deb-0dd7-473c-a26c-7e0591db36e1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 Nod2db5b31cb44 No revision has been approved095c1f504bccf31-0274-4c1e-93c7-4121ce28476f7e0591db36e1 No

403

Data:8aa53d1d-1865-44a0-b931-f7bfe2db6d86 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 No revisione0a2d50bdf No18fed1db5 No revision has been approved forbfe2db6d86 No revision has been

404

Particle deposition in ventilation ducts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ASHRAE (1989a) ASHRAE Guideline 1-1989, Guideline for commissioning of HVAC

Sippola, Mark R.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Flat Oval Spiral Duct Deflection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.8 Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2.9 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3. TEST FACILITY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3....1 Truss Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3.2 Instrumentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 3.3 Blower System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 3.4 Data...

Daugherty, Matthew

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

406

Particle deposition in ventilation ducts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and An Evaluation of Thermophoretic Deposition Rates C.1of estimated thermophoretic deposition velocities, v th+ ,of estimated thermophoretic deposition velocities, v th+ ,

Sippola, Mark R.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Data:Eb22994e-248b-4752-8594-8233db7d9a12 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744b55997c1cc No revision hasa3e396ee3ebbed0-6678a6880d18 No revision has been approved3db7d9a12 No revision has

408

Data:902905fb-8cbb-457d-9db5-352834999c90 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 No revisione0a2d50bdf No18fed1db58-e7b51f6388655-83a5-eb235f1bc98b No revisiond3ce0cd33a834999c90 No

409

Data:2f319697-fbbc-4606-87aa-79187db4b99c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of48d9ff47edf3 Noc7e1a8ffe No869d7ced0c4 No revision has been approved51321ee3e No revision has7db4b99c No

410

Decay Properties of {sup 266}Bh and {sup 262}Db Produced in the {sup 248}Cm+{sup 23}Na Reaction - Further Confirmation of the {sup 278}113 Decay Chain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decay properties of an isotope {sup 266}Bh and its daughter nucleus {sup 262}Db produced by the {sup 248}Cm({sup 23}Na,5n) reaction were studied by using a gas-filled recoil separator coupled with a position-sensitive semiconductor detector. {sup 266}Bh was clearly identified from the correlation of the known nuclide, {sup 262}Db. The obtained decay properties of {sup 266}Bh and {sup 262}Db are consistent with those observed in the {sup 278}113 chain by RIKEN collaboration, which provided further confirmation of the discovery of {sup 278}113.

Morita, K.; Morimoto, K.; Kaji, D.; Haba, H.; Ozeki, K.; Kudou, Y.; Yoneda, A.; Ichikawa, T.; Katori, K.; Yoshida, A. [RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Sato, N. [RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Sumita, T. [RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan); Fujimori, Y.; Tokanai, F. [Department of Physics, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Goto, S. [Center for Instrumental Analysis, Niigata University, Ikarashi, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Ideguchi, E. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kasamatsu, Y.; Koura, H.; Tsukada, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Komori, Y. [Department of Chemistry, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

A 220GHz InP HBT Solid-State Power Amplifier MMIC with at 8.2dB Compressed Gain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A 220GHz InP HBT Solid-State Power Amplifier MMIC with 90mW POUT at 8.2dB Compressed Gain Thomas B, CA, USA 91360 zgriffith@teledyne-si.com Abstract -- A 220 GHz Solid State Power Amplifer MMIC, Solid State Power Amplifier (SSPA). I. INTRODUCTION Future synthetic aperture radars and high resolution

Rodwell, Mark J. W.

412

Oracle Spatial Data Option Spatial Cartridge Oracle8i SpatialIBM ESRI DB2 Spatial ExtenderInformix Informix Spatial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; ---- Oracle Spatial Data Option Spatial Cartridge Oracle8i SpatialIBM ESRI DB2 Spatial ExtenderInformix Informix Spatial Datablade Oracle Oracle8i Spatial Oracle Spatial ----SDO_GEOMETRY SDO_GEOMETRY OracleWeb-Based Three-Dimensional Geo-Referenced Visualization, in Proceedings of International Conference of Spatial

Li, Xiang

413

Heating Greenhouses1 D.E. Buffington, R.A. Bucklin, R.W. Henley and D.B. McConnell2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AE11 Heating Greenhouses1 D.E. Buffington, R.A. Bucklin, R.W. Henley and D.B. McConnell2 1 supplemental heat is required. Obviously there are many ways this can be accomplished from the standpoint of these factors be considered when selecting and installing a heating system. HEATING SYSTEMS Greenhouse heating

Watson, Craig A.

414

Microstructure and Property Evolution in Advanced Cladding and Duct Materials Under Long-Term and Elevated Temperature Irradiation: Modeling and Experimental Investigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The in-service degradation of reactor core materials is related to underlying changes in the irradiated microstructure. During reactor operation, structural components and cladding experience displacement of atoms by collisions with neutrons at temperatures at which the radiation-induced defects are mobile, leading to microstructure evolution under irradiation that can degrade material properties. At the doses and temperatures relevant to fast reactor operation, the microstructure evolves by dislocation loop formation and growth, microchemistry changes due to radiation-induced segregation, radiation-induced precipitation, destabilization of the existing precipitate structure, and in some cases, void formation and growth. These processes do not occur independently; rather, their evolution is highly interlinked. Radiationinduced segregation of Cr and existing chromium carbide coverage in irradiated alloy T91 track each other closely. The radiation-induced precipitation of Ni-Si precipitates and RIS of Ni and Si in alloys T91 and HCM12A are likely related. Neither the evolution of these processes nor their coupling is understood under the conditions required for materials performance in fast reactors (temperature range 300-600°C and doses beyond 200 dpa). Further, predictive modeling is not yet possible as models for microstructure evolution must be developed along with experiments to characterize these key processes and provide tools for extrapolation. To extend the range of operation of nuclear fuel cladding and structural materials in advanced nuclear energy and transmutation systems to that required for the fast reactor, the irradiation-induced evolution of the microstructure, microchemistry, and the associated mechanical properties at relevant temperatures and doses must be understood. Predictive modeling relies on an understanding of the physical processes and also on the development of microstructure and microchemical models to describe their evolution under irradiation. This project will focus on modeling microstructural and microchemical evolution of irradiated alloys by performing detailed modeling of such microstructure evolution processes coupled with well-designed in situ experiments that can provide validation and benchmarking to the computer codes. The broad scientific and technical objectives of this proposal are to evaluate the microstructure and microchemical evolution in advanced ferritic/martensitic and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys for cladding and duct reactor materials under long-term and elevated temperature irradiation, leading to improved ability to model structural materials performance and lifetime. Specifically, we propose four research thrusts, namely Thrust 1: Identify the formation mechanism and evolution for dislocation loops with Burgers vector of a<100> and determine whether the defect microstructure (predominately dislocation loop/dislocation density) saturates at high dose. Thrust 2: Identify whether a threshold irradiation temperature or dose exists for the nucleation of growing voids that mark the beginning of irradiation-induced swelling, and begin to probe the limits of thermal stability of the tempered Martensitic structure under irradiation. Thrust 3: Evaluate the stability of nanometer sized Y- Ti-O based oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) particles at high fluence/temperature. Thrust 4: Evaluate the extent to which precipitates form and/or dissolve as a function of irradiation temperature and dose, and how these changes are driven by radiation induced segregation and microchemical evolutions and determined by the initial microstructure.

Wirth, Brian; Morgan, Dane; Kaoumi, Djamel; Motta, Arthur

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

The use of 2,4-DB as a selective herbicide for broadleaf weed control in peanuts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

!:c, 'gators have demons r'a. el legus s a e l. o I er'ant Gi 2 4 ? D- willie !r, anl of . . !!' LI'G, ! lear !;":cc; c, amon to td!c 'Leguve i'ielcls cu . . l&il' ed by tniz t, rca!r e" t: (, 2, 10, '1, 12, 'I5, 15). less i!oporto:!ce was at i, r'' but ed... Swee 1 and o correl=te phytctoxi 'lty ' 0 hex'Die i de at&sorp ion& anc I&os' itic ce' a-oxica 10. . of 2. 4 ? DB tc 2, 4-D. Pigweed aced'! . gc 'r re srow!& to ' hcighc of 6 ce; " flats ir the gz O' "G' sc anu s'ora, e'. 1, ucl!'g ui&e. 10borai...

Ketchersid, Mary Lou

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

EIS-0342: Wanapa Energy Center Interconnection  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to suppport the installation of highly efficient combustion turbines (CTs) generators at the Wanapa Energy Center. Each CT would exhaust through a heat recovery steam generator that can be fired by auxiliary duct burners. The HRSGs would produce steam to be used onsite in condensing steam turbines.

417

Data:A4db8441-08dc-40fa-ad62-41f42f4374a6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 Nod2db5b31cb44 No revision-b209-069dd1fd7c05a97219c78401d-b420-d95a19f1b4285-4b7a-89b3-0242ed12688e

418

Data:A136dfb8-13b3-497d-b737-80d59b5660c0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 Nod2db5b31cb44 No revision

419

A 0.45NW, 0.5V, 59-DB DR, Gm-C LOW-PASS FILTER FOR PORTABLE ECG RECORDING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A 0.45NW, 0.5V, 59-DB DR, Gm-C LOW-PASS FILTER FOR PORTABLE ECG RECORDING Chutham Sawigun, Senad. Abstract: This paper presents the design of a sub-threshold CMOS G,,,-C low-pass filter in a portable ECG.23Vpp. 1 INTRODUCTION As a consequence of the heart activity, electrocardiograms (ECGs) can be recorded

Serdijn, Wouter A.

420

advanced burner reactors: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "db duct burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

advanced burner reactor: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

422

Modeling Solid Propellant Strand Burner Experiments with Catalytic Additives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation studies how nanoadditives influence burning rates through the development and use of a model to conduct parametric studies on nanoadditive interaction and to formulate theories. Decades of research have yet to determine...

Frazier, Corey

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

423

COMBUSTION OF COAL IN AN OPPOSED FLOW DIFFUSION BURNER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TABLE 1. Pittsburgh seam coal properties, Grosshandler (content of the Pittsburgh seam coal. As the ash layer beginsfrom Pittsburgh seam pulverized coal, screened through a 35

Chin, W.K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Burner Designs and Controls for Variable Air Preheat Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and batch type melting operations resulting in cyclic or variable air preheat temperatures will be discussed. Fuel savings relating to the use of recuperation and various types of fuel/air ratio systems will also be discussed....

Lied, C. R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

COMBUSTION OF COAL IN AN OPPOSED FLOW DIFFUSION BURNER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J.M. , liThe F1uidised Combustion of Coal," Sixteenth Sm osium {International} on Combustion, August 1976 (to beof Various Polymers Under Combustion Conditions," Fourteenth

Chin, W.K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste |  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless orA BRIEFApril 2015CommerceDepartment ofBioenergyBoiler

427

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Advanced Burner  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005DepartmentDecember U.S.FinancialofFuelDepartmentGeothermalGlen

428

GNEP Element:Develop Advanced Burner Reactors | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department of Energy FreeportEnergy Issues Related toDevelop

429

Check Burner Air to Fuel Ratios | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FORSuperior Energy5-1 Chapter 5 Loswhen to check and

430

SEP Success Story: Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research |Regulation Services2014 Update | DepartmentSECRETARYGuidanceBusinesses

431

Scalable, Efficient Solid Waste Burner System - Energy Innovation Portal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systems controller systemsis aSecurity8Nuclearof EnergySawteethBiomass

432

Upgrade Boilers with Energy-Efficient Burners | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Dept. ofUSA RSDepartment of Energy Updated Web ToolUpgrade

433

Saving Energy and Reducing Emissions with Fuel-Flexible Burners  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l LPROJECTS IN7 RoadmapProgram| Department ofat This

434

COMBUSTION OF COAL IN AN OPPOSED FLOW DIFFUSION BURNER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

November 1976. Wilson, P.J. and Wells, J.H. , Coal, Cokeand Coal Chemicals, 108, (1950). This report was done withliThe F1uidised Combustion of Coal," Sixteenth S m osium {

Chin, W.K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Surgical, pathological and clinical correlation of Tc-99m DISIDA hepatobiliary imaging in 138 adult males, in the diagnosis of functional cystic duct obstruction VS acute or chronic cholecystitis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the wide acceptance of the hepatobiliary scintigraphy as a popular diagnostic imaging modality for gallbladder and hepatobiliary disease, correlation between radionuclide diagnoses and the final clinical and/or pathologic findings have not been thoroughly evaluated. The lack of correlative studies frequently generates difficulties in making appropriate diagnostic interpretation of the objective findings. A retrospective clinical pathological and surgical correlative study was undertaken by the authors in 138 male veteran patients, who underwent computer assisted minute by minute Tc-99m DISIDA cholescintigraphy. A very high percentage (75%) revealed abnormalities; non-visualization of gallbladder (GB) with normal choledochus system (46%), choledochal obstruction with no GB visualization (13%), choledochal obstruction with normal GB visualization (6%), severe hepatocellular disease with non-diagnostic GB (4%), and delayed GB visualization (longer than 60 minutes) (3%). Non-visualization of GB but normal choledochus demonstrated diverse pathologic etiologies, acute and chronic cholecystitis (64%), S/P cholecystectomy (8%), functional obstruction secondary to sepsis or pancreatitis (6%), and various other pathologies including porcelain GB and cholangitis (22%). The most important cause of choledochal obstruction was mass lesions or local infiltration with metastases (33%) rather than acute cholecystitis (27%). Although the sensitivity (98%) and specificity (92%) for cystic duct obstruction were very high, the specificity decreases significantly for cholecystitis.

Yoo, J.H.K.; Beal, W.H.; Ware, R.W.; Straw, J.D.; Chaudhuri, T.K.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

PERIODIC VARIATIONS IN THE O - C DIAGRAMS OF FIVE PULSATION FREQUENCIES OF THE DB WHITE DWARF EC 20058-5234  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Variations in the pulsation arrival time of five independent pulsation frequencies of the DB white dwarf EC 20058-5234 individually imitate the effects of reflex motion induced by a planet or companion but are inconsistent when considered in unison. The pulsation frequencies vary periodically in a 12.9 year cycle and undergo secular changes that are inconsistent with simple neutrino plus photon-cooling models. The magnitude of the periodic and secular variations increases with the period of the pulsations, possibly hinting that the corresponding physical mechanism is located near the surface of the star. The phase of the periodic variations appears coupled to the sign of the secular variations. The standards for pulsation-timing-based detection of planetary companions around pulsating white dwarfs, and possibly other variables such as subdwarf B stars, should be re-evaluated. The physical mechanism responsible for this surprising result may involve a redistribution of angular momentum or a magnetic cycle. Additionally, variations in a supposed combination frequency are shown to match the sum of the variations of the parent frequencies to remarkable precision, an expected but unprecedented confirmation of theoretical predictions.

Dalessio, J.; Provencal, J. L.; Shipman, H. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Sullivan, D. J.; Sullivan, T. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, Wellington 6012 (New Zealand)] [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, Wellington 6012 (New Zealand); Kilkenny, D. [Department of Physics, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa)] [Department of Physics, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Fraga, L. [Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile)] [Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Sefako, R. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935 (South Africa)] [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935 (South Africa)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

A 3-Stage Shunt-Feedback Op-Amp having 19.2dB Gain, 54.1dBm OIP3 (2GHz), and 252 OIP3/PDC ratio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A 3-Stage Shunt-Feedback Op-Amp having 19.2dB Gain, 54.1dBm OIP3 (2GHz), and 252 OIP3/PDC ratio-Miller compensation demon- strating 19.2dB mid-band S21 gain, PDC = 1020mW. At 2GHz operation the amplifier shows 54.1dBm OIP3 and a record high OIP3/PDC ratio = 252. Through the use of a 350GHz f , fmax 0.5um InP HBT

Rodwell, Mark J. W.

438

Data:A4a1fbe5-3c71-401d-b420-d95a19f1b428 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office695810186 Nod2db5b31cb44 No revision-b209-069dd1fd7c05a97219c78401d-b420-d95a19f1b428 No revision has been

439

Data:E8be926f-2759-422c-a04b-8ceccff9db4b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744b55997c1cc No revision has beenace4-3e58210a501f Noc9-64f337dd0502055ddf45 No revisionceccff9db4b No revision

440

Data:E9c0221a-8a04-4f3a-96b8-f4b3279ff5db | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744b55997c1cc No revision hasa3e396ee3eb No revision has been approved for thisd62f6d90597e No-f4b3279ff5db No

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "db duct burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Data:Efbc8c50-efc7-41d2-91db-dcc0aab1e636 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Pagec-01b596aa1744b55997c1ccEeae2669-ec94-4cc4-bbae-0108084310cc Nobeedba3b42cEfbc8c50-efc7-41d2-91db-dcc0aab1e636 No revision

442

Data:Efc1d6ee-9ac5-486e-a76d-e6082bfc2db8 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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Data:F23af305-534a-4f5b-b1dc-6767c76db4a3 | Open Energy Information  

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Data:F890887d-0589-432d-86fa-23f7cb15e6db | Open Energy Information  

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Data:75205179-4bb5-45f8-bfbc-d2f0db1f3da9 | Open Energy Information  

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "db duct burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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Data:5e505c03-2c86-4136-89cb-68db9051f6d8 | Open Energy Information  

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462

Data:5ff7e8f1-5caf-4c0f-96ad-5ecd8db81ad8 | Open Energy Information  

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Data:63bdef91-9f22-4451-8b61-3803400db8b1 | Open Energy Information  

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Data:6436c5eb-84b0-4e62-991e-e3bcd810db3c | Open Energy Information  

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