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1

Arizona | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination Davis Dam 230-Kilovolt Switchyards Stage 06 Upgrade (Double Breaker Double Bus) in Mohave County, Arizona CX(s) Applied: B4.11 Date: 06302010...

2

Record of Decision for the Interconnection of the Sutter Power Project With the Western Area Power Administration's Keswick-Elverta/Olinda-Elverta 230-Kilovolt Double-Circuit Transmission Line, June 15, 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 41 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 114 / Tuesday, June 15, 1999 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Western Area Power Administration Record of Decision for the Interconnection of the Sutter Power Project With the Western Area Power Administration's Keswick-Elverta/ Olinda-Elverta 230-Kilovolt Double- Circuit Transmission Line AGENCY: Western Area Power Administration, DOE. ACTION: Record of decision. SUMMARY: The Western Area Power Administration (Western) prepared this Record of Decision in response to a request submitted to Western for a direct interconnection of Calpine Corporation's (Calpine) proposed Sutter Power Project (SPP) with Western's electric transmission system. In response to this request, Western completed an Interconnection Feasibility Study that determined that

3

CX-003193: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3193: Categorical Exclusion Determination 3193: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003193: Categorical Exclusion Determination Davis Dam 230-Kilovolt Switchyards Stage 06 Upgrade (Double Breaker Double Bus) in Mohave County, Arizona CX(s) Applied: B4.11 Date: 06/30/2010 Location(s): Mohave County, Arizona Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region Western Area Power Administration plans to upgrade the existing Upper and Lower Davis Dam 230-kilovolt switchyards in order to provide additional operational flexibility and reliability to the bulk electric system. Construction activities will take place within the existing switchyard fences in areas previously graded and covered with gravel. Existing gravel access roads will be used to reach the project area. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

4

CX-003193: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

93: Categorical Exclusion Determination 93: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003193: Categorical Exclusion Determination Davis Dam 230-Kilovolt Switchyards Stage 06 Upgrade (Double Breaker Double Bus) in Mohave County, Arizona CX(s) Applied: B4.11 Date: 06/30/2010 Location(s): Mohave County, Arizona Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region Western Area Power Administration plans to upgrade the existing Upper and Lower Davis Dam 230-kilovolt switchyards in order to provide additional operational flexibility and reliability to the bulk electric system. Construction activities will take place within the existing switchyard fences in areas previously graded and covered with gravel. Existing gravel access roads will be used to reach the project area. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

5

CX-007137: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

37: Categorical Exclusion Determination 37: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007137: Categorical Exclusion Determination Davis Dam Lower 230-kilovolt Substation Service Building Demolition CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 03/03/2011 Location(s): Mohave County, Arizona Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region Western Area Power Administration (Western) plans to demolish a service building located in the Lower 230-kilovolt Switchyard at Davis Dam, because it no longer meets our needs and we do not anticipate finding a use for it in the future. The building is currently vacant and has been for years. We plan to begin the work on April 1, 2011 and complete it by December 31, 2011. CX-007137.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1595: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1595: Final Environmental Assessment

6

CX-003194: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

194: Categorical Exclusion Determination 194: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003194: Categorical Exclusion Determination Installation of a Mid-Span Interset Structure between Structures 141/1 and 141/2 on the Existing Davis Dam-Prescott 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line in Yavapai County, Arizona CX(s) Applied: B4.13 Date: 06/10/2010 Location(s): Yavapai County, Arizona Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region Western Area Power Administration plans to install a mid-span (interset) structure between structures 141/1 and 141/2 of the existing Davis Dam-Prescott 230-kilovolt transmission line. The proposed undertaking entails constructing a 100-foot tall steel H-frame near the midpoint of the 1900-foot-long span between two lattice tower structures. The H-frame will

7

EIS-0413: Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the proposed Searchlight Wind Energy Project to Western's Davis-Mead 230-kilovolt transmission line and to construct, own, and operate a new switching station to...

8

W. Clay Davis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Dr. Davis' research focuses on coupling gas and liquid chromatography to ICP-MS using high accuracy analytical methods such as speciated ...

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

9

Parker-Davis Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parker-Davis Project Remarketing Effort Reference Material Decision to Apply EPAMP Federal Register Notices Firm Electric Service Amendment Process Resource Pool & Applicant...

10

Mark W. Davis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Since 2008, Mr. Davis has led a project to develop a performance rating methodology for Micro-Combined Heat and Power (Micro-CHP) devices. ...

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

11

Davis Bacon | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Davis Bacon Davis Bacon Davis Bacon Davis Bacon Act question Does the Davis-Bacon Act apply to intern/fellowship work? Does the Davis-Bacon Act apply to training for non-profits? Does the Davis-Bacon Act apply to wages paid to laborers for the installation of energy-efficient lights purchased by a town with ARRA funding? If a state's prevailing wage requirement is higher than the Davis-Bacon federal prevailing wage, which one applies? Would rebates for equipment (for example, HVAC equipment retrofit) to be installed at a commercial site be exempt from Davis-Bacon because the rebate is for the equipment? Applicability of Davis Bacon Act to SEP programs involving students and volunteers? Davis Bacon requirements for EECBG grant involving installation of heating system by vocational-technical school students

12

Raymond Davis Jr.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biography | Research | Images | Publications | Reminiscences | Brookhaven Nat'l Lab Raymond Davis Jr. earned a 1937 B.S. and 1940 M.S. from the University of Maryland, and a Ph.D....

13

Ohio Nuclear Profile - Davis Besse  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Davis Besse" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License Expiration Date"...

14

Parker-Davis Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Davis Project Davis Project FY 2012 Status & Preliminary FY 2013 Annual Operating Plans May 3, 2012 Agenda * Introduction * Hydrology Update * FY 2011 AOP Estimates Presented 5/5/11 & Final Results Final Results * Status of FY 2012 Annual Operating Plan * Preliminary FY 2013 Annual Operating Plan * FY 2013 Purchase Power * Next Steps 1 Hydrology Update For WY 2012 & Actual WY 2011 Results WY 2012 WY 2011 Lake Powell (maf) % (maf) % Unreg Inflow (Norm=12.1) 6.8 56% 16.0 132% Apr-Jul Unreg Inflow (Norm=7.9) 3.5 49% 12.5 158% (Norm=7.9) 3.5 49% 12.5 158% Storage (Max=24.3) 15.1 62% 17.6 74% Releases to Lake Mead (Norm=8.23) 9.5 115% 12.5 152% (ft.) (ft.) Max Lake Elev. 3650 (Oct) 3661 (Jul) Min Lake Elev. 3633 (Sep) 3611 (Mar) Year-End Lake Elev. 3633 3653 2 Colorado River Basin above Lake Powell Water Year Water Year Snowpack and Precipitation

15

EA-1665: Davis-Kingman 69-kV Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Arizona |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

65: Davis-Kingman 69-kV Transmission Line Rebuild Project, 65: Davis-Kingman 69-kV Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Arizona EA-1665: Davis-Kingman 69-kV Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Arizona Overview Western plans to rebuild a 26.6-mile-long portion of the existing 27.3-mile-long Davis-Kingman Tap 69-kV Transmission Line within the existing ROW in order to improve the reliability of the transmission service. The line has been in service well beyond its projected service life, customer load on the line has increased considerably over the years, and reliability has decreased due to natural aging, extreme weather exposure, vandalism, and lightning strikes. The western-most 0.7 mile of the existing line was rebuilt as part of the Davis Dam Switchyard in 2010. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

16

Davis County Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Davis County Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Davis County Biomass Facility Facility...

17

Sponsored by: UC DAVIS HEALTH SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health Information Partnership & Services Organization UC DAVIS FACULTY Estella M. Geraghty, MD, MS, MPHSponsored by: UC DAVIS HEALTH SYSTEM Office of Continuing Medical Education and UC Davis Health Informatics Graduate Program HEALTH INFORMATICS 7TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2013 Educating the Informatics Workforce

California at Davis, University of

18

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 24270 of 31,917 results. 61 - 24270 of 31,917 results. Download CX-003194: Categorical Exclusion Determination Installation of a Mid-Span Interset Structure between Structures 141/1 and 141/2 on the Existing Davis Dam-Prescott 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line in Yavapai County, Arizona CX(s) Applied: B4.13 Date: 06/10/2010 Location(s): Yavapai County, Arizona Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003194-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004896: Categorical Exclusion Determination Davis Dam Switchyards (Erosion Control) CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/12/2010 Location(s): Mohave County, Arizona Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004896-categorical-exclusion-determination

19

CX-004896: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4896: Categorical Exclusion Determination 4896: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004896: Categorical Exclusion Determination Davis Dam Switchyards (Erosion Control) CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/12/2010 Location(s): Mohave County, Arizona Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region Western Area Power Administration proposes to conduct erosion control between the new Davis Dam 69-kilovolts and upper 230-kilovolts wwitchyards. This will consist of building two 3 feet by 3 feet by 12 feet gabions, which are rock-filled with 4-8 inch riprap stocked one on top of the other on the north ends of the wwitchyards. The 6 feet by 6 feet by 6 feet washed out area shall be filled and compacted with native soil and a high survivability filter fabric spread out beneath the gabions.

20

University of California DavisUniversity of California Davis Renal Transplant ProgramRenal Transplant Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of California DavisUniversity of California Davis Renal Transplant Program Center WaitlistsTransplant Center Waitlists in Northern Californiain Northern California 7 from WaitlistsRemoval from Waitlists in Northern Californiain Northern California (%)(%) 07

Hammock, Bruce D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "davis dam 230-kilovolt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Davis  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

California Davis, California, Site This Site All Sites All LM Quick Search Key Documents and Links All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdficon Key Documents Fact Sheet Record...

22

Enabling Technologies Lead: Mark Davis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Technologies Lead: Mark Davis 3.2 Omics Platforms for Systems Biology Lead: Tim Tschaplinski 3.3 Advanced Pretreatment Configuration and Conditions Lead: Charles Wyman 3.1 Characterization of Biomass Features that Enhance Sugar Release Lead: Art Ragauskas 3.1.1 Support for Identification of the TOP40 Recalcitrant Lines (Gjersing) 3.1.2 In-Depth Cell Wall Characterization (Ragauskas) 3.2.1 Transcriptomics & Resequencing (Brown) 3.2.2 Proteomics (Hettich) 3.3.4 Demonstration of Improved Plants with CBP Organisms (Yee) 3.4 Computational Biology Lead: Ying Xu 3.3.1 Enhance Understanding of Pretreatment Fundamentals and Control Recalcitrance (Wyman) 3.3.2 Integrate, Optimize, and Understand Pretreatment with Advanced Plants (Wyman) 3.4.1 An Integrated Omics Data Analysis and

23

Davis-Bacon / Buy American Relationship  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 4, 2010 1 February 4, 2010 1 Davis-Bacon / Buy American Relationship Davis-Bacon / Buy American Relationship Question: Since the Davis Bacon Act uses same or similar language about "construction, alteration, maintenance or repair", does a determination that the project is (or is not) subject to the Davis Bacon Act also mean that the project is (or is not) subject to the Buy American provisions of 1605 of the Recovery Act? Answer: No. A finding that the Davis Bacon Act (and Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act) does not apply (or applies) to a project does not necessarily mean that the Buy American provisions of 1605 of the Recovery Act do not apply (or apply). These two statutes contain some similar language, but are not the same, have different implementing regulatory frameworks, and are construed in the context

24

Patrick B. Davis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Patrick B. Davis Patrick B. Davis About Us Patrick B. Davis - Vehicle Technologies Program Manager Patrick Davis is the Director of the Vehicle Technologies Office in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). Patrick Davis leads an array of activities that help reduce America's dependence on foreign oil and secure a clean energy future. The Vehicle Technologies Office supports about $330 million in annual research funding for hybrid drivetrains, advanced batteries, lightweight materials, advanced combustion and fuels, vehicle systems integration, and Clean Cities deployment activities. He is responsible for three major government and private industry partnerships: the U.S. DRIVE Partnership (Driving Research and Innovation

25

Davis Bacon Act Applicability to Smart Grid Investment Grant...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Davis Bacon Act Applicability to Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) Program Grants Davis Bacon Act Applicability to Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) Program Grants Letter to...

26

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 14830 of 29,416 results. 21 - 14830 of 29,416 results. Download CX-007136: Categorical Exclusion Determination Coolidge-Oracle Pole Replacement CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 11/13/2009 Location(s): Pinal County, Arizona Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-007136-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-007137: Categorical Exclusion Determination Davis Dam Lower 230-kilovolt Substation Service Building Demolition CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 03/03/2011 Location(s): Mohave County, Arizona Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-007137-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-007138: Categorical Exclusion Determination Davis-MKT Kingman Tap Crossarm Replacement

27

Davis Energy Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Davis Energy Group (Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Davis Energy Group (Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions)) Jump to: navigation, search Name Davis Energy Group (Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions) Place Davis, CA Zip 95616 Website http://www.davisenergy.com/ Coordinates 38.5449065°, -121.7405167° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.5449065,"lon":-121.7405167,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

28

ITS-Davis Biennial Report 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in medium-size cities, and hybrid vehicle designs for China.Axsen, ITS-Davis, Hybrid Vehicles and the Neighbor Effect:policy makers, plug-in hybrid vehicle enthusiasts, and

Sperling, Dan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

University of California Davis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Davis Davis Jump to: navigation, search Name University of California, Davis Place Davis, California Zip 95616 Product University in California. Coordinates 39.12868°, -79.465714° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.12868,"lon":-79.465714,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

30

California Lighting Technology Center (University of California, Davis) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lighting Technology Center (University of California, Davis) Lighting Technology Center (University of California, Davis) Jump to: navigation, search Name California Lighting Technology Center (University of California, Davis) Place Davis, CA Website http://cltc.ucdavis.edu/ References CLTC Website[1] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections California Lighting Technology Center (University of California, Davis) is a research institution located in Davis, CA. References ↑ "CLTC Website" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=California_Lighting_Technology_Center_(University_of_California,_Davis)&oldid=381592"

31

University of California, DavisDaniel Zinn 1 University of California, DavisDaniel Zinn 1 Daniel Zinn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of California, DavisDaniel Zinn 1 University of California, DavisDaniel Zinn 1 Map of California, DavisDaniel Zinn 2 Outline Motivation Programing Model of MapReduce Hadoop ­ Free Java-based MR-Software Pig Latin ­ On top of MapReduce Beyond MapReduce #12;University of California, DavisDaniel Zinn 3

Ferrara, Katherine W.

32

Dam Safety Program (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Dam Safety Division within the Department of the Environment is responsible for administering a dam safety program to regulate the construction, operation, and maintenance of dams to prevent...

33

Dam Safety (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection's Division of Dam Safety provides for the regulation and safety of dams and reservoirs throughout the Commonwealth in order to protect the...

34

Institute of Transportation (University of California, Davis)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute of Transportation Studies (University of California, Davis) Year 2001 Paper UCD also relied primarily on the private automobile for their mobility, it is likely that future elderly driving constraints Susan A. Shaheen a , Debbie A. Niemeier b,* a Institute of Transportation

Kammen, Daniel M.

35

Davis PV plant operation and maintenance manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This operation and maintenance manual contains the information necessary to run the Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA) test facility in Davis, California. References to more specific information available in drawings, data sheets, files, or vendor manuals are included. The PVUSA is a national cooperative research and demonstration program formed in 1987 to assess the potential of utility scale photovoltaic systems.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

University of California, Davis Initiating Biofuel Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010 STEPS Symposium: Initiating New Vehicle/Fuel Pathways Davis, California June 14, 2010 Sonia Yeh a challenge for future development of biofuels · e.g. food prices, land use conversion, biodiversity, water savings, biodiversity, soil, water, and air · Social: workers' rights and land rights · EU Renewable

California at Davis, University of

37

RUA # _1384 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will be used to prevent contamination and internal exposures to radiation? Disposable gloves __X__ DisposableRUA # _1384 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY, HEALTH PHYSICS Radiation areas. B. How will you detect radioactive contamination and/or radiation fields? Wipes and liquid

Singer, Mitchell

38

UC Davis Energy Efficiency Center EEC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UC Davis Energy Efficiency Center EEC UC Davis Energy Efficiency Center EEC Jump to: navigation, search Name UC Davis Energy Efficiency Center (EEC) Place California Sector Efficiency Product With a leadership grant from the California Clean Energy Fund (CalCEF) of USD 1.0m, the UC Davis has established the EEC to accelerate energy efficiency innovation and to stimulate the transfer of the technology into the marketplace. References UC Davis Energy Efficiency Center (EEC)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. UC Davis Energy Efficiency Center (EEC) is a company located in California . References ↑ "UC Davis Energy Efficiency Center (EEC)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=UC_Davis_Energy_Efficiency_Center_EEC&oldid=352456

39

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2010 2, 2010 CX-003624: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replacement of Twenty 22-L Structures on the Satsop-Aberdeen Number 2 230-kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/12/2010 Location(s): Gray's Harbor County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration August 12, 2010 CX-004896: Categorical Exclusion Determination Davis Dam Switchyards (Erosion Control) CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/12/2010 Location(s): Mohave County, Arizona Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region August 12, 2010 CX-003417: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency Projects CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 08/12/2010 Location(s): Plover, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office August 12, 2010 CX-003405: Categorical Exclusion Determination

40

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B1.23 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 17, 2011 May 17, 2011 CX-005976: Categorical Exclusion Determination Demolition of Trailers T116, T124, T134 CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 05/17/2011 Location(s): Batavia, Illinois Office(s): Science, Fermi Site Office March 22, 2011 CX-005547: Categorical Exclusion Determination Specific Manufacturing Capability (SMC) Incinerator and Propane Tank System Removal CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 03/22/2011 Location(s): Idaho Office(s): Nuclear Energy, Idaho Operations Office March 3, 2011 CX-007137: Categorical Exclusion Determination Davis Dam Lower 230-kilovolt Substation Service Building Demolition CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 03/03/2011 Location(s): Mohave County, Arizona Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region February 14, 2011 CX-005280: Categorical Exclusion Determination

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "davis dam 230-kilovolt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Davie, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Davie, Florida: Energy Resources Davie, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 26.0628664°, -80.2331038° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.0628664,"lon":-80.2331038,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

42

Davis Energy Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Group Energy Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Davis Energy Group (Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions) Place Davis, CA Zip 95616 Website http://www.davisenergy.com/ Coordinates 38.5449065°, -121.7405167° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.5449065,"lon":-121.7405167,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

43

Davis, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Davis, CA) (Redirected from Davis, CA) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.5449065°, -121.7405167° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.5449065,"lon":-121.7405167,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

44

Davis Graham Stubbs LLP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Graham Stubbs LLP Graham Stubbs LLP Jump to: navigation, search Name Davis Graham & Stubbs LLP Place Denver, Colorado Zip 80202 Sector Services Product String representation "Davis Graham & ... erse workforce." is too long. Coordinates 39.74001°, -104.992259° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.74001,"lon":-104.992259,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

45

Davis-Kingman Draft EA Master_050611  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Davis-Kingman Tap 69-kV Transmission Line Rebuild Mohave County, Arizona DOE/EA-1665 DOI-BLM-AZ-C0-# Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration 615 South 43rd Avenue Phoenix, Arizona 85009 Cooperating Agencies: Bureau of Land Management Kingman Field Office 2755 Mission Boulevard Kingman, Arizona 86401 Bureau of Reclamation Lower Colorado Regional Office

46

Dams Fishways (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

No permanent dam or obstruction may be placed in the waters of the state without providing for fish passage.

47

INTERNATIONAL COMMISSION ON LARGE DAMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

earthquake. The dam was designed as a concrete gravity dam constructed using roller-compacted concrete (RCC a week. The Olivenhain Dam is the first RCC gravity dam permitted by the state of California and), is the tallest RCC dam in the North America. The Olivenhain Dam has the typical geometry for concrete gravity

Bowles, David S.

48

Raymond Davis Jr., Solar Neutrinos, and the Solar Neutrino Problems  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Raymond Davis, Jr., Solar Neutrinos, Raymond Davis, Jr., Solar Neutrinos, and the Solar Neutrino Problem Resources with Additional Information Raymond Davis, Jr. Photo Courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Raymond Davis, Jr., who conducted research in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) from 1948 through 1984, was awarded the 2002 Nobel Prize in Physics "for pioneering contributions to astrophysics, in particular for the detection of cosmic neutrinos." Dr. Davis is also a recipient of the 2003 Fermi Award. He was the first scientist to detect solar neutrinos, ghostlike particles produced in the nuclear reactions that power the sun. "Neutrinos are fascinating particles, so tiny and fast that they can pass straight through everything, even the earth itself, without even slowing down," said Davis. "When I began my work, I was intrigued by the idea of learning something new. The interesting thing about doing new experiments is that you never know what the answer is going to be!"

49

Dam Safety Program (Florida)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Dam safety in Florida is a shared responsibility among the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), the regional water management districts, the United States Army Corps of Engineers ...

50

Dam Safety Standards (New Jersey)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These rules set forth procedures for application to construct, repair or modify a dam and set standards for design and maintenance of dams. These rules also establish a dam inspection procedure....

51

Davis-Bacon Compliance and Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PROCUREMENT PROCUREMENT ATTORNEYS CONFERENCE - Contractor Workforce Issues Jean Seibert Stucky Assistant General Counsel February 22, 2011 GC-63 1. Labor issues (unions) 2. Employment issues (equal employment; workforce restructuring) 3. Pensions and other benefits 4. Labor standards (e.g., Davis-Bacon Act) 2 Why is this important? 60-95% of DOE Contract costs are contractor human resource costs - 3 Roles and Responsibilities  DOE is not  The Employer of the contractor work force, or  The sponsor or the fiduciary of their benefit plans  DOE is  The contracting agency, with responsibility to manage its contracts prudently, consistently with applicable law  DOE contractor pension plans are not  Governmental plans, and  DOE does not  Insure the benefits provided

52

University of California at Davis Project | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

University of California at Davis Project University of California at Davis Project University of California at Davis Project November 13, 2013 - 10:45am Addthis Through an innovative public-private partnership between the University of California at Davis (UC Davis) and the West Village Community Partnership, LLC, the West Village neighborhood will create numerous opportunities for more than 3,000 faculty, staff, and students to live locally and participate in the life of the campus through energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainability measures. The U.S. Department of Energy provided $2.5 million in funding for this Community Renewable Energy Deployment project. Students began moving into the community's Viridian and Ramble apartments in August 2011. Phase 2 of the Ramble Apartments opened in September 2012

53

University of California at Davis Project | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

University of California at Davis Project University of California at Davis Project University of California at Davis Project November 13, 2013 - 10:45am Addthis Through an innovative public-private partnership between the University of California at Davis (UC Davis) and the West Village Community Partnership, LLC, the West Village neighborhood will create numerous opportunities for more than 3,000 faculty, staff, and students to live locally and participate in the life of the campus through energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainability measures. The U.S. Department of Energy provided $2.5 million in funding for this Community Renewable Energy Deployment project. Students began moving into the community's Viridian and Ramble apartments in August 2011. Phase 2 of the Ramble Apartments opened in September 2012

54

Community Renewable Energy Deployment: University of California at at Davis  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

at at Davis at at Davis Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Community Renewable Energy Deployment: University of California at at Davis Project Agency/Company /Organization US Department of Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Other, Renewable Energy, Biomass - Anaerobic Digestion, Solar - Concentrating Solar Power, Hydrogen and Fuel Cells, - Solar Pv, Biomass - Waste To Energy Phase Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type Case studies/examples Availability Publicly available--Free Publication Date 2/2/2011 Website http://www1.eere.energy.gov/co Locality University of California at Davis References Community Renewable Energy Deployment: University of California at at Davis Project[1] Contents

55

A Desk Guide to the Davis-Bacon Act | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Davis-Bacon Act. A Desk Guide to the Davis-Bacon Act More Documents & Publications Audit Report: OAS-RA-11-05 Davis-Bacon Compliance and Performance Revised Interpretation of...

56

Steve Davis Aquaculture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Steve Davis Aquaculture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Steve Davis Aquaculture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Steve Davis Aquaculture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Steve Davis Aquaculture Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Bluffdale, Utah Coordinates 40.4896711°, -111.9388244° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

57

VBA-0083- In the Matter of S.R. Davis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Decision considers an Appeal of an Initial Agency Decision (IAD) issued on April 21, 2004, involving a complaint filed by S.R. Davis (also referred to as the Complainant) under the Department...

58

VBU-0083- In the Matter of S. R. Davis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

S. R. Davis, a former employee of Fluor Fernald, Inc. (Fluor), a Department of Energy (DOE) contractor, appeals the DOE Ohio Field Offices (OFO) dismissal of the whistleblower complaint against...

59

VBH-0083- In the Matter of S.R. Davis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

S.R. Davis (the Employee) filed a complaint against her former employer, Fluor Fernald, Inc. (the Contractor) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R....

60

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY, HEALTH PHYSICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contamination and internal exposures to radiation? Disposable gloves __X__ Disposable booties_____ Lab coat __XRUA # 1384 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY, HEALTH PHYSICS Radiation radioactive contamination and/or radiation fields? Wipes and liquid scintillation counting C. At what

Singer, Mitchell

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "davis dam 230-kilovolt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Dam Safety (Michigan)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule requires that anyone who desires to construct a dam that is 6 feet or more in height and impounds 5 surface acres or more at the design flood elevation, must first obtain a permit from...

62

Regulation of Dams (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The owner of a dam is required to maintain the structure in good condition, and notify the Department of Environmental Management upon the sale or transfer of ownership of the structure. The...

63

Dam Safety (North Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

North Carolina Administrative Code Title 15A, Subchapter 2K lays out further regulations for the design, approval, construction, maintenance, and inspection of dams to ensure public safety and...

64

Academic Organization of UC Davis: A White Paper to Spur Conversation May 13, 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Academic Organization of UC Davis: A White Paper to Spur Conversation May 13, 2013 1 Academic Organization of UC Davis: A White Paper to Spur Conversation Background The academic enterprise of UC Davis Organization of UC Davis: A White Paper to Spur Conversation May 13, 2013 2 projects a recognizable identity

Ferrara, Katherine W.

65

Flood Protection and Dam Safety (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

All dams in Virginia are subject to the Dam Safety Act and Dam Safety Regulations unless specifically excluded. A dam is excluded if it: (a) is less than six feet high; (b) has a maximum capacity...

66

MERLIN Analysis of Leesville Dam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three sections of American Electric Power's (AEP's) Leesville Dam were analyzed with MERLIN, EPRI's fracture mechanics program. The Leesville Dam had previously been found to be unstable under probable maximum flood (PMF) loadings when analyzed using traditional gravity methods.

2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

67

Jefferson Davis Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Davis Elec Coop, Inc Davis Elec Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Jefferson Davis Elec Coop, Inc Place Louisiana Utility Id 9682 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png All Electric Farm and Home Service Residential All Electric Farm and Home Service - Seasonal Residential Commercial and Industrial Services Commercial Extra Large Power Service Commercial Farm and Rice Dryers Residential Flood Lighting Service: 1000 watt- 140,000 Lumen High Pressure Sodium Lighting

68

Nobel Prize | 2002 Pysics Prize, Raymond Davis jr.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Homestake mine Homestake mine Underground tank in the Homestake Gold Mine in South Dakota. Detection of Cosmic Neutrinos Raymond Davis Jr., a chemist at Brookhaven National Laboratory, won the 2002 Nobel Prize in Physics for detecting solar neutrinos, ghostlike particles produced in the nuclear reactions that power the sun. Davis shared the prize with Masatoshi Koshiba of Japan, and Riccardo Giacconi of the U.S. Neutrinos are ghostlike particles that were postulated by Wolfgang Pauli in 1930 on purely theoretical grounds and, until recently, were believed to have zero mass. They are thought to be produced in the nuclear reactions that provide the sun's energy. They rain down on each square inch of the earth at the rate of about 400 billion per second. Raymond Davis Jr. started investigating neutrinos that were produced in

69

STATE OF CALIFORNIA GRAY DAVIS, Governor July 2, 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STATE OF CALIFORNIA GRAY DAVIS, Governor July 2, 2003 Ms. Jessie H. Roberson Assistant Secretary U AVENUE SACRAMENTO, CA 95818 #12;Ms. Jessie H. Roberson July 2, 2003 Page 2 2. DOE Has Provided Dear Ms. Roberson: Thank you for your reply to our letter of June 13 and subsequent discussions

70

Davis says. However, there will be times when a human  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Davis says. However, there will be times when a human operator may want to give particular guidance, there may be only one or a few people trying to watch a very large number of television monitors showing the surveillance video feeds (below). Because people can only focus on a few monitors at a time, much

Davis, James W.

71

Point-counterpoint on UC Davis olive oil report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In July 2010, the University of California Davis Olive Center released a report on olive oil labeling questioning the trueness-to-grade of extra virgin olive oil imported into the United States. The Executive Secretariat of the International Olive Council

72

UC DAVIS HEALTH SYSTEM LABORATORY PATIENT SERVICE CENTERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UC DAVIS HEALTH SYSTEM LABORATORY PATIENT SERVICE CENTERS AUBURN * 3200 BELL ROAD AUBURN, CA 95602-7373 to schedule an appointment ** Ucdmc laboratory patient service centers up-dated May 8, 2013 wpd #12; FOR HEALTH *** 550 West Ranch View Road, Suite 1100 Rocklin, Ca 95765 Lab: (916) 295-5800 Fax: (916) 295

Hammock, Bruce D.

73

UC DAVIS HEALTH SYSTEM LABORATORY PATIENT SERVICE CENTERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UC DAVIS HEALTH SYSTEM LABORATORY PATIENT SERVICE CENTERS AUBURN * 3200 BELL ROAD AUBURN, CA 95602 Services on an Emergency basis Ucdmc laboratory patient service centers up-dated May 8, 2012wpd #12; Monday ­ Friday PLACER CENTER FOR HEALTH *** 550 West Ranch View Road, Suite 1100 Rocklin, Ca 95765 Lab

Hammock, Bruce D.

74

KDM Security in the Hybrid Framework Gareth T. Davies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KDM Security in the Hybrid Framework Gareth T. Davies and Martijn Stam Department of Computer and indistinguishability of the DEM together suffice for KDM security of the resulting hybrid scheme. We consider the most that might be applicable in a wider context. Keywords: KDM Security, Hybrid Encryption, KEM/DEM, Public Key

International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

75

Microsoft PowerPoint - 16.1225_Terry Cooke-Davies - Project Complexity...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

225Terry Cooke-Davies - Project Complexity as of 16 Mar Microsoft PowerPoint - 16.1225Terry Cooke-Davies - Project Complexity as of 16 Mar Microsoft PowerPoint - 16.1225Terry...

76

Alternative Fuels Data Center: UC Davis Pioneers Research for Plug-In  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

UC Davis Pioneers UC Davis Pioneers Research for Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: UC Davis Pioneers Research for Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: UC Davis Pioneers Research for Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: UC Davis Pioneers Research for Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: UC Davis Pioneers Research for Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: UC Davis Pioneers Research for Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: UC Davis Pioneers Research for Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on AddThis.com...

77

UC Davis Natural Reserve System-Four-Year Report (1999-2003)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7. Jepson Prairie Reserve 8. McLaughlin Natural Reserve 9.U.C. Davis U.C. Davis McLaughlin Publications Boulton, A.Grav- ity Survey of the McLaughlin Reserve: Study of Local

Harrison, Susan; Waddell, Shane M.; Boucher, Virginia L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Development of dam safety management system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, we can see an increasing amount of dam damage or failure due to aging, earthquakes occurrence and unusual changes in weather. For this reason, dam safety is gaining more importance than ever before in terms of disaster management at a national ... Keywords: Dam safety, Dam safety issue, Dam safety management system, Field inspection, Instrumentation, Monitoring, Safety evaluation

Jesung Jeon; Jongwook Lee; Donghoon Shin; Hangyu Park

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

BNL Chemist Raymond Davis Wins 2002 Physics Nobel Prize  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Neutrino Experiments Solar Neutrino Experiments Neutrinos are ghostlike particles that were postulated by Wolfgang Pauli in 1930 on purely theoretical grounds and, until recently, were believed to have zero mass. They are thought to be produced in the nuclear reactions that provide the sun's energy. They rain down on each square inch of the earth at the rate of about 400 billion per second. Raymond Davis Jr. started investigat- ing neutrinos that were produced in Brookhaven's Graphite Research Reactor and at a reactor at the Savannah River Plant in South Carolina, in the 1950s. But these experiments were really the prelude to Davis's major triumph, which came in the early 1970s, when he successfully de- tected solar neutrinos in a new experiment based in Lead, South Dakota (image at

80

Davie County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Davie County, North Carolina: Energy Resources Davie County, North Carolina: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.9367033°, -80.5882803° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.9367033,"lon":-80.5882803,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "davis dam 230-kilovolt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A DESK GUIDE TO THE DAVIS-BACON ACT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE DBA Desk Guide 06-16-2010 DOE DBA Desk Guide 06-16-2010 A DESK GUIDE TO THE DAVIS-BACON ACT Prevailing Wage Requirements for Contractors on Federal Contracts and DBA-Covered Federally Financed or Assisted Construction Projects Introduction. The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Desk Guide for the use of contractors and subcontractors performing work on construction projects under a federal contract, or under a statute authorizing federal financial assistance, that requires the application of Davis-Bacon Act (DBA or the Act) prevailing wage requirements. This Desk Guide may also be used by grantees, subgrantees, and federal personnel to administer their respective roles and functions with respect to the DBA. The objective of this Desk Guide is to provide simple, non-technical guidance to help

82

Technical Sessions S. Lovejoy, A. Davis, Y. Tessier Physics Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S. Lovejoy, A. Davis, Y. Tessier S. Lovejoy, A. Davis, Y. Tessier Physics Department McGill University Montreal, Quebec, Canada D. Schertzer, R. Borde laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris, France R. Frouin Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California, San Diego La Jolla, CA 92093-0221 C. Gautier, D. Lavallee Earth Space Research Group University of California Santa Barbara, CA size. It is now clear that the relevant scale changes can be quite general, involving not only stratification (e.g., because of gravity), but also differential rotation (the Coriolis force), and other more complex operations. Between the inner viscous scale and the outer planetary scale, the fundamental dynamical equations of the atmosphere involve no char- acteristic length; this is the physical basis of the scaling.

83

Regulations and Permits Related to Dams (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Vermont law requires a permit, or a dam order, for the construction, alteration, or removal of dams impounding more than 500,000 cubic feet of water, including any accumulated sediments. Dam...

84

Dams, Dikes, and Other Devices; Dam Safety Program (North Dakota) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dikes, and Other Devices; Dam Safety Program (North Dakota) Dikes, and Other Devices; Dam Safety Program (North Dakota) Dams, Dikes, and Other Devices; Dam Safety Program (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting These regulations govern the permitting, construction, operation, inspection, and hazard classifications of dams, dikes, and other water

85

Safety of Dams and Reservoirs Act (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This act regulates dams and associated reservoirs to protect health and public safety and minimize adverse consequences associated with potential dam failure. The act describes the responsibilities...

86

EA-1478: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

478: Finding of No Significant Impact 478: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1478: Finding of No Significant Impact Hoover Dam Bypass Project Phase II, Nevada Western Area Power Administration proposes to double-circuit a portion of the Hoover Dam Bypass Project PHase II (Double-Circuiting a Portion of the Hoover-Mead No. 5 and No. 7 230-kilovolt (kv) Transmission LInes with the Henderson-Mead No. 1 230-kV Transmission Line. In addition, a fiber optic cable would be placed as an overhead ground wire on the double-circuited transmission lines form the area of Hoover Dam to Mead Substation. Finding of No Significant Impact Hoover Dam Bypass Project Phase II (Double-Circuiting a Portion of the Hoover-Mead No. 5 and No. 7 230-kilovolt (kv) Transmission LInes with the Henderson-Mead No. 1 230-kV

87

Davis-Besse Cycle 16 Fuel Deposit Analysis and Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel deposit samples were collected from Davis-Besse Unit 1 during the EOC16 outage. The impetus behind collecting crud samples came from the observation of unusual deposits on fuel during EOC15, as well as measured crud-induced power shape (CIPS) during Cycle 16. The purpose of EOC16 sample campaign therefore was to determine the nature of the fuel deposits. Samples were collected from two fuel assemblies, one after one cycle of exposure and the other after two cycles of exposure. Samples were collected...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

88

EIS-0308: Record of Decision and Floodplain Statement | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Record of Decision and Floodplain Statement 8: Record of Decision and Floodplain Statement EIS-0308: Record of Decision and Floodplain Statement Interconnection of the Southpoint Power Plant with the Wester Area Power Administration's Parker-Davis No. 1 and No. 2, 230-kilovolt Transmission Lines Western has determined that no significant environmental impacts will result from construction, operation and maintenance of Calpine Corporation's Southpoint Power Plant, the two natural gas pipelines, or the approximately 7 miles of high voltage transmission lines, or from the upgrade of the Parker-Davis No. 1 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line. Therefore, Western has decided to provide an interconnection with the plant and Western's transmission system in west central Arizona. However, Calpine has yet to obtain a permit from the Bureau of Land Management (BLM)

89

Use, Maintenance, Removal, Inspections, and Safety of Dams (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section describes operating plans for dams with movable structures, as well as procedures for raising or lowering of impoundment levels, dam removal, and dam safety inspections.

90

Perspectives on Dam Removal: York Creek Dam and the Water Framework Directive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Retirement of Dams and Hydroelectric Facilities. ASCE, Newon the Allier River, a hydroelectric plant in France. Thethe dam generating hydroelectric power versus the ecological

Lawrence, Justin E; Pollak, Josh D; Richmond, Sarah F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

UC Davis Medical Education Building | 4610 X Street | Room 1222 & 2222 ONLINE REGISTRATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UC Davis Medical Education Building | 4610 X Street | Room 1222 & 2222 ONLINE REGISTRATION/ TECHNOLOGIST SYMPOSIUM Advances In Cardiovascular Medical and Surgical Care SAVE THE DATE Saturday, May 5, 2012-734-5512, janine.neely@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu. LOCATION UC Davis Medical Education Building 4610 X Street, Room 1222

Hammock, Bruce D.

92

University of California, Davis, Study Abroad Programs Safety and Emergency Handbook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 University of California, Davis, Study Abroad Programs Safety and Emergency Handbook Quarter Abroad Programs Developed by the Emergency Guidelines for International Programs working group June 2007 Programs The permanently staffed entry point for all emergencies is the UC Davis Campus Dispatch (530) 752

Hammock, Bruce D.

93

University of California, Davis, Study Abroad Programs Safety and Emergency Handbook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 University of California, Davis, Study Abroad Programs Safety and Emergency Handbook Summer Abroad 2011 Developed and updated by the Emergency Guidelines for International Programs Working Group The 24-hour number for all emergencies UC Davis Campus Dispatch (530) 752-1230 Campus dispatch

Hammock, Bruce D.

94

Dam Safety Regulation (Mississippi) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dam Safety Regulation (Mississippi) Dam Safety Regulation (Mississippi) Dam Safety Regulation (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Transportation Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality The purpose of the Dam Safety Regulation is to ensure that all dams constructed in the state of Mississippi are permitted and thus do not potentially harm wildlife, water supplies and property. Any person or entity proposing to construct, enlarge, repair, or alter a dam or reservoir

95

Seismic fracture analysis of concrete gravity dams including dam-reservoir interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the seismic fracture response of concrete gravity dams is investigated with considering the effects of dam-reservoir interaction. A co-axial rotating crack model (CRCM), which includes the strain softening behavior, is selected for concrete ... Keywords: Concrete gravity dam, Dam-reservoir interaction, Non-linear analysis, Seismic fracture

Yusuf Calayir; Muhammet Karaton

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

MHK Technologies/The Davis Hydro Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydro Turbine Hydro Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage The Davis Hydro Turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Blue Energy Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Blue Energy Ocean Turbine acts as a highly efficient underwater vertical axis windmill Four fixed hydrofoil blades of the turbine are connected to a rotor that drives an integrated gearbox and electrical generator assembly The turbine is mounted in a durable concrete marine caisson that anchors the unit to the ocean floor and the structure directs flow through the turbine further concentrating the resource supporting the coupler gearbox and generator above the rotor These sit above the surface of the water and are readily accessible for maintenance and repair The hydrofoil blades employ a hydrodynamic lift principal that causes the turbine foils to move proportionately faster than the speed of the surrounding water Computer optimized cross flow design ensures that the rotation of the turbine is unidirectional on both the ebb and flow of the tide

97

John N. Bahcall and Raymond Davis, Jr., 2003 | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

John N. Bahcall and Raymond Davis, Jr., 2003 John N. Bahcall and Raymond Davis, Jr., 2003 The Enrico Fermi Award Fermi Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2010's 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's 1950's Ceremony The Life of Enrico Fermi Contact Information The Enrico Fermi Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-9395 E: fermi.award@science.doe.gov 2000's John N. Bahcall and Raymond Davis, Jr., 2003 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Citation For their innovative research in astrophysics leading to a revolution in understanding the properties of the elusive neutrino, the lightest known particle with mass. Biography John Bahcall, theorist, and Raymond Davis, Jr., experimentalist, are the scientists most responsible for the field of solar neutrino physics and

98

Dam Safety (Delaware) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dam Safety (Delaware) Dam Safety (Delaware) Dam Safety (Delaware) < Back Eligibility Construction Fed. Government Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info Start Date 2004 State Delaware Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control The Delaware Dam Safety Law was adopted in 2004 and provides the framework for proper design, construction, operation, maintenance, and inspection of dams in the interest of public health, safety, and welfare. The law requires licensing, inspections and preparation of emergency action plans (EAPs) for publicly owned dams with a high or significant hazard potential.

99

Power Plant Dams (Kansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Plant Dams (Kansas) Power Plant Dams (Kansas) Power Plant Dams (Kansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Kansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Health and Environment This act states the provisions for erection and maintenance of dams. When any person, corporation or city may be desirous of erecting and maintaining a milldam or dam for generating power across any watercourse, the party so desiring to do the same may run the stream over the land of any other person by ditching or otherwise, and he, she or it may obtain the right to erect and maintain said dam and keep up and maintain the necessary ditches

100

Dam Safety Program (Florida) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Summary Dam safety in Florida is a shared responsibility among the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), the regional water management districts, the United...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "davis dam 230-kilovolt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Destruction or Alteration of a Dam (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Permission from the Environmental Protection Commission is required prior to the removal, destruction, or alteration that results in a lower water level of any existing dam.

102

McNary Dam, Ice Harbor Dam, and Lower Monumental Dam Smolt Monitoring Program; 1996 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW) assumed responsibility for the Smolt Monitoring Program at McNary Dam on the Columbia River in 1990 and at the new juvenile collection facility at Lower Monumental Dam on the Snake River in 1993. In 1996, Smolt Monitoring Program activities also began at the new juvenile collection facility located at Ice Harbor Dam. This report summarizes the 1996 Smolt Monitoring work at all three sites. The work at Ice Harbor consisted of Gas Bubble Trauma (GBT) monitoring only. In general, the 1996 passage season at both the McNary and Lower Monumental sites can be characterized by reduced passage of juveniles through the collection systems due to elevated river flows and spill, and low (<1%) overall facility mortality rates most likely resulting from cooler water temperatures. In accordance with the National Marine Fisheries Service recommendations (NMFS, 1995) all spring migrants were bypassed at McNary Dam in 1996. Mechanical problems within the McNary collection system resulted in collection and sampling activities being delayed until April 18 at this site, while sampling and collection began on the scheduled starting date of April 1 at Lower Monumental Dam. Monitoring operations were conducted through December 14 at McNary Dam and through October 28 at Lower Monumental Dam. An ongoing transportation evaluation summer migrant marking program was conducted at McNary Dam in 1996 by the NMFS. This necessitated the sampling of 394,211 additional fish beyond the recommended sampling guidelines. All total, 509,237 and 31,219 juvenile salmonids were anesthetized and individually counted, examined for scale loss, injuries, and brands by WDFW Smolt Monitoring personnel in 1996 at McNary Dam and Lower Monumental Dam, respectively.

Hillson, Todd; Lind, Sharon; Price, William (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Multifractal scaling behavior analysis for existing dams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fractal theory was used to describe long term behavior of dam structures by means of determining (mono-) fractal exponents. Many records do not exhibit a simple monofractal scaling behavior, which can be accounted for by a single scaling exponent. ... Keywords: Dam, Long term behavior, Multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis, Observation time series

Huaizhi Su, Zhiping Wen, Feng Wang, Bowen Wei, Jiang Hu

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

The Facts On Electric Vehicles: Interview with Pat Davis | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Facts On Electric Vehicles: Interview with Pat Davis The Facts On Electric Vehicles: Interview with Pat Davis The Facts On Electric Vehicles: Interview with Pat Davis December 22, 2010 - 2:25pm Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Electric vehicles have been an extremely hot topic lately and no stranger to the Energy Blog. When the first public curbside electric vehicle charging station rolled out in Washington DC, we covered it. And when Secretary Chu got a first-hand look at the Nissan Leaf during a recent visit to Japan, he covered it here on the Energy Blog. We're not the only ones talking about Electric Vehicles. From awards, to reviews, to high praise, and tough criticism - it seems everyone has an opinion. That's why we decided to sit down with our resident expert Pat

105

The Facts On Electric Vehicles: Interview with Pat Davis | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Facts On Electric Vehicles: Interview with Pat Davis The Facts On Electric Vehicles: Interview with Pat Davis The Facts On Electric Vehicles: Interview with Pat Davis December 22, 2010 - 2:25pm Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Electric vehicles have been an extremely hot topic lately and no stranger to the Energy Blog. When the first public curbside electric vehicle charging station rolled out in Washington DC, we covered it. And when Secretary Chu got a first-hand look at the Nissan Leaf during a recent visit to Japan, he covered it here on the Energy Blog. We're not the only ones talking about Electric Vehicles. From awards, to reviews, to high praise, and tough criticism - it seems everyone has an opinion. That's why we decided to sit down with our resident expert Pat

106

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Arizona | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arizona Arizona Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Arizona Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions in Arizona. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 13, 2013 CX-010988: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Temperature DC-Bus Capacitors Cost Reduction and Performance Improvements CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.15 Date: 09/13/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory August 22, 2013 CX-010882: Categorical Exclusion Determination Liberty-Parker Dam #2 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line, Optical Power Ground Wire Repair CX(s) Applied: B4.7 Date: 08/22/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region August 12, 2013 CX-010883: Categorical Exclusion Determination PHX-LOB and LIB-LOB 230-Kilovolt Double-Circuit- Replace Insulators at

107

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Desert Southwest Region Desert Southwest Region Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 22, 2013 CX-010882: Categorical Exclusion Determination Liberty-Parker Dam #2 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line, Optical Power Ground Wire Repair CX(s) Applied: B4.7 Date: 08/22/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region August 12, 2013 CX-010883: Categorical Exclusion Determination PHX-LOB and LIB-LOB 230-Kilovolt Double-Circuit- Replace Insulators at Structure No. 28-2 With NCI Type Polymers CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/12/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

108

Seismic Analysis of Morrow Point Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of this study is to perform nonlinear dynamic earthquake time history analyses on Morrow Point Dam, which is located 263 km southwest of Denver, Colorado. This project poses many significant technical challenges, one of which is to model the entire Morrow Point Dam/Foundation Rock/Reservoir system which includes accurate geology topography. In addition, the computational model must be initialized to represent the existing dead loads on the structure and the stress field caused by the dead loads. To achieve the correct dead load stress field due to gravity and hydrostatic load, the computer model must account for the manner in which the dams were constructed. Construction of a dam finite element model with the correct as-built geometry of the dam structure and simply ''turning on'' gravity in the computer model will generally lead to an incorrect initial stress field in the structure. The sequence of segmented lifts typical of dam construction has a significant impact on the static stress fields induced in the dam. In addition, the dam model must also account for the interaction between the adjacent dam segments across the dam contraction joints. As a result of these challenges, it was determined that a significant amount of code development was required in order to accurately simulate the motion of the dam structure. Modifications to the existing slide surfaces are needed to allow for appropriate modeling of the shear keys across the contraction joints. Furthermore, a model for hydrodynamic interaction was also implemented into NIKE3D and DYNA3D for fluid representation in the 3D dam system finite element model. Finally, the modeling of the 3D dam system results in a very large computational model, which makes it difficult to perform a static initialization using an implicit code. Traditionally, for these large models, the model has been initialized over a long time scale using an explicit code. However, recent advancements have made it possible to run NIKE3D in ''parallel'' on relatively small parallel machines as well as on the ASCI platforms.

Noble, C R

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Dam Safety Regulations (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Regulations (Connecticut) Safety Regulations (Connecticut) Dam Safety Regulations (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection All dams, except those owned by the U.S., are under the jurisdiction of these regulations. These dams will be classified by hazard rating, and may

110

NON-RENEWABLE RESOURCE BOOMS AND THE POOR Graham A. Davis1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 NON-RENEWABLE RESOURCE BOOMS AND THE POOR Graham A. Davis1 Division of Economics and Business the level of non-renewable resource extraction and changes in the level of extraction affects the poor. Our," and "make pro-poor forms of growth more difficult" (Ross 2001, p. 16).3 It is well understood that non-renewable

111

Carbon Nanotube Based Supercapacitors Calvin Davis, Georgia Institute of Technology, SURF 2010 Fellow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Nanotube Based Supercapacitors Calvin Davis, Georgia Institute of Technology, SURF 2010 density, which is why much research has been put into super capacitors. Supercapacitors, or electric. Supercapacitors also make use of an electrolyte for the purpose of transporting ions between the two electrodes1

Li, Mo

112

Volume, Freshwater, and Heat Fluxes through Davis Strait, 200405  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Davis Strait volume [?2.3 0.7 Sv (1 Sv ? 106 m3 s?1); negative sign indicates southward transport], freshwater (?116 41 mSv), and heat (20 9 TW) fluxes estimated from objectively mapped 200405 moored array data do not differ significantly ...

B. Curry; C. M. Lee; B. Petrie

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

2008 PACIFIC NORTHWEST SPRING CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008 PACIFIC NORTHWEST SPRING CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1 , Mary Lauver1 , Jack Agricultural Research Center, Oregon State University, Pendleton, OR ABSTRACT A spring canola and rapeseed a strong interest in spring canola (Brassica napus and B. rapa). Spring canola offers growers

Brown, Jack

114

2003 PACIFIC NORTHWEST SPRING CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003 PACIFIC NORTHWEST SPRING CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1 , Jack Brown1 , Don University 3 Montana State University ABSTRACT A canola variety trial with 34 cultivars or advanced breeding Northwest continue to show a strong interest in spring canola, (Brassica napus and B. rapa). Spring canola

Brown, Jack

115

2005 PACIFIC NORTHWEST SPRING CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005 PACIFIC NORTHWEST SPRING CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1 , Jack Brown1 , Don and Extension Center, Washington State University, Prosser, WA ABSTRACT A canola variety trial with 27 cultivars in the Pacific Northwest continue to show a strong interest in spring canola (Brassica napus and B. rapa). Spring

Brown, Jack

116

2006 PACIFIC NORTHWEST SPRING CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006 PACIFIC NORTHWEST SPRING CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1 , Jack Brown1 , and Don Center, Oregon State University, Pendleton, OR ABSTRACT A spring canola and rapeseed variety trial canola (Brassica napus and B. rapa). Spring canola offers growers an alternative crop for rotation

Brown, Jack

117

2001 PACIFIC NORTHWEST SPRING CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001 PACIFIC NORTHWEST SPRING CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1 , Jack Brown1 , and Don Wysocki2 1 PSES Dept., Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-2339; Oregon State University2 ABSTRACT A canola in the Pacific Northwest continues to show a strong interest in spring canola, (Brassica napus and B. rapa

Brown, Jack

118

2008 PACIFIC NORTHWEST WINTER CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008 PACIFIC NORTHWEST WINTER CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1 , Mary Lauver1 , Jack Agricultural Research Center, Oregon State University, Pendleton, OR ABSTRACT A winter rapeseed and canola variety trial with 19 canola or industrial rapeseed (Brassica napus) cultivars or advanced breeding lines

Brown, Jack

119

2007 PACIFIC NORTHWEST WINTER CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 PACIFIC NORTHWEST WINTER CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1 , Mary Lauver1 , Jack Agricultural Research Center, Oregon State University, Pendleton, OR ABSTRACT A winter rapeseed and canola variety trial with 22 canola or industrial rapeseed (Brassica napus) cultivars or advanced breeding lines

Brown, Jack

120

2004 PACIFIC NORTHWEST SPRING CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004 PACIFIC NORTHWEST SPRING CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1 , Jack Brown1 , Don State University, Kalispell, MT ABSTRACT A canola variety trial with 28 cultivars or advanced breeding in the Pacific Northwest continue to show a strong interest in spring canola, (Brassica napus and B. rapa

Brown, Jack

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "davis dam 230-kilovolt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

2009 PACIFIC NORTHWEST SPRING CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009 PACIFIC NORTHWEST SPRING CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1 , Jack Brown1 , Don Agricultural Research Center, Oregon State University, Pendleton, OR ABSTRACT A spring canola and rapeseed a strong interest in spring canola (Brassica napus and B. rapa). Spring canola offers growers

Brown, Jack

122

2004 PACIFIC NORTHWEST WINTER CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004 PACIFIC NORTHWEST WINTER CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1 , Jack Brown1 , Don State University, Kalispell, MT ABSTRACT A winter rapeseed and canola variety trial with 27 canola, and much of this new production has been with cultivars that produce canola quality oil and meal. Many new

Brown, Jack

123

2011 PACIFIC NORTHWEST SPRING CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2011 PACIFIC NORTHWEST SPRING CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1 , Jack Brown1 , Megan canola and rapeseed variety trial with 27 cultivars or advanced breeding lines and five control cultivars in the Pacific Northwest continue to show a strong interest in spring canola (Brassica napus and B. rapa

Brown, Jack

124

2006 PACIFIC NORTHWEST WINTER CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006 PACIFIC NORTHWEST WINTER CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1 , Jack Brown1 , and Don Center, Oregon State University, Pendleton, OR ABSTRACT A winter rapeseed and canola variety trial with 16 canola or industrial rapeseed (Brassica napus) cultivars or advanced breeding lines and three

Brown, Jack

125

2007 PACIFIC NORTHWEST SPRING CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 PACIFIC NORTHWEST SPRING CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1 , Mary Lauver1 , Jack Agricultural Research Center, Oregon State University, Pendleton, OR ABSTRACT A spring canola and rapeseed continue to show a strong interest in spring canola (Brassica napus and B. rapa). Spring canola offers

Brown, Jack

126

2005 PACIFIC NORTHWEST WINTER CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005 PACIFIC NORTHWEST WINTER CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1 , Jack Brown1 , and Don Center, Oregon State University, Pendleton, OR ABSTRACT A winter rapeseed and canola variety trial with 15 canola or industrial rapeseed (Brassica napus) cultivars or advanced breeding lines and five

Brown, Jack

127

2010 PACIFIC NORTHWEST SPRING CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010 PACIFIC NORTHWEST SPRING CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1 , Jack Brown1 , Don Agricultural Research Center, Oregon State University, Pendleton, OR ABSTRACT A spring canola and rapeseed in the Pacific Northwest continue to show a strong interest in spring canola (Brassica napus and B. rapa). Spring

Brown, Jack

128

2002-2003 PACIFIC NORTHWEST WINTER CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2002-2003 PACIFIC NORTHWEST WINTER CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1 , Jack Brown1 A winter rapeseed and canola variety trial with 17 canola (Brassica napus) cultivars or advanced breeding of this new production has been with cultivars that produce canola quality oil and meal. Many new cultivars

Brown, Jack

129

2002 PACIFIC NORTHWEST SPRING CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2002 PACIFIC NORTHWEST SPRING CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL RESULTS Jim B. Davis1 , Jack Brown1 , and Don Wysocki2 1 PSES Dept., Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-2339; Oregon State University2 ABSTRACT A canola in the Pacific Northwest continues to show a strong interest in spring canola, (Brassica napus and B. rapa

Brown, Jack

130

2009-2010 PACIFIC NORTHWEST WINTER CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL Jim B. Davis1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009-2010 PACIFIC NORTHWEST WINTER CANOLA VARIETY TRIAL Jim B. Davis1 , Jack Brown1 , Don Wysocki2 Research Center, Oregon State University, Pendleton, OR ABSTRACT A winter rapeseed and canola variety trial with 23 canola or industrial rapeseed (Brassica napus or B. rapa) cultivars or advanced breeding lines

Brown, Jack

131

Path Forward in PV Research: News from Robert J. Davis, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, business, tax issues, nor reliability If PV will hit $1/Wp as it appears it will, how long will thosePath Forward in PV Research: News from BAPVC Robert J. Davis, Ph.D. Co-Director, Wright Center Trends in PV What is affordable solar durability? Right: Picosun SunALE R-150 atomic layer deposition

Rollins, Andrew M.

132

UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of the UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence which spanned from 2005-2012. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program, to provide a new generation of engineers and scientists with knowledge and skills to create advanced automotive technologies. The UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence established in 2005 is focused on research, education, industrial collaboration and outreach within automotive technology. UC Davis has had two independent GATE centers with separate well-defined objectives and research programs from 1998. The Fuel Cell Center, administered by ITS-Davis, has focused on fuel cell technology. The Hybrid-Electric Vehicle Design Center (HEV Center), administered by the Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, has focused on the development of plug-in hybrid technology using internal combustion engines. The merger of these two centers in 2005 has broadened the scope of research and lead to higher visibility of the activity. UC Davis??s existing GATE centers have become the campus??s research focal points on fuel cells and hybrid-electric vehicles, and the home for graduate students who are studying advanced automotive technologies. The centers have been highly successful in attracting, training, and placing top-notch students into fuel cell and hybrid programs in both industry and government.

Erickson, Paul

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

Perspectives on Dam Removal: York Creek Dam and the Water Framework Directive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 4. Water Framework Directive decision-making processand the Water Framework Directive LA 222 UC Berkeley May 16Dam and the Water Framework Directive Justin Lawrence, Josh

Lawrence, Justin E; Pollak, Josh D; Richmond, Sarah F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Milner Dam Wind Park | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Milner Dam Wind Park Milner Dam Wind Park Jump to: navigation, search Name Milner Dam Wind Park Facility Milner Dam Wind Park Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Exergy Developer Exergy Energy Purchaser Idaho Power Location Cassia County ID Coordinates 42.495962°, -114.021106° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.495962,"lon":-114.021106,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

135

Dams (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Dams (South Dakota) Dams (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources Dam construction in South Dakota requires a Location Notice or a Water Right Permit. A Location Notice is a form that must be filed with the County Register of Deeds, and is the only paperwork required if (a) the proposed dam will impound 25 acre feet of water or less at the primary

136

Roller-Compacted Concrete for Dams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Placing mass concrete by the roller-compacted method improves the economics of hydroelectric dam construction. Many sites previously considered uneconomical for embankment or conventional concrete construction may now prove feasible.

1986-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

137

Dams and Energy Sectors Interdependency Study  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

[Type text] [Type text] Dams and Energy Sectors Interdependency Study September 2011 September 2011 Page 2 Abstract The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) collaborated to examine the interdependencies between two critical infrastructure sectors - Dams and Energy. 1 The study highlights the importance of hydroelectric power generation, with a particular emphasis on the variability of weather patterns and competing demands for water which determine the water available for hydropower production. In recent years, various regions of the Nation suffered drought, impacting stakeholders in both the Dams and Energy Sectors. Droughts have the potential to affect the operation of dams and reduce hydropower production,

138

Dams (South Dakota) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Dams (South Dakota) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as being the most...

139

Prospects for Nuclear Power(Davis 2012) | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prospects for Nuclear Power(Davis 2012) Prospects for Nuclear Power(Davis 2012) Home > Groups > Energy Systems Integration Qinsun's picture Submitted by Qinsun(35) Member 15 November, 2012 - 13:36 This paper analyzed the potential of nuclear power compare to other type of generation. It firstly proposed economic comparison among generations with various fuel types. It provided the condition that nuclear will enter the market without subsidies. It established levelized cost as a metrics to compare the overall cost of various type of generation. It recommended the threshold when nuclear power maker profit, which is doubling the current price of natural gas and charging CO2 $25 per ton. It provided a general metrics to measure the life cycle performance of generators, which can be extended to all type of generation.

140

Testing and Evaluation of a Moisture Separator Drain Demineralizer at Davis-Besse Nuclear Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Davis-Besse plant data show that by polishing 15-20 percent of the moisture separator drains, the entire flow from the drains can be pumped forward, increasing plant power output significantly. In addition, this process extended the useful lifetime of condensate polishers by a factor of about 6, reducing resin replacement costs by approximately $450,000/yr. Information obtained can be applied to all once-through steam generator PWRs.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "davis dam 230-kilovolt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Grand River Dam Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dam Authority Dam Authority Jump to: navigation, search Name Grand River Dam Authority Place Oklahoma Utility Id 7490 Utility Location Yes Ownership S NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png general service Commercial general service commercial Commercial large general servic time of use distributional Commercial

142

Making an automated monitoring system work at Tolt Dam  

SciTech Connect

A major upgrade of the dam safety program at Tolt Dam in Seattle, Washington is described. The upgrade was prompted by the age (30 years) of the dam, the addition of a hydroelectric plant, and public concern. The program is based on an automated condition monitoring and advance warning system. The design, implementation, and operating experience of the system are described.

Marilley, J.M. [Seattle Water Dept., WA (United States); Myers, B.K. [Woodward-Clyde Consultants, Seattle, WA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

WINDAM: modules to analyze overtopping of earth embankment dams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Windows Dam Analysis Modules (WINDAM) is a set of modular software components under development for the analysis of overtopped earth embankments. The initial modules address the routing of floods through reservoirs with dam overtopping and evaluation ... Keywords: dam design and analysis, erosion, flood control, hydraulic modelling, numerical analysis, simulation

Mitchell L. Neilsen; Darrel M. Temple; Gregory J. Hanson

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Construction of high embankment dam material flow equilibrium system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As high embankment dam engineering is often large-scale, how to achieve equilibrium of material flow is a critical factor affecting the construction progress of embankment dam engineering and an important approach to save resource and reduce construction ... Keywords: Embankment dam, Material flow equilibrium, Traffic network

Yan Zhang; Guo-Ping Xia

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Executive Summary The Report of the World Commission on Dams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in drainage applications. Also, dams often have vertical or near-vertical facing, so gravity has a differentGEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS By: Christine T. Weber1 and Jorge Zornberg, Advisor Abstract: The overall goal of this project is to contribute towards the use of geosynthetics in the design of dams

Kammen, Daniel M.

146

"Deadman Island Lock and Dam, Ohio River" The Military Engineer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a concrete gravity dam. It is important to use best estimates of loadings and properties and masonry gravity dams for all failure modes including overtopping (Douglas et al 1999). Table 4 Historic annual frequency of failure of concrete and masonry gravity dams Frequency of Failure x 10-5 Concrete

US Army Corps of Engineers

147

GEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS By: Christine T. Weber1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Finally, the fish ladder at Little Goose Dam uses pumped river water rather than a gravity flow. Of all GOOSE DAM ON UPSTREAM MOVEMENTS OF ADULT CHINOOK SALMON, ONCORHYNCHUS TSHAWYTSCHA A major environmental effects of hydroelectric dams (Figure 1) on the upstream movements of adult salmonids. Results indicated

Zornberg, Jorge G.

148

A Theoretical Study of Cold Air Damming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of cold air damming are examined analytically with a two-layer steady state model. The upper layer is a warm and saturated cross-mountain (easterly or southeasterly onshore) flow. The lower layer is a cold mountain-parallel (...

Qin Xu

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Net Force on a Dam Consider a dam holding back an incompressible fluid such as water. Let us suppose that  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and dams Research dealing with the interaction between a gravity cur- rent and obstacles is scare. A first catching dam heights. For the reference avalanche, the veloc- ity just behind the nose in the head% for the 2-D simulation. The reduction in front velocity due to the presence of dams was an increasing

Keesling, James

150

Sustainable Energy Dam: research into possible improvement of dam/dike safety by application of sustainable energy on dams/dikes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A study on the use of the Afsluitdijk (or more generic, enclosure dams in general) for the generation of energy. Focus in this study in (more)

Wondergem, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Hoover Dam Bypass Project Phase II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE/EA-1478 DOE/EA-1478 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Western' s Hoover Dam Bypass Project Phase II (Double-Circuiting a Portion of the Hoover-Mead #5 and #7 230-kV Transmission Lines with the Henderson-Mead #1 230-kV Transmission Line, Clark County, Nevada) Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration 615 S. 43 rd Avenue Phoenix, Arizona 85009 Prepared by: Transcon Environmental 3740 East Southern Avenue, Suite 218 Mesa, Arizona 85206 (480) 807-0095 October 2003 Western Area Power Administration Hoover Dam Bypass Project Phase II page i Environmental Assessment TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................1 1.1 Background..................................................................................................................................1

152

Safe Dams Act of 1972 (Tennessee) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safe Dams Act of 1972 (Tennessee) Safe Dams Act of 1972 (Tennessee) Safe Dams Act of 1972 (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Transportation Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Tennessee Department Of Environment and Conservation The Safe Dams Act of 1973 (SDA) gives the Commissioner of the Department of Environment and Conservation the power to issue certificates authorizing the construction, alteration, or operation of a dam. A dam is defined as any artificial barrier, together with appurtenant works, which does or may impound or divert water, and which either (1) is or will be twenty (20)

153

Women @ Energy: Kerstin Kleese van Dam | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kerstin Kleese van Dam Kerstin Kleese van Dam Women @ Energy: Kerstin Kleese van Dam March 27, 2013 - 3:41pm Addthis Kerstin Kleese van Dam is an associate division director of the Computational Science and Mathematics Division and leads the Scientific Data Management Group at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Kerstin Kleese van Dam is an associate division director of the Computational Science and Mathematics Division and leads the Scientific Data Management Group at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Check out other profiles in the Women @ Energy series and share your favorites on Pinterest. Kerstin Kleese van Dam has led the charge at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to resolve data management, analysis, and knowledge discovery challenges in extreme-scale data environments. She also directs data

154

Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act (South Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act (South Carolina) Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act (South Carolina) Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control The Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act provides for the certification and inspection of dams in South Carolina and confers regulatory authority on the Department of Health and Environmental Control. Owners of dams and reservoirs are responsible for maintaining the safety of the structures,

155

Georgia Safe Dams Act of 1978 (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safe Dams Act of 1978 (Georgia) Safe Dams Act of 1978 (Georgia) Georgia Safe Dams Act of 1978 (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The purpose of the Georgia Safe Dams Act is to provide regulation,

156

Montana Dam Safety Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Dam Safety Act (Montana) Montana Dam Safety Act (Montana) Montana Dam Safety Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Retail Supplier Institutional Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info Start Date 1985 State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation This Act establishes the state's interest in the construction of dams for water control and regulation and for hydropower generation purposes. It

157

Dam Design and Construction (Wisconsin) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dam Design and Construction (Wisconsin) Dam Design and Construction (Wisconsin) Dam Design and Construction (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info Start Date 1985 State Wisconsin Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Department of Natural Resources These regulations apply to dams that are not owned by the U.S. government

158

Permission for Dam Construction and Operation (Iowa) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

maintain, or operate a dam on a stream for manufacturing or industrial purposes. Other powers of the Department pertaining to such construction are listed in this section...

159

The Solar Neutrino Problem R. Davis Jr., J . C. Evans, and B. T. Cleveland  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4629 4629 The Solar Neutrino Problem R. Davis Jr., J . C. Evans, and B. T. Cleveland Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, NY 11973 Abstract A summary of the results o f the Brookhaven solar neutrino experi- ment is given and discussed i n relation t o solar model calcula- tions. neutrino detectors t h a t have been proposed. A review is given o f the merits o f various new solar I NTRODU CT I ON W e would like t o review the present status of the solar neutrino problem. First will be a report on the Brookhaven 3 7 ~ 1 detector that has been i n operation f o r 10 years. The results obtained d u r i n g the l a s t 7 years will be compared w i t h the current solar model calculations. In recent years a number o f new solar neutrino detectors have been proposed. These various detectors

160

September 10, 2003, Board Public Meeting - Nuclear Regulatory Commission - Davis-Besse Lessons Learned  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 I 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 101 inspector to a senior, and then they'll move to another facility, but seven years is the maximum, and that's written in our policy. CHAIRMAN CONWAY: Thank you. Dr. Hackett. DR. HACKETT: Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I have a different challenge today, which is to try and help walk you through a story that's very important to us in the nuclear industry. In general, it dovetails with what Russ and Cindy had been talking about. The thing I'll add on this slide is that during the timeframe from May to October 2002, I was Assistant Team Leader for the NRC's Davis-Besse Lessons Learned Task Force. That's the role in which I'll be presenting this information to you. As you've been doing, I think I found that these work most

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "davis dam 230-kilovolt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

UC Davis Minors in Energy: Energy Policy (EENP) Offered by the Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 UC Davis Minors in Energy: Energy Policy (EENP) Offered by the Department of Biological with knowledge of basic energy sciences and policy. This minor is intended to provide training in energy policy and energy technologies and introduce the factors considered when developing policies that impact energy

Ferrara, Katherine W.

162

Distributed Energy Resource Optimization Using a Software as Service (SaaS) Approach at the University of California, Davis Campus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tariffs) University of California, Davis United States Department of EnergyEnergy Demand Rescheduled to Minimize Cost under PG&E E-19 TariffEnergy Installed (kWh) PV Installed (kW) Cost Minimizing PG&E E-19 Tariff

Michael, Stadler

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

UC Davis Minors in Energy: Energy Efficiency Minor (EEPL) Offered by the Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 UC Davis Minors in Energy: Energy Efficiency Minor (EEPL) Offered by the Department of Biological of more energy efficient technologies and practices has been identified as the most rapid approach and energy efficiency are needed to design more efficient energy systems and identify approaches

Ferrara, Katherine W.

164

J. Bahcall/Nuclear Physics B (Proc. Suppl.) 48 (1996) 281283 281 Ray Davis: The Scientist and the Man  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Bahcall/Nuclear Physics B (Proc. Suppl.) 48 (1996) 281­283 281 Ray Davis: The Scientist a reactor. He showed that reac- tor anti-neutrinos are not absorbed by chlorine, ¯e + 37 Cl e- + 37 Ar the discovery of solar neutrinos and provided further evidence for a discrepancy between theory and observation

Bahcall, John

165

Three Mile Island-1, Crystal River-3, and Davis-Besse Fuel Crud Observations Assessment and Root Cause  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report shares information pertaining to elevated crud observed on fuel at Babcock Wilcox (BW) plants Crystal River-3, Davis-Besse, and Three Mile Island-1 and the subsequent causal investigation performed by AREVA, Inc. Discussion of industry operating experience, effects of crud, fuel inspection results, and preventive and corrective actions in future operating cycles are also included.

2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

166

EA-1595: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

95: Finding of No Significant Impact 95: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1595: Finding of No Significant Impact Davis-Mead 230-kV Transmission Line Reconductor Project, Mohave County, Arizona and Clark County, Nevada Western Area Power Administration proposes to reconductor the existing 61-mile long 230-kilovolt Davis-Mead Transmission Line located in Clark County, Nevada and Mohave COunty, Arizona. Western owns and operates the existing transmission line. THe transmission line is a mjor component of the electric transmisison grad of the western United States. Department of Energy, Western Area Power Administration Finding of No Significant Impact and Floodplain Statements of Findinds Davis-Mead 230-kV Transmission Line Reconductor Project More Documents & Publications EA-1595: Final Environmental Assessment

167

The Downstream Geomorphic Effects of Dams: A Comprehensive and Comparative Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs of dredging or decommissioning such structures. Whilegreatest component of dam decommissioning costs (e.g. , U.S.operation and ultimate decommissioning. Many of the dams on

Minear, Justin Toby

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

A topography of dams in China : impacts to agriculture, labor, and migration.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Dams are often promoted as a tool to reduce poverty and spur economic development. Dam construction worldwide, and particularly in China, which has built nearly (more)

[No author

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Dams and Energy Sectors Interdependency Study, September 2011 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dams and Energy Sectors Interdependency Study, September 2011 Dams and Energy Sectors Interdependency Study, September 2011 Dams and Energy Sectors Interdependency Study, September 2011 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) collaborated to examine the interdependencies between two critical infrastructure sectors - Dams and Energy. The study highlights the importance of hydroelectric power generation, with a particular emphasis on the variability of weather patterns and competing demands for water which determine the water available for hydropower production. Dams-Energy Interdependency Study.pdf More Documents & Publications Hydroelectric Webinar Presentation Slides and Text Version Impacts of Long-term Drought on Power Systems in the U.S. Southwest - July 2012 Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee

170

Dam Safety and Encroachments Act (Pennsylvania) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dam Safety and Encroachments Act (Pennsylvania) Dam Safety and Encroachments Act (Pennsylvania) Dam Safety and Encroachments Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection This act sets the standards and criteria for the siting and design of dams, water obstructions and encroachments considering both existing and projected conditions. It requires operational plans to be prepared and implemented by owners and also requires monitoring, inspection and reporting of conditions affecting the safety of dams, water obstructions

171

Accident investigation of the electrical shock incident at the PG and E PVUSA site Davis, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the findings of the Accident Investigation Team (Team) assembled in response to a request from Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) to understand the events surrounding the electric shock of a worker at the PVUSA site in Davis, California and to provide recommendations to prevent such events from recurring. The report gives complete details on the sequence of events surrounding the accident and identifies 27 facts related to accident itself. Four technical deficiencies in the electrical systems which require further investigation were identified. The Team believes that the root cause of this accident was related to the absence of a proactive organizational entity responsible for overall health and safety on the site. Two contributing factors were identified. First, the prototype nature and associated operational difficulties of the electrical inverter resulted in large maintenance demands. Second, several of the injured employee`s co-workers noted that he occasionally failed to use appropriate personal protective equipment, but they never reported this practice to management. The direct cause of this accident was the failure of the injured employee to wear appropriate personal protective equipment (i.e., rubber gloves). Based on the review of the facts established in this investigation, five recommendations are presented to the funding agencies to reduce the possibility of future accidents at the PVUSA site.

Jacobson, L.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Garrett, J.O.; Tyler, R.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

University of California Davis West Village: The Largest Planned Net Zero Energy Community in the United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UC Davis West Village UC Davis West Village The largest planned "zero net energy" community in the United States CRED Webinar October 16, 2012 CENTRAL SOUTH WEST WEST VILLAGE Program Phase 1 Phase 2 Total Acres 130 acres 75 acres 205 acres Faculty/Staff Housing 343 units 132 units 475 units Student Housing Beds (including beds over mixed use) 1,980 beds 1,158 beds 3,000 beds Retail/Office Space up to 42,500 sf 0 up to 45,000 sf Los Rios Community College District 20,000 sf 0 60,000 sf Recreation Fields 7.61 acres 14.29 acres 21.90 acres Phasing Plan For-sale Faculty/Staff Housing (343 homes) Student Housing (1,980 beds) Mixed-Use (45,000 sf retail + apartment units above) Community College (60,000 sf) Site for Day Care/Preschool Water management & open space

173

Dams, Mills, and Electric Power (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mills, and Electric Power (Missouri) Mills, and Electric Power (Missouri) Dams, Mills, and Electric Power (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Missouri Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Missouri Department of Natural Resources The Water Resources Center of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources is responsible for implementing regulations pertaining to dam and reservoir safety. Any person or corporation may erect a dam across any watercourse, provided that: (a) the entity is chartered to construct, operate and

174

Regulation of Dams and Bridges Affecting Navigable Waters (Wisconsin) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dams and Bridges Affecting Navigable Waters Dams and Bridges Affecting Navigable Waters (Wisconsin) Regulation of Dams and Bridges Affecting Navigable Waters (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info Start Date 2007 State Wisconsin Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Natural Resources Chapter 31 of the Wisconsin Statutes lays out the regulations relevant to

175

Dams have played an important role in human development throughout the world for thousands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100093, PR China; 3 Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta than 22 000 large dams (but only 22 before 1949), China is the largest dam-building country; by way , and Zehao Shen7 The Three Gorges Dam in China is the largest dam ever built. Its impacts on the biodiversity

Wu, Jianguo "Jingle"

176

Uplift Pressures, Shear Strengths, and Tensile Strengths for Stability Analysis of Concrete Gravity Dams: Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using generic values in stability analyses of existing concrete dams can result in expensive and unnecessary remedial work. The information in this report will help dam owners predict dam stability under extreme loading conditions and identify the conditions that control uplift pressure distributions at study dams.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Dam breaking seiches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the dam is m, and g is gravity, the equation of motion for the dam's position can be written #12;Seiches Benjamin (1955), if the dam's edge is relatively sharp, gravity is negligible, and the outflow is similar assembly. As the dam moves up and down, and the assembly rotates, the component of gravity acting

Balmforth, Neil

178

JOHN DAVIS: Acura steers their crossover fortunes onto a new road with the coupe-like ZDX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas - Metro Buses Natural Gas - Metro Buses 1 JOHN DAVIS: Tratándose de reducir emisiones de vehículos y no depender del petróleo extranjero, el gas natural comprimido sirve como fuente de energía doméstica y limpia, pero el GNC tuvo que luchar para ganar espacio en el mercado privado de autos de pasajeros. JOHN DAVIS: Por otra parte, el combustible limpio ha ganado terreno en flotillas municipales. Ciudades grandes y pequeñas están cambiando a GNC, y están probando que para muchas flotillas, el gas natural es la solución natural. JOHN DAVIS: Comparado con las casi 190 mil gasolineras en EE.UU., hay menos de mil estaciones de GNC y no todas están abiertas al público. Así que a excepción de recargar en casa, el GNC aún no es una opción para la mayoría de conductores en

179

Coupling between the University of California, Davis, Advanced CanopyAtmosphereSoil Algorithm (ACASA) and MM5: Preliminary Results for July 1998 for Western North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of California, Davis, Advanced CanopyAtmosphereSoil Algorithm (ACASA) is coupled to the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State UniversityNational Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Mesoscale Model (MM5) as a land surface ...

R. David Pyles; Bryan C. Weare; Kyaw Tha Paw U; William Gustafson

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Route-Specific Passage Proportions and Survival Rates for Fish Passing through John Day Dam, The Dalles Dam, and Bonneville Dam in 2010 and 2011  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report fulfills a request of the U.S. Army Engineer District, Portland, Oregon, to produce an interim report of estimates of route-specific fish passage proportions and survival rates for lower Columbia River dams in 2010 and 2011. The estimates are needed to update the Compass Model for the Columbia River Treaty and the new Biological Opinion before detail technical reports are published in late 2012. This report tabulates route-specific fish-passage proportions and survival rates for steelhead and Chinook salmon smolts passing through various sampled routes at John Day Dam, The Dalles Dam, and Bonneville Dam in 2010 and 2011. Results were compiled from analyses of data acquired in spring 2010 and 2011 studies that were specifically designed to estimate dam-passage and forebay-to-tailrace survival rates, travel time metrics, and spill passage efficiency, as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. The study designs allowed for estimation of route-specific fish passage proportions and survival rates as well as estimation of forebay-passage survival, all of which are summarized herein.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "davis dam 230-kilovolt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Rules and Regulations for Dam Safety (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These rules and regulations seek to provide for the safety of dams to protect the public, real property, and natural resources by establishing reasonable standards and creating a public record for...

182

Libby Dam Wildlife Habitat Enhancement, 1992 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report of a project that was initiated in September, 1984 to mitigate for the loss of big game winter and spring range by the Libby Dam hydroelectric facility.

Holifield, Jennifer; Komac, Ron (Kootenai National Forest, Fisher River Ranger District, Libby MT)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Microsoft Word - Appendix H - Emergency Response Plan for Dams...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

H Emergency Response Plan for the Rocky Flats Site Dams This page intentionally left blank LMSRFSS04533-3.0 Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site Emergency Response Plan for the Rocky...

184

Centrifuge Modeling and Analysis of Concrete Gravity Dams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains general background information on centrifuge experimentation and linear elastic fracture mechanics pertaining to concrete gravity dam models, and explains in detail the experimental methodology and procedures developed for testing concrete gravity dam models in centrifuges. An important detail in the experimental procedure is that the models are loaded upstream with water and, at fracture, have water uplift pressure within any cracks. Finally, test results and comparisons to analytic...

1995-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

185

Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was designed to monitor movements of bull trout that were provided passage above Albeni Falls Dam, Pend Oreille River. Electrofishing and angling were used to collect bull trout below the dam. Tissue samples were collected from each bull trout and sent to the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Abernathy Fish Technology Center Conservation Genetics Lab, Washington. The DNA extracted from tissue samples were compared to a catalog of bull trout population DNA from the Priest River drainage, Lake Pend Oreille tributaries, and the Clark Fork drainage to determine the most probable tributary of origin. A combined acoustic radio or radio tag was implanted in each fish prior to being transported and released above the dam. Bull trout relocated above the dam were able to volitionally migrate into their natal tributary, drop back downstream, or migrate upstream to the next dam. A combination of stationary radio receiving stations and tracking via aircraft, boat, and vehicle were used to monitor the movement of tagged fish to determine if the spawning tributary it selected matched the tributary assigned from the genetic analysis. Seven bull trout were captured during electrofishing surveys in 2008. Of these seven, four were tagged and relocated above the dam. Two were tagged and left below the dam as part of a study monitoring movements below the dam. One was immature and too small at the time of capture to implant a tracking tag. All four fish released above the dam passed by stationary receivers stations leading into Lake Pend Oreille and no fish dropped back below the dam. One of the radio tags was recovered in the tributary corresponding with the results of the genetic test. Another fish was located in the vicinity of its assigned tributary, which was impassable due to low water discharge at its mouth. Two fish have not been located since entering the lake. Of these fish, one was immature and not expected to enter its natal tributary in the fall of 2008. The other fish was large enough to be mature, but at the time of capture its sex was unable to be determined, indicating it may not have been mature at the time of capture. These fish are expected to enter their natal tributaries in early summer or fall of 2009.

Paluch, Mark; Scholz, Allan; McLellan, Holly [Eastern Washington University Department of Biology; Olson, Jason [Kalispel Tribe of Indians Natural Resources Department

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

186

Division of Water, Part 673: Dam Safety Regulations (New York) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Dam Safety Regulations (New York) 3: Dam Safety Regulations (New York) Division of Water, Part 673: Dam Safety Regulations (New York) < Back Eligibility Fed. Government Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State New York Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations address dam safety, define dam hazard categories and inspection procedures, and apply to any owner of a dam. Dam owners are required to maintain dams in a safe condition at all times and to comply with Department inquiries for information on the status of a given dam

187

2012 CERTS LAAR Program Peer Review - Integration and Extension of Direct Load Management of Smart Loads - Anna Scaglioni, UC Davis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integration and Extension of Direct Integration and Extension of Direct Load Management of Smart Loads Anna Scaglione, UC Davis GRA: Mahnoosh Alizadeh Project objective  Invent methods to "store" load demand for * Real-time "generation following" * Integration of load reserves as dispatchable assets in the Energy Market  Architecture for virtual "reserves" (queues) of electrical load demand * Watts to Job mapping (analysis)  Captures digitally the service requirements - Equal service type = Equal queue * Job to Watts mapping (synthesis)  Allows to optimally schedule the load profile Major technical accomplishments  Centralized model: Digital Direct Load Scheduling (DDLS) - Year 1-Year 2

188

EA-1588: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

88: Final Environmental Assessment 88: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1588: Final Environmental Assessment Sacramento Municipal Utility District 230-kV Folsom Dam Transmission Line Relocation The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers proposes to construct a new vehicle bridge across the American River Downstream about 800 feet east and 1,100 feet west of Folsom Dam, which will be located in an existing right-of-way currently occupied by the Sacramento Municipal Utility District double-circuit Orangevale-Lake/Whiterock-Orangevale 230-kilovolt and 12-kilovolt transmission lines. Finding on No Significant Impact for the Sacramento Municipal Utility District 230-kV Folsom Dam Transmission Line Relocation, EA-1588 (January 2007) More Documents & Publications EA-1588: Finding of No Significant Impact

189

Four Dam Pool Power Agency FDPPA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dam Pool Power Agency FDPPA Dam Pool Power Agency FDPPA Jump to: navigation, search Name Four Dam Pool Power Agency (FDPPA) Place Anchorage, Alaska Zip 99515 Sector Hydro Product Joint action agency consisting of four hydroelectric projects that was organized by five electric cooperatives that purchase power from the facilities. Coordinates 38.264985°, -85.539014° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.264985,"lon":-85.539014,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

190

Ninety-Nine-Year Sediment Yield Record of the Middle Cuyahoga River Watershed Contained Within the Ohio Edison Dam Pool.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The 17.4 m tall Ohio Edison Dam was constructed in 1912 on the Cuyahoga River near the city of Akron, Ohio. The dam was installed (more)

Mann, Kristofer Clayton

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

The Effects of Subcloud-Layer Diabatic Processes on Cold Air Damming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hypothesis that clouds and precipitation enhance cold air damming is examined. A case example of cloud/precipitation-induced enhancement of damming is presented and a conceptual model is proposed.

J. M. Fritsch; J. Kapolka; P. A. Hirschberg

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Mills, Dams, and Reservoirs (Massachusetts) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Mills, Dams, and Reservoirs (Massachusetts) Mills, Dams, and Reservoirs (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Conservation and Recreation This chapter of the Massachusetts General Laws outlines procedures to

193

The Sensor Fish - Making Dams More Salmon-Friendly  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This article describes the Sensor Fish, an instrument package that travels through hydroelectric dams collecting data on the hazardous conditions that migrating salmon smolt encounter. The Sensor Fish was developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory with funding from DOE and the US Army Corps of Engineers and has been used at several federal and utility-run hydroelectric projects on the Snake and Columbia Rivers of the US Pacific Northwest. The article describes the evolution of the Sensor Fish design and provides examples of its use at McNary and Ice Harbor dams.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Keilman, Geogre

2004-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Compliance Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Smolt Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2012  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon at Bonneville Dam during summer 2012, as required by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam to the tailrace 1 km below the dam, as well as forebay residence time, tailrace egress, and spill passage efficiency, as required in the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Proposed construction of Priest Rapids Dam in relation to Hanford Works  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the proposed construction of the Priest Rapids Dam on the Columbia River by the Atomic Energy Commission. Power generation to the Hanford Works and flood control for the surrounding area is the main goal for the construction of the dam. The summary covers the feasibility of the dam from its design, operation, benefits, security, drawbacks, etc.

Smothers, S.A.

1953-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

196

Location-based services to control roller compaction quality for rock-fill dams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is very important for rock-fill dams to carry out more accurately monitoring and remotely quality controlling in real time. Based on location based services, an integration platform, with the name of CRCQ-DAM, is proposed to control roller compaction ... Keywords: RTK, WebGIS, location-based services, rock-fill dams, roller compaction quality

Hao Wu; Qiankun Wang; Jiru Zhang; Qin Chen; Xupeng Wang

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

ANCOLD 2000 Conference on Dams 1 ADVANCES IN THE PRACTICE AND USE OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in 1934, · 200-foot-high by 381-foot-long concrete arch dam, over 500 long with gravity and earth fill Montana Energy Policy Analyst SUBJECT: Briefing on the transfer of Kerr Dam The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) have been the co-licensee for Kerr Dam since 1985. This relationship has been

Bowles, David S.

198

PORTFOLIO RISK ASSESSMENT OF SA WATER'S LARGE DAMS by David S. Bowles1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dimensions [5] and high pressure and gravity die-casting [6,7]. Since the two-dimensional dam ridges. Water from the dam flows through the valley and into the sea under gravity. Immediately after-14 December 2001 Three-dimensional modelling of dam-break induced flows using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

Bowles, David S.

199

Enloe Dam Passage Project, Volume I, 1984 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses issues related to the provision of fish passage facilities at Enloe Dam and the introduction of anadromous salmonid fish to the upper Similkameen River basin. The species of fish being considered is a summer run of steelhead trout adapted to the upper Columbia basin. (ACR)

Fanning, M.L.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

REVIEW PLAN John Redmond Dam Reservoir, Coffee County, Kansas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

............................................................................................................1 2. REVIEW MANAGEMENT ORGANIZATION (RMO) COORDINATION Report with Responses to HQ Comments and support for John Redmond Dam and Reservoir, Kansas. (6) CEWSL Statement (HQ Policy Compliance Review). (8) SWT-PE-P Memorandum 29 June 2009; Response to HQ Policy

US Army Corps of Engineers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "davis dam 230-kilovolt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

An Analytic Model of Cold Air Damming and Its Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that the geometric shape of the cold dome in the two-layer model of cold air damming of Xu can be described approximately by a cubic polynomial and thus a set of coupled algebraic equations can be derived to quantify the scale and ...

Qin Xu; Shouting Gao

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Effects of the Ben Franklin Dam on the Hanford Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A previous assessment of the effects of a Ben Franklin Dam on the Hanford Site made in 1967 was updated so that the potential adverse effects may be better understood in light of existing operations, current environmental and safety standards, and proposed facilities and operations. The major effects would probably arise from flooding of portions of the site by the reservoir associated with the dam and by the raising of the ground water table under the site. A preliminary analysis of the effects of the dam is presented, and a number of studies are recommended in order to fully evaluate and understand these potential impacts. The following seven tasks are identified and discussed: groundwater - hydrology analysis; soil liquefaction analysis; hydrostatic uplift and soil effects on structures; assessment of the potential for landsliding and sloughing; facility decommissioning; hydrothermal analysis; and, meteorological effects. Four other aspects commented upon in this report are: aquatic ecology, terrestrial ecology, socioeconomic effects, and public interaction. Possible effects on ongoing DOE-sponsored R and D are also noted. To the extent possible, cost estimates are developed for corrective actions which must be taken on the Hanford Site to accommodate the dam. Where this was not possible, appropriate courses of action leading to cost estimates are presented.

Harty, H.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Hydroelectric power potential, Woonsocket Falls Dam, Woonsocket, Rhode Island  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of developing a hydroelectric power plant at an existing flood control dam of the city of Woonsocket, RI was examined considering environmental, economic, technical and engineering factors. It was concluded that the City should proceed with plans to develop a hydro plant. (LCL)

Daly, J C; Dowdell, R B; Kelly, W E; Koveos, P E; Krikorian, Jr, J S; Lengyel, G; Prince, M J; Seely, S; Tromp, L; Urish, D W

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

No Van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov Discontinuity in Ads Space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that the van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov discontinuity arising in the massless limit of massive gravity theories is peculiar to Minkowski space and it is not present in Anti De Sitter space, where the massless limit is smooth. More generally, the massless limit is smooth whenever the square of the graviton mass vanishes faster than the cosmological constant.

M. Porrati

2000-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

205

Denneal Jamison-McClung, PhD serves as the associate director of the UC Davis Biotechnology Program and director of the Biotech SYSTEM, a regional K-14 outreach consortium. In this capacity, she coordinates and teaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://create-reu.ucdavis.edu) · Lecturer for the UC Davis Department of Plant Biology, (PLB112-Plant Growth & Development) · Member Davis with a "power house" combination of technical and leadership skills, and facilitate multi-IGERT graduate traineeship in plant biotechnology (http://create- igert.ucdavis.edu) · Program coordinator

Hammock, Bruce D.

206

A review of proposed Glen Canyon Dam interim operating criteria  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three sets of interim operating criteria for Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River have been proposed for the period of November 1991, to the completion of the record of decision for the Glen Canyon Dam environmental impact statement (about 1993). These criteria set specific limits on dam releases, including maximum and minimum flows, up-ramp and down-ramp rates, and maximum daily fluctuation. Under the proposed interim criteria, all of these parameters would be reduced relative to historical operating criteria to protect downstream natural resources, including sediment deposits, threatened and endangered fishes, trout, the aquatic food base, and riparian plant communities. The scientific bases of the three sets of proposed operating criteria are evaluated in the present report:(1) criteria proposed by the Research/Scientific Group, associated with the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies (GCES); (2) criteria proposed state and federal officials charged with managing downstream resources; and (3) test criteria imposed from July 1991, to November 1991. Data from Phase 1 of the GCES and other sources established that the targeted natural resources are affected by dam operations, but the specific interim criteria chosen were not supported by any existing studies. It is unlikely that irreversible changes to any of the resources would occur over the interim period if historical operating criteria remained in place. It is likely that adoption of any of the sets of proposed interim operating criteria would reduce the levels of sediment transport and erosion below Glen Canyon Dam; however, these interim criteria could result in some adverse effects, including the accumulation of debris at tributary mouths, a shift of new high-water-zone vegetation into more flood-prone areas, and further declines in vegetation in the old high water zone.

LaGory, K.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Tomasko, D.; Hayse, J.; Durham, L.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Compliance Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Summer 2012  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon at The Dalles Dam during summer 2012. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion, dam passage survival is required to be greater than or equal to 0.93 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal to 0.015. The study also estimated survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam and through the tailrace to 2 km downstream of the dam, forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and fish passage efficiency (FPE), as required by the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Proposed study program of the effects on Hanford of a dam at Columbia River mile 348  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the request of Hanford Operations Office, Atomic Energy Commission, a study was made of the effects on the Hanford Facilities of a navigation and power dam at Columbia River mile 348, about five miles upstream of the 300 Area. The original study was based on a nominal slack-water pool elevation of 395 to 400 feet at the dam location. A supplemental study evaluated the effects on plant facilities of a dam at the same location but with slack-water pool elevation of 385 feet. In addition to effects of the dam on Hanford, a study was performed to evaluate the effects the dam would have on the environment.

Jasko, R.T.

1959-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

209

Microsoft PowerPoint - 3-03_pt 1_Davis_Waste Removal & Tank Closures.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Removal & Tank Closure Waste Removal & Tank Closure New Technologies Neil Davis Deputy Program Manager Waste Removal & Tank Closure November 16, 2010 Print Close 2 * SRR baseline is to use 2 mechanical and 1 chemical technology on each tank - Large slurry mixer pumps - Hydrolancing/Robotic vacuum system - Oxalic acid * Technologies in hand * Incremental improvements to meet evolving mission needs and to have a defendable Maximum Extent Practical basis Point of View Print Close 3 Program Status Bulk Waste Removal Mechanical Heel Removal Chemical Cleaning Annulus Cleaning Isolation/Final Sampling Grout Tank Cooling Coil Flushing Tanks 4, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, & 15 in progress 2 tanks closed 15 more in progress Tank 8 being prepped for chemical cleaning Tanks 5, 6 & 16 in progress Tanks 5&6 in progress

210

Microsoft PowerPoint - 16.1225_Terry Cooke-Davies - Project Complexity as of 16 Mar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Complexity Complexity Dr Terry Cooke-Davies, Group Chairman Group Chairman, Human Systems International Talking about Complexity Talking about Complexity Causes of Complexity in Projects Projects Today's Talk Responses to Complexity y 2 Why do we do it, and what do we mean when we are Talking about Complexity? g p y 3 What is Complexity? * No generally agreed definition What is Complexity? No generally agreed definition - "If you don't know what will happen when you kick it, then it is complex." * Any definition risks being inadequate * Any definition risks being inadequate - "Complex" is different from "Complicated" - Complexity is both relative and absolute. What is Complexity p y 4 Why are we so interested in it? * Need for managers of more challenging projects F il f

211

10 Questions for a Computational Scientist: Kerstin Kleese-Van Dam |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a Computational Scientist: Kerstin Kleese-Van Dam a Computational Scientist: Kerstin Kleese-Van Dam 10 Questions for a Computational Scientist: Kerstin Kleese-Van Dam June 9, 2011 - 4:35pm Addthis Kerstin Kleese-Van Dam Kerstin Kleese-Van Dam Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Science gave me the opportunity to contribute to addressing some of society's big challenges - climate change, environmental remediation, sustainable clean energy and secure power. Kerstin Kleese-Dam, Computational Scientist Meet Kerstin Kleese-Van Dam. At Pacific Northwest National Lab, she's a master of computers and data - covering a wide span of projects from genomic sciences and climate change to nanometer-scale imaging and power grids. She recently spent some time to give us the download on her many

212

9th Biannual Joint Technical Day of CIE/USA and CNC/CIE, Davis, CA, 7 Nov. 2013 Improving Traceability of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9th Biannual Joint Technical Day of CIE/USA and CNC/CIE, Davis, CA, 7 Nov. 2013 Improving Traceability of Fluorescence Calibrations to Practical Colorimetric Applications 9th Biannual Joint US and Standards National Research Council of Canada #12;9th Biannual Joint Technical Day of CIE/USA and CNC

California at Davis, University of

213

J. Bahcall/Nuclear Physics B (Proc. Suppl.) 48 (1996) 281--283 281 Ray Davis: The Scientist and the Man  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Bahcall/Nuclear Physics B (Proc. Suppl.) 48 (1996) 281--283 281 Ray Davis: The Scientist a reactor. He showed that reac­ tor anti­neutrinos are not absorbed by chlorine, ? # e + 37 Cl ## e - + 37 the discovery of solar neutrinos and provided further evidence for a discrepancy between theory and observation

Bahcall, John

214

Dam Construction and Maintenance (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction and Maintenance (Minnesota) Construction and Maintenance (Minnesota) Dam Construction and Maintenance (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting Dams may be constructed, improved, or repaired on private, non-navigable waters subject to certain timelines; however, previously-developed hydropower mechanisms cannot be disrupted. The State may also choose to

215

Turbocharger with sliding piston, and having vanes and leakage dams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A turbocharger having a sliding piston for regulating exhaust gas flow into the turbine wheel includes a set of first vanes mounted on a fixed first wall of the turbine nozzle and projecting axially toward an opposite second wall of the nozzle, and/or a set of second vanes mounted on the end of the piston and projecting in an opposite axial direction toward the first wall of the nozzle. For the/each set of vanes, there are leakage dams formed on the wall that is adjacent the vane tips when the piston is closed. The leakage dams are closely adjacent the vane tips and discourage exhaust gas from leaking in a generally radial direction past the vane tips as the piston just begins to open from its fully closed position.

Roberts, Quentin (Nancy, FR); Alnega, Ahmed (Thaon Les Vosges, FR)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

216

Rock Island Dam Smolt Monitoring; 1994-1995 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Downstream migrating salmon and steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus spp.) smolts were monitored at the Rock Island Dam bypass trap from April 1 - August 31, 1954. This was the tenth consecutive year that the bypass trap was monitored. Data collected included: (1) number of fish caught by species, (2) number of adipose clipped and/or Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tagged fish caught by species, (3) daily average riverflow, (4) daily average powerhouse No. 1 and No. 2 flows and daily average spill. These data were transmitted to the Fish Passage Center, which manages the Smolt Monitoring Program throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Smolt Monitoring Program is used to manage the {open_quotes}water budget{close_quotes}, releasing upstream reservoir water storage allocated to supplement river flows to enhance survival of downstream migrating juvenile salmonids. The Rock Island Dam trapping facility collected 37,795 downstream migrating salmonids in 1994. Collected fish included 4 yearling and 4 sub-yearling chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) that had been previously PIT tagged to help determine migration rates. Additionally, 1,132 sub-yearling chinook, 4,185 yearling chinook, 6,627 steelhead, (O. mykiss) and 422 sockeye (O. nerka) with clipped adipose fins were collected. The middle 80% of the 1994 spring migration (excluding sub-yearling chinooks) passed Rock Island Dam during a 34 day period, April 25 - May 28. Passage rates of chinook and steelhead smolts released from hatcheries and the downstream migration timing of all salmonids are presented. The spring migration timing of juvenile salmonids is strongly influenced by hatchery releases above Rock Island Dam.

Truscott, Keith B.; Fielder, Paul C. (Chelan County Public Utility District No. 1, Power Operations Department, Wenatchee, WA)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Dam Removal Decisions: Science and Decision-Making  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the result of a two-year collaborative effort partially supported by EPRI and managed by the Heinz Center for Science, Economics, and the Environment. Other project supporters included FEMA, the Department of the Interior, the Army Corps of Engineers, and nongovernmental environmental organizations. The report concludes that dams continue to be extremely important to our nation's infrastructure by providing water supply, flood protection, hydroelectric power production, and recreation. How...

2002-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

218

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Fish Passage through Bonneville Dam in 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers requested that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conduct fish-passage studies at Bonneville Dam in 2004. These studies support the Portland District's goal of maximizing fish-passage efficiency (FPE) and obtaining 95% survival for juvenile salmon passing Bonneville Dam. Major passage routes include 10 turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 1 (B1), an 18-bay spillway, and eight turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 2 (B2). In this report, we present results of four studies related to juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam. The studies were conducted between April 15 and July 15, 2004, encompassing most of the spring and summer migrations. Studies included evaluations of (1) Project fish passage efficiency and other major passage metrics, (2) B2 fish guidance efficiency and gap loss, (3) smolt approach and fate at the B2 Corner Collector (B2CC), and (4) B2 vertical barrier screen head differential.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Schilt, Carl R.; Kim, Jina; Johnson, Peter N.; Hanks, Michael E.; Patterson, Deborah S.; Skalski, John R.; Hedgepeth, J

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

219

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Fish Passage Through Bonneville Dam in 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers requested that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) conduct fish-passage studies at Bonneville Dam in 2002. The ERDC contracted with MEVATEC Corporation to provide staff ranging from scientists to technicians to help conduct the study. This study supports the Portland-District goal of maximizing fish-passage efficiency (FPE) and obtaining 95% survival for juvenile salmon passing Bonneville Dam. In this report, we present results of two studies of juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam that we carried out in the 2002 downstream passage season April 20 through July 15, 2002. The first study of Project-wide FPE provides hourly estimates of fish passage and associated variances for all operating turbine units, spill bays, and the two sluiceway entrances at Powerhouse 1 (B1), as well as estimates of a variety of fish-passage efficiency and effectiveness measures. This was the third consecutive year of full-project hydroacoustic sampling and passage estimation. The second study was more narrowly focused on B2 turbines and had two components: (1) to sample the FGE at two modified turbine intakes and compare them with efficiencies of other B2 units that were sampled in the first study, and (2) to evaluate proportions of fish passing up into gatewell slots versus through screen gaps at a few B2 turbine intakes.

Ploskey, Gene R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Schilt, Carl R. (MEVATEC); Kim, J (Lynntech); Escher, Charles (MEVATEC Corporation); Skalski, John R.

2003-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 6700 of 8,172 results. 91 - 6700 of 8,172 results. Download Product Service Codes @ Headquarters A listing of Product Service Codes used at Headquarters Procurement Services http://energy.gov/management/downloads/product-service-codes-headquarters Download EA-1374-SA-02: Supplment Analysis Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1374-sa-02-supplment-analysis Download EIS-0308: Record of Decision and Floodplain Statement Interconnection of the Southpoint Power Plant with the Wester Area Power Administration's Parker-Davis No. 1 and No. 2, 230-kilovolt Transmission Lines http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0308-record-decision-and-floodplain-statement Download EIS-0247: Record of Decision Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron Source

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "davis dam 230-kilovolt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

091 - 5100 of 26,777 results. 091 - 5100 of 26,777 results. Download IPI_Trademark.pdf http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/ipitrademarkpdf Download Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-314-A BP Energy: Federal Register Notice Volume 76, No. 217- Nov. 9, 2011 Application from BP Energy to export electric energy to Mexico. Federal Register Notice. http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/application-export-electric-energy-oe-docket-no-ea-314-bp-energy-federal-register Page Calendar Year 1999 Documents marked with the * are published in Adobe PDF format. http://energy.gov/ig/calendar-year-reports/calendar-year-1999 Download EIS-0308: Record of Decision and Floodplain Statement Interconnection of the Southpoint Power Plant with the Wester Area Power Administration's Parker-Davis No. 1 and No. 2, 230-kilovolt Transmission

222

Compliance Monitoring of Juvenile Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Summer 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon smolts at The Dalles Dam during summer 2010. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.93 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal 0.015. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam to the tailrace 2 km below the dam The forebay-to-tailrace survival estimate satisfies the BRZ-to-BRZ survival estimate called for in the Fish Accords. , as well as the forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency, as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. The estimate of dam survival for subyearling Chinook salmon at The Dalles in 2010 was 0.9404 with an associated standard error of 0.0091.

Johnson, Gary E.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, John R.

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

223

The Conscious Landscape: Reinterpreting and Reinhabiting the La Colle Falls Hydro Dam.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The ruins of the La Colle Falls Hydro Dam encompass two very distinct topographies: the physical landscape of the vast Canadian Northwest, and the complex (more)

Hurd, Jason John

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Dam Safety Rules (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Rules (West Virginia) Safety Rules (West Virginia) Dam Safety Rules (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Department of Environmental Protection This establishes requirements relating to the design, placement, construction, enlargement, alteration, removal, abandonment, and repair of

225

Water quality and sedimentation implications of installing a hydroelectric dam on the Ro Baker in Chilean Patagonia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HidroAysen, a Chilean corporation operated by energy giant Endesa, has proposed to build two hydroelectric dams on the Rio Baker in the Aysin Region of Chilean Patagonia. The proposed dams have been met with a variety of ...

Leandro, Gianna Dee

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

NOAA's Rapid Response to the Howard A. Hanson Dam Flood Risk Management Crisis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Howard A. Hanson Dam (HHD) has brought flood protection to Washington's Green River Valley for more than 40 years and opened the way for increased valley development near Seattle. However, following a record high level of water behind the dam in ...

Allen B. White; Brad Colman; Gary M. Carter; F. Martin Ralph; Robert S. Webb; David G. Brandon; Clark W. King; Paul J. Neiman; Daniel J. Gottas; Isidora Jankov; Keith F. Brill; Yuejian Zhu; Kirby Cook; Henry E. Buehner; Harold Opitz; David W. Reynolds; Lawrence J. Schick

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Mangla Dam Raising Project (Pakistan): General Review and Socio-Spatial Impact Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mangla Dam Raising Project (Pakistan): General Review and Socio-Spatial Impact Assessment Saheeb, National University of Sciences and Technology, Islamabad-44000, Pakistan saheebk@ceme.nust.edu.pk Abstract. INTRODUCTION Pakistan has recently successfully completed the raising of Mangla dam, a major water works system

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

228

Van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov discontinuity in topologically new massive gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov discontinuity in the topologically new massive gravity (TNMG). The reduction from 2 degrees of freedom to one is interpreted as van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov discontinuity appeared when going from anti-de Sitter spacetime to Minkowski spacetime in the linearized TNMG.

Yun Soo Myung

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

Effect of Flow Pulses on Degradation Downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South Korea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the vertical and horizontal mixing of dye as the fluid slumps under gravity immediately after removal of dam gravity numerical model initialized with a finite length dammed region and periodic boundary conditions (reduced gravity = g , Coriolis parameter = f) propagating alongshore (y = 0). The potential vorticity q

Julien, Pierre Y.

230

An aerial radiological survey of the Davis-Monthan Air Force Base and surrounding area, Tucson, Arizona  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey, which was conducted from March 1 to 13, 1995, covered a 51-square-mile (132-square-kilometer) area centered on the Davis-Monthan Air Force Base (DMAFB) in Tucson, Arizona. The results of the survey are reported as contours of bismuth-214 ({sup 214}Bi) soil concentrations, which are characteristic of natural uranium and its progeny, and as contours of the total terrestrial exposure rates extrapolated to one meter above ground level. All data were scaled and overlaid on an aerial photograph of the DMAFB area. The terrestrial exposure rates varied from 9 to 20 microroentgens per hour at one meter above the ground. Elevated levels of terrestrial radiation due to increased concentrations of {sup 214}Bi (natural uranium) were observed over the Southern Pacific railroad yard and along portions of the railroad track bed areas residing both within and outside the base boundaries. No man-made, gamma ray-emitting radioactive material was observed by the aerial survey. High-purity germanium spectrometer and pressurized ionization chamber measurements at eight locations within the base boundaries were used to verify the integrity of the aerial results. The results of the aerial and ground-based measurements were found to be in agreement. However, the ground-based measurements were able to detect minute quantities of cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) at six of the eight locations examined. The presence of {sup 137}Cs is a remnant of fallout from foreign and domestic atmospheric nuclear weapons testing that occurred in the 1950s and early 1960s. Cesium-137 concentrations varied from 0.1 to 0.3 picocuries per gram, which is below the minimum detectable activity of the aerial system.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

CX-010109: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Curecanti-Poncha 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line Cross Bar Ranch Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04252013 Location(s): Colorado...

232

EIS-0399: Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy announces its decision to issue a Presidential permit to Montana Alberta Tie Limited to construct, operate, and maintain a 230-kilovolt transmission line along...

233

EIS-0399: Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Western Area Power Administration has decided to finance a portion of the Montana Alberta Tie Limited 230-kilovolt transmission line in exchange for ownership of 50 megawatts...

234

CX-007993: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-007993: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hatwai 230-Kilovolt Substation Breaker Replacement CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 02092012 Location(s): Idaho...

235

PREDICTION OF TOTAL DISSOLVED GAS EXCHANGE AT HYDROPOWER DAMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation in waters released at hydropower dams can cause gas bubble trauma in fisheries resulting in physical injuries and eyeball protrusion that can lead to mortality. Elevated TDG pressures in hydropower releases are generally caused by the entrainment of air in spillway releases and the subsequent exchange of atmospheric gasses into solution during passage through the stilling basin. The network of dams throughout the Columbia River Basin (CRB) are managed for irrigation, hydropower production, flood control, navigation, and fish passage that frequently result in both voluntary and involuntary spillway releases. These dam operations are constrained by state and federal water quality standards for TDG saturation which balance the benefits of spillway operations designed for Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed fisheries versus the degradation to water quality as defined by TDG saturation. In the 1970s, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), under the federal Clean Water Act (Section 303(d)), established a criterion not to exceed the TDG saturation level of 110% in order to protect freshwater and marine aquatic life. The states of Washington and Oregon have adopted special water quality standards for TDG saturation in the tailrace and forebays of hydropower facilities on the Columbia and Snake Rivers where spillway operations support fish passage objectives. The physical processes that affect TDG exchange at hydropower facilities have been studied throughout the CRB in site-specific studies and routine water quality monitoring programs. These data have been used to quantify the relationship between project operations, structural properties, and TDG exchange. These data have also been used to develop predictive models of TDG exchange to support real-time TDG management decisions. These empirically based predictive models have been developed for specific projects and account for both the fate of spillway and powerhouse flows in the tailrace channel and resultant exchange in route to the next downstream dam. Currently, there exists a need to summarize the general finding from operational and structural TDG abatement programs conducted throughout the CRB and for the development of a generalized prediction model that pools data collected at multiple projects with similar structural attributes. A generalized TDG exchange model can be tuned to specific projects and coupled with water regulation models to allow the formulation of optimal daily water regulation schedules subject to water quality constraints for TDG supersaturation. A generalized TDG exchange model can also be applied to other hydropower dams that affect TDG pressures in tailraces and can be used to develop alternative operational and structural measures to minimize TDG generation. It is proposed to develop a methodology for predicting TDG levels downstream of hydropower facilities with similar structural properties as a function of a set of variables that affect TDG exchange; such as tailwater depth, spill discharge and pattern, project head, and entrainment of powerhouse releases. TDG data from hydropower facilities located throughout the northwest region of the United States will be used to identify relationships between TDG exchange and relevant dependent variables. Data analysis and regression techniques will be used to develop predictive TDG exchange expressions for various structural categories.

Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL; Pasha, MD Fayzul K [ORNL; Stewart, Kevin M [ORNL; Bender, Merlynn [Bureau of Reclamation; Schneider, Michael L. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation; Aquatic Modeling of the Selective Withdrawal System, Hungry Horse Dam, Montana, 1991-1993 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hungry Horse Dam presently releases frigid water from the bottom of the reservoir all year long. Cold water effects insect production and fish growth downstream. Rapid temperature changes of up to 8.3 C (14 F) have been measured in the Flathead River downstream of the South Fork confluence, controlled by dam discharges. Thermal effects from Hungry Horse Dam are detectable for over 64 Km downstream to Flathead Lake. The installation of a selective withdrawal structure on each of the dam`s discharge penstocks was determined to be the most cost-effective means to provide constant, permanent temperature control without impacting power production and flexibility in dam operation. The thermal model presented herein revealed that fish growth potential in the river would increase two to five times through selective withdrawal, temperature control. Temperature control is possible over the entire range of turbine discharge capacity, with very little effect on power production. Findings indicate that angling would improve through higher catch rates and larger fish. Temperature control will solve the most serious impact to river health. However, flow fluctuations will continue to effect insect production and usable fishery habitat in the Flathead River. A natural thermal regime combined with moderated flow fluctuation would further enhance riverine food production, trout growth and recreation potential.

Marotz, Brian L.; Althen, Craig; Gustafson, Daniel

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

CRFLOOD: A Numerical Model to Estimate Uplift Pressure Distribution in Cracks in Concrete Gravity Dams: Volume 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uplift pressure forms an overturning force on dams that must be minimized so that dams can meet the required safety factors. CRFLOOD is a PC code that permits evaluation of different drain designs by selecting suitable combinations of drain diameter, spacing, and location for specific dam conditions.

1992-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

238

Estimating Overall Risk of Dam Failure: Practical Considerations in Combining Failure Probabilities ANCOLD 2003 Risk Workshop Page 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% 80% 90% 100% M N P Q R P AP ANP NP DAM: D E F G H - - - Flood Concrete Gravity Section Under drainDAM SAFETY DECISION-MAKING: COMBINING ENGINEERING ASSESSMENTS WITH RISK INFORMATION David S. Bowles breaching a dam; so drop the matter before a dispute breaks out. Proverbs 17:14 (NIV) ABSTRACT A decision

Bowles, David S.

239

Simulations of The Dalles Dam Proposed Full Length Spillwall  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling study to evaluatethe impacts of a full-length spillwall at The Dalles Dam. The full-length spillwall is being designed and evaluated as a structural means to improve tailrace egress and thus survival of juvenile fish passing through the spillway. During the course of this study, a full-length spillwall at Bays 6/7 and 8/9 were considered. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has proposed extending the spillwall constructed in the stilling basin between spillway Bays 6 and 7 about 590 ft farther downstream. It is believed that the extension of the spillwall will improve egress conditions for downstream juvenile salmonids by moving them more rapidly into the thalweg of the river hence reducing their exposure to predators. A numerical model was created, validated, and applied the The Dalles Dam tailrace. The models were designed to assess impacts to flow, tailrace egress, navigation, and adult salmon passage of a proposed spill wall extension. The more extensive model validation undertaken in this study greatly improved our confidence in the numerical model to represent the flow conditions in The Dalles tailrace. This study used these validated CFD models to simulate the potential impacts of a spillwall extension for The Dalles Dam tailrace for two locations. We determined the following: (1)The construction of an extended wall (between Bays 6/7) will not adversely impact entering or exiting the navigation lock. Impact should be less if a wall were constructed between Bays 8/9. (2)The construction of a wall between Bays 6/7 will increase the water surface elevation between the wall and the Washington shore. Although the increased water surface elevation would be beneficial to adult upstream migrants in that it decreases velocities on the approach to the adult ladder, the increased flow depth would enhance dissolved gas production, impacting potential operations of the project because of water quality. A wall between Bays 8/9 should have a lesser impact as the confined spill would be across more bays and the relative flow constriction less. (3) The 405 kcfs case was used for the rapid assessment of flow conditions and hydraulic mechanisms that might be responsible for the unexpected erosion at the end of the shelf downstream of Bay 7.

Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

240

ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a Federal sponsor to continue with the project, the Watts Bar Dam Project was canceled and the Exploranium radiation monitors were removed from the doors of Watts Bar Dam in early 2006. The DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office decided to proceed with a Pilot building on the ORNL work performed at the TN and SC weigh stations in the highway sector of the Trusted Corridors project and eventually expanded it to other southern states under the name of Southeastern Corridor Pilot Project (SETCP). Many of the Phase I goals were achieved however real-world test data of private watercraft and barges was never obtained.

Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "davis dam 230-kilovolt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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241

Dr. Rick D. Davis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and a materials research engineer in the ... Division (FRD) of the Engineering Laboratory (EL ... developing and utilizing Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ...

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

242

davis-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

At visible (VIS) wavelengths, incoming solar photons are eventually reflected back to space or absorbed by the ground, so their trajectories are bounded random walks. However,...

243

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B4.7 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B4.7 Existing Regulations B4.7: Fiber optic cable Adding fiber optic cables to transmission facilities or burying fiber optic cable in existing powerline or pipeline rights-of-way. Covered actions may include associated vaults and pulling and tensioning sites outside of rights-of-way in nearby previously disturbed or developed areas. Previous Regulations Categorical Exclusion Determinations dated before November 14th, 2011 were issued under previous DOE NEPA regulations. See the Notice of Final Rulemaking (76 FR 63763, 10/13/2011) for information changes to this categorical exclusion. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 22, 2013 CX-010882: Categorical Exclusion Determination Liberty-Parker Dam #2 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line, Optical Power Ground

244

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5001 - 25010 of 29,416 results. 5001 - 25010 of 29,416 results. Download CX-010882: Categorical Exclusion Determination Liberty-Parker Dam #2 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line, Optical Power Ground Wire Repair CX(s) Applied: B4.7 Date: 08/22/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010882-categorical-exclusion-determination Download WAPA Purchase of Energy Contractor Template http://energy.gov/indianenergy/downloads/wapa-purchase-energy-contractor-template Download Audit Report: OAS-L-12-08 Y-12 National Security Complex's Waste Diversion Efforts http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/audit-report-oas-l-12-08 Rebate Renewable Energy Business Tax Incentives [http://www.azleg.gov/legtext/49leg/1r/bills/sb1403s.pdf SB 1403], signed

245

Dam Control and Safety Act (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Control and Safety Act (West Virginia) Control and Safety Act (West Virginia) Dam Control and Safety Act (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Department of Environmental Protection This law grants authority to the secretary of the Department of Environmental Protection to control and exercise regulatory jurisdiction

246

Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 1999 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 1999 fish collection season at Lower Granite was characterized by high spring flows and spill, low levels of debris, cool water temperatures, increased hatchery chinook numbers, and an overall decrease in numbers of smolts collected and transported. A total of 5,882,872 juvenile salmonids were collected at Lower Granite. Of these, 5,466,057 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 5,232,105 by barge and 233,952 by truck. An additional 339,398 fish were bypassed back to the river. A total of 117,609 salmonids were examined in daily samples. Nine research projects conducted by four agencies impacted a total of 440,810 smolts (7.5% of the total collected) of which 247,268 were PIT tagged and 572 were recorded as incidental mortalities.

Verhey, Peter; Morrill, Charles; Mensik, Fred

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to estimate the survival for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts during spring 2010 in a portion of the Columbia River that includes Bonneville Dam. The study estimated smolt survival from a virtual release at Bonneville Dam to a survival array 81 km downstream of Bonneville Dam. We also estimated median forebay residence time, median tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A single release design was used to estimate survival from Bonneville Dam to a primary array located 81 km downstream of Bonneville. The approach did not include a reference tailrace release. Releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam to Hood River contributed to the formation of virtual releases at a Bonneville Dam forebay entrance array and at the face of the dam. A total of 3,880 yearling Chinook salmon and 3,885 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to estimate the survival for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts during spring 2010 in a portion of the Columbia River that includes Bonneville Dam. The study estimated smolt survival from a virtual release at Bonneville Dam to a survival array 81 km downstream of Bonneville Dam. We also estimated median forebay residence time, median tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A single release design was used to estimate survival from Bonneville Dam to a primary array located 81 km downstream of Bonneville. The approach did not include a reference tailrace release. Releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam to Hood River contributed to the formation of virtual releases at a Bonneville Dam forebay entrance array and at the face of the dam. A total of 3,880 yearling Chinook salmon and 3,885 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation, 1992-1993 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In February of 1900, over forty agency representatives and interested citizens began development of the 1991 Mitigation Plan. This effort culminated in the 1993 Implementation Plan for mitigation of fish losses attributable to the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The primary purpose of this biennial report is to inform the public of the status of ongoing mitigation activities resulting from those planning efforts. A habitat improvement project is underway to benefit bull trout in Big Creek in the North Fork drainage of the Flathead River and work is planned in Hay Creek, another North Fork tributary. Bull trout redd counts have been expanded and experimental programs involving genetic evaluation, outmigrant monitoring, and hatchery studies have been initiated, Cutthroat mitigation efforts have focused on habitat improvements in Elliott Creek and Taylor`s Outflow and improvements have been followed by imprint plants of hatchery fish and/or eyed eggs in those streams. Rogers Lake west of Kalispell and Lion Lake, near Hungry Horse, were chemically rehabilitated. Cool and warm water fish habitat has been improved in Halfmoon Lake and Echo Lake. Public education and public interest is important to the future success of mitigation activities. As part of the mitigation team`s public awareness responsibility we have worked with numerous volunteer groups, public agencies, and private landowners to stimulate interest and awareness of mitigation activities and the aquatic ecosystem. The purpose of this biennial report is to foster public awareness of, and support for, mitigation activities as we move forward in implementing the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan.

DosSantos, Joe; Vashro, Jim; Lockard, Larry

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to estimate dam passage and route specific survival rates for subyearling Chinook salmon smolts to a primary survival-detection array located 81 km downstream of the dam, evaluate a BGS located in the B2 forebay, and evaluate effects of two spill treatments. The 2010 study also provided estimates of forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and spill + B2 Corner Collector (B2CC) efficiency, as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. In addition, the study estimated forebay passage survival and survival of fish traveling from the forebay entrance array, through the dam and downstream through 81 km of tailwater.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Wildlife Mitigation and Restoration for Grand Coulee Dam: Blue Creek Project, Phase 1.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a recommendation from the Spokane Tribe to the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) for partial mitigation for the extensive wildlife and wildlife habitat losses on the Spokane Indian Reservation caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. NPPC`s interim wildlife goal over the next 7 years for the Columbia hydropower system, is to protect, mitigate and enhance approximately 35% basin wide of the lost habitat units. Grand Coulee Dam had the greatest habitat losses of any Dams of the Wildlife Rule.

Merker, Christopher

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to estimate dam passage and route specific survival rates for subyearling Chinook salmon smolts to a primary survival-detection array located 81 km downstream of the dam, evaluate a BGS located in the B2 forebay, and evaluate effects of two spill treatments. The 2010 study also provided estimates of forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and spill + B2 Corner Collector (B2CC) efficiency, as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. In addition, the study estimated forebay passage survival and survival of fish traveling from the forebay entrance array, through the dam and downstream through 81 km of tailwater.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1998 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Snake River stock) yearling fall chinook salmon that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1998. The three fall chinook acclimation facilities are operated by the Nez Perce Tribe and located at Pittsburg Landing and Captain John Rapids on the Snake River and at Big Canyon Creek on the Clearwater River. Yearlings at the Big Canyon facility consisted of two size classes that are referred to in this report as 9.5 fish per pound (fpp) and 30 fpp. The Big Canyon 9.5 fpp were comparable to the yearlings at Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. A total of 9,942 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Pittsburg Landing. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.19. Of the 9,942 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 6,836 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary). A total of 4,926 9.5 fpp and 2,532 30 fpp yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Big Canyon. PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 156.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.13. PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 113.1 mm and mean condition factor of 1.18. Of the 4,926 PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released, a total of 3,042 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. Of the 2,532 PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released, a total of 1,130 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 1,253 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Captain John Rapids. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 147.5 mm and mean condition factor of 1.09. Of the 1,253 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 719 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 2,420 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.0 mm and mean condition factor of 1.10. Of the 2,420 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 979 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Monumental and McNary). Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged fish released from Pittsburg Landing were 10.5 days to Lower Granite Dam, 21.7 days to McNary Dam and 29.8 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 16.4 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 18.3 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 18.9 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were April 25 at Lower Granite Dam, May 6 at McNary Dam and May 14 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 5 at Lower Granite Dam, May 20 at McNary Dam and May 25 at Bonneville Dam. Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released from Big Canyon were 13.3 days to Lower Granite Dam, 26.0 days to McNary Dam and 30.8 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 13.0 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 15.3 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 18.3 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were April 27 at Lower Granite Dam, May 11 at McNary Dam and May 15 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 9 at Lower Granite Dam, May 24 at McNary Dam and May 25 at Bonneville Dam. Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released from Big Canyon were 20.8 days to Lower Granite Dam, 37.6 days to McNary Dam and 43.5 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 8.3 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 10.6 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 12.9 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were May 5 at Lower Granite Dam, May 23 at McNary Dam and May 28 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 22 at Lower Granite Dam, May 31 at McNary Dam and June 5 at Bonneville Dam. Median arrival dates, based on all detections, of PIT tagge

Rocklage, Stephen J. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Water-Power Development, Conservation of Hydroelectric Power Dams and Works  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water-Power Development, Conservation of Hydroelectric Power Dams Water-Power Development, Conservation of Hydroelectric Power Dams and Works (Virginia) Water-Power Development, Conservation of Hydroelectric Power Dams and Works (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia State Corporation Commission It is the policy of the Commonwealth of Virginia to encourage the utilization of its water resources to the greatest practicable extent, to control the waters of the Commonwealth, and also to construct or reconstruct dams in any rivers or streams within the Commonwealth for the

255

Precipitation Changes near Three Gorges Dam, China. Part I: A Spatiotemporal Validation Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October 2010, the water level upstream of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) reached the designated 175-m level. The associated inundation and land useland cover changes have important implications for water resource management, agriculture, ...

Fang Zhao; Marshall Shepherd

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Investigation of Uplift Pressures and Shear and Tensile Strengths for Concrete Gravity Dams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concrete gravity dam stability depends on the characteristics of the rock foundation, strength of the concrete-to-rock bond, concrete strength, and uplift pressure forces. This interim report describes, with examples, how to assess these factors.

1990-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

257

Monitoring of Juvenile Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Summer 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to evaluate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha; CH0) at John Day Dam (JDA) during summer 2010. This study was conducted by researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC) and the University of Washington (UW). The study was designed to estimate the effects of 30% and 40% spill treatment levels on single release survival rates of CH0 passing through two reaches: (1) the dam, and 40 km of tailwater, (2) the forebay, dam, and 40 km of tailwater. The study also estimated additional passage performance measures which are stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Update of Columbia River flow and temperature data measured at Priest Rapids Dam and Vernita Bridge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Columbia River temperatures and flow rates are collected daily at Priest Rapids Dam and Vernita Bridge. These data are necessary for assessing trends or changes in river conditions downstream of Priest Rapids Dam. In order to analyze this data, Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed a computerized data base using existing US Geological Survey flow and temperature records at Priest Rapids Dam and Vernita Bridge. Daily-averaged temperature and daily flow information on the Columbia River just downstream of Priest Rapids Dam and upstream of river mile 380 were collected and stored in a data base. A newly developed computer model, COLSTAT (Columbia River Statistical Update), used the data base to statistically analyze temperature and flow conditions by computing the frequency of occurrence and duration of selected temperatures and flow rates for the Columbia River. Information regarding the data base is presented, as well as, a description of the COLSTAT model.

Whelan, G.; Newbill, C.A.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Surface and subsurface soils at the Pond B dam: July 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pond B, 685-13G, is an inactive reactor cooling impoundment built in 1961 on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Between 1961 and 1964, Pond B received R-Reactor cooling water discharges that were contaminated with {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr and plutonium. Though the pond has not been used since 1964, radionuclides from the contaminated cooling water remain in the water and in the surface sediments of the pond. The current proposal to fix and repair the Pond B dam structure includes installing a new drain system and monitoring equipment. The dam will be reinforced with additional previous material on the downstream face of the dam. The objectives of this report are to describe the sampling methodology used during the July 1998 sampling event at the downstream face of the Pond B dam and in Pond B, present the results of the sampling event, and compare, where possible, these results to related risk-based standards.

Halverson, N.V.

1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

260

Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Surveys of Velocity Downstream of Albeni Falls Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Seattle District, is studying the potential to locate fish bypass systems at Albeni Falls Dam. The USACE requested Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to survey velocity magnitude and direction in the dam tailrace. The empirical data collected will be used to support future numerical modeling, physical modeling, and evaluation of fish bypass system alternatives. In May 2010, PNNL conducted velocity surveys of the Albeni Falls Dam using a boat-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler. The surveys were conducted over three days (May 25 through 27). During the survey period, total river discharge at the dam varied between 30.2 and 31.0 kcfs. A small amount of spill discharge, 2 kcfs, was present on two days (May 26 and 27). This report presents data plots showing measured velocity direction and magnitude averaged over the entire depth and over 5-ft depth increments from 5 to 30 ft.

Perkins, William A.; Titzler, P. Scott; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Kallio, Sara E.; Bellgraph, Brian J.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "davis dam 230-kilovolt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Distributed Energy Resource Optimization Using a Software as Service (SaaS) Approach at the University of California, Davis Campus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Together with OSIsoft LLC as its private sector partner and matching sponsor, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) won an FY09 Technology Commercialization Fund (TCF) grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. The goal of the project is to commercialize Berkeley Lab's optimizing program, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) using a software as a service (SaaS) model with OSIsoft as its first non-scientific user. OSIsoft could in turn provide optimization capability to its software clients. In this way, energy efficiency and/or carbon minimizing strategies could be made readily available to commercial and industrial facilities. Specialized versions of DER-CAM dedicated to solving OSIsoft's customer problems have been set up on a server at Berkeley Lab. The objective of DER-CAM is to minimize the cost of technology adoption and operation or carbon emissions, or combinations thereof. DER-CAM determines which technologies should be installed and operated based on specific site load, price information, and performance data for available equipment options. An established user of OSIsoft's PI software suite, the University of California, Davis (UCD), was selected as a demonstration site for this project. UCD's participation in the project is driven by its motivation to reduce its carbon emissions. The campus currently buys electricity economically through the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA). The campus does not therefore face compelling cost incentives to improve the efficiency of its operations, but is nonetheless motivated to lower the carbon footprint of its buildings. Berkeley Lab attempted to demonstrate a scenario wherein UCD is forced to purchase electricity on a standard time-of-use tariff from Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E), which is a concern to Facilities staff. Additionally, DER-CAM has been set up to consider the variability of carbon emissions throughout the day and seasons. Two distinct analyses of value to UCD are possible using this approach. First, optimal investment choices for buildings under the two alternative objectives can be derived. Second, a week-ahead building operations forecaster has been written that executes DER-CAM to find an optimal operating schedule for buildings given their expected building energy services requirements, electricity prices, and local weather. As part of its matching contribution, OSIsoft provided a full implementation of PI and a server to install it on at Berkeley Lab. Using the PItoPI protocol, this gives Berkeley Lab researchers direct access to UCD's PI data base. However, this arrangement is in itself inadequate for performing optimizations. Additional data not included in UCD's PI database would be needed and the campus was not able to provide this information. This report details the process, results, and lessons learned of this commercialization project.

Michael, Stadler; Marnay, Chris; Donadee, Jon; Lai, Judy; M& #233; gel, Olivier; Bhattacharya, Prajesh; Siddiqui, Afzal

2011-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

262

Association of State Dam Safety Officials (ASDSO)/EPRI Spillway Gate Workshop: January 5 & 6, 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maintaining the integrity of dams at hydroelectric projects is essential to the protection of communities, the surrounding environment, and the power and resource management infrastructure. The Spillway Gate Workshop, sponsored by the Association of State Dam Safety Officials (ASDSO) and EPRI, and with funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), focused on a critical aspect of the safety issues related to analysis, inspection, maintenance, and performance of spillway gates. The intent of...

2000-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

263

Water Velocity Measurement on an Extended-Length Submerged Bar Screen at John Day Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a study of water velocity around an extended-length submerged bar screen (ESBS) at John Day Dam. The study was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers by AScI Corporation and MEVATEC Corporation in March of 2000. This report was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. ESBS are being studied as one method for diverting juvenile migrating fish from the dam's turbine intakes into the gate well and through the juvenile fish bypass channels.

Weiland, Mark A

2001-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

264

Non-powered Dams: An untapped source of renewable electricity in the USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydropower has been a source of clean, renewable electricity in the USA for more than 100 years. Today, approximately 2500 US dams provide 78 GW of conventional and 22 GW of pumped-storage hydropower. In contrast, another approximately 80 000 dams in the USA do not include hydraulic turbine equipment and provide non-energy related services, such as flood control, water supply, navigation, and recreation.

Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Battey, Hoyt [Department of Energy; Smith, Brennan T [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Study of the effects of a disaster at Grand Coulee Dam upon the Hanford Works  

SciTech Connect

Declassified 23 Nov 1973. It is assumed that the Grand Coulee Dam would be destroyed by one direct hit following detonation of an atomic bomb. Major effects of the explosion include flooding and isolation of Richland, flooding of Midway Substation, and flooding of surrounding areas. Maximum water elevations following a direct hit and indirect hits are estimated. Data are presented for flow through openings and flow through dam failure. (HLW)

Kramer, H.A.

1950-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

EIS-0480: Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Two agencies of the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service, are jointly preparing a Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Glen Canyon Dam and an EIS for adoption of the Plan. The Glen Canyon Dam, on the Colorado River in northern, Arizona, generates hydroelectric power that is marketed by DOE's Western Area Power Administration, a cooperating agency.

267

Optimization of Hydroacoustic Equipment Deployments at Lookout Point and Cougar Dams, Willamette Valley Project, 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the study was to optimize performance of the fixed-location hydroacoustic systems at Lookout Point Dam (LOP) and the acoustic imaging system at Cougar Dam (CGR) by determining deployment and data acquisition methods that minimized structural, electrical, and acoustic interference. The general approach was a multi-step process from mount design to final system configuration. The optimization effort resulted in successful deployments of hydroacoustic equipment at LOP and CGR.

Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.

2010-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

268

Compliance Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Spring 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts at The Dalles Dam during spring 2010. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.96 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal 0.015. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay boat-restricted zone (BRZ) to the tailrace BRZ at The Dalles Dam, as well as the forebay residence time, tailrace egress, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A virtual/paired-release design was used to estimate dam passage survival at The Dalles Dam. The approach included releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam that contributed to the formation of a virtual release at the face of The Dalles Dam. A survival estimate from this release was adjusted by a paired release below The Dalles Dam. A total of 4,298 yearling Chinook salmon and 4,309 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation. The dam passage survival results are summarized as follows: Yearling Chinook Salmon 0.9641 (SE = 0.0096) and Steelhead 0.9535 (SE = 0.0097).

Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, John R.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Optimization of Hydroacoustic Deployments at John Day Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes short-term studies conducted in late November and early December 2001 to optimize hydroacoustic sampling techniques for John Day Dam before the 2002 fish passage efficiency (FPE) study. Knowledge gained in this study should significantly improve hydroacoustic sampling and the accuracy of estimates of fish passage at two locations that have presented problems in past studies. The spillway has been most problematic because many fish detected there were not entrained. Without correction, non-commitment of fish can result in multiple detections and overestimation of fish passage and FPE. Trash-rack-mounted, down-looking transducers for sampling unguided fish at a submerged traveling screen (STS) also have posed problems because the beam was aimed so far downstream that researchers had concerns about fish aspect and detectability. The deployments, aiming angles, and ping rates described here should eliminate all problems encountered in previous studies. This report describes hydroacoustic evaluations. The spill-bay deployment identified in this study should completely eliminate multiple detections of fish by limiting the sample volume for counting fish to the deep high-discharge volume adjacent to the gate. Results from testing of transducers deployed in a turbine intake with an STS suggest that, after testing in 2002, it may be possible to cut the number of powerhouse transducers sampling STS units by 50% or to double the spatial sampling coverage with the same number of transducers, all while improving detectability.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Cook, Christopher B.; Titzler, P. Scott; Moursund, Russell A.

2002-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

270

Operation of the Lower Granite Dam Adult Trap, 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 2008 we operated the adult salmonid trap at Lower Granite Dam from 7 March through 25 November, except during a short summer period when water temperatures were too high to safely handle fish. We collected and handled a total of 20,463 steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss and radio-tagged 34 of the hatchery steelhead. We took scale samples from 3,724 spring/summer Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha for age and genetic analysis. We collected and handled a total of 8,254 fall Chinook salmon. Of those fish, 2,520 adults and 942 jacks were transported to Lyons Ferry Hatchery on the Snake River in Washington. In addition, 961 adults and 107 jacks were transported to the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery on the Clearwater River in Idaho. The remaining 3,724 fall Chinook salmon were passed upstream. Scales samples were taken from 780 fall Chinook salmon tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and collected by the sort-by-code system.

Harmon, Jerrel R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Priest Rapids Dam flow curtailment: Incident report, January 7, 1961  

SciTech Connect

This incident report deals with mechanical damage (caused by falling rocks) to the power line supplying station power, Priest Rapids Dam lost all generating flow at 4:23 p.m., cutting discharge from 71,700 cfs to about 12,000 cfs. Within five minutes, spillway gates were opened, bringing river flow back to greater than 36,000 cfs in about 10 minutes. The flow at 181-B dropped from 72,000 cfs to a minimum of 56,000 cfs at about 5:25 p.m. Priest Rapids generators returned to service at 4:45 p.m., the indicated flow at the gauge reaching 71,700 cfs again at about 8:00 p.m. River temperatures at the gauge increased 0.5 C following the interruption, but not at 181-B. Prompt HAPO notification of the flow reduction as provided for in the agreement between the PUD and the AEC was not made on this occasion; the first notice came from the 251 Substation.

Kramer, H.A.; Corley, J.P.

1961-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

272

(DOE/EIS-0183-SA-05): Supplement Analysis for the Boise River Diversion Dam Powerplant Rehabilitation, 10/17/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 17, 2002 October 17, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KECP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Boise River Diversion Dam Powerplant Rehabilitation, DOE/EIS-0183-SA-05 memorandum Mark A. Jones Program Analyst - PGF-6 TO : Proposed Action: Boise River Diversion Dam - Amendment to Capital Investment Sub-Agreement, Contract Number DE-MS79-94BP94618 Proposed By: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) Location: Near Boise, in Ada County, Idaho Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund Reclamation's rehabilitation of the powerplant at the existing Boise River Diversion Dam (Diversion Dam) to use the water resource at Diversion Dam for electrical power production. Analysis: The Diversion Dam is located about 7 miles southeast of Boise, Idaho on the Boise River, about

273

Synthesis of Juvenile Salmonid Passage Studies at The Dalles Dam, Volume II, 2001-05  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of juvenile salmonid research at The Dalles Dam is to provide data to inform decisions on strategies to improve smolt survival rates at the project. Survival improvement strategies address the three primary passage routes at The Dalles Dam -- spillway, sluiceway, and turbines with the general intent to increase spill and sluice passage and decrease turbine passage. Since the review by Ploskey et al. (2001a) of research during 1982-2000 at The Dalles Dam, the Corps funded over $20M of research in at least 39 studies during 2001-2006. The purpose of the current review is to synthesize juvenile salmonid passage data at The Dalles Dam (TDA) collected from 2001 through 2006. The data we synthesize comes from numerous research techniques employed to address particular study objectives at The Dalles Dam. The suite of techniques includes acoustic and radio telemetry, acoustic cameras, acoustic Doppler current profilers, balloon tags, computational fluid dynamics models, drogues, fixed and mobile hydroacoustics, fyke nets, physical scale models, PIT-tags, sensor fish, sonar trackers, and underwater video. Hydraulic data involves flow patterns and water velocities. Biological data involve forebay approach paths and residence times, horizontal and diel distributions, passage efficiencies and effectiveness, fish behaviors, tailrace egress and predation rates, and route-specific and total project survival rates. Data for 2001-2006 are synthesized in this report to provide, in conjunction with Ploskey et al. (2001a), resources for engineers, biologists, and dam operators to use when making decisions about fish protection measures for juvenile salmonids at The Dalles Dam. This review covers the major fish passage research efforts during 2001-2006 and includes sections on the Environmental Setting, Forebay and Project Passage Studies, Spill Studies, Sluiceway Studies, Turbine Studies, Smolt Survival Studies, and a Discussion.

Johnson, Gary E.; Beeman, John W.; Duran, Ian; Puls, Andrew

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Assessment of the impacts of demand curtailments in the DAMs: issues in and proposed modifications of FERC Order No. 745.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), in its initiative to incentivize demand response resources (DRRs) to participate in the day-ahead markets (DAMs), enacted Order No. (more)

Castillo, Isaac

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead through Snake River Dams and Reservoirs, 1995 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Documentation is provided for the third of a multiyear study to estimate the survival of juvenile salmonids passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake River.

Muir, William D.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Water-induced displacement in Thua Thien Hue province: the impacts of hydropower dams on livelihood of forest dependent people.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Thua Thien Hue province is one of provinces in Vietnam where a high potential for hydroelectricity has resulted in the construction of dams for energy (more)

Yustina Artati, ..

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

The Dalles Dam, Columbia River: Spillway Improvement CFD Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents development of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that were applied to The Dalles spillway for the US Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District. The models have been successfully validated against physical models and prototype data, and are suitable to support biological research and operations management. The CFD models have been proven to provide reliable information in the turbulent high-velocity flow field downstream of the spillway face that is typically difficult to monitor in the prototype. In addition, CFD data provides hydraulic information throughout the solution domain that can be easily extracted from archived simulations for later use if necessary. This project is part of an ongoing program at the Portland District to improve spillway survival conditions for juvenile salmon at The Dalles. Biological data collected at The Dalles spillway have shown that for the original spillway configuration juvenile salmon passage survival is lower than desired. Therefore, the Portland District is seeking to identify operational and/or structural changes that might be implemented to improve fish passage survival. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) went through a sequence of steps to develop a CFD model of The Dalles spillway and tailrace. The first step was to identify a preferred CFD modeling package. In the case of The Dalles spillway, Flow-3D was as selected because of its ability to simulate the turbulent free-surface flows that occur downstream of each spilling bay. The second step in development of The Dalles CFD model was to assemble bathymetric datasets and structural drawings sufficient to describe the dam (powerhouse, non-overflow dam, spillway, fish ladder entrances, etc.) and tailrace. These datasets are documented in this report as are various 3-D graphical representations of The Dalles spillway and tailrace. The performance of the CFD model was then validated for several cases as the third step. The validated model was then applied to address specific SIS design questions. Specifically, the CFD models were used to evaluate flow deflectors, baffle block removal and the effects of spillwalls. The CFD models were also used to evaluate downstream differences at other locations, such as at the Highway 197 bridge piers and Oregon shore islands, due to alterations in spill pattern. CFD model results were analyzed to quantitatively compare impacts of the spillwall that has subsequently been constructed between bays 6 and 7. CFD model results provided detailed information about how the spillwall would impact downstream flow patterns that complemented results from the 1:80 scale physical model. The CFD model was also used to examine relative differences between the juvenile spill pattern used in previous years and the anticipated spill pattern that will be applied once the wall is complete. In addition, the CFD model examined velocity magnitudes over the downstream basalt shelf to investigate potential for erosion under high flow conditions (e.g., 21 kcfs/bay for bays 1 through 6) with the spillwall in place. Several appendices follow the results and discussion sections of this report. These appendices document the large number of CFD simulations that have been performed by PNNL; both spillway improvement study (SIS) related and those performed for related biological tests.

Cook, Chris B.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Rapid gravity and gravity gradiometry terrain correction via adaptive quadtree mesh discretization Kristofer Davis, M. Andy Kass, and Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical and Magnetic Studies, Colorado School  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rapid gravity and gravity gradiometry terrain correction via adaptive quadtree mesh discretization Kristofer Davis, M. Andy Kass, and Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical and Magnetic Studies, Colorado School of Mines SUMMARY We present a method for modeling the terrain response in gravity and gravity

279

Evaluation of Fall Chinook and Chum Salmon Spawning below Bonneville Dam; 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2003 a total of 253 adult fall chinook and 113 chum were sampled for biological data in the Ives and Pierce islands area below Bonneville Dam. Vital statistics were developed from 221 fall chinook and 109 chum samples. The peak redd count for fall chinook was 190. The peak redd count for chum was 262. Peak spawning time for fall chinook was set at approximately 24 November. Peak spawning time for chum occurred approximately 24 November. There were estimated to be a total of 1,533 fall chinook spawning below Bonneville Dam in 2003. The study area's 2003 chum population was estimated to be 688 spawning fish. Temperature unit data suggests that below Bonneville Dam 2003 brood bright stock, fall chinook emergence began on January 6, 2004 and ended 28 April 2004, with peak emergence occurring 13 April. 2003 brood juvenile chum emergence below Bonneville Dam began 22 February and continued through 15 April 2004. Peak chum emergence took place 25 March. A total of 25,433 juvenile chinook and 4,864 juvenile chum were sampled between the dates of 20 January and 28 June 2004 below Bonneville Dam. Juvenile chum migrated from the study area in the 40-55 mm fork length range. Migration of chum occurred during the months of March, April and May. Sampling results suggest fall chinook migration from rearing areas took place during the month of June 2004 when juvenile fall chinook were in the 65 to 80 mm fork length size range. Adult and juvenile sampling below Bonneville Dam provided information to assist in determining the stock of fall chinook and chum spawning and rearing below Bonneville Dam. Based on observed spawning times, adult age and sex composition, juvenile emergence timing, juvenile migration timing and juvenile size at the time of migration, it appears that in 2003 all of the fall chinook using the area below Bonneville Dam were of a late-spawning, bright stock. Observed spawning times, adult age and sex composition, GSI and DNA analysis, juvenile emergence timing, juvenile migration timing and juvenile size at the time of migration suggests chum spawning and rearing below Bonneville dam are similar to stocks of chum found in Hamilton and Hardy creek and are part of the Lower Columbia River Chum ESU.

van der Naald, Wayne; Duff, Cameron; Brooks, Robert (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Columbia River Section, John Day, OR)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Evaluation of Fall Chinook and Chum Salmon Spawning below Bonneville Dam; 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002 a total of 364 adult fall chinook and 472 chum were sampled for biological data in the Ives and Pierce islands area below Bonneville Dam. Vital statistics were developed from 290 fall chinook and 403 chum samples. The peak redd count for fall chinook was 214. The peak redd count for chum was 776. Peak spawning time for fall chinook was set at approximately 15 November. Peak spawning time for chum occurred approximately 6 December. There were estimated to be a total of 1,881 fall chinook spawning below Bonneville Dam in 2002. The study area's 2002 chum population was estimated to be 4,232 spawning fish. Temperature unit data suggests that below Bonneville Dam 2002 brood bright stock, fall chinook emergence began on February 3 2003 and ended 7 May 2003, with peak emergence occurring 20 April. 2002 brood juvenile chum emergence below Bonneville Dam began 27 January and continued through 6 April 2003. Peak chum emergence took place 1 March. A total of 10,925 juvenile chinook and 1,577 juvenile chum were sampled between the dates of 24 January and 21 July 2003 below Bonneville Dam. Juvenile chum migrated from the study area in the 40-55 mm fork length range. Migration of chum occurred during the months of March, April and May. Sampling results suggest fall chinook migration from rearing areas took place during the month of June 2003 when juvenile fall chinook were in the 65 to 80 mm fork length size range. Adult and juvenile sampling below Bonneville Dam provided information to assist in determining the stock of fall chinook and chum spawning and rearing below Bonneville Dam. Based on observed spawning times, adult age and sex composition, juvenile emergence timing, juvenile migration timing and juvenile size at the time of migration, it appears that in 2002 and 2003 the majority of fall chinook using the area below Bonneville Dam were of a late-spawning, bright stock of fall chinook. Observed spawning times, adult age and sex composition, GSI and DNA analysis, juvenile emergence timing, juvenile migration timing and juvenile size at the time of migration suggests chum spawning and rearing below Bonneville dam are similar to stocks of chum found in Hamilton and Hardy creek and are part of the Lower Columbia River Chum ESU.

van der Naald, Wayne; Clark, Roy; Brooks, Robert (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Columbia River Section, John Day, OR)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "davis dam 230-kilovolt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Feasibility report on the potential hydroelectric development at Combie Dam. [3. 5 MW, 70-ft head  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of an investigation of the technical, environmental, economic and financial feasibility of installing a hydroelectric powerplant at the existing Combie Dam on the Bear River in Nevada and Placer Counties, California, are discussed. This dam is owned and operated by the Nevada Irrigation District (the District) to act as a diversion and provide some storage for District water supply. The power plant would utilize flows which presently pass over the dam's spillway. The project would involve expanding the existing four foot diameter outlet on the southern gravity portion of the dam, installing a penstock (approximately 175 feet long, 102 inches in diameter) and constructing a 3500 kilowatts (kW) power plant on the south bank of the river below the dam. The capital cost of the project, including interest during construction, would total approximately $4,500,000 in July 1980 dollars. The unit capacity cost of the project at the 1980 price level would be $1,285 per kilowatt. The energy production unit cost would be 41.4 mills per kilowatt hour in 1980, and 56.3 mills per kilowatt hour in 1984. Environmental impacts of the Combie Power Project would be minimal. The primary conclusion from this study is that the Combie Power Project is economically, environmentally and institutionally viable, at the present time if an adequate power purchase agreement can be reached. Continued escalation of energy values will make this project even more attractive. (WHK)

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

The Influence of Large Dams on Surrounding Climate and Precipitation Patterns  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Understanding the forcings exerted by large dams on local climate is key to establishing if artificial reservoirs inadvertently modify precipitation patterns in impounded river basins. Using a 30 year record of reanalysis data, the spatial gradients of atmospheric variables related to precipitation formation are identified around the reservoir shoreline for 92 large dams of North America. Our study reports that large dams influence local climate most in Mediterranean, arid and semi-arid climates, while for humid climates the influence is least. During the growing season, large dams in Mediterranean climates increase CAPE 2-3 times near the reservoir compared to the non-growing season. Clear spatial gradients of CAPE, specific humidity and surface evaporation are also observed around the fringes between the reservoir shoreline and further from these dams. Because of the increasing correlation observed between higher percentile of rain and CAPE, our findings point to the possibility of storm intensification in impounded basins of the Mediterranean and arid climates of the United States.

Degu, Ahmed M.; Hossain, Faisal; Niyogi, Dev; Pielke, Roger; Shepherd, J. M.; Voisin, Nathalie; Chronis, Themis

2011-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

283

Evaluation of Behavioral Guidance Structure on Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at Bonneville Dam in 2009  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an acoustic-telemetry study at Bonneville Dam in 2009 to evaluate the effects of a behavioral guidance structure (BGS) in the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse forebay on fish passage and survival through the second powerhouse (B2), the dam as a whole, and through the first powerhouse and spillway combined. The BGS was deployed to increase the survival of fish passing through B2 by increasing the percentage of outmigrating smolts entering the B2 Corner Collector (B2CC)a surface flow outlet known to be a relatively benign route for downstream passage at this dam. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. Study results indicated that having turbine 11 in service is important for providing flow conditions that are comparable to those observed in pre-BGS years (2004 and 2005) and in 2008. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

Faber, Derrek M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Hughes, James S.; Kim, Jin A.; Fu, Tao; Fischer, Eric S.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, J. R.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Glen Canyon Dam Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan EIS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glen Canyon LTEMP EIS Glen Canyon LTEMP EIS Glen Canyon Dam, a 1,300-MW water-storage and hydroelectric facility is located on the Colorado River upstream of the Grand Canyon. EVS is evaluating the effects of dam operations on the Colorado River. A comprehensive evaluation of Glen Canyon Dam operations and their effects on the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon is being conducted by the Department of the Interior with EVS assistance. The Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan (LTEMP) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) - the first such evaluation in over 15 years - will examine flow regimes to meet the goals of supplying water for communities, agriculture, and industry and will protect the resources of the Grand Canyon, while providing clean hydropower. The LTEMP EIS, which is expected to be completed by the end of 2013, will

285

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan, 1990-2003 Progress (Annual) Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this document the authors present mitigation implementation activities to protect and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. This plan only addresses non-operational actions (mitigation measures that do not affect dam operation) described in the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' (Mitigation Plan) submitted to the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) in March 1991 and in accordance with subsequent Council action on that Mitigation Plan. Operational mitigation was deferred for consideration under the Columbia Basin System Operation Review (SOR) process. This document represents an implementation plan considered and conditionally approved by the Council in March of 1993.

Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks; Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

1993-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

286

A Prehistoric Lahar-Dammed Lake And Eruption Of Mount Pinatubo Described In  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prehistoric Lahar-Dammed Lake And Eruption Of Mount Pinatubo Described In Prehistoric Lahar-Dammed Lake And Eruption Of Mount Pinatubo Described In A Philippine Aborigine Legend Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Prehistoric Lahar-Dammed Lake And Eruption Of Mount Pinatubo Described In A Philippine Aborigine Legend Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The prehistoric eruptions of Mount Pinatubo have followed a cycle: centuries of repose terminated by a caldera-forming eruption with large pyroclastic flows; a post-eruption aftermath of rain-triggered lahars in surrounding drainages and dome-building that fills the caldera; and then another long quiescent period. During and after the eruptions lahars descending along volcano channels may block tributaries from watersheds

287

Effects of Flaming Gorge Dam hydropower operations on downstream flow, stage, and sediment transport  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydropower operations at Flaming Gorge Dam, located on the Green River in Utah, can produce rapid downstream changes in flow and stage. These changes can in turn affect sediment transport and ecologic resources below the dam. To evaluate these effects, four hydropower operational scenarios with varying degrees of hydropower-release fluctuations were examined. This study demonstrates that the combined use of river-flow routing, water-surface profile, and sediment-transport models can provide useful information for evaluating the potential impacts of hydropower-operations on ecological and other resources downstream of the dam. Study results show that flow fluctuations may or may not persist for a long distance, depending on the initial magnitude of fluctuation and the duration of hydropower peaking. Stage fluctuations depend not only on flow fluctuations but also on river channel characteristics, such as channel width and longitudinal slope.

Yin, S.C.L.; Tomasko, D.; Cho, H.E.; Williams, G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); McCoy, J.; Palmer, C. [USDOE Western Area Power Administration, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Fish Migration, Dams, and Loss of Ecosystem Services in the Mekong Basin  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The past decade has seen increased international recognition of the importance of the services provided by natural ecosystems. It is unclear however whether such international awareness will lead to improved environmental management in many regions. We explore this issue by examining the specific case of fish migration and dams on the Mekong river. We determine that dams on the Mekong mainstem and major tributaries will have a major impact on the basin's fisheries and the people who depend upon them for food and income. We find no evidence that current moves towards dam construction will stop, and consider two scenarios for the future of the fisheries and other ecosystems of the basin. We conclude that major investment is required in innovative technology to reduce the loss of ecosystem services, and alternative livelihood strategies to cope with the losses that do occur

Dugan, Patrick J. [WorldFish Center; Barlow, Chris [Australian Center for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR); Agostinho, Angelo A. [Fundacao University, Parana Brazil; Baran, Eric [WorldFish Center; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Chen, Daqing [Yangtze River Fisheries Research Institute, People's Republic of China; Cowx, Ian G. [Hull International Fisheries Research Institute, England; Ferguson, John W. [North West Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA; Jutagate, Tuantong [Ubon Ratchathani University, Ubon Ratchathani, Thailand; Mallen-Cooper, Martin [Fishway Consulting Service, Australia; Marmulla, Gerd [Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Rome, Italy; Nestler, John [USA Corps Engineers, Concord, MA USA; Petrere, Miquel [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rio Claro, Brazil; Winemiller, Kirk O. [Texas A& M University

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam, 2008 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to provide temporary upstream passage of bull trout around Albeni Falls Dam on the Pend Oreille River, Idaho. Our specific objectives are to capture fish downstream of Albeni Falls Dam, tag them with combination acoustic and radio transmitters, release them upstream of Albeni Falls Dam, and determine if genetic information on tagged fish can be used to accurately establish where fish are located during the spawning season. In 2007, radio receiving stations were installed at several locations throughout the Pend Oreille River watershed to detect movements of adult bull trout; however, no bull trout were tagged during that year. In 2008, four bull trout were captured downstream of Albeni Falls Dam, implanted with transmitters, and released upstream of the dam at Priest River, Idaho. The most-likely natal tributaries of bull trout assigned using genetic analyses were Grouse Creek (N = 2); a tributary of the Pack River, Lightning Creek (N = 1); and Rattle Creek (N = 1), a tributary of Lightning Creek. All four bull trout migrated upstream from the release site in Priest River, Idaho, were detected at monitoring stations near Dover, Idaho, and were presumed to reside in Lake Pend Oreille from spring until fall 2008. The transmitter of one bull trout with a genetic assignment to Grouse Creek was found in Grouse Creek in October 2008; however, the fish was not found. The bull trout assigned to Rattle Creek was detected in the Clark Fork River downstream from Cabinet Gorge Dam (approximately 13 km from the mouth of Lightning Creek) in September but was not detected entering Lightning Creek. The remaining two bull trout were not detected in 2008 after detection at the Dover receiving stations. This report details the progress by work element in the 2008 statement of work, including data analyses of fish movements, and expands on the information reported in the quarterly Pisces status reports.

Bellgraph, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

Libby Dam Hydro-electric Project Mitigation: Efforts for Downstream Ecosystem Restoration.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Construction of Libby Dam, a large hydropower and flood control dam occurred from 1966 to 1975 on the Kootenai River, near Libby, Montana in the Northwestern United States. Live reservoir storage is substantial, with water residence time of about 5 1/2 months (based on mean annual discharge of about 440 m{sup 3}/s). Downstream river discharge and thermal regimes and the dependent habitat conditions have been significantly altered by dam construction and operation relative to pre-dam conditions. Highly valued Kootenai River fish populations, including white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus, burbot Lota lota and bull trout Salvelinus confluentus and their supporting ecological conditions have been deteriorating during post-dam years. Measurements of the presence of very low (ultraoligotrophic) concentrations of dissolved phosphorus in the river downstream from Libby Dam were identified as a critical limitation on primary production and overall ecosystem health. A decision was made to initiate the largest experimental river fertilization project to date in the Kootenai River at the Montana-Idaho border. Pre-treatment aquatic biomonitoring began in 2001; post-treatment monitoring began in 2005. A solar-powered nutrient addition system was custom designed and built to dose small releases of dissolved nutrients at rates from 10 to 40 L/hour, depending on river discharge, which averaged several hundred m3/s. Closely monitored experimental additions of ammonium polyphosphate solution (10-34-0) into the river occurred during the summers of 2005 through 2008. Targets for mixed in-river P concentrations were 1.5 {micro}g/L in 2005, and 3 {micro}g/L in subsequent years. Primary productivity and algal accrual rates along with invertebrate and fish community metrics and conditions were consistently measured annually, before and after experimental fertilization. Initial results from the program are very encouraging, and are reported.

Holderman, Charles

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

291

Evaluation of a Behavioral Guidance Structure at Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse including Passage Survival of Juvenile Salmon and Steelhead using Acoustic Telemetry, 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summarizes research conducted at Bonneville Dam in 2008 to evaluate a prototype Behavioral Guidance Structure, that was deployed by the US Army Corps of Engineers in an effort to increase survival of outmigrating smolts at Bonneville Dam.

Faber, Derrek M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Hughes, James S.; McComas, Roy L.; Kim, Jina; Townsend, R. L.; Fu, Tao; Skalski, J. R.; Fischer, Eric S.

2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

292

Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Spring 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at John Day Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at Bonneville Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Spring 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at John Day Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Compliance Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Spring 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study estimated dam passage survival at The Dalles Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and provided additional performance measures as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. This summary report focuses on spring run stocks, yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead.

Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

296

Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at Bonneville Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

297

SUMMARY OF USSD EMERGING ISSUES WHITE PAPER ON DAM SAFETY RISK ASSESSMENT: WHAT IS IT? WHO'S USING IT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUMMARY OF USSD EMERGING ISSUES WHITE PAPER ON DAM SAFETY RISK ASSESSMENT: WHAT IS IT? WHO'S USING White Paper on Dam Safety Risk Assessment. It also includes tables that summarize strengths and references that are summarized in the White Paper, technology transfer and training needs, and research

Bowles, David S.

298

Compliance Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at The Dales Dam, Spring 2011  

SciTech Connect

The study estimated dam passage survival at The Dalles Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and provided additional performance measures as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. This summary report focuses on spring run stocks, yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead.

Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 2001 through March 2002 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam.

Ward, David L.; Kern, J. Chris; Hughes, Michele L.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 2002 through March 2003 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam.

Ward, David L.; Kern, J. Chris; Hughes, Michele L. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Comparison of coupled and decoupled modal approaches in seismic analysis of concrete gravity dams in time domain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Different methods are available for dynamic analysis of concrete dams. Among these, modal approach is highly popular due to the efficiency of the method. This becomes more significant if the response is to be calculated for several earthquake ground ... Keywords: Concrete gravity dam, Coupled modes, Decoupled modal approach, Dynamic analysis

Ali Samii; Vahid Lotfi

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

White Sturgeon Mitigation & Restoration in the Columbia & Snake River Upstream from Bonneville Dam  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Summary: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to fund the White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam Project. The project proposes to continue to carry out harvest monitoring and stock status updates coordinated with fisheries management planning, annual young-of-the year recruitment indexing, research, experimental artificial propagation, and transport of white sturgeon to less densely populated areas of the river(s). Additionally, release of hatchery-reared juveniles is proposed to evaluate release

303

Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents survival, behavioral, and fish passage results for tagged yearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead as part of a survival study conducted at John Day Dam during spring 2011. This study was designed to evaluate the passage and survival of yearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead to assist managers in identifying dam operations for compliance testing as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords. Survival estimates were based on a paired-release survival model.

Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Kim, Jin A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Wagner, Katie A.; Fischer, Eric S.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Batten, G.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Elder, T.; Etherington, D. J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Miracle, Ann L.; Mitchell, T. D.; Prather, K.; Rayamajhi, Bishes; Royer, Ida; Seaburg, Adam; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

304

Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam, 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report presents survival, behavioral, and fish passage results for yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon smolts and juvenile steelhead tagged with JSATS acoustic micro-transmitters as part of a survival study conducted at John Day Dam during 2010. This study was designed to evaluate the passage and survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead to assist managers in identifying dam operations for compliance testing as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords. Survival estimates were based on a single-release survival estimate model.

Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Kim, Jin A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Fischer, Eric S.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Wagner, Katie A.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Miller, Benjamin L.; Miracle, Ann L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Royer, Ida M.; Khan, Fenton; Cushing, Aaron W.; Etherington, D. J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Elder, T.; Batton, George; Johnson, Gary E.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Survival and Passage of Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead at The Dalles Dam, 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The acoustic telemetry study reported here was conducted by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington (UW) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). The purpose of the study was to estimate dam passage survival and other performance measures for yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and steelhead at The Dalles Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) and 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Johnson, Gary E.; Skalski, J. R.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fischer, Eric S.; Hughes, James S.; Khan, Fenton; Kim, Jin A.; Townsend, Richard L.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Survival of Juvenile Chinook Salmon Passing the Bonneville Dam Spillway in 2007  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (CENWP) funds numerous evaluations of fish passage and survival on the Columbia River. In 2007, the CENWP asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to conduct an acoustic telemetry study to estimate the survival of juvenile Chinook salmon passing the spillway at Bonneville Dam. This report documents the study results which are intended to be used to improve the conditions juvenile anadromous fish experience when passing through the dams that the Corps operates on the river.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Durham, Robin E.; Fischer, Eric S.; Kim, Jina; Townsend, R. L.; Skalski, J. R.; Buchanan, Rebecca A.; McComas, Roy L.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Outfall Site and Type Selection for a New Surface Flow Outlet to Pass Juvenile Salmonids at Bonneville Dams Second Powerhouse, Columbia River  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A site near the downstream tip of Cascades Island with a mid-level chute outfall type was selected for the high flow (> 28.3 m3/s) outfall of the new surface flow outlet for juvenile salmonids at Bonneville Dams Second Powerhouse (B2). The new passage route and outfall are a result of modifications to the original ice and trash sluice chute to increase discharge capacity and improve passage conditions, including a new outfall type and site. Technical guidelines on high flow outfall location and design were established concurrently with the outfall development process. Critical design parameters for the new B2 outfall included discharge of 150 m3/s, jet entry velocities approaching 15.2 m/s, and a tailwater elevation range of 6.1 m. For outfall siting, the selection process began with identification of nine initial alternatives. Screening, evaluation, and selection stages narrowed the list to two outfall sites Range D 122 m directly downstream from the existing sluice chute outfall and Range F 760 m downstream near the end of Cascades Island. For outfall type, the selection process was initiated with conceptualization of 13 alternatives. Following successive screening, evaluation, consolidation, and selection stages, two outfall types became finalists Adjustable Cantilever and Mid-Level Cantilever. The four combinations of outfall site/type were evaluated in 1:30 and 1:100 scale physical hydraulic models and a Mid-Level Cantilever at the tip of Cascades Island in Range F was selected. During further engineering after our study, the cantilever was replaced with a monolith structure to reduce construction costs, resulting in a mid-level chute outfall that was installed in 2004. Post-construction evaluations indicated survival rates around 100% through the B2CC were the highest of all passage routes at Bonneville Dam. The B2CC surface flow outlet with its high flow outfall provided a major improvement to juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam.

Johnson, Gary E.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Giorgi, Albert E.; Kuhn, Karen; Lee, Randall T.; Plump, John H.; Stensby, David A.; Sweeney, Charles E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Compliance Monitoring of Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, 2012  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts at John Day Dam during the spring and summer outmigrations in 2012. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.96 for spring migrants and greater than or equal to 0.93 for summer migrants, estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal to 0.015. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam to the tailrace 3 km downstream of the dam, as well as the forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and fish passage efficiency (FPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords (Fish Accords). A virtual/paired-release design was used to estimate dam passage survival at John Day Dam. The approach included releases of smolts, tagged with acoustic micro-transmitters, above John Day Dam that contributed to the formation of a virtual release at the face of John Day Dam. A survival estimate from this release was adjusted by a paired release below John Day Dam. A total of 3376 yearling Chinook salmon, 5726 subyearling Chinook salmon, and 3239 steelhead smolts were used in the virtual releases. Sample sizes for the below-dam paired releases (R2 and R3, respectively) were 997 and 995 for yearling Chinook salmon smolts, 986 and 983 for subyearling Chinook salmon smolts, and 1000 and 1000 for steelhead smolts. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tags were manufactured by Advanced Telemetry Systems. Model SS300 tags, weighing 0.304 g in air, were surgically implanted in yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon, and Model SS130 tag, weighing 0.438 g in air, were surgically implanted in juvenile steelhead for this investigation. The intent of the spring study was to estimate dam passage survival during both 30% and 40% spill conditions. The two spill conditions were to be systematically performed in alternating 2-day test intervals over the course of the spring outmigration. High flow conditions in 2012 interrupted the spill study. Dam passage survival was therefore estimated season-wide regardless of spill conditions.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Finite element methods for unsaturated porous solids and their application to dam engineering problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work presents a finite element formulation of equations proposed in a companion paper to describe the hyperelastic response of three-phase porous media. Attention is paid to the development of consistent tangents required by the Newton-Raphson procedure ... Keywords: Concrete dams, Hydro-mechanical coupling, Multiphase porous media, Rock mass permeability, Unilateral constraints

C. Callari; A. Abati

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

THE VALUE OF THE HIGH ASWAN DAM TO THE EGYPTIAN ECONOMY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The High Aswan Dam converted a variable and uncertain flow of river water into a predictable and controllable flow. We use a computable general equilibrium model of the Egyptian economy to estimate the economic impact of the High Aswan Dam. We compare the 1997 economy as it was to the 1997 economy as it would have been for 72 historical, pre-dam water flows. The steady water flow increased transport productivity, while the seasonal shift in water supply allowed for a shift towards more valuable summer crops. These static effects are worth LE 4.9 billion. Investments in transport and agriculture increased as a consequence. Assuming that Egypt is a small open economy, this is worth another LE 1.1 billion. The risk premium on the reduced variability is estimated to be LE 1.1 billion for a modest risk aversion, and perhaps LE 4.4 billion for a high risk aversion. The total gain of LE 7.1 billion equals 2.7 % of GDP. Key words Egypt, High Aswan Dam, computable general equilibrium model, risk premium, water supply

Kenneth M. Strzepek A; Gary W. Yohe D; Richard S. J. Tol E; Mark Rosegrant B

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Guidelines for Drilling and Testing Core Samples at Concrete Gravity Dams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regulatory agencies for dam safety often require stability data on concrete and foundation conditions--data obtained by testing core samples and taking various site measurements. These guidelines offer field-proven methods for compiling reliable results, with adequate documentation to support utility claims.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Grand Coulee Dam Wildlife Mitigation Program : Pygmy Rabbit Programmatic Management Plan, Douglas County, Washington.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Council and the Bonneville Power Administration approved the pygmy rabbit project as partial mitigation for impacts caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The focus of this project is the protection and enhancement of shrub-steppe/pygmy rabbit habitat in northeastern Washington.

Ashley, Paul

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

A Theoretical Study of Cold Air Damming with Upstream Cold Air Inflow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The previously developed two-layer model of cold air damming is extended to include upstream cold air inflow. The upper layer is an isentropic cross-mountain flow. The lower layer is a cold boundary layer flow partially blocked by a two-...

Qin Xu; Shouting Gao; Brian H. Fiedler

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Spatial variability of sea level rise due to water impoundment behind dams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Church and White, 2006]. This rate may be currently accelerating due to an increased influence of climate reservoirs (based on the work by Vorosmarty et al. [1997]), which are used in this paper's calculations. (b 1a), and added six additional post1997 dams from Chao et al. [2008] (specifically, the Three Gorges

Conrad, Clint

315

Sedimentology of Pennsylvanian sandstone from bedding-plane exposures, Laurel dam spillway, eastern Kentucky Coalfield  

SciTech Connect

Exposures of bedding planes in a coarsening-upward sequence of the Breathitt Formation at the Laurel Dam spillway in Whitley County, Kentucky, were analyzed by surveying a 250,000-ft{sup 2} area on a 10-ft grid and mapping within grids.

Greb, S.F.; Chesnut, D.R. Jr. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Juvenile Radio-Tag Study: Lower Granite Dam, 1985 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concept of using mass releases of juvenile radio tags represents a new and potentially powerful research tool that could be effectively applied to juvenile salmonid passage problems at dams on the Columbia and Snake Rivers. A system of detector antennas, strategically located, would automatically detect and record individually tagged juvenile salmonids as they pass through the spillway, powerhouse, bypass system, or tailrace areas below the dam. Accurate measurements of spill effectiveness, fish guiding efficiency (FGE), collection efficiency (CE), spillway survival, powerhouse survival, and bypass survival would be possible without handling large numbers of unmarked fish. A prototype juvenile radio-tag system was developed and tested by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) at John Day Dam and at Lower Granite Dam. This report summarizes research to: (1) evaluate the effectiveness of the prototype juvenile radio-tag system in a field situation and (2) to test the basic assumptions inherent in using the juvenile radio tag as a research tool.

Stuehrenberg, Lowell C.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Effect of superficial insulation on roller-compacted concrete dams in cold regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Superficial insulation is often used to prevent cracking of concrete dams located in cold regions. In this study, surface temperatures with and without heat insulation during the overwintering period are calculated. Using the material properties of roller-compacted ... Keywords: Superficial crack, Superficial insulation, Temperature difference, Temperature field, Thermal stress, Three-dimensional finite element relocating mesh method

Xiao-fei Zhang; Shou-yi Li; Yan-long Li; Yao Ge; Hui Li

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Critical gravity as van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov discontinuity in anti de Sitter space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider critical gravity as van Dam-Vletman-Zakharov (vDVZ) discontinuity in anti de Sitter space. For this purpose, we introduce the higher curvature gravity. This discontinuity can be confirmed by calculating the residues of relevant poles explicitly. For the non-critical gravity of $0gravity.

Yun Soo Myung

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

319

AN ESTIMATE OF MORTALITY OF CHINOOK SALMON IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER NEAR BONNEVILLE DAM DURING THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al., 1983) Offset Center of Gravity (OCOG) (Bamber, 1994) Leading edge position = Position-7 km does not provide a complete picture of the vector field of ocean currents and gravity anomalies CHINA'S POYANG LAKE (2002­2007) Long Kou Gauge Pass 163 Pass 980 #12;Satellite Altimetry Based Dam

320

Uplift Pressures in Cracks in Concrete Gravity Dams--An Experimental Study: Volume 8  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uplift pressure distribution in cracks in concrete dams is affected by a combination of several factors, such as crack properties, drain dimensions, and the type of flow in the crack. This study shows that most uplift pressure distributions can be controlled using a vertical drain system with diameters from two to four inches and spacing of about ten feet.

1992-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "davis dam 230-kilovolt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Assessment of Natural Stream Sites for Hydroelectric Dams in the Pacific Northwest Region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This pilot study presents a methodology for modeling project characteristics using a development model of a stream obstructing dam. The model is applied to all individual stream reaches in hydrologic region 17, which encompasses nearly all of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. Project site characteristics produced by the modeling technique include: capacity potential, principal dam dimensions, number of required auxiliary dams, total extent of the constructed impoundment boundary, and the surface area of the resulting reservoir. Aggregated capacity potential values for the region are presented in capacity categories including total, that at existing dams, within federal and environmentally sensitive exclusion zones, and the balance which is consider available for greenfield development within the limits of the study. Distributions of site characteristics for small hydropower sites are presented and discussed. These sites are screened to identify candidate small hydropower sites and distributions of the site characteristics of this site population are presented and discussed. Recommendations are made for upgrading the methodology and extensions to make the results more accessible and available on a larger scale.

Douglas G. Hall; Kristin L. Verdin; Randy D. Lee

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Environmental assessment for the decommissioning and decontamination of contaminated facilities at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research University of California, Davis  

SciTech Connect

The Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) was established in 1958 at its present location by the Atomic Energy Commission. Research at LEHR originally focused on the health effects from chronic exposures to radionuclides, primarily strontium 90 and radium 226, using beagles to simulate radiation effects on humans. In 1988, pursuant to a memorandum of agreement between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the University of California, DOE`s Office of Energy Research decided to close out the research program, shut down LEHR, and turn the facilities and site over to the University of California, Davis (UCD) after remediation. The decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of LEHR will be managed by the San Francisco Operations Office (SF) under DOE`s Environmental Restoration Program. This environmental assessment (EA) addresses the D&D of four site buildings and a tank trailer, and the removal of the on-site cobalt 60 (Co-60) source. Future activities at the site will include D&D of the Imhoff building and the outdoor dog pens, and may include remediation of underground tanks, and the landfill and radioactive disposal trenches. The remaining buildings on the LEHR site are not contaminated. The environmental impacts of the future activities cannot be determined at this time because the extent of contamination has not yet been ascertained. The impacts of these future activities (including the cumulative impacts of the future activities and those addressed in this EA) will be addressed in future National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Survey of Potential Hanford Site Contaminants in the Upper Sediment for the Reservoirs at McNary, John Day, The Dalles, and Bonneville Dams, 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results from a multi-agency cooperative environmental surveillance study. of the study looked at sediment from the pools upstream from dams on the Columbia River that are downstream from Hanford Site operations. The radiological and chemical conditions existing in the upper-level sediment found in the pools upstream from McNary Dam, John Day Dam, The Dalles Lock and Dam, and Bonneville Dam were evaluated. This study also evaluated beach sediment where available. Water samples were collected at McNary Dam to further evaluate potential Hanford contaminants in the lower Columbia River. Samples were analyzed for radionuclides, chemicals, and physical parameters. Results from this study were compared to background values from sediment and water samples collect from the pool upstream of Priest Rapids Dam (upstream of the Hanford Site) by the Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project.

Patton, Gregory W.; Priddy, M; Yokel, Jerel W.; Delistraty, Damon A.; Stoops, Thomas M.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Kalispel Tribe of Indians Wildlife Mitigation and Restoration for Albeni Falls Dam: Flying Goose Ranch Phase I.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a recommendation from the Kalispel Tribe to the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) for wildlife habitat mitigation for the extensive habitat losses caused by Albeni Falls Dam on and near the Kalispel Indian Reservation.

Merker, Christopher

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Spring 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to compare dam passage survival, at two spill treatment levels, of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts at John Day Dam during spring 2010. The two treatments were 30% and 40% spill out of total project discharge. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.96 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal 0.015. The study also estimated forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. However, by agreement among the stakeholders, this study was not an official BiOp compliance test because the long-term passage measures at John Day Dam have yet to be finalized and another year of spill-treatment testing was desired.

Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Chemical Imaging Infrastructure Research Team: Carina Lansing, Zoe Guillen, Kerstin Kleese-van Dam, Shaun O'Leary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Imaging Infrastructure Research Team: Carina Lansing, Zoe Guillen, Kerstin Kleese-van Dam, Shaun O'Leary Purpose Support real-time analysis of single and multi-modal chemical imaging experiments

327

An Analysis of the Impact of a Split-Front Rainband on Appalachian Cold-Air Damming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Appalachian cold-air damming (CAD) is characterized by the development of a cool, stable air mass that is advected southwestward along the eastern slopes of the Appalachian Mountains by low-level ageostrophic flow. Operational forecasters have ...

Michael J. Brennan; Gary M. Lackmann; Steven E. Koch

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

The Feasibility of Using an Ultrasonic Fish Tracking System in the Tailrace of Lower Granite Dam in 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a study conducted by PNNL in Spring 2002 at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River for the US Army Corps of Engineers Portland District. Our goal was to determine the feasibility of using ultrasonic fish tracking in the untested environment of a hydroelectric dam tailrace. If fish tracking were determined to be feasible, we would track the movement of juvenile hatchery chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), juvenile hatchery steelhead (O. mykiss), and juvenile wild steelhead (O. mykiss) and relate their movement to dam operations. The majority of fish to be tracked were released as a part of a separate study conducted by the Biological Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey (BRD), which was investigating the movement of juvenile salmon in the forebay of Lower Granite Dam in relation to Removable Spillway Weir (RSW) testing. The two studies took place consecutively from April 14 to June 7, 2002.

Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Cash, Kenneth; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2003-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

329

Ground-water characterization field activities for 1995--1996 Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research, University of California, Davis  

SciTech Connect

This report documents ground-water characterization field activities completed from August to December 1995 and in January 1996 at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) in Davis, California. The ground water at LEHR is one of several operable units under investigation by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The purpose of this work was to further characterize the hydrogeology beneath the LEHR site, with the primary focus on ground water. The objectives were to estimate hydraulic properties for the two uppermost saturated hydrogeologic units (i.e., HSU-1 and HSU-2), and to determine distributions of contaminants of concern in these units. Activities undertaken to accomplish these objectives include well installation, geophysical logging, well development, ground-water sampling, slug testing, Westbay ground-water monitoring system installation, continuous water-level monitoring, Hydropunch installation, and surveying. Ground-water samples were collected from 61 Hydropunch locations. Analytical results from these locations and the wells indicate high chloroform concentrations trending from west/southwest to east/northeast in the lower portion of HSU-1 and in the upper and middle portions of HSU-2. The chloroform appears to originate near Landfill 2. Tritium was not found above the MCL in any of the well or Hydropunch samples. Hexavalent chromium was found at four locations with concentrations above the MCL in HSU-1 and at one location in HSU-2. One well in HSU-1 had a total chromium concentration above the MCL. Nitrate-nitrogen above the MCL was found at several Hydropunch locations in both HSU-1 and HSU-2.

Liikala, T.L.; Lanigan, D.C.; Last, G.V. [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Survival and Passage of Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead at McNary Dam, 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study was designed to evaluate the passage and survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead at McNary Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a virtual/paired-release model. This study supports the USACEs continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

Hughes, James S.; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Fischer, Eric S.; Batton, George; Carlson, Thomas J.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Deng, Zhiqun; Etherington, D. J.; Fu, Tao; Greiner, Michael J.; Ingraham, John M.; Kim, Jin A.; Li, Xi; Martinez, Jayson J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Rayamajhi, Bishes; Seaburg, Adam; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Wagner, Katie A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

331

MISCELLANEOUS PAPER S71-17 EARTHQUAKE RESISTANCE OF EARTH AND ROCK-FILL DAMS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

MISCELLANEOUS PAPER S71-17 MISCELLANEOUS PAPER S71-17 EARTHQUAKE RESISTANCE OF EARTH AND ROCK-FILL DAMS Report 2 ANALYSIS OF RESPONSE O F RIFLE.GAP D A M TO PROJECT RULISON UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATION bv J. E. Ahlberg, J. Fowler, L W. Heller ........ . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - . . - ...... *- , .... . . . - ->-w-J- * - : - . . June 1972 s~omsored by Office, Chief of Engineers, U. S. Army Conducted by U. S. A m y Engineer Waterways Experiment Station Soils and Pavements Laboratory Vicksburg, Mississippi APPROVED FOR WBLlC RELEASE: DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED L i s t o f Associated Reports Previous reports under Engineering Study 540 are: "A Comparative Summary o f Current Earth Dam Analysis Methods for Earthquake Response," issued by Office, Chief o f Engineers, a s Inclosure 1 to Engineer

332

MHK Projects/Lock and Dam No 2 Hydroelectric Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lock and Dam No 2 Hydroelectric Project Lock and Dam No 2 Hydroelectric Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.7486,"lon":-92.8048,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

333

Survival and Passage of Juvenile Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Passing Through Bonneville Dam, 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and subcontractors conducted an acoustic-telemetry study of juvenile salmonid fish passage and survival at Bonneville Dam in 2010. The study was conducted to assess the readiness of the monitoring system for official compliance studies under the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a single-release model. This also was the last year of evaluation of effects of a behavioral guidance device installed in the Powerhouse 2 forebay. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Kim, Jin A.; Royer, Ida M.; Batten, George W.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Etherington, D. J.; Faber, Derrek M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Fu, Tao; Hennen, Matthew J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Survival and Passage of Juvenile Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Passing through Bonneville Dam, 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and subcontractors conducted an acoustic-telemetry study of juvenile salmonid fish passage and survival at Bonneville Dam in 2010. The study was conducted to assess the readiness of the monitoring system for official compliance studies under the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a single-release model. This also was the last year of evaluation of effects of a behavioral guidance device installed in the Powerhouse 2 forebay. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Kim, Jin A.; Royer, Ida M.; Batten, George W.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Etherington, D. J.; Faber, Derrek M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Fu, Tao; Hennen, Matthew J.; Mitchell, Tyler; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Status and Habitat Requirements of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam, 1989-1990 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 1989 through March 1990 on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF), US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). Study objectives addressed by each agency are to describe the life history and population dynamics of subadults and adults between Bonneville and McNary dams and evaluate the need and identify potential methods for protecting, mitigating and enhancing populations downstream from McNary Dam, to describe the white sturgeon recreational fishery between Bonneville and McNary dams, describe reproductive and early life history characteristics downstream from Bonneville Dam and describe life history and population dynamics of subadults and adults downstream from Bonneville Dam, to describe reproduction and early life history characteristics, define habitat requirements for spawning and rearing and quantify extent of habitat available between Bonneville and McNary dams, and to describe reproduction and early life history characteristics, define habitat requirements for spawning and rearing and quantify extent of habitat available downstream from Bonneville Dam. Our approach is to work concurrently downstream and upstream from Bonneville Dam. Upstream from Bonneville Dam we began work in the Dalles Reservoir in 1987 and expanded efforts to Bonneville Reservoir in 1988 and John Day Reservoir in 1989. Highlights from this work is also included. 47 refs., 33 figs., 66 tabs.

Nigro, Anthony A. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Grand Coulee Dam Mitigation, 1996-1999 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) study was to determine baseline habitat units and to estimate future habitat units for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) mitigation projects on the Spokane Indian Reservation. The mitigation between BPA and the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI) is for wildlife habitat losses on account of the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the HEP survey data will assist in mitigation crediting and appropriate management of the mitigation lands.

Kieffer, B.; Singer, Kelly; Abrahamson, Twa-le

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Fish Passage Improvements at Three Mile Falls Diversion Dam, Umatilla River, Oregon, Final Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the results and conclusions from the biological assessment and outlines several alternative plans for solving fish passage problems at the dam. A recommended plan, based on consensus of the fisheries agencies and the tribes, is described, and the rationale for that decision is discussed. Data needs for final designs, a tentative construction schedule, and a discussion of operation and maintenance needs are presented.

Unknown Author

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the fourth year of a four-year study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) in the forebay to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. This work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes).

Johnson, Robert L.; Simmons, Mary Ann; McKinstry, Craig A.; Simmons, Carver S.; Cook, Chris B.; Brown, Richard S.; Tano, Daniel K.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Faber, Derrek M.; Lecaire, Richard; Francis, Stephen

2005-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

339

Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the third year of a four-year study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) in the forebay to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. This work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes).

Simmons, Mary Ann; Johnson, Robert L.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Simmons, Carver S.; Cook, Chris B.; Brown, Richard S.; Tano, Daniel K.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Faber, Derrek M.; Lecaire, Richard; Francis, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Seismic analysis of the Par Pond Dam: Study of slope failure and liquefaction. Technical evaluation report  

SciTech Connect

Stability concerns of the Par Pond Dam, an embankment structure in the Savannah River Site complex, resulted in a comprehensive evaluation of the state of its integrity. Specifically, excessive seepage through the embankment, slope failure due to an earthquake event as well as liquefaction potential of the embankment and the foundation are addressed and the potential of failure is evaluated. Lastly, remedial benefits of the addition of a berm structure are also assessed.

Simos, N.; Reich, M.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "davis dam 230-kilovolt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Scientific substantiation of safe operation of the Earthen Dams at the Votkinsk HPP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over a period of 15 years, coworkers of the B. E. Vedeneev Scientific-Research Institute of Hydraulic Engineering have conducted scientific accompaniment of the operation of the earthen dams at the Votkinsk HPP. During that time, basic performance characteristics associated with complex hydrogeologic and hydrochemical conditions, and the forms of their unfavorable manifestations influencing the reliability and safety of the structures were revealed, and, recommendations and measures were developed for their elimination.

Deev, A. P.; Fisenko, V. F. [Votkinsk HPP Branch of the JSC 'RusGidro,' Chaikovskii (Russian Federation); Sol'skii, S. V.; Lopatina, M. G.; Gints, A. V.; Aref'eva, A. N. [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva', Branch of JSC 'RusGidro' (Russian Federation)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Cultural-resource survey report: Hoover Dam Powerplant Modification Project II. Associated transmission-line facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) is proposing to modify or install additional transmission facilities between the Hoover Dam hydroelectric plant and the Western Area Power Authority substation near Boulder City, Nevada. Reclamation has completed cultural resource investigations to identify historic or prehistoric resources in the project area that might be affected during construction of the transmission line. Four possible transmission corridors approximately 50 feet wide and between 9.5 and 11.5 miles long were investigated. The proposed transmission lines either parallel or replace existing transmission lines. The corridors generally have undergone significant disturbance from past transmission line construction. A Class II sampling survey covering approximately 242 acres was conducted. Access or construction roads have not been identified and surveys of these areas will have to be completed in the future. No historic or prehistoric archeological sites were encountered within the four corridor right-of-ways. It is believed that the probability for prehistoric sites is very low. Four historic period sites were recorded that are outside, but near, the proposed corridor. These sites are not individually eligible for the National Register of Historic Places, but may be associated with the construction of Hoover Dam and contribute to a historic district or multiple property resource area focusing on the dam and its construction.

Queen, R.L.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Total Dissolved Gas Monitoring in Chum Salmon Spawning Gravels Below Bonneville Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the request of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Portland District), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted research to determine whether total dissolved gas concentrations are elevated in chum salmon redds during spring spill operations at Bonneville Dam. The study involved monitoring the total dissolved gas levels at egg pocket depth and in the river at two chum salmon spawning locations downstream from Bonneville Dam. Dissolved atmospheric gas supersaturation generated by spill from Bonneville Dam may diminish survival of chum (Oncorhynchus keta) salmon when sac fry are still present in the gravel downstream from Bonneville Dam. However, no previous work has been conducted to determine whether total dissolved gas (TDG) levels are elevated during spring spill operations within incubation habitats. The guidance used by hydropower system managers to provide protection for pre-emergent chum salmon fry has been to limit TDG to 105% after allowing for depth compensation. A previous literature review completed in early 2006 shows that TDG levels as low as 103% have been documented to cause mortality in sac fry. Our study measured TDG in the incubation environment to evaluate whether these levels were exceeded during spring spill operations. Total dissolved gas levels were measured within chum salmon spawning areas near Ives Island and Multnomah Falls on the Columbia River. Water quality sensors screened at egg pocket depth and to the river were installed at both sites. At each location, we also measured dissolved oxygen, temperature, specific conductance, and water depth to assist with the interpretation of TDG results. Total dissolved gas was depth-compensated to determine when levels were high enough to potentially affect sac fry. This report provides detailed descriptions of the two study sites downstream of Bonneville Dam, as well as the equipment and procedures employed to monitor the TDG levels at the study sites. Results of the monitoring at both sites are then presented in both text and graphics. The findings and recommendations for further research are discussed, followed by a listing of the references cited in the report.

Arntzen, Evan V.; Geist, David R.; Panther, Jennifer L.; Dawley, Earl

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

344

UC DAVIS ARBORETUM Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lee Gross Judah Grossman Julie Grossman Mark Grote Ken & Lou Grubaugh Alice B. Gruenwedel Lisa Guillen

Hammock, Bruce D.

345

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam Sluiceway, 2005  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District engaged the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate fish passage at The Dalles Dam powerhouse in 2005. The goal of the study was to provide information on smolt passage that will inform decisions on long-term measures and operations to enhance sluiceway passage and reduce turbine passage to improve smolt survival at the dam. The study addressed one of the main programs dedicated to improving juvenile salmonid survival at The Dalles Dam: Surface Flow Bypass. The study objectives (see below) were met using a combination of hydroacoustic and hydraulic data. The study incorporated fixed-location hydroacoustic methods across the entire powerhouse, with especially intense sampling using multiple split-beam transducers at all sluiceway portals. We did not sample fish passage at the spillway in 2005. In the sluiceway nearfield, we used an acoustic camera to track fish movements. The fish data were interpreted with hydraulic data from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Fish passage data were collected in the framework of an experiment using a randomized block design (3-day treatments; two treatments) to compare two sluiceway operational configurations: Sluice 2+5 and Sluice 2+19 (six gates open for each configuration). Total project outflow was 76% of the 10-year average for spring and 71% of the 10-year average for summer. Based on these findings, we make the following recommendations: 1) The sluice should be operated 24 h/d from April until November. 2) Open six rather than three sluice gates to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway. 3) Open the three gates above the western-most operating main turbine unit and the three gates at MU 8 where turbine passage rates are relatively high. 4) Operate the turbine units below open sluice gates as a standard fish operations procedure. 5) Develop hydraulic and entrance enhancements to the sluiceway to tap the potential of The Dalles Dam sluiceway to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. 6) Consider the following elements for surface flow bypasses during design of any sluiceway enhancements at The Dalles Dam: Form an extensive surface flow bypass flow net (surface bypass discharge greater than ~7% of total project discharge) at both west and east ends of the dam; Create a gradual increase in water velocity approaching the surface flow bypass (ideally, acceleration < 1 m/s per meter); Make water velocities at an entrance high enough (> 3 m/s) to entrain the subject juvenile fishes, e.g., 10,000 cfs or so; Adapt the shape and orientation of the surface entrance(s) to fit site-specific features, i.e., test a Removable Sluiceway Weir. 7)The Dalles Dam sluiceway has potential to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. We recommend tapping this potential with enhancements to the sluiceway.

Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Hedgepeth, J; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Skalski, John R.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam Sluiceway, 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District engaged the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate fish passage at The Dalles Dam powerhouse in 2005. The goal of the study was to provide information on smolt passage that will inform decisions on long-term measures and operations to enhance sluiceway passage and reduce turbine passage to improve smolt survival at the dam. The study addressed one of the main programs dedicated to improving juvenile salmonid survival at The Dalles Dam: Surface Flow Bypass. The study objectives (see below) were met using a combination of hydroacoustic and hydraulic data. The study incorporated fixed-location hydroacoustic methods across the entire powerhouse, with especially intense sampling using multiple split-beam transducers at all sluiceway portals. We did not sample fish passage at the spillway in 2005. In the sluiceway nearfield, we used an acoustic camera to track fish movements. The fish data were interpreted with hydraulic data from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Fish passage data were collected in the framework of an experiment using a randomized block design (3-day treatments; two treatments) to compare two sluiceway operational configurations: Sluice 2+5 and Sluice 2+19 (six gates open for each configuration). Total project outflow was 76% of the 10-year average for spring and 71% of the 10-year average for summer. Based on these findings, we make the following recommendations: 1) The sluice should be operated 24 h/d from April until November. 2) Open six rather than three sluice gates to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway. 3) Open the three gates above the western-most operating main turbine unit and the three gates at MU 8 where turbine passage rates are relatively high. 4) Operate the turbine units below open sluice gates as a standard fish operations procedure. 5) Develop hydraulic and entrance enhancements to the sluiceway to tap the potential of The Dalles Dam sluiceway to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. 6) Consider the following elements for surface flow bypasses during design of any sluiceway enhancements at The Dalles Dam: Form an extensive surface flow bypass flow net (surface bypass discharge greater than ~7% of total project discharge) at both west and east ends of the dam; Create a gradual increase in water velocity approaching the surface flow bypass (ideally, acceleration 3 m/s) to entrain the subject juvenile fishes, e.g., 10,000 cfs or so; Adapt the shape and orientation of the surface entrance(s) to fit site-specific features, i.e., test a Removable Sluiceway Weir. 7)The Dalles Dam sluiceway has potential to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. We recommend tapping this potential with enhancements to the sluiceway.

Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Hedgepeth, J; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Skalski, John R.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Distribution at Lookout Point Dam, 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at Lookout Point Dam (LOP) on the Middle Fork Willamette River. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). The goal of the study was to provide fish passage and distribution data to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance downstream passage at LOP and others dams in USACEs Willamette Valley Project in response to the listing of Upper Willamette River Spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Upper Willamette River steelhead (O. mykiss) as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. During the year-long study period - February 1, 2010 to January 31, 2011the objectives of the hydroacoustic evaluation of fish passage and distribution at LOP were to: 1. Estimate passage rates, run timing, horizontal distribution, and diel distribution at turbine penstock intakes for smolt-size fish. 2. Estimate passage rates, run timing and diel distribution at turbine penstock intakes for small-size fish. 3. Estimate passage rates and run timing at the regulating outlets for smolt-size fish. 4. Estimate vertical distribution of smolt-size fish in the forebay near the upstream face of the dam. The fixed-location hydroacoustic technique was used to accomplish the objectives of this study. Transducers (420 kHz) were deployed in each penstock intake, above each RO entrance, and on the dam face; a total of nine transducers (2 single-beam and 7 split-beam) were used. We summarize the findings from the hydroacoustic evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at LOP during February 2010 through January 2011 as follows. Fish passage rates for smolt-size fish (> ~90 mm) were highest during December-January and lowest in mid-summer through early fall. During the entire study period, an estimated total of 142,463 fish 4,444 (95% confidence interval) smolt-size fish passed through turbine penstock intakes. Diel periodicity of smolt-size fish showing crepuscular peaks was evident in fish passage into turbine penstock intakes. Run timing for small-size fish (~65-90 mm) peaked (702 fish) on December 18. Downstream passage of small-size juvenile fish was variable, occurring on two days in the spring, eight days in the summer, and at times throughout late fall and winter. A total of 7,017 690 small-size fish passed through the turbine penstock intakes during the study period. Relatively few fish passed into the ROs when they were open in summer (2 fish/d) and winter (8 fish/d). Fish were surface-oriented with 62-80% above 10 m deep. The highest percentage of fish (30-60%) was in the 5-10 m depth bin. We draw the following conclusions from the study. The non-obtrusive hydroacoustic data from this study are reliable because passage estimates and patterns were similar with those observed in the direct capture data from the tailrace screw trap and were consistent with distribution patterns observed in other studies of juvenile salmonid passage at dams. Fish passage at LOP was apparently affected but not dominated by dam operations and reservoir elevation. The surface-oriented vertical distribution of fish we observed supports development of surface passage or collector devices. In summary, the high-resolution spatially and temporally data reported herein provide detailed estimates of vertical, horizontal, diel, daily, and seasonal passage and distributions at LOP during March 2010 through January 2011. This information is applicable to management decisions on design and development of surface passage and collections devices to help restore Chinook salmon populations in the Middle Fork Willamette River watershed above Lookout Point Dam.

Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Trott, Donna M.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Synthesis of Sensor Fish Data for Assessment of Fish Passage Conditions at Turbines, Spillways, and Bypass Facilities Phase 1: The Dalles Dam Spillway Case Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the characterization of spillway passage conditions at The Dalles Dam in 2006 and the effort to complete a comprehensive database for data sets from The Dalles Dam spillway Sensor Fish and balloon-tagged live fish experiments. Through The Dalles Dam spillway case study, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers evaluated the database as an efficient means for accessing and retrieving system-wide data for the U.S Army Corps of Engineers (USACE).

Deng, Zhiqun; Serkowski, John A.; Fu, Tao; Carlson, Thomas J.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

349

Light-Emitting Tag Testing in Conjunction with Testing of the Minimum Gap Runner Turbine Design at Bonneville Dam Powerhouse 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a pilot study conducted by Tom Carlson of PNNL and Mark Weiland of MEVATEC Corp to test the feasibility of using light-emitting tags to visually track objects passing through the turbine environment of a hydroelectric dam. Light sticks were released at the blade tip, mid-blade, and hub in the MGR turbine and a Kaplan turbine at Bonneville Dam and videotaped passing thru the dam to determine visibility and object trajectories.

Carlson, Thomas J

2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

350

Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam with Emphasis on the Prototype Surface Flow Outlet, 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main purpose of the study was to evaluate the performance of Top Spill Weirs installed at two spillbays at John Day Dam and evaluate the effectiveness of these surface flow outlets at attracting juvenile salmon away from the powerhouse and reducing turbine passage. The Juvenile Salmonid Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was used to estimate survival of juvenile salmonids passing the dam and also for calculating performance metrics used to evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of the dam at passing juvenile salmonids.

Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Monter, Tyrell J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Faber, Derrek M.; Durham, Robin E.; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.; Kim, Jina; Fischer, Eric S.; Meyer, Matthew M.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through the Fish Weir and Turbine Unit 1 at Foster Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2012  

SciTech Connect

This report documents investigations of downstream fish passage research involving a spillway fish weir and turbine passage conditions at Foster Dam in May 2012.

Duncan, Joanne P.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Outfall Site and Type Selection for a New Surface Flow Outlet to Pass Juvenile Fish at Bonneville Dams Second Powerhouse, Columbia River  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A site near the downstream tip of Cascades Island and a mid-level cantilever outfall type were selected for the high flow outfall of the new surface flow juvenile fish bypass at Bonneville Dams Second Powerhouse. The new bypass will be a modification of the existing ice and trash sluice chute, which discharges into the tailrace with jet impact on the bottom near a shoreline that predators inhabit. Thus, a new site and type are necessary for this high flow (> 28.3 m3/s) outfall. Technical guidelines on high flow outfall location and design were established and applied during the outfall development process. Critical design parameters included discharge at 150 m3/s, entry velocities approaching 15.2 m/s, and tailwater elevation range of 6.1 m. For outfall siting, the selection process began with identification of nine initial alternatives. Screening, evaluation, and selection stages narrowed the list to two sites Range D 121.9 m straight downstream from the existing outfall and Range F 760 m downstream near the tip of Cascades Island. For outfall type, the selection process was initiated with conceptualization of 13 alternatives. During successive screening, evaluation, consolidation, and selection stages, professional judgment and quantitative comparisons were used to select two finalists Adjustable Cantilever and Mid-Level Cantilever. The four combinations of outfall site/type were evaluated in 1:30 and 1:100 scale physical hydraulic models. The process resulted in selection of a mid-level cantilever with plunge pool at the tip of Cascades Island. The system is scheduled for completion in March 2004.

Johnson, Gary E.; Ebberts, Blaine; Giorgi, Albert E.; Kuhn, Karen; Lee, Randy; Plump, John H.; Stensby, David A.; Sweeney, Charles E.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Reducing the Impacts of Hydroelectric Dams on Juvenile Anadromous Fishes: Bioengineering Evaluations Using Acoustic Imaging in the Columbia River, USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dams impact the survival of juvenile anadromous fishes by obstructing migration corridors, lowering water quality, delaying migrations, and entraining fish in turbine discharge. To reduce these impacts, structural and operational modifications to dams such as voluntary spill discharge, turbine intake guidance screens, and surface flow outletsare instituted. Over the last six years, we have used acoustic imaging technology to evaluate the effects of these modifications on fish behavior, passage rates, entrainment zones, and fish/flow relationships at hydroelectric projects on the Columbia River. The imaging technique has evolved from studies documenting simple movement patterns to automated tracking of images to merging and analysis with concurrent hydraulic data. This chapter chronicles this evolution and shows how the information gleaned from the scientific evaluations has been applied to improve passage conditions for juvenile salmonids. We present data from Bonneville and The Dalles dams that document fish behavior and entrainment zones at sluiceway outlets (14 to 142 m3/s), fish passage rates through a gap at a turbine intake screen, and the relationship between fish swimming effort and hydraulic conditions. Dam operators and fisheries managers have applied these data to support decisions on operational and structural changes to the dams for the benefit of anadromous fish populations in the Columbia River basin.

Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hedgepeth, J.; Khan, Fenton; Mueller, Robert P.; Nagy, William T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Weiland, Mark A.

2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

354

Potential hydroelectric power. Vertical turbine: spillway combine Broadwater Dam. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A feasibility study was made of the hydroelectric power potential at Broadwater Dam in western Montana. Two alternative configurations for the potential project were evaluated and the economics of four possible sources of project funding were assessed. The configurations analyzed were an apron-mounted configuration, in which the turbine-generator units are located on the downstream apron of the existing dam, and a conventional configuration, in which the units are located in a new powerhouse adjacent to the existing dam. The funding sources considered were the Department of Energy loan program, the United States Bureau of Reclamation PL-984 loan program and conventional revenue bonds, both taxable and tax-exempt. The optimal project alternative was determined to be the apron-mounted configuration. The final choice of funding would be dependent on the power purchaser. It was shown that, regardless of the configuraton or funding source selected, the project would be feasible. The cost of the apron-mounted configuration, which would consist of four turbine-generator units for a total installed capacity of 9.76 MW, was estimated as $13,250,000 with financing provided by either a PL-984 loan or tax-exempt bonds. The cost per installed kilowatt was therefore $1,350, and the cost per kilowatt-hour was 19.6 mills. The average annual energy was estimated to be 56.44 million kWh, the equivalent of approximately 87,000 barrels of oil per y. It is therefore recommended that the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation proceed with the project and that discussions be initiated with potential power purchasers as soon as possible.

Willer, D.C.

1979-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

355

Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries...'' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May, 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to redevelop fisheries and fisheries habitat in basin streams and lakes.

Dunnigan, James L.; Marotz, Brian L.; DeShazer, Jay (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating for damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan. Montana FWP uses a combination of diverse techniques to collect a variety of physical and biological data within the Kootenai River Basin. These data serve several purposes including: the development and refinement of models used in management of water resources and operation of Libby Dam; investigations into the limiting factors of native fish populations, gathering basic life history information, tracking trends in endangered, threatened species, and the assessment of restoration or management activities intended to restore native fishes and their habitats.

Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, Jay; Garrow, Larry (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam in 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District engaged the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate juvenile salmon passage at The Dalles Dam in 2004 to inform decisions about long-term measures and operations to enhance sluiceway and spill passage and reduce turbine passage to improve smolt survival at the dam. PNNL used fixed-location hydroacoustic sampling across the entire project, especially at the sluiceway and spillway, using multiple split-beam transducers at selected locations. At the sluiceway nearfield, we used an acoustic camera to track fish. The fish data were interpreted and integrated with hydraulic data from a CFD model and in-field ADCP measurements. Two sluiceway operations were compared: West only (SL 1) vs. West+East (SL 1 + SL 18). Based on our findings, we concluded that The Dalles Dam sluiceway has the potential to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. This potential could be tapped with hydraulic and entrance enhancements to the sluiceway. We recommended the following: (1) six rather than three sluice gates should be opened to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway. (2) The turbine units below open sluice gates should be operated as a standard fish operations procedure. (3) In 2005, the Corps and fisheries agencies should consider operating sluice gates in one or more of the following combinations of six gates: (a) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 18-1, 18-2, 18-3 (repeat 2004 operation), (b) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 11-1, 11-2, 11-3, or (c) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 2-1, 2-2, 2-3. The following elements for surface flow bypasses which should be considered during design of any sluiceway enhancements at The Dalles Dam: (1) form an extensive surface flow bypass flow net (surface bypass discharge greater than {approx}7% of total project discharge), (2) create a gradual increase in water velocity approaching the surface flow bypass (ideally, acceleration < 1 m/s/m), (3) make water velocities at an entrance high enough (> 3 m/s) to entrain the subject juvenile fishes, (4) adapt the shape and orientation of the surface entrance(s) to fit site-specific features, and (5) consider installing a forebay wall to increase fish availability to the surface flow bypass.

Johnson, Gary E.; Hanks, Michael E.; Khan, Fenton; Cook, Chris B.; Hedgepeth, J; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Serkowski, John A.; Skalski, John R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam in 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District engaged the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate juvenile salmon passage at The Dalles Dam in 2004 to inform decisions about long-term measures and operations to enhance sluiceway and spill passage and reduce turbine passage to improve smolt survival at the dam. PNNL used fixed-location hydroacoustic sampling across the entire project, especially at the sluiceway and spillway, using multiple split-beam transducers at selected locations. At the sluiceway nearfield, we used an acoustic camera to track fish. The fish data were interpreted and integrated with hydraulic data from a CFD model and in-field ADCP measurements. Two sluiceway operations were compared: West only (SL 1) vs. West+East (SL 1 + SL 18). Based on our findings, we concluded that The Dalles Dam sluiceway has the potential to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. This potential could be tapped with hydraulic and entrance enhancements to the sluiceway. We recommended the following: (1) six rather than three sluice gates should be opened to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway. (2) The turbine units below open sluice gates should be operated as a standard fish operations procedure. (3) In 2005, the Corps and fisheries agencies should consider operating sluice gates in one or more of the following combinations of six gates: (a) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 18-1, 18-2, 18-3 (repeat 2004 operation), (b) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 11-1, 11-2, 11-3, or (c) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 2-1, 2-2, 2-3. The following elements for surface flow bypasses which should be considered during design of any sluiceway enhancements at The Dalles Dam: (1) form an extensive surface flow bypass flow net (surface bypass discharge greater than {approx}7% of total project discharge), (2) create a gradual increase in water velocity approaching the surface flow bypass (ideally, acceleration 3 m/s) to entrain the subject juvenile fishes, (4) adapt the shape and orientation of the surface entrance(s) to fit site-specific features, and (5) consider installing a forebay wall to increase fish availability to the surface flow bypass.

Johnson, Gary E.; Hanks, Michael E.; Khan, Fenton; Cook, Chris B.; Hedgepeth, J; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Serkowski, John A.; Skalski, John R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Survival Rates of Juvenile Salmonids Passing Through the Bonneville Dam and Spillway in 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a 2008 acoustic telemetry survival study conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The study estimated the survival of juvenile Chinook salmon and steelhead passing Bonneville Dam (BON) and its spillway. Of particular interest was the relative survival of smolts detected passing through end spill bays 1-3 and 16-18, which had deep flow deflectors immediately downstream of spill gates, versus survival of smolts passing middle spill bays 4-15, which had shallow flow deflectors.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Faber, Derrek M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Johnson, Gary E.; Hughes, James S.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Durham, Robin E.; Townsend, R. L.; Skalski, J. R.; Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Kim, Jina; Fischer, Eric S.; Meyer, Matthew M.; McComas, Roy L.; Everett, Jason

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

360

Simulation analysis of within-day flow fluctuation effects on trout below flaming Gorge Dam.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In addition to being renewable, hydropower has the advantage of allowing rapid load-following, in that the generation rate can easily be varied within a day to match the demand for power. However, the flow fluctuations that result from load-following can be controversial, in part because they may affect downstream fish populations. At Flaming Gorge Dam, located on the Green River in northeastern Utah, concern has been raised about whether flow fluctuations caused by the dam disrupt feeding at a tailwater trout fishery, as fish move in response to flow changes and as the flow changes alter the amount or timing of the invertebrate drift that trout feed on. Western Area Power Administration (Western), which controls power production on submonthly time scales, has made several operational changes to address concerns about flow fluctuation effects on fisheries. These changes include reducing the number of daily flow peaks from two to one and operating within a restricted range of flows. These changes significantly reduce the value of the power produced at Flaming Gorge Dam and put higher load-following pressure on other power plants. Consequently, Western has great interest in understanding what benefits these restrictions provide to the fishery and whether adjusting the restrictions could provide a better tradeoff between power and non-power concerns. Directly evaluating the effects of flow fluctuations on fish populations is unfortunately difficult. Effects are expected to be relatively small, so tightly controlled experiments with large sample sizes and long study durations would be needed to evaluate them. Such experiments would be extremely expensive and would be subject to the confounding effects of uncontrollable variations in factors such as runoff and weather. Computer simulation using individual-based models (IBMs) is an alternative study approach for ecological problems that are not amenable to analysis using field studies alone. An IBM simulates how a population responds to environmental changes by representing how the population's individuals interact with their environment and each other. IBMs represent key characteristics of both individual organisms (trout, in this case) and the environment, thus allowing controlled simulation experiments to analyze the effects of changes in the key variables. For the flow fluctuation problem at Flaming Gorge Dam, the key environmental variables are flow rates and invertebrate drift concentrations, and the most important processes involve how trout adapt to changes (over space and time) in growth potential and mortality risk. This report documents simulation analyses of flow fluctuation effects on trout populations. The analyses were conducted in a highly controlled fashion: an IBM was used to predict production (survival and growth) of trout populations under a variety of scenarios that differ only in the level or type of flow fluctuation.

Railsback, S. F.; Hayse, J. W.; LaGory, K. E.; Environmental Science Division; EPRI

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Impacts of Post-Dam Land-use/Land-Cover Changes on Modification of Extreme Precipitation in Contrasting Hydro-climate and Terrain Features  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the impact of post-dam climate feedbacks, due to land-use/land-cover (LULC)variability, on modification of extreme precipitation (EP) remains a challenge for a 21st century approach to dam design and operation. In this study, we used ...

Abel T. Woldemichael; Faisal Hossain; Roger Pielke Sr.

362

Quantification of Libby Reservoir Levels Needed to Maintain or Enhance Reservoir Fisheries, 1990-1994 Investigations of Fish Entrainment Through Libby Dam.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We investigated fish entrainment through Libby Dam from December 1990 to June 1994. This study was one portion of the effort by the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks to quantify Libby Dam operations necessary to maintain or enhance Libby Reservoir fisheries.

Skaar, Don

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Columbia River Salmonid Outmigration: McNary Dam Passage and Enhanced Smolt Quality, 1984 Second Year Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of the McNary Dam transportation system on emigrating fall and spring chinook smolts were evaluated using physiological indices of stress (e.g., plasma cortisol, hepatic glycogen, leucocrit, interrenal cell nuclear diameter) and performance tests (e.g., saltwater challenge, secondary stress challenge, disease resistance). Controlled experiments were conducted in a hatchery environment to characterize the fishes' physiological responses to stress, and disease resistance to allow a basis for judging the nature of the stress experienced by smolts at McNary Dam. 55 figs., 3 tabs.

Schreck, Carl B.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Juvenile Salmonids through Snake River Dams and Reservoirs, 1994 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1994, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the second year of a multi-year study to estimate survival of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) passing through the dams and reservoirs of the Snake River. Actively migrating smolts were collected at selected locations above, at, and below Lower Granite Dam, tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags, and released to continue their downstream migration. Survival estimates were calculated using the Single-Release, Modified Single-Release, and Paired-Release Models.

Muir, William D.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 2004 through March 2005 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported.

Rien, Thomas A.; Hughes, Michele L.; Kern, J. Chris (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

White Sturgeon Mitgation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 2003 through March 2004 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported.

Rein, Thomas A.; Hughes, Michele L.; Kern, J. Chris (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Water Velocity Measurements on a Vertical Barrier Screen at the Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fish screens at hydroelectric dams help to protect rearing and migrating fish by preventing them from passing through the turbines and directing them towards the bypass channels by providing a sweeping flow parallel to the screen. However, fish screens may actually be harmful to fish if they become impinged on the surface of the screen or become disoriented due to poor flow conditions near the screen. Recent modifications to the vertical barrier screens (VBS) at the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse (B2) intended to increase the guidance of juvenile salmonids into the juvenile bypass system (JBS) have resulted in high mortality and descaling rates of hatchery subyearling Chinook salmon during the 2008 juvenile salmonid passage season. To investigate the potential cause of the high mortality and descaling rates, an in situ water velocity measurement study was conducted using acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADV) in the gatewell slot at Units 12A and 14A of B2. From the measurements collected the average approach velocity, sweep velocity, and the root mean square (RMS) value of the velocity fluctuations were calculated. The approach velocities measured across the face of the VBS varied but were mostly less than 0.3 m/s. The sweep velocities also showed large variances across the face of the VBS with most measurements being less than 1.5 m/s. This study revealed that the approach velocities exceeded criteria recommended by NOAA Fisheries and Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife intended to improve fish passage conditions.

Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Yuan, Yong

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

368

Prediction of Total Dissolved Gas (TDG) at Hydropower Dams throughout the Columbia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The network of dams throughout the Columbia River Basin (CRB) are managed for irrigation, hydropower production, flood control, navigation, and fish passage that frequently result in both voluntary and involuntary spillway releases. The entrainment of air in spillway releases and the subsequent exchange of atmospheric gasses into solution during passage through the stilling basin cause elevated levels of total dissolved gas (TDG) saturation. Physical processes that affect TDG exchange at hydropower facilities have been characterized throughout the CRB in site-specific studies and at real-time water quality monitoring stations. These data have been used to develop predictive models of TDG exchange which are site specific and account for the fate of spillway and powerhouse flows in the tailrace channel and resultant transport and exchange in route to the downstream dam. Currently, there exists a need to summarize the findings from operational and structural TDG abatement programs conducted throughout the CRB and for the development of a generalized prediction model that pools data collected at multiple projects with similar structural attributes. A generalized TDG exchange model can be tuned to specific projects and coupled with water regulation models to allow for the formulation of optimal water regulation schedules subject to water quality constraints for TDG supersaturation. It is proposed to develop a methodology for predicting TDG levels downstream of hydropower facilities with similar structural properties as a function of a set of variables that affect TDG exchange; such as tailwater depth, spill discharge and pattern, project head, and entrainment of powerhouse releases.

Pasha, MD Fayzul K [ORNL; Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL; Stewart, Kevin M [ORNL; Bender, Merlynn [Bureau of Reclamation; Schneider, Michael L. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

CX-010427: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

which is located within PacifiCorp's McNary-Wallula 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line right-of-way (ROW). CX-010427.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-010425: Categorical...

370

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

roads and right-of-way (ROW) along the Curecanti-Lost Canyon (CCI-LCN) 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line at structures 02 to 13, 32, 81, 86, 96 to 97, 122 to 142, 155,...

371

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Download CX-007993: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hatwai 230-Kilovolt Substation Breaker Replacement CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 02092012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s):...

372

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestme...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2010 CX-003792: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replacement of Overhead Ground Wire - Fairview-Rogue Number 1 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09...

373

EIS-0496: San Luis Transmission Project, Alameda, Merced, San...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

proposes at a minimum to construct, own, operate, and maintain a new 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line about 62 miles in length between Western's Tracy Substation and...

374

EIS-0414: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Energia Sierra Juarez U.S. Transmission Line Project, Construction, Operation, Maintenance, and Connection of either 230-kilovolt or a 500-kilovolt Electric Transmission Line Crossing U.S.-Mexico Border

375

CX-008704: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Grand Coulee-Bell No. 3 Double Circuit 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line Reconductoring Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/31/2012 Location(s): Washington, Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

376

CX-009408: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Curecanti-Lost Canyon 230 Kilovolt Access Roads and Western Area Power Administration Right-of-Way CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05222012 Location(s): Colorado, Colorado,...

377

Libby Mitigation Program, 2007 Annual Progress Report: Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to 'protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to restore the fisheries and fish habitat in basin streams and lakes. 'Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan.

Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, J.; Garrow, L.

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

378

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Distribution at Detroit Dam, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at Detroit Dam (DET) on the North Santiam River, Oregon for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to provide data to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance downstream passage at DET and others dams in USACEs Willamette Valley Project. This study was conducted in response to regulatory requirements necessitated by the listing of Upper Willamette River Spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Upper Willamette River steelhead (O. mykiss) as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. The goal of the study was to provide information of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at DET from February 2011 through February 2012. The results of the hydroacoustic study provide new and, in some cases, first-ever data on passage estimates, run timing, distributions, and relationships between fish passage and environmental variables at the dam. This information will inform management decisions on the design and development of surface passage and collection devices to help restore Chinook salmon populations in the North Santiam River watershed above DET. During the entire study period, an estimated total of 182,526 smolt-size fish (4,660 fish, 95% CI) passed through turbine penstock intakes. Run timing peaked in winter and early spring months. Passage rates were highest during late fall, winter and early spring months and low during summer. Horizontal distribution for hours when both turbine units were operated simultaneously indicated Unit 2 passed almost twice as much fish as Unit 1. Diel distribution for smolt-size fish during the study period was fairly uniform, indicating fish were passing the turbines at all times of the day. A total of 5,083 smolt-size fish ( 312 fish, 95% CI) were estimated passed via the spillway when it was open between June 23 and September 27, 2011. Daily passage was low at the spillway during the June-August period, and increased somewhat in September 2011. When the spillway was operated simultaneously with the turbines, spillway efficiency (efficiency is estimated as spillway passage divided by total project passage) was 0.72 and effectiveness (fish:flow ratioproportion fish passage at a route (e.g., spillway) divided by proportion water through that route out of the total project) was 2.69. That is, when the spillway was open, 72% of the fish passing the dam used the spillway and 28% passed into the turbine penstocks. Diel distribution for smolt-size fish at the spillway shows a distinct peak in passage between mid-morning and mid-afternoon and low passage at night. We estimated that 23,339 smolt-size fish ( 572 fish, 95% CI) passed via the Regulating Outlet (RO) when it was open from October 29 through November 12, 2011, January 2-6, and January 20 through February 3, 2012. During the OctoberNovember period, RO passage peaked at 1,086 fish on November 5, with a second peak on November 7 (1,075 fish). When the RO was operated simultaneously with the turbines, RO efficiency was 0.33 and effectiveness was 0.89. In multiple regression analyses, a relatively parsimonious model was selected that predicted the observed fish passage data well. The best model included forebay temperature at depth, forebay elevation, total discharge, hours of daylight, and the operation period. The vertical distribution of fish in the forebay near the face of the dam where the transducers sampled showed fish were generally distributed throughout the water column during all four operational periods. During the refill and full pool periods, vertical distribution was bi-modal with surface-layer and mid-water modes. Patterns for day and night distributions were variable. Fish were distributed above and below the thermocline when it was present (full pool and drawdown periods).

Khan, Fenton; Royer, Ida M.; Johnson, Gary E.; Ham, Kenneth D.

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Evaluation of Fall Chinook and Chum Salmon Spawning below Bonneville, The Dalles, John Day and McNary Dams; 1999-2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) from 1 October 1999 to 30 September 2000. The work is part of studies to evaluate spawning of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and chum salmon (O. keta) below the four lowermost Columbia River dams under the Bonneville Power Administration's Project 99-003. The purpose of this project is twofold: (1) Document the existence of fall chinook and chum populations spawning below Bonneville Dam (river mile (RM) 145), The Dalles Dam (RM 192), John Day Dam (RM 216), and McNary Dam (RM 292) (Figure 1) and estimate the size of these populations; and (2) Profile stocks for important population characteristics; including spawning time, genetic make-up, emergence timing, migration size and timing, and juvenile to adult survival rates.

van der Naald, Wayne; Spellman, Bryant; Clark, Roy (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Effects of hydropower operations on recreational use and nonuse values at Glen Canyon and Flaming Gorge Dams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increases in streamflows are generally positively related to the use values of angling and white-water boating, and constant flows tend to increase the use values more than fluctuating flows. In most instances, however, increases in streamflows beyond some threshold level cause the use values to decrease. Expenditures related to angling and white-water boating account for about $24 million of activity in the local economy around Glen Canyon Dam and $24.8 million in the local economy around flaming Gorge Dam. The range of operational scenarios being considered in the Western Area Power Administration`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement, when use rates are held constant, could change the combined use value of angling and white-water boating below Glen Canyon Dam, increasing it by as much as 50%, depending on prevailing hydrological conditions. Changes in the combined use value below Flaming Gorge Dam could range from a decrease of 9% to an increase of 26%. Nonuse values, such as existence and bequest values, could also make a significant contribution to the total value of each site included in this study; however, methodological and data limitations prevented estimating how each operational scenario could change nonuse values.

Carlson, J.L.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Integration of a system for critical infrastructure protection with the OSSIM SIEM platform: a dam case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years the monitoring and control devices in charge of supervising the critical processes of Critical Infrastructures have been victims of cyber attacks. To face such threat, organizations providing critical services are increasingly focusing ... Keywords: OSSIM, SIEM, critical infrastructure protection, dam

Luigi Coppolino; Salvatore D'Antonio; Valerio Formicola; Luigi Romano

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2008, the National Marine Fisheries Service completed the sixteenth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. We PIT tagged and released a total of 18,565 hatchery steelhead O. mykiss, 15,991 wild steelhead, and 9,714 wild yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha at Lower Granite Dam in the Snake River. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and at sites within the hydropower system in both the Snake and Columbia Rivers. These included 122,061 yearling Chinook salmon tagged at Lower Granite Dam for evaluation of latent mortality related to passage through Snake River dams. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, Ice Harbor, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the single-release model). Primary research objectives in 2008 were to: (1) estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead, (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions, and (3) evaluate the survival estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2008 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Additional details on the methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here. Survival and detection probabilities were estimated precisely for most of the 2008 yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead migrations. Hatchery and wild fish were combined in some of the analyses. For yearling Chinook salmon, overall percentages for combined release groups used in survival analyses in the Snake River were 80% hatchery-reared and 20% wild. For steelhead, the overall percentages were 65% hatchery-reared and 35% wild. Estimated survival from the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam to the tailrace of Little Goose Dam averaged 0.939 for yearling Chinook salmon and 0.935 for steelhead.

Faulkner, James R.; Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

383

ROD for the Interconnection of the Griffith Power Plant With the Western Area Power Administration's Parker-Davis and Pacific Northwest-Pacific Southwest Intertie Transmission Systems (5/28/99)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

23 23 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 103 / Friday, May 28, 1999 / Notices 129, Main Street, Madison, ME 04950, (207) 696-1225. l. FERC contact: Nan Allen, nan.allen@ferc.fed.us, (202) 219-2948. m. Pursuant to 18 CFR 16.9(b)(1) each application for a new license and any competing license applications must be filed with the Commission at least 24 months prior to the expiration of the existing license. All applications for license for this project must be filed by May 1, 2002. David P. Boergers, Secretary. [FR Doc. 99-13617 Filed 5-27-99; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6717-01-M DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Western Area Power Administration [DOE/EIS-0297] Record of Decision for the Interconnection of the Griffith Power Plant With the Western Area Power Administration's Parker-Davis and Pacific Northwest-Pacific Southwest

384

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Distribution at Lookout Point Dam, 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at Lookout Point Dam (LOP) on the Middle Fork Willamette River for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE), to provide data to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance downstream passage at LOP and others dams in USACE's Willamette Valley Project. This study was conducted in response to the listing of Upper Willamette River Spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Upper Willamette River steelhead (O. mykiss) as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. We conducted a hydroacoustic evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at LOP during February 2010 through January 2011. Findings from this 1 year of study should be applied carefully because annual variation can be expected due to variability in adult salmon escapement, egg-to-fry and fry-to-smolt survival rates, reservoir rearing and predation, dam operations, and weather. Fish passage rates for smolt-size fish (> {approx}90 mm and fish {+-} 4,444 (95% confidence interval) smolt-size fish passed through turbine penstock intakes. Of this total, 84% passed during December-January. Run timing for small-size fish ({approx}65-90 mm) peaked (702 fish) on December 18. Diel periodicity of smolt-size fish showing crepuscular peaks was evident in fish passage into turbine penstock intakes. Relatively few fish passed into the Regulating Outlets (ROs) when they were open in summer (2 fish/d) and winter (8 fish/d). Overall, when the ROs were open, RO efficiency (RO passage divided by total project passage) was 0.004. In linear regression analyses, daily fish passage (turbines and ROs combined) for smolt-size fish was significantly related to project discharge (Pfish passage and each of the three variables in the model-Julian day, log(discharge), and log(abs(forebay delta)); i.e., as any of the environmental variables increase, expected daily fish passage increases. For vertical distribution of fish at the face of the dam, fish were surface-oriented with 62%-80% occurring above 10 m deep. The highest percentage of fish (30%-60%) was found between 5-10-m-deep. During spring and summer, mean target strengths for the analysis periods ranged from -44.2 to -42.1 dB. These values are indicative of yearling-sized juvenile salmon. In contrast, mean target strengths in fall and winter were about -49.0 dB, which are representative of subyearling-sized fish. The high-resolution spatial and temporal data reported herein provide detailed information about vertical, horizontal, diel, daily, and seasonal fish passage rates and distributions at LOP from March 2010 through January 2011. This information will support management decisions on design and development of surface passage and collection devices to help restore Chinook salmon populations in the Middle Fork Willamette River watershed above LOP.

Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Trott, Donna M.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

385

Evaluation of Fish Passage Conditions for Juvenile Salmonids Using Sensor Fish at Detroit Dam, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fish passage conditions through two spillways at Detroit Dam on the North Santiam River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions through Spillbay 3 and Spillbay 6 at 1.5- and 3.5-ft gate openings, identifying potential fish injury regions of the routes. The study was performed in July 2009, concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish and live fish were deployed at elevations approximately 3 ft above structure at depths determined using a computational fluid dynamics model. Data collected were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates.

Duncan, Joanne P.

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

386

Synthesis of Biological Reports on Juvenile Fish Passage and Survival at Bonneville Dam through 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a review of available literature on juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam from 1939 through 2005. Studies of interest included project-wide fish-passage efficiency (FPE) studies by radio telemetry and fixed-aspect hydroacoustics, fish survival studies (direct and indirect), FGE studies, powerhouse and unit (by netting, hydroacoustics, and radio telemetry), predation studies in the forebay and tailrace, behavioral studies on forebay approach and egress, and surface-bypass studies. The FPE effort will include a review of available distribution data (horizontal, diel, and vertical) for juvenile salmon. This study does not repeat the results of previous review and synthesis studies but cites them. Where no previous review exists for a subject area, all reports were reviewed and synthesized. The report includes an annotated bibliography summarizing each of the documents reviewed and a DVD disk containing all of the original papers and reports along with an HTML index to the documents.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Johnson, Gary E.; Giorgi, Albert E.; Johnson, Richard L.; Stevenson, John R.; Schilt, Carl R.; Johnson, Peter N.; Patterson, Deborah S.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Distribution at Lookout Point Dam, 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at Lookout Point Dam (LOP) on the Middle Fork Willamette River for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE), to provide data to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance downstream passage at LOP and others dams in USACE's Willamette Valley Project. This study was conducted in response to the listing of Upper Willamette River Spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Upper Willamette River steelhead (O. mykiss) as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. We conducted a hydroacoustic evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at LOP during February 2010 through January 2011. Findings from this 1 year of study should be applied carefully because annual variation can be expected due to variability in adult salmon escapement, egg-to-fry and fry-to-smolt survival rates, reservoir rearing and predation, dam operations, and weather. Fish passage rates for smolt-size fish (> {approx}90 mm and < 300 mm) were highest during December-January and lowest in mid-summer through early fall. Passage peaks were also evident in early spring, early summer, and late fall. During the entire study period, an estimated total of 142,463 fish {+-} 4,444 (95% confidence interval) smolt-size fish passed through turbine penstock intakes. Of this total, 84% passed during December-January. Run timing for small-size fish ({approx}65-90 mm) peaked (702 fish) on December 18. Diel periodicity of smolt-size fish showing crepuscular peaks was evident in fish passage into turbine penstock intakes. Relatively few fish passed into the Regulating Outlets (ROs) when they were open in summer (2 fish/d) and winter (8 fish/d). Overall, when the ROs were open, RO efficiency (RO passage divided by total project passage) was 0.004. In linear regression analyses, daily fish passage (turbines and ROs combined) for smolt-size fish was significantly related to project discharge (P<0.001). This relationship was positive, but there was no relationship between total project passage and forebay elevation (P=0.48) or forebay elevation delta, i.e., day-to-day change in forebay elevation (P=0.16). In multiple regression analyses, a relatively parsimonious model was selected that predicted the observed data well. The multiple regression model indicates a positive trend between expected daily fish passage and each of the three variables in the model-Julian day, log(discharge), and log(abs(forebay delta)); i.e., as any of the environmental variables increase, expected daily fish passage increases. For vertical distribution of fish at the face of the dam, fish were surface-oriented with 62%-80% occurring above 10 m deep. The highest percentage of fish (30%-60%) was found between 5-10-m-deep. During spring and summer, mean target strengths for the analysis periods ranged from -44.2 to -42.1 dB. These values are indicative of yearling-sized juvenile salmon. In contrast, mean target strengths in fall and winter were about -49.0 dB, which are representative of subyearling-sized fish. The high-resolution spatial and temporal data reported herein provide detailed information about vertical, horizontal, diel, daily, and seasonal fish passage rates and distributions at LOP from March 2010 through January 2011. This information will support management decisions on design and development of surface passage and collection devices to help restore Chinook salmon populations in the Middle Fork Willamette River watershed above LOP.

Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Trott, Donna M.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Numerical simulation of MHD for electromagnetic edge dam in continuous casting.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer model was developed to predict eddy currents and fluid flows in molten steel. The model was verified by comparing predictions with experimental results of liquid-metal containment and fluid flow in electromagnetic (EM) edge dams (EMDs) designed at Inland Steel for twin-roll casting. The model can optimize the EMD design so it is suitable for application, and minimize expensive, time-consuming full-scale testing. Numerical simulation was performed by coupling a three-dimensional (3-D) finite-element EM code (ELEKTRA) and a 3-D finite-difference fluids code (CaPS-EM) to solve heat transfer, fluid flow, and turbulence transport in a casting process that involves EM fields. ELEKTRA is able to predict the eddy-current distribution and the electromagnetic forces in complex geometries. CaPS-EM is capable of modeling fluid flows with free surfaces. Results of the numerical simulation compared measurements obtained from a static test.

Chang, F. C.

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

389

Billy Shaw Dam and Reservoir : Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impacts.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This notice announces BPA`s decision to fund the construction, operation, and maintenance of the Billy Shaw Dam and Reservoir on the Duck Valley Reservation. This project is part of a continuing effort to address system-wide fish and wildlife losses caused by the development of the hydropower system in the Columbia River Basin. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluating the potential environmental impacts of the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the Proposed Action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Shoshone-Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Reservation, Nevada.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Analysis of potential impacts of Flaming Gorge Dam hydropower operations on archaeological sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An archaeological field study was conducted along the Green River in the areas of Little Hole and Browns Park in Utah and Colorado. The purpose of the study was to measure the potential for hydropower operations at Flaming Gorge Dam to directly or indirectly affect archaeological sites in the study area. Thirty-four known sites were relocated, and six new sites were recorded. Information was collected at each site regarding location, description, geomorphic setting, sedimentary context, vegetation, slope, distance from river, elevation above river level, and site condition. Matching the hydrologic projections of river level and sediment load with the geomorphic and sedimentary context at specific site locations indicated that eight sites were in areas with a high potential for erosion.

Moeller, K.L.; Malinowski, L.M.; Hoffecker, J.F.

1955-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Little Goose Dam Full Flow PIT-Tag Detection System Project Summary.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2006, the design phase of this project was kicked off and was for the most part modeled after the Full Flow PIT installation installed at Lower Monumental Dam during winter and spring of 2006 and 2007. As the Goose Full Flow design progressed and the project started to move towards construction, issues within contracting occurred and the project was put on delay for 1 year. Starting in mid December of 2008, Harcon Inc. was awarded the contract and construction of the new Goose Full Flow PIT-tag detection system began. The purpose of this document is to summarize the installation of the Little Goose Full Flow project from start to finish and to highlight the notable successes and challenges that the installation presented along with the final results and current status.

Warf, Don; Livingston, Scott [Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

392

Juvenile Radio-Tag Study: Lower Granite Dam, 1985-1986 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A prototype juvenile radio-tag system was developed and tested by the National Marine Fisheries Services (NMFS) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) at John Day Dam in 1984. Results indicated that the system could provide acceptable estimates of powerhouse and spillway passage. Research in 1986 continued testing of the tag system to further define its application and limitations. Field work included releases in the forebay and tailrace under a no-spill environment and testing of new systems to improve tag detection. Laboratory tests included the response of the tag in hostile environmental conditions (spillway passage) and the effects of the radio tag on fish buoyancy compensation. This report provides results of the work along with a summarization of the combined 1985--86 field and assumption testing. 12 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

Giorgi, Albert E.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Fully Covariant Van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov Discontinuity, and Absence Thereof  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In both old and recent literature, it has been argued that the celebrated van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov (vDVZ) discontinuity of massive gravity is an artifact due to linearization of the true equations of motion. In this letter, we investigate that claim. First, we exhibit an explicit -albeit somewhat arbitrary- fully covariant set of equations of motion that, upon linearization, reduce to the standard Pauli-Fierz equations. We show that the vDVZ discontinuity still persists in that non-linear, covariant theory. Then, we restrict our attention to a particular system that consistently incorporates massive gravity: the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati (DGP) model. DGP is fully covariant and does not share the arbitrariness and imperfections of our previous covariantization, and its linearization exhibits a vDVZ discontinuity. Nevertheless, we explicitly show that the discontinuity does disappear in the fully covariant theory, and we explain the reason for this phenomenon.

M. Porrati

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

White Sturgeon Mitigation & Restoration in the Columbia & Snake River Upstream from Bonneville Dam  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

29, 2003 29, 2003 To: People Interested in the Project to Mitigate and Restore White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has prepared the Final Environmental Assessment (EA), which includes a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI), for the White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam Project. The document is enclosed for your information. Background: Since 1986, State, Federal, and Tribal fisheries agencies have been gathering data and studying habitats, movements, population dynamics, feeding, and distribution of white sturgeon in the Columbia River system. With the decline in anadromous salmonid runs there has been an increase in the importance of the white sturgeon fisheries. The Oregon Department of

395

An Assessment of Energy Potential at Non-Powered Dams in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

fleet by 15%. A majority of this potential is concentrated in just 100 NPDs, which could contribute approximately 8 GW of clean, reliable hydropower; the top 10 facilities alone could add up to 3 GW of new hydropower. Eighty-one of the 100 top NPDs are U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) facilities, many of which, including all of the top 10, are navigation locks on the Ohio River, Mississippi River, Alabama River, and Arkansas River, as well as their major tributaries. This study also shows that dams owned by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation hold the potential to add approximately 260 MW of capacity; the Bureau has also engaged in an effort to conduct a more detailed evaluation of its own facilities.

Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Research Plan to Determine Timing, Location, Magnitude and Cause of Mortality for Wild and Hatchery Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts Above Lower Granite Dam. Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

From 1966 to 1968, Raymond estimated an average survival rate of 89% for yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) migrating from trap sites on the Salmon River to Ice Harbor Dam, which was then the uppermost dam on the Snake River. During the 1970s, the estimated survival rate declined as the proportion of hatchery fish increased and additional dams were constructed. Recent survival indices for yearling chinook salmon smolts in the Snake River Basin indicate that substantial mortalities are occurring en route to Lower Granite Dam, now the uppermost dam on the Snake River. Detection rates for wild and hatchery PIT-tagged smolts at Lower Granite Dam have been much lower than expected. However, for wild fish, there is considerable uncertainty whether overwinter mortality or smolt loss during migration is the primary cause for low survival. Efforts to rebuild these populations will have a better chance of success after the causes of mortality are identified and addressed. Information on the migrational characteristics and survival of wild fish are especially needed. The goal of this initial planning phase is to develop a research plan to outline potential investigations that will determine the timing, location, magnitude, and cause of smolt mortality above Lower Granite Dam.

Lower Granite Migration Study Steering Committee

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Biological Assessment of the Advanced Turbine Design at Wanapum Dam, 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of studies sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate the biological performance (likelihood of injury to fish) from an advanced design turbine installed at Unit 8 of Wanapum Dam on the Columbia River in Washington State in 2005. PNNL studies included a novel dye technique to measure injury to juvenile fish in the field, an evaluation of blade-strike using both deterministic and stochastic models, and extended analysis of the response of the Sensor Fish Device to strike, pressure, and turbulence within the turbine system. Fluorescein dye was used to evaluate injuries to live fish passed through the advanced turbine and an existing turbine at two spill discharges (15 and 17 kcfs). Under most treatments the results were not significantly different for the two turbines, however, eye injury occurred in nearly 30% of fish passing through Unit 9 but in less than 10% of those passing through Unit 8 at 15 kcfs. Both deterministic and stochastic blade-strike models were applied for the original and new AHTS turbines. The modeled probabilities were compared to the Sensor Fish results (Carlson et al. 2006) and the biological studies using juvenile fish (Normandeau et al. 2005) under the same operational parameters. The new AHTS turbine had slightly higher modeled injury rates than the original turbine, but no statistical evidence to suggest that there is significant difference in blade-strike injury probabilities between the two turbines, which is consistent with the experiment results using Sensor Fish and juvenile fish. PNNL also conducted Sensor Fish studies at Wanapum Dam in 2005 concurrent with live fish studies. The probablility of severe collision events was similar for both turbine. The advanced turbine had a slightly lower probability of severe shear events but a slightly higher probability of slight shear.

Dauble, Dennis D.; Deng, Zhiqun; Richmond, Marshall C.; Moursund, Russell A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Duncan, Joanne P.

2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

398

Adult Salmonid PIT-TAG Returns to Columbia River`s Lower Granite Dam.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of an analysis of the returns of PIT-tagged Snake River spring chinook and steelhead detected at Lower Granite Dam are summarized. Included is theoretical work on statistical power calculations for tests of return rates. The phrase return rate will be taken to mean return and detection rate. Knowledge that a fish has returned depends upon it being detected at Lower Granite Dam. Some returns are unaccounted for because they go through the navigation lock or manage to go through the adult bypass undetected. (1) Adult PIT tag recoveries to date are informative at least from a qualitative perspective. (2) The tagging levels by geographic region, rearing type, and, for chinook, life history stage have varied considerably since PIT tagging began on the Columbia River system. Early tagging studies were directed at Juvenile problems rather than adult return rates. As a result, comparisons in adult return rates between years, regions, etc., are more difficult. Global conclusions about the effect of potential treatments and/or natural factors, such as region of origin, on adult return rates are difficult to make until a more balanced. more consistent tagging study is implemented. (3) Along the same lines, tagging levels will need to be increased considerably if experiments are to be conducted to determine factors that affect return rates. E.g., approximately 46,000 fish in both the control and the treatment groups need to be PIT-tagged to detect a statistically significant difference with 80% probability. (4) Analysis of the available data suggests that life stage (parr or smolt), rearing type (hatchery or wild), and geographic location all affect the return rates for spring chinook. The data are limited, however. (5) Return rates for Snake River steelhead are roughly an order of magnitude greater than Snake River spring chinook return rates.

Newman, Ken

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Ex post power economic analysis of record of decision operational restrictions at Glen Canyon Dam.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On October 9, 1996, Bruce Babbitt, then-Secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior signed the Record of Decision (ROD) on operating criteria for the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD). Criteria selected were based on the Modified Low Fluctuating Flow (MLFF) Alternative as described in the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Arizona, Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (Reclamation 1995). These restrictions reduced the operating flexibility of the hydroelectric power plant and therefore its economic value. The EIS provided impact information to support the ROD, including an analysis of operating criteria alternatives on power system economics. This ex post study reevaluates ROD power economic impacts and compares these results to the economic analysis performed prior (ex ante) to the ROD for the MLFF Alternative. On the basis of the methodology used in the ex ante analysis, anticipated annual economic impacts of the ROD were estimated to range from approximately $15.1 million to $44.2 million in terms of 1991 dollars ($1991). This ex post analysis incorporates historical events that took place between 1997 and 2005, including the evolution of power markets in the Western Electricity Coordinating Council as reflected in market prices for capacity and energy. Prompted by ROD operational restrictions, this analysis also incorporates a decision made by the Western Area Power Administration to modify commitments that it made to its customers. Simulated operations of GCD were based on the premise that hourly production patterns would maximize the economic value of the hydropower resource. On the basis of this assumption, it was estimated that economic impacts were on average $26.3 million in $1991, or $39 million in $2009.

Veselka, T. D.; Poch, L. A.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B; Decision and Information Sciences; Western Area Power Administration

2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

400

Total Dissolved Gas Effects on Incubating Chum Salmon Below Bonneville Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the request of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE; Portland District), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook a project in 2006 to look further into issues of total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation in the lower Columbia River downstream of Bonneville Dam. In FY 2008, the third year of the project, PNNL conducted field monitoring and laboratory toxicity testing to both verify results from 2007 and answer some additional questions about how salmonid sac fry respond to elevated TDG in the field and the laboratory. For FY 2008, three objectives were 1) to repeat the 2006-2007 field effort to collect empirical data on TDG from the Ives Island and Multnomah Falls study sites; 2) to repeat the static laboratory toxicity tests on hatchery chum salmon fry to verify 2007 results and to expose wild chum salmon fry to incremental increases in TDG, above those of the static test, until external symptoms of gas bubble disease were clearly present; and 3) to assess physiological responses to TDG levels in wild chum salmon sac fry incubating below Bonneville Dam during spill operations. This report summarizes the tasks conducted and results obtained in pursuit of the three objectives. Chapter 1 discusses the field monitoring, Chapter 2 reports the findings of the laboratory toxicity tests, and Chapter 3 describes the field-sampling task. Each chapter contains an objective-specific introduction, description of the study site and methods, results of research, and discussion of findings. Literature cited throughout this report is listed in Chapter 4. Additional details on the monitoring methodology and results are provided in Appendices A and B included on the compact disc bound inside the back cover of the printed version of this report.

Arntzen, Evan V.; Hand, Kristine D.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Geist, David R.; Murray, Katherine J.; Dawley, Earl M.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Elston, Ralph A.; Vavrinec, John

2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "davis dam 230-kilovolt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Evaluation of the Biological Effects of the Northwest Power Conservation Council's Mainstem Amendment on the Fisheries Upstream and Downstream of Libby Dam, Montana, 2007-2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new project began in 2005 to monitor the biological and physical effects of improved operations of Hungry Horse and Libby Dams, Montana, called for by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Mainstem Amendment. This operating strategy was designed to benefit resident fish impacted by hydropower and flood control operations. Under the new operating guidelines, July through September reservoir drafts will be limited to 10 feet from full pool during the highest 80% of water supply years and 20 feet from full pool during the lowest 20% of water supply (drought) years. Limits were also established on how rapidly discharge from the dams can be increased or decreased depending on the season. The NPCC also directed the federal agencies that operate Libby and Hungry Horse Dams to implement a new flood control strategy (VARQ) and directed Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks to evaluate biological responses to this operating strategy. The Mainstem Amendment operating strategy has not been fully implemented at the Montana dams as of June 2008 but the strategy will be implemented in 2009. This report highlights the monitoring methods used to monitor the effects of the Mainstem Amendment operations on fishes, habitat, and aquatic invertebrates upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. We also present initial assessments of data and the effects of various operating strategies on physical and biological components of the systems upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Annual electrofishing surveys in the Kootenai River and selected tributaries, along with gill net surveys in the reservoir, are being used to quantify the impacts of dam operations on fish populations upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Scales and otoliths are being used to determine the age structure and growth of focal species. Annual population estimates and tagging experiments provide estimates of survival and growth in the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries. Radio telemetry will be used to validate an existing Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) model developed for the Kootenai River and will also be used to assess the effect of changes in discharge on fish movements and habitat use downstream of Libby Dam. Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags will be injected into rainbow, bull, and cutthroat trout throughout the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries to provide information on growth, survival, and migration patterns in relation to abiotic and biotic variables. Model simulations (RIVBIO) are used to calculate the effects of dam operations on the wetted perimeter and benthic biomass in the Kootenai River below Libby Dam. Additional models (IFIM) will also be used to evaluate the impacts of dam operations on the amount of available habitat for different life stages of rainbow and bull trout in the Kootenai River.

Sylvester, Ryan; Stephens, Brian; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

402

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2005 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2005 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, the age-1 and older fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Age-0 Chinook salmon are more difficult to distinguish between wild and non-adclipped hatchery fish and therefore classified as unknown rearing. The total annual hatchery spring/summer Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 0.34 times greater in 2005 than in 2004. The wild spring/summer Chinook catch was 0.34 times less than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 0.67 times less than in 2004. Wild steelhead trout catch was 0.72 times less than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 1,152 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2005, the Snake River trap captured 219 hatchery and 44 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 110 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. Trap operations began on March 6 and were terminated on June 3. The trap was out of operation for a total of one day due to heavy debris. FPC requested that the trap be restarted on June 15 through June 22 to collect and PIT tag age-0 Chinook salmon. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 1.06 times greater and wild Chinook salmon catch was 1.26 times greater than in 2004. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2005 was 1.41 times greater and wild steelhead trout collection was 1.27 times greater than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 6 and were terminated on May 17 due to high flows. There were two days when the trap was taken out of service because of mechanical failure. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for passive integrated transponder (PIT) tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2005 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery Chinook but was unable to detect a relation for wild Chinook. The inability to detect a migration rate discharge relation for wild Chinook salmon was caused by a lack of data. For hatchery Chinook salmon there was a 1.8-fold increase in migration rate between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 2.2-fold and a 2.2-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2005 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon, wild Chinook salmon, hatchery steelhead trout, and wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 4.2-fold for hatchery Chinook salmon, 2.9-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 2.5-fold for hatchery steelhead, and 1.7-fold for wild steelhead as discharge increased between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with PIT tags at the Snake River and Salmon River traps were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993 and the installation of the Removable Spillway Weir at Lower Granite Dam in 2001, caution must be used in comparing cumulative interrogation data. Cumulative interrogations at the fo

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

403

Satellite Detection of Spatial Distribution and Temporal Changes of Surface Soil Moisture at Three Gorges Dam Region from 2003 to 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowledge of the spatial distribution and temporal changes of the land surface parameters at the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) region is essential to understanding the changes of hydrological processes and climate systems possibly brought by TGD. Based ...

Jinyang Du; Qiang Liu

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Satellite Detection of Spatial Distribution and Temporal Changes of Surface Soil Moisture at Three Gorges Dam Region from 2003 to 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowledge of the spatial distribution and temporal changes of the land surface parameters at Three Gorges Dam (TGD) region are essential to understand the changes of hydrological processes and climate systems possibly brought by TGD. Based on ...

Jinyang Du; Qiang Liu

405

Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. The project began addressing identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area in 1999. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, Spokane River below Spokane Falls, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002 and 2003. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. In 1999, 2000, and 2001 the project began addressing some of the identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Department of Natural Resources, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Department of Natural Resources, Wellpinit, WA)

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. The project began addressing identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area in 1999. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, Spokane River below Spokane Falls, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002 and 2003. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC). The NPPC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPPC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area and the Columbia Basin Blocked Area Management Plan (1998). The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. In 1999, 2000, and 2001 the project began addressing some of the identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of seven streams and four lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2000. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in southern Pend Oreille County, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2001. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Connor, Jason M. (Kalispell Department of Natural Resources, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA); O'Connor, Dick (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Measurements in the Tailrace at John Day Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) were used to measure water velocities in the tailrace at John Day Dam over a two-week period in February 2005. Data were collected by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Hydraulic Design Section, Portland District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The objective of this project was therefore to collect field measurements of water velocities in the near-field draft tube exit zone as well as the far-field tailrace to be used for improving these models. Field data were collected during the project using five separate ADCPs. Mobile ADCP data were collected using two ADCPs mounted on two separate boats. Data were collected by either holding the boat on-station at pre-defined locations for approximately 10 minutes or in moving transect mode when the boat would move over large distances during the data collection. Results from the mobile ADCP survey indicated a complex hydrodynamic flow field in the tailrace downstream of John Day Dam. A large gyre was noted between the skeleton section of the powerhouse and non-spilling portion of the spillway. Downstream of the spillway, the spillway flow is constrained against the navigation lock guide wall, and large velocities were noted in this region. Downstream of the guide wall, velocities decreased as the spillway jet dispersed. Near the tailrace island, the flow split was measured to be approximately equal on Day 2 (25.4 kcfs spillway/123 kcfs total). However, approximately 60% of the flow passed along the south shore of the island on Day 1 (15.0 kcfs spillway/150 kcfs total). At a distance of 9000 ft downstream of the dam, flows had equalized laterally and were generally uniform over the cross section. The collection of water velocities near the draft tube exit of an operating turbine unit is not routine, and equipment capable of measuring 3D water velocities in these zones are at the forefront of hydraulic measurement technology. Although the feasibility of measuring 1D water velocity magnitudes has been previously demonstrated by the authors, the feasibility of resolving 3D water velocity vectors given the heterogeneity of the flow field was unknown before this studys data were collected. Both the 1D and 3D data were collected by deploying three ADCPs on dual-axis rotators directly above the draft tube exit of Turbine Unit 16. These instruments collected 1D data during both the mobile reconnaissance campaign and a later one-week period with zero spillway discharge. During the zero spillway discharge period, Turbine Unit 16 was operated over a range of discharges. Approximately 12 hours of 1D velocity data were collected at low (12 kcfs), middle (16.2 kcfs), and high (19.2 kcfs) turbine discharges. The 1D dataset indicates large differences in flow patterns and RMS velocity fluctuations among the various discharge levels. Results from this project show that it is technically feasible to measure 3D water velocities directly downstream of an operating turbine unit using a narrow beam swath (i.e., 6-degree) ADCP. Data products from these 3D velocity data include a measurement of the draft tube barrel flow distribution (a.k.a., the flow split), directional changes and the general decay of velocity as flow exits the draft tube and enters the tailrace, and a relative measure of the homogeneity of the flow field.

Cook, Chris B.; Dibrani, Berhon; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Titzler, P. Scott; Dennis, Gary W.

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

410

Evaluation of Salmon Spawning Below Bonneville Dam, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since FY 2000, scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have conducted research to assess the extent of spawning by chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) in the lower mainstem Columbia River. Their work supports a larger project funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) aimed at characterizing the physical habitat used by mainstem fall Chinook and chum salmon populations. Multiple collaborators in addition to PNNL are involved in the BPA project--counterparts include the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). Data resulting from the individual tasks each agency conducts are providing a sound scientific basis for developing strategies to operate the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) in ways that will effectively protect and enhance the chum and tule fall Chinook salmon populations--both listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Fall Chinook salmon, thought to originate from Bonneville Hatchery, were first noted to be spawning downstream of Bonneville Dam by WDFW biologists in 1993. Known spawning areas include gravel beds on the Washington side of the river near Hamilton Creek and near Ives Island. Limited surveys of spawning ground were conducted in the area around Ives and Pierce islands from 1994 through 1997. Based on those surveys, it is believed that fall Chinook salmon are spawning successfully in this area. The size of this population from 1994 to 1996 was estimated at 1800 to 5200 fish. Chum salmon also have been documented spawning downstream of Bonneville Dam. Chum salmon were listed as threatened under the ESA in March 1999. At present there is a need to determine the number of fall Chinook and chum salmon spawning downstream of Bonneville Dam, the characteristics of their spawning areas, and the flows necessary to ensure their long-term survival. Ongoing discussions regarding the minimum and maximum flows will result in optimal spawning habitat usage and survival of embryos of both species. Collection of additional data as part of this project will ensure that established flow guidelines are appropriate and provide adequate protection for the species of concern. This is consistent with the high priority placed by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council Independent Scientific Advisory Board and the salmon managers on determining the importance of mainstem habitats to the production of salmon in the Columbia River Basin. Thus, there is a need to better understand the physical habitat variables used by mainstem fall Chinook and chum salmon populations and the effects of hydropower project operations on spawning and incubation. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was asked to participate in the cooperative study during FY 2000. Since then, we have focused on (1) investigating the interactions between groundwater and surface water near fall Chinook and chum salmon spawning areas; (2) providing in-season hyporheic temperature data and assisting state agencies with emergence timing estimates; (3) locating and mapping deep-water fall Chinook salmon spawning areas; and (4) providing support to the WDFW for analysis of stranding data. Work conducted during FY 2006 addressed these same efforts. This report documents the studies and tasks performed by PNNL during FY 2006. Chapter 1 provides a description of the searches conducted for deepwater redds--adjacent to Pierce and Ives islands for fall Chinook salmon and near the Interstate 205 bridge for chum salmon. The chapter also provides data on redd location, information about habitat associations, and estimates of total spawning populations. Chapter 2 documents the collection of data on riverbed and river temperatures and water surface elevations, from the onset of spawning to the end of emergence, and the provision of those data in-season to fisheries management agencies to assist with emer

Arntzen, Evan; Mueller, Robert; Murray, Christopher [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Evaluation of Salmon Spawning Below Bonneville Dam, Annual Report October 2005 - September 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since FY 2000, scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have conducted research to assess the extent of spawning by chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) in the lower mainstem Columbia River. Their work supports a larger project funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) aimed at characterizing the physical habitat used by mainstem fall Chinook and chum salmon populations. Multiple collaborators in addition to PNNL are involved in the BPA project--counterparts include the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). Data resulting from the individual tasks each agency conducts are providing a sound scientific basis for developing strategies to operate the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) in ways that will effectively protect and enhance the chum and tule fall Chinook salmon populations--both listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Fall Chinook salmon, thought to originate from Bonneville Hatchery, were first noted to be spawning downstream of Bonneville Dam by WDFW biologists in 1993. Known spawning areas include gravel beds on the Washington side of the river near Hamilton Creek and near Ives Island. Limited surveys of spawning ground were conducted in the area around Ives and Pierce islands from 1994 through 1997. Based on those surveys, it is believed that fall Chinook salmon are spawning successfully in this area. The size of this population from 1994 to 1996 was estimated at 1800 to 5200 fish. Chum salmon also have been documented spawning downstream of Bonneville Dam. Chum salmon were listed as threatened under the ESA in March 1999. At present there is a need to determine the number of fall Chinook and chum salmon spawning downstream of Bonneville Dam, the characteristics of their spawning areas, and the flows necessary to ensure their long-term survival. Ongoing discussions regarding the minimum and maximum flows will result in optimal spawning habitat usage and survival of embryos of both species. Collection of additional data as part of this project will ensure that established flow guidelines are appropriate and provide adequate protection for the species of concern. This is consistent with the high priority placed by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council Independent Scientific Advisory Board and the salmon managers on determining the importance of mainstem habitats to the production of salmon in the Columbia River Basin. Thus, there is a need to better understand the physical habitat variables used by mainstem fall Chinook and chum salmon populations and the effects of hydropower project operations on spawning and incubation. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was asked to participate in the cooperative study during FY 2000. Since then, we have focused on (1) investigating the interactions between groundwater and surface water near fall Chinook and chum salmon spawning areas; (2) providing in-season hyporheic temperature data and assisting state agencies with emergence timing estimates; (3) locating and mapping deep-water fall Chinook salmon spawning areas; and (4) providing support to the WDFW for analysis of stranding data. Work conducted during FY 2006 addressed these same efforts. This report documents the studies and tasks performed by PNNL during FY 2006. Chapter 1 provides a description of the searches conducted for deepwater redds--adjacent to Pierce and Ives islands for fall Chinook salmon and near the Interstate 205 bridge for chum salmon. The chapter also provides data on redd location, information about habitat associations, and estimates of total spawning populations. Chapter 2 documents the collection of data on riverbed and river temperatures and water surface elevations, from the onset of spawning to the end of emergence, and the provision of those data in-season to fisheries management agencies to assist with emer

Arntzen, Evan V.; Mueller, Robert P.; Murray, Christopher J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

412

An Assessment of Freeze Brand and PIT Tag Recovery Data at McNary Dam, 1987 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study evaluated mark recovery data from PIT-tagged and freeze-branded fish recovered at McNary Dam in 1987. Hatchery and river-run populations of yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye salmon (O. nerka) and steelhead (O. mykiss) were used in this investigation. Paired groups of PIT-tagged and freeze-branded juvenile salmonids were released upstream from McNary Dam and subsequently recaptured at that site. PIT tags were recovered in significantly higher proportions than freeze brands regardless of species of stock. Furthermore, for chinook and sockeye salmon, PIT tag recovery data exhibited less variability. Reasons for the discrepant intermark recovery rates are discussed. 10 refs., 27 figs., 23 tabs.

McCutcheon, Clinton Scott

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water years 2006 through 2010.  

SciTech Connect

Because of concerns about the impact that Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) operations were having on downstream ecosystems and endangered species, the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) conducted an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on dam operations (DOE 1996). New operating rules and management goals for GCD that had been specified in the Record of Decision (ROD) (Reclamation 1996) were adopted in February 1997. In addition to issuing new operating criteria, the ROD mandated experimental releases for the purpose of conducting scientific studies. A report released in January 2011 examined the financial implications of the experimental flows that were conducted at the GCD from 1997 to 2005. This report continues the analysis and examines the financial implications of the experimental flows conducted at the GCD from 2006 to 2010. An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes both that operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and the experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a 'without experiments' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP powerplant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases in some water years resulted in financial benefits to Western while others resulted in financial costs. During the study period, the total financial costs of all experimental releases were more than $4.8 million.

Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B. (Decision and Information Sciences); (Western Area Power Administration, Colorado River Storage Project Management Center)

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

414

Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, commonly known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (blocked area). The three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the blocked area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information housed in a central location will allow managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP (NWPPC program measure 10.8B.26) is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the blocked area and the Columbia Basin blocked area management plan (1998). The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of blocked area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the blocked area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. The use of common collection and analytical tools is essential to the process of streamlining joint management decisions. In 1999 and 2000 the project began to address some of the identified data gaps, throughout the blocked area, with a variety of newly developed sampling projects, as well as, continuing with ongoing data collection of established projects.

Crossley, Brian (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Department of Natural Resources, Wellpinit, WA); Lockwood, Jr., Neil W. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, Annual Report 2005-2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 2005 fish collection season at Lower Granite Dam (LGR) was characterized by average water temperatures, below average flows, above average spill, low levels of debris and the record number of smolts collected compared to the previous five years. With the continued release of unclipped supplementation chinook and steelhead above LGR, we cannot accurately distinguish wild chinook, steelhead, and sockeye/kokanee in the sample. For the purposes of this report we will designate fish as clipped and unclipped. This season a total of 13,030,967 juvenile salmonids were collected at LGR. Of these, 12,099,019 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 12,032,623 by barge and 66,396 by truck. An additional 898,235 fish were bypassed to the river due to over-capacity of the raceways, barges or trucks and for research purposes. This was the first season of summer spill at LGR. Spill was initiated at 12:01am June 20 as directed by the ruling set forth by Judge James Redden of the United States District Court (Order CV 01-640-RE). In addition, the Lower Granite project also conducted a summer spill test alternating spill and spill patterns between spill to the gas cap without the removable spillway weir (RSW) and spill with up to 20 kcfs utilizing the RSW. Because of the forecast low flow this year, most hatchery reared subyearling fall chinook were released up to three weeks early. With the unexpected high flows in late May and early June, more than 90% of the subyearling chinook were collected prior to the initiation of the court ordered summer spill program. Collection number fluctuations reflect river flow and project operations for any given year. For example, low flow years (2001, 2004 and 2005) result in higher collection numbers. Court ordered spill throughout the summer migration will directly affect collection of fall subyearling chinook collection numbers. The editors of this report urge the reader to use caution when comparing fish collection numbers between years, considering both annual river flows and annual project operations, because both affect fish migration and collection.

Menski, Fred

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Placement of the dam for the no. 2 kambaratinskaya HPP by large-scale blasting: some observations  

SciTech Connect

Results of complex instrument observations of large-scale blasting during construction of the dam for the No. 2 Kambaratinskaya HPP on the Naryn River in the Republic of Kirgizia are analyzed. The purpose of these observations was: to determine the actual parameters of the seismic process, evaluate the effect of air and acoustic shock waves, and investigate the kinematics of the surface formed by the blast in its core region within the mass of fractured rocks.

Shuifer, M. I.; Argal, E. S. [JSC 'SPII Gidroproekt' (Russian Federation)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

TVA Melton Hill Dam Sustainable Recreation Area: Analysis of Field Data from Renewable and Energy Efficiency Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the culmination of activities, analyses, and results from EPRI's evaluation of TVA's Sustainable Recreation Area at Melton Hill Dam in East Tennessee. The recreation area includes renewable energy generation, energy and water efficiency, and other environmentally-driven enhancements throughout the area's visitor and campground facilities.EPRI has collected time-series data from a specific subset of technologies to evaluate energy and related performance ...

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

418

Use of an Autonomous Sensor to Evaluate the Biological Performance of the Advanced Turbine at Wanapum Dam  

SciTech Connect

Hydropower is the largest renewable energy resource in the world and the United States. However, Hydropower dams have adverse ecological impacts because migrating fish may be injured or killed when they pass through hydro turbines. In the Columbia and Snake River basins, dam operators and engineers are required to make these hydroelectric facilities more fish-friendly through changes in hydro-turbine design and operation after fish population declines and the subsequent listing of several species of Pacific salmon in the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Grant County Public Utility District (Grant PUD) requested authorization from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the 10 turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines that are designed to improve survival for fish passing through the turbines while improving operation efficiency and increasing power generation. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy provided co-funding to Grant PUD for aspects of performance testing that supported the application. As an additional measure to the primary evaluation measure of direct injury and mortality rates of juvenile Chinook salmon using balloon tag-recapture methodology, this study used an autonomous sensor device to provide insight into the specific hydraulic conditions or physical stresses that the fish experienced or the specific causes of the biological response. We found that the new blade shape and the corresponding reduction of turbulence in the advanced hydropower turbine were effective. The frequency of severe events based on Sensor Fish pressure and acceleration measurements showed trends similar to those of fish survival determined by balloon tag-recapture tests. In addition, the new turbine provided a better pressure and rate of change environment for fish passage. Overall, the Sensor Fish data indicated that the advanced hydro turbine design met the desired fish passage goals for Wanapum Dam.

Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Dauble, Dennis D.

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

419

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2004, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the twelfth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder tags (PIT tags). We PIT tagged and released a total of 19,621 hatchery steelhead, 8,128 wild steelhead, and 9,227 wild yearling Chinook salmon at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and sites within the hydropower system. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the single-release model). Primary research objectives in 2004 were to (1) estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss; (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions; and (3) evaluate the survival-estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2004 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Results are reported primarily in the form of tables and figures; details on methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here. Survival and detection probabilities were estimated precisely for most of the 2004 yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead migrations. Hatchery and wild fish were combined in some of the analyses. Overall, the percentages for combined release groups used in survival analyses were 68% hatchery-reared yearling Chinook salmon and 32% wild. For steelhead, the overall percentages were 73% hatchery-reared and 27% wild. Estimated survival from the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam to the tailrace of Little Goose Dam averaged 0.923 for yearling Chinook salmon and 0.860 for steelhead. Respective average survival estimates for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead were 0.875 and 0.820 from Little Goose Dam tailrace to Lower Monumental Dam tailrace; 0.818 and 0.519 from Lower Monumental Dam tailrace to McNary Dam tailrace (including passage through Ice Harbor Dam); and 0.809 and 0.465 from McNary Dam tailrace to John Day Dam tailrace. Survival for yearling Chinook salmon from John Day Dam tailrace to Bonneville Dam tailrace (including passage through The Dalles Dam) was 0.735. We were unable to estimate survival through this reach for steelhead during 2004 because too few fish were detected at Bonneville Dam due to operation of the new corner collector at the second powerhouse. Combining average estimates from the Snake River smolt trap to Lower Granite Dam, from Lower Granite Dam to McNary Dam, and from McNary Dam to Bonneville Dam, estimated annual average survival through the entire hydropower system from the head of Lower Granite reservoir to the tailrace of Bonneville Dam (eight projects) was 0.353 (s.e. 0.045) for Snake River yearling Chinook salmon. We could not empirically estimate survival through the entire system for steelhead in 2004 because of low detection rates for this species at Bonneville Dam. For yearling spring Chinook salmon released in the Upper Columbia River, estimated survival from point of release to McNary Dam tailrace was 0.484 (s.e. 0.005) for fish released from Leavenworth Hatchery, 0.748 (s.e. 0.015) for fish released from Entiat Hatchery, 0.738 (s.e. 0.036) for fish released from Winthrop Hatchery, and 0.702 (s.e. 0.048) and 0.747 (s.e.0.047) for those from Methow Hatchery, Chewuch Pond and

Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D.; Marsh, Douglas M. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Movements and Distribution of Northern Squawfish Downstream of Lower Snake River Dams Relative to the Migration of Juvenile Salmonids, 1992-1993 Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Northern squawfish Ptychocheilus oregonensis movements were monitored downstream of two lower Snake River dams during the juvenile salmonid migrations of 1992 and 1993. During a high flow year in 1993, the abundance of squawfish in the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam peaked in July, after the majority of juveniles had moved past Lower Granite Dam, and peak abundance was inversely related to river discharge. Few squawfish moved into the tailrace of Ice Harbor Dam in 1993 because of the extended period of spill. Distributions of squawfish in the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam varied between and within years and shifted in response to changing prey densities, flow patterns, water temperature, and diel cycles, but fish consistently used low velocity habitats. Data from Ice Harbor Dam is less extensive, but squawfish distributions there appeared to be affected by changing flow patterns and fish used low velocity habitats. The changes in distribution and abundance of squawfish in tailrace areas are evidence that predation on seaward migrating salmonids depends on the timing of migration and size and timing of runoff. Juvenile salmonids migrating in the spring and early summer will probably be less affected by squawfish predation in tailrace areas than salmon that migrate later in the summer.

Isaak, D.J.; Bjornn, T.C. (University of Idaho, Idaho Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Moscow, ID)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "davis dam 230-kilovolt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Use of aerial videography to evaluate the effects of Flaming Gorge Dam operations on natural resources of the Green River  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Peaking hydropower operations can profoundly alter natural stream flow and thereby affect the natural resources dependent on these flows. In this paper, we describe how aerial videography was used to collect environmental data and evaluate impacts of hydropower operations at Flaming Gorge Dam on natural resources of the Green River. An airborne multispectral video/radiometer remote sensing system was used to collect resource data under four different flow conditions from seven sites (each about one mile in length) located downstream from the dam. Releases from Flaming Gorge Dam during data collection ranged from approximately 800 to 4,000 cubic feet/sec (cfs), spanning most of the normal operating range for this facility. For each site a series of contiguous, non-overlapping images was prepared from the videotapes and used to quantify surface water area, backwater habitats, and areas of riparian vegetation under varying flow conditions. From this information, relationships between flow and habitat parameters were developed and used in conjunction with hydrologic modeling and ecological information to evaluate impacts of various modes of operation.

Snider, M.A.; Hayse, J.W.; Hlohowskyj, I.; LaGory, K.E.; Greaney, M.M.; Kuiper, J.A.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R.A.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Survival and Passage of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead at The Dalles Dam, Spring 2011 - FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The study reported herein was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington (UW) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). The PNNL and UW project managers were Drs. Thomas J. Carlson and John R. Skalski, respectively. The USACE technical lead was Mr. Brad Eppard. The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival and other performance measures at The Dalles Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion (BiOp) and the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords. The study is being documented in two types of reports: compliance and technical. A compliance report is delivered within 6 months of the completion of the field season and focuses on results of the performance metrics outlined in the 2008 BiOp and Fish Accords. A technical report is produced within the 18 months after field work, providing comprehensive documentation of a given study and results on route-specific survival estimates and fish passage distributions, which are not included in compliance reports. This technical report concerns the 2011 acoustic telemetry study at The Dalles Dam.

Johnson, Gary E.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Batten, G.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Hughes, James S.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Royer, Ida M.; Townsend, Richard L.; Woodley, Christa M.; Kim, Jeongkwon; Etherington, D. J.; Skalski, J. R.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Fisher, Erik J.; Greiner, Michael J.; Khan, Fenton; Mitchell, T. D.; Rayamajhi, Bishes; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Juvenile Chinook Salmon through Snake River Dams and Reservoirs, 1993 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A pilot study was conducted to estimate survival of hatchery-reared yearling chinook salmon through dams and reservoirs on the Snake River. The goals of the study were to: (1) field test and evaluate the Single-Release, Modified-Single-Release, and Paired-Release Models for the estimation of survival probabilities through sections of a river and hydroelectric projects; (2) identify operational and logistical constraints to the execution of these models; and (3) determine the usefulness of the models in providing estimates of survival probabilities. Field testing indicated that the numbers of hatchery-reared yearling chinook salmon needed for accurate survival estimates could be collected at different areas with available gear and methods. For the primary evaluation, seven replicates of 830 to 1,442 hatchery-reared yearling chinook salmon were purse-seined from Lower Granite Reservoir, PIT tagged, and released near Nisqually John boat landing (River Kilometer 726). Secondary releases of PIT-tagged smolts were made at Lower Granite Dam to estimate survival of fish passing through turbines and after detection in the bypass system. Similar secondary releases were made at Little Goose Dam, but with additional releases through the spillway. Based on the success of the 1993 pilot study, the authors believe that the Single-Release and Paired-Release Models will provide accurate estimates of juvenile salmonid passage survival for individual river sections, reservoirs, and hydroelectric projects in the Columbia and Snake Rivers.

Iwamoto, Robert N.; Sandford, Benjamin P.; McIntyre, Kenneth W.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

Creveling, Jennifer

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Characterizing the Fish Passage Environment at The Dalles Dam Spillway: 2001-2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The spill environment at The Dalles Dam in 2001-2004 was characterized using a field-deployed autonomous sensor (the so-called Sensor Fish), computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, and Lagrangian particle tracking. The sensor fish has a self-contained capability to digitally the record pressure and triaxial accelerations it was exposed to following its release into the spillway. After recovery downstream of the tailrace, the data stored in the memory of the sensor are downloaded and stored for analysis. The spillway, stilling basin, and tailrace hydrodynamics were simulated using an unsteady, free-surface, three-dimensional CFD code that solved the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations in conjunction with a two-equation turbulence model. The results from the CFD simulations were then used in a Lagrangian particle tracking model that included the effects of mass, drag, and buoyancy in the particle equation of motion. A random walk method was used to simulate the effects of small-scale turbulence on the particle motion. Several operational and structural conditions were evaluated using the Sensor Fish, CFD, and particle tracking. Quantifying events such as strike and stilling basin retention time characterized exposure conditions in the spill environment.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Serkowski, John A.; Cook, Chris B.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Perkins, William A.

2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

426

Characterization of The Dalles Dam Spillbay 6 Vortex Using Surface Entrained Sensor Fish Device: Preliminary Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document summarizes the pilot study to characterize The Dalles Dam Spillbay 6 vortex using a surface entrained Sensor Fish device. It was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on April 13 and 14, 2006. The total spill was controlled at approximately 110 kcfs, the forebay elevation was 157.89 ft, and the discharge of Bay 6 at the tested gate opening of 14 ft was approximately 18 kcfs. The objectives of the full study are to (1) develop baseline conditions for the detailed analysis of Sensor Fish measurements by deploying Sensor Fish in different surface locations in the vortex periphery; (2) observe the entrainment pattern and extract hydraulic data of interest such as acceleration, rotation, pressure, and estimated velocity of Sensor Fish or drogues; (3) integrate the experimental results with companion computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and inertial particle tracking studies. A total of 12 Sensor Fish were released in the surface at upstream edge, left edge, downstream edge, and the core of the vortex at Bay 6. Because of the high discharge, the vortex patterns at the test condition were less consistent than the patterns observed at lower discharges. Compared with the Sensor Fish released at mid-bay at Bay 6, Sensor Fish released from the surface at the vortex experienced higher pressure fluctuations, a larger percentage of severe events, and much more rapid angular velocities.

Deng, Zhiqun; Richmond, Marshall C.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2006-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

427

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka during the 2002 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2002 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 11.4 times greater in 2002 than in 2001. The wild Chinook catch was 15.5 times greater than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 2.9 times greater than in 2001. Wild steelhead trout catch was 2.8 times greater than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 3,996 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2002, the Snake River trap captured 69 hatchery and 235 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 114 hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant increase in catch in 2002 was due to a 3.1 fold increase in hatchery Chinook production and a more normal spring runoff. Trap operations began on March 10 and were terminated on June 7. The trap was out of operation for a total of four days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 4.2 times greater and wild Chinook salmon catch was 2.4 times greater than in 2001. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2002 was 81% of the 2001 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 2002 was 81% of the previous year's catch. Trap operations began on March 10 and were terminated on May 29 due to high flows. The trap was out of operation for four days due to high flow or debris. The increase in hatchery Chinook catch in 2002 was due to a 3.1 fold increase in hatchery production and differences in flow between years. Changes in hatchery and wild steelhead catch are probably due to differences in flow between years. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2002 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery and wild Chinook salmon. For hatchery and wild Chinook salmon there was a 4.7-fold and a 3.7-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 1.8-fold and a 1.7-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2002 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for wild Chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead trout. The analysis was unable to detect a relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon. The lack of a detectable relation was probably a result of the migration rate data being spread over a very narrow range of discharge. Not enough data were available to perform the analysis for wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 4.3-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 2.2-fold for hatchery steelhead between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River trap were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993 and the installation of the Removable Spillway Weir at

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

428

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2004 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2004 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 1.1 times greater in 2004 than in 2003. The wild Chinook catch was 1.1 times greater than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 1.2 times greater than in 2003. Wild steelhead trout catch was 1.6 times greater than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 978 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2004, the Snake River trap captured 23 hatchery and 18 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 60 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. Trap operations began on March 7 and were terminated on June 4. The trap was out of operation for a total of zero days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 10.8% less and wild Chinook salmon catch was 19.0% less than in 2003. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2004 was 20.0% less and wild steelhead trout collection was 22.3% less than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 7 and were terminated on May 28 due to high flows. There were two days when the trap was taken out of service because wild Chinook catch was very low, hatchery Chinook catch was very high, and the weekly quota of PIT tagged hatchery Chinook had been met. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2004 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for wild Chinook salmon but was unable to detect a relation for hatchery Chinook. The inability to detect a migration rate discharge relation for hatchery Chinook salmon was caused by age-0 fall Chinook being mixed in with the age 1 Chinook. Age-0 fall Chinook migrate much slower than age-1 Chinook, which would confuse the ability to detect the migration rate discharge relation. When several groups, which consisted of significant numbers of age-0 Chinook salmon, were removed from the analysis a relation was detected. For hatchery and wild Chinook salmon there was a 2.8-fold and a 2.4-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 2.3-fold and a 2.0-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2004 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon, wild Chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead trout. Not enough data were available to perform the analysis for wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 7.0-fold for hatchery Chinook salmon, 4.7-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 3.8-fold for hatchery steelhead as discharge increased between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River and Salmon River traps were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monume

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

429

Optimization of Concurrent Deployments of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System and Other Hydroacoustic Equipment at John Day Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the results of the acoustic optimization study conducted at John Day Dam during January and February 2008. The goal of the study was to optimize performance of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) by determining deployment and data acquisition methods to minimize electrical and acoustic interference from various other acoustic sampling devices. Thereby, this would allow concurrent sampling by active and passive acoustic methods during the formal evaluations of the prototype surface flow outlets at the dam during spring and summer outmigration seasons for juvenile salmonids. The objectives for the optimization study at John Day Dam were to: 1. Design and test prototypes and provide a total needs list of pipes and trolleys to deploy JSATS hydrophones on the forebay face of the powerhouse and spillway. 2. Assess the effect on mean percentage decoded of JSATS transmissions from tags arrayed in the forebay and detected on the hydrophones by comparing: turbine unit OFF vs. ON; spill bay OPEN vs. CLOSED; dual frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) both OFF vs. ON at a spill bay; and, fixed-aspect hydroacoustic system OFF vs. ON at a turbine unit and a spill bay. 3. Determine the relationship between fixed-aspect hydroacoustic transmit level and mean percentage of JSATS transmissions decoded. The general approach was to use hydrophones to listen for transmissions from JSATS tags deployed in vertical arrays in a series perpendicular to the face of the dam. We used acoustic telemetry equipment manufactured by Technologic and Sonic Concepts. In addition, we assessed old and new JSATS signal detectors and decoders and two different types of hydrophone baffling. The optimization study consisted of a suite of off/on tests. The primary response variable was mean percentage of tag transmissions decoded. We found that there was no appreciable adverse effect on mean percentage decoded for JSATS transmitters from: turbine operations; spillway operations; DIDSON/ADCP acoustic energy; and PAS hydroacoustic systems at transmit level of -12 dB, although there was a significant impact at all higher transmit levels (-11 to -6 dB). The main conclusion from this optimization study is that valid JSATS telemetry data can be collected simultaneously with a DIDSON/ADCP and a PAS hydroacoustic system at transmit level -12 dB. Multiple evaluation tools should be considered to increase the robustness and thoroughness of future fish passage evaluations at John Day and other dams.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Khan, Fenton; Kim, Jina; Lamarche, Brian L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Choi, Eric Y.; Faber, Derrek M.; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Fischer, Eric S.; Cushing, Aaron W.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Evaluation of Fall Chinook and Chum Salmon Spawning below Bonneville, The Dalles, John Day, and McNary Dams; 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2001 a total of 309 adult fall chinook and 264 chum were sampled in the Ives and Pierce islands area below Bonneville Dam. The peak redd count for fall chinook was 48. The peak redd count for chum was 181. Peak spawning time for fall chinook was set at approximately 16 November. Peak spawning time for chum occurred approximately 26 November. There were estimated to be a total of 721 fall chinook spawning below Bonneville Dam in 2001. The 2001 chum population below Bonneville Dam was estimated to be 532 spawning fish. Temperature unit data suggests that below Bonneville Dam 2001 brood chinook emergence began on 11 March 2002 and ended 18 May 2002, with peak emergence occurring 26 April. 2001 brood juvenile chum emergence below Bonneville Dam began 29 January and continued through 31 March 2002. Peak chum emergence took place 25 February. A total of 5,487 juvenile chinook and 678 juvenile chum were sampled between the dates of 22 January and 30 July 2002 below Bonneville Dam. Juvenile chum migrated from the study area in the 40-55 mm fork length range. Migration of chum occurred during the months of March, April and May. Sampling results suggest fall chinook migration from rearing areas took place from mid June through early July 2002 when juvenile fall chinook were in the 65 to 80 mm fork length size range. Adult and juvenile sampling below Bonneville Dam provided information to assist in determining the stock of fall chinook and chum spawning and rearing below Bonneville Dam. Based on observed spawning times, adult age and sex composition, GSI analysis, juvenile emergence timing, juvenile migration timing and juvenile size at the time of migration, it appears that in 2001 and 2002 the majority of fall chinook using the area below Bonneville Dam were of a late-spawning bright stock of fall chinook. Observed spawning times, adult age and sex composition, GSI analysis, juvenile emergence timing, juvenile migration timing and juvenile size at the time of migration suggests chum spawning and rearing below Bonneville dam are similar to stocks of chum found in Hamilton and Hardy creek and are part of the Lower Columbia River Chum ESU.

van der Naald, Wayne; Clark, Roy; Spellman, Bryant (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Health hazard evaluation report No. HHE-80-233-793, Davis Bessie Nuclear Power Station, Toledo Edison Company, United Engineers and Contractors Company (UE and C), Oak Harbor, Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Personal air samples were analyzed and employees were given medical evaluations at Davis Bessie Nuclear Power Station (SIC-4911) in Oak Harbor, Ohio. Requests for evaluation were made by a union representative of the United Engineers and Contractors and a union representative of employees of Toledo Edison Company, working on site at the power station, to evaluate employee skin and scalp problems due to exposure to ceramic wood fibers. Preliminary surveys were conducted on September 24 and 25, 1980 and a follow-up survey was performed on October 16, 1980. Environmental evaluation consisted of gravimetric analyses of personal air samples for airborne ceramic wool fibers. A total of 400 production and maintenance workers and varying numbers of construction workers were exposed to the fibers during installation of insulation which was completed at the time of the survey. The three personal air samples showed no accumulation of particulates and fibers detected were nonrespirable. Medical evaluations were conducted in 52 workers and scalp scrapings were obtained from 43 workers. Thirty seven workers had histories suggestive of irritant dermatitis of the scalp; 24 workers had physical findings consistent with the diagnosis. Of the 43 scalp samples, 18 were contaminated with organisms of the gut, perineum, skin or respiratory tract. Dermatitis was directly related to the history of dust exposure. The authors conclude that a potential health hazard exists for employees from exposure to ceramic wool fiber. Recommendations include provision of handwashing facilities and protective clothing for employees, and installation of an impermeable covering for the ceramic wool fiber.

Cone, J.; Hartle, R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Evaluation of Salmon Spawning below the Four Lowermost Columbia River Dams, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since FY 2000, scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have conducted research to assess the extent of spawning by chum (Oncorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook (O. tshawytscha) salmon in the lower mainstem Columbia River. Their work supports a larger Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) project aimed at characterizing the physical habitat used by mainstem fall Chinook and chum salmon populations. Multiple collaborators in addition to PNNL are involved in the BPA project--counterparts include the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). Data resulting from the individual tasks each agency conducts are providing a sound scientific basis for developing strategies to operate the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) in ways that will effectively protect and enhance the chum and fall Chinook salmon populations--both listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Fall Chinook salmon, thought to originate from Bonneville Hatchery, were first noted to be spawning downstream of Bonneville Dam by biologists from the WDFW in 1993. Known spawning areas include gravel beds on the Washington side of the river near Hamilton Creek and Ives Island. Limited spawning ground surveys were conducted in the area around Ives and Pierce islands during 1994 through 1997. Based on these surveys, fall Chinook salmon were believed to be spawning successfully in this area. In addition, chum salmon have been documented spawning downstream of Bonneville Dam. In FY 1999, BPA Project No. 1999-003 was initiated by the WDFW, ODFW, and the USFWS to characterize the variables associated with physical habitat used by mainstem fall Chinook and chum salmon populations and to better understand the effects of hydropower project operations on spawning and incubation. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was asked to join the study in FY 2000, during which its initial efforts were focused on (1) investigating the interactions between groundwater and surface water near fall Chinook and chum salmon spawning areas and (2) locating and mapping deepwater fall Chinook salmon spawning areas. In FY 2001, an additional task was added to provide support to the WDFW for analysis of juvenile salmon stranding data. The work PNNL has conducted since then continues to address these same three issues. The overall project is subdivided into a series of tasks, with each agency taking the lead on a task; WDFW leads the adult task, ODFW leads the juvenile task, and the USFWS leads the habitat task. All three tasks are designed to complement each other to achieve the overall project goal. Study results from PNNL's work contribute to all three tasks. This report documents the studies and tasks performed by PNNL during FY 2005. Chapter 1 provides a description of the deepwater redd searches conducted adjacent to Pierce and Ives islands and documents the search results and analysis of findings. Chapter 2 documents the collection of data on riverbed and river temperatures, from the onset of spawning to the end of emergence, and the provision of those data in-season to fisheries management agencies to assist with emergence timing estimates. Technical assistance provided to the WDFW in evaluation of stranding data is summarized in Chapter 3.

Geist, David; Currie, Andrea [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Reduced Spill at Hydropower Dams: Opportunities for More Generation and Increased Fish Population  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report indicates that reduction of managed spill at hydropower dams can speed implementation of technologies for fish protection and achieve economic goals. Spill of water over spillways is managed in the Columbia River basin to assist downstream-migrating juvenile salmon, and is generally believed to be the most similar to natural migration, benign and effective passage route; other routes include turbines, intake screens with bypasses, and surface bypasses. However, this belief may be misguided, because spill is becoming recognized as less than natural, with deep intakes below normal migration depths, and likely causing physical damages from severe shear on spillways, high turbulence in tail waters, and collisions with baffle blocks that lead to disorientation and predation. Some spillways induce mortalities comparable to turbines. Spill is expensive in lost generation, and controversial. Fish-passage research is leading to more fish-friendly turbines, screens and bypasses that are more effective and less damaging, and surface bypasses that offer passage of more fish per unit water volume than does spill (leaving more water for generation). Analyses by independent economists demonstrated that goals of increased fish survival over the long term and net gain to the economy can be obtained by selectively reducing spill and diverting some of the income from added power generation to research, development, and installation of fish-passage technologies. Such a plan would selectively reduce spill when and where least damaging to fish, increase electricity generation using the water not spilled and use innovative financing to direct monetary gains to improving fish passage.

Coutant, Charles C [ORNL; Mann, Roger [RMecon, Davis, California; Sale, Michael J [ORNL

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam Spillway, 2006  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to determine detailed vertical, horizontal, intensive, and diel distributions of juvenile salmonid passage at the spillway at The Dalles Dam from April 12 to July16, 2006. These data are being applied in the Spillway Improvements Program to position release pipes for direct injury and mortality studies and to provide baseline data for assessment of the vortex suppression devices scheduled for deployment in 2007. We estimated fish distributions from hydroacoustic data collected with split-beam transducers arrayed across Bays 1 through 9 and 14. Spill at ~20 kcfs per bay was bulked at Bays 1-6, although the other bays were opened at times during the study to maintain a 40% spill percentage out of total project discharge. The vertical distribution of fish was skewed toward the surface during spring, but during summer, passage peaked at 2-3 m above the spillway ogee. Fish passage rates (number per hour) and fish densities (number per kcfs) were highest at Bay 6, followed by passage at Bay 5. This result comports with spillway horizontal distribution data from radio telemetry and hydroacoustic studies in 2004. The vertical and horizontal distribution of fish passage at bays 5 and 6 was much more variable during spring than summer and more variable at bay 5 than bay 6. Diel distribution data revealed that fish passage was highest during 0600-0700 h in spring; otherwise passage was reasonably uniform on a diel basis. This study substantiates the purpose of the spillway vortex suppression device to re-distribute downstream migrants away from Bay 6 toward Bays 1-5.

Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Skalski, John R.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

435

Evaluation of Fall Chinook and Chum Salmon Spawning below Bonneville Dam; 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp. populations have declined over the last century due to a variety of human impacts. Chum salmon O. keta populations in the Columbia River have remained severely depressed for the past several decades, while upriver bright (URB) fall Chinook salmon O. tschawytscha populations have maintained relatively healthy levels. For the past seven years we have collected data on adult spawning and juvenile emergence and outmigration of URB fall Chinook and chum salmon populations in the Ives and Pierce islands complex below Bonneville Dam. In 2004, we estimated 1,733 fall Chinook salmon and 336 chum salmon spawned in our study area. Fall Chinook salmon spawning peaked 19 November with 337 redds and chum salmon spawning peaked 3 December with 148 redds. Biological characteristics continue to suggest chum salmon in our study area are similar to nearby stocks in Hardy and Hamilton creeks, and Chinook salmon we observe are similar to upriver bright stocks. Temperature data indicated that 2004 brood URB fall Chinook salmon emergence began on 6 January and ended 27 May 2005, with peak emergence occurring 12 March. Chum salmon emergence began 4 February and continued through 2 May 2005, with peak emergence occurring on 21 March. Between 13 January and 28 June, we sampled 28,984 juvenile Chinook salmon and 1,909 juvenile chum salmon. We also released 32,642 fin-marked and coded-wire tagged juvenile fall Chinook salmon to assess survival. The peak catch of juvenile fall Chinook salmon occurred on 18 April. Our results suggested that the majority of fall Chinook salmon outmigrate during late May and early June, at 70-80 mm fork length (FL). The peak catch of juvenile chum salmon occurred 25 March. Juvenile chum salmon appeared to outmigrate at 40-55 mm FL. Outmigration of chum salmon peaked in March but extended into April and May.

van der Naald, Wayne; Duff, Cameron; Friesen, Thomas A. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water year 2011  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines the financial implications of experimental flows conducted at the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) in water year 2011. It is the third report in a series examining financial implications of experimental flows conducted since the Record of Decision (ROD) was adopted in February 1997 (Reclamation 1996). A report released in January 2011 examined water years 1997 to 2005 (Veselka et al. 2011), and a report released in August 2011 examined water years 2006 to 2010 (Poch et al. 2011). An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes both that operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and the experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a 'without experiments' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP powerplant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases conducted in water year 2011 resulted only in financial costs; the total cost of all experimental releases was about $622,000.

Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B. (Decision and Information Sciences); (Western Area Power Administration)

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

437

Evaluation of Salmon Spawning Below Bonneville Dam Annual Report October 2006 - September 2007.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

From 1999 through 2007, the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Bonneville Power Administration funded a project to determine the number of fall Chinook and chum salmon spawning downstream of Bonneville Dam, the characteristics of their spawning areas, and the flows necessary to ensure their long-term survival. Data were collected to ensure that established flow guidelines are appropriate and provide adequate protection for the species of concern. The projects objectives are consistent with the high priority placed by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council Independent Scientific Advisory Board and the salmon managers on determining the importance of mainstem habitats to the production of salmon in the Columbia River Basin. Because of the influence of mainstem habitat on salmon production, there is a continued need to better understand the physical habitat variables used by mainstem fall Chinook and chum salmon populations and the effects of hydropower project operations on spawning and incubation. During FY 2007, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory focused on (1) locating and mapping deep-water fall Chinook salmon and chum salmon spawning areas, (2) investigating the interaction between groundwater and surface water near fall Chinook and chum salmon spawning areas, and (3) providing in-season hyporheic temperature and water surface elevation data to assist state agencies with emergence timing and redd dewatering estimates. This report documents the studies and tasks performed by PNNL during FY 2007. Chapter 1 provides a description of the searches conducted for deepwater redds-adjacent to Pierce and Ives islands for fall Chinook salmon and near the Interstate 205 bridge for chum salmon. The chapter also provides data on redd location, information about habitat associations, and estimates of total spawning populations. Chapter 2 documents the collection of data on riverbed and river temperatures and water surface elevations, from the onset of spawning to the end of emergence, and the provision of those data in-season to fisheries management agencies to assist with emergence timing estimates and evaluations of redd dewatering.

Arntzen, Evan V.; Mueller, Robert P.; Murray, Katherine J.; Bott, Yi-Ju [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

438

Development of nondestructive evaluation techniques for DAM inspection. Progress report, January 1995 through August 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has concluded a two and a half year study on the development of an ultrasonic inspection system to inspect post stressed steel tendons on dams and flood gates. The inspection systems were part of a program for the California Department of Water Resources. The effort included the identification of the location and amount of corrosion damage to the tendons, identification of the cause of corrosion, and the technology for inhibiting corrosion. Several NDE methods for inspecting and quantifying damage to steel reinforced concrete water pipes were investigated and presented to the DWR for their consideration. The additional methods included Ground Penetrating RADAR, Electro- Potential Measurements, Infrared Technology, Pipe Inspection Crawlers (designed to travel inside pipelines and simultaneously report on the pipe condition as viewed by ultrasonic methods and video cameras from within the pipeline.) Reference to consultants hired by LLNL for similar on-site corrosion inspections were given to the DWR. The LLNL research into industries that have products to prevent corrosion resulted in the identification of an Innsbruck, Austria, company. This company claims to have products to permanently protect post- or pre-stressed tendons. The caveat is that the tendon protection system must be installed when the tendons are installed because no retrofit is available. Corrosion mitigation on the steel reinforcements surrounding the concrete was addressed through active and passive cathodic protection schemes. The combination of corrosion and erosion were addressed during consideration for the inspection of water-pump impeller-blades that are used in the three stage, million horsepower, pumping stations at Edmunston.

Brown, A. E.; Thomas, G.H.

1997-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

439

Smolt Passage Behavior and Flow-Net Relationship in the Forebay of John Day Dam, 1984-1985 Final Report of Research.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The migration routes of downstream migrant salmonids in the forebay of John Day Dam were defined and assessed in relation to current velocities and water turbidity and temperature. Forebay current patterns were obtained from current meters at fixed sampling stations, the distribution of outmigrants was determined from purse seine sampling, and migration routes of yearling chinook salmon and steelhead were identified by radio telemetry techniques. All species of emigrating salmonids alter their distribution across the forebay as they approach the dam. Fish abundance was positively correlated with water clarity. There was no evidence to suggest that the migration routes were in response to current patterns in the forebay. Radio telemetry studies demonstrated that a certain segment of yearling chinook salmon approaching the dam are predisposed to spill passage (Washington side of the river) by virtue of their lateral position across the forebay. A new application of radio tag methodology was assessed and found to be useful in evaluating the effectiveness of spill for bypassing outmigrant salmon. A program system and cartographic model was developed which displays for any specified hour forebay current patterns at prevailing river flows and dam operations. The system can be used at other dam sites where investigations may wish to detail forebay current patterns.

Giorgi, Albert E.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Potential effects of four Flaming Gorge Dam hydropower operational scenarios on riparian vegetation of the Green River, Utah and Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four hydropower operational scenarios at Flaming Gorge Dam were evaluated to determine their potential effects on riparian vegetation along the Green River in Utah and Colorado. Data collected in June 1992 indicated that elevation above the river had the largest influence on plant distribution. A lower riparian zone occupied the area between the approximate elevations of 800 and 4,200-cfs flows--the area within the range of hydropower operational releases. The lower zone was dominated by wetland plants such as cattail, common spikerush, coyote willow, juncus, and carex. An upper riparian zone was above the elevation of historical maximum power plant releases from the dam (4,200 cfs), and it generally supported plants adapted to mesic, nonwetland conditions. Common species in the upper zone included box elder, rabbitbrush, grasses, golden aster, and scouring rush. Multispectral aerial videography of the Green River was collected in May and June 1992 to determine the relationship between flow and the areas of water and the riparian zone. From these relationships, it was estimated that the upper zone would decrease in extent by about 5% with year-round high fluctuation, seasonally adjusted high fluctuation, and seasonally adjusted moderate fluctuation, but it would increase by about 8% under seasonally adjusted steady flow. The lower zone would increase by about 13% for both year-round and seasonally adjusted high fluctuation scenarios but would decrease by about 40% and 74% for seasonally adjusted moderate fluctuation and steady flows, respectively. These changes are considered to be relatively minor and would leave pre-dam riparian vegetation unaffected. Occasional high releases above power plant capacity would be needed for long-term maintenance of this relict vegetation.

LaGory, K.E.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Ecological Sciences Section

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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