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Sample records for davis dam 230-kilovolt

  1. CX-007137: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Davis Dam Lower 230-kilovolt Substation Service Building DemolitionCX(s) Applied: B1.23Date: 03/03/2011Location(s): Mohave County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  2. CX-003193: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Davis Dam 230-Kilovolt Switchyards Stage 06 Upgrade (Double Breaker Double Bus) in Mohave County, ArizonaCX(s) Applied: B4.11Date: 06/30/2010Location(s): Mohave County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  3. Rachel Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phone: (765) 494-1423. Dept. Fax: (765) 494-0548. Office: 626 Mathematical Sciences Building. Email: davis705@math.purdue.edu. US Mail: Department of ...

  4. CX-011648: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Davis-Parker 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line- Marker Ball(s) Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 12/17/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  5. Q00906010024 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    00906010024 rock check dam Q00906010025 rock check dam Q00906010021 rock check dam Q00906010022 rock check dam Q00906010027 rock check dam Q00906010026 rock check dam Q00906010018 rock check dam Q00906010023 rock check dam Q00906010011 rock check dam Q00906010008 rock check dam Q00906010007 rock check dam Q

  6. W. M. Davis Scientific Programmer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    ;June 5, 2007 Bill Davis, PPPL 2 Overview Introduce NSTX Introduce EPICS & MDSplus The Event-Summation System Side Benefits (EPICS Pages) Future Plans #12;June 5, 2007 Bill Davis, PPPL 3 NSTX Spherical 53 institutions #12;June 5, 2007 Bill Davis, PPPL 4 NSTX #12;June 5, 2007 Bill Davis, PPPL 5 EPICS

  7. Technology Support Bob Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technology Support Services · Bob Davis · Associate Director User Support Services 1 #12;Technology Support Services · NUIT Technology Support Services (TSS) helps Northwestern faculty, staff, and students Technologies · Brian Nielsen · Project Manager Faculty Initiatives 8 #12;Support for Teaching & Learning

  8. UC DAVIS: VICE CHANCELLOR ADMINISTRATIVE AND RESOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    & Community Development - CAES Direct Charges 04-00134 202 Cousteau Ste 110, Davis 2,473 Davis Psychology Central Campus 06-00007 202 Cousteau Ste 175, Davis 2,482 Davis Human & Community Development - CAES

  9. V00306010057 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ¬« ¬« ¬« ¬« ¬« XY! 16-020 16-030(c) 16-026(l) 16-028(c) 16-026(l) V00306010057 rock check dam V00306010012 rock check dam V00306010040 rock check dam V00306010039 rock check dam V00306010058 rock check dam V00306010064 rock check dam V00306010061 rock check dam V00306010062 rock check dam V00306010063

  10. "Toward bioengineering translation" , UC Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Psarrakos, Panayiotis

    "Toward bioengineering translation" . , UC Davis , 6 , 1, ( , parking Engineering at the University of California Davis. He obtained his PhD in Bioengineering (Mechanical the translation of devices and instruments into clinical use and commercialization. #12;Toward bioengineering

  11. PLASMA PHYSICS PPPL UC Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY PPPL UC Davis PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY PPPL UC Davis Scattering System for ETG physics on NSTX H. Park, E. Mazzucato, and D. Smith PPPL, Princeton University C, 2006 Hyatt Regency, Dallas, TX #12;PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY PPPL UC Davis PRINCETON PLASMA

  12. V01406010015 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! ¬« ¬« V01406010015 rock check dam V01406010014 rock check dam V01406010013 rock check dam 1501403010012 earthen berm V01403010008 earthen berm V01406010003 rock check dam V01406010004 rock check dam V01406010010 rock check dam V01406010011 rock check dam 15-0651 15-0307 15-0588 15-0532 15-0575 stormdrain 7160

  13. M01506020006 log check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! ¬« 35-0027 M01506020006 log check dam M01506020007 log check dam M01506020001 log check dam M location Berm Channel/swale Check dam Sediment trap/basin Gabion Seed and mulch Cap Established vegetation

  14. Small-dam rehabs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denning, J.

    1993-01-01

    This article examines the economics of maintenance, rehabilitation and improvement for small, aging, high-hazard dams. The topics of the article include raising the height of the spillway and repairing deteriorated concrete in the spillway of Fellows Lake Dam, emergency repair of the outlet conduit and replacement of riprap on the upstream slope of Storrie Lake Dam, and extensive rehabilitation of Reeves Lake Dam.

  15. Ohio Nuclear Profile - Davis Besse

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Davis Besse" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License Expiration Date"...

  16. T00406010008 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! ¬« T00406010008 rock check dam T00406010009 rock check dam T00406010010 rock check dam T00406010011 rock check dam T-SMA-2.85 0.344 Acres 35-014(g) 35-016(n) T00406010005 rock check dam T00406010006 rock check dam T00403090004 curb T00402040007 established vegetation, green hatch area 7200 7200 7180

  17. J00206010020 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! J00206010020 rock check dam J00206010023 rock check dam 09-009 09-009 09-009 PJ-SMA-2 0.901 Acres J00206010021 rock check dam J00206010019 rock check dam J00206010014 rock check dam J00203010007 Smith DATE: 14-November-2014 REVISION NUMBER: 8 XY! IP sampler location Berm Channel/swale Check dam

  18. T00706010013 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! ¬« T00706010013 rock check dam T00706010014 rock check dam T00702040012 established vegetation, green hatch area T00706010002 rock check dam T00706010011 rock check dam T00703120010 rock berm T00703020003 base course berm T00706010004 rock check dam T00706010009 rock check dam T00703020008 base course

  19. Invasion Biology Mark A. Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Mark A.

    Invasion Biology Mark A. Davis 2 biology 2 MarkA.DavisInvasionBiology2 1 With the exception of climate change, biological invasions have probably received more attention during the past ten years than on the subject, Invasion Biology provides a comprehensive and up-to-date review of the science of biological

  20. ITS-Davis Biennial Report 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan

    2009-01-01

    architecture, explored Scotland, Germany, Denmark, and Sweden. Handy, who directs the UC Davis Sustainable

  1. Friday, October 21 UC Davis Conference Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    through wine, brewing and food sciences UC Davis Department of Entomology Entomology.ucdavis.edu Event

  2. Davis-Besse uncertainty study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, C B

    1987-08-01

    The uncertainties of calculations of loss-of-feedwater transients at Davis-Besse Unit 1 were determined to address concerns of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission relative to the effectiveness of feed and bleed cooling. Davis-Besse Unit 1 is a pressurized water reactor of the raised-loop Babcock and Wilcox design. A detailed, quality-assured RELAP5/MOD2 model of Davis-Besse was developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The model was used to perform an analysis of the loss-of-feedwater transient that occurred at Davis-Besse on June 9, 1985. A loss-of-feedwater transient followed by feed and bleed cooling was also calculated. The evaluation of uncertainty was based on the comparisons of calculations and data, comparisons of different calculations of the same transient, sensitivity calculations, and the propagation of the estimated uncertainty in initial and boundary conditions to the final calculated results.

  3. S00906010006 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! 53-0002 53-0890 53-1036 53-0598 53-0860 53-0056 S00906010006 rock check dam S00906010005 rock check dam S00906010007 rock check dam S00903010009 earthen berm S00903010010 earthen berm S00903120003 Channel/swale Check dam Sediment trap/basin Gabion Seed and mulch Cap Established vegetation SWMU boundary

  4. QER- Comment of Brenda Davies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To Whom it May Concern, we are seeking fix-it-first, reduce demand, and clean energy future is the kind of energy infrastructure Massachusetts wants and needs. Not fracking, we won't allow it! -- Brenda K Davies, OTR/L Outdoor Access Providing recreation for all! YES WE CAN!!

  5. Wim van Dam CURRICULUM VITAE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Wim van Dam CURRICULUM VITAE Department of Computer Science Work: +1-805-893 5211 Harold Frank Hall in physics. #12;Curriculum Vitae Wim van Dam, June 2008 2 PUBLICATIONS Journal and Conference Articles [1] "Quantum Algorithms for Algebraic Problems", Andrew M. Childs and Wim van Dam, to appear in Reviews

  6. INTERNATIONAL COMMISSION ON LARGE DAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    Q76-R INTERNATIONAL COMMISSION ON LARGE DAMS 20TH CONGRESS BEIJING, CHINA THE STATUS OF METHODS FOR ESTIMATION OF THE PROBABILITY OF FAILURE OF DAMS FOR USE IN QUANTITATIVE RISK ASSESSMENT (* ) Robin FELL. INTRODUCTION The use of Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) techniques to assist in dam safety management

  7. World Malaria Day at UC Davis: Current research in vector biology and genetics at UC Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    World Malaria Day at UC Davis: Current research in vector biology and genetics at UC Davis When-borne diseases in the world. Worldwide programs continue to rely on control programs based on the most recent

  8. ITS-Davis Biennial Report 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan

    2009-01-01

    and Environmental Engineering and Environmental Science andenology, civil and environmental engineering, and economics.of civil and environmental engineering, the ITS-Davis

  9. TAP Webinar: Davis-Bacon Act Compliance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This webinar, held on Nov. 18, 2014, offered information for Energy Department grantees, sub-grantees, and their contractors on complying with Davis-Bacon Act requirements.

  10. Perspectives on Dam Removal: York Creek Dam and the Water Framework Directive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Justin E; Pollak, Josh D; Richmond, Sarah F

    2008-01-01

    Sacramento. Graf, W. L. , 1999: Dam Nation: A GeographicCensus of American Dams and Their Large-Scale HydrologicEcological Effects of Dams: A Geomorphic Perspective.

  11. The Davis-Bacon Act: Vestige of Jim Crow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, David

    1994-01-01

    ironic, given that Davis-Bacon has par- ticularly harshoppo- sition of local activist to Davis-Bacon Act).a tenuous one." '4 7 The Davis-Bacon Act was soon to further

  12. The Revolution Revised: A Guided Tour of Davis v. Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    for Petitoner, Davis v. Washington, No. 05-5524, Dec. 22,WL 3597706, p. 15. Davis v. Washington, No. 05-5224, Oralfor Respondent, Davis v. Washington, No. 05-5524, Feb. 2,

  13. EA-1982: Parker-Davis Transmission System Routine Operation and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Parker-Davis Transmission System Routine Operation and Maintenance Project and Proposed Integrated Vegetation Management Program EA-1982: Parker-Davis Transmission System Routine...

  14. Gary Davis | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article)ForthcomingGENERALProblems I n Q uasi---Elas2cDavis About Us

  15. Davis Bacon | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:IAbout Us| DepartmentFunds RecipientsDavid M. KlausDavis

  16. EFFECT OF ENCROACHMENT OF WANAPUM DAM RESERVOIR ON FISH PASSAGE OVER ROCK ISLAND DAM, COLUMBIA RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the survivors. Similarly, man-made fa- cilities such as hydroelectric dams, even though equipped with fish for hydroelectric dams are utilized and the reservoir of one dam begins to encroach on the tailrace of the dam

  17. Failure of Tapo Canyon Tailings Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harder, Leslie F Jr; Stewart, Jonathan P

    1996-01-01

    failures of Chilean tailings dams." J. Soil Mech. and Found.earthquake failure of a tailings dam due to liquefaction offailure of the Tapo Canyon tailings dam was one of the most

  18. World Malaria Day at UC Davis: Research in vector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    World Malaria Day at UC Davis: Research in vector biology and genetics at UC Davis 25 April 2012 Davis, Davis, CA Purpose: In recognition of World Malaria Day and in support of the Roll Back Malaria:54-4:00pm Concluding Remarks Schedule World Malaria

  19. World Malaria Day at UC Davis: Current research in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    World Malaria Day at UC Davis: Current research in vector biology and genetics at UC Davis 25 April-borne diseases in the world. Worldwide programs continue to rely on control programs based on the most recent remarks UC Davis World Malaria Day at UC Davis: Current research in vector biology and genetics at UC

  20. Urban Land Use and Transportation Center University of California, Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Urban Land Use and Transportation Center University of California, Davis The Urban Land Use and Transportation Center (ULTRANS) at the UC Davis Institute of Transportation Studies (ITS-Davis) is tackling-Davis researchers have provided strong input to the design and analysis of the entire array of California's proposed

  1. War damages and reconstruction of Peruca dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nonveiller, E.; Rupcic, J.; Sever, Z.

    1999-04-01

    The paper describes the heavy damages caused by blasting in the Peruca rockfill dam in Croatia in January 1993. Complete collapse of the dam by overtopping was prevented through quick action of the dam owner by dumping clayey gravel on the lowest sections of the dam crest and opening the bottom outlet of the reservoir, thus efficiently lowering the water level. After the damages were sufficiently established and alternatives for restoration of the dam were evaluated, it was decided to construct a diaphragm wall through the damaged core in the central dam part as the impermeable dam element and to rebuild the central clay core at the dam abutments. Reconstruction works are described.

  2. Geotechnical practice in dam rehabilitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, L.R. (ed.)

    1993-01-01

    This proceedings, Geotechnical Practice in Dam Rehabilitation, consists of papers presented at the Specialty Conference sponsored by the Geotechnical Engineering Division of the American Society of Civil Engineers held in Raleigh, North Carolina, April 25-28, 1993. The conference provided a forum for the discussion of the rehabilitation of dams, including case histories and current geotechnical practice. The topics covered by this proceeding include: (1) inspection and monitoring of dams; (2) investigation and evaluation of dams and foundations; (3) risk and reliability assessment; (4) increasing reservoir capacity, spillway modifications and overtopping; (5) seepage control; (6) improving stability of dams, foundations and reservoir slopes; (7) rehabilitation for seismic stability; and (8) geosynthetics and ground improvement techniques.

  3. Recent Agricultural Ergonomics Research at UC Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Davis, Berkeley and San Francisco · Focus on labor-intensive agriculture Agricultural Ergonomics effects of prolonged exposure to musculoskeletal disorders risk factors- Manual weeding Focus on basic exposure to musculoskeletal disorders risk factors- Manual weeding Recent Research Projects Fatigue

  4. ITS-Davis Biennial Report 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan

    2009-01-01

    for Energy and Transportation brings China and CaliforniaCalifornia Presented by ITS-Davis The 11th Biennial Conference on Transportation and Energyalong California Highway 99. Future Transportation Energy:

  5. Dam Construction and Maintenance (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dams may be constructed, improved, or repaired on private, non-navigable waters subject to certain timelines; however, previously-developed hydropower mechanisms cannot be disrupted. The State may...

  6. SEMI-ANNUAL DAVIS-BACON ENFORCEMENT REPORT | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SEMI-ANNUAL DAVIS-BACON ENFORCEMENT REPORT SEMI-ANNUAL DAVIS-BACON ENFORCEMENT REPORT Semi-Annual Davis-Bacon Enforcement Report. Please submit the Semi-Annual Davis-Bacon...

  7. Perspectives on Dam Removal: York Creek Dam and the Water Framework Directive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Justin E; Pollak, Josh D; Richmond, Sarah F

    2008-01-01

    Retirement of Dams and Hydroelectric Facilities. ASCE, Newon the Allier River, a hydroelectric plant in France. Thethe dam generating hydroelectric power versus the ecological

  8. SEMI-ANNUAL DAVIS-BACON ENFORCEMENT REPORT

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    SEMI-ANNUAL DAVIS-BACON ENFORCEMENT REPORT Please submit the Semi-Annual Davis-Bacon Enforcement Report in the Performance and Accountability for Grants in Energy (PAGE) system. If...

  9. Fifty years of bicycle policy in Davis, CA Ted Buehler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Susan L.

    Fifty years of bicycle policy in Davis, CA Ted Buehler Institute of Transportation Studies-752-5878 slhandy@ucdavis.edu Please Submit to the Committee of Bicycle Transportation: ANF20 Word Count: 5378 Number of figures: 6 #12;Buehler and Handy 2 Fifty Years of Bicycle Psolicy in Davis, CA ABSTRACT Davis

  10. RetroSkeleton: Retrofitting Android Apps Benjamin Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Hao

    RetroSkeleton: Retrofitting Android Apps Benjamin Davis University of California, Davis bendavis@ucdavis.edu Hao Chen University of California, Davis chen@ucdavis.edu ABSTRACT An obvious asset of the Android platform. We can leverage the rela- tively uniform nature of Android apps to allow users to tweak appli

  11. Civil Engineering Explore the environmental impact of dams.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    a variety of services. Dams are built for flooding control, water storage, hydroelectricity production, concrete is used for hydroelectric dams and dams over which people drive. Earthen dams are used for water

  12. INDELIBLY DAVIS:  A Quarter-Century of UC Davis Stories...and Backstories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderhoef, Larry N

    2015-01-01

    in Division I-A [now the Football Bowl Subdivision] withmembership in Division I-AA [now the Football Champi- onshipUC Davis 28-21 in the first football game played at Aggie

  13. City of Davis City Manager's Office 23 Russell Boulevard, Suite 1 Davis, California 95616

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    September 17, 2014 The portion of the Putah Creek Parkway Bike Path between West Olive Drive and the tunnel of GATEways Horticulture, UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden, ebgriswold@ucdavis.edu (530) 754-8038 Anne

  14. Mary Ellen Davis Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakleaf, Megan

    Value of Academic Libraries Mary Ellen Davis Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe Megan Oakleaf ACRL Conference 2011 #12;what do we mean by value? Value Use Return-on- Investment Commodity Library Impact Competing Alternatives #12;What's the Evidence? #12;The Value of Academic Libraries: An ACRL Initiative · Align libraries

  15. TAP Webinar: Davis-Bacon Act Compliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This TAP webinar held on Nov. 18, 2014 from 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. It will offer information for Energy Department grantees, sub-grantees, and their contractors on complying with Davis-Bacon Act requirements.

  16. Kidney Transplantation at UC Davis Current Status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Alnimri, B Gallay, C Troppmann Univ of California Davis Med Center World Transplant Congress 2014 #12 from acute stress/injury · Kidney allografts will grow with time #12;#12;Standard pediatric en bloc.2% Imports 100% Cold ischemia (hrs) 23.1 13.6 ­ 30.5 Pulsatile Machine Perfusion 100% Final Pump Flow (ml

  17. Davis PV plant operation and maintenance manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-09-01

    This operation and maintenance manual contains the information necessary to run the Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA) test facility in Davis, California. References to more specific information available in drawings, data sheets, files, or vendor manuals are included. The PVUSA is a national cooperative research and demonstration program formed in 1987 to assess the potential of utility scale photovoltaic systems.

  18. Failure of Tapo Canyon Tailings Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harder, Leslie F Jr; Stewart, Jonathan P

    1996-01-01

    embankment increases. The tailings pond eventually took theThe Tapo Canyon tailings dam and pond are owned by the P. W.of a tailings dam due to liquefaction of the pond deposit."

  19. Thomas Van Dam Principal, Nichols Consulting Engineers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Van Dam Principal, Nichols Consulting Engineers Transportation Research Group TVanDam-cost, widespread availability, versatility, and hallmark longevity, hydraulic cement concrete (HCC) is the most in a variety of applications, including bridges, hydraulic structures, retaining walls, barriers, curbs

  20. Dams Securing Water for Our Future 1 ICOLD Bulletin on Dam Safety Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    Dams ­ Securing Water for Our Future 1 ICOLD Bulletin on Dam Safety Management David S. Bowles 1 , Michel Poupart 6 , David Stewart 5 , Przemyslaw A. Zielinski 7 1 Institute for Dam Safety Risk The ICOLD Committee on Dam Safety (CODS) "was established as a coordinating body to assure

  1. Ethanol Consumption by Rat Dams During Gestation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galef Jr., Bennett G.

    Ethanol Consumption by Rat Dams During Gestation, Lactation and Weaning Increases Ethanol examined effects of ethanol consumption in rat dams during gestation, lactation, and weaning on voluntary ethanol consumption by their adolescent young. We found that exposure to an ethanol-ingesting dam

  2. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42) ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1961 Marine Biological. McKeman, Director ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1961--Fisheries No. 421 Washington, D. C. April 1962 #12;Rock Island Dam, Columbia River, Washington ii #12;CONTENTS

  3. On Quantum Computation Theory Wim van Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koolen, Marijn

    On Quantum Computation Theory Wim van Dam #12;#12;On Quantum Computation Theory #12;ILLC woensdag 9 oktober 2002, te 14.00 uur door Willem Klaas van Dam geboren te Breda. #12;Promotor: Prof. dr. P Dam, 2002 ISBN: 90­5776­091­6 #12;" . . . Many errors have been made in the world which today

  4. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 :y .iiJA/i-3ri ^' WUUUi. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 by Paul D. Zimmer, Clifton and observations 10 Summary 13 #12;#12;ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON

  5. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1960 . SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1960 by Paul D. Zimmer and Clifton C. Davidson United States Fish This annual report of fishway operations at Rock Island Dam in 1960 is dedicated to the memory of co

  6. Viscoplastic dam breaks and the Bostwick consistometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balmforth, Neil

    Viscoplastic dam breaks and the Bostwick consistometer N. J. Balmforth, a R. V. Craster, b P'Informazione, Universit`a di Milano, Crema, Italy Abstract We present a theoretical and experimental analysis of the dam the broken dam) that may assist an experimentalist to unravel those dependences. Experiments are conducted

  7. Annual Fish Passage Report -Rock Island Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By Paul D. Zimmer L. McKeman, Director Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965;#12;Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By PAUL D. ZIMMER, Fishery

  8. Dam Design and Construction (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations apply to dams that are not owned by the U.S. government and (a) have a structural height of more than 6 feet and a maximum storage capacity of 50 acre–feet or more of water, (b)...

  9. Isotopic Survey of Lake Davis and the Local Groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridley, M N; Moran, J E; Singleton, M J

    2007-08-21

    In September 2007, California Fish and Game (CAFG) plans to eradicate the northern pike from Lake Davis. As a result of the eradication treatment, local residents have concerns that the treatment might impact the local groundwater quality. To address the concerns of the residents, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) recommended measuring the naturally occurring stable oxygen isotopes in local groundwater wells, Lake Davis, and the Lake Davis tributaries. The purpose of these measurements is to determine if the source of the local groundwater is either rain/snowmelt, Lake Davis/Big Grizzly Creek water or a mixture of Lake Davis/Big Grizzly Creek and rain/snowmelt. As a result of natural evaporation, Lake Davis and the water flowing into Big Grizzly Creek are naturally enriched in {sup 18}oxygen ({sup 18}O), and if a source of a well's water is Lake Davis or Big Grizzly Creek, the well water will contain a much higher concentration of {sup 18}O. This survey will allow for the identification of groundwater wells whose water source is Lake Davis or Big Grizzly Creek. The results of this survey will be useful in the development of a water-quality monitoring program for the upcoming Lake Davis treatment. LLNL analyzed 167 groundwater wells (Table 1), 12 monthly samples from Lake Davis (Table 2), 3 samples from Lake Davis tributaries (Table 2), and 8 Big Grizzly Creek samples (Table 2). Of the 167 groundwater wells sampled and analyzed, only 2 wells contained a significant component of evaporated water, with an isotope composition similar to Lake Davis water. The other 163 groundwater wells have isotope compositions which indicate that their water source is rain/snowmelt.

  10. UC Davis Health System -Computer Workstation Self Evaluation Assessment Date: ______________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    UC Davis Health System - Computer Workstation Self Evaluation Assessment Date Ergonomics Program at 734-6180 #12;UCDHS ERGONOMICS PROGRAM Adjusting your Computer Workstation to Fit

  11. The UC Davis Emerging Lithium Battery Test Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Andy; Miller, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    The UC Davis Emerging Lithium Battery Test Project Andrewto evaluate emerging lithium battery technologies for plug-vehicles. By emerging lithium battery chemistries were meant

  12. Raymond Davis Jr., Solar Neutrinos, and the Solar Neutrino Problems

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    discrepancy. While at Brookhaven, Ray Davis conducted research and experiments in solar neutrinos at Homestake Gold Mine in South Dakota. This research was funded by the...

  13. Semi-Annual Davis-Bacon Act Enforcement Report Form Guidance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Semi-Annual Davis-Bacon Act Enforcement Report Form Guidance Semi-Annual Davis-Bacon Act Enforcement Report Form Guidance Semi-Annual Davis-Bacon Act Enforcement Report Form...

  14. Davis Water Consumption Efficiency Link, Phung, Purewal, Purewal, Salmon ESM 121 Water Science and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    Davis Water Consumption Efficiency Link, Phung, Purewal, Purewal, Salmon ESM 121 Water Science and Management Water Consumption Efficiency of Toilets & Shower Heads in Davis: Old Davis Purewal, Kiernan Salmon Abstract The efficiency of household water consumption varies with the age

  15. DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT1 PINE CREEK DAM, OKLAHOMA2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    #12;#12;DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT1 PINE CREEK DAM, OKLAHOMA2 DAM SAFETY MODIFICATION3 &4 Environmental Assessment Pine Creek Dam, Oklahoma Dam Safety Modification & Interim Risk Reduction Measure and risk reduction measures necessary to correct structural and maintenance deficiencies of Pine Creek Dam

  16. Green River Locks and Dams 3, 4, 5, 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 Disposition, Kentucky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Green River Locks and Dams 3, 4, 5, 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 Disposition, Kentucky 16 September 2014 ABSTRACT: Green River Locks and Dams 3 through 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 were. The Green River Locks and Dams 5 and 6 ceased operations in 1951 due to a marked decline in navigation

  17. DAVIS-BACON ACT WAGE RATES FOR ARRA-FUNDED ENERGY EFFICIENCY...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DAVIS-BACON ACT WAGE RATES FOR ARRA-FUNDED ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANT (EECBG) PROGRAM PROJECTS INCLUDING RESIDENTIAL WEATHERIZATION WORK DAVIS-BACON ACT WAGE...

  18. FINITE K(ss, 1)'S FOR ARTIN GROUPS Ruth Charney(*)and Michael W. Davis(*)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charney, Ruth

    (*)and Michael W. Davis(*) To Bill Browder for his sixtieth birthday 1 #12;2 RUTH CHARNEY AND MICHAEL W. DAVIS convex, open set I (the interior

  19. University of California Davis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York:Power Company JumpGeoPower JumpCalifornia Davis Jump

  20. Davis Energy Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9) WindGrid Project)Area (1982)DatabusDavis

  1. Davis Energy Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9) WindGrid Project)Area (1982)DatabusDavis

  2. Davis Graham Stubbs LLP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9) WindGrid Project)Area (1982)DatabusDavisGraham

  3. Kim Davis Lebak | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate student Subtask 4Photo4> TheKevinKim Davis Lebak |

  4. Optimal Dam Construction under Climate Change Uncertainty and Anticipated Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron-Loyd, Patricia Jane

    2012-01-01

    real option theory to irrigation dam investment analysis: an43, 2) 482–498. [40] World Commission on Dams (WCD), 2000.Dams and development: A new framework for decision- making.

  5. Net-Zero Campus at University of California, Davis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    With the help of $2.5 million in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funding, the University of California, Davis (UC Davis) built a net-zero community on its 130-acre West Village campus that provides housing for approximately 3,000 people in 662 apartments and 343 single-family homes.

  6. Student Handbook UC Davis Master of Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Student Handbook UC Davis Master of Public Health Degree Program 2014-2015 Academic Year Last . . . . . . . . 6 Learning Objectives . . . . . . . . . . 7 MPH Core Competencies . . . . . . . . . 7 Public Health;3 Welcometo the UC Davis Master of Public Health Program. I congratulate you on joining a new generation

  7. University of California, Davis Office of the University Registrar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    University of California, Davis Office of the University Registrar Diploma Mailing Form One Shields Avenue, 12 Mrak Hall, Davis, CA 95616-8692 | Office: 530-752-3639 | Fax: 530-752-6906 Diploma diploma will be held until your bill is paid. For more information about your hold, contact Student

  8. University of California, Davis Office of the University Registrar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    University of California, Davis Office of the University Registrar Petition for Credit by Examination One Shields Avenue, 12 Mrak Hall, Davis, CA 95616-8692 | Office: 530-752-3639 | Fax: 530 at the Cashier's Office or bill your account at the Office of the University Registrar. · The Office

  9. Analysis of City of Davis 2010 Urban Water Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    Analysis of City of Davis 2010 Urban Water Management Plan Jessica Collado, Junyan Li, Vicki Lin Abstract With a growing population, the water demand in the city of Davis will increase, further depleting its aquifer. In order to prevent groundwater overdrafting, which can lead to degrading water quality

  10. UC Davis School of Medicine Match Results -2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Medicine SACRAMENTO CA UC Davis Med Ctr-CA Emergency Medicine SACRAMENTO CA UC Davis Med Ctr-CA Emergency Medicine SACRAMENTO CA UC San Francisco-CA Emergency Medicine SAN FRANCISCO CA Sutter Health-CA Family Med/Sacramento SACRAMENTO CA Swedish Medical Center-WA Family Med/SeaMar SEATTLE WA Arrowhead Reg Med Ctr-CA Family Medicine

  11. Saeltzer Dam Removal on Clear Creek 11 years later: An assessment of upstream channel changes since the dam's removal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Crystal; Walker, Katelyn; Zimring, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Boulder BLDR Bedrock BDRK Dam Rubble DMRB Table B1. 2011pages. Brown, M. (n.d. ). Clear Creek—McCormick-Saeltzer DamRemoval: Dam removal re-opens spring run salmon habitat. US

  12. US Society on Dams Annual Conference, March 2007, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania TOLERABLE RISK FOR DAMS: HOW SAFE IS SAFE ENOUGH?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    US Society on Dams Annual Conference, March 2007, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1 TOLERABLE RISK and defensive design measures." #12;US Society on Dams Annual Conference, March 2007, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  13. Three-Gorges Dam: Risk to Ancient Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianguo "Jingle"

    Three-Gorges Dam: Risk to Ancient Fish THE HUGETHREE-GORGES DAM (TGD) OFTHE Yangtze River is going and animals, as discussed by J. Wu et al. in their Policy Forum "Three-Gorges Dam-- experiment in habitat). The construction of the Gezhou Dam (38 km downstream from the TGD) in 1981 led to sharp declines in the popula

  14. TOWARDS A DAMS SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FOR Vitor Camilo*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    da Silva, Alberto Rodrigues

    1 TOWARDS A DAMS SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FOR ANGOLA Vitor Camilo* , Alberto Rodrigues da Silva Angola e-mail: vitor.camilo@tecangol.com, webpage: www.tecangol.com Keywords: Dams, Dam Safety Management System, gestBarragens, Angola, Portugal Abstract. Dams have contributed to the human development and have

  15. Backups Using Storage Clusters! Joshua T. A. Davies ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Backups Using Storage Clusters Joshua T. A. Davies Garrett W. Ransom Nicole M. Shaw Mentors: David Kennel, Sonny Rosemond, Cindy Valdez, Timothy Hemphill (DCS-CSD) LA-UR-14-26017...

  16. West Virginia University 1 Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    of our soils, water, forests, wildlife, domestic animals, food, fiber, and living spaces. The Davis and Environmental Microbiology · Animal and Nutritional Sciences · Biochemistry · Environmental Protection · Landscape Architecture SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES · Agribusiness Management and Rural Development · Energy

  17. VBA-0083- In the Matter of S.R. Davis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Decision considers an Appeal of an Initial Agency Decision (IAD) issued on April 21, 2004, involving a complaint filed by S.R. Davis (also referred to as the Complainant) under the Department...

  18. University of California Davis Health Care System Nurse Practitioner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    University of California Davis Health Care System Nurse Practitioner JULIE JORGENSON MSN, RN, FNP, ANP, GNP TITLE: Nurse Practitioner II SPECIALTY: Comprehensive Epilepsy Program Neurology ADDRESS: UC INTERESTS: Pediatric and Adult Epilepsy EDUCATION: 1982 California State University Chico BSN Chico

  19. Updated 1-14 Ronald J. Davis, Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with industry, and programs for continuous improvement including Lean Six Sigma. In November of 2005 Mr. Davis for Installation Management, Army Management Staff College (2008); Lean Six Sigma Executive Green Belt (2007

  20. VBU-0083- In the Matter of S. R. Davis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    S. R. Davis, a former employee of Fluor Fernald, Inc. (Fluor), a Department of Energy (DOE) contractor, appeals the DOE Ohio Field Office’s (OFO) dismissal of the whistleblower complaint against...

  1. Perspectives on Dam Removal: York Creek Dam and the Water Framework Directive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Justin E; Pollak, Josh D; Richmond, Sarah F

    2008-01-01

    supply, flood control, hydropower, and recreation. However,as changes induced by hydropower, flood control, or waterFERC requires private hydropower dams to provide “equal

  2. EVOLVING EXPECTATIONS OF DAM REMOVAL OUTCOMES: DOWNSTREAM GEOMORPHIC EFFECTS FOLLOWING REMOVAL OF A SMALL, GRAVEL-FILLED DAM1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    EVOLVING EXPECTATIONS OF DAM REMOVAL OUTCOMES: DOWNSTREAM GEOMORPHIC EFFECTS FOLLOWING REMOVAL OF A SMALL, GRAVEL-FILLED DAM1 Kelly Kibler, Desiree Tullos, and Mathias Kondolf 2 ABSTRACT: Dam removal is a promising river restoration technique, particularly for the vast number of rivers impounded by small dams

  3. Processes affecting the spatial and temporal variability of methane in a temperate dammed river system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilsley, Nicole A.

    2012-01-01

    emissions from large dams as renewable energy resources: Areservoir (Brazil’s Tucuruí Dam) and the energy policyemissions from hydroelectric dams: controversies provide a

  4. Revised Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the East Branch Dam, Clarion River,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Revised Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the East Branch Dam, Clarion River, Elk County, Pennsylvania: Dam Safety Modification Report Prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute Prepared Report East Branch Dam, Clarion River, Elk County, Pennsylvania: Dam Safety Modification Report

  5. UTILIZATION DOBER, LIDSKY, CRAIG & ASSOCIATES, INC. * CRAIG, GAULDEN & DAVIS * SEAMON, WHITESIDE & ASSOCIATES, INC * MCCRACKEN & LOPEZ, P.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    SPACE UTILIZATION STUDY 2002 DOBER, LIDSKY, CRAIG & ASSOCIATES, INC. * CRAIG, GAULDEN & DAVIS 2002 SPACE UTILIZATION STUDY DOBER, LIDSKY, CRAIG & ASSOCIATES, INC. * CRAIG, GAULDEN & DAVIS * SEAMON CAMPUS SPACE UTILIZATION

  6. Davis-Bacon Act Wage Rates for ARRA-Funded State Energy Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Davis-Bacon Act Wage Rates for ARRA-Funded State Energy Program Projects Involving Residential Weatherization Work Davis-Bacon Act Wage Rates for ARRA-Funded State Energy Program...

  7. DAVIS-BACON ACT WAGE RATES FOR ARRA-FUNDED STATE ENERGY PROGRAM...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DAVIS-BACON ACT WAGE RATES FOR ARRA-FUNDED STATE ENERGY PROGRAM (SEP) PROJECTS INCLUDING RESIDENTIAL WEATHERIZATION WORK DAVIS-BACON ACT WAGE RATES FOR ARRA-FUNDED STATE ENERGY...

  8. PAO Form 5/2001 1 REQUEST FOR DAVIS-BACON DETERMINATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    #12;PAO Form 5/2001 1 REQUEST FOR DAVIS-BACON DETERMINATION Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for Davis-Bacon Determination (1) TO: (2) Project Title: NSTX Upgrade Project No.: Date: 1/20/11 (3

  9. FINITE K( ; 1)'S FOR ARTIN GROUPS Ruth Charney ( ) and Michael W. Davis ( )

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charney, Ruth

    FINITE K(#25;; 1)'S FOR ARTIN GROUPS Ruth Charney (#3;) and Michael W. Davis (#3;) To Bill Browder RUTH CHARNEY AND MICHAEL W. DAVIS convex, open set I (the interior of the \\Tits cone"). When W is #12

  10. UC Davis Medical Center Community Health Needs Assessment Implementation Plan Page 2 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullrich, Paul

    , an 800-member physician's practice group and the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing. UC Davis Medical Center has the region's only Level I pediatric and adult trauma centers; the UC Davis MIND Institute

  11. The Davis Bicycle Studies: Why Do I Bicycle But My Neighbor Doesn't?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    Factors Associated with Bicycle Ownership and Use: A StudyHandy. 2008. “Fifty Years of Bicycle Policy in Davis, CA,”The Davis Bicycle Studies Why do I bicycle but my neighbor

  12. Hydroelectric dams need billions for rehab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, F.H.; Soast, A.

    1993-01-11

    Many of the Corps of Engineers older hydroelectric dams will require major rehabilitation over the next ten years. Preventive maintenance, repair work, and major rehabilitation of the Corp's hydro dams in inadequate because the revenue generated by sales of electricity, by law, is returned to the Treasury. Most multimillion dollar rehabilitation projects require specific approval for funding by Congress and securing it is a long and difficult process. It is hoped the funding problem will soon be addressed by the Clinton administration. Already, nearly one-sixth of the 2,154 Mw of hydro is unavailable because with hydro units are either out of service or operating at less than full capacity.

  13. Lac Courte Oreilles Hydro Dam Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Jason; Meyers, Amy

    2014-12-31

    The main objective of this project was to investigate upgrading the existing hydro power generating system at the Winter Dam. The tribe would like to produce more energy and receive a fair market power purchase agreement so the dam is no longer a drain on our budget but a contributor to our economy. We contracted Kiser Hydro, LLC Engineering for this project and received an engineering report that includes options for producing more energy with cost effective upgrades to the existing turbines. Included in this project was a negotiation of energy price sales negotiations.

  14. MFR PAPER 1222 Effects of Dams on Pacific Salmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Their numbers were few and their total effect was relatively minor. In the 1880's dams for hydroelectric power. In the 1930's major hydroelectric dams were built on the mainstem Columbia River (Fig. I), initiating

  15. Student Competition: Siting Potential Dams at Camp Del Webb, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wamser, William Kyle

    2007-11-14

    Siting Potential Dams at Camp Del Webb, Utah Presented By: Kyle Wamser Problem ? Camp Del Webb is Lacking an Onsite Lake ? High Adventure Bases generally need aquatics ? Large lake nearby, but transportation is required ? Possible Solution... hillshade ? Finding Possible Lake Locations ? Added three potential dam sites ? Calculated watersheds ? Extended dams through terrain to prevent runoff on the sides ? Calculated watershed dam elevation, which identified lakes Results...

  16. INCORPORATING UNCERTAINTY INTO DAM SAFETY RISK Sanjay S. Chauhan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    INCORPORATING UNCERTAINTY INTO DAM SAFETY RISK ASSESSMENT Sanjay S. Chauhan1 and David S. Bowles2 ABSTRACT Risk assessment is becoming more widely used to supplement traditional approaches to dam safety decision-making. Dam owners throughout Australia, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the U.S. Bureau

  17. Wavelet-Based Multiresolution Analysis of Wivenhoe Dam Water Temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Percival, Don

    Wavelet-Based Multiresolution Analysis of Wivenhoe Dam Water Temperatures Don Percival Applied monitoring program recently upgraded with perma- nent installation of vertical profilers at Lake Wivenhoe dam in a subtropical dam as a function of time and depth · will concentrate on a 600+ day segment of temperature fluc

  18. MURTHY, MURTY AND RAGHUPATHY Designing Earth Dams Optimally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murty, Katta G.

    [ 91 ] MURTHY, MURTY AND RAGHUPATHY Designing Earth Dams Optimally G S R Murthy1 , Katta G Murty2, it aims at formulating the problem of designing earth dams as an optimization problem. The problem provides mathematical modeling for optimizing earth dam designs and for computing the factor of safety

  19. Dam-Breach Flood Wave Propagation Using Dimensionless Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    Dam-Breach Flood Wave Propagation Using Dimensionless Parameters Victor M. Ponce, M.ASCE1 ; Ahmad to study the sensitivity of dam-breach flood waves to breach-outflow hydrograph volume, peak discharge the channel. A dam-breach Froude number is defined to enable analysis through a wide range of site and flow

  20. September 17, 2012 Dam Safety' 12, ASDSO| Denver, CO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    September 17, 2012 Dam Safety' 12, ASDSO| Denver, CO Anurag Srivastava, David S. Bowles and Sanjay trees are a valuable way to model dam safety risks: · Loading (e.g. flood, earthquake) · System response in commercially-available event tree software applied to dam safety risk assessment · Discrete business risk

  1. Abstract Interpretation of Reactive Systems DENNIS DAMS and ROB GERTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grumberg, Orna

    Abstract Interpretation of Reactive Systems DENNIS DAMS and ROB GERTH Eindhoven University, formal methods, model checking, mu-calculus, reactive systems Correspondenceaddress: D. Dams, Dept;112 Dennis Dams et al. 1. INTRODUCTION In the model-checking approach Queille and Sifakis 1982 Clarke et al

  2. Abstract Interpretation of Reactive Systems DENNIS DAMS and ROB GERTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dams, Dennis

    Abstract Interpretation of Reactive Systems DENNIS DAMS and ROB GERTH Eindhoven University, formal methods, model checking, mu­calculus, reactive systems Correspondence address: D. Dams, Dept; 112 \\Delta Dennis Dams et al. 1. INTRODUCTION In the model­checking approach [Queille and Sifakis 1982

  3. THREE GORGES DAM Matthew Morioka, Alireza Abrishamkar, Yve Kay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    THREE GORGES DAM Matthew Morioka, Alireza Abrishamkar, Yve Kay CEE 491 #12;Specifications.3 Billion · Total Cost (2008) ¥ 148.4 Billion = $ 21.8 Billion #12;Source of Funds · Three Gorges Dam Construction Fund · Profits from the Gezhouba Dam · Policy Loans from the Chinese Development Bank · Loans from

  4. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Big dams and salmon evolution: changes in thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angilletta, Michael

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Big dams and salmon evolution: changes in thermal regimes and their potential (Oncorhynchus spp.) across portions of their natural range, dams have arguably played a major role in many locations (NRC 1996; Lichatowich 1999; Ruckelshaus et al. 2002). Large dams (>15 m tall)­ designed

  5. Dams and Water Developments1 Robert H. Schueneman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dams and Water Developments1 Robert H. Schueneman 2/ 1/ Presented at the National Conference dams and reservoirs, channelization and erosion control on rivers and tributaries, and coastal works. Such activities include dams and asso- ciated reservoirs, flood and erosion control on tributaries and rivers

  6. GEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS By: Christine T. Weber1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    GEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS By: Christine T. Weber1 and Jorge Zornberg, Advisor Abstract: The overall goal of this project is to contribute towards the use of geosynthetics in the design of dams geomembrane and composite liners under conditions representative of dams. There has been previous work done

  7. April 6, 2011 Gloria Alvarado Vice President, UC Davis Retirees' Association

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Assembly Katie Kolesar ­ Chair, UC Davis Graduate Student Association William Lacy ­ Vice Provost Chancellor, Human Health Sciences Bill Rains ­ President, UC Davis Emeriti Association Rahim Reed ­ AssociateApril 6, 2011 Gloria Alvarado ­ Vice President, UC Davis Retirees' Association Yena Bae ­ Vice

  8. White Oak Dam stability analysis. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, S.B.

    1994-01-01

    A parametric study was conducted to evaluate the stability of the White Oak Dam (WOD) embankment and foundation. Slope stability analyses were performed for the upper and lower bound soil properties at three sections of the dam using the PCSTABL4 computer program. Minimum safety factors were calculated for the applicable seismic and static loading conditions. Liquefaction potential of the dam embankment and foundation solid during the seismic event was assessed by using simplified procedures. The WOD is classified as a low hazard facility and the Evaluation Basis Earthquake (EBE) is defined as an earthquake with a magnitude of m{sub b} = 5.6 and a Peak Ground Accelerator (PGA) of 0.13 g. This event is approximately equivalent to a Modified Mercalli Intensity of VI-VIII. The EBE is used to perform the seismic evaluation for slope stability and liquefaction potential. Results of the stability analyses and the liquefaction assessment lead to the conclusion that the White Oak Dam is safe and stable for the static and the seismic events defined in this study. Ogden Environmental, at the request of MMES, has checked and verified the calculations for the critical loading conditions and performed a peer review of this report. Ogden has determined that the WOD is stable under the defined static and seismic loading conditions and the embankment materials are in general not susceptible to liquefaction.

  9. Wenatchee Subbasin Plan EFFECTS OF HYDROELECTRIC DAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of anadromous salmonids. Run-of river dams present passage obstacles to both adult and juvenile migrantsAnalysts April 2004 The existence and operation of the Columbia River Hydrosystem poses risks to wild populations focuses on Upper Columbia River populations, but in some cases refers to data from the Snake River

  10. 1996 Bruce Davis. Reprinted from GIS: A Visual Approach, p. 210 (OnWord Press). 1996 Bruce Davis. Reprinted from GIS: A Visual Approach, p. 214 (OnWord Press).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    © 1996 Bruce Davis. Reprinted from GIS: A Visual Approach, p. 210 (OnWord Press). #12;© 1996 Bruce Davis. Reprinted from GIS: A Visual Approach, p. 214 (OnWord Press). #12;© 1996 Bruce Davis. Reprinted from GIS: A Visual Approach, p. 216 (OnWord Press). #12;© 1996 Bruce Davis. Reprinted from GIS

  11. University of California, Davis Electrical and Computer Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolner, Brian H.

    AGENDA University of California, Davis Electrical and Computer Engineering Industrial Affiliates, Physical Sciences, IBM Research, T.J. Watson Research Center In Quest of the "Next Switch": Prospects, Industrial Affiliates Committee 8:50 a.m. - 9:15 a.m. Chair's Report ECE Department Chair, Professor Richard

  12. Laser Frequency Stabilization with Optical Cavities Anya M. Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blinov, Boris

    Laser Frequency Stabilization with Optical Cavities Anya M. Davis Walla Walla University University Effective laser cooling requires the laser's frequency to be precise, with a frequency drift of no more than lasers for correcting frequency drift. In the University of Washington Quantum Computing with Trapped

  13. Student Affairs Supporting the Vision of UC Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    that promote student learning · To provide seamless systems that advance transitions and success · To foster programs focused on mentorship, leadership and career development. Students engaged in activities outsideStudent Affairs Supporting the Vision of UC Davis Annual Report, 2010-2011 #12;STUDENT AFFAIRS

  14. TERRORISM AND WAR (SAS 7) UC Davis; Spring, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    1 TERRORISM AND WAR (SAS 7) UC Davis; Spring, 2013 INSTRUCTORS OFFICE HOUR (VIRTUAL) Prof. James R to varying degrees in major conflicts around the world, issues of terrorism and war are heavily debated deeply about terrorism and war and question your assumptions. You will be asked to understand

  15. Transportation Stacy C. Davis Susan W. Diegel Robert G. Boundy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    ;Transportation Energy Data Book Quick Facts Petroleum The U.S. produces 7.9 million barrels of petroleum per day TRANSPORTATION ENERGY DATA BOOK: EDITION 31 Stacy C. Davis Susan W. Diegel Oak Ridge National Laboratory Robert G. Boundy Roltek, Inc. July 2012 Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 31 can be found on line at: cta

  16. UC Davis School of Medicine Match Results -2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    -CA Emergency Medicine SACRAMENTO CA UC Davis Med Ctr-CA Emergency Medicine SACRAMENTO CA Sutter Health-CA Family Med/Sacramento SACRAMENTO CA Contra Costa Reg Med Ctr-CA Family Medicine MARTINEZ CA Kaiser Perm-Woodland Hills-CA Family Medicine WOODLAND HILLS CA Methodist Hosp-Sacramento-CA Family Medicine SACRAMENTO CA

  17. University of California Davis Health Care System Nurse Practitioner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    -C TITLE: Nurse Practitioner II SPECIALTY: Adult Neurology, Deep brain stimulation program ADDRESS: UCUniversity of California Davis Health Care System Nurse Practitioner LAURA SPERRY MSN, RN, ANP Care System Nurse Practitioner LAURA SPERRY MSN, RN, ANP-C RECENT PUBLICATIONS: Zhang, L., & Sperry, L

  18. Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Dr. N. Anne Davies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sciences February 28, 2006 Fusion Energy Sciences Program Update www.ofes.fusion.doe.gov U.S. DepartmentFusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Dr. N. Anne Davies Associate Director for Fusion Energy of Energy's Office of Science #12;Fusion is part of SC's part of the American Competitiveness Initiative

  19. UC DAVIS SCHOOL OF MEDICINE THIRD YEAR ABSENCE POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    UC DAVIS SCHOOL OF MEDICINE THIRD YEAR ABSENCE POLICY In order to gain the knowledge and skills needed to successfully complete the third year, experiential learning is essential. This requires a student to maintain consistent participation and attendance throughout the third year. We recognize

  20. RICHARD A. DAVIS: CURRICULUM VITAE June 1, 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Richard A.

    of International Statistics Institute, 1992 Koopmans Econometric Theory Prize for the period 1994­1996, inclusive Statistics. (Jan '13­present) Associate Editor, Communications for Statistical Applications and Methods. (Jan1 RICHARD A. DAVIS: CURRICULUM VITAE June 1, 2015 Address Department of Statistics Columbia

  1. Reply to Davies: Hydraulic fracturing remains a possible mechanism for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    LETTER Reply to Davies: Hydraulic fracturing remains a possible mechanism for observed methane mechanisms were leaky gas well casings and the possibility that hydraulic fracturing might generate new- knowledged the possibility of hydraulic fracturing playing a role. Is it possible that hydraulic fracturing

  2. GG671b Remote Sensing Planets Gillis-Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GG671b Remote Sensing ­ Planets Gillis-Davis Wednesday 1:30-4:20 POST 544 Description: This course will teach end-to-end principles of remote sensing across electromagnetic spectrum with application state-of-the art remote sensing methods and basic concepts of how to use such data to derive information

  3. Health Happens at UC Davis: Promoting Student Academic Success

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Health Happens at UC Davis: Promoting Student Academic Success Through a Sustainable Wellness Model and community health. Background and Need Today's undergraduate and graduate students face an increasing number of stressors, which has caused a steady increase in student requests for mental health services on university

  4. UC DAVIS PHYSICAL DESIGN FRAMEWORK PHYSICAL DESIGN FRAMEWORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullrich, Paul

    the criteria the campus will use to judge the success of proposed projects with regard to planning and designUC DAVIS PHYSICAL DESIGN FRAMEWORK PHYSICAL DESIGN FRAMEWORK 2008 /2009 #12;ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS, Environmental and Capital Planning Karl Mohr, Physical, Environmental and Capital Planning Joseph Perry, Safety

  5. Energize your career Find out how UC Davis Extension's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    gas purchasing opportunities in the spot market, thermal energy storage, alterna- tive energy supplies, energy security and energy trading. Explore reliability and risk analysis methods, financing projectsEnergize your career Find out how UC Davis Extension's convenient, online Energy Resource

  6. Dam Safety 2015 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8, 20153 METHODSDOE/LaborSeptemberEnergy DS02:Dam Safety

  7. Dams have played an important role in human development throughout the world for thousands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Fangliang

    Dams have played an important role in human development throughout the world for thousands of years dams (>15 m in height) and an estimated 800 000 small dams had been built worldwide (WCD 2000 than 22 000 large dams (but only 22 before 1949), China is the largest dam-building country; by way

  8. Providing protection: Agencies receive funding to repair, upgrade dams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 26 Providing protection Agencies receive funding to repair, upgrade dams along with local partners, can apply for grant funds, he said. Construction of the dams began through four federal authorizations passed between... 1944 and 1981. Land rights were acquired from landowners, and local agencies constructed the dams with federal money from NRCS (formerly the Soil Conservation Service). Local sponsors?including cities, counties, local soil and water conservation...

  9. EA-1994: Malheur Resource Area Jonesboro Diversion Dam Replacement...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Burns Paiute Tribe for replacement of an existing diversion dam and installation of a fish passage structure. BPA's proposed action was to fund the project. PUBLIC COMMENT...

  10. Optimal Dam Construction under Climate Change Uncertainty and Anticipated Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron-Loyd, Patricia Jane

    2012-01-01

    CBA ..dam. Cost-bene…t analysis (CBA) and it’s close cousin, Cost-methods. Two extreme views of CBA follow, the …rst from

  11. Travertine Deposits of Soda Dam, New Mexico, and Their Implications...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the Valles caldera hydrothermal system. Soda Dam discharges from Paleozoic and Precambrian rocks in San Diego Canyon southwest of the caldera, and the canyon was filled...

  12. Title 33 USC 401 Construction of Bridges, Causeways, Dams or...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Title 33 USC 401 Construction of Bridges, Causeways, Dams or Dikes Generally; Exemptions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  13. PROJECT NAME: MEMPHIS AVE. DAM (EPWU Dam #4-TX07017) 1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests planning to act as the sponsor, including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    PROJECT NAME: MEMPHIS AVE. DAM (EPWU Dam #4-TX07017) 1. Provide the name of all non. The purpose for the feasibility study is to determine the need to update/upgrade the dam in order to assist (NFIP), which allows for flood insurance discounts to local residents. #12;Image 1: Dam location

  14. PROJECT NAME: NASHVILLE AVE. DAM (EPWU Dam #3-1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests planning to act as the sponsor, including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    PROJECT NAME: NASHVILLE AVE. DAM (EPWU Dam #3- TX07016) 1. Provide the name of all non. The purpose for the feasibility study is to determine the need to update/upgrade the dam in order to assist;Image 1: Dam location and affected community areas l.egend lmoiReiJii

  15. PROJECT NAME: MOREHEAD AVE. DAM (EPWU Dam #2-TX07015) 1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests planning to act as the sponsor, including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    PROJECT NAME: MOREHEAD AVE. DAM (EPWU Dam #2- TX07015) 1. Provide the name of all non. The purpose for the feasibility study is to determine the need to update/upgrade the dam in order to assist (NFIP), which allows for flood insurance discounts to local residents. #12;Image 1: Dam location

  16. PROJECT NAME: CLIFF ST. DAM (EPWU Dam #10-TX07023) 1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests planning to act as the sponsor, including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    PROJECT NAME: CLIFF ST. DAM (EPWU Dam #10- TX07023) 1. Provide the name of all non. The purpose for the feasibility study is to determine the need to update/upgrade the dam in order to assist (NFIP), which allows for flood insurance discounts to local residents. #12;Image 1: Dam location

  17. Grand River Dam Authority | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEniaElectricHydro Electric Co P Ltd Jump to:County2Dam

  18. Milner Dam Wind Park | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenariosMarysvilleMicrogravity-HybridCredits LLCLandfill BiomassMilner Dam

  19. Dams and Energy Sectors Interdependency Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8, 20153 METHODSDOE/LaborSeptemberEnergy DS02:DamDamienType

  20. Tests with Sandia's Davis gun aid B61-12 life extension effort...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Tests with Sandia's Davis gun aid B61-12 life extension effort | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile...

  1. The distribution of dams in Costa Rica and their hydrologic impacts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurencio, Laura Richards

    2006-04-12

    Dam construction has increased exponentially over the past century, primarily in temperate environments. While the impacts of dams in temperate regions have been well-documented, a parallel level of research on dam impacts ...

  2. High Dams and Marine-Freshwater Linkages: Effects on Native and Introduced Fauna in the Caribbean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmquist, Jeffrey G; Schmidt-Gengenbach, Jutta; Yoshioka, Beverly Buchanan

    1998-01-01

    in relation to hydroelectric dams in the Amazon Basin.effects of the Kafue Gorge Dam. Transactions of the Americanof fishways and impact of dams on the migration of grayling

  3. Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis for a Dam Site in Calabria (Southern Italy)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmaro, Paolo; Stewart, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    expected accelerations for some dam sites in Southern Italy,Seismic Hazard Analysis for a Dam Site in Calabria (SouthernSeismic Hazard Analysis for a Dam Site in Calabria (Southern

  4. Historical Population Structure of Central Valley Steelhead and Its Alteration by Dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    M. 2005. Creating a comprehensive dam dataset for assessingand its Alteration by Dams STEVEN T. LINDLEY 1 , ROBERT S.Pres- ently, impassable dams block access to 80% of

  5. The Downstream Geomorphic Effects of Dams: A Comprehensive and Comparative Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minear, Justin Toby

    2010-01-01

    gages used and the dates of the pre- and post-dam periods.and its alteration by dams. San Francisco Estuary andof water and sediment on rigid dam, J. Eng. Mech. , 119(7),

  6. Historical Shoreline Evolution as a Response to Dam Placement on the Elwha River, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagid, Bethany Marie

    2015-01-01

    patterns and processes prior to dam removal: U.S. Geologicalprior to large-scale dam removal in the Elwha River,P.B. , 2015, Large-scale dam removal on the Elwha River,

  7. DRAFT San Acacia Reach San Acacia Dam to Escondida Bridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    DRAFT San Acacia Reach San Acacia Dam to Escondida Bridge Hydraulic Modeling Analysis 1918, hydraulic modeling analyses have been performed on the San Acacia reach to determine the changes by Reclamation on the San Acacia reach. The 11.6 mile long extends from the San Acacia Diversion dam (River Mile

  8. San Acacia Reach San Acacia Dam to Escondida Bridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    San Acacia Reach San Acacia Dam to Escondida Bridge Hydraulic Modeling Analysis 1918-2006 Middle, hydraulic modeling analyses have been performed on the San Acacia reach to determine the changes by Reclamation on the San Acacia reach. The 11.6 mile long reach extends from the San Acacia Diversion dam (River

  9. Processes affecting the spatial and temporal variability of methane in a temperate dammed river system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilsley, Nicole A.

    2012-01-01

    gas emissions from a hydroelectric reservoir (Brazil’sgas emissions from hydroelectric dams: controversies provideP. M. , 2005a. Do hydroelectric dams mitigate global

  10. Davie County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments Inc JumpIowa:Minnesota: Energy Resources Jump to:NorthDavie

  11. Raymond Davis Jr., Solar Neutrinos, and the Solar Neutrino Problems

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding access toSmall ReactorRaymond Davis, Jr., Solar Neutrinos, and the

  12. MHK Projects/Davis Island Bend | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPT Wave Park < MHKIslandDavis

  13. UC Davis Policy and Procedure Manual Chapter 290, Health and Safety Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    UC Davis Policy and Procedure Manual Chapter 290, Health and Safety Services Section 65, Hazardous or injury caused by hazardous chemicals. Additional regulations for the UCD Medical Center are available maintained on UC Davis properties or in surrounding areas. 3. The environment. B. Emergencies involving

  14. Response to the UC Davis Academic Senate's Executive Council Request for an Action Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Response to the UC Davis Academic Senate's Executive Council Request for an Action Plan January 18 ........................................12 II.10 Reynoso C-3: UCOP should review Police Officers Bill of Rights....................................................................................................13 Section III: Kroll Report Recommendations III.1 Kroll 8.1: UC Davis Leadership Team

  15. Group Name: University of California, Davis Medical Center Benefit Plan Name: Custom Plus Plan #10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Group Name: University of California, Davis Medical Center Benefit Plan Name: Custom Plus Plan #10. Page 1 of 2 #12;Group Name: University of California, Davis Medical Center Benefit Plan Name: Custom/PPO dentist cannot "balance bill" you for amounts greater than the contracted rate. How It Works Out

  16. Response to the UC Davis Academic Senate's Executive Council Request for an Action Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Response to the UC Davis Academic Senate's Executive Council Request for an Action Plan May 1, 2013: UC Davis Police department should strive to be a model of policing...........14 II.8 Reynoso C-1 ........................................15 II.10 Reynoso C-3: UCOP should review Police Officers Bill of Rights

  17. Updated Response to the UC Davis Academic Senate's Executive Council Request for an Action Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Updated Response to the UC Davis Academic Senate's Executive Council Request for an Action Plan ........................................22 II.10 Reynoso C-3: UCOP should review Police Officers Bill of Rights...................................................................................................................................22 Section III: Kroll Report Recommendations III.1 Kroll 8.1: UC Davis Leadership Team

  18. Response to the UC Davis Academic Senate's Executive Council Request for an Action Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Response to the UC Davis Academic Senate's Executive Council Request for an Action Plan June 1 ........................................15 II.10 Reynoso C-3: UCOP should review Police Officers Bill of Rights...................................................................................................................................16 Section III: Kroll Report Recommendations III.1 Kroll 8.1: UC Davis Leadership Team

  19. UC DAVIS HEALTH SYSTEM EMPLOYEE GIVING PROGRAM PAYROLL DEDUCTION AUTHORIZATION/CANCELLATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    of Nursing Greatest Need (S-NRDN803) UC Davis Nurses' Endowed Scholarship (122752) UC Davis Nurses' Endowed Research Fund (122751) Nursing Science Student & Alumni Scholarship (14826) Cancer General Support (S-CC46530) Lung Cancer Research (S-CC48528) Ovarian Cancer Research (S-CC42867) Pediatric Cancer Fund

  20. The City College of New York Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yi

    The City College of New York Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education Physician Assistant #12;1 PREFACE The City College of New York Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education Physician College of New York. The September 2014 edition of the handbook supplants any previous version

  1. The City College of New York Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yi

    2 The City College of New York Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education Physician Assistant #12;3 PREFACE The City College of New York Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education Physician of New York. While this Handbook covers polices for the entire curriculum, there are more specific

  2. BCG Response to UC Davis Policy Institute on Energy, Environment and the Economy May 8, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    BCG Response to UC Davis Policy Institute on Energy, Environment and the Economy May 8, 2013 We appreciate the work the US Davis Institute for Energy, Environment and the Economy put into its review of the Boston Consulting Group analysis of the cumulative impacts of AB 32 policies on California refiners

  3. A. Reservoir Effects of Stream Channels DAM IMPACTS ON AND RESTORATION OF AN ALLUVIAL RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    and reservoirs on alluvial rivers extends both upstream and downstream of the dam. Downstream of dams, both dam construction, the downstream channel bed degraded and coarsened to gravel size, and the planform of the river channels downstream of dams. Additionally, hydrologic and geomorphic impacts lead to changes

  4. Signature of Rhine Valley sturzstrom dam failures in Holocene sediments of Lake Constance, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Signature of Rhine Valley sturzstrom dam failures in Holocene sediments of Lake Constance, Germany 4 November 2003; received in revised form 12 April 2004; accepted 26 April 2004 Abstract Landslide-dammed that the hyperpycnite deposits are directly related to the failure of two sturzstrom dams and the draining of the dammed

  5. DOWNSTREAM CHANNEL CHANGES AFTER A SMALL DAM REMOVAL: USING AERIAL PHOTOS AND MEASUREMENT ERROR FOR CONTEXT;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    DOWNSTREAM CHANNEL CHANGES AFTER A SMALL DAM REMOVAL: USING AERIAL PHOTOS AND MEASUREMENT ERROR and Ecological Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA ABSTRACT Dam removal is often implemented to assess downstream channel changes associated with a small dam removal. The Brownsville Dam, a 2.1 m tall

  6. Experimental Study on Impact Load on a Dam Due to Debris Flow1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Experimental Study on Impact Load on a Dam Due to Debris Flow1 lwao Miyoshi2 ABSTRACT When a dam such destruction, it is important to perform basic research about the impact load on a dam due to debris flow. Thus on the dam. The experiment was performed with glass beads of 5mm in diameter as bulk solid, in an open

  7. TSSGNEO suggestions for refinement of safety criteria for dam at the Sayano-Shushenskaya HPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savich, A. I.; Gaziev, E. G.

    2013-09-15

    Analysis of radial-displacements of the dam, measured by direct and inverted plumb lines, indicates that curves of the variation in radial displacements of the dam at different elevations make it possible to plot diagrams of increases in the radial displacement over the entire height of the dam, i.e., inclines of the axis of the dam to the vertical.

  8. Institute for Water Resources, US Army Corps of Engineers Australian National Committee on Large Dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    Committee on Large Dams LIFESim: A Model for Estimating Dam Failure Life Loss DRAFT by Maged A. Aboelata and David S. Bowles Institute for Dam Safety Risk Management Utah State University Logan, Utah 2005 #12;ii ABSTRACT Catastrophic events such as dam failures or severe floods are considered to be of low probability

  9. Sediment from hydraulic mining detained by Englebright and small dams in the Yuba basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, L. Allan

    Sediment from hydraulic mining detained by Englebright and small dams in the Yuba basin L. Allan substantial modifications or removal of Englebright Dam, a large dam (86 million m3 capacity) built by the U organizations, therefore, is examining aspects of various dam-treatment scenarios that range from no action

  10. Introduction to the special issue: Understanding and linking the biophysical, socioeconomic and geopolitical effects of dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    , socioeconomic and geopolitical effects of dams 1. Introduction Dams have made important contributions to human develop- ment, and the benefits derived from them have been considerable (World Commission on Dams, 2000). With the rising global popu- lation and desire to increase quality of life, dams are prominently staged to deliver

  11. Does Small Dam Removal Affect Local Property Values? An Empirical Analysis Bill Provencher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provencher, R. William

    Does Small Dam Removal Affect Local Property Values? An Empirical Analysis Bill Provencher of small dam removal on property values in south-central Wisconsin. Data on residential property sales were obtained for three categories of sites: those where a dam is intact, those where a dam was recently removed

  12. Proceedings of the Australian Committee on Large Dams Conference, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. November 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    Proceedings of the Australian Committee on Large Dams Conference, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. November 2004 ANCOLD 2004 Conference Page 1 TRANSPORTATION MODEL FOR EVACUATION IN ESTIMATING DAM FAILURE for estimating potential life loss from natural and dam-failure floods. LIFESim can be used for dam safety risk

  13. LEAKAGE THROUGH GEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS Christine T. Weber, The University of Texas at Austin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    LEAKAGE THROUGH GEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS Christine T. Weber, The University of Texas for a range of conditions representative of dams, including representative hydraulic heads and soil hydraulic liner as a redundant lining system for earth dams. Introduction Embankment dams are susceptible

  14. Peak discharge of a Pleistocene lava-dam outburst flood in Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in channel geometry, dam height, and hydraulic characteristics, ranged from 2.3 to 5.3 × 105 m3 s-1 Canyon; Colorado river; Pleistocene floods; Lava dams; Hydraulic modeling; Paleoflood indicators; DamPeak discharge of a Pleistocene lava-dam outburst flood in Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA Cassandra R

  15. Route-Specific Passage Proportions and Survival Rates for Fish Passing through John Day Dam, The Dalles Dam, and Bonneville Dam in 2010 and 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-06-04

    This report fulfills a request of the U.S. Army Engineer District, Portland, Oregon, to produce an interim report of estimates of route-specific fish passage proportions and survival rates for lower Columbia River dams in 2010 and 2011. The estimates are needed to update the Compass Model for the Columbia River Treaty and the new Biological Opinion before detail technical reports are published in late 2012. This report tabulates route-specific fish-passage proportions and survival rates for steelhead and Chinook salmon smolts passing through various sampled routes at John Day Dam, The Dalles Dam, and Bonneville Dam in 2010 and 2011. Results were compiled from analyses of data acquired in spring 2010 and 2011 studies that were specifically designed to estimate dam-passage and forebay-to-tailrace survival rates, travel time metrics, and spill passage efficiency, as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. The study designs allowed for estimation of route-specific fish passage proportions and survival rates as well as estimation of forebay-passage survival, all of which are summarized herein.

  16. BPA customers get insider view of FCRPS dam operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wonder and respect. That energy was abundant among a group of about 50 Northwest public power customers who spent a day exploring McNary Dam, a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers'...

  17. An Agile Approach to the Doctoral Dissertation Process Amir Ataee, Sonnie Avenbuan, Marvin Billings, Sharice Cannady, Terrance Hamilton, LLiver Jose, Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tappert, Charles

    Billings, Sharice Cannady, Terrance Hamilton, LLiver Jose, Davis Mirilla, Mark Pisano, Michael Powell, Egal

  18. Quantum Linear Gravity in de Sitter Universe II: On Bunch-Davies vacuum state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. V. Takook; S. Rouhani

    2015-02-17

    In de Sitter ambient space formalism, the linear gravity can be written in terms of a minimally coupled scalar field and a polarization tensor. In this formalism, the minimally coupled massless scalar field can be quantized on Bunch-Davies vacuum state, that preserves the de Sitter invariant, the analyticity and removes the infrared divergence. The de Sitter quantum linear gravity is then constructed on Bunch-Davis vacuum state, which is also covariant, analytic and free of any infrared divergence. We conclude that the unique Bunch-Davies vacuum states can be used for construction of quantum field theory in de Sitter universe.

  19. Simulating dam removal with a 1D hydraulic model: Accuracy and techniques for reservoir erosion and downstream deposition at the Chiloquin Dam removal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Simulating dam removal with a 1D hydraulic model: Accuracy and techniques for reservoir erosion and downstream deposition at the Chiloquin Dam removal Desiree Tullos1 , Matt Cox1 , Cara Walter1 1 Department are often used to reduce uncertainty regarding the outcomes of dam removal, though the accuracy

  20. Envir202b Earth, Air, Water: the Human Context Winter 2003 F. Stahr The River Dammed: Proposed Removal of the Lower Snake River Dams A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Envir202b ­ Earth, Air, Water: the Human Context Winter 2003 F. Stahr The River Dammed: Proposed Removal of the Lower Snake River Dams ­ A Case Study Assignment & Schedule for Day 2 We will next work as your group will be asked to answer the following questions: 1) What changes (if any) to the dams

  1. Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paluch, Mark; Scholz, Allan; McLellan, Holly; Olson, Jason

    2009-07-13

    This study was designed to monitor movements of bull trout that were provided passage above Albeni Falls Dam, Pend Oreille River. Electrofishing and angling were used to collect bull trout below the dam. Tissue samples were collected from each bull trout and sent to the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Abernathy Fish Technology Center Conservation Genetics Lab, Washington. The DNA extracted from tissue samples were compared to a catalog of bull trout population DNA from the Priest River drainage, Lake Pend Oreille tributaries, and the Clark Fork drainage to determine the most probable tributary of origin. A combined acoustic radio or radio tag was implanted in each fish prior to being transported and released above the dam. Bull trout relocated above the dam were able to volitionally migrate into their natal tributary, drop back downstream, or migrate upstream to the next dam. A combination of stationary radio receiving stations and tracking via aircraft, boat, and vehicle were used to monitor the movement of tagged fish to determine if the spawning tributary it selected matched the tributary assigned from the genetic analysis. Seven bull trout were captured during electrofishing surveys in 2008. Of these seven, four were tagged and relocated above the dam. Two were tagged and left below the dam as part of a study monitoring movements below the dam. One was immature and too small at the time of capture to implant a tracking tag. All four fish released above the dam passed by stationary receivers stations leading into Lake Pend Oreille and no fish dropped back below the dam. One of the radio tags was recovered in the tributary corresponding with the results of the genetic test. Another fish was located in the vicinity of its assigned tributary, which was impassable due to low water discharge at its mouth. Two fish have not been located since entering the lake. Of these fish, one was immature and not expected to enter its natal tributary in the fall of 2008. The other fish was large enough to be mature, but at the time of capture its sex was unable to be determined, indicating it may not have been mature at the time of capture. These fish are expected to enter their natal tributaries in early summer or fall of 2009.

  2. Longitudinal and seasonal variation of stream N uptake in an urbanizing watershed: effect of organic matter, stream size, transient storage and debris dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claessens, Luc; Tague, Christina L.; Groffman, Peter M.; Melack, John M.

    2010-01-01

    streams, organic debris dams can play an important role inin ?ow velocity when debris dams are hydraulically activecontact time. Therefore, debris dams can have an important

  3. A Laser Range Scanner Designed for Minimum Calibration Complexity James Davis, Xing Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    A Laser Range Scanner Designed for Minimum Calibration Complexity James Davis, Xing Chen Computer Graphics Lab, Stanford University {jedavis, xcchen}@graphics.stanford.edu Abstract Laser range scanners reduce the costs associated with calibration. 1 Introduction Laser triangulation scanners

  4. The Effects of Migrant Remittances on Consumption in Highland Guatemala Jason Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    The Effects of Migrant Remittances on Consumption in Highland Guatemala Jason Davis DavidL. Carr This paper investigates the potential impact of migrant remittances on consumption in highland Guatemala

  5. Model-driven support for a vaccine study in Kathmandu Jim Davies, Jeremy Gibbons, Steve Harris,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    Model-driven support for a vaccine study in Kathmandu Jim Davies, Jeremy Gibbons, Steve Harris Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation), which is funded by five national governments and the Bill

  6. ALL DESIGN TECHNOLOGY LIVING TRANSPORTATION ENERGY SCIENCE BUSINESS PODCASTS Alex Davies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Printing Can Do From hermit crab shells to moon bases, 3D printing may remake the world. by Lloyd Alter wave in tech, making gadgets greener along the way. by Alex Davies in Gadgets 19 Amazing Things 3D

  7. @FrankKlotzNNSA Welcome aboard Brig. Gen. Stephen L. Davis--an...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    L. Davis--an outstanding leader to help guide our Stockpile Stewardship Program http:1.usa.gov1sDVbaG | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr...

  8. A review of "Chivalry and Romance in the English Renaissance." by Alex Davis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eugene D. Hill

    2004-01-01

    . Reading Cervantes? Don in this 10 SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY NEWS fashion, as ?an icon of historical discontinuity? (109), misconstrues that character, applying (Davis claims) eighteenth-century constructions of the distinctively medieval (and non.... Highlighting the fluidity of that flux is, in my view, a principal strength of this history. Alex Davis. Chivalry and Romance in the English Renaissance. Rochester: D. S. Brewer, 2003. viii + 263 pp. $85.00. Review by EUGENE D. HILL, MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE...

  9. CX-008779: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008779: Categorical Exclusion Determination Curecanti-Poncha-Canon City West-Midway 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line Road Maintenance...

  10. CX-012215: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    5: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-012215: Categorical Exclusion Determination Curecanti-Poncha 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line Vegetation Management Under the Uncompahgre...

  11. CX-012355: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    55: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-012355: Categorical Exclusion Determination Kayenta-Navajo 230-kilovolt Transmission Line Landing Construction and Insulator Replacement,...

  12. CX-008778: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008778: Categorical Exclusion Determination Combined Crew Vegetation Management on the Curecanti-Poncha 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line...

  13. CX-010109: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    09: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010109: Categorical Exclusion Determination Curecanti-Poncha 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line Cross Bar Ranch Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3...

  14. Development of age of dam and sex adjustment factors for preweaning traits of Brangus cattle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cravey, Matthew David

    1989-01-01

    . 27 and . 41 kg less (from 2-, 3- and 4-yr-old dams, respectively) than male calves from 5+ yr-old dams. Female calves from 2-, 3-, and 4-year- old dams weighed 2. 64, 1. 26 and . 50 kg less, respectively, than heifers from 5+ yr-old dams. Roberson... affecting weaning weight (e. g. , Nelson and Kress, 1981). These two authors reported that compared to 5-10-yr-old dams, adjustments for calves were 21. 3, 11. 3, 5. 9 and 3. 2 kg from Angus dams aged two, three, four and 11+ yrs-of-age, respectively...

  15. The Sensor Fish - Making Dams More Salmon-Friendly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Keilman, Geogre

    2004-07-31

    This article describes the Sensor Fish, an instrument package that travels through hydroelectric dams collecting data on the hazardous conditions that migrating salmon smolt encounter. The Sensor Fish was developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory with funding from DOE and the US Army Corps of Engineers and has been used at several federal and utility-run hydroelectric projects on the Snake and Columbia Rivers of the US Pacific Northwest. The article describes the evolution of the Sensor Fish design and provides examples of its use at McNary and Ice Harbor dams.

  16. Revision date: 11/15/11 Revised by: ACA (GLC) and DAM (TGS) GRADUATE EDUCATION EXPECTATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revision date: 11/15/11 Revised by: ACA (GLC) and DAM (TGS) GRADUATE EDUCATION EXPECTATIONS/15/11 Revised by: ACA (GLC) and DAM (TGS) 9. Students should show ambition, dedication, and commitment

  17. Discrete Applied Mathematics 154 (2006) 16331639 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartke, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Discrete Applied Mathematics 154 (2006) 1633­1639 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam Note The elimination. doi:10.1016/j.dam.2005.11.009 #12;1634 Stephen G. Hartke / Discrete Applied Mathematics 154 (2006

  18. Channel adjustments following two dam removals in Wisconsin Martin W. Doyle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, Emily

    the removal of low-head dams on two low- gradient, fine- to coarse-grained rivers in southern Wisconsin

  19. Compliance Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Smolt Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon at Bonneville Dam during summer 2012, as required by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam to the tailrace 1 km below the dam, as well as forebay residence time, tailrace egress, and spill passage efficiency, as required in the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  20. Dam breaking by wave-induced erosional incision N. J. Balmforth,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balmforth, Neil

    displacement wave can lead to catastrophic erosional incision of a moraine damming a glacial lake incision can also breach moraines damming glacial lakes. In a few of these examples, the incipient channel of extreme climate conditions or intense glacier melting). However, several other dam-break events appear

  1. Dynamic model failure tests of dam structures Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer Jr., Billie F.

    index for the safety assessment of concrete dams and is predicted through dynamic model failure tests INTRODUCTION A great number of high dams will be built in highly seismic areas, the safety evaluation 116024, China ABSTRACT: For the earthquake safety evaluation of dam structures, it is desirable to extend

  2. Final Independent External Peer Review Report Mohawk Dam Major Rehabilitation Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Final Independent External Peer Review Report Mohawk Dam Major Rehabilitation Report Warsaw, Ohio Report Mohawk Dam Major Rehabilitation Report Warsaw, Ohio by Battelle 505 King Avenue Columbus, OH 43201 documentation. #12;This page is intentionally left blank. #12;Mohawk Dam Major Rehabilitation Report i Battelle

  3. STUDY OF LOSS AND DELAY OF SALMON PASSING ROCK ISLAND DAM, COLUMBIA RIVER, 1954-56

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STUDY OF LOSS AND DELAY OF SALMON PASSING ROCK ISLAND DAM, COLUMBIA RIVER, 1954-56 By ROBERT R. PORTLAND. OREGON ABSTRACT To determine loss or delay of salmonids in passing Rock Island Dam tagged and released both above and below the dam in 1954-56. They were subsequently observed passing

  4. Final Independent External Peer Review Report John Day Dam Mitigation Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Final Independent External Peer Review Report John Day Dam Mitigation Program Draft Post Valley Division Contract No. W912HQ-10-D-0002 Task Order: 0077 November 21, 2014 #12;John Day Dam IEPR | Final IEPR Report BATTELLE | November 21, 2014 This page is intentionally left blank. #12;John Day Dam

  5. Author's personal copy Responses of riparian reptile communities to damming and urbanization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorcas, Michael E.

    Author's personal copy Responses of riparian reptile communities to damming and urbanization in revised form 24 August 2012 Accepted 27 August 2012 Keywords: Species richness Rivers Damming Reservoirs of two riparian habitat modifications ­ dam- ming and urbanization ­ on overall and species

  6. Research Article Effects of Alpine hydropower dams on particle transport and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Research Article Effects of Alpine hydropower dams on particle transport and lacustrine December 2006 Abstract. The effects of high-alpine hydropower damming on lacustrine sedimentation impact, such as by hydropower dam construction that form artifi- cial sediment sinks acting as manmade

  7. Generalized event tree algorithm and software for dam safety risk assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    Generalized event tree algorithm and software for dam safety risk assessment Anurag Srivastava 1 an event tree risk model for dam safety risk assessment in a highly flexible manner. This paper describes and a summary of plans for its further development. Keywords: Event tree analysis, dam safety risk assessment

  8. ANCOLD 2000 Conference on Dams 1 ADVANCES IN THE PRACTICE AND USE OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    2000 Conference on Dams 1 ADVANCES IN THE PRACTICE AND USE OF PORTFOLIO RISK ASSESSMENT D. S. Bowles1 process into the owner's dam safety management program and with broader business processes, Utah, USA. 2 A portfolio is a group of dams, which are the responsibility of a single owner

  9. Hugo van Dam and the dynamic adjoint function Imre Pa zsit*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    Hugo van Dam and the dynamic adjoint function Imre Pa´ zsit* Department of Reactor Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Go¨teborg, Sweden Dedicated to Prof. Dr. Hugo van Dam into perspective the seminal contribution of Hugo van Dam to the development of neutron noise diagnostics

  10. Spatial variability of sea level rise due to water impoundment behind dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Clint

    dams Julia W. Fiedler1 and Clinton P. Conrad2 Received 29 March 2010; revised 12 May 2010; accepted 18 May 2010; published 19 June 2010. [1] Dams have impounded 10,800 km3 of water since 1900, reducing depresses the earth's surface near dams and elevates the geoid, which locally increases relative sea level

  11. Interim Tolerable Risk Guidelines for US Army Corps of Engineers Dams Dale F. Munger1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    1 Interim Tolerable Risk Guidelines for US Army Corps of Engineers Dams Dale F. Munger1 , David S , and Nathan Snorteland8 1 Assistant Team Leader, USACE Dam Safety Policy and Procedures Team, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland, OR. 2 Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Director, Institute for Dam

  12. Fish Passage through Dams in Large Temperate Floodplain Rivers: An Annotated Bibliography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Fish Passage through Dams in Large Temperate Floodplain Rivers: An Annotated Bibliography By Brian. Wlosinski, B. C. Knights, and S. J. Zigler. 2001. Fish passage through dams in large temperate floodplain.usgs.gov/ltrmp_fish/fish_passage_biblio.html#lit. (Accessed June 2001.) Fish Passage through Dams in Large Temperate Floodplain Rivers: An Annotated

  13. STATISTICAL AND 3D NONLINEAR FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF SCHLEGEIS DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balaji, Rajagopalan

    STATISTICAL AND 3D NONLINEAR FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF SCHLEGEIS DAM VICTOR SAOUMA, ERIC HANSEN is composed of two parts. First a statistical analysis of the dam crest displacement is performed, along with a prediction for the years 2000-2001. Then a 3D finite element analysis of Schlegeis dam is performed using

  14. PREDICTING UNDERSEEPAGE OF MASONRY DAMS Published in Proceedings of 29th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PREDICTING UNDERSEEPAGE OF MASONRY DAMS Published in Proceedings of 29th ASDSO Conference (1934) selected conservative values of safe creep ratios because of the small number of dam failures judgment is recommended in designing a dam for safety against piping, and Lane's values are a starting

  15. Debris dams and the relief of headwater streams Stephen T. Lancaster a,, Gordon E. Grant b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debris dams and the relief of headwater streams Stephen T. Lancaster a,, Gordon E. Grant b, mountain landscapes where debris flows are common, their deposition commonly forms valley-spanning dams these dams causes alluviation in what would otherwise be bedrock channels. In this paper, the effects

  16. Effect of spill on adult salmon passage delay at Columbia River and Snake River dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Effect of spill on adult salmon passage delay at Columbia River and Snake River dams W. Nicholas dams in the Columbia/Snake River hydrosystem may delay the upstream passage of the adults. To evaluate-to-day variations of spill and upstream fish passage at the eight dams of the Columbia/Snake river hydrosystem

  17. LEARNING FROM DAM REMOVAL MONITORING: CHALLENGES TO SELECTING EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND ESTABLISHING SIGNIFICANCE OF OUTCOMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    LEARNING FROM DAM REMOVAL MONITORING: CHALLENGES TO SELECTING EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND ESTABLISHING, California, USA ABSTRACT As the decommissioning of dams becomes a common restoration technique, decisions about dam removals must be based on sound predictions of expected outcomes. Results of past and ongoing

  18. Independent External Peer Review Report Rough River Dam 18 August 2011 ii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    #12;Independent External Peer Review Report ­ Rough River Dam 18 August 2011 ii This page intentionally blank. #12;Independent External Peer Review Report ­ Rough River Dam 18 August 2011 iii Table Panel Members B-1 Appendix C ­ Charge for IEPR Panel C-1 List of Figures Figure 1. Rough River Dam 4

  19. DAM SAFETY DECISION-MAKING: COMBINING ENGINEERING ASSESSMENTS WITH RISK INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    DAM SAFETY DECISION-MAKING: COMBINING ENGINEERING ASSESSMENTS WITH RISK INFORMATION David S. Bowles breaching a dam; so drop the matter before a dispute breaks out. Proverbs 17:14 (NIV) ABSTRACT A decision assessments and risk assessments. The approach can be adapted to any dam owner's unique decision context

  20. Effect of Flow Pulses on Degradation Downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    Effect of Flow Pulses on Degradation Downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South Korea Young Ho Shin1 and Pierre Y. Julien, M.ASCE2 Abstract: The changes in channel geometry downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South sluice gate operations affect the 45-km reach of the Hwang River between the Hapcheon Reregulation Dam

  1. Earthquake behavior of arch dams Chuhan Zhang, Yanjie Xu, Guanglun Wang & Feng Jin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer Jr., Billie F.

    Earthquake behavior of arch dams Chuhan Zhang, Yanjie Xu, Guanglun Wang & Feng Jin Department millennium, construction of a series of high arch dams up to 250-300m in height is being planned or conducted (Table 1). Table 1. Project data and Design PVA Project Dam height (m) Reservoir capacity (109 m3 ) Power

  2. CONGRESS BEIJING 2000 Question 79 (Gated Spillways and Other Controlled Release Facilities, and Dam Safety)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahmeyer, William J.

    Facilities, and Dam Safety) d) Rehabilitation of Gated and Ungated Spillways THE DESIGN OF A FUSEGATE SYSTEM FOR INCREASING THE RESERVOIR CAPACITY OF TERMINUS DAM AIDED BY A FULLY FUNCTIONING PHYSICAL MODEL STUDY" Authors International SUMMARY A number of designs for increasing reservoir capacity without raising the dam embankment

  3. Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    11 Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey Hydrologic Engineering that water is released from Green River Dam in Kentucky. In May 2006, the interim plan was approved shown that operation of Green River Dam can be changed in ways that improve ecosystems while continuing

  4. Maternal Effects on Reproduction and Traits of Reciprocal F1 Dams of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    Maternal Effects on Reproduction and Production Traits of Reciprocal F1 Dams of Angus, Brahman to determine if differences in their producing ability can be attributed to the breed of their dam. The purpose of this paper is to compare the performance of reciprocal F1 crossbred females as to dam breed for both

  5. Final Independent External Peer Review Report Olmsted Locks and Dam 52 and 53 Replacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Final Independent External Peer Review Report Olmsted Locks and Dam 52 and 53 Replacement Project Review Report Olmsted Locks and Dam 52 and 53 Replacement Project Post Authorization Change Report--0002 Task Order: 0005 #12;This page is intentionally left blank. #12;Olmsted Locks and Dam PACR IEPR i

  6. The Dam1 kinetochore complex harnesses microtubule dynamics to produce force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asbury, Chip

    The Dam1 kinetochore complex harnesses microtubule dynamics to produce force and movement Charles L-dependent force production is unknown. Recent work suggests that the Dam1 complex, an essential component assay where beads coated with pure recombinant Dam1 complex were bound to the tips of individual dynamic

  7. Landslide-dammed paleolake perturbs marine sedimentation and drives genetic change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roering, Joshua J.

    Landslide-dammed paleolake perturbs marine sedimentation and drives genetic change in anadromous by forming dams, forcing upstream ag- gradation of water and sediment, and generating catastrophic out- burst floods. Less apparent is the effect of large landslide dams on river ecosystems and marine sedimentation

  8. Analysis of Dam Failure in the Saluda River February 8, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow, James A.

    Analysis of Dam Failure in the Saluda River Valley February 8, 2005 Abstract We identify and model two possible failure modes for the Saluda Dam: gradual failure due to an enlarging breach and sudden catas- trophic failure due to liqui#12;cation of the dam. For the #12;rst case we de- scribe the breach

  9. Final Independent External Peer Review Report Olmsted Locks and Dam 52 and 53 Replacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Final Independent External Peer Review Report Olmsted Locks and Dam 52 and 53 Replacement Project Review Report Olmsted Locks and Dam 52 and 53 Replacement Project Updated Cost Estimate Peer Review and Dam 52 and 53 Replacement Project Updated Cost Estimate Peer Review EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Project

  10. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Dam breaking seiches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balmforth, Neil

    Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Dam breaking seiches N. J. Balmforth1, J the break of a moraine dam by catastrophic erosional incision initiated by overtopping with a displacement confirm that dams can be broken by a catastrophic incision. However, the displacement wave does not break

  11. The dynamics of travertine dams . Hammer , D.K. Dysthe, B. Jamtveit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dysthe, Dag Kristian

    The dynamics of travertine dams Ø. Hammer , D.K. Dysthe, B. Jamtveit PGP-Physics of Geological 2007 Abstract We present a simple, abstract model for travertine dam formation. The simulation uses, implies a classical pattern formation system with a characteristic dam size, however this wavelength

  12. Durability Assessment of an Arch Dam using Inverse Analysis with Neural Networks and High Performance Computing.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coutinho, Alvaro L. G. A.

    Durability Assessment of an Arch Dam using Inverse Analysis with Neural Networks and High de Brasília diannemv@guarany.cpd.unb.br Abstract: In the present work, an analysis of the Funil dam, a double curvature arch dam placed in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, is presented. The considered

  13. Effects of magnetite on high-frequency ground-penetrating radar Remke L. Van Dam1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borchers, Brian

    Effects of magnetite on high-frequency ground-penetrating radar Remke L. Van Dam1 , Jan M. H, paleoclimatology (Maher and Thompson, 1995), soil development (Singer et al., 1996; Van Dam et al., 2008 et al., 2011), the detection of unexploded ordnance (UXO) and land mines (Van Dam et al., 2005

  14. AN ESTIMATE OF MORTALITY OF CHINOOK SALMON IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER NEAR BONNEVILLE DAM DURING THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AN ESTIMATE OF MORTALITY OF CHINOOK SALMON IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER NEAR BONNEVILLE DAM DURING THE SUMMER RUN OF 1955' . . BY THEODORE R. MERRELL, JR.,I. MELVIN D. COLLlNS,2 AND ,JOSEEH W. GREENOUGH8 at the dam, and the river below the dam was· searched systematically to recover tagged and untagged car

  15. Enloe Dam Passage Project, Volume I, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fanning, M.L.

    1985-07-01

    This report discusses issues related to the provision of fish passage facilities at Enloe Dam and the introduction of anadromous salmonid fish to the upper Similkameen River basin. The species of fish being considered is a summer run of steelhead trout adapted to the upper Columbia basin. (ACR)

  16. Optimization of Hydroacoustic Equipment Deployment at Foster Dam, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, James S.; Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Fischer, Eric S.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of the study was to optimize performance of the fixed-location hydroacoustic systems at Foster Dam (FOS) by determining deployment and data acquisition methods that minimized structural, electrical, and acoustic interference. Optimization of the hydroacoustic systems will establish methodology for sampling by active acoustic methods during this year-long evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage at FOS.

  17. Compliance Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Summer 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon at The Dalles Dam during summer 2012. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion, dam passage survival is required to be greater than or equal to 0.93 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal to 0.015. The study also estimated survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam and through the tailrace to 2 km downstream of the dam, forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and fish passage efficiency (FPE), as required by the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  18. UC DAVIS CUPA SELF AUDIT CHECKLIST 1. Are chemical hazardous waste containers disposed of through Yes No NA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolner, Brian H.

    UC DAVIS CUPA SELF AUDIT CHECKLIST 1. Are chemical hazardous waste containers disposed of through days if 1 pound or 1 quart of acutely hazardous waste is accumulated? (Prudent practice is to dispose of within 90 days). 2. Does each chemical hazardous waste container have a UC Davis Yes Ë No Ë NA Ë

  19. Full Spectrum Boost in Nanoparticle Solar Cells UC Davis/Theory: F.Gygi, M.Voros, GTZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    designs are needed GaAs 29% Alta Devices HIT c-Si cell 26% Panasonic, SunPower Thin film CdTe 20Full Spectrum Boost in Nanoparticle Solar Cells UC Davis/Theory: F.Gygi, M.Voros, GTZ UC Davis% First Solar Organic solar cells 12% Sumitomo #12;Solar Energy Conversion: Basics 5 1. No absorption

  20. Bodega Marine Reserve --Current Research Projects 1 Jessica Abbott, UC Davis Characterization of how traits vary among eelgrass genotypes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Bodega Marine Reserve -- Current Research Projects 1 Jessica Abbott, UC Davis Characterization The ecological and evolutionary consequences of sibling competition in sessile marine invertebrates 3 Dr. Peter Network 14 Bodega Marine Laboratory, UC Davis Bodega Ocean Observing Node (BOON) 15 Bodega Marine Reserve

  1. Threadleaf Groundsel and Forage Response to Herbicides in the Davis Mountains. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, R.D.; Ueckert, D.N.; Nelson J.T.; Cox, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 9 KEYWORDS: Poisonous plan tslrange managemen t / threadleaf groundsel/woolly groundsel/woolly senecio/2 , 4D/dicam bal picloram/tebuthiuron/pelleted herbicides. Threadleaf Groundsel and Forage Response to Herbicides in the Davis Mountains R. D... and Igneous Hill and Moun tain range sites in the Davis Mountains. Tebuthiuron applied as sprays of wettable powder in water or pellets at 1.1 kglha during summer reduced threadleaf ground sel densities by 99 to 100 percent for almost 20 months after...

  2. The Influence of Dam Releases on the Microbial and Physiochemical Parameters in the Alluvial Aquifer of a Regulated River 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrera, Christina S

    2015-04-28

    to the construction of Longhorn Dam (Figure 3.3). Tom Miller Dam was constructed primarily for flood control and hydroelectricity production purposes. This facility provides electricity to the city of Austin, especially during high use summer months. The dam... of the influence of dam releases on the state of alluvial groundwater would be impossible. The topics covered include the impact of hydroelectric dam releases on the down-stream hydrology, stream and groundwater exchange through riverbank filtration, utilization...

  3. EA-2017: Braddock Locks and Dam Hydro Electric Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to authorize the expenditure of federal funding to Hydro Green Energy, LLC to fabricate, install, and operate one interchangeable Modular Bulb Turbine (MBT) which would be inserted in a Large Frame Module (LFM) at the existing Braddock Locks and Dam. The installation would be part of a larger project that would include the design and installation of seven MBTs to create a 5.2 megawatt, low head hydropower system at Braddock Locks and Dam. An Environmental Assessment (EA) previously prepared by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has been adopted by DOE pursuant to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

  4. Turbocharger with sliding piston, and having vanes and leakage dams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, Quentin (Nancy, FR); Alnega, Ahmed (Thaon Les Vosges, FR)

    2011-12-06

    A turbocharger having a sliding piston for regulating exhaust gas flow into the turbine wheel includes a set of first vanes mounted on a fixed first wall of the turbine nozzle and projecting axially toward an opposite second wall of the nozzle, and/or a set of second vanes mounted on the end of the piston and projecting in an opposite axial direction toward the first wall of the nozzle. For the/each set of vanes, there are leakage dams formed on the wall that is adjacent the vane tips when the piston is closed. The leakage dams are closely adjacent the vane tips and discourage exhaust gas from leaking in a generally radial direction past the vane tips as the piston just begins to open from its fully closed position.

  5. Davis-Bacon Labor Rates for Weatherization Work in Multifamily Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Weatherization Assistance Program Notice 10-04 deals with labor rates (wages) for weatherization work in large multifamily buildings that comply with the Davis-Bacon Act requirements of the 2009 Recovery Act.

  6. UC Davis Policy and Procedure Manual Chapter 290, Health and Safety Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    UC Davis Policy and Procedure Manual Chapter 290, Health and Safety Services Section 16, Ergonomics/OSHA ergonomics standard and UC/Collective Bargaining Unit Agreements. C. The program will be incorporated are then evaluated to determine if intervention would be beneficial. E. The following criteria will be used

  7. Generalized Functional Linear Models Hans-Georg Muller (UC Davis) und U. Stadtmuller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    Generalized Functional Linear Models Hans-Georg M¨uller (UC Davis) und U. Stadtm¨uller Preprint FUNCTIONAL LINEAR MODELS Hans-Georg M¨uller1 and Ulrich Stadtm¨uller2 March 2004 1Department of Statistics. Wahrscheinlichkeitstheorie, Universit¨at Ulm, 89069 Ulm, Germany #12;ABSTRACT We propose a generalized functional linear

  8. Hadar Feinberg, Joost C.M.Uitdehaag1 Jason M.Davies, Russell Wallis1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadar Feinberg, Joost C.M.Uitdehaag1 , Jason M.Davies, Russell Wallis1 , Kurt Drickamer1 and William I.Weis2 Departments of Structural Biology and of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford Corresponding author e-mail: bill.weis@stanford.edu H.Feinberg and J.C.M.Uitdehaag contributed equally

  9. UC Davis Research Supports Energy-Efficiency Improvements to California's Title 24 Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    efficiency of residential buildings by 25 percent and boosting energy savings in non-residential buildingsUC Davis Research Supports Energy-Efficiency Improvements to California's Title 24 Codes July 5, 2012 The California Energy Commission recently adopted more stringent energy efficiency requirements

  10. DDR2 and Low Latency Variants Brian Davis, Trevor Mudge Bruce Jacob, Vinodh Cuppu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mudge, Trevor

    DDR2 and Low Latency Variants Brian Davis, Trevor Mudge Bruce Jacob, Vinodh Cuppu Electrical describes a performance examination the DDR2 DRAM architecture and the proposed cache­enhanced variants. This Task Group responsible for developing DDR2 standard. The goal the Low Latency DRAM Working Group

  11. DDR2 and Low Latency Variants Brian Davis, Trevor Mudge Bruce Jacob, Vinodh Cuppu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Brian T.

    1 DDR2 and Low Latency Variants Brian Davis, Trevor Mudge Bruce Jacob, Vinodh Cuppu Electrical describes a performance examination of the DDR2 DRAM architecture and the proposed cache-enhanced variants Task Group. This Task Group is responsible for developing the DDR2 standard. The goal of the Low

  12. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS ACADEMIC SENATE REQUEST TO TEACH AN UNDERGRADUATE VARIABLE-UNIT COURSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS ACADEMIC SENATE REQUEST TO TEACH AN UNDERGRADUATE VARIABLE-UNIT/Major Number Section Units Quarter Offered Year Estimated average student/faculty contact (hours for awarding a passing grade. Student Major Address Phone Email Student ID Total number of units completed

  13. Postdoctoral position -UC Davis -plant-vector interactions, plant-microbe interactions, molecular biology, ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Postdoctoral position - UC Davis - plant-vector interactions, plant-microbe interactions, molecular August 2014. The primary research goal of the Casteel lab is to identify the functions of microbes- microbe or plant-insect interactions will be preferred. Candidates with a proven record of excellence

  14. EA-1665: Davis-Kingman 69-kV Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Western plans to rebuild a 26.6-mile-long portion of the existing 27.3-mile-long Davis–Kingman Tap 69-kV Transmission Line within the existing ROW in order to improve the reliability of the transmission service.

  15. ACE Data from the ACE Science Center A.J. Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Andrew J.

    SH.1.4.29 ACE Data from the ACE Science Center A.J. Davis½ , S.J. Hemple½ and S.R. Sears½ ½ ACE Data Center (NSSDC) for archiving. Generally, the data are less than 1 week old by this time Science Center, Caltech, MC 220-22, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA Abstract The purpose of the ACE Science Center

  16. Modeling the patterned two-dimensional electron gas: Electrostatics John H. Davies and Ivan A. Larkin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, John H.

    Modeling the patterned two-dimensional electron gas: Electrostatics John H. Davies and Ivan A. V. Sukhorukov Institute of Problems of Microelectronics Technology, Academy of Science of Russia, Chernogolovka, Moscow district, Russia, 142432 (Dated: February 21, 2005) Abstract We present analytical

  17. Web Interfaces to MDSplus Data* W. Davis, P. Roney, T. Carroll, T. Gibney, D. Mastrovito

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Web Interfaces to MDSplus Data* W. Davis, P. Roney, T. Carroll, T. Gibney, D. Mastrovito Princeton be run in a Web browser. Web users don't need to know about X-windows, or even have accounts accessible from a Web browser. These utilities could be used at other sites which keep data in MDSplus. I

  18. Drug delivery systems based on sugar-macromolecule conjugates Benjamin G Davis* & Mark A Robinson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Ben G.

    Drug delivery systems based on sugar-macromolecule conjugates Benjamin G Davis* & Mark A Robinson in Drug Discovery & Development 2002 5(2): 279-288 PharmaPress Ltd ISSN 1367-6733 The specificity-tuning of active drug delivery through their great ability to undergo site- specific modification

  19. The Range of Traded Option Prices Mark H.A. Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Range of Traded Option Prices Mark H.A. Davis Imperial College London and David G. Hobson Suppose we are given a set of prices of European call options over a finite range of strike prices conditions for the prices to be consistent with an arbitrage- free model (in which case the model can

  20. UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, Paul

    2012-05-31

    This is the final report of the UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence which spanned from 2005-2012. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program, to provide a new generation of engineers and scientists with knowledge and skills to create advanced automotive technologies. The UC Davis Fuel Cell, Hydrogen, and Hybrid Vehicle (FCH2V) GATE Center of Excellence established in 2005 is focused on research, education, industrial collaboration and outreach within automotive technology. UC Davis has had two independent GATE centers with separate well-defined objectives and research programs from 1998. The Fuel Cell Center, administered by ITS-Davis, has focused on fuel cell technology. The Hybrid-Electric Vehicle Design Center (HEV Center), administered by the Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, has focused on the development of plug-in hybrid technology using internal combustion engines. The merger of these two centers in 2005 has broadened the scope of research and lead to higher visibility of the activity. UC Davisâ??s existing GATE centers have become the campusâ??s research focal points on fuel cells and hybrid-electric vehicles, and the home for graduate students who are studying advanced automotive technologies. The centers have been highly successful in attracting, training, and placing top-notch students into fuel cell and hybrid programs in both industry and government.

  1. University of California, Davis China-U.S. ZEV Policy Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    University of California, Davis China-U.S. ZEV Policy Lab China Center For Energy and Transportation Yunshi Wang Director #12;Chinese New Energy Vehicle Development Status Data Source: 1 2 3IEA-Tianjin-Hebei work together, following California Experience · Beijing led New Energy Vehicle Development Supply

  2. "UUV FCEPS Technology Assessment and Design Process" Kevin L. Davies1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natural Energy Institute (HNEI), School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) University on available UUV FCEPS technology, design methodology, and concepts. The report is limited to the Polymer"UUV FCEPS Technology Assessment and Design Process" Kevin L. Davies1 and Robert M. Moore Hawaii

  3. ER Membrane Protein Complex Required for Nuclear Fusion Davis T.W. Ng and Peter Walter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Peter

    ER Membrane Protein Complex Required for Nuclear Fusion Davis T.W. Ng and Peter Walter Department is localized to the luminal (i.e., noncytoplasmic) face of the ER mem- brane, yet nuclear fusion must initiate of Sec63p, Sec71p, and Sec72p plays a central role in mediating nuclear mem- brane fusion and requires ER

  4. Rapid gravity and gravity gradiometry terrain correction via adaptive quadtree mesh discretization Kristofer Davis, M. Andy Kass, and Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical and Magnetic Studies, Colorado School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristofer Davis, M. Andy Kass, and Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical and Magnetic Studies, Colorado

  5. Compliance Monitoring of Juvenile Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Summer 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, John R.

    2010-12-21

    The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon smolts at The Dalles Dam during summer 2010. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.93 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal 0.015. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam to the tailrace 2 km below the dam The forebay-to-tailrace survival estimate satisfies the “BRZ-to-BRZ” survival estimate called for in the Fish Accords. , as well as the forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency, as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. The estimate of dam survival for subyearling Chinook salmon at The Dalles in 2010 was 0.9404 with an associated standard error of 0.0091.

  6. A not-so-funny thing happened on the way to relicensing the Edwards Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayer, F.J. [Devine & Tarbell, Inc., Portland, ME (United States); Isaacson, M. [Edwards Manufacturing Co., Lisbon Falls, ME (United States)

    1995-12-31

    What started out as a seemingly straightforward and simple exercise, obtaining a new FERC license for the Edwards Dam in Augusta, Maine, turned out to be anything but straightforward and far from simple. This article tells the story of one of the more interesting and possibly precedent setting cases in the {open_quotes}class of 93{close_quotes} and is presented in three sections: (1) the history of the Edwards Dam and the FERC regulatory process through the spring of 1995; (2) Edwards` response to the dam removal campaign; and (3) recommendations for FERC licensees threatened by dam removal during relicensing.

  7. Estimating the seismic stability of the arch dam in the Chirkeiskaya hydrosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khrapkov, A. A.; Skomorovskaya, E. Ya

    2004-11-15

    A calculation analysis of the arch dam constructed in an area with standardized seismicity of magnitude 9-10 is presented.

  8. Contaminant Stratigraphy of the Ballville Reservoir, Sandusky River, NW Ohio: Implications for Dam Removal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottgens, Hans

    Contaminant Stratigraphy of the Ballville Reservoir, Sandusky River, NW Ohio: Implications for Dam, Ohio 43606. 182 #12;Contaminant Stratigraphy of the

  9. University of California Davis West Village: The Largest Planned Net Zero Energy Community in the United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Community Renewable Energy (CommRE) success stories UC Davis net zero energy community; energy efficiency in buildings; PV and photovoltaics.

  10. A dreamer and a painter : visualizing the unconscious in the work of Arthur B. Davies, 1890-1920

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gephart, Emily Willard

    2014-01-01

    The paintings of U. S. artist Arthur B. Davies (1863-1928) spoke to his viewers in terms of the emergent discipline of psychology, creating visualizations of dreaming. This dissertation examines his work and its reception ...

  11. Title 10, Chapter 43 Dams | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)Open EnergyTinox Jump to:, Chapter 43 Dams Jump to: navigation,

  12. Hydroblasting permits safe, cost-effective dam rehabilitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lever, G. [Cavi-Tech Inc., Kennesaw, GA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The cost of using traditional methods to remove lead-based paint from structures subject to strict environmental regulations can be prohibitive, leaving many rehabilitation projects undone. However, alternative methods, including hydroblasting, can reduce debris containment and disposal costs to a tolerable level. This article describes a project which involved the removal of old lead paint and the repainting of a dam situated in a populated recreational area. It details the budgetary, environmental, and public health issues that led to strict specifications and oversight requirements, which saved money and protected the area from lead contamination.

  13. EIS-0352: U.S. 93 Hoover Dam Bypass Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) served as a cooperating agency for this Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) due to WAPA’s role in the relocation of several transmission lines. The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) prepared an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for construction of a new segment of U.S. Highway 93 for the purpose of improving congestion and hazardous vehicle/pedestrian conflicts where the highway crosses the Colorado River over Hoover Dam. As a cooperating agency for the EIS, WAPA proposed modifications to its transmission system and facilities to accommodate the construction of the new highway and bridge spanning the Colorado River.

  14. City of Coulee Dam, Washington (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLCLtd JumpGeorgiaBurley,Columbus Place: OhioCornell,Coulee Dam,

  15. Four Dam Pool Power Agency FDPPA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskeyFootprint Ventures JumpIndiana: EnergyWind Farm JumpGulchDam

  16. Revised Davis-Bacon Wage Determinations for the Weatherization Assistance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Weatherization Assistance Program Notice 10-07 deals with wage determinations for states and U.S. territories that were issued by the U.S. Department of Labor for a new category of wage earners for weatherization that grantees will use to comply with the Davis-Bacon Act requirements under the 2009 Recovery Act

  17. 1 University of California, Davis, Oct 1, 2015 Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas (GHG)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    32 32 37 23 43 44 48 44 45 43 47 48 45 48 48 Conv. diesel HEV Conventional diesel CNG LNG central CI LNG distributed CI LNG central SI F-T diesel w/ CCS LNG distributed SI Oil sand diesel F-T diesel w;10 University of California, Davis, Oct 1, 2015 LNG/CNG vs. Diesel (MHDVs) 80% 90% 100% 110% 120% 0% 1% 2% 3% 4

  18. Geological control of springs and seeps in the Farmington Canyon Complex, Davis County, Utah 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skelton, Robyn Kaye

    1991-01-01

    number of studies were done in the area, and it was concluded that there is a direct correlation between the debris-flow initiation points and discharging ground water. A hydrogeologic study of Davis County found that the discharge of ground water.... TABLE OF CONTENTS Page . . Vl Vill Physiography of the Wasatch Front. . . . . Regional Geology. . Hydrogeology METHODOLOGY Selection of Canyons. . . Field Mapping. Regional Geology. . RESULTS. Centerville Canyon . Parrish Canyon. . Ford...

  19. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research, Davis, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis), conducted November 16 through 20, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the LEHR. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation, and is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations at the LEHR and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the LEHR at UC Davis. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the LEHR Survey. 75 refs., 26 figs., 23 tabs.

  20. Environmental Constraints on Hydropower: An Ex Post Benefit-Cost Analysis of Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lupi, Frank

    a benefit-cost analysis of a relicensing agreement for two hydroelectric dams in Michigan. The agreement and benefits: pro- ducer costs of adapting electricity production to the new time profile of hydroelectric of an environmental constraint on hydroelectric dams. (JEL Q43, Q57) I. INTRODUCTION A reallocation of river resources

  1. Evaluation of Seepage from an Embankment Dam Retaining Pedro J. Amaya1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluation of Seepage from an Embankment Dam Retaining Fly Ash Pedro J. Amaya1 ; John T. Massey of fly ash-laden seepage from the right abutment of an earthen dam are presented herein fly ash reached the level of the prior landslide, the fly ash-laden seepage migrated through

  2. Symmetric Spin # Dragan Bo sna cki 1 , Dennis Dams 2 , and Leszek Holenderski 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dams, Dennis

    Symmetric Spin # Dragan Bo#20;sna#20;cki 1 , Dennis Dams 2 , and Leszek Holenderski 1 1 Dept. of Electrical Eng., Eindhoven University of Technology PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands fD.Bosnacki,D.Dams approaches proceed by listing suÆcient conditions that can be statically checked on the system de- scription

  3. Van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov discontinuity in topologically new massive gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung

    2012-12-31

    We study van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov discontinuity in the topologically new massive gravity (TNMG). The reduction from 2 degrees of freedom to one is interpreted as van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov discontinuity appeared when going from anti-de Sitter spacetime to Minkowski spacetime in the linearized TNMG.

  4. Discrete Applied Mathematics 156 (2008) 26982711 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilbao Arrese, Jesús Mario

    2008-01-01

    Discrete Applied Mathematics 156 (2008) 2698­2711 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam Biprobabilistic-218X/$ - see front matter c 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.dam.2007.11.007 #12;J

  5. Discrete Applied Mathematics 157 (2009) 982990 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Hong-jian

    2009-01-01

    Discrete Applied Mathematics 157 (2009) 982­990 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam Hamiltonian-218X/$ - see front matter c 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.dam.2008.02.005 #12;H

  6. Discrete Applied Mathematics 155 (2007) 733749 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sontag, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    Discrete Applied Mathematics 155 (2007) 733­749 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam Randomized © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.dam.2004.11.009 #12;734 P. Berman et al

  7. Discrete Applied Mathematics 155 (2007) 22572268 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartke, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Discrete Applied Mathematics 155 (2007) 2257­2268 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam Fire containment front matter © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.dam.2007.06.002 #12;2258 M. Develin

  8. Discrete Applied Mathematics 154 (2006) 106119 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Mei

    2006-01-01

    Discrete Applied Mathematics 154 (2006) 106­119 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam Trees of extremal. Tian). 0166-218X/$ - see front matter © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.dam.2004

  9. Modeling the costs and benefits of dam construction from a multidisciplinary perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    - over, new dams continue to be planned and constructed in many developing countries. The checkered for electricity, recent experience has shown that many dams have serious negative environmental, human contributed to human development by providing reliable sources of drinking water and irrigation, hydropower

  10. damidseq pipeline: an automated pipeline for processing DamID sequencing datasets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Owen J.; Brand, Andrea H.

    2015-06-25

    of DamID-seq datasets with normalisation based on read-counts alone can lead to high background and the loss of bound signal. DamID-seq thus presents novel challenges in terms of normalisation and background minimisation. We describe here damidseq_pipeline...

  11. DOWNSTREAM EFFECTS OF DIVERSION DAMS ON SEDIMENT AND HYDRAULIC CONDITIONS OF ROCKY MOUNTAIN STREAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poff, N. LeRoy

    DOWNSTREAM EFFECTS OF DIVERSION DAMS ON SEDIMENT AND HYDRAULIC CONDITIONS OF ROCKY MOUNTAIN STREAMS & Sons, Ltd. key words: flow diversion; dam; fine sediment; stream management; hydraulic alteration examined the effects of variable levels of flow diversion on fine-sediment deposition, hydraulic conditions

  12. Dam and Hydroelectric Powerplant University of Hawai`i CEE 491University of Hawai`i CEE 491

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    Karun 3 Dam and Hydroelectric Powerplant University of Hawai`i ­ CEE 491University of Hawai`i ­ CEE;Location #12;Description/Background Hydroelectric dam on Karun River Help with national energy needs

  13. Water quality and sedimentation implications of installing a hydroelectric dam on the Río Baker in Chilean Patagonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leandro, Gianna Dee

    2009-01-01

    HidroAysen, a Chilean corporation operated by energy giant Endesa, has proposed to build two hydroelectric dams on the Rio Baker in the Aysin Region of Chilean Patagonia. The proposed dams have been met with a variety of ...

  14. and 19% of the stomachs of late-lifted fish were Food of the striped bass at Holyoke Dam was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    below hydroelectric dams and feed on the parts of fish (anadromous or freshwater species) that die Kaplan turbine at a low-head hydroelectric dam. North Am. J. Fish. Manage. 5:33-38. HOLLIS, E. H. 1952

  15. PREDICTION OF TOTAL DISSOLVED GAS EXCHANGE AT HYDROPOWER DAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadjerioua, Boualem; Pasha, MD Fayzul K; Stewart, Kevin M; Bender, Merlynn; Schneider, Michael L.

    2012-07-01

    Total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation in waters released at hydropower dams can cause gas bubble trauma in fisheries resulting in physical injuries and eyeball protrusion that can lead to mortality. Elevated TDG pressures in hydropower releases are generally caused by the entrainment of air in spillway releases and the subsequent exchange of atmospheric gasses into solution during passage through the stilling basin. The network of dams throughout the Columbia River Basin (CRB) are managed for irrigation, hydropower production, flood control, navigation, and fish passage that frequently result in both voluntary and involuntary spillway releases. These dam operations are constrained by state and federal water quality standards for TDG saturation which balance the benefits of spillway operations designed for Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed fisheries versus the degradation to water quality as defined by TDG saturation. In the 1970s, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), under the federal Clean Water Act (Section 303(d)), established a criterion not to exceed the TDG saturation level of 110% in order to protect freshwater and marine aquatic life. The states of Washington and Oregon have adopted special water quality standards for TDG saturation in the tailrace and forebays of hydropower facilities on the Columbia and Snake Rivers where spillway operations support fish passage objectives. The physical processes that affect TDG exchange at hydropower facilities have been studied throughout the CRB in site-specific studies and routine water quality monitoring programs. These data have been used to quantify the relationship between project operations, structural properties, and TDG exchange. These data have also been used to develop predictive models of TDG exchange to support real-time TDG management decisions. These empirically based predictive models have been developed for specific projects and account for both the fate of spillway and powerhouse flows in the tailrace channel and resultant exchange in route to the next downstream dam. Currently, there exists a need to summarize the general finding from operational and structural TDG abatement programs conducted throughout the CRB and for the development of a generalized prediction model that pools data collected at multiple projects with similar structural attributes. A generalized TDG exchange model can be tuned to specific projects and coupled with water regulation models to allow the formulation of optimal daily water regulation schedules subject to water quality constraints for TDG supersaturation. A generalized TDG exchange model can also be applied to other hydropower dams that affect TDG pressures in tailraces and can be used to develop alternative operational and structural measures to minimize TDG generation. It is proposed to develop a methodology for predicting TDG levels downstream of hydropower facilities with similar structural properties as a function of a set of variables that affect TDG exchange; such as tailwater depth, spill discharge and pattern, project head, and entrainment of powerhouse releases. TDG data from hydropower facilities located throughout the northwest region of the United States will be used to identify relationships between TDG exchange and relevant dependent variables. Data analysis and regression techniques will be used to develop predictive TDG exchange expressions for various structural categories.

  16. Invited Contribution to Q 76: The Use of Risk Analysis to Support Dam Safety Decisions and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    ICOLD 20th Congress Invited Contribution to Q 76: The Use of Risk Analysis to Support Dam Safety Decisions and Management DRAFT FOR REVIEW ONLY Portfolio Risk Assessment: A Tool for Managing Dam Safety in the Context of the Owner's Business David S. Bowles Professor and Director, Institute for Dam Safety Risk

  17. Seismic deformation analysis of Tuttle Creek Dam Timothy D. Stark, Michael H. Beaty, Peter M. Byrne, Gonzalo Castro,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seismic deformation analysis of Tuttle Creek Dam Timothy D. Stark, Michael H. Beaty, Peter M. Byrne, and David L. Mathews Abstract: To facilitate the design of seismic remediation for Tuttle Creek Dam in east central Kansas, a seismic finite differ- ence analysis of the dam was performed using the software FLAC

  18. INFLUENCE OF ROCKY REACH DAM AND THE TEMPERATURE OF THE OKANOGAN RIVER ON THE UPSTREAM MIGRATION OF SOCKEYE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INFLUENCE OF ROCKY REACH DAM AND THE TEMPERATURE OF THE OKANOGAN RIVER ON THE UPSTREAM MIGRATION Reach Dam, constructed on the Columbia River 7 miles above Wenatchee, Wash.· in 1957-61, has not appreciably increased the time required for adult sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) to mi~rate to Zosel Dam

  19. THE INFLUENCE OF MAJOR DAMS ON HYDROLOGY THROUGH THE DRAINAGE NETWORK OF THE SACRAMENTO RIVER BASIN, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Michael

    THE INFLUENCE OF MAJOR DAMS ON HYDROLOGY THROUGH THE DRAINAGE NETWORK OF THE SACRAMENTO RIVER BASIN downstream of major dams and confluences in the Sacramento River basin in California, USA. Streamflow data from 10 gauging stations downstream of major dams were divided into hydrologic series corresponding

  20. ALARP Evaluation: Using Cost Effectiveness and Disproportionality To Justify Risk Reduction ANCOLD 2003 Conference on Dams Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    2003 Conference on Dams Page 1 ALARP EVALUATION: USING COST EFFECTIVENESS AND DISPROPORTIONALITY as reasonably practicable" (ALARP). The ALARP Principle is founded on the legal obligation of dam owners as duty, Institute for Dam Safety Risk Management, Utah Water Research Laboratory, College of Engineering, Utah State

  1. A DETAILED RESEARCH PLAN TO ASSESS BEHAVIOR OF ADULT SUMMER/FALL CHINOOK UPSTREAM OF WELLS DAM USING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A DETAILED RESEARCH PLAN TO ASSESS BEHAVIOR OF ADULT SUMMER/FALL CHINOOK UPSTREAM OF WELLS DAM-8295 Final Draft April 19, 2004 #12;BioAnalysts, Inc Summer/Fall Chinook Research Plan Chief Joseph Dam Page........................................................................ 11 3.6.3 Chief Joseph Dam Powerhouse

  2. Received 8 Jul 2014 | Accepted 8 Aug 2014 | Published 19 Sep 2014 Kinetochores require oligomerization of Dam1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asbury, Chip

    oligomerization of Dam1 complex to maintain microtubule attachments against tension and promote biorientation Neil-cell imaging, we find that oligomerization of the Dam1 complex is required for its ability to form microtubule attachments that are robust against tension in vitro and in vivo. An oligo- merization-deficient Dam1 complex

  3. August 2002 / Vol. 52 No. 8 BioScience 659 Dams are structures designed by humans to capture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poff, N. LeRoy

    August 2002 / Vol. 52 No. 8 BioScience 659 Articles Dams are structures designed by humans to capture water and modify the magnitude and timing of its movement downstream. The damming of streams, dams have reduced flood hazard and allowed humans to settle and farm pro- ductive alluvial soils

  4. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 2013 Independent External Peer Review of the USACE Dam Safety Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 2013 Independent External Peer Review of the USACE Dam Safety Program. Dan Corrigan #12;U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 2013 Independent External Peer Review of the USACE Dam All Rights Reserved FINAL REPORT: 2013 INDEPENDENT EXTERNAL PEER REVIEW USACE DAM SAFETY PROGRAM TABLE

  5. Estimating Overall Risk of Dam Failure: Practical Considerations in Combining Failure Probabilities ANCOLD 2003 Risk Workshop Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    Estimating Overall Risk of Dam Failure: Practical Considerations in Combining Failure Probabilities ANCOLD 2003 Risk Workshop Page 1 ESTIMATING OVERALL RISK OF DAM FAILURE: PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS With the move to a risk based approach to dam safety there has been a concomitant focus on estimating

  6. RISK-BASED EVALUATION OF OPERATING RESTRICTIONS TO REDUCE THE RISK OF EARTHQUAKE-INDUCED DAM FAILURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    RISK-BASED EVALUATION OF OPERATING RESTRICTIONS TO REDUCE THE RISK OF EARTHQUAKE-INDUCED DAM and consequences of an Earthquake-induced dam failure. The potential for both a sudden overtopping failure on the seismic performance of the dam, the potential life loss and economic consequences of Earthquake

  7. Proceedings of the Australian Committee on Large Dams (ANCOLD) Annual Meeting, Jindabyne, New South Wales, Australia, November 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    Proceedings of the Australian Committee on Large Dams (ANCOLD) Annual Meeting, Jindabyne, New South Wales, Australia, November 1999 ALAMO DAM DEMONSTRATION RISK ASSESSMENT by David S. Bowles1 , Loren R assessment was conducted on the 283-foot high rolled-earthfill Alamo Dam as part of a U.S. Army Corps

  8. Alterations to dam-spill discharge influence sex-specific activity, behaviour and passage success of migrating adult

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinch, Scott G.

    hydraulic challenges (e.g. dams and weirs) that impede or slow their movement (Keefer et al., 2004; CaudillAlterations to dam-spill discharge influence sex-specific activity, behaviour and passage success dam in British Columbia, Canada, affected the activity, behaviour and passage success of a Fraser

  9. ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Randy M; Gross, Ian G; Smith, Cyrus M; Hill, David E

    2011-11-01

    Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a Federal sponsor to continue with the project, the Watts Bar Dam Project was canceled and the Exploranium radiation monitors were removed from the doors of Watts Bar Dam in early 2006. The DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office decided to proceed with a Pilot building on the ORNL work performed at the TN and SC weigh stations in the highway sector of the Trusted Corridors project and eventually expanded it to other southern states under the name of Southeastern Corridor Pilot Project (SETCP). Many of the Phase I goals were achieved however real-world test data of private watercraft and barges was never obtained.

  10. Sluiceway Operations for Adult Steelhead Downstream Passage at The Dalles Dam, Columbia River, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Fenton; Royer, Ida M.; Johnson, Gary E.; Tackley, Sean C.

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated adult steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss; fallbacks and kelts) downstream passage at The Dalles Dam in the Columbia River, USA, during the late fall, winter, and early spring months between 2008 and 2011. The purpose of the study was to determine the efficacy of operating the dam’s ice-and-trash sluiceway during non-spill months to provide a relatively safe, non-turbine, surface outlet for overwintering steelhead fallbacks and downstream migrating steelhead kelts. We applied the fixed-location hydroacoustic technique to estimate fish passage rates at the sluiceway and turbines of the dam. The spillway was closed during our sampling periods, which generally occurred in late fall, winter, and early spring. The sluiceway was highly used by adult steelhead (91–99% of total fish sampled passing the dam) during all sampling periods. Turbine passage was low when the sluiceway was not operated. This implies that lack of a sluiceway route did not result in increased turbine passage. However, when the sluiceway was open, adult steelhead used it to pass through the dam. The sluiceway may be operated during late fall, winter, and early spring to provide an optimal, non-turbine route for adult steelhead (fallbacks and kelts) downstream passage at The Dalles Dam.

  11. Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the survival for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts during spring 2010 in a portion of the Columbia River that includes Bonneville Dam. The study estimated smolt survival from a virtual release at Bonneville Dam to a survival array 81 km downstream of Bonneville Dam. We also estimated median forebay residence time, median tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A single release design was used to estimate survival from Bonneville Dam to a primary array located 81 km downstream of Bonneville. The approach did not include a reference tailrace release. Releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam to Hood River contributed to the formation of virtual releases at a Bonneville Dam forebay entrance array and at the face of the dam. A total of 3,880 yearling Chinook salmon and 3,885 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation.

  12. Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the survival for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts during spring 2010 in a portion of the Columbia River that includes Bonneville Dam. The study estimated smolt survival from a virtual release at Bonneville Dam to a survival array 81 km downstream of Bonneville Dam. We also estimated median forebay residence time, median tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A single release design was used to estimate survival from Bonneville Dam to a primary array located 81 km downstream of Bonneville. The approach did not include a reference tailrace release. Releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam to Hood River contributed to the formation of virtual releases at a Bonneville Dam forebay entrance array and at the face of the dam. A total of 3,880 yearling Chinook salmon and 3,885 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation.

  13. The repairs on the joint head dam on the Salt River in Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillotson, Luther Rudolph

    1916-01-01

    on the Salt River. This structure impounds the flood waters of the Salt and holds them in a reservoir to be used as needed in the valley below. The next structure un­ dertaken was on the site of the old Granite Reef Dam. This new work is of concrete..., leaving the Joint Head Dam h igh and dry. The government rebuilt this dam of concrete, as shown. It further built dykes of earth over the arroyas south of the river which formed the high level river bed. A p rofile of these washed-out por­ tions...

  14. Wildlife Mitigation and Restoration for Grand Coulee Dam: Blue Creek Project, Phase 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merker, Christopher

    1993-04-01

    This report is a recommendation from the Spokane Tribe to the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) for partial mitigation for the extensive wildlife and wildlife habitat losses on the Spokane Indian Reservation caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. NPPC`s interim wildlife goal over the next 7 years for the Columbia hydropower system, is to protect, mitigate and enhance approximately 35% basin wide of the lost habitat units. Grand Coulee Dam had the greatest habitat losses of any Dams of the Wildlife Rule.

  15. Relationship of the weaning weight of beef calves to the size of their dams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanner, James Edward

    1964-01-01

    and regression of 180- day weight of calf on weight of dam Average 180-day weight of crossbred calves for each weight of dam group 48 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION The major reason for undertaking this study was to explore in de- tail the relationship between... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1964 Major Subject; Animal Breeding REIATIONSHIP OF THE WEANING WEIGHT OF BEEF CALVES TO THE SIZE OF THEIR DAMS A Thesis By JAMES EDWARD TANNER Approved as to style and content by: ';/ . (Chatrman o Committee) (Head...

  16. Integrated automation of the New Waddell Dam performance data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, L.R.; Fields, P.E.

    1999-07-01

    New Waddell Dam, a key feature of the US Bureau of Reclamation's Central Arizona Project, had elements of its dam safety data acquisition system incorporated into the design and construction. The instrumentation array is a reflection of the dam's large size and foundation complexity. Much of the instrumentation is automated. This automation was accomplished while maintaining independent communication connections to major divisions of the instrument array. Fiber optic cables are used to provide high Quality data, free from voltage surges that could originate in a nearby powerplant switchyard or from lightning. The system has been working well but there are concerns with a lack of continued equipment manufacturer support.

  17. Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate dam passage and route specific survival rates for subyearling Chinook salmon smolts to a primary survival-detection array located 81 km downstream of the dam, evaluate a BGS located in the B2 forebay, and evaluate effects of two spill treatments. The 2010 study also provided estimates of forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and spill + B2 Corner Collector (B2CC) efficiency, as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. In addition, the study estimated forebay passage survival and survival of fish traveling from the forebay entrance array, through the dam and downstream through 81 km of tailwater.

  18. Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate dam passage and route specific survival rates for subyearling Chinook salmon smolts to a primary survival-detection array located 81 km downstream of the dam, evaluate a BGS located in the B2 forebay, and evaluate effects of two spill treatments. The 2010 study also provided estimates of forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and spill + B2 Corner Collector (B2CC) efficiency, as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. In addition, the study estimated forebay passage survival and survival of fish traveling from the forebay entrance array, through the dam and downstream through 81 km of tailwater.

  19. Proceedings of the 1998 USCOLD Annual Lecture, Buffalo, New York. August 1998 PORTFOLIO RISK ASSESSMENT: A TOOL FOR DAM SAFETY RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    ASSESSMENT: A TOOL FOR DAM SAFETY RISK MANAGEMENT David S. Bowles1 , Loren R. Anderson2 , Terry F. Glover3 , and Sanjay S. Chauhan4 ABSTRACT Dam owners, engineers and regulators who are responsible for the safety of groups of dams need to prioritize dam safety evaluations or funding for structural and non

  20. UC Davis Models: Geospatial Station Network Design Tool and Hydrogen Infrastructure Rollout Economic Analysis Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternationalReport FY 2009, AnnualEnergy A.I.D. Higher Education SummitUC Davis

  1. An Assessment of Energy Potential at Non-Powered Dams in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadjerioua, Boualem

    2012-04-01

    This document provides results from a nation-scale analysis to determine the potential capacity and generation available from adding power production capability to U.S. non-powered dams.

  2. Finite element analysis of three TVA dams with alkali-aggregate reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grenoble, B.A.; Meisenheimer, J.K.; Wagner, C.D.; Newell, V.A.

    1995-12-31

    Three large Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) dams are currently experiencing problems caused by alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR). Since the fall of 1990, engineers in Stone & Webster`s Denver, Colorado office have been working with TVA to evaluate how AAR is affecting the dams and to identify measures for controlling the adverse effects of the concrete growth. This paper provides an overview of how finite element analysis is being used to understand the affects of AAR on these structures and to evaluate alternatives for minimizing the adverse effects of the concrete growth. Work on Hiwassee Dam is essentially complete, while that on the Chickamauga and Fontana Projects is still in progress. Consequently, this paper will focus primarily on Hiwassee Dam. The ongoing work on the other two projects will only be discussed briefly.

  3. Economic Implications of New Crops, Row Damming and Land Clearing in the Texas Winter Garden 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muncrief, G.E.; Lacewell, R. D.; Cornforth, G. C.; Pena, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    cotton), row damming, and conversion of range to cropland was evaluated using a regional linear programming model. Temporal analysis, 1981-2001, incorporated changes in groundwater availability, static groundwater levels, and corresponding fixed...

  4. A Prehistoric Lahar-Dammed Lake And Eruption Of Mount Pinatubo...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Prehistoric Lahar-Dammed Lake And Eruption Of Mount Pinatubo Described In A Philippine Aborigine Legend Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  5. Monitoring of Juvenile Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Summer 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.

    2012-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha; CH0) at John Day Dam (JDA) during summer 2010. This study was conducted by researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC) and the University of Washington (UW). The study was designed to estimate the effects of 30% and 40% spill treatment levels on single release survival rates of CH0 passing through two reaches: (1) the dam, and 40 km of tailwater, (2) the forebay, dam, and 40 km of tailwater. The study also estimated additional passage performance measures which are stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  6. UNIVERSIT DU QUBEC MONTRAL THE IMPACT Of DAMS ON THE SAINTE-MARGUERITE AND ROMAINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNIVERSITÉ DU QUÉBEC À MONTRÉAL THE IMPACT Of DAMS ON THE SAINTE-MARGUERITE AND ROMAINE RIVERS MATIÈRES LISTE DES FIGURES ET TABLEAUX 6 RÉSUM·É 7 CHAPITRE 1 INTRODUCTION GÉNÉRALE. .1 1

  7. EIS-0480: Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two agencies of the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service, are jointly preparing a Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Glen Canyon Dam and an EIS for adoption of the Plan. The Glen Canyon Dam, on the Colorado River in northern, Arizona, generates hydroelectric power that is marketed by DOE's Western Area Power Administration, a cooperating agency.

  8. Optimization of Hydroacoustic Equipment Deployments at Lookout Point and Cougar Dams, Willamette Valley Project, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.

    2010-08-18

    The goal of the study was to optimize performance of the fixed-location hydroacoustic systems at Lookout Point Dam (LOP) and the acoustic imaging system at Cougar Dam (CGR) by determining deployment and data acquisition methods that minimized structural, electrical, and acoustic interference. The general approach was a multi-step process from mount design to final system configuration. The optimization effort resulted in successful deployments of hydroacoustic equipment at LOP and CGR.

  9. EIS-0351: Operation of Flaming Gorge Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Colorado River, UT

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Secretary of the United States Department of the Interior (Secretary), acting through the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), is considering whether to implement a proposed action under which Flaming Gorge Dam would be operated to achieve the flow and temperature regimes recommended in the September 2000 report Flow and Temperature Recommendations for Endangered Fishes in the Green River Downstream of Flaming Gorge Dam (2000 Flow and Temperature Recommendations), published by the Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program (Recovery Program).

  10. Compliance Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Spring 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, John R.

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts at The Dalles Dam during spring 2010. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.96 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal 0.015. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay boat-restricted zone (BRZ) to the tailrace BRZ at The Dalles Dam, as well as the forebay residence time, tailrace egress, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A virtual/paired-release design was used to estimate dam passage survival at The Dalles Dam. The approach included releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam that contributed to the formation of a virtual release at the face of The Dalles Dam. A survival estimate from this release was adjusted by a paired release below The Dalles Dam. A total of 4,298 yearling Chinook salmon and 4,309 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation. The dam passage survival results are summarized as follows: Yearling Chinook Salmon 0.9641 (SE = 0.0096) and Steelhead 0.9535 (SE = 0.0097).

  11. Hydropower and the environment: A case study at Glen Canyon Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wegner, D.L. [Denver Technical Service Center, Flagstaff, AZ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The management of hydroelectric resources in the Colorado River requires a balancing of hydrologic, social, natural and cultural resources. The resulting management often has to deal with inherently conflicting objectives, short and long-term goals, time frames and operational flexibility. Glen Canyon Dam, AZ, on the Colorado River, controls the release of water into the Grand Canyon. The dam has been under intense public scrutiny since it was completed in 1963. An Environmental Impact Statement evaluating the future operations and options for Glen Canyon Dam was initiated by the Department of the Interior in 1989 and completed in 1995. An Adaptive Management approach to future operational management has been developed as part of the Glen Canyon Dam Environmental Impact Statement process. Future operations at Glen Canyon Dam will take into consideration the need to balance water movement and hydroelectricity development with natural, recreation, Native American and cultural needs. Future management of rivers requires acknowledgement of the dynamic nature of ecosystems and the need to link scientific information into the decision-making process. Lessons learned and programs developed at Glen Canyon Dam may be applied to other river systems.

  12. Thomas Davis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar FuelTechnologyTel:February 25, 2015 |7 D I S C L A I M E R

  13. Health Professions MBA Scholarship Program The UC Davis Graduate School of Management is accepting applications to the Sacramento MBA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Health Professions MBA Scholarship Program The UC Davis Graduate School of Management is accepting for the upcoming year A joint information session regarding the Sacramento MBA Program and the Health Professions@ucdavis.edu). If you have questions about the Health Professions Scholarship, please direct them to Abigail Carroll

  14. An Archaeological Survey of Forest Service Road 556 A-2 in the Davy Crockett National Forest Houston County Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-07-30

    An archaeological survey along a 0.52-mile segment (0.83 acre) of Forest Service Road 556 A-2 in Track K-1b-III and Compartment 23 of the Davy Crocket National Forest in eastern Houston County was conducted by Brazos Valley Research Associates (BVRA...

  15. Renewable Energy-Aware Manycast Overlays Thilo Schondienst, Dylan A.P. Davis, Jeremy M. Plante, and Vinod M. Vokkarane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vokkarane, Vinod M.

    Renewable Energy-Aware Manycast Overlays Thilo Sch¨ondienst, Dylan A.P. Davis, Jeremy M. Plante that are powered by renewable energy sources: Manycast Drop at Greenest Nodes (MA-DGN). The potential for emission traffic. We assume heterogeneously distributed and time-dependent availability of renewable energy sources

  16. Fire Risk and Residential Development: A GIS Analysis1 Jennifer L. Rechel James B. Davis Ted K. Bradshaw2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fire Risk and Residential Development: A GIS Analysis1 Jennifer L. Rechel James B. Davis Ted K and nonspatial analysis (Berry 1987). Fire risk maps were produced with a GIS by combining basic environmental, California. GIS and Fire Risk Analysis Nevada County in the north central Sierra Nevada was California

  17. UC Davis Policies and Practices for Work with Transgenic Plants and Plant Pathogens 1 | P a g e

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    UC Davis Policies and Practices for Work with Transgenic Plants and Plant Pathogens 1 | P a g e rev. 9110 Work with recombinant DNA organisms (transgenic plants, animal and microbes) and plant contamination or soiling of street clothes and dissemination of plant material or plant pathogens outside

  18. OMRAS2 Metadata Project 2009 M. Mauch, C. Cannam, M. Davies, S. Dixon, C. Harte, S. Kolozali, D. Tidhar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Simon

    OMRAS2 Metadata Project 2009 M. Mauch, C. Cannam, M. Davies, S. Dixon, C. Harte, S. Kolozali, D). Chord. These files contain the annotations of chord onsets in physical time using Harte's chord syntax(5), September 2005. [2] C. Harte, M. Sandler, S. A. Abd

  19. UC Davis-LLNL Scientific Advisory Committee Timothy Albertson, MD, PhD, Vice Chair, Internal Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmichael, Owen

    UC Davis-LLNL Scientific Advisory Committee Timothy Albertson, MD, PhD, Vice Chair, Internal Berglund, MD, PhD, CTSC Program Director Stuart Cohen, MD, Head of Infection Control, UCDMC Jeffrey Elias, PhD, Manager, Grant Coordination **Captain** Hernando Garzon, MD, Emergency Medicine, Kaiser Jeffrey

  20. Sedimentation of an elliptical object in a two-dimensional foam I.T. Davies, S.J. Cox1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Simon

    Sedimentation of an elliptical object in a two-dimensional foam I.T. Davies, S.J. Cox1 Institute of Mathematics and Physics, Aberystwyth University, Ceredigion SY23 3BZ, UK Abstract The sedimentation laterally. A larger, more eccentric, ellipse rotates more quickly. Key words: foam, ellipse, sedimentation 1

  1. An Information Theoretic Approach for the Discovery of Irregular and Repetitive Patterns in Genomic Willard Davis, Ananth Kalyanaraman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    in Genomic Data Willard Davis, Ananth Kalyanaraman and Diane Cook School of Electrical Engineering}@eecs.wsu.edu The unprecedented rate at which genomic data is accumulated underscores the need to develop highly efficient of appropriate computational tools. Here, we propose a new approach for exploring and describing a genome without

  2. About 50 ITS-Davis researchers are participating in the 92nd annual meeting of the Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Gian-Claudia Sciara, presiding officer International Aspects of Transportation Energy Subcommittee, ADCAbout 50 ITS-Davis researchers are participating in the 92nd annual meeting of the Transportation Harvey, presiding officer Emerging and Innovative Public Transport and Technologies Committee January 14

  3. DaviD EcclEs school of BusinEss alumni magazinE Part of the Family

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    story Anne Britt Berentsen leads alumni ambassadors in Norway Part of the family The Les Olson CompanyDaviD EcclEs school of BusinEss alumni magazinE eCCLeS EXCHANGE fall 2013 Part of the Family Les Olson Company opens their hearts and their doors to Business Scholars page 12 Democratizing Data Utah

  4. Survival Estimates for the Passage of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead through Snake River Dams and Reservoirs, 1995 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, William D.

    1996-03-01

    Documentation is provided for the third of a multiyear study to estimate the survival of juvenile salmonids passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake River.

  5. Evaluation of Behavioral Guidance Structure on Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at Bonneville Dam in 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faber, Derrek M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Hughes, James S.; Kim, Jin A.; Fu, Tao; Fischer, Eric S.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, J. R.

    2011-03-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an acoustic-telemetry study at Bonneville Dam in 2009 to evaluate the effects of a behavioral guidance structure (BGS) in the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse forebay on fish passage and survival through the second powerhouse (B2), the dam as a whole, and through the first powerhouse and spillway combined. The BGS was deployed to increase the survival of fish passing through B2 by increasing the percentage of outmigrating smolts entering the B2 Corner Collector (B2CC)—a surface flow outlet known to be a relatively benign route for downstream passage at this dam. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. Study results indicated that having turbine 11 in service is important for providing flow conditions that are comparable to those observed in pre-BGS years (2004 and 2005) and in 2008. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

  6. Effects of the Georgia flood of `94 on Lake Blackshear Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Findlay, R.C.; Northrop, J.H. [Northrop, Devine & Tarbell, Inc., Portland, ME (United States); Crisp, R.L. Jr. [and others

    1995-12-31

    Tropical Storm Alberto produced record rainfall in central Georgia in early July, 1994. The area drains into Lake Blackshear, formed in the Flint River by Lake Blackshear Dam. The level of the lake rose 3.5 m (11.5 ft) above normal and caused the worst flooding of the area in recorded history. The north embankment of the dam was overtopped, causing a 215 m (700 ft) breach. Prior to the breach, a few concentrated boils were observed in the tailwater downstream of the non-breached portion of the dam. This portion remained intact through the flood, but the presence of the boils raised questions regarding its integrity. The effects of the flood on the north embankment are discussed, as well as the geotechnical investigation conducted to assess subsurface conditions at the breach and intact portions and the plan for remediation.

  7. Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan, 1990-2003 Progress (Annual) Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks; Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

    1993-03-10

    In this document the authors present mitigation implementation activities to protect and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. This plan only addresses non-operational actions (mitigation measures that do not affect dam operation) described in the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' (Mitigation Plan) submitted to the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) in March 1991 and in accordance with subsequent Council action on that Mitigation Plan. Operational mitigation was deferred for consideration under the Columbia Basin System Operation Review (SOR) process. This document represents an implementation plan considered and conditionally approved by the Council in March of 1993.

  8. Sense of Place - Alberta, Canada by Beverly Sandalack, Ann Davis, Len Novak and Bob Sandford [EDRA/Places Awards 2006 -- Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    agriculture is part of Alberta’s longstanding heritage.Sense of Place—Alberta, Canada Beverly Sandalack, Ann Davis,by twenty years of growth in Alberta’s oil and natural gas

  9. A Review of "Translation and the Poet’s Life. The Ethics of Translating in English Culture, 1645-1726" by Paul Davis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudrum, Alan

    2011-01-01

    of Translating in English Culture, 1645-1726. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008. xi + 324 pp. Review by alan rudrum, simon fraser university. Paul Davis begins his impressive book by commenting on the extraordinary amount of academic work on translation...

  10. CX-010891: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Archer-Stegall 230-Kilovolt Fiber Optic Ground Wire Addition CX(s) Applied: B4.7 Date: 08/20/2013 Location(s): Nebraska, Nebraska Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  11. EIS-0106: Great Falls-Conrad Transmission Line Project, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Western Area Power Administration prepared this EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts of the construction and operation of a 230-kilovolt transmission line from Great Falls, Montana, to Conrad, Montana.

  12. CX-011723: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Happy Jack 230 Kilovolt Substation Fiber Optic Installation in Laramie County, Wyoming CX(s) Applied: B4.7 Date: 12/31/2013 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  13. CX-012077: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Danger Tree Management on Craig to Hayden 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/21/2014 Location(s): Colorado, Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  14. CX-011208: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Danger Tree Management on Malta-Mount Elbert 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09/09/2013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  15. CX-011204: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hayden-North Park 230-Kilovolt Transmission Lane Danger Tree Management CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/30/2013 Location(s): Colorado, Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  16. CX-011209: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Archer-North Park 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line Danger Tree Management CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09/10/2013 Location(s): Colorado, Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  17. CX-012750: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Canon West-Poncha 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line Road Maintenance Chaffee and Fremont Counties, Colorado CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41878 Location(s): ColoradoOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  18. CX-010685: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hayden Substation 230-kilovolt Tie Line CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 07/09/2013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  19. CX-012741: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Liberty-Westwing 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line Insulator Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41795 Location(s): ArizonaOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  20. CX-012764: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kayenta-Navajo 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line Access Road Maintenance Coconini and Navajo Counties, Arizona CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41872 Location(s): ArizonaOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  1. CX-008789: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Curecanti-Lost Canyon 230 Kilovolt Access Roads and Western Area Power Administration Right-of-Way in Montrose, Ouray, San Miguel, Dolores, and Montezuma Counties, Colorado CX(s)...

  2. Survival and Passage of Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead at The Dalles Dam, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Skalski, J. R.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fischer, Eric S.; Hughes, James S.; Khan, Fenton; Kim, Jin A.; Townsend, Richard L.

    2011-12-01

    The acoustic telemetry study reported here was conducted by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington (UW) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). The purpose of the study was to estimate dam passage survival and other performance measures for yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and steelhead at The Dalles Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) and 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  3. Survival of Juvenile Chinook Salmon Passing the Bonneville Dam Spillway in 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Durham, Robin E.; Fischer, Eric S.; Kim, Jina; Townsend, R. L.; Skalski, J. R.; Buchanan, Rebecca A.; McComas, Roy L.

    2008-12-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (CENWP) funds numerous evaluations of fish passage and survival on the Columbia River. In 2007, the CENWP asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to conduct an acoustic telemetry study to estimate the survival of juvenile Chinook salmon passing the spillway at Bonneville Dam. This report documents the study results which are intended to be used to improve the conditions juvenile anadromous fish experience when passing through the dams that the Corps operates on the river.

  4. Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Kim, Jin A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Fischer, Eric S.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Wagner, Katie A.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Miller, Benjamin L.; Miracle, Ann L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Royer, Ida M.; Khan, Fenton; Cushing, Aaron W.; Etherington, D. J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Elder, T.; Batton, George; Johnson, Gary E.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2013-05-01

    This report presents survival, behavioral, and fish passage results for yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon smolts and juvenile steelhead tagged with JSATS acoustic micro-transmitters as part of a survival study conducted at John Day Dam during 2010. This study was designed to evaluate the passage and survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead to assist managers in identifying dam operations for compliance testing as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords. Survival estimates were based on a single-release survival estimate model.

  5. Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Kim, Jin A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Wagner, Katie A.; Fischer, Eric S.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Batten, G.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Elder, T.; Etherington, D. J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Miracle, Ann L.; Mitchell, T. D.; Prather, K.; Rayamajhi, Bishes; Royer, Ida; Seaburg, Adam; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2013-06-21

    This report presents survival, behavioral, and fish passage results for tagged yearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead as part of a survival study conducted at John Day Dam during spring 2011. This study was designed to evaluate the passage and survival of yearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead to assist managers in identifying dam operations for compliance testing as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords. Survival estimates were based on a paired-release survival model.

  6. DFI JOURNAL Vol. 6 No. 1 July 2012 [3] Jet Grouting and Safety of Tuttle Creek Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DFI JOURNAL Vol. 6 No. 1 July 2012 [3] Jet Grouting and Safety of Tuttle Creek Dam Timothy D. Stark to assess, particu- larly when the project involves an operational dam. Usually the reservoir is operating at non- critical conditions (normal pool or non-seismic state) during jet grouting and after construc

  7. Apparatus for efficient sidewall containment of molten metal with horizontal alternating magnetic fields utilizing a ferromagnetic dam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Praeg, W.F.

    1997-02-11

    An apparatus is disclosed for casting sheets of metal from molten metal. The apparatus includes a containment structure having an open side, a horizontal alternating magnetic field generating structure and a ferromagnetic dam. The magnetic field and the ferromagnetic dam contain the molten metal from leaking out side portions of the open side of the containment structure. 25 figs.

  8. Apparatus for efficient sidewall containment of molten metal with horizontal alternating magnetic fields utilizing a ferromagnetic dam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL)

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus for casting sheets of metal from molten metal. The apparatus includes a containment structure having an open side, a horizontal alternating magnetic field generating structure and a ferromagnetic dam. The magnetic field and the ferromagnetic dam contain the molten metal from leaking out side portions of the open side of the containment structure.

  9. Compliance Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Spring 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-06-12

    The study estimated dam passage survival at The Dalles Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and provided additional performance measures as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. This summary report focuses on spring run stocks, yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead.

  10. Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-06-07

    The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at Bonneville Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  11. Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Spring 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-02-01

    The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at John Day Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  12. Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Spring 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-06-01

    The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at John Day Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  13. Compliance Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at The Dales Dam, Spring 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-02-01

    The study estimated dam passage survival at The Dalles Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and provided additional performance measures as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. This summary report focuses on spring run stocks, yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead.

  14. Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-03-01

    The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at Bonneville Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  15. White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, David L.; Kern, J. Chris; Hughes, Michele L.

    2003-12-01

    We report on our progress from April 2001 through March 2002 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam.

  16. White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, David L.; Kern, J. Chris; Hughes, Michele L.

    2004-02-01

    We report on our progress from April 2002 through March 2003 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam.

  17. Evaluation of a Behavioral Guidance Structure at Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse including Passage Survival of Juvenile Salmon and Steelhead using Acoustic Telemetry, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faber, Derrek M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Hughes, James S.; McComas, Roy L.; Kim, Jina; Townsend, R. L.; Fu, Tao; Skalski, J. R.; Fischer, Eric S.

    2010-02-12

    Summarizes research conducted at Bonneville Dam in 2008 to evaluate a prototype Behavioral Guidance Structure, that was deployed by the US Army Corps of Engineers in an effort to increase survival of outmigrating smolts at Bonneville Dam.

  18. 1. Go on top of the check-dam and survey the water-shed, i.e., the upstream part from which water ows into the storage.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 1. Go on top of the check-dam and survey the water-shed, i.e., the upstream part from which water ows into the storage. 2. What is the storage in the dam (in cu.m.)? 3. What is the length and depth of the dam? What is its structure and cost? How much time did it take to build the dam? 4. Where

  19. The Implications of Dam Deconstruction Methods on the Downstream Channel Bed Kristen M. Cannatelli (kmc7r@virginia.edu) and Joanna Crowe Curran (curran@virginia.edu)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curran, Joanna C.

    increased to 77% with dam removal · % Sand on bed surface upstream and downstream of dam removal reducedThe Implications of Dam Deconstruction Methods on the Downstream Channel Bed Kristen M. Cannatelli it downstream. At the same time, the lack of sediment supply downstream leads to channel and bank erosion

  20. In this paper, we formulated an expression for the capacity of the Hamming associative memory and explored its relation to the exponential DAM. In terms of hardware implementation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassoun, Mohamad H.

    memory and explored its relation to the exponential DAM. In terms of hardware implementation, the correspondence between the two models allows us to use the exponential DAM to implement the minimum Hamming; 4 For a sufficiently large radix, the exponential capacity DAM can act as a Hamming associative

  1. ASDSO/FEMA Specialty Workshop on Risk Assessment for Dams. Invited paper in the Proceedings of the 2001 ASDSO 21st Annual Conference, Snowbird, Utah. September 2001.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    ASDSO/FEMA Specialty Workshop on Risk Assessment for Dams. Invited paper in the Proceedings ON RISK ASSESSMENT FOR DAMS David S. Bowles1 and Douglas L. Johnson2 Abstract The purpose of the March 2000 ASDSO/FEMA Specialty Workshop on Risk Assessment for Dams was to "conduct a review of the state

  2. PROJECT NAME: SCENIC DRIVE DAM (EPWUDam #6-TX07019) 1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests planning to act as the sponsor, including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    PROJECT NAME: SCENIC DRIVE DAM (EPWUDam #6-TX07019) 1. Provide the name of all non. The purpose for the feasibility study is to determine the need to update/upgrade the dam in order to assist (NFIP), which allows for flood insurance discounts to local residents. #12;Image 1: Dam location

  3. PROJECT NAME: SAN DIEGO DAM (TX.07314) 1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests planning to act as the sponsor, including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    PROJECT NAME: SAN DIEGO DAM (TX.07314) 1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests planning for the feasibility study is to detennine the need to update/upgrade the dam in order to assist in our effmis), which allows for flood insurance discounts to local residents. #12;Image 1: Dam location and affected

  4. A new way to study teaching in animals: despite demonstrable benefits, rat dams do not teach their young what to eat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galef Jr., Bennett G.

    A new way to study teaching in animals: despite demonstrable benefits, rat dams do not teach taught are large. Here, we determined, first, whether Rattus novegicus dams would modify their food by mothers would be effective, if it occurred. We examined food choices of rat dams trained to eat one of two

  5. PROJECT NAME: TREMONT AVE. DAM (EPWUDam #7-TX07020) 1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests planning to act as the sponsor, including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    PROJECT NAME: TREMONT AVE. DAM (EPWUDam #7- TX07020) 1. Provide the name of all non. The purpose for the feasibility study is to determine the need to update/upgrade the dam in order to assist (NFIP), which allows for flood insurance discounts to local residents. #12;Image 1: Dam location

  6. PROJECT NAME: MURCHISON AVE. DAM (EPWUDam #8--TX07021) 1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests planning to act as the sponsor, including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    PROJECT NAME: MURCHISON AVE. DAM (EPWUDam #8--TX07021) 1. Provide the name of all non. The purpose for the feasibility study is to determine the need to update/upgrade the dam in order to assist (NFIP), which allows for flood insurance discounts to local residents. #12;Image 1: Dam location

  7. PROJECT NAME: OHIO ST. RESERVOIR DAM (TX.09511) 1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests planning to act as the sponsor, including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    PROJECT NAME: OHIO ST. RESERVOIR DAM (TX.09511) 1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests for the feasibility study is to determine the need to update/upgrade the dam in order to assist in our efforts), which allows for flood insurance discounts to local residents. #12;Image 1: Dam location and affected

  8. PROJECT NAME: NEB Range Dam System 1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests planning to act as the sponsor, including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    PROJECT NAME: NEB Range Dam System 1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests planning to act for the feasibility study is to determine the need to update/upgrade the dam in order to assist in our efforts), which allows for flood insurance discounts to local residents. #12;Image 1: Dam location and affected

  9. High-resolution multiproxy records of sedimentological changes induced by dams in the Sept-les area (Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High-resolution multiproxy records of sedimentological changes induced by dams in the Sept. Sedimentological variations have been investigated by wavelet analysis using XRF data and the sharp disappearance sedimentary dam impacts is to disentangle the dam-induced sedimentological variations from the natural

  10. CX-012735: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Davis Dam Maintenance Building Installation at the old Davis Dam 69 Kilovolt West Switchyard CX(s) Applied: B4.11Date: 41820 Location(s): ArizonaOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  11. SAN JOAQUIN RIVER RIPARIAN HABITAT BELOW FRIANT DAM: PRESERVATION AND RESTORATION1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SAN JOAQUIN RIVER RIPARIAN HABITAT BELOW FRIANT DAM: PRESERVATION AND RESTORATION1 2 Donn Furman 1 Executive Director, San Joaquin River Committee, Fresno, California. Abstract: Riparian habitat along California's San Joa- quin River in the 25 miles between Friant Darn and Free- way 99 occurs on approximately

  12. Development of spatial pattern in large woody debris and debris dams in streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    The spatial distribution of large woody debris (LWD) in streams was evaluated using Neighbor K statistics years after wood deposition, we surveyed individual pieces of LWD in one stream and surveyed debris dam) distributions of wood were identified. Individual pieces of LWD were aggregated at spatial extents ranging from

  13. Variability of magnetic soil properties in Hawaii Remke L. van Dam*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borchers, Brian

    Variability of magnetic soil properties in Hawaii Remke L. van Dam*a , J. Bruce J. Harrisona , Jan Hawaiian Islands: O'ahu, Kaho'olawe, and Hawaii. The data show a strong negative correlation between mean oxides, magnetic soils, soil development, Hawaii 1. INTRODUCTION Electromagnetic (EM) and magnetic

  14. Morphological responses and sediment processes following a typhoon-induced dam failure, Dahan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Morphological responses and sediment processes following a typhoon-induced dam failure, Dahan River adjustments following an abrupt and voluminous sediment pulse are investigated in the context of site and valley characteristics and time-varying sediment transport regimes. Approximately 10.5 x 106 m3 of stored

  15. Call for Submissions -CanaDAM 2007 Canadian Discrete and Algorithmic Mathematics Conference 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohar, Bojan

    Call for Submissions - CanaDAM 2007 Canadian Discrete and Algorithmic Mathematics Conference 2007 Banff Conference Center, Banff, Alberta, May 28-31, 2007 http://www.cs.ualberta.ca/mreza/CANADAM/ This is a new conference series on Discrete and Algorithmic Mathematics to be held in Canada every two years (in

  16. Soil effects on thermal signatures of buried nonmetallic landmines Remke L. van Dam*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borchers, Brian

    Soil effects on thermal signatures of buried nonmetallic landmines Remke L. van Dam*a , Brian for temperature propagation through homogeneous and layered soils is presented to predict surface temperatures as a function of soil heat flux amplitude, soil texture, soil water content, and thermal properties and burial

  17. Case Study: Modeling the Lateral Mobility of the Rio Grande below Cochiti Dam, New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    Case Study: Modeling the Lateral Mobility of the Rio Grande below Cochiti Dam, New Mexico Gigi A, lateral migration, and total lateral movement. By 2001, the width of the Cochiti Reach was close width, 78­90% of variance in migration rates, and 92% of the variance in total lateral movement between

  18. EA-1994: Malheur Resource Area Jonesboro Diversion Dam Replacement Project, Malheur County, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bureau of Land Management, with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as a cooperating agency, prepared an EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of the proposed authorization of a right of way to the Burns Paiute Tribe for replacement of an existing diversion dam and installation of a fish passage structure. BPA’s proposed action was to fund the project

  19. PORTFOLIO RISK ASSESSMENT OF SA WATER'S LARGE DAMS by David S. Bowles1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    PORTFOLIO RISK ASSESSMENT OF SA WATER'S LARGE DAMS by David S. Bowles1 , Andrew M. Parsons2 , Loren R. Anderson3 and Terry F. Glover4 ABSTRACT This paper summarises the Portfolio Risk Assessment (PRA a reconnaissance-level engineering assessment and risk assessment. These assessments were performed for floods

  20. Technical background information for the environmental and safety report, Volume 4: White Oak Lake and Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oakes, T.W.; Kelly, B.A.; Ohnesorge, W.F.; Eldridge, J.S.; Bird, J.C.; Shank, K.E.; Tsakeres, F.S.

    1982-03-01

    This report has been prepared to provide background information on White Oak Lake for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental and Safety Report. The paper presents the history of White Oak Dam and Lake and describes the hydrological conditions of the White Oak Creek watershed. Past and present sediment and water data are included; pathway analyses are described in detail.

  1. Updating of Safety Criteria for Basic Diagnostic Indicators of Dam at the Sayano-Shushenskaya HPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, L. A.; Skvortsova, A. E.

    2013-09-15

    Values of diagnostic indicators [K]-limitations placed on radial displacements and turn angles of horizontal sections of the dam - which are permitted for each upper-pool level within the range from 520 to 539 m are determined and proposed for inclusion in the Declaration of Safety. Empirical relationships used to develop safety criteria K1 and K2 are modified.

  2. Assessment of Natural Stream Sites for Hydroelectric Dams in the Pacific Northwest Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Hall; Kristin L. Verdin; Randy D. Lee

    2012-03-01

    This pilot study presents a methodology for modeling project characteristics using a development model of a stream obstructing dam. The model is applied to all individual stream reaches in hydrologic region 17, which encompasses nearly all of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. Project site characteristics produced by the modeling technique include: capacity potential, principal dam dimensions, number of required auxiliary dams, total extent of the constructed impoundment boundary, and the surface area of the resulting reservoir. Aggregated capacity potential values for the region are presented in capacity categories including total, that at existing dams, within federal and environmentally sensitive exclusion zones, and the balance which is consider available for greenfield development within the limits of the study. Distributions of site characteristics for small hydropower sites are presented and discussed. These sites are screened to identify candidate small hydropower sites and distributions of the site characteristics of this site population are presented and discussed. Recommendations are made for upgrading the methodology and extensions to make the results more accessible and available on a larger scale.

  3. FACTORS FOR DECLINE 3.4.5 EFFECTS OF HYDROELECTRIC DAMS ON VIABILITY OF WILD FISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and operation of the Columbia River Hydrosystem poses risks to wild populations of anadromous salmonids. Run-of river dams present passage obstacles to both adult and juvenile migrants, and the water management River populations, but in some cases refers to data from the Snake River or lower Columbia to illustrate

  4. SPH Study of the Evolution of Water-Water Interfaces in Dam Break Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian, Wei; Liang, Dongfang; Shao, Songdong; Chen, Ridong; Liu, Xingnian

    2015-04-08

    but also tides and tsunamis. 465 466 467 20 5.1 Model setup and computational parameters 468 469 The numerical setup of this hypothetical dam-break problem consists of a 2000 m long 470 horizontal water tank. Water is initially...

  5. Compliance Monitoring of Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts at John Day Dam during the spring and summer outmigrations in 2012. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.96 for spring migrants and greater than or equal to 0.93 for summer migrants, estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal to 0.015. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam to the tailrace 3 km downstream of the dam, as well as the forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and fish passage efficiency (FPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords (Fish Accords). A virtual/paired-release design was used to estimate dam passage survival at John Day Dam. The approach included releases of smolts, tagged with acoustic micro-transmitters, above John Day Dam that contributed to the formation of a virtual release at the face of John Day Dam. A survival estimate from this release was adjusted by a paired release below John Day Dam. A total of 3376 yearling Chinook salmon, 5726 subyearling Chinook salmon, and 3239 steelhead smolts were used in the virtual releases. Sample sizes for the below-dam paired releases (R2 and R3, respectively) were 997 and 995 for yearling Chinook salmon smolts, 986 and 983 for subyearling Chinook salmon smolts, and 1000 and 1000 for steelhead smolts. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tags were manufactured by Advanced Telemetry Systems. Model SS300 tags, weighing 0.304 g in air, were surgically implanted in yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon, and Model SS130 tag, weighing 0.438 g in air, were surgically implanted in juvenile steelhead for this investigation. The intent of the spring study was to estimate dam passage survival during both 30% and 40% spill conditions. The two spill conditions were to be systematically performed in alternating 2-day test intervals over the course of the spring outmigration. High flow conditions in 2012 interrupted the spill study. Dam passage survival was therefore estimated season-wide regardless of spill conditions.

  6. A giant dune-dammed lake on the North Platte River, Nebraska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swinehart, J.B. (Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Conservation and Survey Div.); Loope, D.B. (Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    The recent work in the Nebraska Sand Hills, just north of the North Platte Valley, has revealed the presence of numerous dune dams--sites where eolian sand has filled Pleistocene paleovalleys and caused the formation of lake basins containing abundant small, interdunal lakes. Although the Platte River is considered the southern margin of the Sand Hills, there is a 1,200 sq km triangular area of large dunes in Lincoln County just south of the South Platte. The authors hypothesize that large dunes migrated southward to fill the North Platte Valley during glacial maximum when both the North and South Platte were dry. As Rocky Mountain snowmelt and Great Plains precipitation increased during deglaciation, a single 65 km-long, 15 km-wide, 50 m-deep lake formed behind the massive dune dam. The tentative chronology suggests that the lake was in existence for at least several thousand years. They have not yet found compelling evidence of catastrophic flooding downstream of the former lake. Evidence of two large Quaternary lakes on the White Nile between Khartoum and Malakal (Sudan) was discovered in the 1960's. Shoreline deposits indicate the lakes were 400--600 km long and up to 50 km wide. Although the lakes have been attributed to repeated blockage of the White Nile by clay-rich Blue Nile deposits, the distribution and age of dune sand near the confluence of these rivers suggest that, as in the Nebraska example, the course of the White Nile was blocked by dunes when the region was desiccated in the Late Pleistocene. Lakes behind permeable dams rise to a level where input equals output. Earthen dams are vulnerable to overtopping and piping. The relatively high permeability of dune sand prevents or delays overtopping, and piping is prevented by the extremely high low hydraulic gradients that typify extant sand dams.

  7. Dune-dammed lakes of the Nebraska Sand Hills: Geologic setting and paleoclimatic implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loope, D.B.; Swinehart, J.B. (Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Within the western half of this grass-stabilized dunefield, about 1,000 interdune lakes are grouped into two clusters here named the Blue and Birdwood lake basins. In the lake basins, those parts of the valley not filled by dune sand are occupied by modern lakes and Holocene lake sediments. The Blue Creek dam is mounded transverse to flow; spill-over of the lake basin takes place over bedrock on the east side of the dam when lake level is 2 m higher than present. The permeability of dune sand prevents massive overflow, and thereby contributes to the integrity and longevity of the dam. Preserved lake sediments in the basin indicate that Blue Creek was obstructed prior to 13,000 yr BP, probably during glacial maximum (18,000 yr BP). Extensive peats dated at 1,500-1,000 yr BP lie directly on fluvial sand and gravel along the Calamus River, a stream that presently discharges a nearly constant 350 cfs. These sediments indicate blockage of streams also took place when linear dunes were active in the eastern Sand Hills in Late Holocene time. With the onset of an arid episode, dunes forming an interfluves curtail the severity of runoff events. As the regional water table drops, drainages go dry and dunes move uncontested into blocking positions. Although drainages of the eastern Sand Hills appear to have repeatedly broken through sand-blocked channels, the Blue and Birdwood lake basins are still blocked by Late Pleistocene dune dams. The repeated episodes of stream blockage and interbedded lake sediments and dune sands behind the extant dams record several strong fluctuations in Holocene climate. Recently proposed climatic models indicate that the northward flow of warm, moist air from the Gulf of Mexico is enhanced when the Gulf's surface temperature is low and the Bermuda high is intensified and in a western position. When the Bermuda high moves eastward, the core of the North American continent becomes desiccated.

  8. Survey of Potential Hanford Site Contaminants in the Upper Sediment for the Reservoirs at McNary, John Day, The Dalles, and Bonneville Dams, 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patton, Gregory W.; Priddy, M; Yokel, Jerel W.; Delistraty, Damon A.; Stoops, Thomas M.

    2005-02-01

    This report presents the results from a multi-agency cooperative environmental surveillance study. of the study looked at sediment from the pools upstream from dams on the Columbia River that are downstream from Hanford Site operations. The radiological and chemical conditions existing in the upper-level sediment found in the pools upstream from McNary Dam, John Day Dam, The Dalles Lock and Dam, and Bonneville Dam were evaluated. This study also evaluated beach sediment where available. Water samples were collected at McNary Dam to further evaluate potential Hanford contaminants in the lower Columbia River. Samples were analyzed for radionuclides, chemicals, and physical parameters. Results from this study were compared to background values from sediment and water samples collect from the pool upstream of Priest Rapids Dam (upstream of the Hanford Site) by the Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project.

  9. Lessons from a Dam Failure1 JAMI;S E. EVANS, SCUDDKR D. MACKKY, JOHAN F. GOTTC.KNS, AND WILFRID M. GILL, Department of Geology, Bowling Green State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottgens, Hans

    Lessons from a Dam Failure1 JAMI;S E. EVANS, SCUDDKR D. MACKKY, JOHAN F. GOTTC.KNS, AND WILFRID M, OH 43606, and Enecotech Southwest, Inc., Phoenix, AZ 85004. ABSTRACT. The IVEX Dam (Chagrin River of the dam. The failure was the result of seepage piping at the toe of the dam, near the masonry spillway

  10. Current Biology 16, 14891501, August 8, 2006 2006 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2006.06.063 Mps1 Phosphorylation of Dam1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .cub.2006.06.063 Article Mps1 Phosphorylation of Dam1 Couples Kinetochores to Microtubule Plus Ends ends. Results: Dam1 is a kinetochore component that directly binds to microtubules. We identified DAM1-765, a dom- inant allele of DAM1, in a genetic screen for mutations that increase stress on the spindle pole

  11. Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Spring 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.

    2012-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare dam passage survival, at two spill treatment levels, of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts at John Day Dam during spring 2010. The two treatments were 30% and 40% spill out of total project discharge. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.96 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal 0.015. The study also estimated forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. However, by agreement among the stakeholders, this study was not an official BiOp compliance test because the long-term passage measures at John Day Dam have yet to be finalized and another year of spill-treatment testing was desired.

  12. Static and dynamic characteristics for a two-axial-groove bearing and a pressure-dam bearing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Jughaiman, Bader K.

    2009-06-02

    This thesis compares experimental static and dynamic force characteristics for a two-axial-groove bearing and a pressure-dam bearing without a relief track. The thesis also compares experimental results to predictions from a numerical analysis...

  13. Survival and Passage of Juvenile Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Passing through Bonneville Dam, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Batten, G.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Kim, Jin A.; Johnson, Gary E.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Etherington, D. J.; Fischer, Eric S.; Fu, Tao; Greiner, Michael J.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Rayamajhi, Bishes; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2013-02-15

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and subcontractors conducted an acoustic-telemetry study of juvenile salmonid fish passage and survival at Bonneville Dam in 2011. The study was conducted to assess the readiness of the monitoring system for official compliance studies under the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a virtual/paired-release model. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon using a virtual release, paired reference release survival model. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

  14. Optimal control of a large dam, taking into account the water costs [New Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abramov, Vyacheslav M

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies large dam models where the difference between lower and upper levels $L$ is assumed to be large. Passage across the levels leads to damage, and the damage costs of crossing the lower or upper level are proportional to the large parameter $L$. Input stream of water is described by compound Poisson process, and the water cost depends upon current level of water in the dam. The aim of the paper is to choose the parameters of output stream (specifically defined in the paper) minimizing the long-run expenses. The particular problem, where input stream is Poisson and water costs are not taken into account has been studied in [Abramov, \\emph{J. Appl. Prob.}, 44 (2007), 249-258]. The present paper partially answers the question \\textit{How does the structure of water costs affect the optimal solution?} In particular the case of linear costs is studied.

  15. Survival and Passage of Juvenile Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Passing through Bonneville Dam, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Kim, Jin A.; Royer, Ida M.; Batten, George W.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Etherington, D. J.; Faber, Derrek M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Fu, Tao; Hennen, Matthew J.; Mitchell, Tyler; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2011-12-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and subcontractors conducted an acoustic-telemetry study of juvenile salmonid fish passage and survival at Bonneville Dam in 2010. The study was conducted to assess the readiness of the monitoring system for official compliance studies under the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a single-release model. This also was the last year of evaluation of effects of a behavioral guidance device installed in the Powerhouse 2 forebay. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

  16. Survival and Passage of Juvenile Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Passing Through Bonneville Dam, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Kim, Jin A.; Royer, Ida M.; Batten, George W.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Etherington, D. J.; Faber, Derrek M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Fu, Tao; Hennen, Matthew J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2012-09-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and subcontractors conducted an acoustic-telemetry study of juvenile salmonid fish passage and survival at Bonneville Dam in 2010. The study was conducted to assess the readiness of the monitoring system for official compliance studies under the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a single-release model. This also was the last year of evaluation of effects of a behavioral guidance device installed in the Powerhouse 2 forebay. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

  17. Survival and Passage of Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead at McNary Dam, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, James S.; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Fischer, Eric S.; Batton, George; Carlson, Thomas J.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Deng, Zhiqun; Etherington, D. J.; Fu, Tao; Greiner, Michael J.; Ingraham, John M.; Kim, Jin A.; Li, Xi; Martinez, Jayson J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Rayamajhi, Bishes; Seaburg, Adam; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Wagner, Katie A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2013-12-23

    The study was designed to evaluate the passage and survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead at McNary Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a virtual/paired-release model. This study supports the USACE’s continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

  18. Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Mary Ann; Johnson, Robert L.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Simmons, Carver S.; Cook, Chris B.; Brown, Richard S.; Tano, Daniel K.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Faber, Derrek M.; Lecaire, Richard; Francis, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the third year of a four-year study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) in the forebay to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. This work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes).

  19. Framing India's Hydraulic Crises The Politics of the Modern Large Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Framing India's Hydraulic Crises The Politics of the Modern Large Dam ROHAN D'SOUZA For several University Press, 2006). #12;I N D I A ' S H Y D R A U L I C C R I S I S 1 1 3 commentator on India, declared landscape.4 The TVA model was soon to mark a profound hydraulic departure by kick-starting the post

  20. Sedimentary processes of the Red River between Denison Dam, TX and Alexandria, LA 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weirich, Thomas Moody - Kenyon

    1990-01-01

    the processes that govern the suspended sediment concentration of the Red River; processes which may impact river navigation and the operation of lock and dams currently being constructed on the Red River between Alexandria, LA and Shreveport, LA. Knowledge.... 2. changes in land use which have promoted erosion of the lands along the reach of the Red River between Index, AR and Shreveport, LA. 3. easily erodible fine grained fractions that may be present in, or outcrop immediately adjacent to, the Red...

  1. Scientific substantiation of safe operation of the Earthen Dams at the Votkinsk HPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deev, A. P.; Fisenko, V. F.; Sol'skii, S. V.; Lopatina, M. G.; Gints, A. V.; Aref'eva, A. N.

    2012-11-15

    Over a period of 15 years, coworkers of the B. E. Vedeneev Scientific-Research Institute of Hydraulic Engineering have conducted scientific accompaniment of the operation of the earthen dams at the Votkinsk HPP. During that time, basic performance characteristics associated with complex hydrogeologic and hydrochemical conditions, and the forms of their unfavorable manifestations influencing the reliability and safety of the structures were revealed, and, recommendations and measures were developed for their elimination.

  2. Design Tools to Assess Hydro-Turbine Biological Performance: Priest Rapids Dam Turbine Replacement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Strickler, Brad; Weisbeck, Molly; Dotson, Curtis L.

    2013-06-25

    Over the past two decades, there have been many studies describing injury mechanisms associated with turbine passage, the response of various fish species to these mechanisms, and the probability of survival through dams. Although developing tools to design turbines that improve passage survival has been difficult and slow, a more robust quantification of the turbine environment has emerged through integrating physical model data, fish survival data, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies. Grant County Public Utility District (GCPUD) operates the Priest Rapids Dam (PRD), a hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River in Washington State. The dam contains 10 Kaplan-type turbine units that are now almost 50 years old. The Utility District plans to refit all of these aging turbines with new turbines. The Columbia River at PRD is a migratory pathway for several species of juvenile and adult salmonids, so passage of fish through the dam is a major consideration when replacing the turbines. In this presentation, a method for turbine biological performance assessment (BioPA) is introduced. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a CFD model of a proposed turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. Using known relationships between the dose of an injury mechanism and frequency of injury (dose–response) from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from proposed designs, the engineer can identify the more-promising alternatives. We will present application of the BioPA method for baseline risk assessment calculations for the existing Kaplan turbines at PRD that will be used as the minimum biological performance that a proposed new design must achieve.

  3. A Raymond Davis Jr. Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, U.S.A.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries PrintA New SolarA Present . . .Raymond Davis

  4. Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, Jay; Garrow, Larry (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

    2005-06-01

    ''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan. Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) uses a combination of techniques to collect physical and biological data within the Kootenai River Basin. These data serve several purposes including: the development and refinement of models used in management of water resources and operation of Libby Dam; investigations into the limiting factors of native fish populations, gathering basic life history information, tracking trends in endangered and threatened species, and the assessment of restoration or management activities designed to restore native fishes and their habitats.

  5. Total Dissolved Gas Monitoring in Chum Salmon Spawning Gravels Below Bonneville Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arntzen, Evan V.; Geist, David R.; Panther, Jennifer L.; Dawley, Earl

    2007-01-30

    At the request of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Portland District), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted research to determine whether total dissolved gas concentrations are elevated in chum salmon redds during spring spill operations at Bonneville Dam. The study involved monitoring the total dissolved gas levels at egg pocket depth and in the river at two chum salmon spawning locations downstream from Bonneville Dam. Dissolved atmospheric gas supersaturation generated by spill from Bonneville Dam may diminish survival of chum (Oncorhynchus keta) salmon when sac fry are still present in the gravel downstream from Bonneville Dam. However, no previous work has been conducted to determine whether total dissolved gas (TDG) levels are elevated during spring spill operations within incubation habitats. The guidance used by hydropower system managers to provide protection for pre-emergent chum salmon fry has been to limit TDG to 105% after allowing for depth compensation. A previous literature review completed in early 2006 shows that TDG levels as low as 103% have been documented to cause mortality in sac fry. Our study measured TDG in the incubation environment to evaluate whether these levels were exceeded during spring spill operations. Total dissolved gas levels were measured within chum salmon spawning areas near Ives Island and Multnomah Falls on the Columbia River. Water quality sensors screened at egg pocket depth and to the river were installed at both sites. At each location, we also measured dissolved oxygen, temperature, specific conductance, and water depth to assist with the interpretation of TDG results. Total dissolved gas was depth-compensated to determine when levels were high enough to potentially affect sac fry. This report provides detailed descriptions of the two study sites downstream of Bonneville Dam, as well as the equipment and procedures employed to monitor the TDG levels at the study sites. Results of the monitoring at both sites are then presented in both text and graphics. The findings and recommendations for further research are discussed, followed by a listing of the references cited in the report.

  6. Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Distribution at Lookout Point Dam, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Trott, Donna M.; Ploskey, Gene R.

    2011-07-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at Lookout Point Dam (LOP) on the Middle Fork Willamette River. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). The goal of the study was to provide fish passage and distribution data to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance downstream passage at LOP and others dams in USACE’s Willamette Valley Project in response to the listing of Upper Willamette River Spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Upper Willamette River steelhead (O. mykiss) as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. During the year-long study period - February 1, 2010 to January 31, 2011the objectives of the hydroacoustic evaluation of fish passage and distribution at LOP were to: 1. Estimate passage rates, run timing, horizontal distribution, and diel distribution at turbine penstock intakes for smolt-size fish. 2. Estimate passage rates, run timing and diel distribution at turbine penstock intakes for small-size fish. 3. Estimate passage rates and run timing at the regulating outlets for smolt-size fish. 4. Estimate vertical distribution of smolt-size fish in the forebay near the upstream face of the dam. The fixed-location hydroacoustic technique was used to accomplish the objectives of this study. Transducers (420 kHz) were deployed in each penstock intake, above each RO entrance, and on the dam face; a total of nine transducers (2 single-beam and 7 split-beam) were used. We summarize the findings from the hydroacoustic evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at LOP during February 2010 through January 2011 as follows. • Fish passage rates for smolt-size fish (> ~90 mm) were highest during December-January and lowest in mid-summer through early fall. • During the entire study period, an estimated total of 142,463 fish ± 4,444 (95% confidence interval) smolt-size fish passed through turbine penstock intakes. • Diel periodicity of smolt-size fish showing crepuscular peaks was evident in fish passage into turbine penstock intakes. • Run timing for small-size fish (~65-90 mm) peaked (702 fish) on December 18. Downstream passage of small-size juvenile fish was variable, occurring on two days in the spring, eight days in the summer, and at times throughout late fall and winter. A total of 7,017 ± 690 small-size fish passed through the turbine penstock intakes during the study period. • Relatively few fish passed into the ROs when they were open in summer (2 fish/d) and winter (8 fish/d). • Fish were surface-oriented with 62-80% above 10 m deep. The highest percentage of fish (30-60%) was in the 5-10 m depth bin. We draw the following conclusions from the study. • The non-obtrusive hydroacoustic data from this study are reliable because passage estimates and patterns were similar with those observed in the direct capture data from the tailrace screw trap and were consistent with distribution patterns observed in other studies of juvenile salmonid passage at dams. • Fish passage at LOP was apparently affected but not dominated by dam operations and reservoir elevation. • The surface-oriented vertical distribution of fish we observed supports development of surface passage or collector devices. In summary, the high-resolution spatially and temporally data reported herein provide detailed estimates of vertical, horizontal, diel, daily, and seasonal passage and distributions at LOP during March 2010 through January 2011. This information is applicable to management decisions on design and development of surface passage and collections devices to help restore Chinook salmon populations in the Middle Fork Willamette River watershed above Lookout Point Dam.

  7. Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam with Emphasis on the Prototype Surface Flow Outlet, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Monter, Tyrell J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Faber, Derrek M.; Durham, Robin E.; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.; Kim, Jina; Fischer, Eric S.; Meyer, Matthew M.

    2009-12-01

    The main purpose of the study was to evaluate the performance of Top Spill Weirs installed at two spillbays at John Day Dam and evaluate the effectiveness of these surface flow outlets at attracting juvenile salmon away from the powerhouse and reducing turbine passage. The Juvenile Salmonid Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was used to estimate survival of juvenile salmonids passing the dam and also for calculating performance metrics used to evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of the dam at passing juvenile salmonids.

  8. Synthesis of Sensor Fish Data for Assessment of Fish Passage Conditions at Turbines, Spillways, and Bypass Facilities – Phase 1: The Dalles Dam Spillway Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Serkowski, John A.; Fu, Tao; Carlson, Thomas J.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2007-12-31

    This report summarizes the characterization of spillway passage conditions at The Dalles Dam in 2006 and the effort to complete a comprehensive database for data sets from The Dalles Dam spillway Sensor Fish and balloon-tagged live fish experiments. Through The Dalles Dam spillway case study, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers evaluated the database as an efficient means for accessing and retrieving system-wide data for the U.S Army Corps of Engineers (USACE).

  9. Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through the Fish Weir and Turbine Unit 1 at Foster Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.

    2013-02-01

    This report documents investigations of downstream fish passage research involving a spillway fish weir and turbine passage conditions at Foster Dam in May 2012.

  10. Structures of Escherichia coli DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) in complex with a non-GATC sequence: Potential implications for methylation-independent transcriptional repression

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Horton, John R.; Zhang, Xing; Blumenthal, Robert M.; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-04-06

    DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) is widespread and conserved among the ?-proteobacteria. Methylation of the Ade in GATC sequences regulates diverse bacterial cell functions, including gene expression, mismatch repair and chromosome replication. Dam also controls virulence in many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. An unexplained and perplexing observation about Escherichia coli Dam (EcoDam) is that there is no obvious relationship between the genes that are transcriptionally responsive to Dam and the promoter-proximal presence of GATC sequences. Here, we demonstrate that EcoDam interacts with a 5-base pair non-cognate sequence distinct from GATC. The crystal structure of a non-cognate complex allowed us to identify amore »DNA binding element, GTYTA/TARAC (where Y = C/T and R = A/G). This element immediately flanks GATC sites in some Dam-regulated promoters, including the Pap operon which specifies pyelonephritis-associated pili. In addition, Dam interacts with near-cognate GATC sequences (i.e. 3/4-site ATC and GAT). All together, these results imply that Dam, in addition to being responsible for GATC methylation, could also function as a methylation-independent transcriptional repressor.« less

  11. Noise in the processing and application of magnetic gradients Leon Foks, Kristofer Davis, and Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical, and Magnetics, Colorado School of Mines,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noise in the processing and application of magnetic gradients Leon Foks, Kristofer Davis SUMMARY The increased use of magnetic gradients brings about the need for reliable noise characterization to characterize noise in magnetic gradient data. We use an equivalent source technique and finite differ- ence

  12. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO UCSD BERKELEY DAVIS IRVINE LOS ANGELES MERCED RIVERSIDE SAN DIEGO SAN FRANCISCO SANTA BARBARA SANTA CRUZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO UCSD BERKELEY · DAVIS · IRVINE · LOS ANGELES · MERCED · RIVERSIDE · SAN DIEGO · SAN FRANCISCO SANTA BARBARA · SANTA CRUZ UC San Diego Dean's Office: (858) 822-1123 2016 Provider Proposal Guidelines Thank you for your interest in partnering with UC San Diego Global

  13. The Center for Water-Energy Efficiency is a not-for-profit research and development unit at the University of California, Davis, leading innovations in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    The Center for Water-Energy Efficiency is a not-for-profit research and development unit at the University of California, Davis, leading innovations in water and energy efficient technologies and policies between water and energy and to use and allocate both more efficiently. Collaborating with partners

  14. READINGS FOR EVERYONE Davies, P.J., Bubela, B. and Ferguson, J., 1978, The formation of ooids: Sedimentology, v. 25, p. 703-730.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kah, Linda

    OOIDS READINGS FOR EVERYONE Davies, P.J., Bubela, B. and Ferguson, J., 1978, The formation of ooids: Sedimentology, v. 25, p. 703-730. Given, R.K., and Wilkinson, B.H., 1985, Kinetic control of morphology, composition and mineralogy of abiotic sedimentary carbonates: Journal of Sedimentary Petrology v. 55, p. 109

  15. 3D joint inversion of gradient and total-field magnetic data Kristofer Davis and Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical, and Magnetics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Gravity, Electrical, and Magnetics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado SUMMARY Recently3D joint inversion of gradient and total-field magnetic data Kristofer Davis and Yaoguo Li, Center and demonstrate it with a synthetic and field example. INTRODUCTION Airborne magnetic gradiometry data

  16. Please return this form to the School of Medicine, Registrar's Office. 4610 X Street, Ste 1208, Sacramento 95817. University of California, Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    , Sacramento 95817. University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Registrar's Office Insurance Waiver Form 4610 X Street, Suite 1208, Sacramento CA 95817-2200 / Phone: (916) 734-4990 / Fax: (916) 734 Education Building 4610 X Street, Suite 1208 Sacramento, CA 95817 Fax: (916) 734-2178 3. Waiver applications

  17. Please return this form to the School of Medicine, Registrar's Office. 4610 X Street, Ste 1208, Sacramento 95817. University of California, Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    , Sacramento 95817. University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Registrar's Office Insurance Waiver Form 4610 X Street, Suite 1208, Sacramento CA 95817-2200 / Phone: (916) 734-4664 / Fax: (916) 734: Krista Newberry Medical Education Building 4610 X Street, Suite 1208 Sacramento, CA 95817 Fax: (916) 734

  18. "Leveraging University Expertise to Inform Better Policy" The UC Davis Policy Institute for Energy, Environment and the Economy is a bold new initiative that leverages world-class

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    the sustainable management and development of biomass in California for the production of renewable energy and Agricultural Research (CIFAR) energy management project leader; and Doug Wickizer, chief of environmental"Leveraging University Expertise to Inform Better Policy" The UC Davis Policy Institute for Energy

  19. A review of the history of alkali-aggregate reaction at three of the Tennessee Valley Authority`s dams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, C.D.; Newell, V.A.

    1995-12-31

    Three of The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) major hydroelectric projects are experiencing alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR), These projects include Fontana Dam and Powerhouse, Hiwassee Dam and Powerhouse, and Chickamauga Lock, Dam and Powerhouse, All of these dams are considered {open_quotes}high hazard,{close_quotes} causing significant economic losses from loss of power, replacement of the dam and generation facilities, and loss of life should they fail. This paper presents an overview of the descriptions of each of these projects, including construction and original instrumentation installed in the structure during construction, All of these projects are now 50 to 60 years old and are experiencing problems in one or more locations due to AAR with no indication of any slowing of the concrete growth process, Concrete problems at these projects came as no surprise. Cracks were noted within 5 years of construction, and by 1980 some of these cracks were 1/2 inch in width. continuous monitoring of these projects has always been a priority. This paper will discuss how the growth from AAR has affected each structure, which structures have been affected most, and why. It will discuss how TVA has managed AAR at these projects in the past and how TVA is changing from a reactive to a pro-active approach in its response to AAR.

  20. Reducing the Impacts of Hydroelectric Dams on Juvenile Anadromous Fishes: Bioengineering Evaluations Using Acoustic Imaging in the Columbia River, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hedgepeth, J.; Khan, Fenton; Mueller, Robert P.; Nagy, William T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Weiland, Mark A.

    2008-07-29

    Dams impact the survival of juvenile anadromous fishes by obstructing migration corridors, lowering water quality, delaying migrations, and entraining fish in turbine discharge. To reduce these impacts, structural and operational modifications to dams— such as voluntary spill discharge, turbine intake guidance screens, and surface flow outlets—are instituted. Over the last six years, we have used acoustic imaging technology to evaluate the effects of these modifications on fish behavior, passage rates, entrainment zones, and fish/flow relationships at hydroelectric projects on the Columbia River. The imaging technique has evolved from studies documenting simple movement patterns to automated tracking of images to merging and analysis with concurrent hydraulic data. This chapter chronicles this evolution and shows how the information gleaned from the scientific evaluations has been applied to improve passage conditions for juvenile salmonids. We present data from Bonneville and The Dalles dams that document fish behavior and entrainment zones at sluiceway outlets (14 to 142 m3/s), fish passage rates through a gap at a turbine intake screen, and the relationship between fish swimming effort and hydraulic conditions. Dam operators and fisheries managers have applied these data to support decisions on operational and structural changes to the dams for the benefit of anadromous fish populations in the Columbia River basin.

  1. Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunnigan, James L.; Marotz, Brian L.; DeShazer, Jay (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

    2003-06-01

    Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries...'' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May, 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to redevelop fisheries and fisheries habitat in basin streams and lakes.

  2. Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, Jay; Garrow, Larry (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

    2004-06-01

    ''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating for damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan. Montana FWP uses a combination of diverse techniques to collect a variety of physical and biological data within the Kootenai River Basin. These data serve several purposes including: the development and refinement of models used in management of water resources and operation of Libby Dam; investigations into the limiting factors of native fish populations, gathering basic life history information, tracking trends in endangered, threatened species, and the assessment of restoration or management activities intended to restore native fishes and their habitats.

  3. Survival Rates of Juvenile Salmonids Passing Through the Bonneville Dam and Spillway in 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Faber, Derrek M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Johnson, Gary E.; Hughes, James S.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Durham, Robin E.; Townsend, R. L.; Skalski, J. R.; Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Kim, Jina; Fischer, Eric S.; Meyer, Matthew M.; McComas, Roy L.; Everett, Jason

    2009-12-28

    This report describes a 2008 acoustic telemetry survival study conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The study estimated the survival of juvenile Chinook salmon and steelhead passing Bonneville Dam (BON) and its spillway. Of particular interest was the relative survival of smolts detected passing through end spill bays 1-3 and 16-18, which had deep flow deflectors immediately downstream of spill gates, versus survival of smolts passing middle spill bays 4-15, which had shallow flow deflectors.

  4. Strong obstruction of the Berends-Burgers-van Dam spin-3 vertex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xavier Bekaert; Nicolas Boulanger; Serge Leclercq

    2010-02-01

    In the eighties, Berends, Burgers and van Dam (BBvD) found a nonabelian cubic vertex for self-interacting massless fields of spin three in flat spacetime. However, they also found that this deformation is inconsistent at higher order for any multiplet of spin-three fields. For arbitrary symmetric gauge fields, we severely constrain the possible nonabelian deformations of the gauge algebra and, using these results, prove that the BBvD obstruction cannot be cured by any means, even by introducing fields of spin higher (or lower) than three.

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - Hydropower Meeting Dam Safety Program_20150615.pptx [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on darkMicroorganisms toPalladium/28/2008HentschelValue ofMeeting Dam

  6. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT NORTH FORK SKOKOMISH POWERHOUSE AT CUSHMAN NO. 2 DAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Steve; Wilson, Matthew

    2013-09-30

    The objective of this project was to add generating capacity on an in-stream flow release at Tacoma Power's Cushman hydroelectric project, Cushman No. 2 Dam, FERC Project P-460. The flow that is being used to generate additional electricity was being discharged from a valve at the base of the dam without recovery of the energy. A second objective to the project was to incorporate upstream fish passage by use of a fish collection structure attached to the draft tubes of the hydroelectric units. This will enable reintroduction of native anadromous fish above the dams which have blocked fish passage since the late 1920's. The project was funded in part by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act through the Department of Energy, Office of Energy, Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Wind and Water Power Program.

  7. Rapid-response analysis of the Davis-Besse loss-of-feedwater event on June 9, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lime, J.F.; Nassersharif, B.; Boyack, B.E.

    1986-01-01

    At the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), we performed a rapid-response analysis of the loss-of-feedwater (LOFW) event that occurred at the Toledo Edison Davis-Besse plant on June 9, 1985. The initial 831 s of the plant transient were simulated and, in addition, four postulated transients were calculated to determine how the plant would have responded if feedwater had not been restored, and how it would have responded to a feed-and-bleed (FAB) decay-heat removal procedure initiated at different times. The Transient Reactor Analysis Code was used for this analysis. We completed these calculations within a two-week period and provided a report to the NRC 30 days later. Our analysis showed that FAB was a viable decay-heat-removal procedure for the Davis-Besse plant for the initiation times analyzed. With complete LOFW and no alternate decay-heat removal procedure, we calculated that core uncovery would have occurred at about 9200 s. FAB initiated at 8 min and 13 min after complete LOFW, which in the actual LOFW transient occurred 6 min after the initiating event of a main-feedwater pump trip, was successful in that the primary system remained subcooled and water-solid throughout the transient. FAB initiated at 28 min after complete LOFW was considered successful even though it resulted in a loss of subcooling, a net loss in primary inventory, and a slow voiding of the primary system. The core would have remained covered for the nine hours that we estimated for the primary pressure to decrease to the residual-heat-removal pressure.

  8. Evaluation of the water quality in the releases from thirty dams in the Tennessee River Valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butkus, S.R.

    1990-09-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has routinely monitored dissolved oxygen (DO) and temperature from the tailwater releases of its dams since the 1950s. The original objective of this monitoring was to collect baseline information to support reaeration research and determine the relative impact of impoundments on the assimilative capacity of the river system. This monitoring has continued even though the original objective was satisfied. New purposes for this monitoring data have arisen in support of several programs, without new consideration of the monitoring strategy and sampling design. The primary purpose of this report is to compare the historical release data for 30 dams in the Tennessee Valley based on four different objectives: (1) comparison of seasonal patterns, (2) comparison of baseline conditions using descriptive statistics, (3) evaluation of monotonic trends, and (4) discussion of monitoring strategies that might be required to determine compliance with existing and proposed criteria. A secondary purpose of the report is to compile the existing database into tables and figures that would be useful for other investigators. 51 refs., 210 figs., 1 tab.

  9. An integration of aeromagnetic and electrical resistivity methods in dam site investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aina, A. [Univ. of Lagos (Nigeria). Dept. of Physics] [Univ. of Lagos (Nigeria). Dept. of Physics; Olorunfemi, M.O. [Obafemi Awolowo Univ., Ile-Ife (Nigeria). Dept. of Geology] [Obafemi Awolowo Univ., Ile-Ife (Nigeria). Dept. of Geology; Ojo, J.S. [Federal Univ. of Technology, Akure (Nigeria). Dept. of Applied Geophysics] [Federal Univ. of Technology, Akure (Nigeria). Dept. of Applied Geophysics

    1996-03-01

    Aeromagnetic map and electrical resistivity sounding data obtained along eight traverses were examined at two sites across the Katsina-Ala River. The principal goals of this exercise were to define depths to the bedrock, bedrock relief, geologic structures, define the nature of the superficial deposit, and select probable minor and major axes for hydroelectric power dams. The aeromagnetic map shows that the basement rocks trend roughly northeast-southwest, which correlates with the strike of foliation measurements made on rock outcrops along the river channel. A network of cross cutting lineaments, suspected to be faults/fractures that trend approximately northeast/southwest and northwest/southeast, was also delineated from the magnetic map. The depths to the bedrock estimated from resistivity depth sounding data at site 1 generally vary from 1--53.1 m. Depths to the bedrock estimated at site 2 range from 1.9--19.5 m. The superficial deposit varies from clay to sandy clay, to clayey sand (with boulders in places), and to sand and laterite. The bedrock relief is relatively flat and gently undulates along most of the traverses, with an overall dip towards the river channel. Traverses E-F or I-J at site 1 and K-L at site 2 are probable dame axes. These traverses are characterized by relatively thin overburden thicknesses and rock heads dipping toward the river channel, thereby reducing the likelihood of water seepages from the flanks of the proposed dam axes.

  10. Water Velocity Measurements on a Vertical Barrier Screen at the Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Yuan, Yong

    2011-11-22

    Fish screens at hydroelectric dams help to protect rearing and migrating fish by preventing them from passing through the turbines and directing them towards the bypass channels by providing a sweeping flow parallel to the screen. However, fish screens may actually be harmful to fish if they become impinged on the surface of the screen or become disoriented due to poor flow conditions near the screen. Recent modifications to the vertical barrier screens (VBS) at the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse (B2) intended to increase the guidance of juvenile salmonids into the juvenile bypass system (JBS) have resulted in high mortality and descaling rates of hatchery subyearling Chinook salmon during the 2008 juvenile salmonid passage season. To investigate the potential cause of the high mortality and descaling rates, an in situ water velocity measurement study was conducted using acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADV) in the gatewell slot at Units 12A and 14A of B2. From the measurements collected the average approach velocity, sweep velocity, and the root mean square (RMS) value of the velocity fluctuations were calculated. The approach velocities measured across the face of the VBS varied but were mostly less than 0.3 m/s. The sweep velocities also showed large variances across the face of the VBS with most measurements being less than 1.5 m/s. This study revealed that the approach velocities exceeded criteria recommended by NOAA Fisheries and Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife intended to improve fish passage conditions.

  11. Proceedings of the 1998 USCOLD Annual Lecture, Buffalo, New York. August 1998 PORTFOLIO RISK ASSESSMENT: A TOOL FOR DAM SAFETY RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    ASSESSMENT: A TOOL FOR DAM SAFETY RISK MANAGEMENT David S. Bowles1 , Loren R. Anderson2 , Terry F. Glover3 on to provide the basis for an effective and efficient program for managing and reducing dam safety risksProceedings of the 1998 USCOLD Annual Lecture, Buffalo, New York. August 1998 PORTFOLIO RISK

  12. Libby Mitigation Program, 2007 Annual Progress Report: Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, J.; Garrow, L.

    2009-05-26

    Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to 'protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to restore the fisheries and fish habitat in basin streams and lakes. 'Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan.

  13. Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Distribution at Detroit Dam, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Fenton; Royer, Ida M.; Johnson, Gary E.; Ham, Kenneth D.

    2012-11-15

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at Detroit Dam (DET) on the North Santiam River, Oregon for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to provide data to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance downstream passage at DET and others dams in USACE’s Willamette Valley Project. This study was conducted in response to regulatory requirements necessitated by the listing of Upper Willamette River Spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Upper Willamette River steelhead (O. mykiss) as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. The goal of the study was to provide information of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at DET from February 2011 through February 2012. The results of the hydroacoustic study provide new and, in some cases, first-ever data on passage estimates, run timing, distributions, and relationships between fish passage and environmental variables at the dam. This information will inform management decisions on the design and development of surface passage and collection devices to help restore Chinook salmon populations in the North Santiam River watershed above DET. During the entire study period, an estimated total of 182,526 smolt-size fish (±4,660 fish, 95% CI) passed through turbine penstock intakes. Run timing peaked in winter and early spring months. Passage rates were highest during late fall, winter and early spring months and low during summer. Horizontal distribution for hours when both turbine units were operated simultaneously indicated Unit 2 passed almost twice as much fish as Unit 1. Diel distribution for smolt-size fish during the study period was fairly uniform, indicating fish were passing the turbines at all times of the day. A total of 5,083 smolt-size fish (± 312 fish, 95% CI) were estimated passed via the spillway when it was open between June 23 and September 27, 2011. Daily passage was low at the spillway during the June-August period, and increased somewhat in September 2011. When the spillway was operated simultaneously with the turbines, spillway efficiency (efficiency is estimated as spillway passage divided by total project passage) was 0.72 and effectiveness (fish:flow ratio—proportion fish passage at a route (e.g., spillway) divided by proportion water through that route out of the total project) was 2.69. That is, when the spillway was open, 72% of the fish passing the dam used the spillway and 28% passed into the turbine penstocks. Diel distribution for smolt-size fish at the spillway shows a distinct peak in passage between mid-morning and mid-afternoon and low passage at night. We estimated that 23,339 smolt-size fish (± 572 fish, 95% CI) passed via the Regulating Outlet (RO) when it was open from October 29 through November 12, 2011, January 2-6, and January 20 through February 3, 2012. During the October–November period, RO passage peaked at 1,086 fish on November 5, with a second peak on November 7 (1,075 fish). When the RO was operated simultaneously with the turbines, RO efficiency was 0.33 and effectiveness was 0.89. In multiple regression analyses, a relatively parsimonious model was selected that predicted the observed fish passage data well. The best model included forebay temperature at depth, forebay elevation, total discharge, hours of daylight, and the operation period. The vertical distribution of fish in the forebay near the face of the dam where the transducers sampled showed fish were generally distributed throughout the water column during all four operational periods. During the refill and full pool periods, vertical distribution was bi-modal with surface-layer and mid-water modes. Patterns for day and night distributions were variable. Fish were distributed above and below the thermocline when it was present (full pool and drawdown periods).

  14. Factors Affecting Route Selection and Survival of Steelhead Kelts at Snake River Dams in 2012 and 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harnish, Ryan A.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Li, Xinya; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun

    2014-12-15

    In 2012 and 2013, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a study that summarized the passage proportions and route-specific survival rates of steelhead kelts that passed through Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) dams. To accomplish this, a total of 811 steelhead kelts were tagged with Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) transmitters. Acoustic receivers, both autonomous and cabled, were deployed throughout the FCRPS to monitor the downstream movements of tagged-kelts. Kelts were also tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder tags to monitor passage through juvenile bypass systems and detect returning fish. The current study evaluated data collected in 2012 and 2013 to identify individual, behavioral, environmental and dam operation variables that were related to passage and survival of steelhead kelts that passed through FCRPS dams. Bayesian model averaging of multivariable logistic regression models was used to identify the environmental, temporal, operational, individual, and behavioral variables that had the highest probability of influencing the route of passage and the route-specific survival probabilities for kelts that passed Lower Granite (LGR), Little Goose (LGS), and Lower Monumental (LMN) dams in 2012 and 2013. The posterior probabilities of the best models for predicting route of passage ranged from 0.106 for traditional spill at LMN to 0.720 for turbine passage at LGS. Generally, the behavior (depth and near-dam searching activity) of kelts in the forebay appeared to have the greatest influence on their route of passage. Shallower-migrating kelts had a higher probability of passing via the weir and deeper-migrating kelts had a higher probability of passing via the JBS and turbines than other routes. Kelts that displayed a higher level of near-dam searching activity had a higher probability of passing via the spillway weir and those that did less near-dam searching had a higher probability of passing via the JBS and turbines. The side of the river in which kelts approached the dam and dam operations also affected route of passage. Dam operations and the size and condition of kelts were found to have the greatest effect on route-specific survival probabilities for fish that passed via the spillway at LGS. That is, longer kelts and those in fair condition had a lower probability of survival for fish that passed via the spillway weir. The survival of spillway weir- and deep-spill passed kelts was positively correlated with the percent of the total discharge that passed through turbine unit 4. Too few kelts passed through the traditional spill, JBS, and turbine units to evaluate survival through these routes. The information gathered in this study describes Snake River steelhead kelt passage behavior, rates, and distributions through the FCRPS as well as provide information to biologists and engineers about the dam operations and abiotic conditions that are related to passage and survival of steelhead kelts.

  15. Figure 1. The wet area is flooded by damming up a small stream adjacent to the study area once a year for a period of 2-3 months. By

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    Figure 1. The wet area is flooded by damming up a small stream adjacent to the study area once. Figure 1.g The wet area is flooded by damming up a small streamded by damming up a smded by damwet area Vegetation data are obtained from two ri- parian grassland sites with strong hydro- logical gradients

  16. Efficient 3D inversion of magnetic data via octree mesh discretization, space-filling curves, and Kristofer Davis and Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical, and Magnetics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and wavelets Kristofer Davis and Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical, and Magnetics, Colorado SchoolEfficient 3D inversion of magnetic data via octree mesh discretization, space-filling curves

  17. review of: A Companion to Linear B: Mycenaean Greek Texts and Their World, edited by Yves Duhous and Anna Morporgo Davies, Louvain & Dudley MA: Peeters 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Younger, John G.

    2009-10-01

    n A e A n Gr e e k te x t s A n d th e i r Wo r L d . Vo L . 1 edited by yves duhOux and anna MORPuRgO davies. PP. xi + 448, figs. 96, tables 5. PeeteRs, lOuvain and dudley, Mass. 2008. €55. isbn 078-90-42-1848-1 (PaPeR). This volume has nine... n A e A n Gr e e k te x t s A n d th e i r Wo r L d . Vo L . 1 edited by yves duhOux and anna MORPuRgO davies. PP. xi + 448, figs. 96, tables 5. PeeteRs, lOuvain and dudley, Mass. 2008. €55. isbn 078-90-42-1848-1 (PaPeR). This volume has nine...

  18. An Assessment of Energy Potential at Non-Powered Dams in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadjerioua, Boualem; Wei, Yaxing; Kao, Shih-Chieh

    2012-04-01

    fleet by 15%. A majority of this potential is concentrated in just 100 NPDs, which could contribute approximately 8 GW of clean, reliable hydropower; the top 10 facilities alone could add up to 3 GW of new hydropower. Eighty-one of the 100 top NPDs are U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) facilities, many of which, including all of the top 10, are navigation locks on the Ohio River, Mississippi River, Alabama River, and Arkansas River, as well as their major tributaries. This study also shows that dams owned by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation hold the potential to add approximately 260 MW of capacity; the Bureau has also engaged in an effort to conduct a more detailed evaluation of its own facilities.

  19. Financial Analysis of Experimental Releases Conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during Water Year 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graziano, D. J.; Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.

    2015-09-01

    This report examines the financial implications of experimental flows conducted at the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) in water year (WY) 2014. It is the sixth report in a series examining the financial implications of experimental flows conducted since the Record of Decision (ROD) was adopted in February 1997 (Reclamation 1996). A report released in January 2011 examined water years 1997 to 2005 (Veselka et al. 2011), a report released in August 2011 examined water years 2006 to 2010 (Poch et al. 2011), a report released June 2012 examined water year 2011 (Poch et al. 2012), a report released April 2013 examined water year 2012 (Poch et al. 2013), and a report released June 2014 examined water year 2013 (Graziano et al. 2014).

  20. Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Distribution at Lookout Point Dam, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Trott, Donna M.; Ploskey, Gene R.

    2012-05-31

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at Lookout Point Dam (LOP) on the Middle Fork Willamette River for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE), to provide data to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance downstream passage at LOP and others dams in USACE's Willamette Valley Project. This study was conducted in response to the listing of Upper Willamette River Spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Upper Willamette River steelhead (O. mykiss) as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. We conducted a hydroacoustic evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at LOP during February 2010 through January 2011. Findings from this 1 year of study should be applied carefully because annual variation can be expected due to variability in adult salmon escapement, egg-to-fry and fry-to-smolt survival rates, reservoir rearing and predation, dam operations, and weather. Fish passage rates for smolt-size fish (> {approx}90 mm and < 300 mm) were highest during December-January and lowest in mid-summer through early fall. Passage peaks were also evident in early spring, early summer, and late fall. During the entire study period, an estimated total of 142,463 fish {+-} 4,444 (95% confidence interval) smolt-size fish passed through turbine penstock intakes. Of this total, 84% passed during December-January. Run timing for small-size fish ({approx}65-90 mm) peaked (702 fish) on December 18. Diel periodicity of smolt-size fish showing crepuscular peaks was evident in fish passage into turbine penstock intakes. Relatively few fish passed into the Regulating Outlets (ROs) when they were open in summer (2 fish/d) and winter (8 fish/d). Overall, when the ROs were open, RO efficiency (RO passage divided by total project passage) was 0.004. In linear regression analyses, daily fish passage (turbines and ROs combined) for smolt-size fish was significantly related to project discharge (P<0.001). This relationship was positive, but there was no relationship between total project passage and forebay elevation (P=0.48) or forebay elevation delta, i.e., day-to-day change in forebay elevation (P=0.16). In multiple regression analyses, a relatively parsimonious model was selected that predicted the observed data well. The multiple regression model indicates a positive trend between expected daily fish passage and each of the three variables in the model-Julian day, log(discharge), and log(abs(forebay delta)); i.e., as any of the environmental variables increase, expected daily fish passage increases. For vertical distribution of fish at the face of the dam, fish were surface-oriented with 62%-80% occurring above 10 m deep. The highest percentage of fish (30%-60%) was found between 5-10-m-deep. During spring and summer, mean target strengths for the analysis periods ranged from -44.2 to -42.1 dB. These values are indicative of yearling-sized juvenile salmon. In contrast, mean target strengths in fall and winter were about -49.0 dB, which are representative of subyearling-sized fish. The high-resolution spatial and temporal data reported herein provide detailed information about vertical, horizontal, diel, daily, and seasonal fish passage rates and distributions at LOP from March 2010 through January 2011. This information will support management decisions on design and development of surface passage and collection devices to help restore Chinook salmon populations in the Middle Fork Willamette River watershed above LOP.

  1. Critical gravity as van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov discontinuity in anti de Sitter space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung

    2011-07-20

    We consider critical gravity as van Dam-Vletman-Zakharov (vDVZ) discontinuity in anti de Sitter space. For this purpose, we introduce the higher curvature gravity. This discontinuity can be confirmed by calculating the residues of relevant poles explicitly. For the non-critical gravity of $0

  2. Use of an autonomous sensor to evaluate the biological performance of the advanced turbine at Wanapum Dam

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Dauble, Dennis D.

    2010-10-13

    Hydropower is the largest renewable energy resource in the United States and the world. However, hydropower dams have adverse ecological impacts because migrating fish may be injured or killed when they pass through hydroturbines. In the Columbia and Snake River basins, dam operators and engineers are required to make those hydroelectric facilities more fish-friendly through changes in hydroturbine design and operation after fish population declines and the subsequent listing of several species of Pacific salmon under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County, Washington, requested authorization from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission tomore »replace the ten turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines designed to improve survival for fish passing through the turbines while improving operation efficiency and increasing power generation. As an additional measure to the primary metric of direct injury and mortality rates of juvenile Chinook salmon using balloon tag-recapture methodology, this study used an autonomous sensor device - the Sensor Fish - to provide insight into the specific hydraulic conditions and physical stresses experienced by the fish as well as the specific causes of fish biological response. We found that the new hydroturbine blade shape and the corresponding reduction of turbulence in the advanced hydropower turbine were effective in meeting the objectives of improving fish survival while enhancing operational efficiency of the dam. The frequency of severe events based on Sensor Fish pressure and acceleration measurements showed trends similar to those of fish survival determined by the balloon tag-recapture methodology. In addition, the new turbine provided a better pressure and rate of pressure change environment for fish passage. Altogether, the Sensor Fish data indicated that the advanced hydroturbine design improved passage of juvenile salmon at Wanapum Dam.« less

  3. Use of an autonomous sensor to evaluate the biological performance of the advanced turbine at Wanapum Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Dauble, Dennis D.

    2010-10-13

    Hydropower is the largest renewable energy resource in the United States and the world. However, hydropower dams have adverse ecological impacts because migrating fish may be injured or killed when they pass through hydroturbines. In the Columbia and Snake River basins, dam operators and engineers are required to make those hydroelectric facilities more fish-friendly through changes in hydroturbine design and operation after fish population declines and the subsequent listing of several species of Pacific salmon under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County, Washington, requested authorization from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the ten turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines designed to improve survival for fish passing through the turbines while improving operation efficiency and increasing power generation. As an additional measure to the primary metric of direct injury and mortality rates of juvenile Chinook salmon using balloon tag-recapture methodology, this study used an autonomous sensor device - the Sensor Fish - to provide insight into the specific hydraulic conditions and physical stresses experienced by the fish as well as the specific causes of fish biological response. We found that the new hydroturbine blade shape and the corresponding reduction of turbulence in the advanced hydropower turbine were effective in meeting the objectives of improving fish survival while enhancing operational efficiency of the dam. The frequency of severe events based on Sensor Fish pressure and acceleration measurements showed trends similar to those of fish survival determined by the balloon tag-recapture methodology. In addition, the new turbine provided a better pressure and rate of pressure change environment for fish passage. Overall, the Sensor Fish data indicated that the advanced hydroturbine design improved passage of juvenile salmon at Wanapum Dam.

  4. Ex post power economic analysis of record of decision operational restrictions at Glen Canyon Dam.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veselka, T. D.; Poch, L. A.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B; Decision and Information Sciences; Western Area Power Administration

    2010-07-31

    On October 9, 1996, Bruce Babbitt, then-Secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior signed the Record of Decision (ROD) on operating criteria for the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD). Criteria selected were based on the Modified Low Fluctuating Flow (MLFF) Alternative as described in the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Arizona, Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (Reclamation 1995). These restrictions reduced the operating flexibility of the hydroelectric power plant and therefore its economic value. The EIS provided impact information to support the ROD, including an analysis of operating criteria alternatives on power system economics. This ex post study reevaluates ROD power economic impacts and compares these results to the economic analysis performed prior (ex ante) to the ROD for the MLFF Alternative. On the basis of the methodology used in the ex ante analysis, anticipated annual economic impacts of the ROD were estimated to range from approximately $15.1 million to $44.2 million in terms of 1991 dollars ($1991). This ex post analysis incorporates historical events that took place between 1997 and 2005, including the evolution of power markets in the Western Electricity Coordinating Council as reflected in market prices for capacity and energy. Prompted by ROD operational restrictions, this analysis also incorporates a decision made by the Western Area Power Administration to modify commitments that it made to its customers. Simulated operations of GCD were based on the premise that hourly production patterns would maximize the economic value of the hydropower resource. On the basis of this assumption, it was estimated that economic impacts were on average $26.3 million in $1991, or $39 million in $2009.

  5. Total Dissolved Gas Effects on Incubating Chum Salmon Below Bonneville Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arntzen, Evan V.; Hand, Kristine D.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Geist, David R.; Murray, Katherine J.; Dawley, Earl M.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Elston, Ralph A.; Vavrinec, John

    2009-01-29

    At the request of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE; Portland District), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook a project in 2006 to look further into issues of total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation in the lower Columbia River downstream of Bonneville Dam. In FY 2008, the third year of the project, PNNL conducted field monitoring and laboratory toxicity testing to both verify results from 2007 and answer some additional questions about how salmonid sac fry respond to elevated TDG in the field and the laboratory. For FY 2008, three objectives were 1) to repeat the 2006-2007 field effort to collect empirical data on TDG from the Ives Island and Multnomah Falls study sites; 2) to repeat the static laboratory toxicity tests on hatchery chum salmon fry to verify 2007 results and to expose wild chum salmon fry to incremental increases in TDG, above those of the static test, until external symptoms of gas bubble disease were clearly present; and 3) to assess physiological responses to TDG levels in wild chum salmon sac fry incubating below Bonneville Dam during spill operations. This report summarizes the tasks conducted and results obtained in pursuit of the three objectives. Chapter 1 discusses the field monitoring, Chapter 2 reports the findings of the laboratory toxicity tests, and Chapter 3 describes the field-sampling task. Each chapter contains an objective-specific introduction, description of the study site and methods, results of research, and discussion of findings. Literature cited throughout this report is listed in Chapter 4. Additional details on the monitoring methodology and results are provided in Appendices A and B included on the compact disc bound inside the back cover of the printed version of this report.

  6. Evaluation of the Biological Effects of the Northwest Power Conservation Council's Mainstem Amendment on the Fisheries Upstream and Downstream of Libby Dam, Montana, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sylvester, Ryan; Stephens, Brian; Tohtz, Joel

    2009-04-03

    A new project began in 2005 to monitor the biological and physical effects of improved operations of Hungry Horse and Libby Dams, Montana, called for by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Mainstem Amendment. This operating strategy was designed to benefit resident fish impacted by hydropower and flood control operations. Under the new operating guidelines, July through September reservoir drafts will be limited to 10 feet from full pool during the highest 80% of water supply years and 20 feet from full pool during the lowest 20% of water supply (drought) years. Limits were also established on how rapidly discharge from the dams can be increased or decreased depending on the season. The NPCC also directed the federal agencies that operate Libby and Hungry Horse Dams to implement a new flood control strategy (VARQ) and directed Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks to evaluate biological responses to this operating strategy. The Mainstem Amendment operating strategy has not been fully implemented at the Montana dams as of June 2008 but the strategy will be implemented in 2009. This report highlights the monitoring methods used to monitor the effects of the Mainstem Amendment operations on fishes, habitat, and aquatic invertebrates upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. We also present initial assessments of data and the effects of various operating strategies on physical and biological components of the systems upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Annual electrofishing surveys in the Kootenai River and selected tributaries, along with gill net surveys in the reservoir, are being used to quantify the impacts of dam operations on fish populations upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Scales and otoliths are being used to determine the age structure and growth of focal species. Annual population estimates and tagging experiments provide estimates of survival and growth in the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries. Radio telemetry will be used to validate an existing Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) model developed for the Kootenai River and will also be used to assess the effect of changes in discharge on fish movements and habitat use downstream of Libby Dam. Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags will be injected into rainbow, bull, and cutthroat trout throughout the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries to provide information on growth, survival, and migration patterns in relation to abiotic and biotic variables. Model simulations (RIVBIO) are used to calculate the effects of dam operations on the wetted perimeter and benthic biomass in the Kootenai River below Libby Dam. Additional models (IFIM) will also be used to evaluate the impacts of dam operations on the amount of available habitat for different life stages of rainbow and bull trout in the Kootenai River.

  7. Cost of presumptive source term Remedial Actions Laboratory for energy-related health research, University of California, Davis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, G.V.; Bagaasen, L.M.; Josephson, G.B.; Lanigan, D.C.; Liikala, T.L.; Newcomer, D.R.; Pearson, A.W.; Teel, S.S.

    1995-12-01

    A Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) is in progress at the Laboratory for Energy Related Health Research (LEHR) at the University of California, Davis. The purpose of the RI/FS is to gather sufficient information to support an informed risk management decision regarding the most appropriate remedial actions for impacted areas of the facility. In an effort to expedite remediation of the LEHR facility, the remedial project managers requested a more detailed evaluation of a selected set of remedial actions. In particular, they requested information on both characterization and remedial action costs. The US Department of Energy -- Oakland Office requested the assistance of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to prepare order-of-magnitude cost estimates for presumptive remedial actions being considered for the five source term operable units. The cost estimates presented in this report include characterization costs, capital costs, and annual operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. These cost estimates are intended to aid planning and direction of future environmental remediation efforts.

  8. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A.

    2009-02-18

    This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2005 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2005 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, the age-1 and older fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Age-0 Chinook salmon are more difficult to distinguish between wild and non-adclipped hatchery fish and therefore classified as unknown rearing. The total annual hatchery spring/summer Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 0.34 times greater in 2005 than in 2004. The wild spring/summer Chinook catch was 0.34 times less than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 0.67 times less than in 2004. Wild steelhead trout catch was 0.72 times less than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 1,152 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2005, the Snake River trap captured 219 hatchery and 44 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 110 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. Trap operations began on March 6 and were terminated on June 3. The trap was out of operation for a total of one day due to heavy debris. FPC requested that the trap be restarted on June 15 through June 22 to collect and PIT tag age-0 Chinook salmon. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 1.06 times greater and wild Chinook salmon catch was 1.26 times greater than in 2004. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2005 was 1.41 times greater and wild steelhead trout collection was 1.27 times greater than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 6 and were terminated on May 17 due to high flows. There were two days when the trap was taken out of service because of mechanical failure. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for passive integrated transponder (PIT) tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2005 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery Chinook but was unable to detect a relation for wild Chinook. The inability to detect a migration rate discharge relation for wild Chinook salmon was caused by a lack of data. For hatchery Chinook salmon there was a 1.8-fold increase in migration rate between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 2.2-fold and a 2.2-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2005 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon, wild Chinook salmon, hatchery steelhead trout, and wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 4.2-fold for hatchery Chinook salmon, 2.9-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 2.5-fold for hatchery steelhead, and 1.7-fold for wild steelhead as discharge increased between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with PIT tags at the Snake River and Salmon River traps were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993 and the installation of the Removable Spillway Weir at Lower Granite Dam in 2001, caution must be used in comparing cumulative interrogation data. Cumulative interrogations at the fo

  9. Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, Jason M.; McLellan, Jason G.; Butler, Chris

    2005-11-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. The project began addressing identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area in 1999. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, Spokane River below Spokane Falls, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002 and 2003. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

  10. Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, Jason M.; McLellan, Jason G.; Butler, Chris

    2006-02-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. The project began addressing identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area in 1999. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, Spokane River below Spokane Falls, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002 and 2003. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

  11. Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, Jason M.; McLellan, Jason G.; O'Connor, Dick

    2003-01-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC). The NPPC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPPC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area and the Columbia Basin Blocked Area Management Plan (1998). The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. In 1999, 2000, and 2001 the project began addressing some of the identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of seven streams and four lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2000. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in southern Pend Oreille County, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2001. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

  12. Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, Jason M.; McLellan, Jason G.; Butler, Chris

    2003-09-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. In 1999, 2000, and 2001 the project began addressing some of the identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

  13. The influence of sire, dam, and hatching date on growth of single comb white Leghorn pullets from hatching to eighteen weeks of age 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garber, Morris Joseph

    1951-01-01

    Major dam and reservoir development within the Brazos River Basin is correlative with a significant decrease in the suspended sediment load of the river and with increased coastal erosion rates near the delta. A hydrologic analysis of the river...

  14. Passage Distribution and Federal Columbia River Power System Survival for Steelhead Kelts Tagged Above and at Lower Granite Dam, Year 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colotelo, Alison HA; Harnish, Ryan A.; Jones, Bryan W.; Hanson, Amanda C.; Trott, Donna M.; Greiner, Michael J.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun; Brown, Richard S.; Weiland, Mark A.; Li, X.; Fu, Tao

    2014-03-28

    Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations have declined throughout their range in the last century and many populations, including those of the Snake River Basin are listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. The reasons for their decline are many and complex, but include habitat loss and degradation, overharvesting, and dam construction. The 2008 Biological Opinion calls for an increase in the abundance of female steelhead through an increase in iteroparity (i.e., repeat spawning) and this can be realized through a combination of reconditioning and in-river survival of migrating kelts. The goal of this study is to provide the data necessary to inform fisheries managers and dam operators of Snake River kelt migration patterns, survival, and routes of dam passage. Steelhead kelts (n = 487) were captured and implanted with acoustic transmitters and passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tags at the Lower Granite Dam (LGR) Juvenile Fish Facility and at weirs located in tributaries of the Snake and Clearwater rivers upstream of LGR. Kelts were monitored as they moved downstream through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) by 15 autonomous and 3 cabled acoustic receiver arrays. Cabled receiver arrays deployed on the dam faces allowed for three-dimensional tracking of fish as they approached the dam face and were used to determine the route of dam passage. Overall, 27.3% of the kelts tagged in this study successfully migrated to Martin Bluff (rkm 126, as measured from the mouth of the Columbia River), which is located downstream of all FCRPS dams. Within individual river reaches, survival per kilometer estimates ranged from 0.958 to 0.999; the lowest estimates were observed in the immediate forebay of FCRPS dams. Steelhead kelts tagged in this study passed over the spillway routes (spillway weirs, traditional spill bays) in greater proportions and survived at higher rates compared to the few fish passed through powerhouse routes (turbines and juvenile bypass systems). The results of this study provide information about the route of passage and subsequent survival of steelhead kelts that migrated through the Snake and Columbia rivers from LGR to Bonneville Dam in 2013. These data may be used by fisheries managers and dam operators to identify potential ways to increase the survival of kelts during their seaward migrations.

  15. Passage Distribution and Federal Columbia River Power System Survival for Steelhead Kelts Tagged Above and at Lower Granite Dam, Year 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colotelo, Alison H.A.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Jones, Bryan W.; Hanson, Amanda C.; Trott, Donna M.; Greiner, Michael J.; Mcmichael, Geoffrey A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun; Brown, Richard S.; Weiland, Mark A.; Li, Xinya; Fu, Tao

    2014-12-15

    Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations have declined throughout their range in the last century and many populations, including those of the Snake River Basin are listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. The reasons for their decline are many and complex, but include habitat loss and degradation, overharvesting, and dam construction. The 2008 Biological Opinion calls for an increase in the abundance of female steelhead through an increase in iteroparity (i.e., repeat spawning) and this can be realized through a combination of reconditioning and in-river survival of migrating kelts. The goal of this study is to provide the data necessary to inform fisheries managers and dam operators of Snake River kelt migration patterns, survival, and routes of dam passage. Steelhead kelts (n = 487) were captured and implanted with acoustic transmitters and passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tags at the Lower Granite Dam (LGR) Juvenile Fish Facility and at weirs located in tributaries of the Snake and Clearwater rivers upstream of LGR. Kelts were monitored as they moved downstream through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) by 15 autonomous and 3 cabled acoustic receiver arrays. Cabled receiver arrays deployed on the dam faces allowed for three-dimensional tracking of fish as they approached the dam face and were used to determine the route of dam passage. Overall, 27.3% of the kelts tagged in this study successfully migrated to Martin Bluff (rkm 126, as measured from the mouth of the Columbia River), which is located downstream of all FCRPS dams. Within individual river reaches, survival per kilometer estimates ranged from 0.958 to 0.999; the lowest estimates were observed in the immediate forebay of FCRPS dams. Steelhead kelts tagged in this study passed over the spillway routes (spillway weirs, traditional spill bays) in greater proportions and survived at higher rates compared to the few fish passed through powerhouse routes (turbines and juvenile bypass systems). The results of this study provide information about the route of passage and subsequent survival of steelhead kelts that migrated through the Snake and Columbia rivers from LGR to Bonneville Dam in 2013. These data may be used by fisheries managers and dam operators to identify potential ways to increase the survival of kelts during their seaward migrations.

  16. Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water years 1997 through 2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veselka, T. D.; Poch, L. A.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.; Decision and Information Sciences; Western Area Power Administration

    2010-04-21

    Because of concerns about the impact that Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) operations were having on downstream ecosystems and endangered species, the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) conducted an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on dam operations (DOE 1996). New operating rules and management goals for GCD that had been specified in the Record of Decision (ROD) (Reclamation 1996) were adopted in February 1997. In addition to issuing new operating criteria, the ROD mandated experimental releases for the purpose of conducting scientific studies. This paper examines the financial implications of the experimental flows that were conducted at the GCD from 1997 to 2005. An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a ''without experiments'' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP power plant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases in some water years resulted in financial benefits to Western while others resulted in financial costs. During the study period, the total financial costs of all experimental releases were $11.9 million.

  17. Placement of the dam for the no. 2 kambaratinskaya HPP by large-scale blasting: some observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shuifer, M. I.; Argal, E. S.

    2011-11-15

    Results of complex instrument observations of large-scale blasting during construction of the dam for the No. 2 Kambaratinskaya HPP on the Naryn River in the Republic of Kirgizia are analyzed. The purpose of these observations was: to determine the actual parameters of the seismic process, evaluate the effect of air and acoustic shock waves, and investigate the kinematics of the surface formed by the blast in its core region within the mass of fractured rocks.

  18. Use of an Autonomous Sensor to Evaluate the Biological Performance of the Advanced Turbine at Wanapum Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Dauble, Dennis D.

    2010-10-13

    Hydropower is the largest renewable energy resource in the world and the United States. However, Hydropower dams have adverse ecological impacts because migrating fish may be injured or killed when they pass through hydro turbines. In the Columbia and Snake River basins, dam operators and engineers are required to make these hydroelectric facilities more fish-friendly through changes in hydro-turbine design and operation after fish population declines and the subsequent listing of several species of Pacific salmon in the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Grant County Public Utility District (Grant PUD) requested authorization from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the 10 turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines that are designed to improve survival for fish passing through the turbines while improving operation efficiency and increasing power generation. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy provided co-funding to Grant PUD for aspects of performance testing that supported the application. As an additional measure to the primary evaluation measure of direct injury and mortality rates of juvenile Chinook salmon using balloon tag-recapture methodology, this study used an autonomous sensor device to provide insight into the specific hydraulic conditions or physical stresses that the fish experienced or the specific causes of the biological response. We found that the new blade shape and the corresponding reduction of turbulence in the advanced hydropower turbine were effective. The frequency of severe events based on Sensor Fish pressure and acceleration measurements showed trends similar to those of fish survival determined by balloon tag-recapture tests. In addition, the new turbine provided a better pressure and rate of change environment for fish passage. Overall, the Sensor Fish data indicated that the advanced hydro turbine design met the desired fish passage goals for Wanapum Dam.

  19. Route-Specific Passage and Survival of Steelhead Kelts at The Dalles and Bonneville Dams, 2012 - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayamajhi, Bishes; Ploskey, Gene R.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Faber, Derek M.; Kim, Jin A.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao

    2013-07-31

    This study was mainly focused on evaluating the route-specific passage and migration success of steelhead kelts passing downstream through The Dalles Dam (TDA) and Bonneville Dam (BON) at Columbia River (CR) river kilometers 309 and 234 respectively. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) personnel collected, tagged and released out-migrating steelhead kelts in the tributaries of the Deschutes River, 15 Mile Creek and Hood River between April 14 and June 4, 2012. A PIT tag was injected into each kelt’s dorsal sinus whereas a Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) acoustic micro-transmitter was attached to an external FLoy T-bar tag and inserted into the dorsal back musculature using a Floy tagging gun. JSATS cabled arrays were deployed at TDA and BON and autonomous node arrays were deployed near Celilo, Oregon (CR325); the BON forebay (CR236); the BON tailrace (CR233); near Knapp, Washington (CR156); and near Kalama, Washington (CR113) to monitor the kelts movement while passing through the dams and above mentioned river cross-sections.

  20. Survival and Passage of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead at The Dalles Dam, Spring 2011 - FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Batten, G.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Hughes, James S.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Royer, Ida M.; Townsend, Richard L.; Woodley, Christa M.; Kim, Jeongkwon; Etherington, D. J.; Skalski, J. R.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Fisher, Erik J.; Greiner, Michael J.; Khan, Fenton; Mitchell, T. D.; Rayamajhi, Bishes; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.

    2012-10-01

    The study reported herein was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington (UW) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). The PNNL and UW project managers were Drs. Thomas J. Carlson and John R. Skalski, respectively. The USACE technical lead was Mr. Brad Eppard. The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival and other performance measures at The Dalles Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion (BiOp) and the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords. The study is being documented in two types of reports: compliance and technical. A compliance report is delivered within 6 months of the completion of the field season and focuses on results of the performance metrics outlined in the 2008 BiOp and Fish Accords. A technical report is produced within the 18 months after field work, providing comprehensive documentation of a given study and results on route-specific survival estimates and fish passage distributions, which are not included in compliance reports. This technical report concerns the 2011 acoustic telemetry study at The Dalles Dam.