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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "datum ntu nephelometric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Microsoft Word - 2902ntu.dot  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

902-NTU (10-2004) Supersedes (6-2000) issue SNL COMPUTER BANNER Banner for all SNL Computing SF 2902-NTU (10-2004) WARNING NOTICE TO USERS This is a Federal computer system and is...

2

The Harmonic Constant Datum Method: Options for Overcoming Datum Discontinuities at Mixed–Diurnal Tidal Transitions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The harmonic constant datum (HCD) method is a computationally efficient way of estimating tidal datums relative to mean sea level, without the need to compute long time series. However, datum discontinuities can occur between mixed and diurnal ...

Harold O. Mofjeld; Angie J. Venturato; Frank I. González; Vasily V. Titov; Jean C. Newman

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

NTU Carbon Management Statement 2010 Nottingham Trent University fully supports government and HEFCE climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NTU Carbon Management Statement 2010 Nottingham Trent University fully supports government the following absolute carbon reduction target aligned to higher education sector target: · At least a 48% reduction in scope 1 and 2 carbon emissions from 2005/6 to 2020/21 NTU is currently completing actions from

Evans, Paul

4

Microsoft Word - S05827_WCR_Final.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NTU nephelometric turbidity unit OD outside diameter pCiL picocuries per liter PMIT Production Multi-Finger Imaging Tool Well Completion Report for CAU 443 CNTA U.S....

5

Geographic Coordinate System North American Datum 1983  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SMCA (No-Take)* Batiquitos Lagoon SMCA (No-Take)* San Elijo Lagoon SMCA (No-Take)* Tijuana River Mouth Head Point SMCA Dana Point SMCA Laguna Beach SMR Crystal Cove SMCA Swami's SMCA San Diego

Hampton, Randy

6

Storm Water Best Management Practices Manual for Transmission Line Rights-of-Way Construction and Maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed a general construction storm water permit that would require implementation of best management practices (BMPs) to meet a specific nephelometric turbidity unit (NTU) and total suspended solids (TSS) limit as well as additional erosion and sediment control requirements from construction sites. These new requirements will provide unique challenges for those designing, constructing, and maintaining transmission line rights-of-way (ROWs). This techn...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

7

Nephelometric determination of the chemical oxygen demand in filtrates after the ultrafiltration purification of used lubricants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regions with developed industry are characterized by a large amount of lubricants in wastewater, and controlling the amount of mineral oil in the water in these regions is of prime importance. One of the methods of purifying used lubricants is ultrafiltration. In most cases, ultrafiltration purification is performed in BTU-0.5/2 tubular units with F-1 Teflon membranes. It is known that, in the case of the ultrafiltration purification of dispersed systems, the part of the dispersed phase with a particle size smaller than the diameter of membrane pores usually penetrates to the filtrate. The formation of the dispersed phase with a smaller size of particles is also possible because oil particles of a larger size are pressed through the membrane due to the wetting of the membrane material with the dispersed phase, which is the case of Teflon membranes. As a result, water produced by the ultrafiltration purification of lubricant-containing wastes contains oil particles 10-100 nm in size, which is comparable to the membrane pores. The amount of these particles can be small, which makes their determination difficult. Moreover, the method of controlling the amount of oil in the filtrate should be rapid, sensitive, and simple enough to allow its application in industrial conditions.

Bykadorov, N.U.; Radchenko, S.S. [Volgograd State Technical Univ. (Russian Federation)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Interpolation of Tidal Levels in the Coastal Zone for the Creation of a Hydrographic Datum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the U.K. Hydrographic Office (UKHO)-sponsored Vertical Offshore Reference Frames (VORF) project, a high-resolution model of lowest astronomical tide (LAT) with respect to mean sea level has been developed for U.K.–Irish waters. In ...

J. F. Turner; J. C. Iliffe; M. K. Ziebart; C. Wilson; K. J. Horsburgh

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

AOCS Official Method Ca 19-86  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phospholipids in Vegetable Oils Nephelometric Method AOCS Official Method Ca 19-86 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION The nephelometric method measu

10

Universitt des Saarlandes Wintersemester 2009/2010 Datum: 31.08.2009 Grenzwerte fr nichteinbezogene 1. Nachrckverfahren Seite: 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anträge zugelassen Biologie / LAB Alle Anträge zugelassen Chemie / LAG 2,0 / 02 Dienst=JA 03 / 3,0 Dienst=JA Chemie / LAR Alle Anträge zugelassen Chemie / LAH Alle Anträge zugelassen Chemie / LAB Alle Anträge zugelassen Deutsch / LAG 2,2 / 00 teilweise 02 / 2,5 Dienst=JA teilweise Deutsch / LAR Alle Anträge

Mayberry, Marty

11

Universitt des Saarlandes Wintersemester 2009/2010 Datum: 03.08.2009 Grenzwerte fr nichteinbezogene Hauptverfahren Seite: 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zugelassen Biologie / LAB Alle Anträge zugelassen Chemie / LAG 2,0 / 02 Dienst=JA 03 / 3,0 Dienst=JA Chemie / LAR Alle Anträge zugelassen Chemie / LAH Alle Anträge zugelassen Chemie / LAB Alle Anträge zugelassen Deutsch / LAG 2,0 / 00 teilweise 02 / 2,1 Dienst=JA Deutsch / LAR Alle Anträge zugelassen Deutsch / LAH

Mayberry, Marty

12

Universitt des Saarlandes Wintersemester 2011/2012 Datum: 08.08.2011 Grenzwerte fr nichteinbezogene Hauptverfahren Seite: 1 von 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zugelassen Chemie / LAB Alle Anträge zugelassen Deutsch / LAG 2,0 / 00 04 / 2,3 Deutsch / LAR 2,6 / 00 03 / 2,3 Chemie / LAG 2,0 / 01 teilweise 03 / 1,9 Chemie / LAR Alle Anträge zugelassen Chemie / LAH Alle Anträge,4 Dienst= JA Deutsch / LAH Alle Anträge zugelassen Deutsch / LAB Alle Anträge zugelassen Englisch / LAG 2

Mayberry, Marty

13

Universitt des Saarlandes Wintersemester 2009/2010 Datum: 22.09.2009 Grenzwerte fr nichteinbezogene 2. Nachrckverfahren Seite: 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zugelassen Chemie / LAH Alle Anträge zugelassen Chemie / LAB Alle Anträge zugelassen Deutsch / LAG 2,4 / 00 Alle Anträge zugelassen Chemie / LAG 2,0 / 02 Dienst=JA 03 / 3,0 Dienst=JA Chemie / LAR Alle Anträge Dienst=JA 02 / 2,5 Dienst=JA teilweise Deutsch / LAR Alle Anträge zugelassen Deutsch / LAH Alle Anträge

Mayberry, Marty

14

Universitt des Saarlandes Wintersemester 2009/2010 Datum: 29.09.2009 Grenzwerte fr nichteinbezogene 3. Nachrckverfahren Seite: 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zugelassen Biologie / LAB Alle Anträge zugelassen Chemie / LAG 2,0 / 02 Dienst=JA 03 / 3,0 Dienst=JA Chemie / LAR Alle Anträge zugelassen Chemie / LAH Alle Anträge zugelassen Chemie / LAB Alle Anträge zugelassen Deutsch / LAG 2,4 / 00 Dienst=Nein teilweise 02 / 2,5 Dienst=JA teilweise Deutsch / LAR Alle Anträge

Mayberry, Marty

15

Universitt des Saarlandes Wintersemester 2012/2013 Datum: 03.08.2012 Grenzwerte fr nichteinbezogene Hauptverfahren Seite: 1 von 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anträge zugelassen Chemie / LA LPS 1 1,5 / 00 16 / 3,6 Chemie / LAB Alle Anträge zugelassen Deutsch / LA,0 / 00 10 / 3,5 Dienst=JA Chemie / LA Sek I + II 2,0 / 00 teilweise 02 / 1,3 Chemie / LA Sek I Alle Sek I + II 1,9 / 02 teilweise 06 / 2,7 Dienst=JA Deutsch / LA Sek I 2,6 / 00 06 / 3,4 Dienst= JA

Mayberry, Marty

16

Universitt des Saarlandes Wintersemester 2013/2014 Datum: 07.08.2013 Grenzwerte fr nichteinbezogene Hauptverfahren Seite: 1 von 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1,9 / 00 ** Chemie / LAB Alle Anträge zugelassen Deutsch / LA Sek I + II 2,0 / 00 teilweise 04 / 3,9 / 00 06 / 3,5 Biologie / LPS Sek 1 1,6 / 00 16 / 3,1 Biologie / LAB 2,2 / 04 05 / 3,3 Dienst=JA Chemie / LA Sek I + II 2,2 / 00 teilweise 02 / 1,6 Chemie / LA Sek I Alle Anträge zugelassen Chemie / LA LPS 1

Mayberry, Marty

17

Universitt des Saarlandes Wintersemester 2010/2011 Datum: 05.08.2010 Grenzwerte fr nichteinbezogene Hauptverfahren Seite: 1 von 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,6 / 02 05 / 3,5 Biologie / LAB 2,2 / 00 10 / 3,8 Chemie / LAG 2,1 / 00 teilweise 02 / 1,5 Chemie / LAR Alle Anträge zugelassen Chemie / LAH Alle Anträge zugelassen Chemie / LAB Alle Anträge zugelassen Deutsch / LAG 2,2 / 01 teilweise 03 / 1,8 Deutsch / LAR 2,9 / 00 Dienst=JA 03 / 2,7 Deutsch / LAH Alle

Mayberry, Marty

18

Optimal design and control strategies for novel combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems. Part I of II, datum design conditions and approach.  

SciTech Connect

Energy network optimization (ENO) models identify new strategies for designing, installing, and controlling stationary combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems (FCSs) with the goals of (1) minimizing electricity and heating costs for building owners and (2) reducing emissions of the primary greenhouse gas (GHG) - carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). A goal of this work is to employ relatively inexpensive simulation studies to discover more financially and environmentally effective approaches for installing CHP FCSs. ENO models quantify the impact of different choices made by power generation operators, FCS manufacturers, building owners, and governments with respect to two primary goals - energy cost savings for building owners and CO{sub 2} emission reductions. These types of models are crucial for identifying cost and CO{sub 2} optima for particular installations. Optimal strategies change with varying economic and environmental conditions, FCS performance, the characteristics of building demand for electricity and heat, and many other factors. ENO models evaluate both 'business-as-usual' and novel FCS operating strategies. For the scenarios examined here, relative to a base case of no FCSs installed, model results indicate that novel strategies could reduce building energy costs by 25% and CO{sub 2} emissions by 80%. Part I of II articles discusses model assumptions and methodology. Part II of II articles illustrates model results for a university campus town and generalizes these results for diverse communities.

Colella, Whitney G.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

MEE 452: Example 3-2 ShellShell--andand--Tube Heat Exchanger Analysis:Tube Heat Exchanger Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

minmaxminmax min ,;; ,min)()( C C NTU C UA NTU TC q q q CCCcmCcmC UA CHCpCHpH #12;Tube arrangement in shell

Kostic, Milivoje M.

20

Microsoft Word - datuminstr.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Instructions for locating the latitude and longitude of a coal mine or coal preparation plant and determining the datum for the location. A datum is a set of reference latitude and longitude positions of high accuracy placed on a model of the earth as a spheroid. The request for the datum requires you to identify the datum and enter its name. Example responses include: NAD27 (North American Datum 1927) NAD83 (North American Datum 1983) WGS84 (World Geodetic Survey 1984) If you use options 3 or 4 (listed below) you are required to determine and enter a datum. Options 1 and 2 have known datums. Generally, NAD83 and WGS84 are datums used on maps prepared after 1985 and on points collected with a GPS (Global Positioning System) receiver. NAD27 often is the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "datum ntu nephelometric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

NIST National Measurement System Assessment ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Measurement Need Datum (MN) Technology at Issue: Top Down Micro/Nano Manufacturing Submitter(s): Nicholas G. Dagalakis ...

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Apparatus and method for detecting flaws in conductive material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present invention is an improved sensing unit for detecting flaws in conductive material wherein the sensing coil is positioned away from a datum of either the datum point, the datum orientation, or a combination thereof. Position of the sensing coil away from a datum increases sensitivity for detecting flaws having a characteristic volume less than about 1 mm{sup 3}, and further permits detection of subsurface flaws. Use of multiple sensing coils permits quantification of flaw area or volume.

Hockey, R.L.; Riechers, D.M.

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

23

Apparatus and method for detecting flaws in conductive material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an improved sensing unit for detecting flaws in conductive material wherein the sensing coil is positioned away from a datum of either the datum point, the datum orientation, or a combination thereof. Position of the sensing coil away from a datum increases sensitivity for detecting flaws having a characteristic volume less than about 1 mm.sup.3, and further permits detection of subsurface flaws. Use of multiple sensing coils permits quantification of flaw area or volume.

Hockey, Ronald L. (Richland, WA); Riechers, Douglas M. (Richland, WA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

On the Effects of Haptic Display in Brush and Ink Simulation for Chinese Painting and Calligraphy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jeng-sheng Yeh jsyeh@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw Ting-yu Lien andie@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw Ming Ouhyoung ming to construct a 3D brush. Then we simulate the ink-water transfer system for ink spreading and color blending plus a paper model, and a model for ink and water transfer. With force feedback, a user experiences

Ouhyoung, Ming

25

Agency datasets monthly list | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

conducted from September 9 through 22, 2005 between lake elevations 437 and 441 feet (project datum). The underwater survey used sonic depth recording equipment interfaced with a...

26

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Claire Datum: Top of Mt. Simon Sandstone Location of cross section Upper Middle Lower shale Model of Mt. Simon Structure Johnston Hinton Manlove Gas Storage Project Key wells...

27

mep client impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... IDAHO ... ClIeNT SuCCeSS: PCS edveNTuReS, INC. “Idaho TechHelp's Export Excellence program gave me the opportunity to meet ...

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

28

Heat exchanger design for thermoelectric electricity generation from low temperature flue gas streams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An air-to-oil heat exchanger was modeled and optimized for use in a system utilizing a thermoelectric generator to convert low grade waste heat in flue gas streams to electricity. The NTU-effectiveness method, exergy, and ...

Latcham, Jacob G. (Jacob Greco)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Leaching: Fundamentals and Industrial Practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

He graduated from NTU in Athens, Greece with a Diploma of Engineering degree in 1975, obtained his M.Sc. degree in 1977 and his Ph.D in 1981 from McGill.

30

Method For Detecting The Presence Of A Ferromagnetic Object  

SciTech Connect

A method for detecting a presence or an absence of a ferromagnetic object within a sensing area may comprise the steps of sensing, during a sample time, a magnetic field adjacent the sensing area; producing surveillance data representative of the sensed magnetic field; determining an absolute value difference between a maximum datum and a minimum datum comprising the surveillance data; and determining whether the absolute value difference has a positive or negative sign. The absolute value difference and the corresponding positive or negative sign thereof forms a representative surveillance datum that is indicative of the presence or absence in the sensing area of the ferromagnetic material.

Roybal, Lyle G. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

31

A Bias in Skill in Forecasts Based on Analogues and Antilogues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bias in skill may exist in statistical forecast methods in which the verification datum is withheld from the developmental data (cross-validation methods). Under certain circumstances this bias in skill can become troublesome. By way of example,...

H. M. van den Dool

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 2011-2012 Writing in EEB: General Guidelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the original usage ­ and to remember that the singular of data is datum or anecdote (= only one data point). 8 that certain species of bacteria respond to light stimuli. 9. While/Whereas "While" refers to time (e

California at Santa Cruz, University of

33

Anaerobic Co-digestion of Brown Water and Food Waste for Energy Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIM J.W. Anaerobic Co-digestion of Brown Water and Food Waste for Energy Recovery Jun Wei LIM, Singapore 639798 (E-mail: jwlim3@e.ntu.edu.sg) Abstract The anaerobic digestion of brown water (BW), food in a decentralized reactor via anaerobic digestion. The bio-methane potential of these substrates at different feed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

34

MMDS 08 Edward Chang, Google 1 Mining LargeMining Largescale Social Networksscale Social Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MMDS 08 Edward Chang, Google 1 Mining LargeMining Largescale Social Networksscale Social Networks Challenges & Scalable SolutionsChallenges & Scalable Solutions Edward Chang Google Research #12;MMDS 08 Edward Chang, Google 2 Collaborators · Prof. Chih-Jen Lin (NTU) · Hongjie Bai (Google) · Wen-Yen Chen

Chang, Edward Y.

35

Library OneSearch: User Guide (v1.4) 2 Overview: Library OneSearch ..........................................................................3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rep NTU's institutional repository of research output To search any of these collections, simply enter your search terms into the box under these tabs and click `Search'. You can change the collection which OneSearch: User Guide (v1.4) 7 Entering a database into the `Name' field and clicking `Find databases

Evans, Paul

36

Library OneSearch: User Guide (v1.6) 2 Overview: Library OneSearch ..........................................................................3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's institutional repository of research output To search any of these collections, simply enter your search terms. Searching for ebooks If you only want to search NTU ebooks, click the `Books and Audio-Visual' tab and enter your search terms. Results will be displayed; click the `Books' link on the left-hand toolbar: Next

Evans, Paul

37

Serpentine Thermal Coupling Between a Stream and a Conducting Body  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Here we document the effect of flow configuration on the heat transfer performance of a serpentine shaped stream embedded in a conducting solid. Several configurations with fixed volume of fluid are considered: U-shaped with varying spacing between the parallel portions of the U, serpentine shapes with three elbows, and conducting soil with several parallelepipedal shapes. We show that the spacing must be greater than a critical value in order for the heat transfer density of the stream-solid configuration to be the highest that it can be. Spacings larger than this critical value do not yield improvements in heat transfer density. We also show that even though the heat transfer is time dependent, the stream-solid configuration has an effective number of heat transfer units Ntu that is nearly constant in time. The larger Ntu values correspond to the configurations with greater heat transfer density.

Kobayashi, H.; Lorente, S.; Anderson, R.; Bejan, A.

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Khesbn no. 108 - Autumn 1986 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

t OlriT . 'tND tJlD i2.1y11 Dty:rti[, Ey.r JrrDyD 13 'ltJDt''12 ! jg ntu JrN ll$n /rti\\,rn itir-'ii u! : Jii:Niii ,l )lt''lr{ lX, rn lD,t? D]'l]'rti lB'lylj'";'rylDr111 6tr1 . '

Admin, LAYCC

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

FACH-Fachschaft Chemie und Wirtschaftschemie  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FACH-Fachschaft Chemie und Wirtschaftschemie Ulm e.V. FACH-Fachschaft Chemie und Wirtschaftschemie: +49 731/50-22407 Fax: +49 731/50-22403 fs-chemie@uni-ulm.de Protokoll der 5. Mitgliederversammlung des FACH-Fachschaft Chemie und Wirtschaftschemie Ulm e.V. Sitzungsort: Universit¨at Ulm O27 131 Datum der

Pfeifer, Holger

40

FACH-Fachschaft Chemie und Wirtschaftschemie  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FACH-Fachschaft Chemie und Wirtschaftschemie Ulm e.V. FACH-Fachschaft Chemie und Wirtschaftschemie: +49 731/50-22407 Fax: +49 731/50-22403 fs-chemie@uni-ulm.de Protokoll der 3. Mitgliederversammlung des FACH Fachschaft Chemie und Wirtschaftschemie Ulm e.V. Sitzungsort: Universit¨at Ulm O27 131 Datum der

Pfeifer, Holger

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "datum ntu nephelometric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Introducing HTDP 3.1 to transform coordinates across time and spatial reference frames  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Geodetic Survey, an office within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, recently released version 3.1 of the Horizontal Time-Dependent Positioning (HTDP) utility for transforming coordinates across time and between spatial ... Keywords: Crustal deformation, Dynamic datums, Geodesy, NAD83

Chris Pearson; Richard Snay

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY G E O L O G I C A L S O C I E T Y O F A M E R I C A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

correlations. In the coal mining and the petroleum industries, performing subsurface coal correlations of the sub-A coal zone;from the Emery Mine to Pictograph Point the datum is the base of the composite A and Architecture of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone: Implications for Coal and Coalbed Methane Resources-A Field

Seamons, Kent E.

43

WESTFLISCHE HELMHOLTZ-INSTITUT FR BIOMEDIZINISCHE TECHNIK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Leonhardt Smart Solid-State Lighting Control Steuerung eines Intelligenten Belichtungssystems mit LED, Datum Unterschrift #12;#12;Abstract General illumination using LEDs has enabled designers to have temperature CRI Color rendering index LED Light emitting diode PSO Particle swarm optimization LP Linear

44

Semiparametric Bayesian Analysis of Selection Models Jaeyong Lee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Semiparametric Bayesian Analysis of Selection Models Jaeyong Lee National Institute of Statistical Science James O. Berger Duke University Abstract Selection models are appropriate when a datum x enters it to be of some particular functional form. By introducing latent variables related to the selection mechanism

Berger, Jim

45

Grounding geographic categories in the meaningful environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ontologies are a common approach to improve semantic interoperability by explicitly specifying the vocabulary used by a particular information community. Complex expressions are defined in terms of primitive ones. This shifts the problem of semantic ... Keywords: meaningful environment, semantic datum, semantic heterogeneity, symbol grounding problem

Simon Scheider; Krzysztof Janowicz; Werner Kuhn

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Performance optimization of rotary dehumidifiers  

SciTech Connect

A rotary dehumidifier consists of a rotating porous matrix made of a desiccant with mechanically supporting materials. The dehumidification performance of a rotary dehumidifier wheel depends on its rotational speed, the sorption properties of the desiccant, the heat and mass transfer characteristics of the matrix, and the size of the dehumidifier. The effect of the rotational speed on the dehumidification performance of a rotary dehumidifier has been investigated by Zheng, Worek, and Novosel (1993). this paper extends that previous work and investigates the effects of desiccant sorption properties, the heat and mass transfer characteristics, and the size of the rotary dehumidifier on the dehumidification performance. The results show that the using desiccant materials in a rotary dehumidifier with different adsorption characteristics results in a wide variation in dehumidification performance. However, the maximum performance of a rotary dehumidifier occurs for a desiccant material having an isotherm shape that can be characterized to have a separation factor of 0.07. Also, as the desiccant moisture uptake increases, the dehumidifier performance also increases. However, the performance improvement for a desiccant matrix having a maximum moisture uptake of larger than 0.25 by weight is not significant. The heat and mass transfer properties and the size of rotary dehumidifier are characterized by the number of transfer units NTU. Generally, the larger the NTU, the better dehumidification performance. However, similar to the maximum moisture uptake, when the NTU is larger than 12, the performance will not improve significantly. Also, the dehumidifier with the most favorable adsorption characteristic has a slower rotational speed, which results in lower power requirements to rotate the desiccant wheel and smaller carry-over losses.

Zheng, W.; Worek, W.M. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Novosel, D. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Global Classical Solutions of the Relativistic Vlasov-Darwin System with Small Cauchy Data: the Generalized Variables Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that a smooth, small enough Cauchy datum launches a unique classical solution of the relativistic Vlasov-Darwin (RVD) system globally in time. A similar result is claimed in Comm. Math. Sci. 6, 749-764 (2008) following the work in Int. Mat. Res. Not. 57191, 1-31 (2006). Our proof does not require estimates derived from the conservation of the total energy, nor those previously given on the transverse component of the electric field. These estimates are crucial in the references cited above. Instead, we exploit the formulation of the RVD system in terms of the generalized space and momentum variables. By doing so, we produce a simple a-priori estimate on the transverse component of the electric field. We widen the functional space required for the Cauchy datum to extend the solution globally in time, and we improve decay estimates given in Comm. Math. Sci. 6, 749-764 (2008) on the electromagnetic field and its space derivatives. Our method extends the constructive proof presented in "Collisionless kinetic equations from astrophysics: The Vlasov-Poisson system. Handbook of Differential Equations: Evolutionary Equations, Vol.3, Elsevier, 2007" to solve the Cauchy problem for the Vlasov-Poisson system with a small initial datum.

Reinel Sospedra-Alfonso; Martial Agueh; Reinhard Illner

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

48

Engineering faculty forum. Final report, June 1, 1993--May 31, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the project was to develop and broadcast monthly one-hour teleconferences to support the professional development of engineering faculty. The {open_quotes}Engineering Faculty Forum{close_quotes} was available nationwide over the NTU Satellite Network and was also available from a C-Band Satellite. There was no cost to participate in the live teleconferences for the two year period. The programs were developed in response to a questionnaire sent to engineering faculty members across the United States. Copies of the flyers and a print out of each course participation form has been included as a part of this report.

Baldwin, L.V.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Building and Calibration of a FAST Model of the SWAY Prototype Floating Wind Turbine: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Present efforts to verify and validate aero-hydro-servo-elastic numerical simulation tools that predict the dynamic response of a floating offshore wind turbine are primarily limited to code-to-code comparisons or code-to-data comparisons using data from wind-wave basin tests. In partnership with SWAY AS, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) installed scientific wind, wave, and motion measurement equipment on the 1/6.5th-scale prototype SWAY floating wind system to collect data to validate a FAST model of the SWAY design in an open-water condition. Nanyang Technological University (NTU), through a collaboration with NREL, assisted in this validation.

Koh, J. H.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Driscoll, F.; Ng, E. Y. K.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The Hartree equation for infinitely many particles. II. Dispersion and scattering in 2D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the nonlinear Hartree equation for an interacting gas containing infinitely many particles and we investigate the large-time stability of the stationary states of the form $f(-\\Delta)$, describing an homogeneous Fermi gas. Under suitable assumptions on the interaction potential and on the momentum distribution $f$, we prove that the stationary state is asymptotically stable in dimension 2. More precisely, for any initial datum which is a small perturbation of $f(-\\Delta)$ in a Schatten space, the system weakly converges to the stationary state for large times.

Mathieu Lewin; Julien Sabin

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

51

Shear strength of reinforced concrete wall-beam structures: upper- bound analysis and experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ratio tensile force in longitudinal steel bar (general) non-dimensional tensile force. Used in equilibrium check in Chapter 3 transformation matrix , equation (3.18) shear force (general) (vii) w a b c d { doi} e J fe f~ feu p s shear... . the thickness of the discontinuity zone in Chapter 3 or an arbitrary selected linear displacement datum in Ohapter 4 Uoi, Voi, Woi rigid block displacement components with reference to global axes. v Vt Pt CJ, € (f3B,D) f 'nt r r/ fe i = 1,2, ... ,NB...

Bin Mohamed, Zainai

1987-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

52

Mean field limit of bosonic systems in partially factorized states and their linear combinations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the mean field limit of one-particle reduced density matrices, for a bosonic system in an initial state with a fixed number of particles, only a fraction of which occupies the same state, and for linear combinations of such states. In the mean field limit, the time-evolved reduced density matrix is proved to converge: in trace norm, towards a rank one projection (on the state solution of Hartree equation) for a single state; in Hilbert-Schmidt norm towards a mixed state, combination of projections on different solutions (corresponding to each initial datum), for states that are a linear superposition.

Marco Falconi

2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

53

Microsoft Word - Appendix A Alluvial GW Samples.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Groundwater Samples, Groundwater Samples, January 2000 through April 2011 This page intentionally left blank Alluvial Groundwater -- Upgradient -- 92-05 a,b ______________________________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 04/11/01 07/20/01 10/10/01 ______________________________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L -- 270 321 303 Conductivity c ÎĽmhos/cm 1520 1250 1366 1350 DO c mg/L -- 7.7 -- -- ORP c mV 84 71 -- 38 pH c s.u. 7.05 7.66 6.42 6.99 Temperature c C 9.4 7.7 9.7 10 Turbidity c NTU 42.6 4.05 60.3 70.5

54

Microsoft Word - S03623_2007AnnRep_091007.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Alluvial Groundwater -- Upgradient -- 92-05 Alluvial Groundwater -- Upgradient -- 92-05 a,b ______________________________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 04/11/01 07/20/01 10/10/01 ______________________________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L -- 270 321 303 Conductivity c ÎĽmhos/cm 1520 1250 1366 1350 DO c mg/L -- 7.7 -- -- ORP c mV 84 71 -- 38 pH c s.u. 7.05 7.66 6.42 6.99 Temperature c C 9.4 7.7 9.7 10 Turbidity c NTU 42.6 4.05 60.3 70.5 Common Ions Ca mg/L 266 214 206 207

55

Microsoft Word - Appendix B Bedrock GW Samples.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Analytical Results for Bedrock Groundwater Samples, Analytical Results for Bedrock Groundwater Samples, January 2000 through April 2011 This page intentionally left blank Bedrock Groundwaters -- Upgradient -- 92-06 a,b ____________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 10/10/01 ____________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L 189 182 Conductivity c ÎĽmhos/cm 560 560 DO c mg/L 1.4 -- ORP c mV -51 -46 pH c s.u. 7.24 7.52 Temperature c C 11.3 11.6 Turbidity c NTU 0.84 4.3 Common Ions Ca mg/L 72.8 69.3 Chloride mg/L 2.15 2.44 Fluoride ÎĽg/L 124 242

56

Alluvial Groundwater -- Upgradient -- 92-05&  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

09 09 This page intentionally left blank Alluvial Groundwater -- Upgradient -- 92-05 a,b ______________________________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 04/11/01 07/20/01 10/10/01 ______________________________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L -- 270 321 303 Conductivity c ÎĽmhos/cm 1520 1250 1366 1350 DO c mg/L -- 7.7 -- -- ORP c mV 84 71 -- 38 pH c s.u. 7.05 7.66 6.42 6.99 Temperature c C 9.4 7.7 9.7 10 Turbidity c NTU 42.6 4.05 60.3 70.5 Common Ions Ca mg/L 266 214 206 207

57

Bedrock Groundwaters -- Upgradient -- 92-06a,b  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

09 09 This page intentionally left blank Bedrock Groundwaters -- Upgradient -- 92-06 a,b ____________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 10/10/01 ____________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L 189 182 Conductivity c ÎĽmhos/cm 560 560 DO c mg/L 1.4 -- ORP c mV -51 -46 pH c s.u. 7.24 7.52 Temperature c C 11.3 11.6 Turbidity c NTU 0.84 4.3 Common Ions Ca mg/L 72.8 69.3 Chloride mg/L 2.15 2.44 Fluoride ÎĽg/L 124 242 Hardness mg/L 225 214 K mg/L 1.98 1.81

58

Microsoft Word - S06596_GW.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

10 10 This page intentionally left blank Alluvial Groundwater -- Upgradient -- 92-05 a,b ______________________________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 04/11/01 07/20/01 10/10/01 ______________________________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L -- 270 321 303 Conductivity c ÎĽmhos/cm 1520 1250 1366 1350 DO c mg/L -- 7.7 -- -- ORP c mV 84 71 -- 38 pH c s.u. 7.05 7.66 6.42 6.99 Temperature c C 9.4 7.7 9.7 10 Turbidity c NTU 42.6 4.05 60.3 70.5 Common Ions Ca mg/L 266 214 206 207

59

Microsoft Word - S03623_2007AnnRep_091007.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Bedrock Groundwaters -- Upgradient -- 92-06 Bedrock Groundwaters -- Upgradient -- 92-06 a,b ____________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 10/10/01 ____________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L 189 182 Conductivity c ÎĽmhos/cm 560 560 DO c mg/L 1.4 -- ORP c mV -51 -46 pH c s.u. 7.24 7.52 Temperature c C 11.3 11.6 Turbidity c NTU 0.84 4.3 Common Ions Ca mg/L 72.8 69.3 Chloride mg/L 2.15 2.44 Fluoride ÎĽg/L 124 242 Hardness mg/L 225 214 K mg/L 1.98 1.81 Mg mg/L 10.5 9.99

60

Microsoft Word - S02459_2006Annual GW Rpt.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Page 1 Page 1 Bedrock Groundwaters -- Upgradient -- 92-06 a,b ____________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 10/10/01 ____________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L 189 182 Conductivity b µmhos/cm 560 560 DO b mg/L 1.4 -- ORP b mV -51 -46 pH b s.u. 7.24 7.52 Temperature b C 11.3 11.6 Turbidity b NTU 0.84 4.3 Common Ions Ca mg/L 72.8 69.3 Chloride mg/L 2.15 2.44 Fluoride µg/L 124 242 Hardness mg/L 225 214 K mg/L 1.98 1.81 Mg mg/L 10.5 9.99

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "datum ntu nephelometric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Microsoft Word - S06596_GW.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

10 10 This page intentionally left blank Bedrock Groundwaters -- Upgradient -- 92-06 a,b ____________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 10/10/01 ____________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L 189 182 Conductivity c ÎĽmhos/cm 560 560 DO c mg/L 1.4 -- ORP c mV -51 -46 pH c s.u. 7.24 7.52 Temperature c C 11.3 11.6 Turbidity c NTU 0.84 4.3 Common Ions Ca mg/L 72.8 69.3 Chloride mg/L 2.15 2.44 Fluoride ÎĽg/L 124 242 Hardness mg/L 225 214 K mg/L 1.98 1.81

62

Preliminary analysis of two aspects of magma-powered electric-generation plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two aspects critical to the development of magma electric generation plants using closed heat exchanger systems are addressed. The heat transfer between the cold fluid in the downcomer and the hot fluid in the upcomer is analyzed using an NTU-effectiveness technique. The results indicate the hot fluid must be thermally insulated from the colder fluid in order to yield a useful temperature difference at the surface. A preliminary system analysis is conducted to determine the well cost requirements of an economically competitive magma electric plant. There is no economic incentive to make the magma tap wellbore larger than conventional deep gas wells. The cost competitiveness of a magma/electric plant is influenced by the depth to the magma, the convective heat flux of the magma, and the expected life of each well.

Hoover, E.R.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

During second quarter 1994, samples from the FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Piezometer FAC 5P and monitoring well FAC 6 were dry and could not be sampled. Analytical results that exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard of 50 NTU during the quarter were as follows: gross alpha exceeded the final PDWS and aluminum, iron, manganese, and total organic halogens exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the FAC wells. Turbidity exceeded the SRS standard in well FAC 3. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Optimal sequencing of a cooling tower with multiple cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the energy savings potential of multi-cell cooling tower optimal sequencing control methods. Annual tower fan energy usage is calculated for a counter-flow tower with multiple variable-speed fans. Effectiveness-NTU tower model is employed to predict the cooling tower performance at various conditions. Natural convection when the fan is off is accounted by using an assumed airflow rate. The energy savings at five cities representing different typical climates are studied using typical meteorological year data. The results show that, if the tower capacity can be increased by 50% and 100% by running extra tower cells, the annual total fan power usage can be reduced by 44% and 61%, respectively. A cumulative saving percent curve is generated to help estimate the annual total savings percent when extra cooling tower capacity is available during only part of a year.

Zhang, Z.; Liu, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Method for laser-based two-dimensional navigation system in a structured environment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low power, narrow laser beam, generated by a laser carried by a mobile vehicle, is rotated about a vertical reference axis as the vehicle navigates within a structured environment. At least three stationary retroreflector elements are located at known positions, preferably at the periphery of the structured environment, with one of the elements having a distinctive retroflection. The projected rotating beam transverses each retroflector in succession, and the corresponding retroreflections are received at the vehicle and focussed on a photoelectric cell to generate corresponding electrical signals. The signal caused by the distinctive retroreflection serves as an angle-measurement datum. An angle encoder coupled to the apparatus rotating the projected laser beam provides the angular separation from this datum of the lines connecting the mobile reference axis to successive retroreflectors. This real-time angular data is utilized with the known locations of the retroreflectors to trigonometrically compute the exact real-time location of the mobile reference axis (hence the navigating vehicle) vis-a-vis the structure environment, e.g., in terms of two-dimensional Cartesian coordinates associated with the environment.

Boultinghouse K.D.; Schoeneman, J.L.; Bertice, L.T.

1986-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

66

Method for laser-based two-dimensional navigation system in a structured environment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low power, narrow laser beam, generated by a laser carried by a mobile vehicle, is rotated about a vertical reference axis as the vehicle navigates within a structured environment. At least three stationary retroreflector elements are located at known positions, preferably at the periphery of the structured environment, with one of the elements having a distinctive retroreflection. The projected rotating beam traverses each retroreflector in succession, and the corresponding retroreflections are received at the vehicle and focussed on a photoelectric cell to generate corresponding electrical signals. The signal caused by the distinctive retroreflection serves as an angle-measurement datum. An angle encoder coupled to the apparatus rotating the projected laser beam provides the angular separation from this datum of the lines connecting the mobile reference axis to successive retroreflectors. This real-time angular data is utilized with the known locations of the retroreflectors to trigonometrically compute using three point resection, the exact real-time location of the mobile reference axis (hence the navigating vehicle) vis-a-vis the structured environment, e.g., in terms of two-dimensional Cartesian coordinates associated with the environment.

Boultinghouse, Karlan D. (Sandia Park, NM); Schoeneman, J. Lee (Albuquerque, NM); Tise, Bertice L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

NREL GIS Data: New York High Resolution Wind Resource | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New York High Resolution Wind Resource New York High Resolution Wind Resource Dataset Summary Description Abstract: Annual average wind resource potential for New York at a 50 meter height. Purpose: Provide information on the wind resource development potential in New York. Supplemental_Information: This data set has been validated by NREL and wind energy meteorological consultants. However, the data is not suitable for micro-siting potential development projects. This shapefile was generated from a raster dataset with a 200 m resolution, in a UTM zone 18, datum WGS 84 projection system. Other_Citation_Details: This map has been validated with available surface data by NREL and wind energy meteorological consultants. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date Released November 30th, 2003 (10 years ago)

68

Raw Data from National Wind Technology Center M2 Tower (2001 - 2011) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2001 - 2011) 2001 - 2011) Dataset Summary Description This raw data reflects readings from instruments mounted on or near a 82 meter meteorological tower located at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), approximately 5 miles south of Boulder, CO (specifically: 39.9107 N, 105.2348 W, datum WGS84). The base elevation at the site is 1,855 meters AMSL.The dataset includes irrandiance information, such as global PSP (W/m2) and meteorological data, such as temperature, pressure, and wind speed and direction (at 2m, 5m, 10m, 20m, 50m, and 80m). Included here is a portion of the available data: from August 24, 2001 - March 10, 2011. A separate dataset is available for the period between September 23, 1996 and August 23, 2001.The NWTC website provides up to the day updates to this data, from as early as August 24, 2001 through yesterday, as well as instrument specifications.

69

hawaii | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

hawaii hawaii Dataset Summary Description Abstract: Annual average wind resource potential for the state of Hawaii at a 50 meter height. Purpose: Provide information on the wind resource development potential within the state of Hawaii. Supplemental_Information: This data set has been validated by NREL and wind energy meteorological consultants. However, the data is not suitable for micro-siting potential development projects. This shapefile was generated from a raster dataset with a 200 m resolution, in a UTM zone 4, datum WGS 84 projection system. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date Released November 30th, 2004 (10 years ago) Date Updated May 04th, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords GIS hawaii NREL shapefile wind Data application/zip icon Shapefile (zip, 2 MiB)

70

Closure Report (CR) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 91: Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well with Errata Sheet and Certification, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

The closure report for CAU 91 has no Use Restriction Form or drawing/map included in the document to describe the use restricted area, however, Section 3.3.3 states that the site will be fenced and signage placed indicating the area as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Unit. The drawing that was placed in the FFACO indicating the use restricted area lists the coordinates for the RCRA Unit in Nevada State Plan Coordinates - North American Datum of 1983. In the ensuing years the reporting of coordinates has been standardized so that all coordinates are reported in the same manner, which is: NAD 27 UTM Zone 11 N, meters. This Errata Sheet updates the coordinate reporting to the currently accepted method and includes an aerial photo showing the RCRA Unit with the coordinates listed showing the use restricted area.

Navarro Nevada Environmental Services

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

71

Iowa | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Iowa Iowa Dataset Summary Description Abstract: Annual average wind resource potential for the state of Iowa at a 50 meter height. Purpose: Provide information on the wind resource development potential within the state of Iowa. Supplemental_Information: This data set has been validated by NREL and wind energy meteorological consultants. However, the data is not suitable for micro-siting potential development projects. This shapefile was generated from a raster dataset with a 200 m resolution, in a UTM zone 12, datum WGS 84 projection system. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date Released November 30th, 2003 (11 years ago) Date Updated December 30th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords GIS Iowa NREL shapefile wind Data application/zip icon Shapefile (zip, 4.6 MiB)

72

Indiana | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indiana Indiana Dataset Summary Description Abstract: Annual average wind resource potential for the state of Indiana at a 50 meter height. Purpose: Provide information on the wind resource development potential within the state of Indiana. Supplemental_Information: This data set has been validated by NREL and wind energy meteorological consultants. However, the data is not suitable for micro-siting potential development projects. This shapefile was generated from a raster dataset with a 200 m resolution, in a UTM zone 16 datum WGS 84 projection system. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date Released March 31st, 2004 (10 years ago) Date Updated March 02nd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords GIS Indiana NREL shapefile wind Data application/zip icon Shapefile (zip, 2.7 MiB)

73

Texas | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texas Texas Dataset Summary Description Abstract: Annual average wind resource potential for the state of Texas. Purpose: Provide information on the wind resource development potential within the state of Texas. Supplemental_Information: This data set has been validated by NREL and wind energy meteorological consultants. However, the data is not suitable for micro-siting potential development projects. This shapefile in a UTM zone 19, datum WGS 84 projection system. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date Released November 30th, 2003 (10 years ago) Date Updated October 14th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords GIS NREL shapefile Texas wind Data application/zip icon Shapefile (zip, 315.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

74

Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 1km resolution  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

China from NREL China from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Raster GIS data, exported as BIL file, 50 m wind power density for eastern China. (Purpose): To provide information on the wind resource potential in eastern China. Values range from 0 to 3079 W/m2. (Supplemental Information): The modeling regions do not completely cover eastern China. Projection Parameters Projection LAMBERT_AZIMUTHAL Datum WGS84 Zunits METERS Units METERS Spheroid DEFINED Major Axis 6370997.00000 Minor Axis 0.00000 Parameters: radius of the sphere of reference 6370997.00000 Continue? longitude of center of projection 119 0 0.00 latitude of center of projection 33 30 0.000 false easting (meters) 0.00000 false northing (meters) 0.00000 Spatial Information Raster: Number of Columns: 2658 Number of Rows: 3926 Pixel

75

turbulence | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

turbulence turbulence Dataset Summary Description This raw data reflects readings from instruments mounted on or near a 82 meter meteorological tower located at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), approximately 5 miles south of Boulder, CO (specifically: 39.9107 N, 105.2348 W, datum WGS84). Source NREL Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords DOE irradiance NREL NWTC temperature turbulence wind wind direction wind speed Data text/plain icon Raw data (txt, 82 KiB) application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Raw data field descriptions (xlsx, 52.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Data have not been reviewed for accuracy or completeness; disclaimer available (http://www.nrel.gov/disclaimer.html). Temporal and Spatial Coverage

76

Wind: wind power density maps at 50 m above ground and 1km resolution for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

eastern China from NREL eastern China from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): PDF maps of Eastern China wind mapping. (Purpose): To provide information on the wind resource potential in eastern China. Includes maps of full mapping region, and 15 sub-regions. (Supplemental Information): The modeling regions do not completely cover eastern China. Projection Parameters Projection LAMBERT_AZIMUTHAL Datum WGS84 Z-units METERS Units METERS Spheroid DEFINED Major Axis 6370997.00000 Minor Axis 0.00000 Parameters: radius of the sphere of reference 6370997.00000 Continue? longitude of center of projection 119 0 0.00 latitude of center of projection 33 30 0.000 false easting (meters) 0.00000 false northing (meters) 0.00000 Spatial Information Raster: Number of Columns: 2658 Number of Rows: 3926

77

Raw Data from National Wind Technology Center M2 Tower (1996 - 2001) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1996 - 2001) 1996 - 2001) Dataset Summary Description This raw data reflects readings from instruments mounted on or near a 82 meter meteorological tower located at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), approximately 5 miles south of Boulder, CO (specifically: 39.9107 N, 105.2348 W, datum WGS84). The base elevation at the site is 1,855 meters AMSL.The dataset includes irrandiance information (Global, kWs/m2) and meteorological data, such as temperature, pressure, and dew point, as well as wind speed and direction at 2m, 5m, 10m, 20m, 50m, and 80m. Included here is a portion of the available data: from September 23, 1996 - August 23, 2001. A separate dataset is available for Aug 24, 2001 - March 10, 2011 in OpenEI. The NWTC website provides current data (updated daily), from as early as August 24, 2001, as well as instrument specifications.

78

NREL GIS Data: Indiana High Resolution Wind Resource | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indiana High Resolution Wind Resource Indiana High Resolution Wind Resource Dataset Summary Description Abstract: Annual average wind resource potential for the state of Indiana at a 50 meter height. Purpose: Provide information on the wind resource development potential within the state of Indiana. Supplemental_Information: This data set has been validated by NREL and wind energy meteorological consultants. However, the data is not suitable for micro-siting potential development projects. This shapefile was generated from a raster dataset with a 200 m resolution, in a UTM zone 16 datum WGS 84 projection system. Other_Citation_Details: The wind power resource estimates were produced by AWS TrueWind using their MesoMap system and historical weather data under contract to Wind Powering America/NREL. This map has been validated with available surface data by NREL and wind energy meteorological consultants.

79

NREL GIS Data: Hawaii High Resolution Wind Resource | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Resource Wind Resource Dataset Summary Description Abstract: Annual average wind resource potential for the state of Hawaii at a 50 meter height. Purpose: Provide information on the wind resource development potential within the state of Hawaii. Supplemental_Information: This data set has been validated by NREL and wind energy meteorological consultants. However, the data is not suitable for micro-siting potential development projects. This shapefile was generated from a raster dataset with a 200 m resolution, in a UTM zone 4, datum WGS 84 projection system. Other_Citation_Details: The wind power resource estimates were produced by TrueWind Solutions using their MesoMap system and historical weather data under contract to Wind Powering America/NREL. This map has been validated with available surface data by NREL and wind energy meteorological consultants.

80

New York | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

York York Dataset Summary Description Abstract: Annual average wind resource potential for New York at a 50 meter height. Purpose: Provide information on the wind resource development potential in New York. Supplemental_Information: This data set has been validated by NREL and wind energy meteorological consultants. However, the data is not suitable for micro-siting potential development projects. This shapefile was generated from a raster dataset with a 200 m resolution, in a UTM zone 18, datum WGS 84 projection system. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date Released November 30th, 2003 (11 years ago) Date Updated November 01st, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords GIS New York NREL shapefile wind Data application/zip icon Shapefile (zip, 5 MiB) Quality Metrics

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "datum ntu nephelometric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 400m resolution  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

400m resolution 400m resolution for Sri Lanka from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Raster GIS data, 50 m wind power density for Sri Lanka (Purpose): To provide information on the wind resource potential within Sri Lanka and selected offshore areas (Supplemental Information): ***** Spatial Reference Information (Beg) *****Projection ParametersProjection UTMZone 44Datum WGS84Zunits NoneUnits METERSSpheroid WGS84Xshift 0.0000000000Yshift 0.0000000000ParametersSpatial InformationRaster:Number of Columns: 764Number of Rows: 1218Pixel Resolution (m): 400Data Type: real***** Spatial Reference Information (End) ***** Source NREL Date Released June 30th, 2004 (10 years ago) Date Updated November 01st, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords GIS NREL Sri Lanka SWERA UNEP wind Data application/zip icon Download Data (zip, 771.5 KiB)

82

NWTC | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NWTC NWTC Dataset Summary Description This raw data reflects readings from instruments mounted on or near a 82 meter meteorological tower located at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), approximately 5 miles south of Boulder, CO (specifically: 39.9107 N, 105.2348 W, datum WGS84). Source NREL Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords DOE irradiance NREL NWTC temperature turbulence wind wind direction wind speed Data text/plain icon Raw data (txt, 82 KiB) application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Raw data field descriptions (xlsx, 52.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Data have not been reviewed for accuracy or completeness; disclaimer available (http://www.nrel.gov/disclaimer.html). Temporal and Spatial Coverage

83

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-017.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 SECTION A. Project Title: United States Geological Survey (USGS) Geotechncial Drilling for USGS 139 SECTION B. Project Description: The USGS proposes to drill an approximate 1,000-foot deep geotechnical corehole (USGS 139) into the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. The location of the corehole will be 7.4 mile(s) (approximate) east of the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) complex at the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 28, Township 4 North, Range 31 East (Figure 1); latitude/longitude (World Geodetic System [WGS] 1984 Datum) 43deg 38min 25.0sec N / 112deg 46min 06.7sec W, respectively. The borehole will be 5 inches in diameter, will have a locking wellhead installed after completion, will be marked with a brass survey marker,

84

Microsoft Word - S03623_2007AnnRep_091007.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Analytical Results for Post-ROD Biomonitoring Analytical Results for Post-ROD Biomonitoring Baseline Surface Water and Sediment This page intentionally left blank Biomonitoring Data a Sediment Surface Water Surface Location Date Sampled Se (mg/kg) Se (µg/L) Se b (µg/L) Alkalinity b (mg/L) Conductivity (µmhos/cm) pH (s.u.) Temperature (C) Turbidity (NTU) 10/06/04 3.3 3.7 3 273 1481 8.1 14.5 -- 10/06/04 -- 3.6 2.9 -- -- -- -- -- 04/05/05 1.3 2.9 2.2 170 810 7.92 12.08 38.5 10/11/05 1.9 3 2.8 -- -- -- -- -- 04/19/06 0.56 3.6EJ -- -- -- -- -- -- 10/04/06 0.58 4.1E -- -- -- -- -- -- P-S1 04/09/07 4.3 4.5 -- -- -- -- -- -- 10/06/04 3 1.6 1.2 292 1500 7.72 13.3 53.5 04/05/05 0.86 2.8 2.4 171 785 7.99 13.1 37.4 10/11/05 0.51 3.2E 2.8 -- -- -- -- -- 04/19/06 0.55 3.4J -- -- -- -- -- --

85

A Cross-Flow Ceramic Heat Recuperator for Industrial Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With increasing fuel costs, the efficient use of fuel is very important to the U.S. process heat industries. Increase in fuel usage efficiency can be obtained by transferring the waste exhaust heat to the cold combustion air. The metallic recuperators currently available suffer from problems of creep, corrosion and oxidation, particularly at high temperatures. The Department of Energy and GTE Products corporation have pursued a jointly funded venture, Contract No. EX-76-C-Q1-2162, to establish performance criteria and demonstrate a cross-flow ceramic heat recuperator for high temperature industrial heat recovery applications. The immediate goals of the ceramic recuperator project were to demonstrate a heat exchanger capable of handling high temperatures (1600-2400oF), that is compact with a high surface area and with costs comparable to the lower temperature metal heat exchangers. This paper describes the basic GTE Products Corporation design and details the design basis, the predicted recuperator performance, the ceramic and housing materials, the recuperator design procedure and the fabrication and assembly. The data provided includes NTU-Effectiveness and low friction and heat transfer ("f" and "J") plots.

Gonzalez, J. M.; Cleveland, J. J.; Kohnken, K. H.; Rebello, W. J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Optimized Design of a Furnace Cooling System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a case study of manufacturing furnace optimized re-design. The bottleneck in the production process is the cooling of heat treatment furnaces. These ovens are on an approximate 24-hour cycle, heating for 12 hours and cooling for 12 hours. Pressurized argon and process water are used to expedite cooling. The proposed modifications aim to minimize cycling by reducing cooling time; they are grouped into three fundamental mechanisms. The first is a recommendation to modify current operating procedures. This entails opening the furnace doors at higher than normal temperatures. A furnace temperature model based on current parameters is used to show the reduction in cooling time in response to opening the furnace doors at higher temperatures. The second mechanism considers the introduction of forced argon convection. Argon is used in the process to mitigate part oxidation. Cycling argon through the furnace during cooling increases convection over the parts and removes heat from the furnace envelope. Heat transfer models based on convective Nusselt correlations are used to determine the increase in heat transfer rate. The last mechanism considers a modification to the current heat exchanger. By decreasing the temperature of the water jacket and increasing heat exchanger efficiency, heat transfer from the furnace is increased and cooling time is shortened. This analysis is done using the Effectiveness-NTU method.

Morelli, F.; Bretschneider, R.; Dauzat, J.; Guymon, M.; Studebaker, J.; Rasmussen, B. P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Heat Transfer of a Multiple Helical Coil Heat Exchanger Using a Microencapsulated Phase Change Material Slurry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present study has focused on the use of coil heat exchangers (CHEs) with microencapsulated phase change material (MPCM) slurries to understand if CHEs can yield greater rates of heat transfer. An experimental study was conducted using a counterflow CHE consisting of 3 helical coils. Two separate tests were conducted, one where water was used as heat transfer fluid (HTF) on the coil and shell sides, respectively; while the second one made use of MPCM slurry and water on the coil and shell sides, respectively. The NTU-effectiveness relationship of the CHE when MPCM fluid is used approaches that of a heat exchanger with a heat capacity ratio of zero. The heat transfer results have shown that when using a MPCM slurry, an increase in heat transfer rate can be obtained when compared to heat transfer results obtained using straight heat transfer sections. It has been concluded that the increased specific heat of the slurry as well as the fluid dynamics in helical coil pipes are the main contributors to the increased heat transfer.

Gaskill, Travis

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Ozone (o3) efficacy on reduction of phytophthora capsici in recirculated horticultural irrigation water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microorganisms that cause plant disease have been isolated in recirculated irrigation water and increase the risks of disease incidence in horticultural operations. Ozone is an effective oxidizer used to disinfect drinking water supplies and treat industrial wastewater. The objective of this research was to investigate using ozone gas as part of a strategy to reduce the incidence of Phytophthora deBary in recirculated irrigation water. An isolate of Phytophthora capsici Leonian was cultured to induce sporulation. Spore dilutions were placed in aliquots of reverse osmosis water and bubbled with ozone gas (O3) to concentrations of 0 to 1.5 mg·L-1. Ozonated samples were plated and observed for colony forming units. Increasing ozone concentrations reduced the number of colony forming units to 0 at 1.5 mg· L-1 03. Turbidity effects on efficacy on Phytophthora capsici were tested using bentonite clay at 0 to 2.0 nephelometric turbidity units and ozone concentrations of 0 to 1.5 mg· L-1. Increasing bentonite did not affect the efficacy of increasing ozone concentrations on reducing colony formation to 0 at 1.5 mg·L-1 O3. Bioassays using Phytophthora capsici on Capsicum annuum L. seedlings confirmed apparent pathogenicity. Reverse osmosis water, containing a soluble fertilizer at 0 to 300 mg· L-1 N, was ozonated to concentrations of 0 to 1.5 mg·L-1 O3 and used to irrigate Chrysanthemum x morifolium T. de Romatuelle. Increasing ozone concentrations did not interact with increasing fertilizer levels to affect the final growth parameters. Chrysanthemum exposed to ozone gas concentrations of 0.5 to 1.5 mg·L-1 showed symptomatic ozone damage. Complete soluble fertilizer solutions with micronutrients were ozonated from 0 to 1.5 mg·L-1 O3 and analysed for nutrient content. Increasing ozone levels did not interact with fertilizers to affect macronutrients. Increasing ozone interacted with iron at a high fertilizer level. Ozone did not affect the efficacy of paclobutralzol in controlling growth in Viola x wittrockiana. Ozone was effective in controlling Phytophthora capsici in recirculated irrigation water with minimum impact on plant growth. Adjustments in fertility regiemes may be needed to counteract the oxidizing affect of ozone on micronutrients.

McDonald, Garry Vernon

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Secret color images sharing schemes based on XOR operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s paper presents two new constructi ons for the secret colori mages shari ng schemes .Onei s a (n, n) th eshold scheme, whi ch can be const ucted based on XOR ope ati on. The othe i s a (2, n) th eshold scheme, whi ch can be const ucted by usi ng AND and XOR ope ati ons. The two schemes have no pi xel expansi on, and the ti me complexi ty fo const ucti ng sha ed i mages i s O(k 1 n), excludi ng the ti me needed fo gene ati ng n di sti nct andom mati ces (he e k si ze of the sharedi mage). The reconstructed i mages can be obtai nedi n the two schemes by usi ng the XOR operati on alone. The relati vedi fferences of the two schemes are 1 and 1/2, respecti vely. The ti me complexi ty of the recoveredi magesi s O(k 1 n) and O(2k 1 ), especti vely. The two schemes also povi de pe fect sec ecy. Keywo ds: Sec et shai ng scheme; Vi sual c yptog aphy; Vi sual sec et shai ng scheme; XOR ope ati on; Pe fect sec ecy 1. Int oduction Afte Blakely and Shami i ndependently p oposed the (k, n) th eshold scheme [1-2], hund eds of pape s we e publi shed epo ti ng esea ch about thi s topi c. Howeve , these schemes a e only sui table fo di gi tal data such as text fi les, passwo ds, and enc ypti on / Correspondi ng author. Tel.: +86-10-62782930 E-mai l address: daoshun@mai l.tsi nghua.edu.cn decrypti on keys [3]. Compared wi thdi gi tal data such as passwords and text fi les,di gi tal i mages have a large amount of datum, and the di fference between two nei ghbori ng datum i s very small. Because of the features ofdi gi tali mages,i ti si mpracti cal to apply the tradi ti onal threshold scheme to share a secretdi gi tali magedi rectly, soi ti s veryi mportant and necessary toi nvesti gate (k, n) th eshold schemes of di gi tal i mages. In [3], the Chang and Hwang p ...

Wang Dao-Shun; Zhang Lei; Ma Ning; Huang Lian-Sheng; Bei Ji

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Appendix H biomonitoring data table H-1.xls  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Baseline Surface Baseline Surface Water, Sediment, and Benthic Macroinvertebrate Samples This page intentionally left blank Table H-1: Biomonitoring Sediment and Surface Water Data a Sediment Surface Location Date Sampled Se (mg/kg) Se (µg/L) Se b (µg/L) Alkalinity b (mg/L) Conductivity (µmhos/cm) ORP (mV) pH (s.u.) Temperature (C) Turbidity (NTU) 10/06/04 3.3 3.7 3 273 1481 -- 8.1 14.5 -- 10/06/04 -- 3.6 2.9 -- -- -- -- -- -- 04/05/05 1.3 2.9 2.2 170 810 -- 7.92 12.08 38.5 10/11/05 1.9 3 2.8 -- -- -- -- -- -- 04/19/06 0.56 3.6EJ -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 10/04/06 0.58 4.1E -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 04/09/07 4.3 4.5 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 04/08/08 1.1 4 -- -- 858 82 7.32 8.6 -- 04/08/08 -- 3.9 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 06/23/10 -- 9.3 -- 260 2024 156.1 7.1 20.76 20.6 06/23/10 -- 9.3 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 10/06/04 3 1.6 1.2 292 1500 -- 7.72 13.3 53.5 04/05/05 0.86 2.8 2.4 171 785 -- 7.99 13.1 37.4 10/11/05 0.51 3.2E 2.8 --

91

Simulation model air-to-air plate heat exchanger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple simulation model of an air-to-air plate heat exchanger is presented. The model belongs to a collection of simulation models that allows the eflcient computer simulation of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. The main emphasis of the models is to shorten computation time and to use only input data that are known in the design process of an HVAC system. The target of the models is to describe the behavior of HVAC components in the part-load operation mode, which is becoming increasingly important in energy eficient HVAC systems. The models are intended to be used for yearly energy calculations or load calculations with time steps of about 10 minutes or larger. Short- time dynamic effects, which are of interest for different aspects of control theory, are neglected. The part-load behavior is expressed in terms of the nominal condition and the dimensionless variation of the heat transfer with change of mass flow and temperature. The effectiveness- NTU relations are used to parametrize the convective heat transfer at nominal conditions and to compute the part-load condition. If the heat transfer coefficients on the two exchanger sides are not equal (i. e. due to partial bypassing of air), their ratio can be easily calculated and set as a parameter. The model is static and uses explicit equations only. The explicit model formulation ensures short computation time and numerical stability, which allows using the model with sophisticated engineering methods like automatic system optimization. This paper fully outlines the algorithm description and its simplifications. It is not tailored for any particular simulation program to ensure easy implementation in any simulation program.

Wetter, Michael

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

humidity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

humidity humidity Dataset Summary Description This raw data reflects readings from instruments mounted on or near a 82 meter meteorological tower located at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), approximately 5 miles south of Boulder, CO (specifically: 39.9107 N, 105.2348 W, datum WGS84). The base elevation at the site is 1,855 meters AMSL. Source NREL Date Released Unknown Date Updated March 10th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords DOE humidity irrandiance NREL NWTC pressure temperature turbulence wind wind direction wind speed Data text/plain icon Raw data (8/24/2001 - 3/10/2011) (txt, 681 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Field IDs for above .txt file (xls, 69.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Scientists and Technicians are notified real-time via email of instruments outside the above min/max or delta comparisons (http://www.nrel.gov/midc/nwtc_m2/) Data have not been reviewed for accuracy or completeness; disclaimer available (http://www.nrel.gov/disclaimer.html).

93

A fault-tolerant corrector/detector chip for high-speed data processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An internally fault-tolerant data error detection and correction integrated circuit device (10) and a method of operating same. The device functions as a bidirectional data buffer between a 32-bit data processor and the remainder of a data processing system and provides a 32-bit datum is provided with a relatively short eight bits of data-protecting parity. The 32-bits of data by eight bits of parity is partitioned into eight 4-bit nibbles and two 4-bit nibbles, respectively. For data flowing towards the processor the data and parity nibbles are checked in parallel and in a single operation employing a dual orthogonal basis technique. The dual orthogonal basis increase the efficiency of the implementation. Any one of ten (eight data, two parity) nibbles are correctable if erroneous, or two different erroneous nibbles are detectable. For data flowing away from the processor the appropriate parity nibble values are calculated and transmitted to the system along with the data. The device regenerates parity values for data flowing in either direction and compares regenerated to generated parity with a totally self-checking equality checker. As such, the device is self-validating and enabled to both detect and indicate an occurrence of an internal failure. A generalization of the device to protect 64-bit data with 16-bit parity to protect against byte-wide errors is also presented.

Andaleon, D.D.; Napolitano, L.M. Jr.; Redinbo, G.R.; Shreeve, W.O.

1990-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

94

Fault-tolerant corrector/detector chip for high-speed data processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An internally fault-tolerant data error detection and correction integrated circuit device (10) and a method of operating same. The device functions as a bidirectional data buffer between a 32-bit data processor and the remainder of a data processing system and provides a 32-bit datum is provided with a relatively short eight bits of data-protecting parity. The 32-bits of data by eight bits of parity is partitioned into eight 4-bit nibbles and two 4-bit nibbles, respectively. For data flowing towards the processor the data and parity nibbles are checked in parallel and in a single operation employing a dual orthogonal basis technique. The dual orthogonal basis increase the efficiency of the implementation. Any one of ten (eight data, two parity) nibbles are correctable if erroneous, or two different erroneous nibbles are detectable. For data flowing away from the processor the appropriate parity nibble values are calculated and transmitted to the system along with the data. The device regenerates parity values for data flowing in either direction and compares regenerated to generated parity with a totally self-checking equality checker. As such, the device is self-validating and enabled to both detect and indicate an occurrence of an internal failure. A generalization of the device to protect 64-bit data with 16-bit parity to protect against byte-wide errors is also presented.

Andaleon, David D. (San Ramon, CA); Napolitano, Jr., Leonard M. (Danville, CA); Redinbo, G. Robert (Davis, CA); Shreeve, William O. (Fayetteville, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

pressure | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pressure pressure Dataset Summary Description This raw data reflects readings from instruments mounted on or near a 82 meter meteorological tower located at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), approximately 5 miles south of Boulder, CO (specifically: 39.9107 N, 105.2348 W, datum WGS84). The base elevation at the site is 1,855 meters AMSL. Source NREL Date Released Unknown Date Updated March 10th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords DOE humidity irrandiance NREL NWTC pressure temperature turbulence wind wind direction wind speed Data text/plain icon Raw data (8/24/2001 - 3/10/2011) (txt, 681 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Field IDs for above .txt file (xls, 69.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Scientists and Technicians are notified real-time via email of instruments outside the above min/max or delta comparisons (http://www.nrel.gov/midc/nwtc_m2/) Data have not been reviewed for accuracy or completeness; disclaimer available (http://www.nrel.gov/disclaimer.html).

96

irrandiance | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

irrandiance irrandiance Dataset Summary Description This raw data reflects readings from instruments mounted on or near a 82 meter meteorological tower located at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), approximately 5 miles south of Boulder, CO (specifically: 39.9107 N, 105.2348 W, datum WGS84). The base elevation at the site is 1,855 meters AMSL. Source NREL Date Released Unknown Date Updated March 10th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords DOE humidity irrandiance NREL NWTC pressure temperature turbulence wind wind direction wind speed Data text/plain icon Raw data (8/24/2001 - 3/10/2011) (txt, 681 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Field IDs for above .txt file (xls, 69.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Scientists and Technicians are notified real-time via email of instruments outside the above min/max or delta comparisons (http://www.nrel.gov/midc/nwtc_m2/) Data have not been reviewed for accuracy or completeness; disclaimer available (http://www.nrel.gov/disclaimer.html).

97

Development of A-bomb survivor dosimetry  

SciTech Connect

An all important datum in risk assessment is the radiation dose to individual survivors of the bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The first set of dose estimates for survivors was based on a dosimetry system developed in 1957 by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These Tentative 1957 Doses (T57D) were later replaced by a more extensive and refined set of Tentative 1965 Doses (T65D). The T65D system of dose estimation for survivors was also developed at ORNL and served as a basis for risk assessment throughout the 1970s. In the late 1970s, it was suggested that there were serious inadequacies with the T65D system, and these inadequacies were the topic of discussion at two symposia held in 1981. In early 1983, joint US- Japan research programs were established to conduct a thorough review of all aspects of the radiation dosimetry for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb survivors. A number of important contributions to this review were made by ORNL staff members. The review was completed in 1986 and a new Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) was adopted for use. This paper discusses the development of the various systems of A-bomb survivor dosimetry, and the status of the current DS86 system as it is being applied in the medical follow-up studies of the A-bomb survivors and their offspring.

Kerr, G.D.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Using reference frames and the Global Positioning System (GPS) to produce control networks for spatial data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Global Positioning System has enabled researchers to gather spatial data on a scale that was, until recently, cost prohibitive. Projects that cover an area of a few hectares can be included in data sets that cover entire countries. The ease at which point locations can be measured over large distances has highlighted an existing problem with data capture. Data collected using one set of control points may or may not overlay data collected using another. This thesis details a procedure for setting base control points that cover very large areas. Data obtained from the International GPS Service for Geodynamics (IGS) is used in conjunction with the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) to establish control points anywhere in the world. Researchers utilizing these control points for base station locations or as registration points, are able to produce data with an absolute accuracy of 0.3 meter between projects, countries and continents. The problem of overlaying data has been reduced to the point that it is insignificant. Issues of datum and projections, and the use of existing data sets are addressed. Of special interest are the short project times and resulting cost savings over conventional methods. Specific projects in Texas, Azerbaijan, and Mali are presented. The project in Texas is the same size as the project in Azerbaijan, but on different continents. The project in Mali is much larger and has been the most comprehensive, from setting initial control points to training local researchers in data collection.

Naismith, James Mozeney

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Fault-tolerant corrector/detector chip for high-speed data processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An internally fault-tolerant data error detection and correction integrated circuit device and a method of operating same is described. The device functions as a bidirectional data buffer between a 32-bit data processor and the remainder of a data processing system and provides a 32-bit datum with a relatively short eight bits of data-protecting parity. The 32-bits of data by eight bits of parity is partitioned into eight 4-bit nibbles and two 4-bit nibbles, respectively. For data flowing towards the processor the data and parity nibbles are checked in parallel and in a single operation employing a dual orthogonal basis technique. The dual orthogonal basis increase the efficiency of the implementation. Any one of ten (eight data, two parity) nibbles are correctable if erroneous, or two different erroneous nibbles are detectable. For data flowing away from the processor the appropriate parity nibble values are calculated and transmitted to the system along with the data. The device regenerates parity values for data flowing in either direction and compares regenerated to generated parity with a totally self-checking equality checker. As such, the device is self-validating and enabled to both detect and indicate an occurrence of an internal failure. A generalization of the device to protect 64-bit data with 16-bit parity to protect against byte-wide errors is also presented. 8 figures.

Andaleon, D.D.; Napolitano, L.M. Jr.; Redinbo, G.R.; Shreeve, W.O.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Precision grid and hand motion for accurate needle insertion in brachytherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: In prostate brachytherapy, a grid is used to guide a needle tip toward a preplanned location within the tissue. During insertion, the needle deflects en route resulting in target misplacement. In this paper, 18-gauge needle insertion experiments into phantom were performed to test effects of three parameters, which include the clearance between the grid hole and needle, the thickness of the grid, and the needle insertion speed. Measurement apparatus that consisted of two datum surfaces and digital depth gauge was developed to quantify needle deflections. Methods: The gauge repeatability and reproducibility (GR and R) test was performed on the measurement apparatus, and it proved to be capable of measuring a 2 mm tolerance from the target. Replicated experiments were performed on a 2{sup 3} factorial design (three parameters at two levels) and analysis included averages and standard deviation along with an analysis of variance (ANOVA) to find significant single and two-way interaction factors. Results: Results showed that grid with tight clearance hole and slow needle speed increased precision and accuracy of needle insertion. The tight grid was vital to enhance precision and accuracy of needle insertion for both slow and fast insertion speed; additionally, at slow speed the tight, thick grid improved needle precision and accuracy. Conclusions: In summary, the tight grid is important, regardless of speed. The grid design, which shows the capability to reduce the needle deflection in brachytherapy procedures, can potentially be implemented in the brachytherapy procedure.

McGill, Carl S.; Schwartz, Jonathon A.; Moore, Jason Z.; McLaughlin, Patrick W.; Shih, Albert J. [Biomedical Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Biomedical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering Departments, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

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101

Evolution of the pc-scale structure of PKS 1934-638 revisited: first science with the ASKAP and New Zealand telescopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have studied the archetypal Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum radio galaxy, PKS 1934-638, using the Australian Long Baseline Array, augmented with two new telescopes that greatly improve the angular resolution of the array. These VLBI observations represent the first scientific results from a new antenna in NZ and the first antenna of the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP). A compact double radio source, PKS 1934-638, has been monitored over a period of 40 years, and the observation described here provides the latest datum, eight years after the previous observation, to aid in the study of the long-term evolution of the source structure. We take advantage of these new long baselines to probe PKS 1934-638 at the relatively low frequency of 1.4 GHz, in order to examine the effects of optical depth on the structure of the radio source. Optical depth effects, resulting in the observation of frequency dependent structure, may have previously been interpreted in terms of an expansion of the source as a function of time. ...

Tzioumis, A K; Stansby, B; Reynolds, J E; Phillips, C J; Amy, S W; Edwards, P G; Bowen, M A; Leach, M R; Kesteven, M J; Chung, Y; Stevens, J; Forsyth, A R; Gulyaev, S; Natush, T; Macquart, J -P; Reynolds, C; Wayth, R B; Bignall, H E; Hotan, A; Hotan, C; Ellingsen, S; Dickey, J; Blanchard, J; Lovell, J E J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

4. pi. physics. [/sup 40/Ar + KCl, 0. 4 to 1. 8 GeV/A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exclusive ..pi../sup -/ and charged-particle production in collisions of /sup 40/Ar on KCl are studied at incident energies from 0.4 to 1.8 GeV/A. The correlation between the ..pi../sup -/ and the total charged particle multiplicity confines the reaction along a narrow ridge with no exotic islands of pion production. For high multiplicities the system reaches the total disintegration of target and projectile into singly charged fragments and pions. Every 200 MeV/A datum was taken with a central and inelastic trigger. For central collisions the mean ..pi../sup -/ multiplicity increases linearly with the bombarding energy with no marked discontinuities due to the ..delta..(3,3) resonance. At 1.8 GeV/A evidence for nonthermal ..pi../sup -/ production in central collisions is found. The total c.m. energy in ..pi../sup -/ shows linear dependence on the ..pi../sup -/ multiplicity with a slope of epsilon = 300 MeV/..pi../sup -/. Strange particle production in the central collision of 1.8 GeV/A Ar on KCl is seen. 8 figures.

Sandoval, A.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Algebraic zip data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An algebraic zip datum is a tuple $\\CZ := (G,P,Q,\\phi)$ consisting of a reductive group $G$ together with parabolic subgroups $P$ and $Q$ and an isogeny $\\phi\\colon P/R_uP\\to Q/R_uQ$. We study the action of the group $E := \\{(p,q)\\in P{\\times}Q | \\phi(\\pi_{P}(p)) =\\pi_Q(q)\\}$ on $G$ given by $((p,q),g)\\mapsto pgq^{-1}$. We define certain smooth $E$-invariant subvarieties of $G$, show that they define a stratification of $G$. We determine their dimensions and their closures and give a description of the stabilizers of the $E$-action on $G$. We also generalize all results to non-connected groups. We show that for special choices of $\\CZ$ the algebraic quotient stack $[E \\backslash G]$ is isomorphic to $[G \\backslash Z]$ or to $[G \\backslash Z']$, where $Z$ is a $G$-variety studied by Lusztig and He in the theory of character sheaves on spherical compactifications of $G$ and where $Z'$ has been defined by Moonen and the second author in their classification of $F$-zips. In these cases the $E$-invariant subvariet...

Pink, Richard; Ziegler, Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

The Holocene valley fill sequence in south Louisiana: A geological and geotechnical interpretation based on results of two deep cores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Louisiana Geological Survey--US Geological Survey cooperative research program concerning wetland subsidence in Terrebonne and Lafourche Parishes, Louisiana, funded two deep research borings, each of which recovered core of the entire Holocene valley fill. These boreholes, 22 km apart in dip direction, were logged by porosity and resistivity tools and calibrated to cone penetrometer and seismic profiles immediately offsetting them. Major deltaic cycles and ravinement surfaces were recognized in each core by ROCKEVAL pyrolysis, [sup 13]C isotope signatures, shifts of increasing radiocarbon age with depth, shifts of increasing resistivity and density with depth, microfossil analysis, and the presence and type of shell material. Data collected in this project suggest the top of the Pleistocene in this onshore, fluvially-dominated section may not be the top of Substratum sands, but significantly higher in the section, as determined by the strongest positive reflection coefficient below the 10,000 year radiocarbon datum. This satisfies the criterion that this operational boundary be mappable and chronostratigraphic. Additionally, the presence of two growth faults in the northern part of the study area may have acted as sites for preferential thickening of the Holocene. Both reasons stated above profoundly influence the modeling of Holocene thickness and consolidation settlement potential, critical for understanding subsurface controls on wetland loss.

Kuecher, G.J.; Roberts, H.H.; Suhayda, J.H. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)); McGinnis, L.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Report of exploratory trenching for the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three exploratory trenches, totaling about 1,300 ft in length were excavated and logged across the site of a proposed Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF), to assess whether or not active Greenville fault zone, located about 4100 ft to the northeast, pass through or within 200 ft of the site. The layout of the trenches (12-16 ft deep) was designed to provide continuous coverage across the DWTF site and an area within 200 ft northeast and southwest of the site. Deposits exposed in the trench walls are primarily of clay, and are typical of weakly cemented silty sand to sandy silt with the alluvial deposits in the area. Several stream channels were encountered that appear to have an approximated east-west orintation. The channel deposits consist of well-sorted, medium to coarse-grained sand and gravel. A well-developed surface soil is laterally continuous across all three trenches. The soil reportedly formed during late Pleistocene time (about 35,000 to 40,000 yr before present) based on soil stratigraphic analyses. A moderately to well-developed buried soil is laterally continuous in all three trenches, except locally where it has been removed by channelling. This buried soil apparently formed about 100,000 yr before present. At least one older, discontinuous soil is present below the 100,000-yr-old soil in some locations. The age of the older soil is unknown. At several locations, two discontinuous buried soils were observed between the surface soil and the 100,000-yr-old soil. Various overlapping stratigraphic units could be traced across the trenches providing a continuous datum of at least 100,000 yr to assess the presence or absence of faulting. The continuity of stratigraphic units in all the trenches demonstrated that no active faults pass through or within 200 ft of the proposed DWTF site.

Dresen, M.D.; Weiss, R.B.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Search for data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The origins of our current data requirements are threefold: the needs of basic research, the needs of industry, and the needs of government. The data exist, as we shall see, in great quantity. The difficulties lie in finding them when they are wanted and in determining their accuracy once they are found. By far, the most frequently used sources are the standard handbooks, usually covering broad subject areas and many types of data, generally extracted from other published data compilations. The most familiar of these is, of course, the CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics. Recently, a new publication to disseminate data has become available that ameliorates many of these difficulties: the data sheet or data compilation. These may be produced by data centers for profit or as part of the federally supported National Standard Reference Data System of the National Bureau of Standards. The compilations may take the form of loose-leaf sheets, technical reports, journal articles, monographs, or magnetic tapes. The data may be original (measured at the data center under controlled experimental conditions using the finest instrumentation) or extracted from the literature and carefully evaluated. The modern data compilation is the most desirable source of data. Except for those federally subsidized, however, many are almost prohibitively expensive, even for libraries. Furthermore, the particular datum needed may not be easy to find - these sources are not well indexed as a body - or it may simply not be available in such a source. In many instances, the scientist is still forced to turn to the primary or secondary sources.

Arny, L.R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Needs assessment for manufacturing ceramic gas turbine components  

SciTech Connect

An assessment of needs for the manufacturing of ceramic gas turbine components was undertaken to provide a technical basis for planning R&D activities to support DOE`s gas turbine programs. The manufacturing processes for ceramic turbine engine components were examined from design through final inspection and testing. The following technology needs were identified: Concurrent engineering early in the design phase to develop ceramic components that are more readily manufacturable. Additional effort in determining the boundaries of acceptable design dimensions and tolerances through experimental and/or analytical means. Provision, by the designer, of a CAD based model of the component early in the design cycle. Standardization in the way turbine components are dimensioned and toleranced, and in the way component datum features are defined. Rapid means of fabricating hard tooling, including intelligent systems for design of tooling and rapid prototyping of tooling. Determination of process capabilities by manufacturing significant numbers of parts. Development of more robust ceramic manufacturing processes which are tolerant of process variations. Development of intelligent processing as a means of controlling yield and quality of components. Development of computer models of key manufacturing steps, such as green forming to reduce the number of iterations required to manufacture intolerance components. Development of creep feed or other low-damage precision grinding for finish machining of components. Improved means of fixturing components for finish machining. Fewer and lower-cost final inspection requirements. Standard procedures, including consistent terminology and analytical software for dimensional inspection of components. Uniform data requirements from the US turbine engine companies. An agreed-upon system of naming ceramic materials and updating the name when changes have been made.

Johnson, D.R.; McSpadden, S.B.; Morris, T.O.; Pasto, A.E.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Historic Habitat Opportunities and Food-Web Linkages of Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River Estuary and Their Implications for Managing River Flows and Restoring Estuarine Habitat, Physical Sciences Component, Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Long-term changes and fluctuations in river flow, water properties, tides, and sediment transport in the Columbia River and its estuary have had a profound effect on Columbia River salmonids and their habitat. Understanding the river-flow, temperature, tidal, and sediment-supply regimes of the Lower Columbia River (LCR) and how they interact with habitat is, therefore, critical to development of system management and restoration strategies. It is also useful to separate management and climate impacts on hydrologic properties and habitat. This contract, part of a larger project led by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), consists of three work elements, one with five tasks. The first work element relates to reconstruction of historic conditions in a broad sense. The second and third elements consist, respectively, of participation in project-wide integration efforts, and reporting. This report focuses on the five tasks within the historic reconstruction work element. It in part satisfies the reporting requirement, and it forms the basis for our participation in the project integration effort. The first task consists of several topics related to historic changes in river stage and tide. Within this task, the chart datum levels of 14 historic bathymetric surveys completed before definition of Columbia River Datum (CRD) were related to CRD, to enable analysis of these surveys by other project scientists. We have also modeled tidal datums and properties (lower low water or LLW, higher high water or HHW, mean water level or MWL, and greater diurnal tidal range or GDTR) as a function of river flow and tidal range at Astoria. These calculations have been carried for 10 year intervals (1940-date) for 21 stations, though most stations have data for only a few time intervals. Longer-term analyses involve the records at Astoria (1925-date) and Vancouver (1902-date). Water levels for any given river flow have decreased substantially (0.3-1.8 m, depending on river flow and tidal range), and tidal ranges have increased considerably (by a factor of 1.5 to 4 for most river-flow levels) since the 1900-1940 period at most stations, with the largest percentage changes occurring at upriver stations. These changes have been caused by a combination of changes in channel roughness, shape and alignment, changes in coastal tides, and (possibly) bed degradation. Tides are growing throughout the Northeast Pacific, and Astoria (Tongue Pt) has one of the most rapid rates of increase in tidal range in the entire Eastern Pacific, about 0.3m per century. More than half of this change appears to result from changes within the system, the rest from larger scale changes in coastal tides. Regression models of HHW have been used to estimate daily shallow water habitat (SWHA) available in a {approx}25 mile long reach of the system from Eagle Cliff to Kalama for 1925-2004 under four different scenarios (the four possible combinations of diked/undiked and observed flow/ virgin flow). More than 70% of the habitat in this reach has been lost (modern conditions vs. virgin flow with not dikes). In contrast, however, to the reach between Skamokawa and Beaver, selective dike removal (instead of a combination of dike removal and flow restoration) would suffice to increase spring SWHA. The second task consists of reconstruction of the hydrologic cycle before 1878, based on historic documents and inversion of tidal data collected before the onset of the historic flow record in 1878. We have a complete list of freshet times and peak flows for 1858-1877, and scattered freshet information for 1841-1857. Based on tidal data, we have reconstructed the annual flow cycles for 1870 and 1871; other time periods between 1854 and 1867 are under analysis. The three remaining tasks relate to post-1878 hydrologic conditions (flows, sediment supply and water temperature), and separation of the human and climate influences thereon. Estimated ob-served (sometimes routed), adjusted (corrected for reservoir manipulation) and virgin (corrected also for irrigation div

Jay, David A. [Portland State University

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

109

Microsoft Word - S02459_2006Annual GW Rpt.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Baseline Surface Water and Sediment This page intentionally left blank Biomonitoring Data a Sediment Surface Location Date Sampled Se (mg/kg) Se (µg/L) Se b (µg/L) Alkalinity b (mg/L) Conductivity (µmhos/cm) pH (s.u.) Temperature (C) Turbidity (NTU) 10/06/04 3.3 3.7 3 273 1481 8.1 14.5 -- 10/06/04 -- 3.6 2.9 -- -- -- -- -- 04/05/05 1.3 2.9 2.2 170 810 7.92 12.08 38.5 10/11/05 1.9 3 2.8 -- -- -- -- -- 04/19/06 0.56 3.6EJ -- -- -- -- -- -- 10/06/04 3 1.6 1.2 292 1500 7.72 13.3 53.5 04/05/05 0.86 2.8 2.4 171 785 7.99 13.1 37.4 10/11/05 0.51 3.2E 2.8 -- -- -- -- -- 04/19/06 0.55 3.4J -- -- -- -- -- -- 10/06/04 2.2 2 1.6 306 1523 7.72 12.2 50.7 04/05/05 3.4 3 2.5 176 803 8.04 13.92 33.6 10/11/05 4.1 3.1 2.6 -- -- -- -- -- 04/19/06 1.4 3.4J -- -- -- -- -- -- 10/06/04 0.18 2.8 2.3 328 1830 6.6 9.9 1.91 04/05/05 0.14J 4.1 3.8 323 1606 6.84 10.89 1.57 10/11/05 0.033U 0.67 0.75 -- -- -- -- -- 04/19/06 0.13 0.56J

110

Simulation model finned water-air-coil withoutcondensation  

SciTech Connect

A simple simulation model of a finned water-to- air coil without condensation is presented. The model belongs to a collection of simulation models that allows eficient computer simulation of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. The main emphasis of the models is short computation time and use of input data that are known in the design process of an HVAC system. The target of the models is to describe the behavior of HVAC components in the part load operation mode, which is becoming increasingly important for energy efficient HVAC systems. The models are intended to be used for yearly energy calculation or load calculation with time steps of about 10 minutes or larger. Short-time dynamic effects, which are of interest for different aspects of control performance, are neglected. The part load behavior of the coil is expressed in terms of the nominal condition and the dimensionless variation of the heat transfer with change of mass flow and temperature on the water side and the air side. The effectiveness- NTU relations are used to parametrize the convective heat transfer at nominal conditions and to compute the part load conditions. Geometrical data for the coil are not required, The calculation of the convective heat transfer coefficients at nominal conditions is based on the ratio of the air side heat transfer coefficients multiplied by the fin eficiency and divided by the water side heat transfer coefficient. In this approach, the only geometrical information required are the cross section areas, which are needed to calculate the~uid velocities. The formulas for estimating this ratio are presented. For simplicity the model ignores condensation. The model is static and uses only explicit equations. The explicit formulation ensures short computation time and numerical stability. This allows using the model with sophisticated engineering methods such as automatic system optimization. The paper fully outlines the algorithm description and its simplifications. It is not tailored for a particular simulation program to ensure easy implementation in any simulation program.

Wetter, Michael

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Heat Transfer Performance and Piping Strategy Study for Chilled Water Systems at Low Cooling Loads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The temperature differential of chilled water is an important factor used for evaluating the performance of a chilled water system. A low delta-T may increase the pumping energy consumption and increase the chiller energy consumption. The system studied in this thesis is the chilled water system at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW Airport). This system has the problem of low delta-T under low cooling loads. When the chilled water flow is much lower than the design conditions at low cooling loads, it may lead to the laminar flow of the chilled water in the cooling coils. The main objective of this thesis is to explain the heat transfer performance of the cooling coils under low cooling loads. The water side and air side heat transfer coefficients at different water and air flow rates are calculated. The coefficients are used to analyze the heat transfer performance of the cooling coils at conditions ranging from very low loads to design conditions. The effectiveness-number of transfer units (NTU) method is utilized to analyze the cooling coil performance under different flow conditions, which also helps to obtain the cooling coil chilled water temperature differential under full load and partial load conditions. When the water flow rate drops to 1ft/s, laminar flow occurs; this further decreases the heat transfer rate on the water side. However, the cooling coil effectiveness increases with the drop of water flow rate, which compensates for the influence of the heat transfer performance under laminar flow conditions. Consequently, the delta-T in the cooling coil decreases in the transitional flow regime but increases in the laminar flow regime. Results of this thesis show that the laminar flow for the chilled water at low flow rate is not the main cause of the low delta-T syndrome in the chilled water system. Possible causes for the piping strategy of the low delta-T syndrome existing in the chilled water system under low flow conditions are studied in this thesis: (1) use of two way control valves; and (2) improper tertiary pump piping strategy.

Li, Nanxi 1986-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Development of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy instrumentatin for safeguards applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In September 2006, a Technical Meeting on Application of Laser Spectrometry Techniques in IAEA Safeguards was held at IAEA headquarters (HQ). One of the principal recommendations from this meeting was the need to 'pursue the development of novel complementary access instrumentation based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the detection of gaseous and solid signatures and indicators of nuclear fuel cycle processes and associated materials.' Pursuant to this recommendation the Department of Safeguards (SG) under the Division of Technical Support (SGTS) convened the Experts and Users Advisory Meeting on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for Safeguards Applications. This meeting was held at IAEA HQ from July 7-11,2008 and hosted by the Novel Technologies Unit (NTU). The meeting was attended by 12 LIBS experts from the Czech Republic, the European Commission, France, the Republic of Korea, the United States of America, Germany, the United Kingdom of Great Britain, Canada, and Northern Ireland. After a presentation of the needs of the IAEA inspectors, the LIBS experts were in agreement that needs as presented could be partially or fully fulfilled using LIBS instrumentation. The needs of the IAEA inspectors were grouped in the following broad categories: (1) Improvements to in-field measurements/environmental sampling; (2) Monitoring status of activity in a Hot Cell; (3) Verifying status of activity at a declared facility via process monitoring; and (4) Need for pre-screening of environmental samples before analysis. Under the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) Los Alamos National Laboratory is exploring three potential applications of LIBS for international safeguards. As part of this work, we are developing: (1) a user-friendly man-portable LIBS system to characterize samples across a wide range of elements in the periodic table from hydrogen up to heavy elements like plutonium and uranium; (2) a LIBS system that can be deployed in harsh environments such as gloveboxes and hot cells providing relative compositional analysis of process streams for example ratios like Cm/Pu and Cm/U; and (3) an inspector field deployable system that can be used to analyze the elemental composition of microscopic quantities of samples containing plutonium and uranium. In this paper we will describe our current development and performance testing results both in a fixed lab and measurements in field deployable configurations using LIBS instrumentation developed for applications to international safeguards.

Barefield Il, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clegg, Samuel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Le, Loan A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lopez, Leon N [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcp_a2_r10_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcp_a2_r10_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 9:02:39 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports" "Sourcekey","MTTIPP11","MTTIPP1PG1","MTTIP_R10-ME0_1","MTTIPP1AG1","MTTIPP1AO1","MTTIPP1EC1","MTTIP_R10-NIZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NKU_1","MTTIP_R10-NLY_1","MTTIPP1NI1","MTTIP_R10-NQA_1","MTTIPP1SA1","MTTIP_R10-NTC_1","MTTIPP1VE1","MTTIPP1VV1","MTTIP_R10-NAR_1","MTTIP_R10-NAA_1","MTTIP_R10-NAS_1","MTTIP_R10-NAU_1","MTTIP_R10-NAJ_1","MTTIPP1BF1","MTTIP_R10-NBA_1","MTTIP_R10-NBB_1","MTTIP_R10-NBO_1","MTTIP_R10-NBE_1","MTTIPP1BR1","MTTIP_R10-NBX_1","MTTIP_R10-NBU_1","MTTIPP1CM1","MTTIPP1CA1","MTTIP_R10-NCD_1","MTTIP_R10-NCI_1","MTTIP_R10-NCH_1","MTTIPP1CO1","MTTIP_R10-NCF_1","MTTIPP1CG1","MTTIP_R10-NCS_1","MTTIP_R10-NHR_1","MTTIP_R10-NCY_1","MTTIP_R10-NDA_1","MTTIP_R10-NDR_1","MTTIPP1EG1","MTTIP_R10-NES_1","MTTIP_R10-NEK_1","MTTIP_R10-NEN_1","MTTIP_R10-NFI_1","MTTIPP1FR1","MTTIPP1GB1","MTTIP_R10-NGG_1","MTTIPP1BZ1","MTTIP_R10-NGH_1","MTTIP_R10-NGI_1","MTTIP_R10-NGR_1","MTTIP_R10-NGT_1","MTTIP_R10-NGV_1","MTTIP_R10-NHK_1","MTTIP_R10-NHU_1","MTTIP_R10-NIN_1","MTTIP_R10-NID_1","MTTIP_R10-NEI_1","MTTIP_R10-NIS_1","MTTIPP1IT1","MTTIP_R10-NIV_1","MTTIP_R10-NJM_1","MTTIPP1JA1","MTTIP_R10-NKZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NKS_1","MTTIP_R10-NKG_1","MTTIP_R10-NLG_1","MTTIP_R10-NLI_1","MTTIP_R10-NLH_1","MTTIP_R10-NMY_1","MTTIP_R10-NMT_1","MTTIPP1MX1","MTTIP_R10-NMO_1","MTTIP_R10-NWA_1","MTTIPP1NL1","MTTIPP1NA1","MTTIP_R10-NNE_1","MTTIPP1NO1","MTTIP_R10-NMU_1","MTTIP_R10-NPK_1","MTTIP_R10-NPM_1","MTTIP_R10-NPE_1","MTTIP_R10-NRP_1","MTTIP_R10-NPL_1","MTTIP_R10-NPO_1","MTTIPP1RQ1","MTTIP_R10-NRO_1","MTTIP_R10-NRS_1","MTTIP_R10-NSG_1","MTTIP_R10-NSN_1","MTTIP_R10-NSF_1","MTTIPP1SP1","MTTIP_R10-NWZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NSW_1","MTTIP_R10-NSZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NSY_1","MTTIP_R10-NTW_1","MTTIP_R10-NTH_1","MTTIP_R10-NTO_1","MTTIP_R10-NTN_1","MTTIPP1TD1","MTTIP_R10-NTS_1","MTTIP_R10-NTU_1","MTTIP_R10-NTX_1","MTTIP_R10-NUR_1","MTTIPP1UK1","MTTIP_R10-NUY_1","MTTIP_R10-NVM_1","MTTIPP1VQ1","MTTIP_R10-NYE_1"

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" 6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcp_a2_r30_ep00_ip0_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcp_a2_r30_ep00_ip0_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 9:12:12 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports" "Sourcekey","MTTIPP31","MTTIPP3PG1","MTTIP_R30-ME0_1","MTTIPP3AG1","MTTIPP3AO1","MTTIPP3EC1","MTTIP_R30-NIZ_1","MTTIPP3KU1","MTTIP_R30-NLY_1","MTTIPP3NI1","MTTIP_R30-NQA_1","MTTIPP3SA1","MTTIPP3TC1","MTTIPP3VE1","MTTIPP3VV1","MTTIP_R30-NAL_1","MTTIPP3AR1","MTTIP_R30-NAA_1","MTTIPP3AS1","MTTIP_R30-NAU_1","MTTIP_R30-NAJ_1","MTTIP_R30-NBF_1","MTTIP_R30-NBA_1","MTTIP_R30-NBO_1","MTTIPP3BE1","MTTIP_R30-NBH_1","MTTIP_R30-NBN_1","MTTIP_R30-NBL_1","MTTIP_R30-NBR_1","MTTIP_R30-NBX_1","MTTIP_R30-NBU_1","MTTIP_R30-NBM_1","MTTIP_R30-NCM_1","MTTIPP3CA1","MTTIP_R30-NCD_1","MTTIP_R30-NCI_1","MTTIP_R30-NCH_1","MTTIPP3CO1","MTTIPP3CF1","MTTIPP3CG1","MTTIP_R30-NCW_1","MTTIP_R30-NCS_1","MTTIP_R30-NHR_1","MTTIP_R30-NCY_1","MTTIP_R30-NCZ_1","MTTIP_R30-NDA_1","MTTIPP3EG1","MTTIP_R30-NES_1","MTTIP_R30-NEK_1","MTTIP_R30-NEN_1","MTTIP_R30-NFI_1","MTTIPP3FR1","MTTIPP3GB1","MTTIP_R30-NGG_1","MTTIP_R30-NGM_1","MTTIP_R30-NGH_1","MTTIP_R30-NGR_1","MTTIP_R30-NGT_1","MTTIP_R30-NGV_1","MTTIP_R30-NHU_1","MTTIP_R30-NIN_1","MTTIPP3ID1","MTTIP_R30-NEI_1","MTTIP_R30-NIS_1","MTTIPP3IT1","MTTIP_R30-NIV_1","MTTIP_R30-NJM_1","MTTIP_R30-NJA_1","MTTIP_R30-NKZ_1","MTTIPP3KS1","MTTIP_R30-NKG_1","MTTIP_R30-NLG_1","MTTIP_R30-NLI_1","MTTIP_R30-NLH_1","MTTIP_R30-NMY_1","MTTIP_R30-NMT_1","MTTIP_R30-NMR_1","MTTIPP3MX1","MTTIP_R30-NMQ_1","MTTIP_R30-NMO_1","MTTIP_R30-NNL_1","MTTIPP3NA1","MTTIP_R30-NNZ_1","MTTIPP3NO1","MTTIP_R30-NMU_1","MTTIP_R30-NPK_1","MTTIP_R30-NPM_1","MTTIP_R30-NPP_1","MTTIP_R30-NPE_1","MTTIP_R30-NRP_1","MTTIP_R30-NPL_1","MTTIP_R30-NPO_1","MTTIP_R30-NPZ_1","MTTIP_R30-NRO_1","MTTIP_R30-NRS_1","MTTIP_R30-NSN_1","MTTIP_R30-NSK_1","MTTIP_R30-NSF_1","MTTIPP3SP1","MTTIPP3SW1","MTTIP_R30-NSZ_1","MTTIPP3SY1","MTTIP_R30-NTW_1","MTTIPP3TH1","MTTIP_R30-NTO_1","MTTIPP3TD1","MTTIP_R30-NTS_1","MTTIP_R30-NTU_1","MTTIP_R30-NTX_1","MTTIP_R30-NUR_1","MTTIPP3UK1","MTTIP_R30-NUY_1","MTTIP_R30-NUZ_1","MTTIP_R30-NVM_1","MTTIPP3VQ1","MTTIPP3YE1"

115

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcp_a2_r10_ep00_ip0_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcp_a2_r10_ep00_ip0_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 9:03:09 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports" "Sourcekey","MTTIPP11","MTTIPP1PG1","MTTIP_R10-ME0_1","MTTIPP1AG1","MTTIPP1AO1","MTTIPP1EC1","MTTIP_R10-NIZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NKU_1","MTTIP_R10-NLY_1","MTTIPP1NI1","MTTIP_R10-NQA_1","MTTIPP1SA1","MTTIP_R10-NTC_1","MTTIPP1VE1","MTTIPP1VV1","MTTIP_R10-NAR_1","MTTIP_R10-NAA_1","MTTIP_R10-NAS_1","MTTIP_R10-NAU_1","MTTIP_R10-NAJ_1","MTTIPP1BF1","MTTIP_R10-NBA_1","MTTIP_R10-NBB_1","MTTIP_R10-NBO_1","MTTIP_R10-NBE_1","MTTIPP1BR1","MTTIP_R10-NBX_1","MTTIP_R10-NBU_1","MTTIPP1CM1","MTTIPP1CA1","MTTIP_R10-NCD_1","MTTIP_R10-NCI_1","MTTIP_R10-NCH_1","MTTIPP1CO1","MTTIP_R10-NCF_1","MTTIPP1CG1","MTTIP_R10-NCS_1","MTTIP_R10-NHR_1","MTTIP_R10-NCY_1","MTTIP_R10-NDA_1","MTTIP_R10-NDR_1","MTTIPP1EG1","MTTIP_R10-NES_1","MTTIP_R10-NEK_1","MTTIP_R10-NEN_1","MTTIP_R10-NFI_1","MTTIPP1FR1","MTTIPP1GB1","MTTIP_R10-NGG_1","MTTIPP1BZ1","MTTIP_R10-NGH_1","MTTIP_R10-NGI_1","MTTIP_R10-NGR_1","MTTIP_R10-NGT_1","MTTIP_R10-NGV_1","MTTIP_R10-NHK_1","MTTIP_R10-NHU_1","MTTIP_R10-NIN_1","MTTIP_R10-NID_1","MTTIP_R10-NEI_1","MTTIP_R10-NIS_1","MTTIPP1IT1","MTTIP_R10-NIV_1","MTTIP_R10-NJM_1","MTTIPP1JA1","MTTIP_R10-NKZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NKS_1","MTTIP_R10-NKG_1","MTTIP_R10-NLG_1","MTTIP_R10-NLI_1","MTTIP_R10-NLH_1","MTTIP_R10-NMY_1","MTTIP_R10-NMT_1","MTTIP_R10-NMR_1","MTTIPP1MX1","MTTIP_R10-NMO_1","MTTIP_R10-NWA_1","MTTIPP1NL1","MTTIPP1NA1","MTTIP_R10-NNE_1","MTTIPP1NO1","MTTIP_R10-NMU_1","MTTIP_R10-NPK_1","MTTIP_R10-NPM_1","MTTIP_R10-NPE_1","MTTIP_R10-NRP_1","MTTIP_R10-NPL_1","MTTIP_R10-NPO_1","MTTIPP1RQ1","MTTIP_R10-NRO_1","MTTIP_R10-NRS_1","MTTIP_R10-NSG_1","MTTIP_R10-NSN_1","MTTIP_R10-NSF_1","MTTIPP1SP1","MTTIP_R10-NWZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NSW_1","MTTIP_R10-NSZ_1","MTTIP_R10-NSY_1","MTTIP_R10-NTW_1","MTTIP_R10-NTH_1","MTTIP_R10-NTO_1","MTTIPP1TD1","MTTIP_R10-NTS_1","MTTIP_R10-NTU_1","MTTIP_R10-NTX_1","MTTIP_R10-NUR_1","MTTIPP1UK1","MTTIP_R10-NUY_1","MTTIP_R10-NVM_1","MTTIPP1VQ1","MTTIP_R10-NYE_1"

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Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

98,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" 98,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcp_a2_r50_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcp_a2_r50_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 9:20:29 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Coast (PADD 5) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports" "Sourcekey","MTTIPP51","MTTIPP5PG1","MTTIP_R50-ME0_1","MTTIP_R50-NAG_1","MTTIP_R50-NAO_1","MTTIPP5EC1","MTTIP_R50-NIZ_1","MTTIP_R50-NKU_1","MTTIP_R50-NLY_1","MTTIP_R50-NNI_1","MTTIP_R50-NQA_1","MTTIPP5SA1","MTTIP_R50-NTC_1","MTTIPP5VE1","MTTIPP5VV1","MTTIPP5AR1","MTTIP_R50-NAA_1","MTTIPP5AS1","MTTIP_R50-NAJ_1","MTTIP_R50-NBF_1","MTTIP_R50-NBA_1","MTTIP_R50-NBO_1","MTTIP_R50-NBE_1","MTTIP_R50-NBN_1","MTTIP_R50-NBL_1","MTTIP_R50-NBR_1","MTTIP_R50-NBX_1","MTTIP_R50-NCM_1","MTTIPP5CA1","MTTIP_R50-NCD_1","MTTIP_R50-NCI_1","MTTIPP5CH1","MTTIPP5CO1","MTTIPP5CF1","MTTIP_R50-NCG_1","MTTIP_R50-NCS_1","MTTIP_R50-NHR_1","MTTIP_R50-NDA_1","MTTIP_R50-NDR_1","MTTIP_R50-NEG_1","MTTIP_R50-NES_1","MTTIP_R50-NEK_1","MTTIP_R50-NEN_1","MTTIP_R50-NFI_1","MTTIP_R50-NFR_1","MTTIP_R50-NGB_1","MTTIP_R50-NGM_1","MTTIP_R50-NGR_1","MTTIP_R50-NGT_1","MTTIP_R50-NGV_1","MTTIP_R50-NHK_1","MTTIP_R50-NHU_1","MTTIP_R50-NIN_1","MTTIPP5ID1","MTTIP_R50-NIS_1","MTTIP_R50-NIT_1","MTTIP_R50-NIV_1","MTTIP_R50-NJM_1","MTTIP_R50-NJA_1","MTTIP_R50-NKZ_1","MTTIP_R50-NKS_1","MTTIP_R50-NLH_1","MTTIP_R50-NMY_1","MTTIP_R50-NMT_1","MTTIPP5MX1","MTTIP_R50-NMO_1","MTTIP_R50-NNL_1","MTTIP_R50-NNA_1","MTTIP_R50-NNZ_1","MTTIP_R50-NNU_1","MTTIP_R50-NNO_1","MTTIP_R50-NMU_1","MTTIP_R50-NPM_1","MTTIP_R50-NPP_1","MTTIPP5PE1","MTTIP_R50-NRP_1","MTTIP_R50-NPL_1","MTTIP_R50-NPO_1","MTTIP_R50-NRO_1","MTTIP_R50-NRS_1","MTTIPP5SN1","MTTIP_R50-NSF_1","MTTIP_R50-NSP_1","MTTIP_R50-NPG_1","MTTIP_R50-NSW_1","MTTIP_R50-NSY_1","MTTIP_R50-NTW_1","MTTIP_R50-NTH_1","MTTIP_R50-NTD_1","MTTIP_R50-NTS_1","MTTIP_R50-NTU_1","MTTIP_R50-NTX_1","MTTIP_R50-NUR_1","MTTIPP5UK1","MTTIP_R50-NUY_1","MTTIP_R50-NVM_1","MTTIPP5VQ1","MTTIP_R50-NYE_1"

117

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" 7,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_impcp_a2_r30_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_impcp_a2_r30_ep00_ip0_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 9:11:43 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports" "Sourcekey","MTTIPP31","MTTIPP3PG1","MTTIP_R30-ME0_1","MTTIPP3AG1","MTTIPP3AO1","MTTIPP3EC1","MTTIP_R30-NIZ_1","MTTIPP3KU1","MTTIP_R30-NLY_1","MTTIPP3NI1","MTTIP_R30-NQA_1","MTTIPP3SA1","MTTIPP3TC1","MTTIPP3VE1","MTTIPP3VV1","MTTIP_R30-NAL_1","MTTIPP3AR1","MTTIP_R30-NAA_1","MTTIPP3AS1","MTTIP_R30-NAU_1","MTTIP_R30-NAJ_1","MTTIP_R30-NBF_1","MTTIP_R30-NBA_1","MTTIP_R30-NBO_1","MTTIPP3BE1","MTTIP_R30-NBH_1","MTTIP_R30-NBN_1","MTTIP_R30-NBL_1","MTTIP_R30-NBR_1","MTTIP_R30-NBX_1","MTTIP_R30-NBU_1","MTTIP_R30-NBM_1","MTTIP_R30-NCM_1","MTTIPP3CA1","MTTIP_R30-NCD_1","MTTIP_R30-NCI_1","MTTIP_R30-NCH_1","MTTIPP3CO1","MTTIPP3CF1","MTTIPP3CG1","MTTIP_R30-NCW_1","MTTIP_R30-NCS_1","MTTIP_R30-NHR_1","MTTIP_R30-NCY_1","MTTIP_R30-NCZ_1","MTTIP_R30-NDA_1","MTTIPP3EG1","MTTIP_R30-NES_1","MTTIP_R30-NEK_1","MTTIP_R30-NEN_1","MTTIP_R30-NFI_1","MTTIPP3FR1","MTTIPP3GB1","MTTIP_R30-NGG_1","MTTIP_R30-NGM_1","MTTIP_R30-NGH_1","MTTIP_R30-NGR_1","MTTIP_R30-NGT_1","MTTIP_R30-NGV_1","MTTIP_R30-NHU_1","MTTIP_R30-NIN_1","MTTIPP3ID1","MTTIP_R30-NEI_1","MTTIP_R30-NIS_1","MTTIPP3IT1","MTTIP_R30-NIV_1","MTTIP_R30-NJM_1","MTTIP_R30-NJA_1","MTTIP_R30-NKZ_1","MTTIPP3KS1","MTTIP_R30-NKG_1","MTTIP_R30-NLG_1","MTTIP_R30-NLI_1","MTTIP_R30-NLH_1","MTTIP_R30-NMY_1","MTTIP_R30-NMT_1","MTTIP_R30-NMR_1","MTTIPP3MX1","MTTIP_R30-NMQ_1","MTTIP_R30-NMO_1","MTTIP_R30-NNL_1","MTTIPP3NA1","MTTIP_R30-NNZ_1","MTTIPP3NO1","MTTIP_R30-NMU_1","MTTIP_R30-NPK_1","MTTIP_R30-NPM_1","MTTIP_R30-NPP_1","MTTIP_R30-NPE_1","MTTIP_R30-NRP_1","MTTIP_R30-NPL_1","MTTIP_R30-NPO_1","MTTIP_R30-NPZ_1","MTTIP_R30-NRO_1","MTTIP_R30-NRS_1","MTTIP_R30-NSN_1","MTTIP_R30-NSK_1","MTTIP_R30-NSF_1","MTTIPP3SP1","MTTIPP3SW1","MTTIP_R30-NSZ_1","MTTIPP3SY1","MTTIP_R30-NTW_1","MTTIPP3TH1","MTTIP_R30-NTO_1","MTTIP_R30-NTN_1","MTTIPP3TD1","MTTIP_R30-NTS_1","MTTIP_R30-NTU_1","MTTIP_R30-NTX_1","MTTIP_R30-NUR_1","MTTIPP3UK1","MTTIP_R30-NUY_1","MTTIP_R30-NUZ_1","MTTIP_R30-NVM_1","MTTIPP3VQ1","MTTIPP3YE1"

118

Roles of nanoclusters in shear banding and plastic deformation of bulk metallic glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the course of this research we published 33 papers in various physics/material journals. We select four representing papers in this report and their results are summarized as follows. I. To study shear banding process, it is pertinent to know the intrinsic shear strain rate within a propagating shear band. To this aim, we used nanoindentation technique to probe the mechanical response of a Au49Ag5.5Pd2.3Cu26.9Si16.3 bulk metallic glass in locality and found notable pop-in events associated with shear band emission. Using a free volume model and under the situation when temperature and stress/hardness are fixed result in an equation, which predicts that hardness serration caused by pop-in decreases exponentially with the strain rate. Our data are in good agreement with the prediction. The result also predicts that, when strain rate is higher than a critical strain rate of 1700 s^-1, there will be no hardness serration, thereby no pop-in. In other words, multiple shear bandings will take place and material will flow homogeneously. The critical strain rate of 1700 s^-1 can be treated as the intrinsic strain rate within a shear band. We subsequently carried out a simulation study and showed that, if the imposed strain rate was over , the shear band spacing would become so small that the entire sample would virtually behave like one major shear band. Using the datum strain rate =1700 s^-1 and based on a shear band nucleation model proposed by us, the size of a shear-band nucleus in Au-BMG was estimated to be 3 ���� 10^6 atoms, or a sphere of ~30 nm in diameter. II. Inspired by the peculiar result published in a Science article �¢����Super Plastic Bulk Metallic Glasses at Room Temperature�¢���, we synthesized the Zr-based bulk metallic glass with a composition identical to that in the paper (Zr64.13Cu15.75Ni10.12Al10) and, subsequently, tested in compression at the same slow strain rate (~10^-4 s^-1). We found that the dominant deformation mode is always single shear. The stress-strain curve exhibited serrated pattern in the plastic region, which conventionally has been attributed to individual shear band propagation. The scanning electron micrographs taken from the deformed sample surface revealed regularly spaced striations. Analysis indicates that the observed stress-strain serrations are intimately related to the striations on the shear surface, suggesting the serrations were actually caused slip-and-stick shear along the principal shear plane. We further use video camera to conduct in situ compression experiments to unambiguously confirm the one-to-one temporal and spatial correspondence between the intermittent sliding and flow serration. This preferential shear band formation along the principal shear plane is, in fact, a natural consequence of Mode II crack, independent of strain softening or hardening, usually claimed in the literature. III. Flow serration in compression of metallic glasses is caused by the formation and propagation of localized shear bands. These shear bands propagate at an extremely high speed, so high that a load cell and load frame were unable to capture the details of the dynamic event. To subdue this problem, we conducted uniaxial compression on Zr64.13Cu15.75Ni10.12Al10 bulk metallic glass using a high-speed camera to capture the sample image and also high-sensitivity strain gauges attached to the test samples to directly measure the strain. The displacement-time curves obtained from the test and a magnified version of the displacement burst reveals clearly a three-step (acceleration, steady-state, and deceleration) process during shear band propagation. The fastest propagating speed occurring at the steady state is calculated as 8����10^2 ���µm/s. This speed is about 1,000 times faster than the crosshead speed. This explains the gradual disappearance of flow serration at higher strain rates previously reported during compression of

Nieh, T.G.

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

Roles of nanoclusters in shear banding and plastic deformation of bulk metallic glasses  

SciTech Connect

During the course of this research we published 33 papers in various physics/material journals. We select four representing papers in this report and their results are summarized as follows. I. To study shear banding process, it is pertinent to know the intrinsic shear strain rate within a propagating shear band. To this aim, we used nanoindentation technique to probe the mechanical response of a Au49Ag5.5Pd2.3Cu26.9Si16.3 bulk metallic glass in locality and found notable pop-in events associated with shear band emission. Using a free volume model and under the situation when temperature and stress/hardness are fixed result in an equation, which predicts that hardness serration caused by pop-in decreases exponentially with the strain rate. Our data are in good agreement with the prediction. The result also predicts that, when strain rate is higher than a critical strain rate of 1700 s^-1, there will be no hardness serration, thereby no pop-in. In other words, multiple shear bandings will take place and material will flow homogeneously. The critical strain rate of 1700 s^-1 can be treated as the intrinsic strain rate within a shear band. We subsequently carried out a simulation study and showed that, if the imposed strain rate was over , the shear band spacing would become so small that the entire sample would virtually behave like one major shear band. Using the datum strain rate =1700 s^-1 and based on a shear band nucleation model proposed by us, the size of a shear-band nucleus in Au-BMG was estimated to be 3 ���� 10^6 atoms, or a sphere of ~30 nm in diameter. II. Inspired by the peculiar result published in a Science article �¢����Super Plastic Bulk Metallic Glasses at Room Temperature�¢���, we synthesized the Zr-based bulk metallic glass with a composition identical to that in the paper (Zr64.13Cu15.75Ni10.12Al10) and, subsequently, tested in compression at the same slow strain rate (~10^-4 s^-1). We found that the dominant deformation mode is always single shear. The stress-strain curve exhibited serrated pattern in the plastic region, which conventionally has been attributed to individual shear band propagation. The scanning electron micrographs taken from the deformed sample surface revealed regularly spaced striations. Analysis indicates that the observed stress-strain serrations are intimately related to the striations on the shear surface, suggesting the serrations were actually caused slip-and-stick shear along the principal shear plane. We further use video camera to conduct in situ compression experiments to unambiguously confirm the one-to-one temporal and spatial correspondence between the intermittent sliding and flow serration. This preferential shear band formation along the principal shear plane is, in fact, a natural consequence of Mode II crack, independent of strain softening or hardening, usually claimed in the literature. III. Flow serration in compression of metallic glasses is caused by the formation and propagation of localized shear bands. These shear bands propagate at an extremely high speed, so high that a load cell and load frame were unable to capture the details of the dynamic event. To subdue this problem, we conducted uniaxial compression on Zr64.13Cu15.75Ni10.12Al10 bulk metallic glass using a high-speed camera to capture the sample image and also high-sensitivity strain gauges attached to the test samples to directly measure the strain. The displacement-time curves obtained from the test and a magnified version of the displacement burst reveals clearly a three-step (acceleration, steady-state, and deceleration) process during shear band propagation. The fastest propagating speed occurring at the steady state is calculated as 8����10^2 ���µm/s. This speed is about 1,000 times faster than the crosshead speed. This explains the gradual disappearance of flow serration at higher strain rates previously reported during compression of

Nieh, T.G.

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS IN THE STANDARD ATOMIC WEIGHTS TABLE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the 1949 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, a series of new elements were added to the Atomic Weights Table. Since these elements had been produced in the laboratory and were not discovered in nature, the atomic weight value of these artificial products would depend upon the production method. Since atomic weight is a property of an element as it occurs in nature, it would be incorrect to assign an atomic weight value to that element. As a result of that discussion, the Commission decided to provide only the mass number of the most stable (or longest-lived) known isotope as the number to be associated with these entries in the Atomic Weights Table. As a function of time, the mass number associated with various elements has changed as longer-lived isotopes of a particular element has been found in nature, or as improved half-life values of an element's isotopes might cause a shift in the longest-lived isotope from one mass to another. In the 1957 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, it was decided to discontinue the listing of the mass number in the Atomic Weights Table on the grounds that the kind of information supplied by the mass number is inconsistent with the primary purpose of the Table, i.e., to provide accurate values of 'these constants' for use in various chemical calculations. In addition to the Table of Atomic Weights, the Commission included an auxiliary Table of Radioactive Elements for the first time, where the entry would be the isotope of that element which was the most stable, i.e., the one with the longest known half-life. In their 1973 Report, the Commission noted that the users of the main Table of Atomic Weights were dissatisfied with the omission of values for some elements in that Table and it was decided to reintroduce the mass number for the radioactive elements into the main Table. In their 1983 Report, the Commission decided that radioactive elements were considered to lack a characteristic terrestrial isotopic composition, from which an atomic weight value could be calculated to five or more figure accuracy, without prior knowledge of the sample involved. These elements were again listed in the Atomic Weights Table with no further information, i.e., with no mass number or atomic weight value. For the elements, which have no stable characteristic terrestrial isotopic composition, the data on the half-lives and the relative atomic masses for the nuclides of interest for those elements have been evaluated. The values of the half-lives with their uncertainties are listed in the table. The uncertainties are given for the last digit quoted of the half-life and are given in parentheses. A half-life entry for the Table having a value and an uncertainty of 7 {+-} 3 is listed in the half-life column as 7 (3). The criteria to include data in this Table, is to be the same as it has been for over sixty years. It is the same criteria, which are used for all data that are evaluated for inclusion in the Standard Table of Atomic Weights. If a report of data is published in a peer-reviewed journal, that data is evaluated and considered for inclusion in the appropriate table of the biennial report of the Atomic Weights Commission. As better data becomes available in the future, the information that is contained in either of the Tables of Standard Atomic Weights or in the Table of Radioactive Elements may be modified. It should be noted that the appearance of any datum in the Table of the Radioactive Elements is merely for the purposes of calculating an atomic mass value for any sample of a radioactive material, which might have a variety of isotopic compositions and it has no implication as to the priority for claiming discovery of a given element and is not intended to. The atomic mass values have been taken primarily from the 2003 Atomic Mass Table. Mass values for those radioisotopes that do not appear in the 2003 Atomic mass Table have been taken from preliminary data of the Atomic Mass Data Center. Most of the quoted half-lives.

Holden, N.E.; Holden, N.; Holden,N.E.

2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z