Sample records for datum ntu nephelometric

  1. Microsoft Word - 2902ntu.dot

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    902-NTU (10-2004) Supersedes (6-2000) issue SNL COMPUTER BANNER Banner for all SNL Computing SF 2902-NTU (10-2004) WARNING NOTICE TO USERS This is a Federal computer system and is...

  2. English Literature Resources of NTU Library National Taiwan University Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    English Literature Resources of NTU Library National Taiwan University Library #12;MLA Inter- national Bibliography Literature Online, Early English Books Online Naxos Spoken Word Library19 7 14 15 Naxos Spoken Word Library Literature Online Literature Resource Center Shakespeare

  3. Wen-Hann Sheu Professor of Dept. of Engineering Science and Ocean Engineering, NTU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Su-Yun

    Wen-Hann Sheu Position Professor of Dept. of Engineering Science and Ocean Engineering, NTU Research Fields Scientific computing for science and engineering problems Research Interests Ā· Explore

  4. Nonlinear analysis of the three-dimensional datum transformation [conformal group C7(3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuttgart, Universität

    of the stochasticity of both systems involved in the seven-datum transformation problem [conformal group C7š3Ž algorithm to solve the seven-datum trans- formation problem [conformal group C7š3Ž] taking algorithm to solve the seven-datum transformation problem [con- formal group C7š3Ž] is presented in the work

  5. NTU Carbon Management Statement 2010 Nottingham Trent University fully supports government and HEFCE climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    NTU Carbon Management Statement 2010 Nottingham Trent University fully supports government the following absolute carbon reduction target aligned to higher education sector target: · At least a 48% reduction in scope 1 and 2 carbon emissions from 2005/6 to 2020/21 NTU is currently completing actions from

  6. NTU Wakeboarding Handbook 2013 -14 www.facebook.com/groups/trentwakeboard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    NTU Wakeboarding Handbook 2013 - 14 www.facebook.com/groups/trentwakeboard www and let off some steam. Even if you only come to training sessions and you've never been riding, everyone

  7. NTU Library User's Guide w w w . l i b . n t u . e d u . t w

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    My L ve Affairwith Library NTU Library User's Guide #12;w w w . l i b . n t u . e d u . t w NTU Library always welcomes you #12;C Get to know your library To be an information-seeking pro How to find to listen to music, watch movies... All your libraries Main Campus College of Law and Social Sciences

  8. w w w . l i b . n t u . e d u . t w NTU Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    #12;w w w . l i b . n t u . e d u . t w NTU Library always welcomes you #12;Get to know your library To be an information-seeking pro A wonderful place to stay I want to read books... I want to listen to music, watch movies... All your libraries Main Campus College of Law and Social Sciences

  9. environment.team@ntu.ac.uk Reviewed and updated March 2014 NOTTINGHAM TRENT UNIVERSITY: ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    : ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY As one of the UK's largest Universities, encompassing three campuses, 26,000 students for the above to be achieved. NTU's Environmental Policy is fully supported by the Senior Management Team their acceptance of the Environmental Policy, are key to its success. As such, this will provide an ongoing focus

  10. NOAA Technical Memorandum OAR PMEL-122 Tidal Datum Distributions in Puget Sound,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum OAR PMEL-122 Tidal Datum Distributions in Puget Sound, Washington, Based . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3. Puget Sound Channel Tide Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3.1 Description of the channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 9. Appendix: Tidal harmonic constants in Puget Sound . . . 30 10. References

  11. NTU Health Exam Requirement for Incoming Exchange / Visiting Students In order to understand the general health condition of coming students, and to meet the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    .ntu.edu.tw/oia/index.php/doc/view/sn/209/block/85/lang/en and bring it to the hospital. The required items are included in the "NTU: Abdomen: Heart: Oral Cavity: Others: Muscles/Bones/Joints: Visual Acuity: Uncorrected R L

  12. 1 Journey to Lean 2 NTU community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Water 44 Recycling 45 Gym 46 Battery Recycling Bin 47 Library 48 Monitoring System 49 Emergency 55 Plaza :_ #12; 56 Alert Facilities 57 Please Keep Quiet 58 Please Recycle 59 Aluminum 60

  13. Microsoft Word - 2902ntu.dot

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your HomeOverviewCleanupShipping Form3 A LCF U

  14. ICSICSICSICS http://cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw/~thlin/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, Shih-Hao

    (duplexer; RF passive device)· SWr GMD44 (duplexer; RF passive device) · Invensense MPU3050 MPU3050 Triple software ICS 15 #12;ICSICS IC d ig h IC design house Start-up company Design service company FoundryFoundry System house ... Pain is inevitable; suffering is optional. 16 #12;

  15. Seminar zu Verzweigungsprozessen Datum Vortragender/Thema Literatur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alsmeyer, Gerold

    .html) [A/N] Athreya, K.B. und Ney, P. Branching Processes, Springer, New York (1972) [L/P] R. Lyons/Y] NEU: GW-Bäume und GW-Bäume mit Rückgrat 11.11.08 Diana Kern/Tatjana Kern S. 318-324 in [L/P] 18.11.08 Satz von Kesten-Stigum (alte V. S.315-321) 25.11.08 Sönke Schnurr S. 325-326 in [L/P] Wie schnell fällt

  16. MINIMUM PROBLEMS ON SBV WITH IRREGULAR BOUNDARY DATUM Pietro Celada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Celada, Pietro

    Matematiche Universit`a degli Studi di Trieste P.le Europa 1, 34100 Trieste, Italy e-mail: celada@univ.trieste

  17. IAM Bibliothek Datum: 09.03.04 Neubrckstrasse 10 Urheberliste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jäger, Gerhard

    International Symposium on Industrial Robots and Robots 7 Conference Proceedings Applications Worldwide, Vol. 2 1983 25.27.3/II 2458 -- 13th International Symposium on Industrial Robots and Robots 7 Conference

  18. THE WORDS OF OMEGASTHE WORDS OF OMEGAS http://http://www.math.ntu.edu.tw/~shiehnrwww.math.ntu.edu.tw/~shiehnr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Su-Yun

    :19)28:19) #12;left: Fortuna( a goddess), right: anleft: Fortuna( a goddess), right: an astragalusastragalus

  19. Reviewed and updated March 2013 NTU Sustainable Construction and Refurbishment Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    to energy efficiency and costs in use. Achieve British Research Establishment Environmental Assessment government targets, for example zero carbon new build non domestic buildings by 2019 and at least 80% carbon

  20. Sustainable Food Policy Nottingham Trent University (NTU) recognises that food production and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    where possible, o Minimise waste and pollution through effective recycling and waste disposal systems, o assured meat and poultry; · We only use organic eggs and milk in freshly prepared meals and beverages Monitor, record and take the necessary action with regard to plate waste. Reviewed and updated: February

  1. Chien-Cheng Chang Professor, Institute of Applied Mechanics and Department of Math., NTU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Su-Yun

    Energy, Solar Energy, Lithium BatteryĀ­vibration and fluid me- chanics of wind turbines, solar panel)Ā­ mechanics, heat transfer of microstructures (theory, computation and experiments) Ā· Energy Research in Wind

  2. NTU Singapore visit 27/28 February 2012 Workshop, Monday 27 February, Pfizer Lecture Theatre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alavi, Ali

    :45-6:05 Dominic Wright Inorganic Synthesis: from Molecules and Molecular Catalysis to Nanotechnology 6 Materials Chemistry of Batteries and Fuel Cells 1:50-2:10 Soo-Ying Lee Femtosecond stimulated Raman Diversity Oriented Synthesis 3:35-3:55 Rod Bates Synthesis of Heterocyclic Natural Products 4:00-4:10 Chris

  3. Departement Anestesiologie en Kritieke Sorg Jaarprogram en nuttige datums vir 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geldenhuys, Jaco

    Anesthesia and Analgesia P Marwick British Journal of Anesthesia D Muller Canadian Journal of Anesthesia Marais Current Opinion Anaesthesiology A Rocher Pyn joernale L Firfirary J Cardioth Vasc Anesthesia.o.v. senuwee blokke F Retief Anaesthesia D Muller Anesthesia and Intensive Care W Schwabe Algemene opmerkings

  4. Departement Anestesiologie en Kritieke Sorg Jaarprogram en nuttige datums vir 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geldenhuys, Jaco

    program vlot verloop. Joernaal verantwoordelikheid. Anesthesiology T Louw Anesthesia and Analgesia P le Roux British Journal of Anesthesia P Marwick Canadian Journal of Anesthesia D Muller European Journal Anaesthesia K de la Porte Anesthesia and Intensive Care E Campbell Algemene opmerking. Die program is so

  5. Vortrge im Sommersemester 2012 im SFB Datum Referent(in) Herkunft Thema Ort Videobertragung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madlener, Klaus

    Kohlenhydrat- Karlsruhe liganden 22.05.2012 Prof. Dr. Klaus MĆ¼llen MPI fĆ¼r Polymerforschung Mainz Ist die-couplings 19.06.2012 Jun.Prof. Dr. M. Bauer TU Kaiserslautern Chemie und Synchrotronstrahlung: Von den

  6. Informatica Propedeuse Voorjaar 2013-2014 week Datum Ma Di Wo Do Vr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmerich, Michael

    /304,306/308 Bjr2 = bijeenkomst over jaar 2, aanvang 10.30 u. (B02) Db Databases Dr. M. Emmerich B02 Studsem (2e jr): 1e jrs zijn welkom wDb Werkgr. Databases Dr. M. Emmerich 302/304,306/308 Pointer workshop Leidsche Dr. M.M. Bonsangue B02, B02/B03 Studsem Studentenseminarium Dr. M. Emmerich/Dr. T. Stefanov 174 w

  7. Informatica en Wiskunde, Propedeuse, Voorjaar 2013-2014 week Datum Ma Di Wo Do Vr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmerich, Michael

    .30 u. Db/wDb Databases Dr. M. Emmerich B02 Pointer workshop, Leidsche Flesch wDb Werkgroep Databases Dr. M. Emmerich 302/304,306/308 IKR Inleiding Kansrekening Dr. M.O. Heydenreich Studsem (2e jr): 1e jrs zijn welkom Lo/wLo Logica Dr. M.M. Bonsangue B02, B02/B03 Studsem Studentenseminarium Dr. M. Emmerich

  8. Towards Long-Term Mobility Tracking in NTU Hospital's Elder Care Center Chun-Chieh Hsiao1, 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Polly

    to automatically track elders' activities can be classified into two categories: non-intrusive and intrusive. For the non- intrusive methods, the devices to acquire daily activities are deployed in the environment], technologies of laser range finder and infrared are respectively utilized to allow non- intrusive tracking

  9. Universitt des Saarlandes Wintersemester 2009/2010 Datum: 31.08.2009 Grenzwerte fr nichteinbezogene 1. Nachrckverfahren Seite: 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayberry, Marty

    (Kernbereich) 3,0 / 02 teilweise 02 / 3,3 Bioinformatik / BA (Kernbereich) Alle Anträge zugelassen Biologie,0 / 02 Dienst=JA 03 / 2,8 Dienst=JA Germanistik / BA (Hauptfach) Alle Anträge zugelassen Historisch orientierte Kulturw. / BA Alle Anträge zugelassen Psychologie / BA (Kernbereich) 1,8 / 02 Dienst

  10. Universitt des Saarlandes Wintersemester 2009/2010 Datum: 03.08.2009 Grenzwerte fr nichteinbezogene Hauptverfahren Seite: 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayberry, Marty

    (Kernbereich) 3,0 / 02 teilweise 02 / 2,2 Dienst=JA Bioinformatik / BA (Kernbereich) Alle Anträge zugelassen Dienst=JA 04 / 2,9 Germanistik / BA (Hauptfach) Alle Anträge zugelassen Historisch orientierte Kulturw. / BA Alle Anträge zugelassen Psychologie / BA (Kernbereich) 1,8 / 02 Dienst=JA teilweise 06 / 2

  11. Universitt des Saarlandes Wintersemester 2009/2010 Datum: 22.09.2009 Grenzwerte fr nichteinbezogene 2. Nachrckverfahren Seite: 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayberry, Marty

    (Kernbereich) 3,4 / 01 01 / 3,2 Bioinformatik / BA (Kernbereich) Alle Anträge zugelassen Biologie / BA=Nein teilweise 02 / 2,2 Dienst=JA Germanistik / BA (Hauptfach) Alle Anträge zugelassen Historisch orientierte Kulturw. / BA Alle Anträge zugelassen Psychologie / BA (Kernbereich) 1,8 / 00 Dienst=Nein teilweise 05 / 3

  12. Universitt des Saarlandes Wintersemester 2009/2010 Datum: 29.09.2009 Grenzwerte fr nichteinbezogene 3. Nachrckverfahren Seite: 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayberry, Marty

    (Kernbereich) Alle Anträge zugelassen Bioinformatik / BA (Kernbereich) Alle Anträge zugelassen Biologie / BA=Nein teilweise 02 / 2,2 Dienst=Nein teilweise Germanistik / BA (Hauptfach) Alle Anträge zugelassen Historisch orientierte Kulturw. / BA Alle Anträge zugelassen Psychologie / BA (Kernbereich) 1,8 / 00 Dienst

  13. Review Of Low-Flow Bladder Pump And High-Volume Air Piston Pump Groundwater Sampling Systems At Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, S. S.; Bailey, G. A.; Jackson, T. O.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1996, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) has run both a portable high-volume air-piston pump system and a dedicated, low-flow bladder pump system to collect groundwater samples. The groundwater contaminants of concern at SNL/NM are nitrate and the volatile organic compounds trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloethene (PCE). Regulatory acceptance is more common for the high-volume air piston pump system, especially for programs like SNL/NM's, which are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper describes logistical and analytical results of the groundwater sampling systems used at SNL/NM. With two modifications to the off-the-shelf low-flow bladder pump, SNL/NM consistently operates the dedicated low-flow system at depths greater than 450 feet below ground surface. As such, the low-flow sampling system requires fewer personnel, less time and materials, and generates less purge and decontamination water than does the high-volume system. However, the bladder pump cannot work in wells with less than 4 feet of water. A review of turbidity and laboratory analytical results for TCE, PCE, and chromium (Cr) from six wells highlight the affect or lack of affects the sampling systems have on groundwater samples. In the PVC wells, turbidity typically remained < 5 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU) regardless of the sampling system. In the wells with a stainless steel screen, turbidity typically remained < 5 NTU only with the low-flow system. When the high-volume system was used, the turbidity and Cr concentration typically increased an order of magnitude. TCE concentrations at two wells did not appear to be sensitive to the sampling method used. However, PCE and TCE concentrations dropped an order of magnitude when the high-volume system was used at two other wells. This paper recommends that SNL/NM collaborate with other facilities with similar groundwater depths, continue to pursue regulatory approval for using dedicated the lowflow system, and review data for sample system affects on nitrate concentrations.

  14. Review of low-flow bladder pump and high-volume air piston pump groundwater sampling systems at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, Sue S.; Jackson, Timmie Okchumpulla (Weston Solutions, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Bailey, Glenn A.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1996, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) has run both a portable high-volume air-piston pump system and a dedicated, low-flow bladder pump system to collect groundwater samples. The groundwater contaminants of concern at SNL/NM are nitrate and the volatile organic compounds trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloethene (PCE). Regulatory acceptance is more common for the high-volume air piston pump system, especially for programs like SNL/NM's, which are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper describes logistical and analytical results of the groundwater sampling systems used at SNL/NM. With two modifications to the off-the-shelf low-flow bladder pump, SNL/NM consistently operates the dedicated low-flow system at depths greater than 450 feet below ground surface. As such, the low-flow sampling system requires fewer personnel, less time and materials, and generates less purge and decontamination water than does the high-volume system. However, the bladder pump cannot work in wells with less than 4 feet of water. A review of turbidity and laboratory analytical results for TCE, PCE, and chromium (Cr) from six wells highlight the affect or lack of affects the sampling systems have on groundwater samples. In the PVC wells, turbidity typically remained < 5 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU) regardless of the sampling system. In the wells with a stainless steel screen, turbidity typically remained < 5 NTU only with the low-flow system. When the high-volume system was used, the turbidity and Cr concentration typically increased an order of magnitude. TCE concentrations at two wells did not appear to be sensitive to the sampling method used. However, PCE and TCE concentrations dropped an order of magnitude when the high-volume system was used at two other wells. This paper recommends that SNL/NM collaborate with other facilities with similar groundwater depths, continue to pursue regulatory approval for using dedicated the lowflow system, and review data for sample system affects on nitrate concentrations.

  15. Instructions of NTU Health Exam for Exchange Students from China In order to understand the general health condition of the new students, and to meet the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Hypertension Cervical cancer Gout or hyperuricemia Psychiatric disorders None of the diseases described

  16. 1 Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Polymeric Biomaterials Laboratory 2 Ecole Polytechnique Fdrale de Lausanne (EPFL), Laboratoire de Technologie des Composites et Polymres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalang, Robert C.

    /v% · Highly hydrated polymer Its long chains form random coils occupying molecular domains containing large synthetic crosslinks. The synthesis of such a macromolecular network in the form of a hydrogel has volumes of water · Key role in wound healing, promoting cell motility and differentiation Hyaluronic Acid

  17. Joint CQSE and CASTS Seminar Weekly Seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    -Ming Lu National Center for High Performance Computing PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU

  18. September 2011 Publicado por la O cina de Asuntos Internacionales Toda la informacin contenida en este folleto est disponible en linea. Para informacin ms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    requeridos Hay dos centros de lenguaje en NTU. Por favor contac- tarlos directamente para la solicitud

  19. Journal Citation Reports JCRSCISSCIIF 15% Web of ScienceWoS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Thrombosuction and Tirofiban Infusion (ITTI) trial Department of Internal Medicine, NTU Hospital Department

  20. Optimal design and control strategies for novel combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems. Part I of II, datum design conditions and approach.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colella, Whitney G.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy network optimization (ENO) models identify new strategies for designing, installing, and controlling stationary combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems (FCSs) with the goals of (1) minimizing electricity and heating costs for building owners and (2) reducing emissions of the primary greenhouse gas (GHG) - carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). A goal of this work is to employ relatively inexpensive simulation studies to discover more financially and environmentally effective approaches for installing CHP FCSs. ENO models quantify the impact of different choices made by power generation operators, FCS manufacturers, building owners, and governments with respect to two primary goals - energy cost savings for building owners and CO{sub 2} emission reductions. These types of models are crucial for identifying cost and CO{sub 2} optima for particular installations. Optimal strategies change with varying economic and environmental conditions, FCS performance, the characteristics of building demand for electricity and heat, and many other factors. ENO models evaluate both 'business-as-usual' and novel FCS operating strategies. For the scenarios examined here, relative to a base case of no FCSs installed, model results indicate that novel strategies could reduce building energy costs by 25% and CO{sub 2} emissions by 80%. Part I of II articles discusses model assumptions and methodology. Part II of II articles illustrates model results for a university campus town and generalizes these results for diverse communities.

  1. Overview: STEEL Enabling Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of springback predictability * LS-Dyna simulation Datum points Datum points Formed Dual-Phase Rail Panel Panel after draw process Panel after trimming process Conclusion: *...

  2. "Jean-Pierre-Miville-Preis" der Vetsuisse-Fakultt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    ausgeschlossen. Dieses Reglement tritt mit dem Datum der Unterzeichnung durch den Stiftungsrat in Kraft

  3. SIR Estimation in Hexagonal Cellular Networks with Best Server Mattia Minelli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coupechoux, Marceau

    Technological University Nanyang Avenue, Singapore mattia1@e.ntu.edu.sg Marceau Coupechoux T´el´ecom Paris

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF A LAMINATED DISK FOR THE SPIN TEK ROTARY MICROFILTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, D.

    2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Funded by the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management, EM-31, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) partnered with SpinTek Filtration{trademark} to develop a filter disk that would withstand a reverse pressure or flow during operation of the rotary microfilter. The ability to withstand a reverse pressure and flow eliminates a potential accident scenario that could have resulted in damage to the filter membranes. While the original welded filter disks have been shown to withstand and reverse pressure/flow in the static condition, the filter disk design discussed in this report will allow a reverse pressure/flow while the disks are rotating. In addition, the laminated disk increases the flexibility during filter startup and cleaning operations. The new filter disk developed by SRNL and SpinTek is manufactured with a more open structure significantly reducing internal flow restrictions in the disk. The prototype was tested at the University of Maryland and demonstrated to withstand the reverse pressure due to the centrifugal action of the rotary filter. The tested water flux of the disk was demonstrated to be 1.34 gpm in a single disk test. By comparison, the water flux of the current disk was 0.49 gpm per disk during a 25 disk test. The disk also demonstrated rejection of solids by filtering a 5 wt % Strontium Carbonate slurry with a filtrate clarity of less the 1.4 Nephelometric Turbidity Units (NTU) throughout the two hour test. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been working with SpinTek Filtration{trademark} to adapt the rotary microfilter for radioactive service in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. One potential weakness is the loose nature of the membrane on the filter disks. The current disk is constructed by welding the membrane at the outer edge of the disk. The seal for the center of the membrane is accomplished by an o-ring in compression for the assembled stack. The remainder of the membrane is free floating on the disk. This construction requires that a positive pressure be applied to the rotary filter tank to prevent the membrane from rising from the disk structure and potentially contacting the filter turbulence promoter. In addition, one accident scenario is a reverse flow through the filtrate line due to mis-alignment of valves resulting in the membrane rising from the disk structure. The structural integrity of the current disk has been investigated, and shown that the disk can withstand a significant reverse pressure in a static condition. However, the disk will likely incur damage if the filter stack is rotated during a reverse pressure. The development of a laminated disk would have several significant benefits for the operation of the rotary filter including the prevention of a compromise in filter disk integrity during a reverse flow accident, increasing operational flexibility, and increasing the self cleaning ability of the filter. A laminated disk would allow the filter rotor operation prior to a positive pressure in the filter tank. This would prevent the initial dead-head of the filter and prevent the resulting initial filter cake buildup. The laminated disk would allow rotor operation with cleaning fluid, eliminating the need for a recirculation pump. Additionally, a laminated disk would allow a reverse flow of fluid through the membrane pores removing trapped particles.

  5. Brief History 01 Library Organiza on 02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    The National Taiwan University (NTU) was established in March of 1928. The present Main Library was officially & Social Sciences Library Medical Library Organization Chart 2 #12;Library Collections The role of the NTU#12;Brief History 01 Library Organiza on 02 Library Collec ons 03 Electronic Resources Special

  6. POSTDOCTORAL POSITION ADVANCED SUBSTRATE ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; Information regarding SMART: http://smart.mit.edu/home.html Professor Fitzgerald's Web Site: http AND SMART, C.S. TAN, NTU AND SMART, AND S.F. YOON, NTU AND SMART BACKGROUND: There is an opening in MIT's Singapore research center (SMART) for post-doctoral fellow in the area of advanced substrate engineering

  7. aire tubular vertical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vertical datum will be less sensitive to geodynamic activity, local crustal uplift and subsidence, and deterioration of benchmarks. Marc Vronneau; Robert Duval; Jianliang...

  8. Title: Boundary File: GTA (Greater Toronto Area) Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Municipal Boundary shapefiles: Municipal Boundary ­ Upper Tier and District, and Municipal Boundary ­ Lower Municipality of Durham, Regional Municipality of York Data Type: Digital Vector Data Format: Shapefile Datum

  9. Digital Elevation Models for the Chajnantor Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    areas, and Holdaway (1994) obtained a DEM for Mauna Kea. The DEMs are easily converted into FITS images with a 60% overlap. Photogrammetry can make a stereographic image of the earth's surface in the overlapping or SAM 56 datum). The South America 1969 geodetic datum (SAM 69) is the current standard in Chile, but we

  10. Formulier R&O startgesprek | Faculteit W&N | versie januari 2009 Pagina 1 van 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hille, Sander

    /begeleider Beoordelingsautoriteit ... Datum in dienst Datum R&O startgesprek 200 In het R&O startgesprek wordt het UFO - Wachtwoord leiden7 Van toepassing zijnde resultaatgebieden uit het UFO profiel Toevoegen van behalen resultaten op basis van de resultaatgebieden uit het UFO profiel, opgedragen taken, competenties

  11. Heat exchanger design for thermoelectric electricity generation from low temperature flue gas streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latcham, Jacob G. (Jacob Greco)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An air-to-oil heat exchanger was modeled and optimized for use in a system utilizing a thermoelectric generator to convert low grade waste heat in flue gas streams to electricity. The NTU-effectiveness method, exergy, and ...

  12. Tailoring the Lasing Modes in Semiconductor Nanowire Cavities Using Intrinsic Self-Absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiong, Qihua

    groundbreaking work on utilizing semiconductor NW cavities to compensate the damping loss and amplify Division of Microelectronics, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 § Energy Research Institute @ NTU (ERI@N), Nanyang Technological University, 50

  13. Thng 9, 2010 Xut bn bi Office of International Affairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Loan, ć thōng bįo cįc chng trģnh ąo to cp bng cht lng cao vi chi phķ hp lż (khong t 3200~4500 USD mt nm cht lng. Bźn cnh cįc chng trģnh cp bng, NTU cņn có 2 trung tām ngoi ng tuyt vi cho nhng ai thķch thś.v...) c trao cho cįc sinh viźn t yźu cu cht lng. Bźn cnh cįc chng trģnh cp bng, NTU cņn có 2 trung tām

  14. Method For Detecting The Presence Of A Ferromagnetic Object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roybal, Lyle G. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detecting a presence or an absence of a ferromagnetic object within a sensing area may comprise the steps of sensing, during a sample time, a magnetic field adjacent the sensing area; producing surveillance data representative of the sensed magnetic field; determining an absolute value difference between a maximum datum and a minimum datum comprising the surveillance data; and determining whether the absolute value difference has a positive or negative sign. The absolute value difference and the corresponding positive or negative sign thereof forms a representative surveillance datum that is indicative of the presence or absence in the sensing area of the ferromagnetic material.

  15. Anmlan om framlggning av licentiatavhandling Announcement of licentiate thesis submission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yuxiao

    Anmälan om framläggning av licentiatavhandling Announcement of licentiate thesis submission Ifylls of licentiate seminar Den vetenskapliga uppsatsens (licentiatavhandlingens) titel / Title of licentiate thesis / Decision on opponent at licentiate seminar Namn Akademisk titel Högskola eller universitet Datum

  16. Hochspannungstechnik/ Energieversorgungsnetze

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wichmann, Felix

    UCTE-Netz Referent: Johannes Twittmann (studentischer Seminarbeitrag) Datum: Montag, 18. Dezember 2006 elektrischer Energie in Spanien Referent: Alberto de Juana (studentischer Beitrag) Schwedische Statorwicklung rotierender, elektrischer Maschinen Referent: Polichronis Atmatzidis (Studienarbeit) Innovative

  17. area gerenciamento da: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Datum: NAD83 Cell Size: 28.5 meters Boundaries Border Lakes Region Wilderness Area to a transitional cover type (i.e., herbaceous, brush, regeneration, fire scar or blowdown) in...

  18. 2004_Dare_Co_Survey_Report_v25may05.doc Dare County Beaches, Shore Protection Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ..................................................................... 3 2. Overview ..................................................................... 3 3. Previous System ...................................... 10 Figure 5. Survey and Sediment Sampling LARCs. The report begins with a brief overview and list of previous surveys. The survey methods and datums

  19. GEOL 102: Historical Geology Exam 1 Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

    & Last Appearance Datum; Zone #12;Other Methods of Stratigraphy Magnetostratigraphy (Chron); Sequence Stratigraphy (Sequence) Geologic Column Chronostratigraphy (Rock) Geochronology (Time) Eonthem Eon Erathem Era (= clastic = siliciclastic), biogenic, chemical; strata Detrital Sedimentary Cycle: Source Weathering

  20. GEOL 102: Historical Geology Online Exam 1 Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

    & Last Appearance Datum; Zone Other Methods of Stratigraphy Magnetostratigraphy (Chron); Sequence Stratigraphy (Sequence) #12;Geologic Column Chronostratigraphy (Rock) Geochronology (Time) Eonthem Eon Erathem: detrital (= clastic = siliciclastic), biogenic, chemical; strata Detrital Sedimentary Cycle: Source

  1. Utility of Foraminifera in Paleoenvironmental and Paleoceanographic Research A Foram Primer by R. Mark Leckie University of Massachusetts, Amherst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leckie, Mark

    the surface ocean to the deepest seafloor to salt marshes and estuaries. Together with the remains of other actively do during academic or industry drilling operations. Ages of planktic foram datums have been

  2. Title: Boundary File: GTHA (Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area) Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Natural Resources 2012 Municipal Boundary shapefiles: Municipal Boundary ­ Upper Tier and District Data Type: Digital Vector Data Format: Shapefile Datum / Map Projection: WGS84 / UTM (17) Resolution: N

  3. Title: Ontario Wind Resources Information Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 80m, and 100m) above ground level. There are also ESRI point shapefiles that contain temporal@mnr.gov.on.ca. Data Type: Vector Digital Data Format: Shapefile, Text file Datum / Map Projection: NAD83 Resolution: N

  4. Green-Aware Workload Scheduling in Geographically Distributed Data Centers Changbing Chen, Bingsheng He, Xueyan Tang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Xueyan

    : {chchangb, bshe, asxytang}@ntu.edu.sg Abstract--Renewable (or green) energy, such as solar or wind, has with renewable energy sources. While green energy supply for a single data center is intermittent due to daily/seasonal effects, our workload scheduling algorithm is aware of different amounts of green energy supply

  5. Placement of Digital Microfluidic Biochips Using the T-tree Formulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Yao-Wen

    Placement of Digital Microfluidic Biochips Using the T-tree Formulation Ping-Hung Yuh, chia@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw ABSTRACT Droplet-based microfluidic biochips have recently gained much attention and are expected that adopts a topological representation to solve the placement problem of digital microfluidic biochips

  6. Lai & Barkan 1 AN ENHANCED PARAMETRIC RAILWAY CAPACITY EVALUATION TOOL (RCET)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    as safer and more efficient in terms of land-use and energy efficiency. Therefore, public officials-2-2363-9990 Email: yclai@ntu.edu.tw Christopher P.L. Barkan Associate Professor Director ­ Railroad Engineering and Tables) = 7,311 words * Corresponding author #12;Lai & Barkan 2 ABSTRACT Many railroad lines

  7. OFC Review 2013 Software Defined Network (SDN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    and transmission rate w/o hardware change Dedicated PCE to scale OpenFlow architectutre #12;Network ArchitectureOFC Review 2013 Software Defined Network (SDN) M. Farhan Habib May 10, 2013 Friday Group Meeting Networks Lab @ UCD #12;NTu3F: SDN in Today's Network #12;SDN: What and Why · Traditional distributed

  8. A TEST OF EARTHQUAKE EARLY WARNING SYSTEM USING LOW COST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    A TEST OF EARTHQUAKE EARLY WARNING SYSTEM USING LOW COST ACCELEROMETER IN HUALIEN, TAIWAN Y.-M. Wu early warning system was first motivated by the Hualien offshore earthquake (Mw = 7.8) in November 15 Abstract The earthquake early warning (EEW) research group at the National Taiwan University (NTU) and one

  9. Journal Citation Reports JCRSCISSCIIF 15% Web of ScienceWoS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Oncology Summit 2013 Department of Internal Medicine, NTU College of Medicine Hepatitis Research Center%IFIF 201421 2 #12;IF IF IF10 BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL Volume: 347 Article Number: f6008 Amplification of HOXD-Harboring Chromosome Region Is Implicated in Mulitiple- Walled Carbon Nanotubes

  10. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON EVOLUTIONARY COMPUTATION, VOL. 14, NO. 3, JUNE 2010 329 Generalizing Surrogate-Assisted Evolutionary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Yaochu

    , 2010. This paper was supported by Honda Research Institute Europe GmbH, Germany. D. Lim is with Center (e-mail: dlim@ntu.edu.sg). Y. Jin and B. Sendhoff are with Honda Research Institute Europe GmbH, Offenbach 63073, Germany (e-mail: yaochu.jin@honda-ri.de; bernhard.sendhoff@honda-ri.de). Y. S. Ong

  11. Motivated Learning for the Development of Autonomous Systems$ Janusz A. Starzyka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Ah-Hwee

    Motivated Learning for the Development of Autonomous Systems$ Janusz A. Starzyka , James T. Grahama in part by the Singapore National Re- search Foundation Interactive Digital Media R&D Program, under@ohio.edu (James T. Graham), pawel.raif@polsl.pl (Pawel Raif), asahtan@ntu.edu.sg (Ah-Hwee Tan

  12. Stresa, Italy, 25-27 April 2007 DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF A DIAPHRAGM MICRO-PUMP WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, UniversitƩ de

    Stresa, Italy, 25-27 April 2007 DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF A DIAPHRAGM MICRO-PUMP@ntu.edu.tw, 8862-23629976 ABSTRACT In this study, a new type of thin, compact, and light weighed diaphragm micro-pump-diaphragm pump with two valves is fabricated in an aluminum case by using highly accurate CNC machine

  13. Testing of a hybrid membrane system for groundwater desalination in an Australian national park 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schäfer, Andrea; Richards, Bryce S.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in reducing high feedwater turbidity of up to 370 NTU. For the system, designed for a production of about 1000 L/d for remote communities, the specific energy consumption (SEC) was below 5 W.h/L when operated at a pressure above 7 bar. Retention of multivalent...

  14. Treatability of Stormwater Heavy Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    for Chemical Treatment · Type 1 water: high turbidity, >100 NTU, and high alkalinity, >250 mg/L as CaCO3, CaCO3 (alkalinity may need to be added for alum or ferric chloride). · Type 3 water: low turbidity, 250 mg/L as CaCO3 (most stormwaters approach this category

  15. Web Unit Mining Finding and Classifying Subgraphs of Centre for Advanced Information Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aixin, Sun

    Web Unit Mining ­ Finding and Classifying Subgraphs of Web Pages Aixin Sun Centre for Advanced Technological University Singapore, 639798 aseplim@ntu.edu.sg ABSTRACT In web classification, most researchers assume that the ob- jects to classify are individual web pages from one or more web sites. In practice

  16. Master Programme REMA/EUREC Course 2008/2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    of Oldenburg (Core Provider) NTU Athens (Specialisation Provider: Wind Energy) #12; EUREC Module, Lectures, Labs and Seminars Core Oldenburg 1. Semester, Winter Term Module Title Term Titel Solar Energy Titel Wind Energy Winter Wind Energy I Tutorial Wind Energy Systems Wind Tunel (Lab

  17. Optimal sequencing of a cooling tower with multiple cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Z.; Liu, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper evaluates the energy savings potential of multi-cell cooling tower optimal sequencing control methods. Annual tower fan energy usage is calculated for a counter-flow tower with multiple variable-speed fans. Effectiveness-NTU tower model...

  18. Center for Quantum Science and Engineering Weekly Seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    , 14:30 ~ 15:30 TITLE Probe Nanoscale Morphologies of Bulk Heterojunction Polymer Solar Cell from cells are promising renewable energy sources because of their low production cost, high mechanical Sinica PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar

  19. A moving-mesh relaxation scheme for one-dimensional barotropic two-phase flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyue, Keh-Ming

    . However, due to the non-monotonic behavior of the mixture sound speed (denoted by c) ver- sus the volume-mail: shyue@math.ntu.edu.tw 1 Introduction Cavitation is commonly defined as a phenomenon in a liquid-flowing system when the pressure of the liquid falls sufficiently low in some re- gion of the flow so that vapor

  20. 3D Cinematography Principles and Their Applications to Stereoscopic Media Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouhyoung, Ming

    3D Cinematography Principles and Their Applications to Stereoscopic Media Processing Chun-Wei Liu Taiwan University Taipei, Taiwan cyy@csie.ntu.edu.tw ABSTRACT This paper introduces 3D cinematography show that by incorporating 3D cinematography prin- ciples, the proposed methods yield more comfortable

  1. Joint CQSE and CASTS Seminar Weekly Seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Development and Benchmark of New Multi-Coefficient Double-Hybrid Density Functional Theory with SCS-MP2 and MP Cheng University PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract We have developed a series. The performance of MC-DFT can be further improved combining energies from ab initio MP2 and SCS-MP2 calculation

  2. Risk Assessment Risk communication 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, Shih-Hao

    · 1 1997 2003 WHO #12;6060 NTU Alumni Bimonthly No.87 Fault tree Event tree [2] Nuclear reactor of nuclear power plants. Reliability Engineering and Safety System, 52:297-314. [4] Jonas Hagmann. 2012. Fukushima: probing the analytical and epistemological limits of risk analysis. Journal of Risk Research. 15

  3. ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE published: 09 January 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belles, Xavier

    , Taipei 106, Taiwan. e-mail: m480@ntu.edu.tw Hypertrehalosemic hormone (HTH) is a peptide hormone pleiotropic actions related to catabolic reaction and stress response. AKH peptides have been demon- strated pathway of HTH involved in anti-oxidative stress, we have characterized a HIH receptor cDNA in Blattella

  4. Cloud Computing: a Perspective Study Lizhe WANG, Gregor von LASZEWSKI, Younge ANDREW, Xi HE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloud Computing: a Perspective Study Lizhe WANG, Gregor von LASZEWSKI, Younge ANDREW, Xi HE Service@ntu.edu.sg Received 1 Dec 2008 Abstract The Cloud computing emerges as a new computing paradigm which aims to provide study the Cloud computing paradigm from various aspects, such as definitions, distinct features

  5. OneClick: A Framework for Capturing Users' Network Experiences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    @cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw ABSTRACT To learn about users' experiences in using network applica- tions, we present a lightweight, non-intrusive of the application in use. OneClick is particularly effective because it is lightweight, non-intrusive, and efficient- iments. It is non-intrusive because the user does not need to pay much attention to the scoring procedure

  6. Joint CQSE and CASTS Seminar Weekly Seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    -Einstein condensates SPEAKER Prof. Shih-Chuan Gou Department of Physics, National Changhua University of Education PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract Atomic Bose-Einstein condensates conned to a dual a test of the scaling laws for defect formation by quenching a Bose gas to degeneracy in this geometry

  7. POSTDOCTORAL POSITION WIDEGAP NONNITRIDE FET INTEGRATION ON SI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Information regarding SMART: http://smart.mit.edu/home.html Professor Fitzgerald's Web Site: http, MIT AND SMART, AND KEN LEE, NTU AND SMART You will be part of a team conducting cuttingedge material systems. This position will be located at MIT's new research center in Singapore, called SMART

  8. Module Handbook Specialisation Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    ;Specialisation Wind Energy, NTU Athens, 2nd Semester Module 1/Wind Energy: Wind potential, Aerodynamics & Loading of Wind Turbines Module name: Wind potential, Aerodynamics & Loading of Wind Turbines Section Classes Evaluation of Wind Energy Potential Wind turbine Aerodynamics Static and dynamic Loading of Wind turbines

  9. Terr. Atmos. Ocean. Sci., Vol. 17, No. 4, 933-950, December 2006 Methane Venting in Gas Hydrate Potential Area Offshore of SW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

    933 Terr. Atmos. Ocean. Sci., Vol. 17, No. 4, 933-950, December 2006 Methane Venting in Gas Hydrate-mail: tyyang@ntu.edu.tw Water column samples were collected systematically in several poten- tial gas hydrate are considered to have originated from dissociation of gas hydrates and/or a deeper gas reservoir. (Key words

  10. Enhanced software for the GT1022 automated gaging system. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hines, R.E.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several enhancements have been added to the gaging software of a microcomputer-controlled gaging system (GT1022) that is used to acquire and process dimensional product data from multiprobe rotary gages. Processing routines have been developed to inspect five additional feature types: dimension, least squares center, MMC position with datum diameter bonus, total indicator reading, and two-sided wall thickness. Mathematical alignment routines have been added that permit parts to be gaged in a misaligned condition and then have the measurements corrected relative to the part`s datum axes.

  11. Letters to the Editor 5925 To the best of our knowledge there exist no previous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    - photon dissociation process. 3-6 The primary datum is the shock tube dissociation study of SF6 carried that the threshold for F- forma- tion from dissociative electron attachment in SF6 is nearly 0 eV. When kcal/mol. 10 However, Chen and Chan- tryll fail to observe r production from SF6 dissociative electron

  12. Cycles in the chamber homology for GL(3) Anne-Marie Aubert, Samir Hasan and Roger Plymen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubert, Anne-Marie

    . This chamber is a polysimplex, the product of an n-simplex by a 1-simplex: C = n × 1. To this datum we will attach a homological coefficient system, see [13, p.11]. To each simplex in n we attach by Bushnell-Kutzko. We now specialize to GL(3). In this article, we will explicitly construct representative

  13. Ontwerp Programmaplan Instellingstoets TU/e

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franssen, Michael

    , 5612 AZ Eindhoven Postbus 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven www.tue.nl Datum 6 december 2012 #12;Technische Universiteit Eindhoven University of Technology Inhoud 1 Inleiding? ........................................................... 12 1Ontwerp Programmaplan / 6-12-2012 #12;Technische Universiteit Eindhoven University of Technology

  14. An Information Flow Model of Fault Detection Margaret C. Thompson ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    not be practical. Nonethe­ less, Relay provides insight into testing and fault de­ tection and suggests an approach and Computer Science Amherst, MA 01003 University of California Irvine, CA 92717 Abstract Relay is a model of how a fault causes a failure on execution of some test datum. This process begins with introduction

  15. Siemens und Axsionics sichern Online-Banking mit Internetpass ab ... http://www.computerwoche.de/_misc/article/articleprintpopup/index... 1 of 2 01/25/08 12:16

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borchert, Bernd

    Siemens und Axsionics sichern Online-Banking mit Internetpass ab ... http://www.computerwoche.de/_misc/article/articleprintpopup/index... 1 of 2 01/25/08 12:16 Datum: URL: Siemens und Axsionics sichern Online-Banking mit Internetpass ab-Erkennung will Siemens IT Solutions and Services einen neuen Online-Banking-Standard in Deutschland einführen. Mit dem

  16. Metadata for Nearshore Fish Atlas of Alaska Definitions of field names

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of bays; kelps (e.g., Saccharina latissima, Alaria marginata) often attached to bedrock faces Catch understory kelps growing as dense, low-lying mats on rocky substrates; dominant kelps (e.g., Saccharina latissima, Cymathere triplicata, Alaria spp.) Latitude: decimal degrees, WGS84 datum, northern hemisphere

  17. OVERWEIGHT DEFORMATIONS OF AFFINE TORIC VARIETIES AND LOCAL UNIFORMIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    uniformization for Abhyankar valuations of algebraic function fields and also uses toroidal methods and phrases. Toric geometry, Valuations, Key polynomials. 1 hal-00933721,version2-31Mar2014 #12;2 Abstract. A valuation of a local domain (R, m) is the datum of a valuation ring (R , m ) of the fraction field K of R

  18. Handleiding Remote Desktop Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galis, Frietson

    Handleiding Remote Desktop Service Versie: 1.3 Remote Desktop Datum: 29-08-2013 #12;2 Configureren Remote Desktop Connection 1) Type in de zoekbalk van Windows 7: "remote" of "mstsc" en start de applicatie "Remote Desktop Connection" zoals in onderstaand voorbeeld wordt getoond. 2) Selecteer "Show

  19. Title: Worldview 2 Satellite Image of York University Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and surrounding areas. Consists of two images, a multispectral (colour) and a panchromatic (black and white Panchromatic (blank and white) Image Resolution: 11 metre Multispectral (colour) image resolution: 3 metres Image Date: July 25, 2012 Cloud Cover: 0% Data Type: Raster Digital Data Format: GeoTIFF Datum / Map

  20. Optimization of Rainfall Interpolation I. Soenario, R. Sluiter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Optimization of Rainfall Interpolation I. Soenario, R. Sluiter De Bilt, March 2010 | Intern rapport; IR 2010-01 #12;#12;Optimization of Rainfall Interpolation Versie 2.0 Datum Maart 2010 Status Definitief #12;Optimization of Rainfall Interpolation Page 4 of 31 Colofon Titel Optimization of Rainfall

  1. Title: Gridded Population of World and Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Gridded Population of World and Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project Data Creator / Copyright Data Format: BIL, ASCII, Grid, Shapefile, CSV, XLS, E00 Datum / Map Projection: N/A Resolution: N Science Information Network (CIESIN). "Gridded Population of World and Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project

  2. Title: Open Street Map shapefile downloads Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Open Street Map shapefile downloads Data Creator / Copyright Owner: OpenStreetMap Publisher applications. Data Type: Vector Digital Data Format: Shapefile Datum / Map Projection: WGS84 Resolution: N site: http://downloads.cloudmade.com/ Citation: OpenStreetMap. "OpenStreetMap shapefile downloads

  3. Information Im Rahmen der Konzernnormung von BMW ist ab 01.04.2013 ein Praktikum fr die Dauer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wichmann, Felix

    Information Im Rahmen der Konzernnormung von BMW ist ab 01.04.2013 ein Praktikum für die Dauer von Standort: BMW Forschungs- und Innovationszentrum, München, Knorrstr. 147 Vollzeit: 35 h/ Woche Abt./Absender TI-509/ Arnd Früngel Telefon +49-89-382-18375 Fax E-Mail arnd.fruengel@bmw.de Kopie an Datum 15

  4. Journal of Earthquake Engineering, 14:918933, 2010 Copyright A.S. Elnashai & N.N. Ambraseys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padgett, Jamie Ellen

    1 Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas, USA 2 School of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, USA 3 Datum of potential bridge damage and economic losses are evaluated for several scenario events in order to aid

  5. Historische Fragen zur Ethnogenese der Salaren

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dwyer, Arienne M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -türkischen organisatorischen Besonderheiten gezeigt werden. Die salarische Gesellschaft in der Zeit der Mķng- und Q?ng-Dynastien war eine außergewöhnliche Mischung: die Einverleibung der mittelasiatisch-türkischen und tibetischen Strukturen in ein lokales... Salar erwähnt werden, d.h. die Salaren, die im Hézh?u-Bezirk in Nordwest- China lebten; das frühsten Datum, das mit den Salaren in Verbindung gebracht werden kann, ist 1370 (XTZ).1 Lokale chinesische und salarische Quellen beschreiben zwar 1 Im...

  6. Terminal Server Versie: 1.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galis, Frietson

    Terminal Server Versie: 1.0 Linux Datum: 30-10-2014 #12;2 Inleiding Sinds zomer 2014 biedt het ISSC Linux Terminal Server of LTS. Wat is het? De LTS is een server systeem gebaseerd op de Ubuntu Linux://media.leidenuniv.nl/legacy/introductie-linux-werkplek.pdf) Iedere gebruiker met een ULCN account kan hierop inloggen. Vanaf deze server kan men inloggen op andere

  7. Cenozoic Planktonic Foraminiferal Zonation and Characteristics of Index Forms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stainforth, R. M.; Lamb, J. L.; Luterbacher, Hanspeter; Beard, J. H.; Jeffords, Russell M.

    1975-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    for the Mediterranean, Atlantic, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mexico areas 88 18. Planktonic forarniniferal zonation of the present paper for the late Middle Miocene to Holocene compared with some current zonal schemes proposed by different authors for the Pacific Ocean...- iterranean stages and corresponding planktonic foramini- feral datums 105 26. Correlation of Pliocene-Pleistocene stages of the Gulf of Mexico and Italy based on planktonic foraminifers and climatic implications 108 27. Shapes of chambers in planktonic...

  8. Spatially resolved temperature and heat flux measurements for slow evaporating droplets heated by a microfabricated heater array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paik, Sokwon

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    flux datum per one droplet. No spatial or temporal heat flux information was given. Klassen et al. [12] and di Marzo et al. [13] were the first to use an infrared thermography technique to attempt to measure the spatially and temporally resolved... infrared thermography. Because of the aforementioned limitation of the IR thermography, measurements were only possible outside of the droplets. Michiyoshi and Makino [15] used a dual beam synchroscope to measure the variation of the heater supply...

  9. A geographic information system (GIS) based determination of estuarine and marine wetland and shoreline changes in the Galveston Bay estuary from 1995 to 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Christina Claudette

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    shapefiles. These files were available for all the United States Geological Survey (USGS) quadrangles in Table 1 and were analyzed in the Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) projection, North American Datum (NAD) 1983 for Zone 15. Aerial photography... implemented to determine which method was most accurate and time efficient. The NWI quad maps from 1993 and aerial photos for 1995 were imported into an ArcGIS Desktop project file. For the first method, a new shapefile was created and 13 labeled...

  10. Magnetic stratigraphy and biostratigraphy of the Piacenzian (Upper Pliocene) at Monte San Nicola (Sicily)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Channell, J.E.T.; Sprovieri, R.; Di Stefano, E.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the Neogene, the Mediterranean was a rather unique biogeographic province. For this reason, first and last occurrences of Neogene species recorded in the Mediterranean region may not be synchronous with those recorded in the open oceans. This has important implications as most of the Neogene stage boundaries are defined on the basis of Mediterranean type sections. The most direct way to determine the relative timing of Mediterranean and open ocean datums is through correlation with the polarity time scale. Such correlations are not available for the Mediterranean Pliocene. The Trubi pelagic limestones and Monte narbone marls which characterize the SicilianPliocene are not ideal for magnetic stratigraphy due to weak remnant intensities and an ubiquitous normal polarity overprint. However, at Monte San Nicola, a magnetic stratigraphy has been resolved by stepwise demagnetization in small temperature increments. The upper and lower bounds of the Gauss Epoch, and the Mammoth and Kaena polarity events can be correlated to well defined planktonic foraminiferal and calcareous nannofossil datums. Hence the synchronism of these datums between the Mediterranean and the open ocean can be tested. The most notable discrepancy is in the last occurrence of G. margaritae which occurs at the base of the Gauss in most open marine sections, but is found at the top of the Gilbert at Monte San Nicola.

  11. Engineering faculty forum. Final report, June 1, 1993--May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, L.V.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the project was to develop and broadcast monthly one-hour teleconferences to support the professional development of engineering faculty. The {open_quotes}Engineering Faculty Forum{close_quotes} was available nationwide over the NTU Satellite Network and was also available from a C-Band Satellite. There was no cost to participate in the live teleconferences for the two year period. The programs were developed in response to a questionnaire sent to engineering faculty members across the United States. Copies of the flyers and a print out of each course participation form has been included as a part of this report.

  12. Building and Calibration of a FAST Model of the SWAY Prototype Floating Wind Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koh, J. H.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Driscoll, F.; Ng, E. Y. K.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Present efforts to verify and validate aero-hydro-servo-elastic numerical simulation tools that predict the dynamic response of a floating offshore wind turbine are primarily limited to code-to-code comparisons or code-to-data comparisons using data from wind-wave basin tests. In partnership with SWAY AS, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) installed scientific wind, wave, and motion measurement equipment on the 1/6.5th-scale prototype SWAY floating wind system to collect data to validate a FAST model of the SWAY design in an open-water condition. Nanyang Technological University (NTU), through a collaboration with NREL, assisted in this validation.

  13. Thng 9, 2011 Xu t b n b i O ce of International A airs M i thng tin trong t ri ny u c trn m ng. c thng tin chi ti t v c p nh t, xin vui lng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Thįng 9, 2011 Xu t b n b i O ce of International A airs M i thōng tin trong t ri nąy u có trźn m ng. có thōng tin chi ti t vą c p nh t, xin vui lņng tra c u t i website c a chśng tōi : httpThōng tin nhanh NTU, tr ng i h c t ng h p l n nh t vą lāu i nh t ąi Loan, ć thōng bįo cįc chng trģnh ąo

  14. {kshirai,t-yagi}@jaist.ac.jp [3, 5, 9, 10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirai, Kiyoaki

    {kshirai,t-yagi}@jaist.ac.jp 1 ( ) [1, 2] [8] ( ) [3, 5, 9, 10] EDR [6] 2 SVM Support Vector 3 [8] EDR 6 ID 3c5631 , 1f66e3 3c5631 1f66e3 3c5631 1f66e3 EDR 1 3http://www.csie.ntu.edu.tw/%7 1 SVM (2 ) (3 ) 2 2 4.1 SVM 5 20 4.2 ( ) ( (2)) = (2) Oh 5 Oh=10 ( ) 5 EDR [6] EDR 20 EDR ID EDR 20

  15. Wave variability and wave spectra for wind generated gravity waves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bretschneider, Charles L.

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    \\c7) cJ\\y \\ pj?7y T7jwJc ObD 6? U7)u7yc s{ 6\\?7( jy Mr\\i)\\yc( OOO H? nsy{ji7yu7 1j_jc( {s) ns))7P\\cjsy ns7{{juj7yc( PjPc 8e $7(c {s) 1jy7\\)jcL s{ h7w)7((jsy OOZ nT^U$0h k?? t ^ $T0vh* v. 6^k0 2U0n$h^ .hva /v?'$ I?2$h?nC$?v' O9 p7y7)\\P O?Q ?9 0y...7)wL nsy(ji7)\\cjsy( O?Q Q? I7)j?\\cjsy s{ V 2d7uc)\\ s{ V ^ 126 nT^U$0h k t 6^k0 k^h?^m?1?$* ^ 'I /v?'$ I?2$h?mC$?v' ?jjj C? t t2d7uc)\\ s{ , , O?D %? U7)jsi 2d7uc)\\ O?o 69 .)7lr7yuL 2d7uc)\\ OQb H? U)sd7)cj7( s{ 6\\?7 2d7uc)\\ OQQt U7\\? s{ ) t2d7...

  16. F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During second quarter 1995, samples from the FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Piezometer FAC 5P and monitoring well FAC 6 were dry and could not be sampled. New monitoring wells FAC 9C, 10C, 11C, and 12C were completed in the Barnwell/McBean aquifer and were sampled for the first time during third quarter 1994 (second quarter 1995 is the fourth of four quarters of data required to support the closure of the basin). Analytical results that exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria such as the SRS turbidity standard of 50 NTU during the quarter were as follows: gross alpha exceeded the final PDWS and aluminum, iron, manganese, and radium-226 exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the FAC wells. Turbidity exceeded the SRS standard (50 NTU) in well FAC 3. Groundwater flow direction in the water table beneath the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was to the west at a rate of 1300 feet per year. Groundwater flow in the Barnwell/McBean was to the northeast at a rate of 50 feet per year.

  17. Characterization and interwell connectivity evaluation of Green Rver reservoirs, Wells Draw study area, Uinta Basin, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abiazie, Joseph Uchechukwu

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and seal rocks of the Green River petroleum system. Datum is Mahoganey oil shale bed (1). 49 27 Fig. 11?Cross-section of thermal maturity of oil accumulations in the Green River petroleum system. 49 28 Fig. 12? Lake Uinta depositional... This petroleum system has produced more than 450 MMBO mainly from two formations, the Green River and Colton Formations. 7 The Green River Formation contains the source rock and most of the reservoir and seal rocks (Fig. 10). 49 Most of the kerogen-rich oil...

  18. A "blind" study of the power spectra analysis of respiratory sounds at the trachea of a sample of pulmonary insufficiency patients and normal subjects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Brenda Ann

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the condition of the lungs. The slow progress is due to: (1) a variety of human factor problems, (2) the limitations of the instrumentation, (3) the lack of total understanding of the mechanism of production of respiratory sounds, and (4) the lack... was a "blind s'tudy The equipment used in the analysis of the magnetic tapes consisted of the following components: 1. Ampex 2200 PM analog tape recorder 2, Datum Time Code Generator/Reader Model 9300 3. 20 Hz, 1800 Hz low pass filters 4. 100 Hz...

  19. Conversion of Hanford site well locations to Washington coordinate system of 1983, South Zone 1991 (WCS83S)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnett, R.A.; Tzemos, S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Dietz, L.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Past construction and survey practices have resulted in the use of multiple local coordinate systems for measuring and reporting the horizontal position of wells and other facilities and locations on the Hanford Site. This report describes the development of a coordinate transformation process and algorithm and its application to the conversion of the horizontal coordinates of Hanford site wells from the various local coordinate systems and datums to a single standard coordinate system, the Washington Coordinate system of 1983, South Zone 1991 (WCS83S). The coordinate transformation algorithm, implemented as a computer program called CTRANS, uses standard two-dimensional translation, rotation, and scaling transformation equations and can be applied to any set of horizontal point locations. For each point to be transformed, the coefficients of the transformation equations are calculated locally, using the coordinates of the three nearest registration points (points with known locations in both coordinate systems). The report contains a discussion of efforts to verify and validate both the software and the well location data, a description of the methods used to estimate transformation and registration point accuracy, instructions for using the computer program, and a summary of the Hanford well conversion results for each local coordinate system and datum. Also included are the results of using recent U.S. Army Corps of Engineers survey data to obtain estimated measures of location errors in wells for which the local coordinate data source is undocumented, unverified, and therefore of unknown accuracy.

  20. The Influence of Availability Costs on Optimal Heat Exchanger Size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witte, L. C.

    3.62 2272.5 2230.2 2691.5 0.1433 110 3.86 2321. 3 2129.6 2740.3 0.4154 145 4.03 2344.5 2066.2 2763.5 0.7005 165 . 4.29 2371. 0 1960.0 2790.0 1. 3978 195 2385.0 4.67 230 2804.0 1813.8 2.795 2370.7 5.24 270 2789.7 1605.2 5.499 The scheme... clearly affects the optimal NTU hat will result. Thus the effect of the s r roundings and function of a particularlheat exchanger on its irreversibility costs is inherently contained in the curves of iq ure 2. The parameter Thi/Tci ranges ftom 1...

  1. Closure Report (CR) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 91: Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well with Errata Sheet and Certification, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navarro Nevada Environmental Services

    2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The closure report for CAU 91 has no Use Restriction Form or drawing/map included in the document to describe the use restricted area, however, Section 3.3.3 states that the site will be fenced and signage placed indicating the area as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Unit. The drawing that was placed in the FFACO indicating the use restricted area lists the coordinates for the RCRA Unit in Nevada State Plan Coordinates - North American Datum of 1983. In the ensuing years the reporting of coordinates has been standardized so that all coordinates are reported in the same manner, which is: NAD 27 UTM Zone 11 N, meters. This Errata Sheet updates the coordinate reporting to the currently accepted method and includes an aerial photo showing the RCRA Unit with the coordinates listed showing the use restricted area.

  2. Cooling process for inelastic Boltzmann equations for hard spheres, Part I: The Cauchy problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stéphane Mischler; Clément Mouhot; Mariano Rodriguez Ricard

    2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop the Cauchy theory of the spatially homogeneous inelastic Boltzmann equation for hard spheres, for a general form of collision rate which includes in particular variable restitution coefficients depending on the kinetic energy and the relative velocity as well as the sticky particles model. We prove (local in time) non-concentration estimates in Orlicz spaces, from which we deduce weak stability and existence theorem. Strong stability together with uniqueness and instantaneous appearance of exponential moments are proved under additional smoothness assumption on the initial datum, for a restricted class of collision rates. Concerning the long-time behaviour, we give conditions for the cooling process to occur or not in finite time.

  3. A survey of list processing techniques and their uses in monitors and translators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stivers, William Walter

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , B, and CD HDRTWO has Dv E, and F as its elements, and HDRTHR consists of elements G, H, and R. 0 A 0 0 HDRTWO 0 D 0 E 0 F HDRTHR 0 G 0 H 0 R Figure 2 6 The "trailer" is the last storage register on a list. It is also called the bottom... is constructed in the same manner as all other lists~ ex- cept that the datum symbol has no value, The free list bas a header 10 0 A 15 0 D 0 15 22 0 B 22 0 0 10 Figure 2, 7 and a trailer, and each record has a pointer to the next element of the free list...

  4. A Bayesian sequential processor approach to spectroscopic portal system decisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sale, K; Candy, J; Breitfeller, E; Guidry, B; Manatt, D; Gosnell, T; Chambers, D

    2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of faster more reliable techniques to detect radioactive contraband in a portal type scenario is an extremely important problem especially in this era of constant terrorist threats. Towards this goal the development of a model-based, Bayesian sequential data processor for the detection problem is discussed. In the sequential processor each datum (detector energy deposit and pulse arrival time) is used to update the posterior probability distribution over the space of model parameters. The nature of the sequential processor approach is that a detection is produced as soon as it is statistically justified by the data rather than waiting for a fixed counting interval before any analysis is performed. In this paper the Bayesian model-based approach, physics and signal processing models and decision functions are discussed along with the first results of our research.

  5. On the transfer of energy towards infinity in the theory of weak turbulence for the nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. H. M. Kierkels; J. J. L. Velįzquez

    2014-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the mathematical properties of a kinetic equation which describes the long time behaviour of solutions to the weak turbulence equation associated to the cubic nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation. In particular, we give a precise definition of weak solutions and prove global existence of solutions for all initial data with finite mass. We also prove that any nontrivial initial datum yields the instantaneous onset of a condensate, i.e. a Dirac mass at the origin for any positive time. Furthermore we show that the only stationary solutions with finite total measure are Dirac masses at the origin. We finally construct solutions with finite energy, which is transferred to infinity in a self-similar manner.

  6. Problems encountered in establishing a historical erosion-rate database for the Illinois coast of Lake Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chrzastowski, M.J.; Erdmann, A.L.; Stohr, C.J. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Erosion rates for segments of the Lake Michigan coast at Lake County, Illinois were determined from historical maps prepared by the US Lake Survey and aerial photographs collected for the State of Illinois. Shorelines and blufflines were digitized at 1:20,000 scale for 1872--73, 1910--11, 1947, and 1987; these data were registered to 1:24,000-scale USGS digital line graphs. Erosion rates were calculated from temporal changes on shore-normal transects at 50-m spacing. Three major factors were identified pertinent to future digital mapping of historical coastal changes along similar Great Lakes coasts. (1) Ground-control points and points for rubber sheeting must be carefully selected to ensure these points were stable. For example, road intersections had changed position 15 m or more between early and late data sets. (2) Unlike US ocean coasts, the Great Lakes do not have a standard datum for shoreline mapping, and shorelines are commonly shown for the lake level at the time of the survey. Variation in historical, monthly mean lake level (1.9 m max. range for Lake Michigan) can cause significant shoreline differences between data sets. Shoreline translations of tens of meters may be needed to adjust to a common datum. (3) The bluff crest may not always be an ideal reference line for documenting rates of coastal change. Locally and temporally, recession of the bluff crest may be caused by a variety of slope processes that are independent of wave erosion. Along some bluff coasts, the bluff toe, if carefully defined, may be a more appropriate reference for calculating erosion rates strictly due to coastal processes.

  7. Eddy pump dredging: Does it produce water quality impacts?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creek, K.D. [Pacific Gas and Electric Co., Ramon, CA (United States); Sagraves, T.H. [RESNA Industries, Magalia, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During a prototype demonstration at Pacific Gas and Electric Company`s (PG&E`s) Cresta Reservoir, the feasibility of a new dredging technique was tested for its reported ability to produce only minimal water quality impacts. The technique, developed by PBMK Consultants and Engineers, uses the EDDY Pump, a patented submerged slurry pump system with a higher solids-to-liquid ratio and lower re-suspension of sediment than achieved by conventional suction dredging. Turbidity and total suspended solids concentrations of water samples collected adjacent to and downstream of the pump head were similar to those of samples collected adjacent to and upstream of the pump head. Dissolved oxygen downstream of the pump head remained near saturation. The dredged sediment was pumped 600 m upstream of the pump head and discharged back to the surface of Cresta Reservoir. Increases in turbidity and total suspended solids downstream of the discharge site were minor. Throughout the demonstration, turbidity levels and total suspended solids concentrations remained well below allowable levels set by the California Regional Water Quality Control Board - no more than a 25 NTU turbidity increase over ambient background nor more than 80 mg/I total suspended solids, absolute.

  8. Fault-tolerant corrector/detector chip for high-speed data processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andaleon, David D. (San Ramon, CA); Napolitano, Jr., Leonard M. (Danville, CA); Redinbo, G. Robert (Davis, CA); Shreeve, William O. (Fayetteville, NY)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An internally fault-tolerant data error detection and correction integrated circuit device (10) and a method of operating same. The device functions as a bidirectional data buffer between a 32-bit data processor and the remainder of a data processing system and provides a 32-bit datum is provided with a relatively short eight bits of data-protecting parity. The 32-bits of data by eight bits of parity is partitioned into eight 4-bit nibbles and two 4-bit nibbles, respectively. For data flowing towards the processor the data and parity nibbles are checked in parallel and in a single operation employing a dual orthogonal basis technique. The dual orthogonal basis increase the efficiency of the implementation. Any one of ten (eight data, two parity) nibbles are correctable if erroneous, or two different erroneous nibbles are detectable. For data flowing away from the processor the appropriate parity nibble values are calculated and transmitted to the system along with the data. The device regenerates parity values for data flowing in either direction and compares regenerated to generated parity with a totally self-checking equality checker. As such, the device is self-validating and enabled to both detect and indicate an occurrence of an internal failure. A generalization of the device to protect 64-bit data with 16-bit parity to protect against byte-wide errors is also presented.

  9. Minimally non-local nucleon-nucleon potentials with chiral two-pion exchange including Delta resonances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Piarulli, M; Girlanda, L; Schiavilla, R; Perez, R Navarro; Amaro, J E; Arriola, E Ruiz

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a coordinate-space chiral potential, including $\\Delta$-isobar intermediate states in its two-pion-exchange component up to order $Q^3$ ($Q$ denotes generically the low momentum scale).The contact interactions entering at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-next-to-leading orders ($Q^2$ and $Q^4$, respectively) are rearranged by Fierz transformations to yield terms at most quadratic in the relative momentum operator of the two nucleons. The low-energy constant multiplying these contact interactions are fitted to the 2013 Granada database, consisting of 2309 $pp$ and 2982 $np$ data (including, respectively, 148 and 218 normalizations) in the laboratory-energy range 0--300 MeV. For the total 5291 $pp$ and $np$ data inmore »this range, we obtain a $\\chi^2$/datum of roughly 1.3 for a set of three models characterized by long- and short-range cutoffs, $R_{\\rm L}$ and $R_{\\rm S}$ respectively, ranging from $(R_{\\rm L},R_{\\rm S})=(1.2,0.8)$ fm down to $(0.8,0.6)$ fm. The long-range (short-range) cutoff regularizes the one- and two-pion exchange (contact) part of the potential.« less

  10. Quantum Jet Theory I: Free fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. A. Larsson

    2007-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    QJT (Quantum Jet Theory) is the quantum theory of jets, which can be canonically identified with truncated Taylor series. Ultralocality requires a novel quantization scheme, where dynamics is treated as a constraint in the history phase space. QJT differs from QFT since it involves a new datum: the expansion point. This difference is substantial because it leads to new gauge and diff anomalies, which are necessary to combine background independence with locality. Physically, the new ingredient is that the observer's trajectory is explicitly introduced and quantized together with the fields. In this paper the harmonic oscillator and free fields are treated within QJT, correcting previous flaws. The standard Hilbert space is recovered for the harmonic oscillator, but there are interesting modifications already for the free scalar field, due to quantization of the observer's trajectory. Only free fields are treated in detail, but the complications when interactions are introduced are briefly discussed. We also explain why QJT is necessary to resolve the conceptual problems of quantum gravity.

  11. Minimally non-local nucleon-nucleon potentials with chiral two-pion exchange including Delta resonances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Piarulli, M; Girlanda, L; Schiavilla, R; Perez, R Navarro; Amaro, J E; Arriola, E Ruiz

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a coordinate-space chiral potential, including $\\Delta$-isobar intermediate states in its two-pion-exchange component up to order $Q^3$ ($Q$ denotes generically the low momentum scale).The contact interactions entering at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-next-to-leading orders ($Q^2$ and $Q^4$, respectively) are rearranged by Fierz transformations to yield terms at most quadratic in the relative momentum operator of the two nucleons. The low-energy constant multiplying these contact interactions are fitted to the 2013 Granada database, consisting of 2309 $pp$ and 2982 $np$ data (including, respectively, 148 and 218 normalizations) in the laboratory-energy range 0--300 MeV. For the total 5291 $pp$ and $np$ data in this range, we obtain a $\\chi^2$/datum of roughly 1.3 for a set of three models characterized by long- and short-range cutoffs, $R_{\\rm L}$ and $R_{\\rm S}$ respectively, ranging from $(R_{\\rm L},R_{\\rm S})=(1.2,0.8)$ fm down to $(0.8,0.6)$ fm. The long-range (short-range) cutoff regularizes the one- and two-pion exchange (contact) part of the potential.

  12. ASTER Thermal Anomalies in western Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: ASTER Thermal Anomalies Western Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the areas identified as areas of anomalous surface temperature from ASTER satellite imagery. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. Areas that had temperature greater than 2?, and areas with temperature equal to 1? to 2?, were considered ASTER modeled very warm and warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies), respectively Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4547052.446651 m Left: 158917.090117 m Right: 4101162.228281 m Bottom: 4101162.228281 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  13. Colorado Regional Faults

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Regional Faults Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the regional faults of Colorado Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4543192.100000 m Left: 144385.020000 m Right: 754585.020000 m Bottom: 4094592.100000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  14. Structural Orientations Adjacent to Some Colorado Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard,

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Publication Date: 2012 Title: Structural Data Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Reno Nevada Publisher: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Description: Structural orientations (fractures, joints, faults, lineaments, bedding orientations, etc.) were collected with a standard Brunton compass during routine field examinations of geothermal phenomena in Colorado. Often multiple orientations were taken from one outcrop. Care was taken to ensure outcrops were "in place". Point data was collected with a hand-held GPS unit. The structural data is presented both as standard quadrant measurements and in format suitable for ESRI symbology Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4491528.924999 m Left: 207137.983196 m Right: 432462.310324 m Bottom: 4117211.772001 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Contact Person: Richard “Rick” Zehner Address: 3740 Barron Way City: Reno State: NV Postal Code: 89511 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 775-737-7806 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  15. Colorado Potential Geothermal Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado PRS Cool Fairways Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the weakened basement rocks. Isostatic gravity was utilized to identify structural basin areas, characterized by gravity low values reflecting weakened basement rocks. Together interpreted regional fault zones and basin outlines define geothermal "exploration fairways", where the potential exists for deep, superheated fluid flow in the absence of Pliocene or younger volcanic units Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4544698.569273 m Left: 144918.141004 m Right: 763728.391299 m Bottom: 4094070.397932 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  16. Colorado Electrical Transmission Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Xcel Energy Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado XcelEnergy NonXcel Transmission Network Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains transmission network of Colorado Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4540689.017558 m Left: 160606.141934 m Right: 758715.946645 m Bottom: 4098910.893397m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shapefile

  17. Simulation model air-to-air plate heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetter, Michael

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple simulation model of an air-to-air plate heat exchanger is presented. The model belongs to a collection of simulation models that allows the eflcient computer simulation of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. The main emphasis of the models is to shorten computation time and to use only input data that are known in the design process of an HVAC system. The target of the models is to describe the behavior of HVAC components in the part-load operation mode, which is becoming increasingly important in energy eficient HVAC systems. The models are intended to be used for yearly energy calculations or load calculations with time steps of about 10 minutes or larger. Short- time dynamic effects, which are of interest for different aspects of control theory, are neglected. The part-load behavior is expressed in terms of the nominal condition and the dimensionless variation of the heat transfer with change of mass flow and temperature. The effectiveness- NTU relations are used to parametrize the convective heat transfer at nominal conditions and to compute the part-load condition. If the heat transfer coefficients on the two exchanger sides are not equal (i. e. due to partial bypassing of air), their ratio can be easily calculated and set as a parameter. The model is static and uses explicit equations only. The explicit model formulation ensures short computation time and numerical stability, which allows using the model with sophisticated engineering methods like automatic system optimization. This paper fully outlines the algorithm description and its simplifications. It is not tailored for any particular simulation program to ensure easy implementation in any simulation program.

  18. TESTING OF THE SPINTEK ROTARY MICROFILTER USING ACTUAL HANFORD WASTE SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HUBER HJ

    2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The SpinTek rotary microfilter was tested on actual Hanford tank waste. The samples were a composite of archived Tank 241-AN-105 material and a sample representing single-shell tanks (SST). Simulants of the two samples have been used in non-rad test runs at the 222-S laboratory and at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The results of these studies are compared in this report. Two different nominal pore sizes for the sintered steel rotating disk filter were chosen: 0.5 and 0.1 {micro}m. The results suggest that the 0.5-{micro}m disk is preferable for Hanford tank waste for the following reasons: (1) The filtrate clarity is within the same range (<<4 ntu for both disks); (2) The filtrate flux is in general higher for the 0.5-{micro}m disk; and (3) The 0.1-{micro}m disk showed a higher likelihood of fouling. The filtrate flux of the actual tank samples is generally in the range of 20-30% compared to the equivalent non-rad tests. The AN-105 slurries performed at about twice the filtrate flux of the SST slurries. The reason for this difference has not been identified. Particle size distributions in both cases are very similar; comparison of the chemical composition is not conclusive. The sole hint towards what material was stuck in the filter pore holes came from the analysis of the dried flakes from the surface of the fouled 0.1-{micro}m disk. A cleaning approach developed by SRNL personnel to deal with fouled disks has been found adaptable when using actual Hanford samples. The use of 1 M nitric acid improved the filtrate flux by approximately two times; using the same simulants as in the non-rad test runs showed that the filtrate flux was restored to 1/2 of its original amount.

  19. Tuning metal–carboxylate coordination in crystalline metal–organic frameworks through surfactant media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Junkuo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Ye, Kaiqi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); State Key Laboratory of Supramolecular Structure and Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); He, Mi [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Xiong, Wei-Wei; Cao, Wenfang; Lee, Zhi Yi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Wang, Yue [State Key Laboratory of Supramolecular Structure and Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Wu, Tom [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Huo, Fengwei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Liu, Xiaogang [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Institute of Materials Research Engineering, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); Zhang, Qichun, E-mail: qczhang@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Although it has been widely demonstrated that surfactants can efficiently control the size, shape and surface properties of micro/nanocrystals of metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) due to the strong interactions between surfactants and crystal facets of MOFs, the use of surfactants as reaction media to grow MOF single crystals is unprecedented. In addition, compared with ionic liquids, surfactants are much cheaper and can have multifunctional properties such as acidic, basic, neutral, cationic, anionic, or even block. These factors strongly motivate us to develop a new synthetic strategy: growing crystalline MOFs in surfactants. In this report, eight new two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) MOFs have been successfully synthesized in an industrially-abundant and environmentally-friendly surfactant: polyethylene glycol-200 (PEG-200). Eight different coordination modes of carboxylates, ranging from monodentate ?{sup 1} mode to tetra-donor coordination µ{sub 3}-?{sup 1}:?{sup 2}:?{sup 1} mode, have been founded in our research. The magnetic properties of Co-based MOFs were investigated and MOF NTU-Z6b showed a phase transition with a Curie temperature (T{sub c}) at 5 K. Our strategy of growing crystalline MOFs in surfactant could offer exciting opportunities for preparing novel MOFs with diverse structures and interesting properties. - Graphical abstract: Surfactants have been used as reaction media to grow MOF single crystals for the first time. Eight new two-dimensional or three-dimensional MOFs were successfully synthesized in surfactant polyethylene glycol-200 (PEG-200). Coordination modes of carboxylates up to eight were founded. Our strategy of growing crystalline MOFs in surfactant could offer exciting opportunities for preparing novel MOFs with diverse structures and interesting properties. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Surfactant-thermal synthesis of crystalline metal–organic frameworks. • Eight new 2-D or 3-D metal–organic frameworks. • Eight different metal–carboxylate coordination modes.

  20. Report of exploratory trenching for the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresen, M.D.; Weiss, R.B.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three exploratory trenches, totaling about 1,300 ft in length were excavated and logged across the site of a proposed Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF), to assess whether or not active Greenville fault zone, located about 4100 ft to the northeast, pass through or within 200 ft of the site. The layout of the trenches (12-16 ft deep) was designed to provide continuous coverage across the DWTF site and an area within 200 ft northeast and southwest of the site. Deposits exposed in the trench walls are primarily of clay, and are typical of weakly cemented silty sand to sandy silt with the alluvial deposits in the area. Several stream channels were encountered that appear to have an approximated east-west orintation. The channel deposits consist of well-sorted, medium to coarse-grained sand and gravel. A well-developed surface soil is laterally continuous across all three trenches. The soil reportedly formed during late Pleistocene time (about 35,000 to 40,000 yr before present) based on soil stratigraphic analyses. A moderately to well-developed buried soil is laterally continuous in all three trenches, except locally where it has been removed by channelling. This buried soil apparently formed about 100,000 yr before present. At least one older, discontinuous soil is present below the 100,000-yr-old soil in some locations. The age of the older soil is unknown. At several locations, two discontinuous buried soils were observed between the surface soil and the 100,000-yr-old soil. Various overlapping stratigraphic units could be traced across the trenches providing a continuous datum of at least 100,000 yr to assess the presence or absence of faulting. The continuity of stratigraphic units in all the trenches demonstrated that no active faults pass through or within 200 ft of the proposed DWTF site.

  1. Test Series 2. 3 detailed test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Test Series 2.3 is chronologically the second of the five sub-series of tests which comprise Test Series 2, the second major Test Series as part of the combustion research phase to be carried out at the Grimethorpe Experimental Pressurised Fluidised Bed Combustion Facility. Test Series 2.3 will consist of 700 data gathering hours which is expected to require some 1035 coal burning hours. The tests will be performed using US supplied coal and dolomite. This will be the first major series of tests on the Facility with other than the UK datum coal and dolomite. The document summarises the background to the facility and the experimental program. Described are modifications which have been made to the facility following Test Series 2.1 and a series of Screening Tests. Detailed test objectives are specified as are the test conditions for the experiments which comprise the test series. The test results will provide information on the effects of the bed temperature, excess air level, Ca/S ratio, number of coal feed lines, and combustion efficiency and sulphur retention. A significant aspect of the test series will be part load tests which will investigate the performance of the facility under conditions of turn down which simulate load following concepts specified for two combined cycle concepts, i.e., their CFCC combined cycle and a turbo charged combined cycle. The material test plan is also presented. The principal feature of the materials programme is the planned exposure of a set of static turbine blade specimens in a cascade test loop to the high temperature, high pressure flue gas. A schedule for the programme is presented as are contingency plans.

  2. Mid-Continent basin: a reappraisal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, J.R.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the largest unevaluated basins in the Mid-Continent is the Salina basin in Kansas and its extension into eastern Nebraska. The purpose of this study is to update all older data, reconstruct new maps, and reappraise the potential for further exploration. The last comprehensive publications on the area were in 1948 and 1956. The Salina basin includes 12,700 mi/sup 2/ (33,000 km/sup 2/) in north-central Kansas, and approximately 7000 mi/sup 2/ (18,000 km/sup 2/) in east-central Nebraska. The basin is delineated by the zero isopach of Mississippian rocks bordering the basin. The Central Kansas uplift borders the basin on the southwest and Nemaha ridge on the east; the southern limit is an ill-defined saddle in the vicinity of T17S. Boundaries of the Nebraska basin are less well defined, but the axis of the basin trends directly north from the Kansas border along the boundary of Ts10 and 11W, to 41/sup 0/N lat., and then bifurcates to the northwest toward the Siouxiana arch and northeast for an unknown distance. Conventional structure maps have been constructed on several horizons, and a series of cross sections depicts anomalous structures. Recent gravity, magnetic, and seismic reflection profiling also provide information on basement tectonics which may influence structures in the younger sediments. Basement depth ranges from 600 ft (180 m) on the northeast Nemaha ridge boundary of the basin, to a depth of 4750 ft (1450 m) or -3000 ft (-915 m) below sea-level datum in Jewell County; therefore, there may be an approximate total of 10,000 mi/sup 3/ (42,000 km/sup 3/ of sediments for future exploration.

  3. Favorable Geochemistry from Springs and Wells in COlorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno Nevada Originator: United States Geological Survey (USGS) Originator: Colorado Geological Survey Publication Date: 2012 Title: Favorable Geochemistry Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Reno Nevada Publisher: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Description: This layer contains favorable geochemistry for high-temperature geothermal systems, as interpreted by Richard "Rick" Zehner. The data is compiled from the data obtained from the USGS. The original data set combines 15,622 samples collected in the State of Colorado from several sources including 1) the original Geotherm geochemical database, 2) USGS NWIS (National Water Information System), 3) Colorado Geological Survey geothermal sample data, and 4) original samples collected by R. Zehner at various sites during the 2011 field season. These samples are also available in a separate shapefile FlintWaterSamples.shp. Data from all samples were reportedly collected using standard water sampling protocols (filtering through 0.45 micron filter, etc.) Sample information was standardized to ppm (micrograms/liter) in spreadsheet columns. Commonly-used cation and silica geothermometer temperature estimates are included. Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4515595.841032 m Left: 149699.513964 m Right: 757959.309388 m Bottom: 4104156.435530 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Contact Person: Richard “Rick” Zehner Address: 3740 Barron Way City: Reno State: NV Postal Code: 89511 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 775-737-7806 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  4. Drunkard`s wash project: Coalbed methane production from Ferron coals in east-central Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemarre, R.A. [Texaco Exploration and Production, Inc., Denver, CO (United States); Burns, T.D. [River Gas Corporation, Northport, AL (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Drunkard`s Wash Project produces dry, coalbed methane gas from coals within the Ferron Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale. The project covers 120,000 acres on the western flank of the San Rafael Uplift in east-central Utah. Gas was first produced into the sales line in January 1993. The field is being developed on 160 acre spacing with 73 wells currently producing 32.2 MMCFD for an average of 437 MCFD/well. Thirty three of those wells have been producing for 32 months and now average 637 MCFD/well. Most of the wells show a classic coalbed methane negative decline curve with increasing gas rates as the reservoir pressure declines due to production of water. Daily water production is 14,500 BPD, for an average of 199 BWPD/well. Total coal thickness ranges from 7 ft. to 48 ft., with an average of 24 ft. The coals occur in 3 to 6 seams at depths of 1350 to 2450 ft. The coal rank is high volatile A&B bituminous. We can not yet see a correlation between total coal thickness and current production. All wells are cased and hydraulically stimulated and most require pumping units to handle the large volumes of water. However, 22 wells do not require pumps and flow unassisted to the surface. The structure consists of monoclinal westward dip. A thin tonstein layer in the bottom coal seam serves as an excellent datum for mapping. Enhanced production is encountered along a southwest-plunging nose that probably formed additional fracture permeability within the coals. Northeast-trending reverse faults with small displacement appear to compartmentalize the reservoir. The Ferron coals were deposited in a river-dominated deltaic system that prograded to the east and southeast during Turonian-Coniacian (Upper Cretaceous) time. The Ferron Sandstone Member represents an eastward-thinning elastic wedge that was deposited during regression of the Western Interior Cretaceous seaway.

  5. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Alamosa Saguache Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4217727.601630 m Left: 394390.400264 m Right: 460179.841813 m Bottom: 4156258.036086 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  6. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Garfield County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Garfield Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Garfield County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4441550.552290 m Left: 271445.053363 m Right: 359825.053363 m Bottom: 4312490.552290 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  7. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Routt County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Routt Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Routt County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4501071.574000 m Left: 311351.975000 m Right: 359681.975000 m Bottom: 4447251.574000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  8. Geothermal Target Areas in Colorado as Identified by Remote Sensing Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Target Areas Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the areas identified as targets of potential geothermal activity. The Criteria used to identify the target areas include: hot/warm surface exposures modeled from ASTER/Landsat satellite imagery and geological characteristics, alteration mineral commonly associated with hot springs (clays, Si, and FeOx) modeled from ASTER and Landsat data, Coloradodo Geological Survey (CGS) known thermal hot springs/wells and heat-flow data points, Colorado deep-seated fault zones, weakened basement identified from isostatic gravity data, and Colorado sedimentary and topographic characteristics Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4546251.530446 m Left: 151398.567298 m Right: 502919.587395 m Bottom: 4095100.068903 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  9. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Chaffee County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Chaffee Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Chaffee County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4333432.368072 m Left: 366907.700763 m Right: 452457.816015 m Bottom: 4208271.566715 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  10. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Archuleta County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Archuleta Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Archuleta County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4144691.792023 m Left: 285531.662851 m Right: 348694.182686 m Bottom: 4097005.210304 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  11. Colorado Heat Flow Data from IHFC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: The International Heat Flow Commission (IHFC) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado IHFC Data Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: Abstract: This layer contains the heat flow sites and data of the State of Colorado compiled from the International Heat Flow Commission (IHFC) of the International Association of Seismology and Physics of the Earth's Interior (IASPEI) global heat flow database (www.heatflow.und.edu/index2.html). The data include different items: Item number, descriptive code, name of site, latitude and longitude, elevation, depth interval, number of temperature data, temperature gradient, number of conductivity measurement, average conductivity, number of heat generation measurements, average heat production, heat flow, number of individual sites, references, and date of publication. Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4522121.800672 m Left: 165356.134075 m Right: 621836.776246 m Bottom: 4097833.419676 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude Of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  12. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Dolored County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Dolores Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Dolores County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4186234.213315 m Left: 212558.673056 m Right: 232922.811862 m Bottom: 4176781.467043 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  13. Heat flow and subsurface temperature distributions in central and western New York. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, D.S.; Fromm, K.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Initiation of a geothermal energy program in western and central New York requires knowledge of subsurface temperatures for targeting areas of potential resources. The temperature distribution in possible geothermal reservoirs, calculated from heat flow measurements and modeling techniques, shows that a large area of New York can be considered for exploitation of geothermal resources. Though the temperatures at currently accessible depths show the availability of only a low-temperature (less than 100/sup 0/C), direct-use resource, this can be considered as an alternative for the future energy needs of New York State. From analysis of bottom-hole-temperature data and direct heat flow measurements, estimates of temperatures in the Cambrian Sandstones provide the basis of the economic evaluation of the reservoir. This reservoir contains the extractable fluids needed for targeting a potential geothermal well site in the low-temperature geothermal target zone. In the northern section of the Appalachian basin, reservoir temperatures in the Cambrian are below 50/sup 0/C but may be over 80/sup 0/C in the deeper parts of the basin in southern New York State. Using a minimum of 50/sup 0/C as a useful reservoir temperature, temperatures in excess of this value are encountered in the Theresa Formation at depths in excess of 1300 meters. Considering a maximum depth for economical drilling to be 2500 meters with present technology, the 2500 meters to the Theresa (sea level datum) forms the lower limit of the geothermal resource. Temperatures in the range of 70/sup 0/C to 80/sup 0/C are predicted for the southern portion of New York State.

  14. Historic Habitat Opportunities and Food-Web Linkages of Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River Estuary and Their Implications for Managing River Flows and Restoring Estuarine Habitat, Physical Sciences Component, Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay, David A. [Portland State University

    2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-term changes and fluctuations in river flow, water properties, tides, and sediment transport in the Columbia River and its estuary have had a profound effect on Columbia River salmonids and their habitat. Understanding the river-flow, temperature, tidal, and sediment-supply regimes of the Lower Columbia River (LCR) and how they interact with habitat is, therefore, critical to development of system management and restoration strategies. It is also useful to separate management and climate impacts on hydrologic properties and habitat. This contract, part of a larger project led by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), consists of three work elements, one with five tasks. The first work element relates to reconstruction of historic conditions in a broad sense. The second and third elements consist, respectively, of participation in project-wide integration efforts, and reporting. This report focuses on the five tasks within the historic reconstruction work element. It in part satisfies the reporting requirement, and it forms the basis for our participation in the project integration effort. The first task consists of several topics related to historic changes in river stage and tide. Within this task, the chart datum levels of 14 historic bathymetric surveys completed before definition of Columbia River Datum (CRD) were related to CRD, to enable analysis of these surveys by other project scientists. We have also modeled tidal datums and properties (lower low water or LLW, higher high water or HHW, mean water level or MWL, and greater diurnal tidal range or GDTR) as a function of river flow and tidal range at Astoria. These calculations have been carried for 10 year intervals (1940-date) for 21 stations, though most stations have data for only a few time intervals. Longer-term analyses involve the records at Astoria (1925-date) and Vancouver (1902-date). Water levels for any given river flow have decreased substantially (0.3-1.8 m, depending on river flow and tidal range), and tidal ranges have increased considerably (by a factor of 1.5 to 4 for most river-flow levels) since the 1900-1940 period at most stations, with the largest percentage changes occurring at upriver stations. These changes have been caused by a combination of changes in channel roughness, shape and alignment, changes in coastal tides, and (possibly) bed degradation. Tides are growing throughout the Northeast Pacific, and Astoria (Tongue Pt) has one of the most rapid rates of increase in tidal range in the entire Eastern Pacific, about 0.3m per century. More than half of this change appears to result from changes within the system, the rest from larger scale changes in coastal tides. Regression models of HHW have been used to estimate daily shallow water habitat (SWHA) available in a {approx}25 mile long reach of the system from Eagle Cliff to Kalama for 1925-2004 under four different scenarios (the four possible combinations of diked/undiked and observed flow/ virgin flow). More than 70% of the habitat in this reach has been lost (modern conditions vs. virgin flow with not dikes). In contrast, however, to the reach between Skamokawa and Beaver, selective dike removal (instead of a combination of dike removal and flow restoration) would suffice to increase spring SWHA. The second task consists of reconstruction of the hydrologic cycle before 1878, based on historic documents and inversion of tidal data collected before the onset of the historic flow record in 1878. We have a complete list of freshet times and peak flows for 1858-1877, and scattered freshet information for 1841-1857. Based on tidal data, we have reconstructed the annual flow cycles for 1870 and 1871; other time periods between 1854 and 1867 are under analysis. The three remaining tasks relate to post-1878 hydrologic conditions (flows, sediment supply and water temperature), and separation of the human and climate influences thereon. Estimated ob-served (sometimes routed), adjusted (corrected for reservoir manipulation) and virgin (corrected also for irrigation div

  15. TESTING OF A ROTARY MICROFILTER TO SUPPORT HANFORD APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, M; David Herman, D; David Stefanko, D; Samuel Fink, S

    2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) researchers are investigating and developing a rotary microfilter for solid-liquid separation applications at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Because of the success of that work, the Hanford Site is evaluating the use of the rotary microfilter for its Supplemental Pretreatment process. The authors performed rotary filter testing with a full-scale, 25-disk unit with 0.5 {micro} filter media manufactured by Pall Corporation using a Hanford AN-105 simulant at solids loadings of 0.06, 0.29, and 1.29 wt%. The conclusions from this testing are: (1) The filter flux at 0.06 wt% solids reached a near constant value at an average of 0.26 gpm/ft{sup 2} (6.25 gpm total). (2) The filter flux at 0.29 wt% solids reached a near constant value at an average of 0.17 gpm/ft{sup 2} (4 gpm total). (3) The filter flux at 1.29 wt% solids reached a near constant value at an average of 0.10 gpm/ft{sup 2} (2.4 gpm total). (4) Because of differences in solids loadings, a direct comparison between crossflow filter flux and rotary filter flux is not possible. The data show the rotary filter produces a higher flux than the crossflow filter, but the improvement is not as large as seen in previous testing. (5) Filtrate turbidity measured < 4 NTU in all samples collected. (6) During production, the filter should be rinsed with filtrate or dilute caustic and drained prior to an extended shutdown to prevent the formation of a layer of settled solids on top of the filter disks. (7) Inspection of the seal faces after {approx} 140 hours of operation showed an expected amount of initial wear, no passing of process fluid through the seal faces, and very little change in the air channeling grooves on the stationary face. (8) Some polishing was observed at the bottom of the shaft bushing. The authors recommend improving the shaft bushing by holding it in place with a locking ring and incorporated grooves to provide additional cooling. (9) The authors recommend that CH2MHill Hanford test other pore size media to determine the optimum pore size for Hanford waste.

  16. Development of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy instrumentatin for safeguards applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barefield Il, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clegg, Samuel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Le, Loan A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lopez, Leon N [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 2006, a Technical Meeting on Application of Laser Spectrometry Techniques in IAEA Safeguards was held at IAEA headquarters (HQ). One of the principal recommendations from this meeting was the need to 'pursue the development of novel complementary access instrumentation based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the detection of gaseous and solid signatures and indicators of nuclear fuel cycle processes and associated materials.' Pursuant to this recommendation the Department of Safeguards (SG) under the Division of Technical Support (SGTS) convened the Experts and Users Advisory Meeting on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for Safeguards Applications. This meeting was held at IAEA HQ from July 7-11,2008 and hosted by the Novel Technologies Unit (NTU). The meeting was attended by 12 LIBS experts from the Czech Republic, the European Commission, France, the Republic of Korea, the United States of America, Germany, the United Kingdom of Great Britain, Canada, and Northern Ireland. After a presentation of the needs of the IAEA inspectors, the LIBS experts were in agreement that needs as presented could be partially or fully fulfilled using LIBS instrumentation. The needs of the IAEA inspectors were grouped in the following broad categories: (1) Improvements to in-field measurements/environmental sampling; (2) Monitoring status of activity in a Hot Cell; (3) Verifying status of activity at a declared facility via process monitoring; and (4) Need for pre-screening of environmental samples before analysis. Under the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) Los Alamos National Laboratory is exploring three potential applications of LIBS for international safeguards. As part of this work, we are developing: (1) a user-friendly man-portable LIBS system to characterize samples across a wide range of elements in the periodic table from hydrogen up to heavy elements like plutonium and uranium; (2) a LIBS system that can be deployed in harsh environments such as gloveboxes and hot cells providing relative compositional analysis of process streams for example ratios like Cm/Pu and Cm/U; and (3) an inspector field deployable system that can be used to analyze the elemental composition of microscopic quantities of samples containing plutonium and uranium. In this paper we will describe our current development and performance testing results both in a fixed lab and measurements in field deployable configurations using LIBS instrumentation developed for applications to international safeguards.

  17. Simulation model finned water-air-coil withoutcondensation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetter, Michael

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple simulation model of a finned water-to- air coil without condensation is presented. The model belongs to a collection of simulation models that allows eficient computer simulation of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. The main emphasis of the models is short computation time and use of input data that are known in the design process of an HVAC system. The target of the models is to describe the behavior of HVAC components in the part load operation mode, which is becoming increasingly important for energy efficient HVAC systems. The models are intended to be used for yearly energy calculation or load calculation with time steps of about 10 minutes or larger. Short-time dynamic effects, which are of interest for different aspects of control performance, are neglected. The part load behavior of the coil is expressed in terms of the nominal condition and the dimensionless variation of the heat transfer with change of mass flow and temperature on the water side and the air side. The effectiveness- NTU relations are used to parametrize the convective heat transfer at nominal conditions and to compute the part load conditions. Geometrical data for the coil are not required, The calculation of the convective heat transfer coefficients at nominal conditions is based on the ratio of the air side heat transfer coefficients multiplied by the fin eficiency and divided by the water side heat transfer coefficient. In this approach, the only geometrical information required are the cross section areas, which are needed to calculate the~uid velocities. The formulas for estimating this ratio are presented. For simplicity the model ignores condensation. The model is static and uses only explicit equations. The explicit formulation ensures short computation time and numerical stability. This allows using the model with sophisticated engineering methods such as automatic system optimization. The paper fully outlines the algorithm description and its simplifications. It is not tailored for a particular simulation program to ensure easy implementation in any simulation program.

  18. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Garfield County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Garfield Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Garfield County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4442180.552290 m Left: 268655.053363 m Right: 359915.053363 m Bottom: 4312490.552290 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  19. Remotely Sensed Thermal Anomalies in western Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Landsat Thermal Anomalies Western Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the areas identified as areas of anomalous surface temperature from Landsat satellite imagery in Western Colorado. Data was obtained for two different dates. The digital numbers of each Landsat scene were converted to radiance and the temperature was calculated in degrees Kelvin and then converted to degrees Celsius for each land cover type using the emissivity of that cover type. And this process was repeated for each of the land cover types (open water, barren, deciduous forest and evergreen forest, mixed forest, shrub/scrub, grassland/herbaceous, pasture hay, and cultivated crops). The temperature of each pixel within each scene was calculated using the thermal band. In order to calculate the temperature an average emissivity value was used for each land cover type within each scene. The NLCD 2001 land cover classification raster data of the zones that cover Colorado were downloaded from USGS site and used to identify the land cover types within each scene. Areas that had temperature residual greater than 2?, and areas with temperature equal to 1? to 2?, were considered Landsat modeled very warm and warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies), respectively Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4546381.234113 m Left: 140556.857021 m Right: 573390.000000 m Bottom: 4094583.641581 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  20. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Routt County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Routt Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Routt County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4501071.574000 m Left: 311351.975000 m Right: 359411.975000 m Bottom: 4447521.574000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  1. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Dolores County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Dolores Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Dolores County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4186234.213315 m Left: 212558.673056 m Right: 232922.811862 m Bottom: 4176781.467043 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  2. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Chaffee County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Chaffee Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Chaffee County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4333432.368072 m Left: 366907.700763 m Right: 452457.816015 m Bottom: 4208271.566715 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  3. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Archuleta County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Archuleta Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Archuleta County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies). Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4144825.235807 m Left: 285446.256851 m Right: 350577.338852 m Bottom: 4096962.250137 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  4. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Alamosa Saguache Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4217727.601630 m Left: 394390.400264 m Right: 460179.841813 m Bottom: 4156258.036086 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  5. Archuleta County CO Lineaments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Publication Date: 2012 Title: Archuleta Lineaments Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Reno Nevada Publisher: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Description: This layer traces apparent topographic and air-photo lineaments in the area around Pagosa springs in Archuleta County, Colorado. It was made in order to identify possible fault and fracture systems that might be conduits for geothermal fluids. Geothermal fluids commonly utilize fault and fractures in competent rocks as conduits for fluid flow. Geothermal exploration involves finding areas of high near-surface temperature gradients, along with a suitable “plumbing system” that can provide the necessary permeability. Geothermal power plants can sometimes be built where temperature and flow rates are high. To do this, georeferenced topographic maps and aerial photographs were utilized in an existing GIS, using ESRI ArcMap 10.0 software. The USA_Topo_Maps and World_Imagery map layers were chosen from the GIS Server at server.arcgisonline.com, using a UTM Zone 13 NAD27 projection. This line shapefile was then constructed over that which appeared to be through-going structural lineaments in both the aerial photographs and topographic layers, taking care to avoid manmade features such as roads, fence lines, and right-of-ways. These lineaments may be displaced somewhat from their actual location, due to such factors as shadow effects with low sun angles in the aerial photographs. Note: This shape file was constructed as an aid to geothermal exploration in preparation for a site visit for field checking. We make no claims as to the existence of the lineaments, their location, orientation, and nature. Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4132831.990103 m Left: 311979.997741 m Right: 331678.289280 m Bottom: 4116067.165795 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Contact Person: Richard “Rick” Zehner Address: 3740 Barron Way City: Reno State: NV Postal Code: 89511 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 775-737-7806 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  6. Shallow (2-meter) temperature surveys in Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado 2m Survey Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Reno Nevada Publisher: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Description: Shallow temperature surveys are useful in early-stage geothermal exploration to delineate surface outflow zones, with the intent to identify the source of upwelling, usually a fault. Detailed descriptions of the 2-meter survey method and equipment design can be found in Coolbaugh et al. (2007) and Sladek et al. (2007), and are summarized here. The survey method was devised to measure temperature as far below the zone of solar influence as possible, have minimal equilibration time, and yet be portable enough to fit on the back of an all-terrain vehicle (ATV); Figure 2). This method utilizes a direct push technology (DPT) technique where 2.3 m long, 0.54” outer diameter hollow steel rods are pounded into the ground using a demolition hammer. Resistance temperature devices (RTD) are then inserted into the rods at 2-meter depths, and allowed to equilibrate for one hour. The temperatures are then measured and recorded, the rods pulled out of the ground, and re-used at future sites. Usually multiple rods are planted over the course of an hour, and then the sampler returns back to the first station, measures the temperatures, pulls the rods, and so on, to eliminate waiting time. At Wagon Wheel Gap, 32 rods were planted around the hot springs between June 20 and July 1, 2012. The purpose was to determine the direction of a possible upflow fault or other structure. Temperatures at 1.5m and 2m depths were measured and recorded in the attribute table of this point shapefile. Several anomalous temperatures suggest that outflow is coming from a ~N60W striking fault or shear zone that contains the quartz-fluorite-barite veins of the adjacent patented mining claims. It should be noted that temperatures at 2m depth vary according to the amount of solar heating from above, as well as possible geothermal heating from below. Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4490310.560635 m Left: 150307.008238 m Right: 433163.213617 m Bottom: 4009565.915398 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Contact Person: Richard “Rick” Zehner Address: 3740 Barron Way City: Reno State: NV Postal Code: 89511 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 775-737-7806 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  7. Roles of nanoclusters in shear banding and plastic deformation of bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieh, T.G.

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During the course of this research we published 33 papers in various physics/material journals. We select four representing papers in this report and their results are summarized as follows. I. To study shear banding process, it is pertinent to know the intrinsic shear strain rate within a propagating shear band. To this aim, we used nanoindentation technique to probe the mechanical response of a Au49Ag5.5Pd2.3Cu26.9Si16.3 bulk metallic glass in locality and found notable pop-in events associated with shear band emission. Using a free volume model and under the situation when temperature and stress/hardness are fixed result in an equation, which predicts that hardness serration caused by pop-in decreases exponentially with the strain rate. Our data are in good agreement with the prediction. The result also predicts that, when strain rate is higher than a critical strain rate of 1700 s^-1, there will be no hardness serration, thereby no pop-in. In other words, multiple shear bandings will take place and material will flow homogeneously. The critical strain rate of 1700 s^-1 can be treated as the intrinsic strain rate within a shear band. We subsequently carried out a simulation study and showed that, if the imposed strain rate was over , the shear band spacing would become so small that the entire sample would virtually behave like one major shear band. Using the datum strain rate =1700 s^-1 and based on a shear band nucleation model proposed by us, the size of a shear-band nucleus in Au-BMG was estimated to be 3 Ć?Ā?Ć?Ā? 10^6 atoms, or a sphere of ~30 nm in diameter. II. Inspired by the peculiar result published in a Science article Ć?Ā¢Ć?Ā?Ć?Ā?Super Plastic Bulk Metallic Glasses at Room TemperatureĆ?Ā¢Ć?Ā?Ć?Ā¯, we synthesized the Zr-based bulk metallic glass with a composition identical to that in the paper (Zr64.13Cu15.75Ni10.12Al10) and, subsequently, tested in compression at the same slow strain rate (~10^-4 s^-1). We found that the dominant deformation mode is always single shear. The stress-strain curve exhibited serrated pattern in the plastic region, which conventionally has been attributed to individual shear band propagation. The scanning electron micrographs taken from the deformed sample surface revealed regularly spaced striations. Analysis indicates that the observed stress-strain serrations are intimately related to the striations on the shear surface, suggesting the serrations were actually caused slip-and-stick shear along the principal shear plane. We further use video camera to conduct in situ compression experiments to unambiguously confirm the one-to-one temporal and spatial correspondence between the intermittent sliding and flow serration. This preferential shear band formation along the principal shear plane is, in fact, a natural consequence of Mode II crack, independent of strain softening or hardening, usually claimed in the literature. III. Flow serration in compression of metallic glasses is caused by the formation and propagation of localized shear bands. These shear bands propagate at an extremely high speed, so high that a load cell and load frame were unable to capture the details of the dynamic event. To subdue this problem, we conducted uniaxial compression on Zr64.13Cu15.75Ni10.12Al10 bulk metallic glass using a high-speed camera to capture the sample image and also high-sensitivity strain gauges attached to the test samples to directly measure the strain. The displacement-time curves obtained from the test and a magnified version of the displacement burst reveals clearly a three-step (acceleration, steady-state, and deceleration) process during shear band propagation. The fastest propagating speed occurring at the steady state is calculated as 8Ć?Ā?Ć?Ā?10^2 Ć?Ā?Ć?Āµm/s. This speed is about 1,000 times faster than the crosshead speed. This explains the gradual disappearance of flow serration at higher strain rates previously reported during compression of