National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for datum ntu nephelometric

  1. Prince House-NTU Shui-Yuan Dorms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Hao-hua

    Prince House- NTU Shui-Yuan Dorms Prince House- NTU Hsiu-Chi House Incubation Center Bldg Dept. of Entomology 5th Men's Dorm 8th Men's Dorm Prince House - NTU Chang-Hsing Dorms Civil

  2. Prince House-NTU Shui-Yuan Dorms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Hao-hua

    Prince House- NTU Shui-Yuan Dorms Prince House- NTU Hsiu-Chi House Incubation Center Bldg-Yuan Hall Halcyon House Bldg. No. 1 Agricultural Exhibition Hall New Moon Pavilion NTU Visitor Center Lesyue's Dorm Fang-Lan Mansion Dept. of Animal Science & Technology Environment Research Bldg. Recycling Center

  3. Microsoft Word - 2902ntu.dot

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework uses concrete and realistic microscopicWednesday,050-P (3-2008)902-NTU

  4. English Literature Resources of NTU Library National Taiwan University Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    English Literature Resources of NTU Library National Taiwan University Library #12;MLA Inter- national Bibliography Literature Online, Early English Books Online Naxos Spoken Word Library19 7 14 15 Naxos Spoken Word Library Literature Online Literature Resource Center Shakespeare

  5. Speaker: Prof. Fa-Hsuan Lin (Institute of Biomedical Engineering, NTU) Dr. Yi-Cheng Hsu (Institute of Biomedical Engineering, NTU)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Speaker: Prof. Fa-Hsuan Lin (Institute of Biomedical Engineering, NTU) Dr. Yi-Cheng Hsu (Institute of Biomedical Engineering, NTU) Title: Magnetic resonance imaging of the human brain: progress, challenges

  6. 94753007@nccu.edu.tw zmgao@ntu.edu.tw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94753007@nccu.edu.tw zmgao@ntu.edu.tw chaolin@nccu.edu.tw changcy@ntnu.edu.tw (IEA] IEA TIMSS [3] TIMSS (sublanguage) #12;(controlled-language) [4] [1] TIMSS 3 i i. Google Translate[12] [19] Http Connection Interface html html ii. #12; IEA

  7. NTU Library User's Guide w w w . l i b . n t u . e d u . t w

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    My L ve Affairwith Library NTU Library User's Guide #12;w w w . l i b . n t u . e d u . t w NTU Library always welcomes you #12;C Get to know your library To be an information-seeking pro How to find to listen to music, watch movies... All your libraries Main Campus College of Law and Social Sciences

  8. Page 1 of 4 NTU EcoCampus Environnemental Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    approach over 3years ­ Jan 2012. Procurement Objective: To limit the environmental impact of NTU an action plan to reduce Estates & Resources vehicle fleet environmental impacts - Aug 2011. · Roll out projects e.g. wind turbines at Brackenhurst/ photovoltaic power generation 10 year plan­ Feb 2012

  9. w w w . l i b . n t u . e d u . t w NTU Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    #12;w w w . l i b . n t u . e d u . t w NTU Library always welcomes you #12;Get to know your library To be an information-seeking pro A wonderful place to stay I want to read books... I want to listen to music, watch movies... All your libraries Main Campus College of Law and Social Sciences

  10. {tzshen,cjlin}@nlg.csie.ntu.edu.tw; hh_chen@csie.ntu.edu.tw "Why" "" ""

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    spread all over the hill. "since" "since" patterns patterns patterns 3 pattern pattern #12, and Marcinkiewicz, 1993) "PRP" "" "" Chevron had to shut down a crude-oil pipeline in the Bay area to check for leaks. ((S (NP-SBJ-1 Chevron) (VP had (S (NP-SBJ *-1) (VP to (VP shut (PRT down) (NP (NP a crude-oil

  11. NTU International Conference on Economics, Finance and Accounting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyuu, Yuh-Dauh

    of Hong Kong) Kevin C.W. Chen (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology) David Easley (Cornell, Johnson Graduate School of Management, Cornell University, Professor of Finance, Johnson Graduate School, Northwestern University, 1979 M.A. (Economics), Northwestern University, 1976 B.S. (Economics), University

  12. 1.0 1928 17 Summary of NTU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    .0 522 541 1063 59 International Exchanges 185 162 90 15 2 #12;30 5.0 Association of Pacific Rim and the Pacific, UMAP International Exchanges #12;31 5.0 International Exchanges #12;#12;

  13. New Moon Pavilion / NTU Visitor Center Sports Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Subjects Classroom Building Xiao-Fu Square Liberal Education Classroom Building Gymnasium Swimming Pool Sciences Freshman Classroom Building Mathematics Research Center Building Department of Mathematics Shih and Research Center, College of Management The Odeum 2nd Student Activity Center Building 2, College

  14. An NTU Cooperative Game Theoretic View of Manipulating Elections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Daniel

    voting rule may lead to a situation where some voter(s) are better off by casting votes different from). Formally, in the coalitional manipulation problem, introduced by Conitzer, Sand- holm, and Lang [5

  15. Reviewed and updated March 2013 NTU Sustainable Construction and Refurbishment Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    to energy efficiency and costs in use. Achieve British Research Establishment Environmental Assessment government targets, for example zero carbon new build non domestic buildings by 2019 and at least 80% carbon

  16. *Corresponding author. Tel: (65) 6790-6235. Email: arbhatnagar@ntu.edu.sg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graves, Stephen C.

    ). The company operates a manufacturing factory in Europe and many distribution facilities. Raw materials by the multi-stage distribution system of a computer printer peripherals manufacturer (see Figure 1 and components are manufactured and assembled into bulk products at the factory. These bulk products

  17. Learning with Augmented Features for Heterogeneous Domain Lixin Duan S080003@ntu.edu.sg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Dong

    . Copyright 2012 by the author(s)/owner(s). learning (a.k.a., domain adaptation), as a new machine learning data from the target domain by leveraging a large amount of labeled data from other existing domains (a.k.a

  18. Nonlinear analysis of the three-dimensional datum transformation [conformal group C7(3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuttgart, Universität

    . Grafarend, J. L. Awange Department of Geodesy and GeoInformatics, University of Stuttgart, Geschwister

  19. Vortrge im Sommersemester 2012 im SFB Datum Referent(in) Herkunft Thema Ort Videobertragung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madlener, Klaus

    Kohlenhydrat- Karlsruhe liganden 22.05.2012 Prof. Dr. Klaus MĂĽllen MPI fĂĽr Polymerforschung Mainz Ist die-couplings 19.06.2012 Jun.Prof. Dr. M. Bauer TU Kaiserslautern Chemie und Synchrotronstrahlung: Von den

  20. 2015/06/03(new-updates) The 2015 Academia Sinica Shuttle Bus Service Schedule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    NTU Information Building( near to Starbucks on Xinhai Road) NTU Fu Bell NTU Multi-Purpose Classroom Building( near to Starbucks on Xinhai Road) NTU Fu Bell NTU Multi-Purpose Classroom Building ()( 3 ) Bus Kong Monument) NTU Information Building( near to Starbucks on Xinhai Road) A.S. 2. 09:40 A.S. NTU

  1. () 102 10 26 1 () 103 3 22 3 23

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    ; 103 3 2223 ) () () () () () () ) () 103 3 6 5 () myNTU () https://info2.ntu.edu.tw/register/flex/main.html () 1.- 2.- 3.- () myNTU () 103 3 12 http://ann.cc.ntu.edu.tw/ http://www.pe.ntu.edu.tw/new/sports_event.html; 103 3 1721 () () () 103 3 6 5 () myNTU () myNTU : https://info2.ntu.edu.tw/register/flex/main.html

  2. NATIONAL TAIWAN UNIVERSITY ACADEMIC DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION National Taiwan University Academic Development Foundation was established by NTU alumni to support the advancement of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    GIFT TO NATIONAL TAIWAN UNIVERSITY ACADEMIC DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION National Taiwan University the purpose and/or beneficiary of your gift: University Endowment Library Fund For # __________ journal (Please find the # info on the library website.) General Library Fund Other

  3. Optimal design and control strategies for novel combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems. Part I of II, datum design conditions and approach.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colella, Whitney G.

    2010-06-01

    Energy network optimization (ENO) models identify new strategies for designing, installing, and controlling stationary combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems (FCSs) with the goals of (1) minimizing electricity and heating costs for building owners and (2) reducing emissions of the primary greenhouse gas (GHG) - carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). A goal of this work is to employ relatively inexpensive simulation studies to discover more financially and environmentally effective approaches for installing CHP FCSs. ENO models quantify the impact of different choices made by power generation operators, FCS manufacturers, building owners, and governments with respect to two primary goals - energy cost savings for building owners and CO{sub 2} emission reductions. These types of models are crucial for identifying cost and CO{sub 2} optima for particular installations. Optimal strategies change with varying economic and environmental conditions, FCS performance, the characteristics of building demand for electricity and heat, and many other factors. ENO models evaluate both 'business-as-usual' and novel FCS operating strategies. For the scenarios examined here, relative to a base case of no FCSs installed, model results indicate that novel strategies could reduce building energy costs by 25% and CO{sub 2} emissions by 80%. Part I of II articles discusses model assumptions and methodology. Part II of II articles illustrates model results for a university campus town and generalizes these results for diverse communities.

  4. Journal Citation Reports JCRSCISSCIIF 15% Web of ScienceWoS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Thrombosuction and Tirofiban Infusion (ITTI) trial Department of Internal Medicine, NTU Hospital Department

  5. Joint CQSE and CASTS Seminar Weekly Seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    -Ming Lu National Center for High Performance Computing PLACE Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU

  6. At the Intersection of Applied Formal Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmerman, Daniel M.

    of Technology University of Washington Tacoma NTU Graduate Seminar, - 7 January 2011 #12;Outline · Applied

  7. September 2011 Publicado por la O cina de Asuntos Internacionales Toda la informacin contenida en este folleto est disponible en linea. Para informacin ms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    requeridos Hay dos centros de lenguaje en NTU. Por favor contac- tarlos directamente para la solicitud

  8. Effects of Rain Attenuation on Satellite Video Transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkler, Stefan

    10 GHz. Raindrops absorb and scatter radio wave energy, which degrades the reliability Technological University (NTU), Singapore 639798, email: eyhlee@ntu.edu.sg Cheetah Technologies, San Jose, CA

  9. Administration and Service Buildings Instructional Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Hao-hua

    Dormitories Others Prince House- NTU Shui-Yuan Dorms Prince House- NTU Hsiu-Chi House Incubation Center Bldg-Yuan Hall Halcyon House Bldg. No. 1 Agricultural Exhibition Hall New Moon Pavilion NTU Visitor Center Lesyue Research Center for Biotechnology 7th Men's Dorm Fang-Lan Mansion Dept. of Animal Science & Technology

  10. San Joaquin River Up-Stream DO TMDL Project Task 4: Monitoring Study Interim Task Report #3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    feet Orp Turbid+ Chl Chl Battery Flow mV NTU ug/L RFU voltsfeet Orp Turbid+ Chl Chl Battery Flow mV NTU ug/L RFU volts+ Chl Chl Battery mV NTU ug/L RFU volts Flow CFS 1591.84

  11. A User Guide for Marsh Analysis and Planning Tool Incorporating Tides and Elevations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................... 18 3) Vertical Datum (VDatum) Transformation ....................... 20 c. Digital Elemation Models on a combination of a digital elevation model (DEM) derived from GPS observations, local tidal datums, and grass

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A LAMINATED DISK FOR THE SPIN TEK ROTARY MICROFILTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, D.

    2011-06-03

    Funded by the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management, EM-31, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) partnered with SpinTek Filtration{trademark} to develop a filter disk that would withstand a reverse pressure or flow during operation of the rotary microfilter. The ability to withstand a reverse pressure and flow eliminates a potential accident scenario that could have resulted in damage to the filter membranes. While the original welded filter disks have been shown to withstand and reverse pressure/flow in the static condition, the filter disk design discussed in this report will allow a reverse pressure/flow while the disks are rotating. In addition, the laminated disk increases the flexibility during filter startup and cleaning operations. The new filter disk developed by SRNL and SpinTek is manufactured with a more open structure significantly reducing internal flow restrictions in the disk. The prototype was tested at the University of Maryland and demonstrated to withstand the reverse pressure due to the centrifugal action of the rotary filter. The tested water flux of the disk was demonstrated to be 1.34 gpm in a single disk test. By comparison, the water flux of the current disk was 0.49 gpm per disk during a 25 disk test. The disk also demonstrated rejection of solids by filtering a 5 wt % Strontium Carbonate slurry with a filtrate clarity of less the 1.4 Nephelometric Turbidity Units (NTU) throughout the two hour test. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been working with SpinTek Filtration{trademark} to adapt the rotary microfilter for radioactive service in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. One potential weakness is the loose nature of the membrane on the filter disks. The current disk is constructed by welding the membrane at the outer edge of the disk. The seal for the center of the membrane is accomplished by an o-ring in compression for the assembled stack. The remainder of the membrane is free floating on the disk. This construction requires that a positive pressure be applied to the rotary filter tank to prevent the membrane from rising from the disk structure and potentially contacting the filter turbulence promoter. In addition, one accident scenario is a reverse flow through the filtrate line due to mis-alignment of valves resulting in the membrane rising from the disk structure. The structural integrity of the current disk has been investigated, and shown that the disk can withstand a significant reverse pressure in a static condition. However, the disk will likely incur damage if the filter stack is rotated during a reverse pressure. The development of a laminated disk would have several significant benefits for the operation of the rotary filter including the prevention of a compromise in filter disk integrity during a reverse flow accident, increasing operational flexibility, and increasing the self cleaning ability of the filter. A laminated disk would allow the filter rotor operation prior to a positive pressure in the filter tank. This would prevent the initial dead-head of the filter and prevent the resulting initial filter cake buildup. The laminated disk would allow rotor operation with cleaning fluid, eliminating the need for a recirculation pump. Additionally, a laminated disk would allow a reverse flow of fluid through the membrane pores removing trapped particles.

  13. Impacts of Delayed Drawdown on Aquatic Biota and Water Quality in Seasonally Managed Wetlands of the Grasslands Ecological Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2009-01-01

    L) Turbidity (NTU) Solar Radiation (W/m 2 ) Label Date Ave.mg/L-P) Date Phosphate (mg/L-P) Solar Radiation (Ly/day)

  14. Center for Quantum Science and Engineering Weekly Seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    cells. Two kinds of polymer solar cells will be addressed; one is the bulk heterojunction solar cell solar cells Speaker: Prof. Chun-Wei Chen () Department of Materials Science and Engineering, NTU Place: Rm716, CCMS & New Physics Building, NTU Abstract Over the past decade, solar cells based on organic

  15. On the Search of Internet AS-level Topology Lung-de Shyu, Seng-Yong Lau and Polly Huang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Polly

    Electrical Engineering Department National Taiwan University r93921029@ntu.edu.tw sylau@ntu.edu.tw phuang to fit better a particular set of graph properties over time, there is a more fundamental need in knowing. For instance, Inet 3.0 [10] and TANG [1] are Internet AS-level graph generators based on the power

  16. Module Handbook Specialisation Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    Module Handbook Specialisation Wind Energy 2nd Semester for the Master Programme REMA/EUREC Course 2008/2009 NTU Athens Specialisation Provider: Wind Energy #12;Specialisation Wind Energy, NTU Athens, 2nd Semester Module 1/Wind Energy: Wind potential, Aerodynamics & Loading

  17. November 2012 Key Performance Indicator (KPI): Carbon Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    November 2012 Key Performance Indicator (KPI): Carbon Management NTU report our carbon footprint provided. The carbon emissions are calculated using Carbon Trust conversion factors, as used in NTU's EMS.64 2011/2012 18,130 4.20 The recorded changes in emissions are a result of carbon management projects

  18. Brief History 01 Library Organiza on 02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    The National Taiwan University (NTU) was established in March of 1928. The present Main Library was officially & Social Sciences Library Medical Library Organization Chart 2 #12;Library Collections The role of the NTU#12;Brief History 01 Library Organiza on 02 Library Collec ons 03 Electronic Resources Special

  19. US-Taiwan Workshop on Smart Structural Technology for Seismic Hazard Mitigation Taipei, Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    US-Taiwan Workshop on Smart Structural Technology for Seismic Hazard Mitigation Taipei, Taiwan Taiwan Univ., Taipei, Taiwan, r92521247@ntu.edu.tw 6 Professor, Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Taiwan Univ., Taipei, Taiwan, lohc0220@ntu.edu.tw #12;hydraulic dampers (SHD), electrorheological (ER

  20. doi: 10.3319/TAO.2014.03.27.01(T) * Corresponding author

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    by National Taiwan University (NTU) with 401 Micro-Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) accelerators. The network by the NTU system suggest damage and casualty locations. Equipped with a dense array of MEMS accelerometers direction which is one of the key indices used to estimate possible damage. The low cost MEMS accelerator

  1. ON BUILDING AN INTERNET GATEWAY FOR INTERNET TELEPHONY Cheng-Yue Chang and Ming-Syan Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, Shih-Hao

    ON BUILDING AN INTERNET GATEWAY FOR INTERNET TELEPHONY Cheng-Yue Chang and Ming-Syan Chen@arbor.ee.ntu.edu.tw; mschen@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw ABSTRACT In recent years, the Internet has emerged as an important collaborative, it is very important to construct a PSTN/Internet gateway for further experiments and devel- opments

  2. Thermal studies in a geothermal area: Report I. Thermal studies at Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah; Report II. Heat flow above an arbitrarily dipping plane of heat sources; and Report III. A datum correction for heat flow measurements made on an arbitrary surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, W.R.; Chapman, D.S.

    1980-10-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the three reports included in this volume on the interpretation of heat flow data in a geothermal area. (MHR)

  3. Mitteilung des Zentralen Prfungsamtes Aushang KlausurteilnehmerInnen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bongartz, Klaus

    Energiemanagement (WIE) MWiWi 1.7Marketing (1307) Prüfer/-in 1: Prof. Dr.Langner Datum: 22.07.2014 Prüfer/-in 2

  4. Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 1km...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    regions do not completely cover eastern China. Projection Parameters Projection LAMBERTAZIMUTHAL Datum WGS84 Zunits METERS Units METERS Spheroid DEFINED Major Axis...

  5. Wind: wind power density maps at 50 m above ground and 1km resolution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    regions do not completely cover eastern China. Projection Parameters Projection LAMBERTAZIMUTHAL Datum WGS84 Z-units METERS Units METERS Spheroid DEFINED Major Axis...

  6. Canadian Atlas Map Bundle Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Nunavut, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Saskatchewan, Yukon Keywords (Subject): Railroads, mountains, parks and islands. Data Type: Vector Digital Data Format: Shapefile Datum / Map Projection: NAD83

  7. Heat exchanger design for thermoelectric electricity generation from low temperature flue gas streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latcham, Jacob G. (Jacob Greco)

    2009-01-01

    An air-to-oil heat exchanger was modeled and optimized for use in a system utilizing a thermoelectric generator to convert low grade waste heat in flue gas streams to electricity. The NTU-effectiveness method, exergy, and ...

  8. Design and Transient Analysis of Passive Safety Cooling Systems for Advanced Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galvez, Cristhian

    2011-01-01

    specific to the heat exchanger type. Once the NTU iseach heat exchanger, both sizing and rating type of problemsHeat Exchanger parameter variation 8.5 OPTIMIZATION CRITERIA – COOLANT TYPE

  9. Emergency Care Management with Location-Aware Services Shih-wei Lee* , Shao-you Cheng*, Jane Yung-jen Hsu*, Polly Huangt, Chuang-wen You*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Polly

    . system proactively to infer event notifications for remind- The statistical data shows that NTU Hospital, location- finding patients, hospital assets (e.g. sickbeds, pumps, or aware services for indoor

  10. Social Status Compensation: Variations on the Sending of Cultural Remittances among Chinese Overseas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Min; Li, Xiangyi

    2014-01-01

    of California, Los Angeles Xiangyi LI Sun Yat-Sen UniversityMin Zhouzhoumin@ntu.edu.sg. Xiangyi Li, PhD. , is assistantOverseas 1 Min Zhou and Xiangyi Li INTRODUCTION Economic

  11. PipeProbe: Mapping Spatial Layout of Indoor Water Yu-Chen Chang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Polly

    PipeProbe: Mapping Spatial Layout of Indoor Water Pipelines Yu-Chen Chang1 , Tsung-Te Lai1 , Hao}@csie.ntu.edu.tw, phuang@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw Abstract--We propose PipeProbe, a mobile sensor system for mapping water- sule into the source of the water pipelines. As the PipeProbe cap- sule traverses the pipelines

  12. Method For Detecting The Presence Of A Ferromagnetic Object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roybal, Lyle G. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-11-21

    A method for detecting a presence or an absence of a ferromagnetic object within a sensing area may comprise the steps of sensing, during a sample time, a magnetic field adjacent the sensing area; producing surveillance data representative of the sensed magnetic field; determining an absolute value difference between a maximum datum and a minimum datum comprising the surveillance data; and determining whether the absolute value difference has a positive or negative sign. The absolute value difference and the corresponding positive or negative sign thereof forms a representative surveillance datum that is indicative of the presence or absence in the sensing area of the ferromagnetic material.

  13. GEOL 102 Historical Geology Exam 1 Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtz Jr., Thomas R.

    & Last Appearance Datum; Zone Other Methods of Stratigraphy Magnetostratigraphy (Chron); Sequence Stratigraphy (Sequence) #12;Geologic Column Chronostratigraphy (Rock) Geochronology (Time) Eonthem Eon Erathem Facies concept Transgressions (onlap sequences) & Regressions (offlap sequences) Sources of coastline

  14. Utility of Foraminifera in Paleoenvironmental and Paleoceanographic Research A Foram Primer by R. Mark Leckie University of Massachusetts, Amherst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leckie, Mark

    the surface ocean to the deepest seafloor to salt marshes and estuaries. Together with the remains of other actively do during academic or industry drilling operations. Ages of planktic foram datums have been

  15. Development of a strain rate sensitive ice material model for hail ice impact simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tippmann, Jeffery Dwayne

    2011-01-01

    60 Table B.1: Coordinates of Partition Datum Points forsize is 0.0075. Table B.1: Coordinates of Partition Datumcoordinates as ratios of the diameter of the sphere provided in Table

  16. arXiv:0907.0199v1[stat.AP]1Jul2009 High-Dimensional Density Estimation via SCA: An Example in the Modelling of Hurricane Tracks6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ann B..

    in the Modelling of Hurricane Tracks6 Susan M. Buchman, Ann B. Lee1 , Chad M. Schafer Department of Statistics variability of tropical cyclones in the North Atlantic; each datum in this case is an entire hurricane

  17. Web Unit Mining Finding and Classifying Subgraphs of Centre for Advanced Information Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aixin, Sun

    Web Unit Mining ­ Finding and Classifying Subgraphs of Web Pages Aixin Sun Centre for Advanced Technological University Singapore, 639798 aseplim@ntu.edu.sg ABSTRACT In web classification, most researchers assume that the ob- jects to classify are individual web pages from one or more web sites. In practice

  18. JOINT RETREAT ON COSMOLOGY AND LHC PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    (NCKU) Organizing Committee · Chuan-Hung Chen (NCKU) round table discussion. We-Fu Chang (NTHU) Chuan-Hung Chen (NCKU) Je-An Gu(NTU) Yu-Kuo Hsiao (AS) Chuan Hung Chen (NCKU) · Kingman Cheung (NTHU) · Cheng-Wei Chiang

  19. 968 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 23, NO. 6, JUNE 2004 TCG-S: Orthogonal Coupling of -Admissible

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Yao-Wen

    968 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 23, NO. 6], and transitive closure graph (TCG) [9]. Unlike the traditional classification of the slicing and nonslicing Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (e-mail: ywchang@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw). Digital Obje

  20. What to do with Your Waste All major types of waste are listed below. Click on the item that you want to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    and Freezers G Glass I IT/Computer Equipment H Hazardous Waste L Laboroatory Waste M Mobile Phones O Oil PWhat to do with Your Waste All major types of waste are listed below. Click on the item that you continue to expand and improve waste management at NTU. If you require further information contact a member

  1. CCCeeennnttteeerrr fffooorrr QQQuuuaaannntttuuummm SSSccciiieeennnccceee aaannnddd EEEnnngggiiinnneeeeeerrriiinnnggg WWWooorrrkkkssshhhoooppp ooonnn AAAtttooommmiiiccc,,, MMMooollleeecccuuulllaaarrr,,, aaannnddd OOOppptttiiicccaaalll

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    : June 27 (Saturday), 2009 Time: 9:00am ~ 5:00pm PlaceRM312 , CCMS and New Physics Building , NTU Workshop ThemeRecent Advances in AMO Science and Technology OrganizersTsin-Fu JiangInstitute of Physics of plasma-waveguide based soft x-ray lasers 11:2011:50 Controlling the carrier-envelope phase of Raman

  2. Optimal sequencing of a cooling tower with multiple cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Z.; Liu, J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the energy savings potential of multi-cell cooling tower optimal sequencing control methods. Annual tower fan energy usage is calculated for a counter-flow tower with multiple variable-speed fans. Effectiveness-NTU tower model...

  3. Journal Citation Reports JCRSCISSCIIF 15% Web of ScienceWoS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Oncology Summit 2013 Department of Internal Medicine, NTU College of Medicine Hepatitis Research Center%IFIF 201421 2 #12;IF IF IF10 BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL Volume: 347 Article Number: f6008 Amplification of HOXD-Harboring Chromosome Region Is Implicated in Mulitiple- Walled Carbon Nanotubes

  4. OFC Review 2013 Software Defined Network (SDN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    and transmission rate w/o hardware change Dedicated PCE to scale OpenFlow architectutre #12;Network ArchitectureOFC Review 2013 Software Defined Network (SDN) M. Farhan Habib May 10, 2013 Friday Group Meeting Networks Lab @ UCD #12;NTu3F: SDN in Today's Network #12;SDN: What and Why · Traditional distributed

  5. Sensor-Enhanced Mobility Prediction for Energy-Efficient Localization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Polly

    the mobility estimation error problem by utilizing addi- tional sensors on mobile targets. The result of Electrical Engineeringc National Taiwan University {f91023, b89066, hchu}@csie.ntu.edu.tw, phuang accuracy by developing an en- ergy-aware localization that adapts the sampling rate to target's mobility

  6. Department of Mathematics College of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiedler, Bernold

    -Volterra Competition Model Jia-Yuan Dai Advisor: Chun-Hsiung Hsia, Ph.D 99 7 July, 2010 #12;i 7 37 of monotone dynamical systems 1 Lotka-Volterra 2 R97221006@ntu.edu.tw #12;The Effects of Diffusion and Advection on the Evolution of Competing Species: a Survey on the Lotka-Volterra Competition Model Jia Yuan

  7. Microbial Metabolism Microbial nutrients,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Ching-Tsan

    1 Microbial Metabolism Microbial nutrients, growth and cultivation Ching-Tsan Huang () Office: Agronomy Hall, Room 111 Tel: (02) 33664454 E-mail: cthuang@ntu.edu.tw #12;2 Microbial Nutrition Purpose To obtain energy and construct new cellular components Nutrient Requirement The major elements: C, O, H, N

  8. Center for Quantum Science and Engineering (CQSE) National Center of Theoretical Sciences (NCTS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    substrates which leads to a new area of application called flexible electronics. Hydrogenated amorphous) Joint Seminar April 9, 2010 (Friday) Time: April 9, 2:30pm ~ 3:30pm Title: LARGE AREA ELECTRONICS: from silicon to oxide electronics Speaker: Prof. Jian Z. Chen () Graduate Institute of Applied Mechanics, NTU

  9. Administrative Units M50 Administration Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Administrative Units M50 Administration Building M41 Building No. 2 M43 2nd Administration Building S1 School of Professional and Continuing Studies M3 Gallery of NTU History Old Main Library N75 for Psychological Services Instructional Buildings M57 Common Subjects Classroom Building N11 Core Subjects

  10. Web Unit Mining Finding and Classifying Subgraphs of Centre for Advanced Information Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aixin, Sun

    Web Unit Mining ­ Finding and Classifying Subgraphs of Web Pages Aixin Sun Centre for Advanced Technological University Singapore, 639798 aseplim@ntu.edu.sg ABSTRACT In web classification, most researchers assume that the ob- jects to classify are individual web pages from one or more web sites. In practice

  11. 2013/1/4 1 / 7 1 Curriculum Mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    of undergraduate transfer students 21 Common Subjects Classroom Building 22 Core Subjects Classroom Building 23 Freshman Classroom Building 24 Multi-Purpose Classroom Building 25 Liberal Education Classroom Building CEIBA Course Management System 31 NTU Speech 32 E-Learning and Multimedia Projects 33 Consultation

  12. LIU ET AL. VOL. XXX ' NO. XX ' 000000 ' XXXX www.acsnano.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiong, Qihua

    ), 08010 Barcelona, CAT, Spain, ) Singapore-Berkeley Research Initiative for Sustainable Energy, 1 Create Technological University, Singapore 637371, Singapore, Energy Research Institute @ NTU (ERI@N), Nanyang,6,7 Additionally, this kind of layered material would provide us an ideal system to inves- tigate the fundamental

  13. Bilingual Instructions for Asking Directions 1. To ASIAA/National Taiwan University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ming-Jye

    Bilingual Instructions for Asking Directions 1. To ASIAA/National Taiwan University 2. When you for help: 3. To Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport 4. To Taipei Songshan Airport Please show me how.) Please take me to NTU Astronomy-Mathematics Building. Please take me to Taiwan Taoyuan International

  14. 4th International Conference on Earthquake Engineering Taipei, Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    4th International Conference on Earthquake Engineering Taipei, Taiwan October 12-13, 2006 Paper No, law@stanford.edu 5 Research Assistant, Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Taiwan Univ., Taipei, Taiwan, r92521247@ntu.edu.tw 6 Professor, Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Taiwan Univ., Taipei

  15. US-Taiwan Workshop on Smart Structural Technology for Seismic Hazard Mitigation Taipei, Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    US-Taiwan Workshop on Smart Structural Technology for Seismic Hazard Mitigation Taipei, Taiwan and the __________________________ 1 Graduate student, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, r92521247@ntu.edu.tw 2 Associate Research Fellow, National Center for Research on Earthquake Engineering, Taiwan, ysyang@ncree.org.tw 3

  16. Chang, Tsai-Lin Rm. 205, 2F., No.48, Ln. 245, Sec. 4, Bade Rd., Taipei City 105, Taiwan (R.O.C.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouhyoung, Ming

    Chang, Tsai-Lin Rm. 205, 2F., No.48, Ln. 245, Sec. 4, Bade Rd., Taipei City 105, Taiwan (R.O.C.) tsailing_chang@hotmail.com | +886-912-152-868 EDUCATION 2005 - 2009 NATIONAL TAIWAN UNIVERSITY (NTU) Taipei, Taiwan Bachelor, Department of Finance · Overall GPA ­ 3.8/4.0; Major GPA ­ 3.9/4.0 · President Award

  17. 4th International Conference on Earthquake Engineering Taipei, Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    4th International Conference on Earthquake Engineering Taipei, Taiwan October 12-13, 2006 Paper No., USA, law@stanford.edu 5 Research Assistant, Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Taiwan Univ., Taipei, Taiwan, r92521247@ntu.edu.tw 6 Professor, Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Taiwan Univ., Taipei

  18. SICE Annual Conference 2010 August 18-21, 2010, The Grand Hotel, Taipei, Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Pei-Chun

    SICE Annual Conference 2010 August 18-21, 2010, The Grand Hotel, Taipei, Taiwan Ą400 © 2010 SICE of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University Taipei, Taiwan Corresponding email: peichunlin@ntu.edu.tw Chia-Hung Tsai Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University Taipei, Taiwan

  19. ENGR 345: Principles and Practices of Global Innovation (An iPodia elective course with Peking University in China and National Taiwan University in Taiwan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hai

    University in China and National Taiwan University in Taiwan) USC/Viterbi iPodiaTM (ViP) Program Page 1 partner universities of this course are: Peking University (PKU) in Beijing, China and National Taiwan University (NTU) in Taipei, Taiwan. #12;ENGR 345: Principles and Practices of Global Innovation (An i

  20. Proceedings of the workshop on cumputational sciences National Taiwan Univ, Taipei, Taiwan, June 1994.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shann, Wei-Chang

    Proceedings of the workshop on cumputational sciences National Taiwan Univ, Taipei, Taiwan, June was supported by the National Science Council in Taiwan; grant #83­0208­M­008­052. 1 Department of Mathematics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C. E­mail address: chern@math.ntu.edu.tw. 2 Department

  1. Proceedings of the 13th Conference of the European Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics, pages 3037, Avignon, France, April 23 -27 2012. c 2012 Association for Computational Linguistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . aseschng@ntu.edu.sg Abstract In this paper we evaluate the possibility of improving the performance Retrieval, in this work we study the feasibility of stop word removal in Statistical Machine Translation Linguistics An Empirical Evaluation of Stop Word Removal in Statistical Machine Translation Chong Tze Yuang

  2. Fusion of Metrology Data for Large-Scale High-Volume Manufacturing of Polymer-based Microfluidic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusion of Metrology Data for Large-Scale High-Volume Manufacturing of Polymer-based Microfluidic@mit.edu, youcef@mit.edu 2 Singapore Inst. of Manufacturing Technology; email: sgli@ntu.edu.sg, ivanr@SIMTech.a-star multiple data sets from disparate instru- ments. For example, fusion of data from different metrol- ogy

  3. THE I4U SYSTEM IN NIST 2008 SPEAKER RECOGNITION EVALUATION Haizhou Li1,3,4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultz, Tanja

    Technological University (NTU), Singapore, 5 Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), USA {hli, mabin}@i2r.a-star, classifier, channel variability, system fusion 1. INTRODUCTION The NIST 2008 Speaker Recognition Evaluation) feature extraction, (ii) a parallel bank of seven classifiers and (iii) system fusion. Two

  4. Green-Aware Workload Scheduling in Geographically Distributed Data Centers Changbing Chen, Bingsheng He, Xueyan Tang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Xueyan

    : {chchangb, bshe, asxytang}@ntu.edu.sg Abstract--Renewable (or green) energy, such as solar or wind, has with renewable energy sources. While green energy supply for a single data center is intermittent due to daily/seasonal effects, our workload scheduling algorithm is aware of different amounts of green energy supply

  5. Master Programme REMA/EUREC Course 2008/2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    of Oldenburg (Core Provider) NTU Athens (Specialisation Provider: Wind Energy) #12; EUREC Module, Lectures, Labs and Seminars Core Oldenburg 1. Semester, Winter Term Module Title Term Titel Solar Energy Titel Wind Energy Winter Wind Energy I Tutorial Wind Energy Systems Wind Tunel (Lab

  6. Cloud Computing: a Perspective Study Lizhe WANG, Gregor von LASZEWSKI, Younge ANDREW, Xi HE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloud Computing: a Perspective Study Lizhe WANG, Gregor von LASZEWSKI, Younge ANDREW, Xi HE Service@ntu.edu.sg Received 1 Dec 2008 Abstract The Cloud computing emerges as a new computing paradigm which aims to provide study the Cloud computing paradigm from various aspects, such as definitions, distinct features

  7. Serpentine Thermal Coupling Between a Stream and a Conducting Body

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, H.; Lorente, S.; Anderson, R.; Bejan, A.

    2012-02-15

    Here we document the effect of flow configuration on the heat transfer performance of a serpentine shaped stream embedded in a conducting solid. Several configurations with fixed volume of fluid are considered: U-shaped with varying spacing between the parallel portions of the U, serpentine shapes with three elbows, and conducting soil with several parallelepipedal shapes. We show that the spacing must be greater than a critical value in order for the heat transfer density of the stream-solid configuration to be the highest that it can be. Spacings larger than this critical value do not yield improvements in heat transfer density. We also show that even though the heat transfer is time dependent, the stream-solid configuration has an effective number of heat transfer units Ntu that is nearly constant in time. The larger Ntu values correspond to the configurations with greater heat transfer density.

  8. Cross-flow versus counter-current flow packed-bed scrubbers: a mathematical analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fthenakis, V.M.

    1996-02-01

    Little is known about the mass transfer properties of packing media exposed to a crossflow of gas and liquid, whereas there is abundant information related to counter-current scrubbers. This paper presents a theoretical analysis of mass transfer and hydrodynamics in cross- flow packed bed scrubbers and compares those with information available for counter current towers, so that the first can be evaluated and/or designed based on data derived for the second. Mathematical models of mass transfer in cross-flow and counter- current packed bed scrubbers are presented. From those, one can predict the removal effectiveness of a crossflow scrubber from the number of transfer units (NTU) calculated for a similar counterflow operation; alternatively, when the removal effectiveness in counterflow is known, one can predict the corresponding NTU in crossflow.

  9. Introduction to Computer Science Lecture 1: Data Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Introduction to Computer Science Lecture 1: Data Storage Instructor: Tian-Li Yu Taiwan Evolutionary@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw Slides made by Tian-Li Yu, Jie-Wei Wu, and Chu-Yu Hsu Instructor: Tian-Li Yu Data Storage 1 / 1 #12 0 1 1 1 1 Instructor: Tian-Li Yu Data Storage 2 / 1 #12;Binary World Logical Gates XOR NOT Output

  10. Impact of ANSI X9.24-1:2009 Key Check Value on ISO/IEC 9797-1:2011 MACs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Impact of ANSI X9.24-1:2009 Key Check Value on ISO/IEC 9797-1:2011 MACs Tetsu Iwata1 and Lei Wang2, wang.lei@ntu.edu.sg Abstract. ANSI X9.24-1:2009 specifies the key check value, which is used to verify check value. As a result, we obtain a complete characterization of the impact of using ANSI X9.24-1 key

  11. Security Analysis of PRINCE Jeremy Jean1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Security Analysis of PRINCE J´er´emy Jean1 , Ivica Nikoli´c2 , Thomas Peyrin2 , Lei Wang2,thomas.peyrin,wang.lei,wushuang}@ntu.edu.sg Abstract. In this article, we provide the first third-party security analysis of the PRINCE lightweight the structural linear relations that exist for PRINCE in order to obtain a key recovery attack that slightly

  12. THE UNIVERSALITY CLASSES IN THE PARABOLIC ANDERSON MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hofstad, Remco van der

    . We discuss the long time behaviour of the parabolic Anderson model, the Cauchy problem for the heat setting. We show that intermittency occurs on unboundedly increasing islands whose diameter is slowly for the heat equation with random coefficients and localised initial datum, t v(t, z) = d v(t, z) + (z)v(t, z

  13. Numerical Modeling of Sedimentation by Storm Waves at Sand Island in Lake Superior, Wisconsin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    (1 m) above the Low Water Datum (LWD) or 601 ft (183 m) according to the International Great Lake at the lakeside end of the dock is 2.6 ft (0.8 m) below the LWD. Figure 1. Sand Island north of Bayfield Peninsula

  14. An Information Flow Model of Fault Detection Margaret C. Thompson ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    not be practical. Nonethe­ less, Relay provides insight into testing and fault de­ tection and suggests an approach and Computer Science Amherst, MA 01003 University of California Irvine, CA 92717 Abstract Relay is a model of how a fault causes a failure on execution of some test datum. This process begins with introduction

  15. Information Survival Threshold in Sensor and P2P Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    between nodes is subject to loss (link failures), and nodes may go down (battery failure, shut down and where links and nodes can go up or down. Consider also a `datum', that is, a piece of information, like a report of an emergency condition in a sensor network, a national traditional song, or a mobile phone

  16. Title: Soils: Southern Ontario Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Soils: Southern Ontario Data Creator / Copyright Owner: Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs Publisher: Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs Edition: N Ontario. Data Type: Vector Digital Data Format: Shapfile Datum / Map Projection: NAD83 / Lambert Conformal

  17. Prell, W.L., Wang, P., Blum, P., Rea, D.K., and Clemens, S.C. (Eds.) Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results Volume 184

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Qianyu

    Drilling Program, Scientific Results Volume 184 OLIGOCENE­MIOCENE PLANKTONIC FORAMINIFER BIOSTRATIGRAPHY the Oligocene­Miocene section of Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1148. Most datum levels occur in similar mechanisms have been operating, causing deepwater circulation changes concomitantly in world oceans

  18. Title: China Dimensions Data Collection Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    holds wide range of natural science and socioeconomic research and educational activities of China Digital Data Format: Arc Info, TwinBridge Based MS Access, SPSS, ASCII, dBase IV Datum / Map Projection: N Network (CIESIN). "China Dimensions Data Collection" [electronic resource: vector]. Palisades, New York

  19. Closure Report (CR) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 41: Area 27 Landfills with Errata Sheet, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navarro Nevada Environmental Services

    2010-08-10

    The closure report for CAU 41 is just a one page summary listing the coordinates of the landfill which were given at the time (1996) in Nevada State Plan Coordinates - North American Datum of 1983. The drawing of the use restricted site also listed the coordinates in Nevada State Plan Coordinates - North American Datum of 1983. In the ensuing years the reporting of coordinates has been standardized so that all coordinates are reported in the same manner, which is: NAD 27 UTM Zone 11 N, meters. This Errata Sheet updates the coordinate reporting to the currently accepted method and includes an aerial photo showing the landfill with the coordinates listed showing the use restricted area.

  20. GG 461 Geospatial Information The goals of this course are to convince students that they should collect field data in a spatially-quantitative manner (i.e.,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @hawaii.edu Office Hours: W 10:00-12:00 or by appointment text: Mastering ArcGIS (7th Edition), by Maribeth Price, 5 2b 9/3 Map Datums Chapter 11 2 3a 9/8 GPS Utility Chapter 2 2 3b 9/10 Shape files, tables, raster, ancillary data Mapping handout 2, 3, 5 10b 10/29 Tables, Joins Chapters 5, 6 2 11a 11/3 Geologic Map V

  1. Depositional environment of Red Fork sandstones, deep Anadarko Basin, western Oklahoma 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whiting, Philip Howard

    1982-01-01

    of constructional channel-fill sandstones of the Red Fork, East Clinton Field. Location of cross section shown in Fig. 17. Datum level is an overlying highly conductive shale marker 51 19 Core analysis plot showing porosity, permeability, and fluid saturation...- ducers of oil and gas. Huch of the Red Fork production 'n this area has occurred while drilling for the deeper Morrow sandstones. The excellent natural gas productior. from the shallower Red Fork reservoirs has recently generated much interest...

  2. Engineering faculty forum. Final report, June 1, 1993--May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, L.V.

    1994-11-01

    The goal of the project was to develop and broadcast monthly one-hour teleconferences to support the professional development of engineering faculty. The {open_quotes}Engineering Faculty Forum{close_quotes} was available nationwide over the NTU Satellite Network and was also available from a C-Band Satellite. There was no cost to participate in the live teleconferences for the two year period. The programs were developed in response to a questionnaire sent to engineering faculty members across the United States. Copies of the flyers and a print out of each course participation form has been included as a part of this report.

  3. Urban Sewage Delivery Heat Transfer System (2): Heat Transfer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, C.; Wu, R.; Li, X.; Li, G.; Zhuang, Z.; Sun, D.

    2006-01-01

    analysis of above flow resistance and energy cost, we know that the economy flux ratio of transfer heat-transfer means is between 0.54 and 0.85, namely sewage flux is smaller, and minC Cr min wwCVc?= . It is necessary to point out that though depending... efficiency of contranatant two pass thimble: ()213 1 11 21wwNn wz tt Cr tt 1n? ?? ?==?+ ? (1) Fig.1 Reverse-flow heat efficiency of TDHTS Contranatant single pass heat-transfer efficiency: ( ) ()1 1exp (1 ) 1exp (1)n Cr NTU Cr? = ?? ? ? Put...

  4. Building and Calibration of a FAST Model of the SWAY Prototype Floating Wind Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koh, J. H.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Driscoll, F.; Ng, E. Y. K.

    2013-09-01

    Present efforts to verify and validate aero-hydro-servo-elastic numerical simulation tools that predict the dynamic response of a floating offshore wind turbine are primarily limited to code-to-code comparisons or code-to-data comparisons using data from wind-wave basin tests. In partnership with SWAY AS, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) installed scientific wind, wave, and motion measurement equipment on the 1/6.5th-scale prototype SWAY floating wind system to collect data to validate a FAST model of the SWAY design in an open-water condition. Nanyang Technological University (NTU), through a collaboration with NREL, assisted in this validation.

  5. Theoretical and experimental investigation of heat pipe solar collector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azad, E.

    2008-09-15

    Heat pipe solar collector was designed and constructed at IROST and its performance was measured on an outdoor test facility. The thermal behavior of a gravity assisted heat pipe solar collector was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A theoretical model based on effectiveness-NTU method was developed for evaluating the thermal efficiency of the collector, the inlet, outlet water temperatures and heat pipe temperature. Optimum value of evaporator length to condenser length ratio is also determined. The modelling predictions were validated using experimental data and it shows that there is a good concurrence between measured and predicted results. (author)

  6. Integration of remote sensing and geographic information systems for Great Lakes water quality monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lathrop, R.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The utility of three operational satellite remote sensing systems, namely, the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM), the SPOT High Resolution Visible (HRV) sensors and the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), were evaluated as a means of estimating water quality and surface temperature. Empirical calibration through linear regression techniques was used to relate near-simultaneously acquired satellite radiance/reflectance data and water quality observations obtained in Green Bay and the nearshore waters of Lake Michigan. Four dates of TM and one date each of SPOT and AVHRR imagery/surface reference data were acquired and analyzed. Highly significant relationships were identified between the TM and SPOT data and secchi disk depth, nephelometric turbidity, chlorophyll a, total suspended solids (TSS), absorbance, and surface temperature (TM only). The AVHRR data were not analyzed independently but were used for comparison with the TM data. Calibrated water quality image maps were input to a PC-based raster GIS package, EPPL7. Pattern interpretation and spatial analysis techniques were used to document the circulation dynamics and model mixing processes in Green Bay. A GIS facilitates the retrieval, query and spatial analysis of mapped information and provides the framework for an integrated operational monitoring system for the Great Lakes.

  7. Anger camera image generation with microcomputers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Karl Morgan

    1988-01-01

    the e pos tron emit ting radionuc lides in conventional, two-din. ensional, lmag ng studies (7). Since gamma-rays in erect with matter 1n a quantit tive manner, t?e task of rhe detection portion of an nstrum. . utation systex; is to qualify... and output functions. It had 32K of memory and a Datum disk controller. The disk drive was a Diablo dual disk drive (1 fixed and I removable) and was capable of handling 2 I/2 megabytes of 23 Monitor Anger Camera Analog Electronics Graphics Monitor...

  8. Distillation efficiencies of an industrial-scale i-butane/n-butane fractionator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klemola, K.T.; Ilme, J.K.

    1996-12-01

    Rarely published industrial-scale distillation efficiency data are presented. The Murphree tray efficiencies are determined from the i-butane/n-butane fractionator performance data. Point efficiencies, numbers of overall vapor phase transfer units, numbers of vapor and liquid phase transfer units, and liquid phase resistances of mass transfer are backcalculated from the Murphree tray efficiencies. Various efficiency prediction and scale-up methods have been tested against experimental results. A new model for the prediction of the numbers of vapor and liquid phase transfer units has been developed. The model can be applied to hydrocarbon systems at high pressure. The influence of the mass-transfer coefficients, the interfacial area, and the vapor and liquid residence times on mass transfer has been analyzed separately, and as a result the NTU correlations for vapor and liquid phases are obtained. The constants of the model can be obtained by fitting the model to experimental efficiency data from a similar system.

  9. Cooling process for inelastic Boltzmann equations for hard spheres, Part I: The Cauchy problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stéphane Mischler; Clément Mouhot; Mariano Rodriguez Ricard

    2006-07-21

    We develop the Cauchy theory of the spatially homogeneous inelastic Boltzmann equation for hard spheres, for a general form of collision rate which includes in particular variable restitution coefficients depending on the kinetic energy and the relative velocity as well as the sticky particles model. We prove (local in time) non-concentration estimates in Orlicz spaces, from which we deduce weak stability and existence theorem. Strong stability together with uniqueness and instantaneous appearance of exponential moments are proved under additional smoothness assumption on the initial datum, for a restricted class of collision rates. Concerning the long-time behaviour, we give conditions for the cooling process to occur or not in finite time.

  10. Digital Elevation Model, 0.25 m, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska, 2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cathy Wilson; Garrett Altmann

    2015-11-20

    This 0.25m horizontal resolution digital elevation model, DEM, was developed from Airborne Laser Altimetry flown by Aerometric Inc, now known as Quantum Spatial, Inc. on 12 July, 2013. One Mission was flown and the data jointly processed with LANL personnel to produce a 0.25m DEM covering a region approximately 2.8km wide and 12.4km long extending from the coast above North Salt Lagoon to south of Gas Well Road. This DEM encompasses a diverse range of hydrologic, geomorphic, geophysical and biological features typical of the Barrow Peninsula. Vertical accuracy at the 95% confidence interval was computed as 0.143m. The coordinate system, datum, and geoid for this DEM are UTM Zone 4N, NAD83 (2011), NAVD88 (GEOID09).

  11. Non-existence of Physical Classical Solutions to Euler's Equations of Rigid Body Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark Wilkinson

    2015-11-23

    We prove that one cannot construct, for arbitrary initial data, global-in-time physical classical solutions to Euler's equations of continuum rigid body mechanics when the constituent rigid bodies are not perfect spheres. By 'physical' solutions, we mean those that conserve the total linear momentum, angular momentum and kinetic energy of any given initial datum. The reason for absence of classical solutions is due to the non-existence of velocity scattering maps which resolve a collision between two non-spherical rigid bodies in such a way that (i) they do not interpenetrate, and (ii) total linear momentum, angular momentum and kinetic energy of the bodies are conserved through collision. In particular, this implies that when solving Euler's equations, it is necessary to deal with rigid body trajectories which experience infinitely-many collisions in a finite time interval.

  12. Analysis of three-nucleon forces effects in the $A=3$ system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kievsky

    2010-11-09

    Using modern nucleon-nucleon interactions in the description of the $A=3,4$ nuclear systems the $\\chi^2$ per datum results to be much bigger than one. In particular it is not possible to reproduce the three- and four-nucleon binding energies and the $n-d$ scattering length simultaneously. This is one manifestation of the necessity of including a three-nucleon force in the nuclear Hamiltonian. In this paper we perform an analysis of some, widely used, three-nucleon force models. We analyze their capability to describe the aforementioned quantities and, to improve their description, we propose modifications in the parametrization of the models. The effects of these new parametrization are studied in some polarization observables at low energies.

  13. An accurate determination of the Avogadro constant by counting the atoms in a 28Si crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas, B; Bartl, G; Becker, P; Bettin, H; Borys, M; Busch, I; Gray, M; Fuchs, P; Fujii, K; Fujimoto, H; Kessler, E; Krumrey, M; Kuetgens, U; Kuramoto, N; Mana, G; Manson, P; Massa, E; Mizushima, S; Nicolaus, A; Picard, A; Pramann, A; Rienitz, O; Schiel, D; Valkiers, S; Waseda, A

    2010-01-01

    The Avogadro constant links the atomic and the macroscopic properties of matter. Since the molar Planck constant is well known via the measurement of the Rydberg constant, it is also closely related to the Planck constant. In addition, its accurate determination is of paramount importance for a definition of the kilogram in terms of a fundamental constant. We describe a new approach for its determination by "counting" the atoms in 1 kg single-crystal spheres, which are highly enriched with the 28Si isotope. It enabled isotope dilution mass spectroscopy to determine the molar mass of the silicon crystal with unprecedented accuracy. The value obtained, 6.02214084(18) x 10^23 mol^-1, is the most accurate input datum for a new definition of the kilogram.

  14. Closure Report (CR) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 91: Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well with Errata Sheet and Certification, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navarro Nevada Environmental Services

    2010-08-10

    The closure report for CAU 91 has no Use Restriction Form or drawing/map included in the document to describe the use restricted area, however, Section 3.3.3 states that the site will be fenced and signage placed indicating the area as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Unit. The drawing that was placed in the FFACO indicating the use restricted area lists the coordinates for the RCRA Unit in Nevada State Plan Coordinates - North American Datum of 1983. In the ensuing years the reporting of coordinates has been standardized so that all coordinates are reported in the same manner, which is: NAD 27 UTM Zone 11 N, meters. This Errata Sheet updates the coordinate reporting to the currently accepted method and includes an aerial photo showing the RCRA Unit with the coordinates listed showing the use restricted area.

  15. Problems encountered in establishing a historical erosion-rate database for the Illinois coast of Lake Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chrzastowski, M.J.; Erdmann, A.L.; Stohr, C.J. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Erosion rates for segments of the Lake Michigan coast at Lake County, Illinois were determined from historical maps prepared by the US Lake Survey and aerial photographs collected for the State of Illinois. Shorelines and blufflines were digitized at 1:20,000 scale for 1872--73, 1910--11, 1947, and 1987; these data were registered to 1:24,000-scale USGS digital line graphs. Erosion rates were calculated from temporal changes on shore-normal transects at 50-m spacing. Three major factors were identified pertinent to future digital mapping of historical coastal changes along similar Great Lakes coasts. (1) Ground-control points and points for rubber sheeting must be carefully selected to ensure these points were stable. For example, road intersections had changed position 15 m or more between early and late data sets. (2) Unlike US ocean coasts, the Great Lakes do not have a standard datum for shoreline mapping, and shorelines are commonly shown for the lake level at the time of the survey. Variation in historical, monthly mean lake level (1.9 m max. range for Lake Michigan) can cause significant shoreline differences between data sets. Shoreline translations of tens of meters may be needed to adjust to a common datum. (3) The bluff crest may not always be an ideal reference line for documenting rates of coastal change. Locally and temporally, recession of the bluff crest may be caused by a variety of slope processes that are independent of wave erosion. Along some bluff coasts, the bluff toe, if carefully defined, may be a more appropriate reference for calculating erosion rates strictly due to coastal processes.

  16. Sustainable Management of Flowback Water during Hydraulic Fracturing of Marcellus Shale for Natural Gas Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vidic, Radisav

    2015-01-24

    This study evaluated the feasibility of using abandoned mine drainage (AMD) as make- up water for the reuse of produced water for hydraulic fracturing. There is an abundance of AMD sources near permitted gas wells as documented in this study that can not only serve as makeup water and reduce the demand on high quality water resources but can also as a source of chemicals to treat produced water prior to reuse. The assessment of AMD availability for this purpose based on proximity and relevant regulations was accompanied by bench- and pilot-scale studies to determine optimal treatment to achieve desired water quality for use in hydraulic fracturing. Sulfate ions that are often present in AMD at elevated levels will react with Ba˛? and Sr˛? in produced water to form insoluble sulfate compounds. Both membrane microfiltration and gravity separation were evaluated for the removal of solids formed as a result of mixing these two impaired waters. Laboratory studies revealed that neither AMD nor barite formed in solution had significant impact on membrane filtration but that some produced waters contained submicron particles that can cause severe fouling of microfiltration membrane. Coagulation/flocculation was found to be an effective process for the removal of suspended solids and both bench- and pilot-scale studies revealed that optimal process conditions can consistently achieve the turbidity of the finished water below 5 NTU. Adjusting the blending ratio of AMD and produced water can achieve the desired effluent sulfate concentration that can be accurately predicted by chemical thermodynamics. Co-treatment of produced water and AMD will result in elevated levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in the solid waste generated in this process due to radium co-precipitation with barium sulfate. Laboratory studies revealed that the mobility of barite that may form in the subsurface due to the presence of sulfate in the fracturing fluid can be controlled by the addition of appropriate antiscalants.

  17. Tuning metal–carboxylate coordination in crystalline metal–organic frameworks through surfactant media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Junkuo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Ye, Kaiqi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); State Key Laboratory of Supramolecular Structure and Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); He, Mi [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Xiong, Wei-Wei; Cao, Wenfang; Lee, Zhi Yi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Wang, Yue [State Key Laboratory of Supramolecular Structure and Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Wu, Tom [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Huo, Fengwei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Liu, Xiaogang [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Institute of Materials Research Engineering, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); Zhang, Qichun, E-mail: qczhang@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2013-10-15

    Although it has been widely demonstrated that surfactants can efficiently control the size, shape and surface properties of micro/nanocrystals of metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) due to the strong interactions between surfactants and crystal facets of MOFs, the use of surfactants as reaction media to grow MOF single crystals is unprecedented. In addition, compared with ionic liquids, surfactants are much cheaper and can have multifunctional properties such as acidic, basic, neutral, cationic, anionic, or even block. These factors strongly motivate us to develop a new synthetic strategy: growing crystalline MOFs in surfactants. In this report, eight new two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) MOFs have been successfully synthesized in an industrially-abundant and environmentally-friendly surfactant: polyethylene glycol-200 (PEG-200). Eight different coordination modes of carboxylates, ranging from monodentate ?{sup 1} mode to tetra-donor coordination µ{sub 3}-?{sup 1}:?{sup 2}:?{sup 1} mode, have been founded in our research. The magnetic properties of Co-based MOFs were investigated and MOF NTU-Z6b showed a phase transition with a Curie temperature (T{sub c}) at 5 K. Our strategy of growing crystalline MOFs in surfactant could offer exciting opportunities for preparing novel MOFs with diverse structures and interesting properties. - Graphical abstract: Surfactants have been used as reaction media to grow MOF single crystals for the first time. Eight new two-dimensional or three-dimensional MOFs were successfully synthesized in surfactant polyethylene glycol-200 (PEG-200). Coordination modes of carboxylates up to eight were founded. Our strategy of growing crystalline MOFs in surfactant could offer exciting opportunities for preparing novel MOFs with diverse structures and interesting properties. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Surfactant-thermal synthesis of crystalline metal–organic frameworks. • Eight new 2-D or 3-D metal–organic frameworks. • Eight different metal–carboxylate coordination modes.

  18. TESTING OF THE SPINTEK ROTARY MICROFILTER USING ACTUAL HANFORD WASTE SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HUBER HJ

    2010-04-13

    The SpinTek rotary microfilter was tested on actual Hanford tank waste. The samples were a composite of archived Tank 241-AN-105 material and a sample representing single-shell tanks (SST). Simulants of the two samples have been used in non-rad test runs at the 222-S laboratory and at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The results of these studies are compared in this report. Two different nominal pore sizes for the sintered steel rotating disk filter were chosen: 0.5 and 0.1 {micro}m. The results suggest that the 0.5-{micro}m disk is preferable for Hanford tank waste for the following reasons: (1) The filtrate clarity is within the same range (<<4 ntu for both disks); (2) The filtrate flux is in general higher for the 0.5-{micro}m disk; and (3) The 0.1-{micro}m disk showed a higher likelihood of fouling. The filtrate flux of the actual tank samples is generally in the range of 20-30% compared to the equivalent non-rad tests. The AN-105 slurries performed at about twice the filtrate flux of the SST slurries. The reason for this difference has not been identified. Particle size distributions in both cases are very similar; comparison of the chemical composition is not conclusive. The sole hint towards what material was stuck in the filter pore holes came from the analysis of the dried flakes from the surface of the fouled 0.1-{micro}m disk. A cleaning approach developed by SRNL personnel to deal with fouled disks has been found adaptable when using actual Hanford samples. The use of 1 M nitric acid improved the filtrate flux by approximately two times; using the same simulants as in the non-rad test runs showed that the filtrate flux was restored to 1/2 of its original amount.

  19. Nucleon-nucleon interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiringa, R.B.

    1996-12-31

    Nucleon-nucleon interactions are at the heart of nuclear physics, bridging the gap between QCD and the effective interactions appropriate for the shell model. We discuss the current status of {ital NN} data sets, partial-wave analyses, and some of the issues that go into the construction of potential models. Our remarks are illustrated by reference to the Argonne {ital v}{sub 18} potential, one of a number of new potentials that fit elastic nucleon-nucleon data up to 350 MeV with a {Chi}{sup 2} per datum near 1. We also discuss the related issues of three-nucleon potentials, two-nucleon charge and current operators, and relativistic effects. We give some examples of calculations that can be made using these realistic descriptions of {ital NN} interactions. We conclude with some remarks on how our empirical knowledge of {ital NN} interactions may help constrain models at the quark level, and hence models of nucleon structure.

  20. Minimally non-local nucleon-nucleon potentials with chiral two-pion exchange including Delta resonances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Piarulli, M; Girlanda, L; Schiavilla, R; Perez, R Navarro; Amaro, J E; Arriola, E Ruiz

    2015-02-01

    We construct a coordinate-space chiral potential, including ?-isobar intermediate states in its two-pion-exchange component up to order Q3 (Q denotes generically the low momentum scale).The contact interactions entering at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-next-to-leading orders (Q2 and Q4, respectively) are rearranged by Fierz transformations to yield terms at most quadratic in the relative momentum operator of the two nucleons. The low-energy constant multiplying these contact interactions are fitted to the 2013 Granada database, consisting of 2309 pp and 2982 np data (including, respectively, 148 and 218 normalizations) in the laboratory-energy range 0--300 MeV. For the total 5291 $pp$ and $np$ data inmore »this range, we obtain a ?2 /datum of roughly 1.3 for a set of three models characterized by long- and short-range cutoffs, RL and RS respectively, ranging from (RL,RS)=(1.2,0.8) fm down to (0.8,0.6) fm. The long-range (short-range) cutoff regularizes the one- and two-pion exchange (contact) part of the potential.« less

  1. Fault-tolerant corrector/detector chip for high-speed data processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andaleon, D.D.; Napolitano, L.M. Jr.; Redinbo, G.R.; Shreeve, W.O.

    1994-03-01

    An internally fault-tolerant data error detection and correction integrated circuit device and a method of operating same is described. The device functions as a bidirectional data buffer between a 32-bit data processor and the remainder of a data processing system and provides a 32-bit datum with a relatively short eight bits of data-protecting parity. The 32-bits of data by eight bits of parity is partitioned into eight 4-bit nibbles and two 4-bit nibbles, respectively. For data flowing towards the processor the data and parity nibbles are checked in parallel and in a single operation employing a dual orthogonal basis technique. The dual orthogonal basis increase the efficiency of the implementation. Any one of ten (eight data, two parity) nibbles are correctable if erroneous, or two different erroneous nibbles are detectable. For data flowing away from the processor the appropriate parity nibble values are calculated and transmitted to the system along with the data. The device regenerates parity values for data flowing in either direction and compares regenerated to generated parity with a totally self-checking equality checker. As such, the device is self-validating and enabled to both detect and indicate an occurrence of an internal failure. A generalization of the device to protect 64-bit data with 16-bit parity to protect against byte-wide errors is also presented. 8 figures.

  2. Nonproportionality in the scintillation light yield of bismuth germanate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentile, T R; Breuer, H; Chupp, T E; Coakley, K J; Cooper, R L; Nico, J S; O'Neill, B

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of nonproportionality in the scintillation light yield of bismuth germanate (BGO) for gamma-rays with energies between 6 keV and 662 keV. The scintillation light was read out by avalanche photodiodes (APDs) with both the BGO crystals and APDs operated at a temperature of approximately 90 K. Data were obtained using radioisotope sources to illuminate both a single BGO crystal in a small test cryostat and a 12-element detector in a neutron radiative beta-decay experiment. In addition one datum was obtained in a 4.6 T magnetic field based on the bismuth K x-ray escape peak produced by a continuum of background gamma rays in this apparatus. These measurements and comparison to prior results were motivated by an experiment to study the radiative decay mode of the free neutron. The combination of data taken under different conditions yields a reasonably consistent picture for BGO nonproportionality that should be useful for researchers employing BGO detectors at low gamma ray energies.

  3. Nonproportionality in the scintillation light yield of bismuth germanate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. R. Gentile; M. J. Bales; H. Breuer; T. E. Chupp; K. J. Coakley; R. L. Cooper; J. S. Nico; B. O'Neill

    2015-05-01

    We present measurements of nonproportionality in the scintillation light yield of bismuth germanate (BGO) for gamma-rays with energies between 6 keV and 662 keV. The scintillation light was read out by avalanche photodiodes (APDs) with both the BGO crystals and APDs operated at a temperature of approximately 90 K. Data were obtained using radioisotope sources to illuminate both a single BGO crystal in a small test cryostat and a 12-element detector in a neutron radiative beta-decay experiment. In addition one datum was obtained in a 4.6 T magnetic field based on the bismuth K x-ray escape peak produced by a continuum of background gamma rays in this apparatus. These measurements and comparison to prior results were motivated by an experiment to study the radiative decay mode of the free neutron. The combination of data taken under different conditions yields a reasonably consistent picture for BGO nonproportionality that should be useful for researchers employing BGO detectors at low gamma ray energies.

  4. Minimally non-local nucleon-nucleon potentials with chiral two-pion exchange including $?$'s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Piarulli; L. Girlanda; R. Schiavilla; R. Navarro Pérez; J. E. Amaro; E. Ruiz Arriola

    2015-02-16

    We construct a coordinate-space chiral potential, including $\\Delta$-isobar intermediate states in its two-pion-exchange component. The contact interactions entering at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-next-to-leading orders ($Q^2$ and $Q^4$, respectively, $Q$ denoting generically the low momentum scale) are rearranged by Fierz transformations to yield terms at most quadratic in the relative momentum operator of the two nucleons. The low-energy constants multiplying these contact interactions are fitted to the 2013 Granada database, consisting of 2309 $pp$ and 2982 $np$ data (including, respectively, 148 and 218 normalizations) in the laboratory-energy range 0--300 MeV. For the total 5291 $pp$ and $np$ data in this range, we obtain a $\\chi^2$/datum of roughly 1.3 for a set of three models characterized by long- and short-range cutoffs, $R_{\\rm L}$ and $R_{\\rm S}$ respectively, ranging from $(R_{\\rm L},R_{\\rm S})=(1.2,0.8)$ fm down to $(0.8,0.6)$ fm. The long-range (short-range) cutoff regularizes the one- and two-pion exchange (contact) part of the potential.

  5. Minimally nonlocal nucleon-nucleon potentials with chiral two-pion exchange including ? resonances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Piarulli, M.; Girlanda, L.; Schiavilla, R.; Pérez, R. Navarro; Amaro, J. E.; Arriola, E. Ruiz

    2015-02-26

    In this study, we construct a coordinate-space chiral potential, including ?-isobar intermediate states in its two-pion-exchange component up to order Q3 (Q denotes generically the low momentum scale). The contact interactions entering at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-next-to-leading orders (Q2 and Q4, respectively) are rearranged by Fierz transformations to yield terms at most quadratic in the relative momentum operator of the two nucleons. The low-energy constant multiplying these contact interactions are fitted to the 2013 Granada database, consisting of 2309 pp and 2982 np data (including, respectively, 148 and 218 normalizations) in the laboratory-energy range 0–300 MeV. For the total 5291 $pp$more »and $np$ data in this range, we obtain a ?2 /datum of roughly 1.3 for a set of three models characterized by long- and short-range cutoffs, RL and RS respectively, ranging from (RL,RS)=(1.2,0.8) fm down to (0.8,0.6) fm. The long-range (short-range) cutoff regularizes the one- and two-pion exchange (contact) part of the potential.« less

  6. Properties of Lithium-11 and Carbon-22 at leading order in halo effective field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acharya, Bijaya

    2015-01-01

    We study the $^{11}\\mathrm{Li}$ and $^{22}\\mathrm{C}$ nuclei at leading order (LO) in halo effective field theory (Halo EFT). Using the value of the $^{22}\\mathrm{C}$ rms matter radius deduced in Ref. [1] as an input in a LO calculation, we simultaneously constrained the values of the two-neutron (2$n$) separation energy of $^{22}\\mathrm{C}$ and the virtual-state energy of the $^{20}\\mathrm{C}-$neutron system (hereafter denoted $^{21}$C). The 1$-\\sigma$ uncertainty of the input rms matter radius datum, along with the theory error estimated from the anticipated size of the higher-order terms in the Halo EFT expansion, gave an upper bound of about 100 keV for the 2$n$ separation energy. We also study the electric dipole excitation of 2$n$ halo nuclei to a continuum state of two neutrons and the core at LO in Halo EFT. We first compare our results with the $^{11}\\mathrm{Li}$ data from a Coulomb dissociation experiment and obtain good agreement within the theoretical uncertainty of a LO calculation. We then obtai...

  7. Colorado Electrical Transmission Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Xcel Energy Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado XcelEnergy NonXcel Transmission Network Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains transmission network of Colorado Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4540689.017558 m Left: 160606.141934 m Right: 758715.946645 m Bottom: 4098910.893397m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shapefile

  8. ASTER Thermal Anomalies in western Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: ASTER Thermal Anomalies Western Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the areas identified as areas of anomalous surface temperature from ASTER satellite imagery. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. Areas that had temperature greater than 2?, and areas with temperature equal to 1? to 2?, were considered ASTER modeled very warm and warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies), respectively Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4547052.446651 m Left: 158917.090117 m Right: 4101162.228281 m Bottom: 4101162.228281 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  9. Colorado Regional Faults

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Regional Faults Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the regional faults of Colorado Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4543192.100000 m Left: 144385.020000 m Right: 754585.020000 m Bottom: 4094592.100000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  10. Structural Orientations Adjacent to Some Colorado Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard,

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Publication Date: 2012 Title: Structural Data Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Reno Nevada Publisher: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Description: Structural orientations (fractures, joints, faults, lineaments, bedding orientations, etc.) were collected with a standard Brunton compass during routine field examinations of geothermal phenomena in Colorado. Often multiple orientations were taken from one outcrop. Care was taken to ensure outcrops were "in place". Point data was collected with a hand-held GPS unit. The structural data is presented both as standard quadrant measurements and in format suitable for ESRI symbology Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4491528.924999 m Left: 207137.983196 m Right: 432462.310324 m Bottom: 4117211.772001 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Contact Person: Richard “Rick” Zehner Address: 3740 Barron Way City: Reno State: NV Postal Code: 89511 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 775-737-7806 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  11. Colorado Potential Geothermal Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado PRS Cool Fairways Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the weakened basement rocks. Isostatic gravity was utilized to identify structural basin areas, characterized by gravity low values reflecting weakened basement rocks. Together interpreted regional fault zones and basin outlines define geothermal "exploration fairways", where the potential exists for deep, superheated fluid flow in the absence of Pliocene or younger volcanic units Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4544698.569273 m Left: 144918.141004 m Right: 763728.391299 m Bottom: 4094070.397932 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  12. Analog morphocorrelation: new technique with implications for high-resolution absolute age dating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, A.J.; Parker, W.C.; Berggren, W.A.

    1986-05-01

    The conventional approach to increased biostratigraphic resolution involves identifying additional datum planes defined by discrete events. Multivariate techniques used to refine a conventional taxonomic zonal scheme offer no improvement in precision; however, since the characters on which the zonal boundaries are based often show continuous stratigraphic variation, they offer an opportunity for continuous stratigraphic correlation based on the stage of evolution. Morphometric analysis was conducted on two lineages: (1) the Globorotalia cibaoensis-G. crassaformis linage, using a reference section from the early Pliocene of the Rio Grande rise, spanning approximately 2.6 m.y.; and (2) the G. conoidea-G.inflata lineage, using a reference section from the late Miocene to the Holocene from the southwest Pacific, spanning approximately 8 m.y. Stepwise multiple regression of morphologic variates generated an equation with an age-prediction precision (95% confidence) of +/- 122 k.y. in the G. crassaformis lineage and +/- 463 k.y. in the G conoidea lineage (accuracy depends on calibration of absolute dates in the reference section and our knowledge of sedimentation rates over the measured interval). Using single-equation analog morphocorrelation, any sample overlapped by the reference lineage can be correlated, which reduce the need for repeated sampling in a search for discrete events. The authors demonstrate that analysis of continuous morphologic variation can increase stratigraphic precision with a few carefully chosen variables, and that analog morpho-correlation can yield absolute dates, rather than relative dates with quantified error. Any disadvantages inherent in analog morphocorrelation are also found in conventional biostratigraphic techniques, but are usually unquantified and unrecognized.

  13. Properties of Lithium-11 and Carbon-22 at leading order in halo effective field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bijaya Acharya; Daniel Phillips

    2015-08-11

    We study the $^{11}\\mathrm{Li}$ and $^{22}\\mathrm{C}$ nuclei at leading order (LO) in halo effective field theory (Halo EFT). Using the value of the $^{22}\\mathrm{C}$ rms matter radius deduced in Ref. [1] as an input in a LO calculation, we simultaneously constrained the values of the two-neutron (2$n$) separation energy of $^{22}\\mathrm{C}$ and the virtual-state energy of the $^{20}\\mathrm{C}-$neutron system (hereafter denoted $^{21}$C). The 1$-\\sigma$ uncertainty of the input rms matter radius datum, along with the theory error estimated from the anticipated size of the higher-order terms in the Halo EFT expansion, gave an upper bound of about 100 keV for the 2$n$ separation energy. We also study the electric dipole excitation of 2$n$ halo nuclei to a continuum state of two neutrons and the core at LO in Halo EFT. We first compare our results with the $^{11}\\mathrm{Li}$ data from a Coulomb dissociation experiment and obtain good agreement within the theoretical uncertainty of a LO calculation. We then obtain the low-energy spectrum of $B(E1)$ of this transition at several different values of the 2$n$ separation energy of $^{22}\\mathrm{C}$ and the virtual-state energy of $^{21}\\mathrm{C}$. Our predictions can be compared to the outcome of an ongoing experiment on the Coulomb dissociation of $^{22}\\mathrm{C}$ to obtain tighter constraints on the two- and three-body energies in the $^{22}\\mathrm{C}$ system.

  14. Heat flow and subsurface temperature distributions in central and western New York. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, D.S.; Fromm, K.

    1984-01-01

    Initiation of a geothermal energy program in western and central New York requires knowledge of subsurface temperatures for targeting areas of potential resources. The temperature distribution in possible geothermal reservoirs, calculated from heat flow measurements and modeling techniques, shows that a large area of New York can be considered for exploitation of geothermal resources. Though the temperatures at currently accessible depths show the availability of only a low-temperature (less than 100/sup 0/C), direct-use resource, this can be considered as an alternative for the future energy needs of New York State. From analysis of bottom-hole-temperature data and direct heat flow measurements, estimates of temperatures in the Cambrian Sandstones provide the basis of the economic evaluation of the reservoir. This reservoir contains the extractable fluids needed for targeting a potential geothermal well site in the low-temperature geothermal target zone. In the northern section of the Appalachian basin, reservoir temperatures in the Cambrian are below 50/sup 0/C but may be over 80/sup 0/C in the deeper parts of the basin in southern New York State. Using a minimum of 50/sup 0/C as a useful reservoir temperature, temperatures in excess of this value are encountered in the Theresa Formation at depths in excess of 1300 meters. Considering a maximum depth for economical drilling to be 2500 meters with present technology, the 2500 meters to the Theresa (sea level datum) forms the lower limit of the geothermal resource. Temperatures in the range of 70/sup 0/C to 80/sup 0/C are predicted for the southern portion of New York State.

  15. Colorado Heat Flow Data from IHFC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: The International Heat Flow Commission (IHFC) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado IHFC Data Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: Abstract: This layer contains the heat flow sites and data of the State of Colorado compiled from the International Heat Flow Commission (IHFC) of the International Association of Seismology and Physics of the Earth's Interior (IASPEI) global heat flow database (www.heatflow.und.edu/index2.html). The data include different items: Item number, descriptive code, name of site, latitude and longitude, elevation, depth interval, number of temperature data, temperature gradient, number of conductivity measurement, average conductivity, number of heat generation measurements, average heat production, heat flow, number of individual sites, references, and date of publication. Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4522121.800672 m Left: 165356.134075 m Right: 621836.776246 m Bottom: 4097833.419676 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude Of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  16. Geothermal Target Areas in Colorado as Identified by Remote Sensing Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Target Areas Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the areas identified as targets of potential geothermal activity. The Criteria used to identify the target areas include: hot/warm surface exposures modeled from ASTER/Landsat satellite imagery and geological characteristics, alteration mineral commonly associated with hot springs (clays, Si, and FeOx) modeled from ASTER and Landsat data, Coloradodo Geological Survey (CGS) known thermal hot springs/wells and heat-flow data points, Colorado deep-seated fault zones, weakened basement identified from isostatic gravity data, and Colorado sedimentary and topographic characteristics Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4546251.530446 m Left: 151398.567298 m Right: 502919.587395 m Bottom: 4095100.068903 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  17. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Chaffee County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Chaffee Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Chaffee County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4333432.368072 m Left: 366907.700763 m Right: 452457.816015 m Bottom: 4208271.566715 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  18. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Garfield County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Garfield Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Garfield County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4441550.552290 m Left: 271445.053363 m Right: 359825.053363 m Bottom: 4312490.552290 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  19. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Alamosa Saguache Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4217727.601630 m Left: 394390.400264 m Right: 460179.841813 m Bottom: 4156258.036086 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  20. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Dolored County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Dolores Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Dolores County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4186234.213315 m Left: 212558.673056 m Right: 232922.811862 m Bottom: 4176781.467043 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  1. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Archuleta County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Archuleta Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Archuleta County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4144691.792023 m Left: 285531.662851 m Right: 348694.182686 m Bottom: 4097005.210304 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  2. Favorable Geochemistry from Springs and Wells in COlorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno Nevada Originator: United States Geological Survey (USGS) Originator: Colorado Geological Survey Publication Date: 2012 Title: Favorable Geochemistry Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Reno Nevada Publisher: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Description: This layer contains favorable geochemistry for high-temperature geothermal systems, as interpreted by Richard "Rick" Zehner. The data is compiled from the data obtained from the USGS. The original data set combines 15,622 samples collected in the State of Colorado from several sources including 1) the original Geotherm geochemical database, 2) USGS NWIS (National Water Information System), 3) Colorado Geological Survey geothermal sample data, and 4) original samples collected by R. Zehner at various sites during the 2011 field season. These samples are also available in a separate shapefile FlintWaterSamples.shp. Data from all samples were reportedly collected using standard water sampling protocols (filtering through 0.45 micron filter, etc.) Sample information was standardized to ppm (micrograms/liter) in spreadsheet columns. Commonly-used cation and silica geothermometer temperature estimates are included. Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4515595.841032 m Left: 149699.513964 m Right: 757959.309388 m Bottom: 4104156.435530 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Contact Person: Richard “Rick” Zehner Address: 3740 Barron Way City: Reno State: NV Postal Code: 89511 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 775-737-7806 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  3. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Routt County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Routt Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Routt County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4501071.574000 m Left: 311351.975000 m Right: 359681.975000 m Bottom: 4447251.574000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  4. TESTING OF A ROTARY MICROFILTER TO SUPPORT HANFORD APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, M; David Herman, D; David Stefanko, D; Samuel Fink, S

    2008-06-26

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) researchers are investigating and developing a rotary microfilter for solid-liquid separation applications at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Because of the success of that work, the Hanford Site is evaluating the use of the rotary microfilter for its Supplemental Pretreatment process. The authors performed rotary filter testing with a full-scale, 25-disk unit with 0.5 {micro} filter media manufactured by Pall Corporation using a Hanford AN-105 simulant at solids loadings of 0.06, 0.29, and 1.29 wt%. The conclusions from this testing are: (1) The filter flux at 0.06 wt% solids reached a near constant value at an average of 0.26 gpm/ft{sup 2} (6.25 gpm total). (2) The filter flux at 0.29 wt% solids reached a near constant value at an average of 0.17 gpm/ft{sup 2} (4 gpm total). (3) The filter flux at 1.29 wt% solids reached a near constant value at an average of 0.10 gpm/ft{sup 2} (2.4 gpm total). (4) Because of differences in solids loadings, a direct comparison between crossflow filter flux and rotary filter flux is not possible. The data show the rotary filter produces a higher flux than the crossflow filter, but the improvement is not as large as seen in previous testing. (5) Filtrate turbidity measured < 4 NTU in all samples collected. (6) During production, the filter should be rinsed with filtrate or dilute caustic and drained prior to an extended shutdown to prevent the formation of a layer of settled solids on top of the filter disks. (7) Inspection of the seal faces after {approx} 140 hours of operation showed an expected amount of initial wear, no passing of process fluid through the seal faces, and very little change in the air channeling grooves on the stationary face. (8) Some polishing was observed at the bottom of the shaft bushing. The authors recommend improving the shaft bushing by holding it in place with a locking ring and incorporated grooves to provide additional cooling. (9) The authors recommend that CH2MHill Hanford test other pore size media to determine the optimum pore size for Hanford waste.

  5. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Garfield County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Garfield Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Garfield County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4442180.552290 m Left: 268655.053363 m Right: 359915.053363 m Bottom: 4312490.552290 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  6. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Alamosa Saguache Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4217727.601630 m Left: 394390.400264 m Right: 460179.841813 m Bottom: 4156258.036086 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  7. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Archuleta County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Archuleta Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Archuleta County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies). Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4144825.235807 m Left: 285446.256851 m Right: 350577.338852 m Bottom: 4096962.250137 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  8. Remotely Sensed Thermal Anomalies in western Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Landsat Thermal Anomalies Western Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the areas identified as areas of anomalous surface temperature from Landsat satellite imagery in Western Colorado. Data was obtained for two different dates. The digital numbers of each Landsat scene were converted to radiance and the temperature was calculated in degrees Kelvin and then converted to degrees Celsius for each land cover type using the emissivity of that cover type. And this process was repeated for each of the land cover types (open water, barren, deciduous forest and evergreen forest, mixed forest, shrub/scrub, grassland/herbaceous, pasture hay, and cultivated crops). The temperature of each pixel within each scene was calculated using the thermal band. In order to calculate the temperature an average emissivity value was used for each land cover type within each scene. The NLCD 2001 land cover classification raster data of the zones that cover Colorado were downloaded from USGS site and used to identify the land cover types within each scene. Areas that had temperature residual greater than 2?, and areas with temperature equal to 1? to 2?, were considered Landsat modeled very warm and warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies), respectively Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4546381.234113 m Left: 140556.857021 m Right: 573390.000000 m Bottom: 4094583.641581 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  9. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Dolores County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Dolores Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Dolores County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4186234.213315 m Left: 212558.673056 m Right: 232922.811862 m Bottom: 4176781.467043 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  10. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Routt County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Routt Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Routt County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4501071.574000 m Left: 311351.975000 m Right: 359411.975000 m Bottom: 4447521.574000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  11. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Chaffee County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Chaffee Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Chaffee County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4333432.368072 m Left: 366907.700763 m Right: 452457.816015 m Bottom: 4208271.566715 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  12. Final Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Charles R

    2012-12-31

    The response of dielectric material to electromagnetic waves in the millimeter wavelength range (30 to 300 GHz) has received relatively little study and the processes that give rise to absorption in this region are often poorly understood. Understanding the origin of absorption at these wavelengths has basic significance for solid state physics as well as importance for development of technology in this region of the RF spectrum. This project has provided high-quality data on the temperature dependence of the dielectric loss in high-purity, semi-insulating silicon carbide (HPSI SiC), a material that holds much promise for application, especially in devices that must operate in the high power and high frequency regime. Comparison of this experimental data with theoretical predictions for various loss processes provides convincing evidence that the loss in HPSI SiC arises almost entirely from intrinsic lattice loss (ILL) as described by Garin. Fitting the data to this model yields an accurate value for the Debye temperature that characterizes crystalline SiC. In addition, our results refute a previous study(2) which reported much higher loss, attributed to the presence of free charge. The quality of the data acquired in this project is clear evidence for the value of the experimental technique that was employed here. This technique combines the excitation of a high-quality open resonator by a phase-locked backward wave oscillator (BWO) with use of a spectrum analyzer to measure the change in the resonator response curve when the sample is inserted. This system has demonstrated consistent results for very challenging measurements and does not suffer from the artifacts that often arise when using other techniques that rely on thermal sources. The low absorption loss found in HPSI SiC, when combined with its other outstanding material properties, e.g. high thermal conductivity, high tensile strength, and high carrier mobility, should provide incentive for designers to utilize this material to solve the challenging problems that are encountered as devices are pushed to operate at higher frequencies and higher power levels. In particular, for the fusion energy program, it may provide an economical alternative to CVD diamond for certain gyrotron and beam line applications. In addition, the value obtained for the Debye temperature provides an important datum for modeling the crystalline structure of SiC. Clearly SiC is a unique material with few competitors and should see wider utilization.

  13. Archuleta County CO Lineaments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Publication Date: 2012 Title: Archuleta Lineaments Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Reno Nevada Publisher: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Description: This layer traces apparent topographic and air-photo lineaments in the area around Pagosa springs in Archuleta County, Colorado. It was made in order to identify possible fault and fracture systems that might be conduits for geothermal fluids. Geothermal fluids commonly utilize fault and fractures in competent rocks as conduits for fluid flow. Geothermal exploration involves finding areas of high near-surface temperature gradients, along with a suitable “plumbing system” that can provide the necessary permeability. Geothermal power plants can sometimes be built where temperature and flow rates are high. To do this, georeferenced topographic maps and aerial photographs were utilized in an existing GIS, using ESRI ArcMap 10.0 software. The USA_Topo_Maps and World_Imagery map layers were chosen from the GIS Server at server.arcgisonline.com, using a UTM Zone 13 NAD27 projection. This line shapefile was then constructed over that which appeared to be through-going structural lineaments in both the aerial photographs and topographic layers, taking care to avoid manmade features such as roads, fence lines, and right-of-ways. These lineaments may be displaced somewhat from their actual location, due to such factors as shadow effects with low sun angles in the aerial photographs. Note: This shape file was constructed as an aid to geothermal exploration in preparation for a site visit for field checking. We make no claims as to the existence of the lineaments, their location, orientation, and nature. Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4132831.990103 m Left: 311979.997741 m Right: 331678.289280 m Bottom: 4116067.165795 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Contact Person: Richard “Rick” Zehner Address: 3740 Barron Way City: Reno State: NV Postal Code: 89511 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 775-737-7806 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  14. Robustness and Consistency of Jet Quenching and Perfect Fluidity in semi Quark Gluon Monopole Plasmas (sQGMP) Produced at RHIC and LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiechen Xu; Jinfeng Liao; Miklos Gyulassy

    2015-08-03

    A new model (CUJET3.0) of jet quenching in nuclear collisions coupled to bulk data constrained (VISH2+1D) viscous hydrodynamic backgrounds is constructed by generalizing the perturbative QCD based (CUJET2.0) model to include possible non-perturbative chromodynamical features of the QCD confinement transition near $T_c\\approx 160$ MeV. Two competing mechanisms are considered: (1) the suppression of quark and gluon chromo-electric-charged (cec) degrees of freedom (aka the semi-QGP model of Pisarski et al) and (2) the emergence of chromo-magnetic-monopole (cmm) degrees of freedom (aka the magnetic scenario of Shuryak-Liao). This semi Quark Gluon Monopole Plasma (sQGMP) model depends on two free parameters: (1) the saturating value of the QCD running coupling $\\alpha_c$ below $T_c$ and (2) the ratio $c_m$ of color electric to magnetic screening scales. The value of $\\alpha_c$ is fixed by fitting to a $single$ LHC reference datum, $R^{ch}_{PbPb}(p_T=12{\\rm GeV/c})\\approx 0.3$ for 20-30% centrality. Consistency is then tested by comparing predictions to $all$ $R^h_{AA}(p_T>10{\\rm GeV/c})$, $v^h_2(p_T>10{\\rm GeV/c})$, $h=\\pi,D,B$ data simultaneously at both RHIC and LHC. Robustness to uncertainties in modeling the suppression of cec degrees of freedom is tested by comparing results based on lattice data for Polyakov loop versus for quark susceptibility. The emergent cmm degrees of freedom are shown to solve robustly the long standing $R_{AA}$ vs $v_2$ puzzle by predicting a maximum of the jet quenching parameter field $\\hat{q}(E,T)/T^3$ near $T_c$. Robustness and consistency of jet quenching with observed bulk perfect fluidity is demonstrated by extrapolating the sQGMP $\\hat{q}$ down to thermal energy $E\\sim 3 T$ scales and showing that the $\\eta/s \\approx T^3/\\hat{q}$ falls close to the unitarity bound, $1/4\\pi$, in the range $(1-2)T_c$.

  15. Shallow (2-meter) temperature surveys in Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado 2m Survey Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Reno Nevada Publisher: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Description: Shallow temperature surveys are useful in early-stage geothermal exploration to delineate surface outflow zones, with the intent to identify the source of upwelling, usually a fault. Detailed descriptions of the 2-meter survey method and equipment design can be found in Coolbaugh et al. (2007) and Sladek et al. (2007), and are summarized here. The survey method was devised to measure temperature as far below the zone of solar influence as possible, have minimal equilibration time, and yet be portable enough to fit on the back of an all-terrain vehicle (ATV); Figure 2). This method utilizes a direct push technology (DPT) technique where 2.3 m long, 0.54” outer diameter hollow steel rods are pounded into the ground using a demolition hammer. Resistance temperature devices (RTD) are then inserted into the rods at 2-meter depths, and allowed to equilibrate for one hour. The temperatures are then measured and recorded, the rods pulled out of the ground, and re-used at future sites. Usually multiple rods are planted over the course of an hour, and then the sampler returns back to the first station, measures the temperatures, pulls the rods, and so on, to eliminate waiting time. At Wagon Wheel Gap, 32 rods were planted around the hot springs between June 20 and July 1, 2012. The purpose was to determine the direction of a possible upflow fault or other structure. Temperatures at 1.5m and 2m depths were measured and recorded in the attribute table of this point shapefile. Several anomalous temperatures suggest that outflow is coming from a ~N60W striking fault or shear zone that contains the quartz-fluorite-barite veins of the adjacent patented mining claims. It should be noted that temperatures at 2m depth vary according to the amount of solar heating from above, as well as possible geothermal heating from below. Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4490310.560635 m Left: 150307.008238 m Right: 433163.213617 m Bottom: 4009565.915398 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Contact Person: Richard “Rick” Zehner Address: 3740 Barron Way City: Reno State: NV Postal Code: 89511 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 775-737-7806 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  16. Roles of nanoclusters in shear banding and plastic deformation of bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieh, T.G.

    2012-07-31

    During the course of this research we published 33 papers in various physics/material journals. We select four representing papers in this report and their results are summarized as follows. I. To study shear banding process, it is pertinent to know the intrinsic shear strain rate within a propagating shear band. To this aim, we used nanoindentation technique to probe the mechanical response of a Au49Ag5.5Pd2.3Cu26.9Si16.3 bulk metallic glass in locality and found notable pop-in events associated with shear band emission. Using a free volume model and under the situation when temperature and stress/hardness are fixed result in an equation, which predicts that hardness serration caused by pop-in decreases exponentially with the strain rate. Our data are in good agreement with the prediction. The result also predicts that, when strain rate is higher than a critical strain rate of 1700 s^-1, there will be no hardness serration, thereby no pop-in. In other words, multiple shear bandings will take place and material will flow homogeneously. The critical strain rate of 1700 s^-1 can be treated as the intrinsic strain rate within a shear band. We subsequently carried out a simulation study and showed that, if the imposed strain rate was over , the shear band spacing would become so small that the entire sample would virtually behave like one major shear band. Using the datum strain rate =1700 s^-1 and based on a shear band nucleation model proposed by us, the size of a shear-band nucleus in Au-BMG was estimated to be 3 ���� 10^6 atoms, or a sphere of ~30 nm in diameter. II. Inspired by the peculiar result published in a Science article �¢����Super Plastic Bulk Metallic Glasses at Room Temperature�¢���, we synthesized the Zr-based bulk metallic glass with a composition identical to that in the paper (Zr64.13Cu15.75Ni10.12Al10) and, subsequently, tested in compression at the same slow strain rate (~10^-4 s^-1). We found that the dominant deformation mode is always single shear. The stress-strain curve exhibited serrated pattern in the plastic region, which conventionally has been attributed to individual shear band propagation. The scanning electron micrographs taken from the deformed sample surface revealed regularly spaced striations. Analysis indicates that the observed stress-strain serrations are intimately related to the striations on the shear surface, suggesting the serrations were actually caused slip-and-stick shear along the principal shear plane. We further use video camera to conduct in situ compression experiments to unambiguously confirm the one-to-one temporal and spatial correspondence between the intermittent sliding and flow serration. This preferential shear band formation along the principal shear plane is, in fact, a natural consequence of Mode II crack, independent of strain softening or hardening, usually claimed in the literature. III. Flow serration in compression of metallic glasses is caused by the formation and propagation of localized shear bands. These shear bands propagate at an extremely high speed, so high that a load cell and load frame were unable to capture the details of the dynamic event. To subdue this problem, we conducted uniaxial compression on Zr64.13Cu15.75Ni10.12Al10 bulk metallic glass using a high-speed camera to capture the sample image and also high-sensitivity strain gauges attached to the test samples to directly measure the strain. The displacement-time curves obtained from the test and a magnified version of the displacement burst reveals clearly a three-step (acceleration, steady-state, and deceleration) process during shear band propagation. The fastest propagating speed occurring at the steady state is calculated as 8����10^2 ���µm/s. This speed is about 1,000 times faster than the crosshead speed. This explains the gradual disappearance of flow serration at higher strain rates previously reported during compression of

  17. RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS IN THE STANDARD ATOMIC WEIGHTS TABLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, N.E.; Holden, N.; Holden,N.E.

    2011-07-27

    In the 1949 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, a series of new elements were added to the Atomic Weights Table. Since these elements had been produced in the laboratory and were not discovered in nature, the atomic weight value of these artificial products would depend upon the production method. Since atomic weight is a property of an element as it occurs in nature, it would be incorrect to assign an atomic weight value to that element. As a result of that discussion, the Commission decided to provide only the mass number of the most stable (or longest-lived) known isotope as the number to be associated with these entries in the Atomic Weights Table. As a function of time, the mass number associated with various elements has changed as longer-lived isotopes of a particular element has been found in nature, or as improved half-life values of an element's isotopes might cause a shift in the longest-lived isotope from one mass to another. In the 1957 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, it was decided to discontinue the listing of the mass number in the Atomic Weights Table on the grounds that the kind of information supplied by the mass number is inconsistent with the primary purpose of the Table, i.e., to provide accurate values of 'these constants' for use in various chemical calculations. In addition to the Table of Atomic Weights, the Commission included an auxiliary Table of Radioactive Elements for the first time, where the entry would be the isotope of that element which was the most stable, i.e., the one with the longest known half-life. In their 1973 Report, the Commission noted that the users of the main Table of Atomic Weights were dissatisfied with the omission of values for some elements in that Table and it was decided to reintroduce the mass number for the radioactive elements into the main Table. In their 1983 Report, the Commission decided that radioactive elements were considered to lack a characteristic terrestrial isotopic composition, from which an atomic weight value could be calculated to five or more figure accuracy, without prior knowledge of the sample involved. These elements were again listed in the Atomic Weights Table with no further information, i.e., with no mass number or atomic weight value. For the elements, which have no stable characteristic terrestrial isotopic composition, the data on the half-lives and the relative atomic masses for the nuclides of interest for those elements have been evaluated. The values of the half-lives with their uncertainties are listed in the table. The uncertainties are given for the last digit quoted of the half-life and are given in parentheses. A half-life entry for the Table having a value and an uncertainty of 7 {+-} 3 is listed in the half-life column as 7 (3). The criteria to include data in this Table, is to be the same as it has been for over sixty years. It is the same criteria, which are used for all data that are evaluated for inclusion in the Standard Table of Atomic Weights. If a report of data is published in a peer-reviewed journal, that data is evaluated and considered for inclusion in the appropriate table of the biennial report of the Atomic Weights Commission. As better data becomes available in the future, the information that is contained in either of the Tables of Standard Atomic Weights or in the Table of Radioactive Elements may be modified. It should be noted that the appearance of any datum in the Table of the Radioactive Elements is merely for the purposes of calculating an atomic mass value for any sample of a radioactive material, which might have a variety of isotopic compositions and it has no implication as to the priority for claiming discovery of a given element and is not intended to. The atomic mass values have been taken primarily from the 2003 Atomic Mass Table. Mass values for those radioisotopes that do not appear in the 2003 Atomic mass Table have been taken from preliminary data of the Atomic Mass Data Center. Most of the quoted half-lives.