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1

The Search for Dark Matter  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

More than 25 years ago, PNNL scientists began the first underground measurements searching for dark matter using specialized radiation detector technology. Dark matter is yet to be discovered says Physicist John L. Orrell.

Orrell, John

2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

2

Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS): The Hunt for Dark Matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deciphering the nature of dark matter has great scientific importance. A leading hypothesis is that dark matter is made of Weakly Interactive Massive Particles (WIMPs), which may result from supersymmetry or additional spatial dimensions. The underground search for elastic scattering of WIMPs on suitable targets (the so-called 'direct detection') is currently led by the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search II (CDMS II) experiment. Its sensitivity is ten times better than any other experiment and we hope to obtain another factor ten in the coming two years. After a brief recall of our recent results, I will describe the complementarity between direct detection experiments, the LHC and the ILC and I will outline the role that SLAC could play in this SuperCDMS program.

Sadoulet, Bernard (UC Berkeley) [UC Berkeley

2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

3

Direct search for WIMP dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We will review the experimental aspects of the direct search for WIMP dark matter. In thin search, one looks in a terrestrial target for nuclear recoils produced by the impacts with WIMPs from the galatic halo. After describing the different search strategies and review the currently running experiments and the prospects of future experiments

J. Gascon

2005-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

4

Search for pseudoscalar cold dark matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

AH dynamical evidence points to the conclusion that the predominant form of matter in the universe is in a non-luminous form. Furthermore, large scale deviations from uniform Hubble flow, and the recent COBE reports of inhomogeneities in the cosmic microwave background strongly suggest that we live in an exactly closed universe. If this is true, then ordinary baryonic matter could only be a minority component (10% at most) of the missing mass, and that what constitutes the majority of the dark matter must involve new physics. The axion is one of very few well motivated candidates which may comprise the dark matter. Additionally it is a `cold` dark-matter candidate which is preferred by the COBE data. We propose to construct and operate an experiment to search for axions which may constitute the dark matter of our own galaxy. As proposed by Sikivie, dark-matter axions may be detected by their stimulated conversion into monochromatic microwave photons in a tunable high-Q cavity inside a strong magnetic field. Our ability to mount an experiment quickly and take data within one year is due to a confluence of three factors. The first is the availability of a compact high field superconducting magnet and a local industrial partner, Wang NMR, who can make a very thermally efficient and economical cryostat for it. The second is an ongoing joint venture with the Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences to do R&D on metalized precision-formed ceramic microwave cavities for the axion search, and INR has commited to providing all the microwave cavity arrays for this experiment, should this proposal be approved. The third is a commitment of very substantial startup capital monies from MIT for all of the state-of-the-art ultra-low noise microwave electronics, to one of our outstanding young collaborators who is joining their faculty.

van Bibber, K.; Stoeffl, W.; LLNL Collaborators

1992-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

5

Dark Matter Search with Moderately Superheated Liquids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We suggest the use of moderately superheated liquids in the form of superheated droplet detectors for a new type of neutralino search experiment. The advantage of this method for Dark Matter detection is, that the detector material is cheap, readily available and that it is easily possible to fabricate a large mass detector. Moreover the detector can be made "background blind", i.e. exclusively sensitive to nuclear recoils.

L. A. Hamel; L. Lessard; V. Zacek; Bhaskar Sur

1996-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

6

EDELWEISS dark matter search: Latest results and future plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EDELWEISS dark matter search: Latest results and future plans Johann Gironnet Institut de Physique is a direct search for WIMP dark matter using cryogenic heat-and-ionization germanium detectors. We report the 4850 meter- water-equivalent rock cover reduces the cosmic-ray background by six order of magnitude

Boyer, Edmond

7

Indirect Search for Dark Matter with the ANTARES Neutrino Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significant high energy neutrino fluxes. Indirect search for Dark Matter looking at such neutrino fluxes for the Cherenkov light induced by high energy muons during their travel in the sea water throughout the detectorIndirect Search for Dark Matter with the ANTARES Neutrino Telescope V. Bertin1 on behalf

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

8

New Directions in Direct Dark Matter Searches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I present the status of direct dark matter detection with specific attention to the experimental results and their phenomenological interpretation in terms of dark matter interactions. In particular I review a new and more general approach to study signals in this field based on non-relativistic operators which parametrize more efficiently the dark matter-nucleus interactions in terms of a very limited number of relevant degrees of freedom. Then I list the major experimental results, pointing out the main uncertainties that affect the theoretical interpretation of the data. Finally, since the underlying theory that describes both the dark matter and the standard model fields is unknown, I address the uncertainties coming from the nature of the interaction. In particular, the phenomenology of a class of models in which the interaction between dark matter particles and target nuclei is of a long-range type is discussed.

Paolo Panci

2014-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

9

Astrophysical search strategies for accelerator blind dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A weakly interacting dark-matter particle may be difficult to discover at an accelerator because it either (1) is too massive, (2) has no standard-model gauge interactions, or (3) is almost degenerate with other states. In each of these cases, searches for annihilation products in the Galactic halo are useful probes of dark-matter properties. Using the example of supersymmetric dark matter, I discuss how astrophysical searches for dark matter may provide discovery and mass information inaccessible to collider physics programs such as the Tevatron and LHC.

James D. Wells

1998-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

10

Dark Matter Searches with Representing the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Supernova Remnants · Unidentified Gamma-ray Sources · Gamma-Ray Bursts · Solar Physics · Dark Matter #12)United States · California State University at Sonoma (SSU) · University of California at Santa Cruz - Santa

California at Santa Cruz, University of

11

Indirect Dark Matter search with large neutrino telescopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dark matter is one of the main goals of neutrino astronomy. At present, there are two big neutrino telescopes based on the Cherenkov technique in ice and water: IceCube at the South Pole and ANTARES in the northern hemisphere. Both telescopes are performing an indirect search for Dark Matter by looking for a statistical excess of neutrinos coming from astrophysical massive objects. This excess could be an evidence of the possible annihilation of dark matter particles in the centre of these objects. In one of the most popular scenarios the Dark Matter is composed of WIMP particles. The analysis and results of the ANTARES neutrino telescope for the indirect detection of Dark Matter fluxes from the Sun are here presented, as well as the latest IceCube published sensitivity results, for different Dark Matter models.

Fermani, Paolo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Direct Search for Low Mass Dark Matter Particles with CCDs  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

A direct dark matter search is performed using fully-depleted high-resistivity CCD detectors. Due to their low electronic readout noise (RMS ~7 eV) these devices operate with a very low detection threshold of 40 eV, making the search for dark matter particles with low masses (~5 GeV) possible. The results of an engineering run performed in a shallow underground site are presented, demonstrating the potential of this technology in the low mass region.

Barreto, J [Rio de Janeiro Federal U.; Cease, H.; Diehl, H.T.; Estrada, J.; Flaugher, B.; Harrison, N.; Jones, J.; Kilminster, B [Fermilab; Molina, J [Asuncion Natl. U.; Smith, J.; Sonnenschein, A [Fermilab

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Hidden Photon Dark Matter Search with a Large Metallic Mirror  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If Dark Matter is composed of hidden-sector photons that kinetically mix with photons of the visible sector, then Dark Matter has a tiny oscillating electric field component. Its presence would lead to a small amount of visible radiation being emitted from a conducting surface, with the photon frequency given approximately by the mass of the hidden photon. Here, we report on experimental efforts that have started recently to search for such hidden photon Dark Matter in the (sub-)eV regime with a prototype mirror for the Auger fluorescence detector at the Karlsruhe Institute for Technology.

Babette Dbrich; Kai Daumiller; Ralph Engel; Marek Kowalski; Axel Lindner; Javier Redondo; Markus Roth

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Search for Dark Matter Satellites Using the FERMI-LAT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical simulations based on the {Lambda}CDM model of cosmology predict a large number of as yet unobserved Galactic dark matter satellites. We report the results of a Large Area Telescope (LAT) search for these satellites via the {gamma}-ray emission expected from the annihilation of weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter. Some dark matter satellites are expected to have hard {gamma}-ray spectra, finite angular extents, and a lack of counterparts at other wavelengths. We sought to identify LAT sources with these characteristics, focusing on {gamma}-ray spectra consistent with WIMP annihilation through the b{bar b} channel. We found no viable dark matter satellite candidates using one year of data, and we present a framework for interpreting this result in the context of numerical simulations to constrain the velocity-averaged annihilation cross section for a conventional 100 GeV WIMP annihilating through the b{bar b} channel.

Ackermann, M.; /DESY; Albert, A.; /Ohio State U.; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Blandford, R.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bottacini, E.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Brandt, T.J.; /IRAP, Toulouse /Toulouse III U.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Buehler, R.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Burnett, T.H.; /Washington U., Seattle; Caliandro, G.A.; /ICE, Bellaterra; Cameron, R.A.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /ASDC, Frascati /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /ASDC, Frascati /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Bologna Observ. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; /more authors..

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

15

Demonstration of Surface Electron Rejection with Interleaved Germanium Detectors for Dark Matter Searches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demonstration of Surface Electron Rejection with Interleaved Germanium Detectors for Dark Matter Search to be published in Physical Review Letters

Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Cherry, M.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Fox, J.; Fritts, M.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hasi, J.; Hertel, S. A.; Hines, B. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kenany, S.; Kennedy, A.; Kenney, C. J.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Martinez, C.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Moore, D. C.; Nadeau, P.; Nelson, R. H.; Novak, L.; Page, K.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Radpour, R.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Resch, R. W.; Ricci, Y.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schmitt, R.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, Richard; Scorza, S.; Seitz, D.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Tomada, A.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

2013-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

16

Complementarity of Dark Matter Searches in the pMSSM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As is well known, the search for and eventual identification of dark matter in supersymmetry requires a simultaneous, multi-pronged approach with important roles played by the LHC as well as both direct and indirect dark matter detection experiments. We examine the capabilities of these approaches in the 19-parameter p(henomenological)MSSM which provides a general framework for complementarity studies of neutralino dark matter. We summarize the sensitivity of dark matter searches at the 7, 8 (and eventually 14) TeV LHC, combined with those by \\Fermi, CTA, IceCube/DeepCore, COUPP, LZ and XENON. The strengths and weaknesses of each of these techniques are examined and contrasted and their interdependent roles in covering the model parameter space are discussed in detail. We find that these approaches explore orthogonal territory and that advances in each are necessary to cover the Supersymmetric WIMP parameter space. We also find that different experiments have widely varying sensitivities to the various dark matter annihilation mechanisms, some of which would be completely excluded by null results from these experiments.

Matthew Cahill-Rowley; Randy Cotta; Alex Drlica-Wagner; Stefan Funk; JoAnne Hewett; Ahmed Ismail; Tom Rizzo; Matthew Wood

2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

17

A Comprehensive Search for Dark Matter Annihilation in Dwarf Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new formalism designed to discover dark matter annihilation occurring in the Milky Way's dwarf galaxies. The statistical framework extracts all available information in the data by simultaneously combining observations of all the dwarf galaxies and incorporating the impact of particle physics properties, the distribution of dark matter in the dwarfs, and the detector response. The method performs maximally powerful frequentist searches and produces confidence limits on particle physics parameters. Probability distributions of test statistics under various hypotheses are constructed exactly, without relying on large sample approximations. The derived limits have proper coverage by construction and claims of detection are not biased by imperfect background modeling. We implement this formalism using data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope to search for an annihilation signal in the complete sample of Milky Way dwarfs whose dark matter distributions can be reliably determined. We find that the observed data is consistent with background for each of the dwarf galaxies individually as well as in a joint analysis. The strongest constraints are at small dark matter particle masses. Taking the median of the systematic uncertainty in dwarf density profiles, the cross section upper limits are below the pure s-wave weak scale relic abundance value (2.2 x 10^-26 cm^3/s) for dark matter masses below 26 GeV (for annihilation into b quarks), 29 GeV (tau leptons), 35 GeV (up, down, strange, charm quarks and gluons), 6 GeV (electrons/positrons), and 114 GeV (two-photon final state). For dark matter particle masses less than 1 TeV, these represent the strongest limits obtained to date using dwarf galaxies.

Alex Geringer-Sameth; Savvas M. Koushiappas; Matthew G. Walker

2014-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

18

Statistical Issues in Astrophysical Searches for Particle Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this review statistical issues appearing in astrophysical searches for particle dark matter, i.e. indirect detection (dark matter annihilating into standard model particles) or direct detection (dark matter particles scattering in deep underground detectors) are discussed. One particular aspect of these searches is the presence of very large uncertainties in nuisance parameters (astrophysical factors) that are degenerate with parameters of interest (mass and annihilation/decay cross sections for the particles). The likelihood approach has become the most powerful tool, offering at least one well motivated method for incorporation of nuisance parameters and increasing the sensitivity of experiments by allowing a combination of targets superior to the more traditional data stacking. Other statistical challenges appearing in astrophysical searches are to large extent similar to any new physics search, for example at colliders, a prime example being the calculation of trial factors. Frequentist methods prevail for hypothesis testing and interval estimation, Bayesian methods are used for assessment of nuisance parameters and parameter estimation in complex parameter spaces. The basic statistical concepts will be exposed, illustrated with concrete examples from experimental searches and caveats will be pointed out.

Jan Conrad

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

19

XENON dark matter searches: Results and the future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

XENON100 is a dark matter search experiment looking for elastic WIMP scattering using a 62 kg liquid target. WIMP search data from XENON100 published in 2012 has set the world's strongest limits on WIMP-nucleus spinindependent, elastic scattering. It has also set the strongest limits on WIMP-nucleus spin-dependent scattering considering neutron scattering only, and competitive limits considering proton scattering only. The successor experiment to XENON100, XENON1T, is currently under construction, with commissioning scheduled to begin in 2014. XENON1T's design goal is a 100 fold increase in sensitivity for elastic WIMP searches over XENON100.

Brown, Andrew [Physics Department, Purdue University - 525 Northwestern Ave., West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Collaboration: XENON Collaboration

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

20

Hot and Cold Dark Matter Search with GENIUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GENIUS is a proposal for a large volume detector to search for rare events. An array of 40-400 'naked' HPGe detectors will be operated in a tank filled with ultra-pure liquid nitrogen. After a description of performed technical studies of detector operation in liquid nitrogen and of Monte Carlo simulations of expected background components, the potential of GENIUS for detecting WIMP dark matter, the neutrinoless double beta decay in 76-Ge and low-energy solar neutrinos is discussed.

Laura Baudis; Alexander Dietz; Gerd Heusser; Hans Volker Klapdor-Kleingrothaus; Bela Majorovits; Herbert Strecker

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Methane ionization chamber to search for spin-dependent dark matter interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A liquid-methane ionization chamber is proposed as a setup to search for spin-dependent interactions of dark-matter particles with hydrogen

B. M. Ovchinnikov; V. V. Parusov; V. A. Bednyakov

2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

22

The Cold Dark Matter Search test stand warm electronics card  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A card which does the signal processing for four SQUID amplifiers and two charge sensitive channels is described. The card performs the same functions as is presently done with two custom 9U x 280mm Eurocard modules, a commercial multi-channel VME digitizer, a PCI to GPIB interface, a PCI to VME interface and a custom built linear power supply. By integrating these functions onto a single card and using the power over Ethernet standard, the infrastructure requirements for instrumenting a Cold Dark Matter Search (CDMS) detector test stand are significantly reduced.

Hines, Bruce; /Colorado U., Denver; Hansen, Sten; /Fermilab; Huber, Martin; /Colorado U., Denver; Kiper, Terry; /Fermilab; Rau, Wolfgang; /Queen's U., Kingston; Saab, Tarek; /Florida U.; Seitz, Dennis; Sundqvist, Kyle; /UC, Berkeley; Mandic, Vuk; /Minnesota U.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Taming astrophysical bias in direct dark matter searches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We explore systematic biases in the identification of dark matter in future direct detection experiments and compare the reconstructed dark matter properties when assuming a self-consistent dark matter distribution function and the standard Maxwellian velocity distribution. We find that the systematic bias on the dark matter mass and cross-section determination arising from wrong assumptions for its distribution function is of order ? 1?. A much larger systematic bias can arise if wrong assumptions are made on the underlying Milky Way mass model. However, in both cases the bias is substantially mitigated by marginalizing over galactic model parameters. We additionally show that the velocity distribution can be reconstructed in an unbiased manner for typical dark matter parameters. Our results highlight both the robustness of the dark matter mass and cross-section determination using the standard Maxwellian velocity distribution and the importance of accounting for astrophysical uncertainties in a statistically consistent fashion.

Pato, Miguel [Physik-Department T30d, Technische Universitt Mnchen, James-Franck-Strae, 85748 Garching (Germany); Strigari, Louis E. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Trotta, Roberto [Astrophysics Group and Imperial Centre for Inference and Cosmology, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Bertone, Gianfranco, E-mail: miguel.pato@tum.de, E-mail: strigari@stanford.edu, E-mail: r.trotta@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: gf.bertone@gmail.com [GRAPPA Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1090 GL Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Dark Matters  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

One of the greatest mysteries in the cosmos is that it is mostly dark. Astronomers and particle physicists today are seeking to unravel the nature of this mysterious, but pervasive dark matter which has profoundly influenced the formation of structure in the universe. I will describe the complex interplay between galaxy formation and dark matter detectability and review recent attempts to measure particle dark matter by direct and indirect means.

Joseph Silk

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

25

A Superheated Droplet Detector for Dark Matter Search  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the operation principle of a detector based on superheated droplets of Freon-12 and its feasibility for the search of weakly interacting cold dark matter particles. In particular we are interested in a neutralino search experiment in the mass range from 10 to 10^4 GeV/c^2 and with a sensitivity of better than 10^-2 events/kg/d. We show that our new proposed detector can be operated at ambient pressure and room temperature in a mode where it is exclusively sensitive to nuclear recoils like those following neutralino interactions, which allows a powerful background discrimination. An additional advantage of this technique is due to the fact that the detection material, Freon-12, is cheap and readily available in large quantities. Moreover we were able to show that piezoelectric transducers allow efficient event localization in large volumes.

Hamel, L A; Rainville, L; Sur, B; Zacek, V

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

A Superheated Droplet Detector for Dark Matter Search  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the operation principle of a detector based on superheated droplets of Freon-12 and its feasibility for the search of weakly interacting cold dark matter particles. In particular we are interested in a neutralino search experiment in the mass range from 10 to 10^4 GeV/c^2 and with a sensitivity of better than 10^-2 events/kg/d. We show that our new proposed detector can be operated at ambient pressure and room temperature in a mode where it is exclusively sensitive to nuclear recoils like those following neutralino interactions, which allows a powerful background discrimination. An additional advantage of this technique is due to the fact that the detection material, Freon-12, is cheap and readily available in large quantities. Moreover we were able to show that piezoelectric transducers allow efficient event localization in large volumes.

L. A. Hamel; L. Lessard; L. Rainville; B. Sur; V. Zacek

1996-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Indirect Search of Dark Matter with the ANTARES Neutrino on behalf of the ANTARES Collaboration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significant high energy neutrino fluxes. Indirect search for Dark Matter looking at such neutrino fluxes for the Cherenkov light induced by high energy muons during their travel in the sea water throughout the detectorIndirect Search of Dark Matter with the ANTARES Neutrino Telescope V. Bertin1 on behalf

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

28

LIPSS Free-Electron Laser Searches for Dark Matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of Dark Matter particle candidates have been hypothesized by physics Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) in the very light (10{sup -6} - 10{sup -3} eV) range. In the past decade several international groups have conducted laboratory experiments designed to either produce such particles or extend the boundaries in parameter space. The LIght Pseudo-scalar and Scalar Search (LIPSS) Collaboration, using the 'Light Shining through a Wall' (LSW) technique, passes the high average power photon beam from Jefferson Lab's Free-Electron Laser through a magnetic field upstream from a mirror and optical beam dump. Light Neutral Bosons (LNBs), generated by coupling of photons with the magnetic field, pass through the mirror ('the Wall') into an identical magnetic field where they revert to detectable photons by the same coupling process. While no evidence of LNBs was evident, new scalar coupling boundaries were established. New constraints were also determined for hypothetical para-photons and for millicharged fermions. We will describe our experimental setup and results for LNBs, para-photons, and milli-charged fermions. Plans for chameleon particle searches are underway.

Afanaciev, Andrei; Beard, Kevin; Biallas, George; Boyce, James R; Minarni, M; Ramdon, R; Robinson, Taylor; Shinn, Michelle D

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Quantifying galactic propagation uncertainty in WIMP dark matter search with AMS01 Z=-1 spectrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for a WIMP dark matter annihilation signal is carried out in the AMS01 negatively charged (Z=-I) particle spectrum, following a set of supersymmetric benchmark scenarios in the mSUGRA framework. The result is ...

Xiao, Sa, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

A Search for the Dark Matter Annual Modulation in South Pole Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Astrophysical observations and cosmological data have led to the conclusion that nearly one quarter of the Universe consists of dark matter. Under certain assumptions, an observable signature of dark matter is the annual modulation of the rate of dark matter-nucleon interactions taking place in an Earth-bound experiment. To search for this effect, we introduce the concept for a new dark matter experiment using NaI scintillation detectors deployed deep in the South Pole ice. This experiment complements dark matter search efforts in the Northern Hemisphere and will investigate the observed annual modulation in the DAMA/LIBRA and DAMA/NaI experiments. The unique location will permit the study of background effects correlated with seasonal variations and the surrounding environment. This paper describes the experimental concept and explores the sensitivity of a 250 kg NaI experiment at the South Pole.

Cherwinka, J; Cowen, D F; Grant, D; Halzen, F; Heeger, K M; Hsu, L; Karle, A; Kudryavtsev, V A; Maruyama, R; Pettus, W; Robinson, M; Spooner, N J C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Nuclear spin structure in dark matter search: The finite momentum transfer limit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spin-dependent elastic scattering of weakly interacting massive dark matter particles (WIMP) off nuclei is reviewed. All available, within different nuclear models, structure functions S(q) for finite momentum transfer (q>0) are presented. These functions describe the recoil energy dependence of the differential event rate due to the spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon interactions. This paper, together with the previous paper ``Nuclear spin structure in dark matter search: The zero momentum transfer limit'', completes our review of the nuclear spin structure calculations involved in the problem of direct dark matter search.

V. A. Bednyakov; F. Simkovic

2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

32

Carbon Nanotubes Potentialities in Directional Dark Matter Searches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new solution to the problem of dark matter directional detection based on large parallel arrays of carbon nanotubes. The phenomenon of ion channeling in single wall nanotubes is simulated to calculate the expected number of recoiling carbon ions, due to the hypothetical scattering with dark matter particles, subsequently being driven along their longitudinal extension. As shown by explicit calculation, the relative orientation of the carbon nanotube array with respect to the direction of motion of the Sun has an appreciable effect on the channeling probability of the struck ion and this provides the required detector anisotropic response.

L. M. Capparelli; G. Cavoto; D. Mazzilli; A. D. Polosa

2014-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

33

pMSSM Dark Matter Searches on Ice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We explore the capability of the IceCube/Deepcore array to discover signal neutrinos resulting from the annihilations of Supersymmetric WIMPS that may be captured in the solar core. In this analysis, we use a previously generated set of {approx} 70k model points in the 19-dimensional parameter space of the pMSSM which satisfy existing experimental and theoretical constraints. Our calculations employ a realistic estimate of the IceCube/DeepCore effective area that has been modeled by the IceCube collaboration. We find that a large fraction of the pMSSM models are shown to have significant signal rates in the anticipated IceCube/DeepCore 1825 day dataset, including some prospects for an early discovery. Many models where the LSP only constitutes a small fraction of the total dark matter relic density are found to have observable rates. We investigate in detail the dependence of the signal neutrino fluxes on the LSP mass, weak eigenstate composition, annihilation products and thermal relic density, as well as on the spin-independent and spin-dependent scattering cross sections. Lastly, We compare the model coverage of IceCube/DeepCore to that obtainable in near-future direct detection experiments and to pMSSM searches at the 7 TeV LHC.

Cotta, R.C.; /SLAC; Howe, K.T.K.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Hewett, J.L.; Rizzo, T.G.; /SLAC

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

34

Searching for Dark Matter Annihilation in the Smith High-Velocity Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent observations suggest that some high-velocity clouds may be confined by massive dark matter halos. In particular, the proximity and proposed dark matter content of the Smith Cloud make it a tempting target for the indirect detection of dark matter annihilation. We argue that the Smith Cloud may be a better target than some Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies and use gamma-ray observations from the Fermi Large Area Telescope to search for a dark matter annihilation signal. No significant gamma-ray excess is found coincident with the Smith Cloud, and we set strong limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section assuming a spatially-extended dark matter profile consistent with dynamical modeling of the Smith Cloud. Notably, these limits exclude the canonical thermal relic cross section ($\\sim 3\\times10^{-26}{\\rm cm}^{3}{\\rm s}^{-1}$) for dark matter masses $\\lesssim 30$ GeV annihilating via the $b \\bar b$ or $\\tau^{+}\\tau^{-}$ channels for certain assumptions of the dark matter density profile; however, uncertainties in the dark matter content of the Smith Cloud may significantly weaken these constraints.

Alex Drlica-Wagner; German A. Gomez-Vargas; John W. Hewitt; Tim Linden; Luigi Tibaldo

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

35

The XENON1T Dark Matter Search Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The worldwide race towards direct dark matter detection in the form of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) has been dramatically accelerated by the remarkable progress and evolution of liquid xenon time projection chambers (LXeTPCs). With a realistic discovery potential, XENON100 has already reached a sensitivity of $7\\times10^{-45}\\,\

Aprile, Elena

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

The XENON1T Dark Matter Search Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The worldwide race towards direct dark matter detection in the form of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) has been dramatically accelerated by the remarkable progress and evolution of liquid xenon time projection chambers (LXeTPCs). With a realistic discovery potential, XENON100 has already reached a sensitivity of $7\\times10^{-45}\\,\

Elena Aprile; XENON1T collaboration

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

37

dark matter dark energy inflation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

theory dark matter dark energy inflation The National Science Foundation The Kavli Foundation NSF Site Review November 28-29, 2005 #12;dark matter dark energy inflation NSF Site Visit ­ November 28 Gravitation initial conditions beyond single-field slow roll #12;dark matter dark energy inflation NSF Site

Hu, Wayne

38

Strategy for Searching for a Dark Matter Sterile Neutrino  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a strategy of how to look for dark matter (DM) particles possessing a radiative decay channel and derive constraints on their parameters from observations of X-rays from our own Galaxy and its dwarf satellites. When applied to the sterile neutrinos in keV mass range, it allows a significant improvement of restrictions to its parameters, as compared with previous works.

Boyarsky, A; Ruchayskiy, O; Shaposhnikov, M E; Tkachev, I I

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

The search for dark matter using monojets and monophotons with the ATLAS detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents results on the search for dark matter with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The studies discussed involve searches for events with a single (mono) jet or photon plus missing transverse energy interpreted with effective field theory as well as searches for light gravitinos and lepton-jets. No evidence for dark matter production has been found and the results have been translated into exclusion limits on physics beyond the Standard Model for several different scenarios. In particular, ATLAS bounds on weakly interacting massive particles are seen to be both complementary and quite competitive to those from direct detection experiments.

Diehl, Edward [Physics Dept., University of Michigan, 450 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Collaboration: ATLAS Collaboration

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

40

Big Questions: Dark Matter  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Carl Sagan's oft-quoted statement that there are "billions and billions" of stars in the cosmos gives an idea of just how much "stuff" is in the universe. However scientists now think that in addition to the type of matter with which we are familiar, there is another kind of matter out there. This new kind of matter is called "dark matter" and there seems to be five times as much as ordinary matter. Dark matter interacts only with gravity, thus light simply zips right by it. Scientists are searching through their data, trying to prove that the dark matter idea is real. Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln tells us why we think this seemingly-crazy idea might not be so crazy after all.

Lincoln, Don

2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The Search for Dark Matter with the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has been scanning the gamma ray sky since it was launched by NASA in June 2008 and has a mission lifetime goal of 10 years. Largely due to our particle physics heritage, one of the main physics topics being studied by the Fermi LAT Collaboration is the search for dark matter via indirect detection. My talk will review the progress of these studies, something on how the LAT detector enables them, and expectations for the future. I will discuss both gamma-ray and (electron + positron) searches for dark matter, and some resulting theoretical implications.

Bloom, Elliott (SLAC) [SLAC

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

42

Dark Energy and Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A brief overview of our current understanding of abundance and properties of dark energy and dark matter is presented. A more focused discussion of supersymmetric dark matter follows. Included is a frequentist approach to the supersymmetric parameter space and consequences for the direct detection of dark matter.

Keith A. Olive

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

43

Searching for Smoking Gun Signatures of Decaying Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clear methods to differentiate between decaying and annihilating dark matter (DM) scenarios are still by and large unavailable. In this note, we study the potential astrophysical signatures of a new class of hidden sector decaying DM models, which can address the recent cosmic ray measurements. Such models may produce primary photons and/or neutrinos at large rates, correlated with the leptonic production. The photon and neutrino spectra will then contain sharp features at the TeV scale. We demonstrate the discovery potential for upcoming and future measurements by FERMI, HESS, AGIS and IceCube/DeepCore. We show that these models may be discovered in the near future. Specifically, measurements of diffuse gamma rays by FERMI can detect the start of a hard photon feature. We argue that these hard spectra can be produced by decaying dark matter and be consistent with current constraints, but are difficult to reconcile with models of annihilating DM. Consequently the measurement of a hard spectral feature, in correlation with the current cosmic ray measurements, will strongly favor decaying DM models. Finally we comment on the preliminary results from the Inner Galaxy presented by the FERMI collaboration.

Joshua T. Ruderman; Tomer Volansky

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

44

Matter Field, Dark Matter and Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model concerning particle theory and cosmology is proposed. Matter field, dark matter and dark energy are created by an energy flow from space to primordial matter fields at the phase transition in the early universe.

Masayasu Tsuge

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

45

Planned Dark Matter searches with the MAGIC Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MAGIC 17m-diameter Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescope (IACT) has been commissioned beginning of 2005. The telescope has been designed to achieve the lower detection energy threshold ever obtained with an IACT, about 50 GeV. A new window in gamma-ray astronomy is being opened with great impact for exciting new physics and new discoveries. Among the targets of MAGIC is the indirect detection of Dark Matter (DM). We have considered different DM halo models of high DM density objects like the center of the Milky Way, its closest satellites and nearby galaxies (M31,M87). For each object, detection limits are computed for different DM halo models in a mSUGRA scenario for supersymmetric neutralino annihilation $\\gamma$-ray production. Advantages and drawbacks of these objects and plans for future observations are discussed.

J. Flix

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

E-Print Network 3.0 - axion dark matter Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with Axions Summary: Lecture April 23, 2009 Outline: From neutrons to axions Axion phenomenology Axion dark matter Thursday... Axion phenomenology Axion dark matter Inflationary...

47

Can Solar Neutrinos be a Serious Background in Direct Dark Matter Searches?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The coherent contribution of all neutrons in neutrino nucleus scattering due to the neutral current is examined considering the boron solar neutrinos. These neutrinos could potentially become a source of background in the future dark matter searches aiming at nucleon cross sections in the region well below the few events per ton per year.

J. D. Vergados; H. Ejiri

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

48

The asymmetry and the diurnal variation in axionic dark matter searches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the present work we propose to study the modulation signal in Axion Dark Matter searches. This can be seen in directional experiments employing cylindrical resonant cavities, which exploit the axion photon-conversion in the presence of strong magnetic fields

Y. Semertzidis; J. D. Vergados

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

49

Dark Matter Theory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dark Matter Theory Dark Matter Theory Understanding discoveries at the Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic Frontiers Get Expertise Rajan Gupta (505) 667-7664 Email Bruce Carlsten (505)...

50

Indirect Search for Dark Matter in M31 with the CELESTE Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If dark matter is made of neutralinos, annihilation of such Majorana particles should produce high energy cosmic rays, especially in galaxy halo high density regions like galaxy centres. M31 (Andromeda) is our nearest neighbour spiral galaxy, and both its high mass and its low distance make it a source of interest for the indirect search for dark matter through gamma-ray detection. The ground based atmospheric Cherenkov telescope CELESTE observed M31 from 2001 to 2003, in the mostly unexplored energy range 50-500 GeV. These observations provide an upper limit on the flux above 50 GeV around $10^{-10}\\rm{cm}^{-2}\\rm{s}^{-1}$ in the frame of supersymmetric dark matter, and more generally on any gamma emission from M31.

Lavalle, J; Britto, R; Bruel, P; Bussons-Gordo, J; Dumora, D; Durand, E; Giraud, E; Jacholkowska, A; Lott, B; M"unz, F; Manseri, H; Nuss, E; Piron, Frdric; Reposeur, T; Smith, D A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Indirect Search for Dark Matter in M31 with the CELESTE Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If dark matter is made of neutralinos, annihilation of such Majorana particles should produce high energy cosmic rays, especially in galaxy halo high density regions like galaxy centres. M31 (Andromeda) is our nearest neighbour spiral galaxy, and both its high mass and its low distance make it a source of interest for the indirect search for dark matter through gamma-ray detection. The ground based atmospheric Cherenkov telescope CELESTE observed M31 from 2001 to 2003, in the mostly unexplored energy range 50-500 GeV. These observations provide an upper limit on the flux above 50 GeV around $10^{-10}\\rm{cm}^{-2}\\rm{s}^{-1}$ in the frame of supersymmetric dark matter, and more generally on any gamma emission from M31.

J. Lavalle; H. Manseri; A. Jacholkowska; E. Brion; R. Britto; P. Bruel; J. Bussons-Gordo; D. Dumora; E. Durand; E. Giraud; B. Lott; F. Mnz; E. Nuss; F. Piron; T. Reposeur; D. A. Smith

2006-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

52

In Wino Veritas? Indirect Searches Shed Light on Neutralino Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indirect detection constraints on gamma rays (both continuum and lines) have set strong constraints on wino dark matter. By combining results from Fermi-LAT and HESS, we show that: light nonthermal wino dark matter is strongly excluded; thermal wino dark matter is allowed only if the Milky Way dark matter distribution has a significant (>~0.4 kpc) core; and for plausible NFW and Einasto distributions the entire range of wino masses from 100 GeV up to 3 TeV can be excluded. The case of light, nonthermal wino dark matter is particularly interesting in scenarios with decaying moduli that reheat the universe to a low temperature. Typically such models have been discussed for low reheating temperatures, not far above the BBN bound of a few MeV. We show that constraints on the allowed wino relic density push such models to higher reheating temperatures and hence heavier moduli. Even for a flattened halo model consisting of an NFW profile with constant-density core inside 1 kpc and a density near the sun of 0.3 GeV/cm^3, for 150 GeV winos current data constrains the reheat temperature to be above 1.4 GeV. As a result, for models in which the wino mass is a loop factor below the gravitino mass, the data favor moduli that are more than an order of magnitude heavier than the gravitino. We discuss some of the sobering implications of this result for the status of supersymmetry. We also comment on other neutralino dark matter scenarios, in particular the case of mixed bino/higgsino dark matter. We show that in this case, direct and indirect searches are complementary to each other and could potentially cover most of the parameter space.

JiJi Fan; Matthew Reece

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

53

Latest Results of the Edelweiss-II Dark Matter Search Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A search for WIMP dark matter has been undertaken with new-generation germanium heat-and-ionization cryogenic detectors in the EDELWEISS-II experiment. The InterDigit bolometers, with an interleaved electrode design, have proven excellent rejection performance against gamma-ray and surface event backgrounds which are limiting germanium bolometer dark matter searches. One year of continuous operation at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane has been achieved with an array of ten 400 g detectors. Preliminary resultats for WIMP search are presented with an effective exposure of 322 kg.days, which corresponds to a 5x10{sup -8} pb sensitivity to the spin independant WIMP-nucleon cross-section at 90% C.L. for a WIMP mass of 80 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Loaiza, P. [Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane, CEA-CNRS, 1125 route de Bardonneche, 73500 Modane (France)

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

54

Optimized analysis method for indirect dark matter searches with imaging air Cherenkov telescopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose a dedicated analysis approach for indirect Dark Matter searches with Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes. By using the full likelihood analysis, we take complete advantage of the distinct features expected in the gamma ray spectrum of Dark Matter origin, achieving better sensitivity with respect to the standard analysis chains. We describe the method and characterize its general performance. We also compare its sensitivity with that of the current standards for several Dark Matter annihilation models, obtaining gains of up to factors of order of 10. We compute the improved limits that can be reached using this new approach, taking as an example existing estimates for several benchmark models as well as the recent results from VERITAS on observations of the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Segue 1. Furthermore, we estimate the sensitivity of Cherenkov Telescopes for monochromatic line signals. Predictions are made on improvement that can be achieved for MAGIC and CTA. Lastly, we discuss how this method can be applied in a global, sensitivity-optimized indirect Dark Matter search that combines the results of all Cherenkov observatories of the present generation.

Aleksi?, J.; Martinez, M. [Institut de Fsica d'Altes Energies (IFAE), Campus UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Rico, J., E-mail: jelena@ifae.es, E-mail: jrico@ifae.es, E-mail: martinez@ifae.es [Instituci Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avanats (ICREA), E-08010 Barcelona (Spain)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Recent developments in the search for baryonic dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cosmological nucleosynthesis calculations imply that many of the baryons in the Universe must be dark. We discuss the likelihood that some of these dark baryons may reside in galaxies as Massive Compact Halo Objects (MACHOs), the remnants of a first generation of pregalactic or protogalactic stars. Various candidates have been proposed for such remnants and we review the many types of observations which can be used to detect or exclude them. Claims to have found positive evidence for some of the candidates have generally turned out to be spurious or questionable, so the status of the MACHO scenario remains controversial. However, it would be premature to reject MACHOs altogether and further observations are likely to resolve the issue soon.

B. J. Carr

2001-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

56

A Search for Dark Matter with the ZEPLIN II Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIMP search experiment that attempts to directly detect WIMP interactions using the two-phase xenon approach. The detector measures both scintillation and ionization generated by interactions in a 31 kg liquid xenon target. This approach provides a...

Gao, Jianting

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

57

A search for Z = -1 dark matter annihilation products in cosmic rays with AMS-01  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The majority of mass in the universe has not been observed optically and is termed dark matter. The supersymmetric neutralino provides an interesting dark matter candidate, which may self-annihilate in our galaxy, producing ...

Rybka, Gray

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search and Background Rejection with Event Position Information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evidence from observational cosmology and astrophysics indicates that about one third of the universe is matter, but that the known baryonic matter only contributes to the universe at 4%. A large fraction of the universe is cold and non-baryonic matter, which has important role in the universe structure formation and its evolution. The leading candidate for the non-baryonic dark matter is Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), which naturally occurs in the supersymmetry theory in particle physics. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is searching for evidence of a WIMP interaction off an atomic nucleus in crystals of Ge and Si by measuring simultaneously the phonon energy and ionization energy of the interaction in the CDMS detectors. The WIMP interaction energy is from a few keV to tens of keV with a rate less than 0.1 events/kg/day. To reach the goal of WIMP detection, the CDMS experiment has been conducted in the Soudan mine with an active muon veto and multistage passive background shields. The CDMS detectors have a low energy threshold and background rejection capabilities based on ionization yield. However, betas from contamination and other radioactive sources produce surface interactions, which have low ionization yield, comparable to that of bulk nuclear interactions. The low-ionization surface electron recoils must be removed in the WIMP search data analysis. An emphasis of this thesis is on developing the method of the surface-interaction rejection using location information of the interactions, phonon energy distributions and phonon timing parameters. The result of the CDMS Soudan run118 92.3 live day WIMP search data analysis is presented, and represents the most sensitive search yet performed.

Wang, Gen-sheng

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Dark Matter: Early Considerations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A review of the study of dark matter is given, starting with earliest studies and finishing with the establishment of the standard Cold Dark Matter paradigm in mid 1980-s. Particular attention is given to the collision of the classical and new paradigms concerning the matter content of the Universe. Also the amount of baryonic matter, dark matter and dark energy is discussed using modern estimates.

J. Einasto

2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

60

Dark Matter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOffice ofINL is a U.S.11-26-20131Daren Dark Fiber

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Future Directions in the Microwave Cavity Search for Dark Matter Axions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The axion is a light pseudoscalar particle which suppresses CP-violating effects in strong interactions and also happens to be an excellent dark matter candidate. Axions constituting the dark matter halo of our galaxy may be detected by their resonant conversion to photons in a microwave cavity permeated by a magnetic field. The current generation of the microwave cavity experiment has demonstrated sensitivity to plausible axion models, and upgrades in progress should achieve the sensitivity required for a definitive search, at least for low mass axions. However, a comprehensive strategy for scanning the entire mass range, from 1-1000 $\\mu$eV, will require significant technological advances to maintain the needed sensitivity at higher frequencies. Such advances could include sub-quantum-limited amplifiers based on squeezed vacuum states, bolometers, and/or superconducting microwave cavities. The Axion Dark Matter eXperiment at High Frequencies (ADMX-HF) represents both a pathfinder for first data in the 20-100 $\\mu$eV range ($\\sim$5-25 GHz), and an innovation test-bed for these concepts.

T. M. Shokair; J. Root; K. A. Van Bibber; B. Brubaker; Y. V. Gurevich; S. B. Cahn; S. K. Lamoreaux; M. A. Anil; K. W. Lehnert; B. K. Mitchell; A. Reed; G. Carosi

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

62

CAST solar axion search with 3^He buffer gas: Closing the hot dark matter gap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) has finished its search for solar axions with 3^He buffer gas, covering the search range 0.64 eV < m_a <1.17 eV. This closes the gap to the cosmological hot dark matter limit and actually overlaps with it. From the absence of excess X-rays when the magnet was pointing to the Sun we set a typical upper limit on the axion-photon coupling of g_ag < 3.3 x 10^{-10} GeV^{-1} at 95% CL, with the exact value depending on the pressure setting. Future direct solar axion searches will focus on increasing the sensitivity to smaller values of g_a, for example by the currently discussed next generation helioscope IAXO.

M. Arik; S. Aune; K. Barth; A. Belov; S. Borghi; H. Brauninger; G. Cantatore; J. M. Carmona; S. A. Cetin; J. I. Collar; E. Da Riva; T. Dafni; M. Davenport; C. Eleftheriadis; N. Elias; G. Fanourakis; E. Ferrer-Ribas; P. Friedrich; J. Galan; J. A. Garcia; A. Gardikiotis; J. G. Garza; E. N. Gazis; T. Geralis; E. Georgiopoulou; I. Giomataris; S. Gninenko; H. Gomez; M. Gomez Marzoa; E. Gruber; T. Guthorl; R. Hartmann; S. Hauf; F. Haug; M. D. Hasinoff; D. H. H. Hoffmann; F. J. Iguaz; I. G. Irastorza; J. Jacoby; K. Jakovcic; M. Karuza; K. Konigsmann; R. Kotthaus; M. Krcmar; M. Kuster; B. Lakic; P. M. Lang; J. M. Laurent; A. Liolios; A. Ljubicic; V. Lozza; G. Luzon; S. Neff; T. Niinikoski; A. Nordt; T. Papaevangelou; M. J. Pivovaroff; G. Raffelt; H. Riege; A. Rodriguez; M. Rosu; J. Ruz; I. Savvidis; I. Shilon; P. S. Silva; S. K. Solanki; L. Stewart; A. Tomas; M. Tsagri; K. van Bibber; T. Vafeiadis; J. Villar; J. K. Vogel; S. C. Yildiz; K. Zioutas

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Axion Dark Matter searches and New Limits on CPT and Lorentz-Invariance-violating interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the proton and neutron spin contributions for a wide range of nuclei using semi-empirical methods. These values are required for interpretations of searches for exotic nuclear spin-dependent couplings, including those that arise in dark matter detection schemes, which search for axions, WIMPs and topological defects, as well as tests of CPT and Lorentz-invariance violation. We reconsider experiments, which search for evidence of CPT and Lorentz-invariance-violating couplings, using a $^{3}$He/$^{129}$Xe comagnetometer and show that the $^{3}$He/$^{129}$Xe system is in fact particularly sensitive to proton interaction parameters. From existing data, we derive a limit on the CPT and Lorentz-invariance-violating parameter $|\\tilde{b}_{\\perp}^p| nuclear anapole moment data for Cs to obtain new limits on several other CPT and Lorentz-invariance-violating parameters.

Y. V. Stadnik; V. V. Flambaum

2014-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

64

E-Print Network 3.0 - annihilating dark matter Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;SCIPP... Supernova Remnants Unidentified Gamma-ray Sources Gamma-Ray Bursts Solar Physics Dark Matter 12... ;SCIPP talk Larry Wai SLAC 4 Talk...

65

Discrete dark matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose a new motivation for the stability of dark matter (DM). We suggest that the same non-Abelian discrete flavor symmetry which accounts for the observed pattern of neutrino oscillations, spontaneously breaks to a Z{sub 2} subgroup which renders DM stable. The simplest scheme leads to a scalar doublet DM potentially detectable in nuclear recoil experiments, inverse neutrino mass hierarchy, hence a neutrinoless double beta decay rate accessible to upcoming searches, while {theta}{sub 13}=0 gives no CP violation in neutrino oscillations.

Hirsch, M.; Morisi, S.; Peinado, E.; Valle, J. W. F. [AHEP Group, Institut de Fisica Corpuscular--C.S.I.C./Universitat de Valencia, Edificio Institutos de Paterna, Apartado 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Particle identification with the AMS-02 RICH detector: search for dark matter with antideuterons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), whose final version AMS-02 is to be installed on the International Space Station (ISS) for at least 3 years, is a detector designed to measure charged cosmic ray spectra with energies up to the TeV region and with high energy photon detection capability up to a few hundred GeV, using state-of-the art particle identification techniques. It is equipped with several subsystems, one of which is a proximity focusing Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector equipped with a dual radiator (aerogel+NaF), a lateral conical mirror and a detection plane made of 680 photomultipliers and light guides, enabling precise measurements of particle electric charge and velocity (Delta beta / beta ~ 10^-3 and 10^-4 for Z=1 and Z=10-20, respectively) at kinetic energies of a few GeV/nucleon. Combining velocity measurements with data on particle rigidity from the AMS-02 Tracker (Delta R / R ~ 2% for R=1-10 GV) it is possible to obtain a reliable measurement for particle mass. One of the main topics of the AMS-02 physics program is the search for indirect signatures of dark matter. Experimental data indicate that dark, non-baryonic matter of unknown composition is much more abundant than baryonic matter, accounting for a large fraction of the energy content of the Universe. Apart from antideuterons produced in cosmic-ray propagation, the annihilation of dark matter will produce additional antideuteron fluxes. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations of AMS-02 have been used to evaluate the detector's performance for mass separation, a key issue for anti-D/anti-p separation. Results of these studies are presented.

Lusa Arruda; Fernando Baro; Rui Pereira

2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

67

Atomic dark matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose that dark matter is dominantly comprised of atomic bound states. We build a simple model and map the parameter space that results in the early universe formation of hydrogen-like dark atoms. We find that atomic dark matter has interesting implications for cosmology as well as direct detection: Weak-scale dark atoms can accommodate hyperfine splittings of order 100 keV, consistent with the inelastic dark matter interpretation of the DAMA data while naturally evading direct detection bounds. Moreover, protohalo formation can be suppressed below M{sub proto} ? 10{sup 3}10{sup 6}M{sub s}un for weak scale dark matter due to Ion-Radiation and Ion-Atom interactions in the dark sector.

Kaplan, David E.; Krnjaic, Gordan Z.; Rehermann, Keith R.; Wells, Christopher M., E-mail: dkaplan@pha.jhu.edu, E-mail: gordan@pha.jhu.edu, E-mail: keith@pha.jhu.edu, E-mail: cwells13@pha.jhu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States)

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Higgs Partner Searches and Dark Matter Phenomenology in a Classically Scale Invariant Higgs Boson Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a previous work, a classically scale invariant extension of the standard model was proposed, as a potential candidate for resolving the hierarchy problem, by minimally introducing a complex gauge singlet scalar, and generating radiative electroweak symmetry breaking by means of the Coleman- Weinberg Mechanism. Postulating the singlet sector to respect the CP-symmetry, the existence of a stable pseudoscalar dark matter candidate with a mass in the TeV range was demonstrated. More- over, the model predicted the presence of another physical CP-even Higgs boson (with suppressed tree-level couplings), in addition to the 125 GeV scalar discovered by the LHC. The viable region of the parameter space was determined by various theoretical and experimental considerations. In this work, we continue to examine the phenomenological implications of the proposed minimal sce- nario by considering the constraints from the dark matter relic density, as determined by the Planck collaboration, as well as the direct detection bounds from the LUX experiment. Furthermore, we investigate the implications of the collider Higgs searches for the additional Higgs boson. Our results are comprehensively demonstrated in unified exclusion plots, which analyze the viable region of the parameter space from all relevant angles, demonstrating the testability of the proposed scenario.

Arsham Farzinnia; Jing Ren

2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

69

Simplified Models for Dark Matter and Missing Energy Searches at the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The study of collision events with missing energy as searches for the dark matter (DM) component of the Universe are an essential part of the extensive program looking for new physics at the LHC. Given the unknown nature of DM, the interpretation of such searches should be made broad and inclusive. This report reviews the usage of simplified models in the interpretation of missing energy searches. We begin with a brief discussion of the utility and limitation of the effective field theory approach to this problem. The bulk of the report is then devoted to several different simplified models and their signatures, including s-channel and t-channel processes. A common feature of simplified models for DM is the presence of additional particles that mediate the interactions between the Standard Model and the particle that makes up DM. We consider these in detail and emphasize the importance of their inclusion as final states in any coherent interpretation. We also review some of the experimental progress in the field, new signatures, and other aspects of the searches themselves. We conclude with comments and recommendations regarding the use of simplified models in Run-II of the LHC.

Jalal Abdallah; Adi Ashkenazi; Antonio Boveia; Giorgio Busoni; Andrea De Simone; Caterina Doglioni; Aielet Efrati; Erez Etzion; Johanna Gramling; Thomas Jacques; Tongyan Lin; Enrico Morgante; Michele Papucci; Bjoern Penning; Antonio Walter Riotto; Thomas Rizzo; David Salek; Steven Schramm; Oren Slone; Yotam Soreq; Alessandro Vichi; Tomer Volansky; Itay Yavin; Ning Zhou; Kathryn Zurek

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Implications of Direct Dark Matter Constraints for Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model Higgs Boson Searches at the Tevatron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Searches for the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) Higgs bosons are among the most promising channels for exploring new physics at the Tevatron. In particular, interesting regions of large $\\tan \\beta$ and small $m_A$ are probed by searches for heavy neutral Higgs bosons, A and H, when they decay to $\\tau^+ \\tau^-$ and $b\\bar{b}$. At the same time, direct searches for dark matter, such as CDMS, attempt to observe neutralino dark matter particles scattering elastically off nuclei. This can occur through t-channel Higgs exchange, which has a large cross section in the case of large $\\tan \\beta$ and small $m_A$. As a result, there is a natural interplay between the heavy, neutral Higgs searches at the Tevatron and the region of parameter space explored by CDMS. We show that if the lightest neutralino makes up the dark matter of our universe, current limits from CDMS strongly constrain the prospects of heavy, neutral MSSM Higgs discovery at the Tevatron (at 3 sigma with 4 fb^-1 per experiment) unless $|\\mu| \\gsim$ 400 GeV. The limits of CDMS projected for 2007 will increase this constraint to $|\\mu| \\gsim$ 800 GeV. On the other hand, if CDMS does observe neutralino dark matter in the near future, it will make the discovery of heavy, neutral MSSM Higgs bosons far more likely at the Tevatron.

Marcela Carena; Dan Hooper; Peter Skands

2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

71

Development of a Navigator and Imaging Techniques for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project contributes to the detection of flaws in the germanium detectors for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Specifically, after imaging the detector surface with a precise imaging and measuring device, they developed software to stitch the resulting images together, applying any necessary rotations, offsets, and averaging, to produce a smooth image of the whole detector that can be used to detect flaws on the surface of the detector. These images were also tiled appropriately for the Google Maps API to use as a navigation tool, allowing viewers to smoothly zoom and pan across the detector surface. Automated defect identification can now be implemented, increasing the scalability of the germanium detector fabrication.

Wilen, Chris; /Carleton Coll. /KIPAC, Menlo Park

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

72

Demonstration of surface electron rejection with interleaved germanium detectors for dark matter searches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SuperCDMS experiment in the Soudan Underground Laboratory searches for dark matter with a 9-kg array of cryogenic germanium detectors. Symmetric sensors on opposite sides measure both charge and phonons from each particle interaction, providing excellent discrimination between electron and nuclear recoils, and between surface and interior events. Surface event rejection capabilities were tested with two {sup 210}Pb sources producing ?130 beta decays/hr. In ?800 live hours, no events leaked into the 8115 keV signal region, giving upper limit leakage fraction 1.7 10{sup ?5} at 90% C.L., corresponding to < 0.6 surface event background in the future 200-kg SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment.

Agnese, R.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Saab, T.; Welliver, B. [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Anderson, A. J.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Hertel, S. A.; McCarthy, K. A. [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Basu Thakur, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States) [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illnois 61801 (United States); Bauer, D. A.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Loer, B.; Schmitt, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)] [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Hasi, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory/Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)] [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory/Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Collaboration: The SuperCDMS Collaboration; and others

2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

73

The Dark Matter problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In these notes I will briefly summarize our knowledge about the dark matter problem, and emphasize the corresponding dynamical aspects. This covers a wide area of research, so I have been selective, and have concentrated on the subject of dark matter in nearby galaxies, in particular spirals.

A. Bosma

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Dark Energy and Dark Matter Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We revisit the problems of dark energy and dark matter and several models designed to explain them, in the light of some latest findings.

Burra G. Sidharth

2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

75

Status of the large-scale dark-matter axion search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If axions constitute the dark matter of our galactic halo they can be detected by their conversion into monochromatic microwave photons in a high-Q microwave cavity permeated by a strong magnetic field. A large-scale experiment is under construction at LLNL to search for halo axions in the mass range 1.3 - 13 {mu}eV, where axions may constitute closure density of the universe. The search builds upon two pilot efforts at BNL and the University of Florida in the late 1980`s, and represents a large improvement in power sensitivity ({approximately}50) both due to the increase in magnetic volume (B{sup 2}V = 14 T{sup 2}m{sup 3}), and anticipated total noise temperature (T{sub n} {approximately}3K). This search will also mark the first use of multiple power-combined cavities to extend the mass range accessible by this technique. Data will be analyzed in two parallel streams. In the first, the resolution of the power spectrum will be sufficient to resolve the expected width of the overall axion line, {approximately}{bigcirc} (1kHz). In the second, the resolution will be {bigcirc}(O.01-1 Hz) to look for extremely narrow substructure reflecting the primordial phase-space of the axions during infall. This experiment will be the first to have the required sensitivity to detect axions, for plausible axion models.

Van Bibber, K.; Hagmann, C.; Stoeffl, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Daw, E.; Rosenberg, L. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Sikivie, P.; Sullivan, N.; Tanner, D. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics; Moltz, D.; Tighe, R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

WIMP Dark Matter Limit-Direct Detection Data and Sensitivity Plots from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search II and the University of California at Santa Barbara  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Expectations for non-baryonic dark matter are founded principally in Big Bang nucleosynthesis calculations, which indicate that the missing mass of the universe is not likely to be baryonic. The supersymmetric standard model (SUSY) offers a promising framework for expectations of particle species which could satisfy the observed properties of dark matter. WIMPs are the most likely SUSY candidate for a dark matter particle. The High Energy Physics Group at University of California, Santa Barbara, is part of the CDMSII Collaboration and have provided the Interactive Plotter for WIMP Dark Matter Limit-Direct Detection Data on their website. They invite other collaborations working on dark matter research to submit datasets and, as a result, have more than 150 data sets now available for use with the plotting tool. The published source of the data is provided with each data set.

77

A search for signatures of dark matter in the AMS-01 electron and antiproton spectrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If dark matter consists of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), such as the supersymmetric neutralino, various theories predict that their annihilation in the galaxy can give rise to anomalous features in the ...

Carosi, Gianpaolo Patrick

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Low Energy Nuclear Recoil Response in Xenon Gas for Low Mass Dark Matter WIMP Search  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Massive Particles (WIMPs) and dark energy. Initial cosmological considerations suggested that WIMPs were some type of Standard Model (SM) particle, but even the best-case estimates lead to matter energy densities that come up well short without a...

Sofka, Clement James

2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

79

Advancing the search for dark matter : from CDMS II to SuperCDMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An overwhelming proportion of the universe (83% by mass) is composed of particles we know next to nothing about. Detecting these dark matter particles directly, through hypothesized weak-force-mediated recoils with nuclear ...

Hertel, Scott A. (Scott Alexander)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Working Group Report: Dark Matter Complementarity (Dark Matter in the Coming Decade: Complementary Paths to Discovery and Beyond)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this Report we discuss the four complementary searches for the identity of dark matter: direct detection experiments that look for dark matter interacting in the lab, indirect detection experiments that connect lab signals to dark matter in our own and other galaxies, collider experiments that elucidate the particle properties of dark matter, and astrophysical probes sensitive to non-gravitational interactions of dark matter. The complementarity among the different dark matter searches is discussed qualitatively and illustrated quantitatively in several theoretical scenarios. Our primary conclusion is that the diversity of possible dark matter candidates requires a balanced program based on all four of those approaches.

Arrenberg, Sebastian; et al.,

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Mono-Z': searches for dark matter in events with a resonance and missing transverse energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the potential dark matter implications of LHC events with missing transverse momentum and a resonance, such as a Z', decaying to a pair of jets or leptons. This final state contains significant discovery potential, but has not yet been examined in detail by the LHC experiments. We introduce models of Z' production in association with dark matter particles, propose reconstruction and selection strategies, and estimate the sensitivity of the current LHC dataset.

Autran, Marcelo; Lin, Tongyan; Whiteson, Daniel

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Axion Dark Matter Detection using Atomic Transitions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dark matter axions may cause transitions between atomic states that differ in energy by an amount equal to the axion mass. Such energy differences are conveniently tuned using the Zeeman effect. It is proposed to search for dark matter axions by cooling a kilogram-sized sample to milliKelvin temperatures and count axion induced transitions using laser techniques. This appears an appropriate approach to axion dark matter detection in the $10^{-4}$ eV mass range.

P. Sikivie

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

83

In Wino Veritas? Indirect Searches Shed Light on Neutralino Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indirect detection constraints on gamma rays (both continuum and lines) have set strong constraints on wino dark matter. By combining results from Fermi-LAT and HESS, we show that: light nonthermal wino dark matter is strongly excluded; thermal wino dark matter is allowed only if the Milky Way dark matter distribution has a significant (>~0.4 kpc) core; and for plausible NFW and Einasto distributions the entire range of wino masses from 100 GeV up to 3 TeV can be excluded. The case of light, nonthermal wino dark matter is particularly interesting in scenarios with decaying moduli that reheat the universe to a low temperature. Typically such models have been discussed for low reheating temperatures, not far above the BBN bound of a few MeV. We show that constraints on the allowed wino relic density push such models to higher reheating temperatures and hence heavier moduli. Even for a flattened halo model consisting of an NFW profile with constant-density core inside 1 kpc and a density near the sun of 0.3 GeV/...

Fan, JiJi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Search for bosonic superweakly interacting massive dark matter particles with the XMASS-I detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bosonic superweakly interacting massive particles (super-WIMPs) are a candidate for warm dark matter. With the absorption of such a boson by a xenon atom these dark matter candidates would deposit an energy equivalent to their rest mass in the detector. This is the first direct detection experiment exploring the vector super-WIMPs in the mass range between 40 and 120 keV. Using 165.9 days of data no significant excess above background was observed in the fiducial mass of 41 kg. The present limit for the vector super-WIMPs excludes the possibility that such particles constitute all of dark matter. The absence of a signal also provides the most stringent direct constraint on the coupling constant of pseudoscalar super-WIMPs to electrons. The unprecedented sensitivity was achieved exploiting the low background at a level $10^{-4}$ kg$^{-1}$keV$_{ee}^{-1}$day$^{-1}$ in the detector.

K. Abe; K. Hieda; K. Hiraide; S. Hirano; Y. Kishimoto; K. Ichimura; K. Kobayashi; S. Moriyama; K. Nakagawa; M. Nakahata; H. Ogawa; N. Oka; H. Sekiya; A. Shinozaki; Y. Suzuki; A. Takeda; O. Takachio; D. Umemoto; M. Yamashita; B. S. Yang; S. Tasaka; J. Liu; K. Martens; K. Hosokawa; K. Miuchi; A. Murata; Y. Onishi; Y. Otsuka; Y. Takeuchi; Y. H. Kim; K. B. Lee; M. K. Lee; J. S. Lee; Y. Fukuda; Y. Itow; K. Masuda; H. Takiya; H. Uchida; N. Y. Kim; Y. D. Kim; F. Kusaba; K. Nishijima; K. Fujii; I. Murayama; S. Nakamura

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

85

Radiopurity of CaWO$_4$ Crystals for Direct Dark Matter Search with CRESST and EURECA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The direct dark matter search experiment CRESST uses scintillating CaWO$_4$ single crystals as targets for possible WIMP scatterings. An intrinsic radioactive contamination of the crystals as low as possible is crucial for the sensitivity of the detectors. In the past CaWO$_4$ crystals operated in CRESST were produced by institutes in Russia and the Ukraine. Since 2011 CaWO$_4$ crystals have also been grown at the crystal laboratory of the Technische Universit\\"at M\\"unchen (TUM) to better meet the requirements of CRESST and of the future tonne-scale multi-material experiment EURECA. The radiopurity of the raw materials and of first TUM-grown crystals was measured by ultra-low background $\\gamma$-spectrometry. Two TUM-grown crystals were also operated as low-temperature detectors at a test setup in the Gran Sasso underground laboratory. These measurements were used to determine the crystals' intrinsic $\\alpha$-activities which were compared to those of crystals produced at other institutes. The total $\\alpha$...

Mnster, A; Angloher, G; Bento, A; Bucci, C; Canonica, L; Erb, A; Feilitzsch, F v; Gorla, P; Gtlein, A; Hauff, D; Jochum, J; Kraus, H; Lanfranchi, J -C; Laubenstein, M; Loebell, J; Ortigoza, Y; Petricca, F; Potzel, W; Prbst, F; Puimedon, J; Reindl, F; Roth, S; Rottler, K; Sailer, C; Schffner, K; Schieck, J; Scholl, S; Schnert, S; Seidel, W; Stodolsky, L; Strandhagen, C; Strauss, R; Tanzke, A; Uffinger, M; Ulrich, A; Usherov, I; Wawoczny, S; Willers, M; Wstrich, M; Zller, A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search: First 5-Tower Data and Improved Understanding of Ionization Collection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) is searching for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with cryogenic particle detectors. These detectors have the ability to discriminate between nuclear recoil candidate and electron recoil background events by collecting both phonon and ionization energy from recoils in the detector crystals. The CDMS-II experiment has completed analysis of the first data runs with 30 semiconductor detectors at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, resulting in a world leading WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section limit for WIMP masses above 44 GeV/c{sup 2}. As CDMS aims to achieve greater WIMP sensitivity, it is necessary to increase the detector mass and discrimination between signal and background events. Incomplete ionization collection results in the largest background in the CDMS detectors as this causes electron recoil background interactions to appear as false candidate events. Two primary causes of incomplete ionization collection are surface and bulk trapping. Recent work has been focused on reducing surface trapping through the modification of fabrication methods for future detectors. Analyzing data taken with test devices has shown that hydrogen passivation of the amorphous silicon blocking layer worsens surface trapping. Additional data has shown that the iron-ion implantation used to lower the critical temperature of the tungsten transition-edge sensors causes a degradation of the ionization collection. Using selective implantation on future detectors may improve ionization collection for events near the phonon side detector surface. Bulk trapping is minimized by neutralizing ionized lattice impurities. Detector investigations at testing facilities and in situ at the experimental site have provided methods to optimize the neutralization process and monitor running conditions to maintain full ionization collection. This work details my contribution to the 5-tower data taking, monitoring, and analysis effort as well as the SuperCDMS detector development with the focus on monitoring and improving ionization collection in the detectors.

Bailey, Catherine N.; /Case Western Reserve U.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Unbound particles in dark matter halos  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate unbound dark matter particles in halos by tracing particle trajectories in a simulation run to the far future (a = 100). We find that the traditional sum of kinetic and potential energies is a very poor predictor of which dark matter particles will eventually become unbound from halos. We also study the mass fraction of unbound particles, which increases strongly towards the edges of halos, and decreases significantly at higher redshifts. We discuss implications for dark matter detection experiments, precision calibrations of the halo mass function, the use of baryon fractions to constrain dark energy, and searches for intergalactic supernovae.

Behroozi, Peter S.; Wechsler, Risa H. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Physics Department, Stanford University and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Loeb, Abraham, E-mail: behroozi@stanford.edu, E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: rwechsler@stanford.edu [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA (United States)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Can Dark Matter Decay in Dark Energy?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the interaction between Dark Energy and Dark Matter from a thermodynamical perspective. By assuming they have different temperatures, we study the possibility of occurring a decay from Dark Matter into Dark Energy, characterized by a negative parameter $Q$. We find that, if at least one of the fluids has non vanishing chemical potential, for instance $\\mu_x0$, the decay is possible, where $\\mu_x$ and $\\mu_{dm}$ are the chemical potentials of Dark Energy and Dark Matter, respectively. Using recent cosmological data, we find that, for a fairly simple interaction, the Dark Matter decay is favored with a probability of $\\sim 93%$ over the Dark Energy decay. This result comes from a likelihood analysis where only background evolution has been considered.

S. H. Pereira; J. F. Jesus

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

89

Dark matter axions `96  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses why axions have been postulated to exist, what cosmology implies about their presence as cold dark matter in the galactic halo, how axions might be detected in cavities wherein strong magnetic fields stimulate their conversion into photons, and relations between axions` energy spectra and galactic halos` properties.

Sikivie, P.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

90

Search for a Dark Matter Candidate Produced in Association with a Single Top Quark in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We report a new search for dark matter in a data sample of an integrated luminosity of 7.7 fb? of Tevatron pp collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV, collected by the CDF II detector. We search for production of a dark-matter candidate, D, in association with a single top quark. We consider the hadronic decay mode of the top quark exclusively, yielding a final state of three jets with missing transverse energy. The data are consistent with the standard model; we thus set 95% confidence level upper limits on the cross section of the process pp??t+D as a function of the mass of the dark-matter candidate. The limits are approximately 0.5 pb for a dark-matter particle with mass in the range of 0150 GeV/c.

Aaltonen, T.; lvarez Gonzlez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Anz, F.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; dAscenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; DellOrso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; dErrico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; DOnofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Fuks, B.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzlez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martnez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Detecting the invisible universe with neutrinos and dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent work in astrophysics has show that most of the matter in the universe is non-luminous. This work investigates two searches for non-luminous matter: hot dark matter formed from cosmic relic neutrinos from the Big ...

Kaboth, Asher C. (Asher Cunningham)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Asymmetric condensed dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the viability of a boson dark matter candidate with an asymmetry between the number densities of particles and antiparticles. A simple thermal field theory analysis confirms that, under certain general conditions, this component would develop a Bose-Einstein condensate in the early universe that, for appropriate model parameters, could survive the ensuing cosmological evolution until now. The condensation of a dark matter component in equilibrium with the thermal plasma is a relativistic process, hence the amount of matter dictated by the charge asymmetry is complemented by a hot relic density frozen out at the time of decoupling. Contrary to the case of ordinary WIMPs, dark matter particles in a condensate can be very light, $10^{-22}\\,{\\rm eV} \\lesssim m \\lesssim 10^2\\,{\\rm eV}$; the lower limit arises from constraints on small-scale structure formation, while the upper bound ensures that the density from thermal relics is not too large. Big-Bang nucleosynthesis constrains the temperature of deco...

Aguirre, Anthony

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

First measurement of the Head-Tail directional nuclear recoil signature at energies relevant to WIMP dark matter searches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present first evidence for the so-called Head-Tail asymmetry signature of neutron-induced nuclear recoil tracks at energies down to 1.5 keV/amu using the 1m^3 DRIFT-IIc dark matter detector. This regime is appropriate for recoils induced by Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMPs) but one where the differential ionization is poorly understood. We show that the distribution of recoil energies and directions induced here by Cf-252 neutrons matches well that expected from massive WIMPs. The results open a powerful new means of searching for a galactic signature from WIMPs.

S. Burgos; E. Daw; J. Forbes; C. Ghag; M. Gold; C. Hagemann; V. A. Kudryavtsev; T. B. Lawson; D. Loomba; P. Majewski; D. Muna; A. StJ. Murphy; G. G. Nicklin; S. M. Paling; A. Petkov; S. J. S. Plank; M. Robinson; N. Sanghi; D. P. Snowden-Ifft; N. J. C. Spooner; J. Turk; E. Tziaferi

2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

94

Constraining Decaying Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We revisited the decaying dark matter (DDM) model, in which one collisionless particle decays early into two collisionless particles, that are potentially dark matter particles today. The effect of DDM will be manifested in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and structure formation. With a systematic modification of CMB calculation tool \\texttt{camb}, we can numerically calculated this effect, and compare it to observations. Further Markov Chain Monte Carlo \\texttt{cosmomc} runnings update the constraints in that model: the free streaming length $\\lambda_{FS}\\lesssim0.5$Mpc for nonrelativistic decay, and $((M_{DDM}/keV) Y)^2 (T_d/yr)\\lesssim5\\times10^{-5}$ for relativistic decay.

Ran Huo

2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

95

Search for Dark Matter in Events with One Jet and Missing Transverse Energy in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We present the results of a search for dark matter production in the monojet signature. We analyze a sample of Tevatron pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.7 fb? recorded by the CDF II detector. In events with large missing transverse energy and one energetic jet, we find good agreement between the standard model prediction and the observed data. We set 90% confidence level upper limits on the dark matter production rate. The limits are translated into bounds on nucleon-dark matter scattering rates which are competitive with current direct detection bounds on spin-independent interaction below a dark matter candidate mass of 5 GeV/c, and on spin-dependent interactions up to masses of 200 GeV/c.

Aaltonen, T.; lvarez Gonzlez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Bai, Y.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; dAscenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; DellOrso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; dErrico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; DOnofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Fox, P. J.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzlez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harnik, R.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martnez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

A fussy revisitation of antiprotons as a tool for Dark Matter searches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Antiprotons are regarded as a powerful probe for Dark Matter (DM) indirect detection and indeed current data from PAMELA have been shown to lead to stringent constraints. However, in order to exploit their constraining/discovery power properly and especially in anticipation of the exquisite accuracy of upcoming data from AMS, great attention must be put into effects (linked to their propagation in the Galaxy) which may be perceived as subleasing but actually prove to be quite relevant. We revisit the computation of the astrophysical background and of the DM antiproton fluxes fully including the effects of: diffusive reacceleration, energy losses including tertiary component and solar modulation (in a force field approximation). We show that their inclusion can somewhat modify the current bounds, even at large DM masses, and that a wrong interpretation of the data may arise if they are not taken into account. The numerical results for the astrophysical background are provided in terms of fit functions; the results for Dark Matter are incorporated in the new release of the PPPC4DMID.

Mathieu Boudaud; Marco Cirelli; Galle Giesen; Pierre Salati

2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

97

A fussy revisitation of antiprotons as a tool for Dark Matter searches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Antiprotons are regarded as a powerful probe for Dark Matter (DM) indirect detection and indeed current data from PAMELA have been shown to lead to stringent constraints. However, in order to exploit their constraining/discovery power properly and especially in anticipation of the exquisite accuracy of upcoming data from AMS, great attention must be put into effects (linked to their propagation in the Galaxy) which may be perceived as subleasing but actually prove to be quite relevant. We revisit the computation of the astrophysical background and of the DM antiproton fluxes fully including the effects of: diffusive reacceleration, energy losses including tertiary component and solar modulation (in a force field approximation). We show that their inclusion can somewhat modify the current bounds, even at large DM masses, and that a wrong interpretation of the data may arise if they are not taken into account. The numerical results for the astrophysical background are provided in terms of fit functions; the results for Dark Matter are incorporated in the new release of the PPPC4DMID.

Mathieu Boudaud; Marco Cirelli; Galle Giesen; Pierre Salati

2015-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

98

Global interpretation of direct Dark Matter searches after CDMS-II results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We perform a global fit to data from Dark Matter (DM) direct detection experiments, including the recent CDMS-II results. We discuss possible interpretations of the DAMA annual modulation signal in terms of spin-independent and spin-dependent DM-nucleus interactions, both for elastic and inelastic scattering. We find that for the spin-dependent inelastic scattering off protons a good fit to all data is obtained. We present a simple toy model realizing such a scenario. In all the remaining cases the DAMA allowed regions are disfavored by other experiments or suffer from severe fine tuning of DM parameters with respect to the galactic escape velocity. Finally, we also entertain the possibility that the two events observed in CDMS-II are an actual signal of elastic DM scattering, and we compare the resulting CDMS-II allowed regions to the exclusion limits from other experiments.

Kopp, Joachim; Schwetz, Thomas; Zupan, Jure

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Silicon Detector Dark Matter Results from the Final Exposure of CDMS II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dark Matter Search Results Using Silicon Detectors of CDMS II journal article to be submitted to Physicial Review Letters

Agnese, R.; Ahmed, Z.; Anderson, A. J.; Arrenberg, S.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bruch, T.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Dejongh, F.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Filippini, J.; Fox, J.; Fritts, M.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, R. H.; Hertel, S. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kim, P.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Kos, M.; Leman, S. W.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Martinez, C.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Moore, D. C.; Nadeau, P.; Nelson, R. H.; Page, K.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redi, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, K.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, Richard; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Sundqvist, K. M.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Yoo, J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

100

Search for Dark Matter in Events with a Z Boson and Missing Transverse Momentum in pp Collisions at ?s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search is presented for production of dark-matter particles recoiling against a leptonically decaying Z boson in 20.3??fb[superscript ?1] of pp collisions at ?s = 8??TeV with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. ...

Taylor, Frank E.

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Astronomical Evidence for Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

weapon in "Quake 4" is the Dark Matter Gun. In Futurama they use dark matter fuel, where "one pound is 10 of dynamics: #12;Galaxy Clusters Also with Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect. Inverse Compton scattering Sensitive to baryons Spectral distortion: Line of sight integral of pressure #12;Galaxy Clusters SZ Effect Compute

Golwala, Sunil

102

Particle Dark Matter and its Detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The status and prospects of the experimental efforts in the detection of Particle Dark Matter is reviewed. Emphasis is put in the direct searches for WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles), outlining the various strategies and techniques currently followed and sumarizing the results. A briefing of the indirect methods of WIMP detection is also presented.

Angel Morales

1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

103

Dark matter search in a Beam-Dump eXperiment (BDX) at Jefferson Lab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MeV-GeV dark matter (DM) is theoretically well motivated but remarkably unexplored. This Letter of Intent presents the MeV-GeV DM discovery potential for a 1 m$^3$ segmented plastic scintillator detector placed downstream of the beam-dump at one of the high intensity JLab experimental Halls, receiving up to 10$^{22}$ electrons-on-target (EOT) in a one-year period. This experiment (Beam-Dump eXperiment or BDX) is sensitive to DM-nucleon elastic scattering at the level of a thousand counts per year, with very low threshold recoil energies ($\\sim$1 MeV), and limited only by reducible cosmogenic backgrounds. Sensitivity to DM-electron elastic scattering and/or inelastic DM would be below 10 counts per year after requiring all electromagnetic showers in the detector to exceed a few-hundred MeV, which dramatically reduces or altogether eliminates all backgrounds. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations are in progress to finalize the detector design and experimental set up. An existing 0.036 m$^3$ prototype based on the same technology will be used to validate simulations with background rate estimates, driving the necessary R$\\&$D towards an optimized detector. The final detector design and experimental set up will be presented in a full proposal to be submitted to the next JLab PAC. A fully realized experiment would be sensitive to large regions of DM parameter space, exceeding the discovery potential of existing and planned experiments by two orders of magnitude in the MeV-GeV DM mass range.

BDX Collaboration; M. Battaglieri; A. Celentano; R. De Vita; E. Izaguirre; G. Krnjaic; E. Smith; S. Stepanyan; A. Bersani; E. Fanchini; S. Fegan; P. Musico; M. Osipenko; M. Ripani; E. Santopinto; M. Taiuti; P. Schuster; N. Toro; M. Dalton; A. Freyberger; F. -X. Girod; V. Kubarovsky; M. Ungaro; G. De Cataldo; R. De Leo; D. Di Bari; L. Lagamba; E. Nappi; R. Perrino; M. Carpinelli; V. Sipala; S. Aiello; V. Bellini; M. De Napoli; A. Giusa; F. Mammoliti; E. Leonora; F. Noto; N. Randazzo; G. Russo; M. Sperduto; C. Sutera; C. Ventura; L. Barion; G. Ciullo; M. Contalbrigo; P. Lenisa; A. Movsisyan; F. Spizzo; M. Turisini; F. De Persio; E. Cisbani; C. Fanelli; F. Garibaldi; F. Meddi; G. M. Urciuoli; S. Anefalos Pereira; E. De Sanctis; D. Hasch; V. Lucherini; M. Mirazita; R. Montgomery; S. Pisano; G. Simi; A. D'Angelo; L. Colaneri L. Lanza; A. Rizzo; C. Schaerf; I. Zonta; D. Calvo; A. Filippi; M. Holtrop; R. Peremuzyan; D. Glazier; D. Ireland; B. McKinnon; D. Sokhan A. Afanasev; B. Briscoe; N. Kalantarians; L. El Fassi; L. Weinstein; P. Beltrame; A. Murphy; D. Watts; L. Zana; K. Hicks

2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

104

Direct constraints on diffusion models from cosmic-ray positron data: Excluding the Minimal model for dark matter searches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Galactic Cosmic-ray (CR) transport parameters are usually constrained by the boron-to-carbon ratio. This procedure is generically plagued with degeneracies between the diffusion coefficient and the vertical extent of the Galactic magnetic halo. The latter is of paramount importance for indirect dark matter (DM) searches, because it fixes the amount of DM annihilation or decay that contributes to the local antimatter CR flux. These degeneracies could be broken by using secondary radioactive species, but the current data still have large error bars, and this method is extremely sensitive to the very local interstellar medium (ISM) properties. Here, we propose to use the low-energy CR positrons in the GeV range as another direct constraint on diffusion models. We show that the PAMELA data disfavor small diffusion halo ($L\\lesssim 3$ kpc) and large diffusion slope models, and exclude the minimal ({\\em min}) configuration (Maurin et al. 2001, Donato et al. 2004) widely used in the literature to bracket the uncertainties in the DM signal predictions. This is complementary to indirect constraints (diffuse radio and gamma-ray emissions) and has strong impact on DM searches. Indeed this makes the antiproton constraints more robust while enhancing the discovery/exclusion potential of current and future experiments, like AMS-02 and GAPS, especially in the antiproton and antideuteron channels.

Julien Lavalle; David Maurin; Antje Putze

2015-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

105

Lorentz-violating dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LORENTZ-VIOLATING DARK MATTER A Dissertation by ANTONIO R. MONDRAGON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2007 Major Subject...: Physics LORENTZ-VIOLATING DARK MATTER A Dissertation by ANTONIO R. MONDRAGON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair...

Mondragon, Antonio Richard

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

On the Nature of Dark Matter and Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown that some problems connected with dark matter and dark energy can be solved in the framework of the byuon theory

Yu. A. Baurov; I. F. Malov

2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

107

Inert scalar dark matter in an extra dimension inspired model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we analyze a dark matter model inspired by theories with extra dimensions. The dark matter candidate corresponds to the first Kaluza-Klein mode of a real scalar added to the Standard Model. The tower of new particles enriches the calculation of the relic abundance. For large mass splitting, the model converges to the predictions of the inert singlet dark matter model. For nearly degenerate mass spectrum, coannihilations increase the cross-sections used for direct and indirect dark matter searches. Moreover, the Kaluza-Klein zero mode can mix with the SM higgs and further constraints can be applied.

R. A. Lineros; F. A. Pereira dos Santos

2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

108

Weak Lensing: Dark Matter, Dark Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The light rays from distant galaxies are deflected by massive structures along the line of sight, causing the galaxy images to be distorted. Measurements of these distortions, known as weak lensing, provide a way of measuring the distribution of dark matter as well as the spatial geometry of the universe. I will describe the ideas underlying this approach to cosmology. With planned large imaging surveys, weak lensing is a powerful probe of dark energy. I will discuss the observational challenges ahead and recent progress in developing multiple, complementary approaches to lensing measurements.

Jain, Bhuvnesh (University of Pennsylvania) [University of Pennsylvania

2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

109

A DEEP SEARCH FOR EXTENDED RADIO CONTINUUM EMISSION FROM DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR PARTICLE DARK MATTER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present deep radio observations of four nearby dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, designed to detect extended synchrotron emission resulting from weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter annihilations in their halos. Models by Colafrancesco et al. (CPU07) predict the existence of angularly large, smoothly distributed radio halos in such systems, which stem from electron and positron annihilation products spiraling in a turbulent magnetic field. We map a total of 40.5 deg{sup 2} around the Draco, Ursa Major II, Coma Berenices, and Willman 1 dSphs with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) at 1.4 GHz to detect this annihilation signature, greatly reducing discrete-source confusion using the NVSS catalog. We achieve a sensitivity of {sigma}{sub sub} {approx}< 7 mJy beam{sup -1} in our discrete source-subtracted maps, implying that the NVSS is highly effective at removing background sources from GBT maps. For Draco we obtained approximately concurrent Very Large Array observations to quantify the variability of the discrete source background, and find it to have a negligible effect on our results. We construct radial surface brightness profiles from each of the subtracted maps, and jackknife the data to quantify the significance of the features therein. At the {approx}10' resolution of our observations, foregrounds contribute a standard deviation of 1.8 mJy beam{sup -1} {<=} {sigma}{sub ast} {<=} 5.7 mJy beam{sup -1} to our high-latitude maps, with the emission in Draco and Coma dominated by foregrounds. On the other hand, we find no significant emission in the Ursa Major II and Willman 1 fields, and explore the implications of non-detections in these fields for particle dark matter using the fiducial models of CPU07. For a WIMP mass M{sub {chi}} = 100 GeV annihilating into b b-bar final states and B = 1 {mu}G, upper limits on the annihilation cross-section for Ursa Major II and Willman I are log (({sigma}v){sub {chi}}, cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}) {approx}< -25 for the preferred set of charged particle propagation parameters adopted by CPU07; this is comparable to that inferred at {gamma}-ray energies from the two-year Fermi Large Area Telescope data. We discuss three avenues for improving the constraints on ({sigma}v){sub {chi}} presented here, and conclude that deep radio observations of dSphs are highly complementary to indirect WIMP searches at higher energies.

Spekkens, Kristine [Department of Physics, Royal Military College of Canada, P.O. Box 17000, Station Forces, Kingston, Ontario K7K 7B4 (Canada); Mason, Brian S. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Aguirre, James E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Nhan, Bang, E-mail: kristine.spekkens@rmc.ca [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 391 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

110

Dark energy and dark matter from cosmological observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present status of our knowledge about the dark matter and dark energy is reviewed. Bounds on the content of cold and hot dark matter from cosmological observations are discussed in some detail. I also review current bounds on the physical properties of dark energy, mainly its equation of state and effective speed of sound.

Steen Hannestad

2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

111

Dark Matter and Dark Energy huncheng@math.mit.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dark Matter and Dark Energy Hung Cheng huncheng@math.mit.edu January 17, 2008 Abstract We suggest. Besides producing particle masses, the mass generation mechanism also produces the observed dark energy that a candidate for dark matter is a meson with spin one the existence of which is dictated by local scale

Cheng, Hung

112

The Dark Side: from Dark Energy & Dark Matter to Washington and Science Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Dark Side: from Dark Energy & Dark Matter to Washington and Science Policy Presenter: Michael: The Map Room (www.maproom.com )1949 N. Hoyne #12;The Dark Side: from Dark Energy and Dark Matter? What is the nature of the dark energy that is causing the expansion of the Universe to speed up

Collar, Juan I.

113

Search for muon signal from dark matter annihilations in the Sun with the Baksan Underground Scintillator Telescope for 24.12 years  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a new dataset analysis of the neutrino experiment at the Baksan Underground Scintillator Telescope with muon energy threshold about 1 GeV for the longest exposure time toward the Sun. In search for a signal from self-annihilations of dark matter particles in the center of the Sun we use an updated sample of upward through-going muons for 24.12 years of live time. No observable excess has been found in measured muons relative to expected background from neutrinos of atmospheric origin. We present an improved data analysis procedure and describe it in detail. We set the 90% C.L. new upper limits on expected neutrino and muon fluxes from dark matter annihilations in the Sun, on the corresponding annihilation rates and cross sections of their elastic scattering off proton.

Boliev, M.M. [Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences, Baksan Neutrino Observatory, Kabardino-Balkariya 400900 (Russian Federation); Demidov, S.V.; Mikheyev, S.P.; Suvorova, O.V., E-mail: boliev2005@yandex.ru, E-mail: demidov@ms2.inr.ac.ru, E-mail: mikheyev@pcbai10.inr.ruhep.ru, E-mail: suvorova@cpc.inr.ac.ru [Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences, prospect 60-th October 7A, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Dark matter axions and caustic rings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains discussions on the following topics: the strong CP problem; dark matter axions; the cavity detector of galactic halo axions; and caustic rings in the density distribution of cold dark matter halos.

Sikivie, P.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Dark Matter Theory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganizationElectronic2005-2007DanMesoporousDark Energy: ADark

116

Dark Energy - Dark Matter Unification: Generalized Chaplygin Gas Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the main features of the generalized Chaplygin gas (GCG) proposal for unification of dark energy and dark matter and discuss how it admits an unique decomposition into dark energy and dark matter components once phantom-like dark energy is excluded. In the context of this approach we consider structure formation and show that unphysical oscillations or blow-up in the matter power spectrum are not present. Moreover, we demonstrate that the dominance of dark energy occurs about the time when energy density fluctuations start evolving away from the linear regime.

Orfeu Bertolami

2005-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

117

Dark Matter Searches with Cherenkov Telescopes: Nearby Dwarf Galaxies or Local Galaxy Clusters?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we compare dwarf galaxies and galaxy clusters in order to elucidate which object class is the best target for gamma-ray DM searches with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). We have built a mixed dwarfs+clusters sample containing some of the most promising nearby dwarf galaxies (Draco, Ursa Minor, Wilman 1 and Segue 1) and local galaxy clusters (Perseus, Coma, Ophiuchus, Virgo, Fornax, NGC 5813 and NGC 5846), and then compute their DM annihilation flux profiles by making use of the latest modeling of their DM density profiles. We also include in our calculations the effect of DM substructure. Willman 1 appears as the best candidate in the sample. However, its mass modeling is still rather uncertain, so probably other candidates with less uncertainties and quite similar fluxes, namely Ursa Minor and Segue 1, might be better options. As for galaxy clusters, Virgo represents the one with the highest flux. However, its large spatial extension can be a serious handicap for IACT observations and posterior data analysis. Yet, other local galaxy cluster candidates with more moderate emission regions, such as Perseus, may represent good alternatives. After comparing dwarfs and clusters, we found that the former exhibit annihilation flux profiles that, at the center, are roughly one order of magnitude higher than those of clusters, although galaxy clusters can yield similar, or even higher, integrated fluxes for the whole object once substructure is taken into account. Even when any of these objects are strictly point-like according to the properties of their annihilation signals, we conclude that dwarf galaxies are best suited for observational strategies based on the search of point-like sources, while galaxy clusters represent best targets for analyses that can deal with rather extended emissions. Finally, we study the detection prospects for present and future IACTs in the framework of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model. We find that the level of the annihilation flux from these targets is below the sensitivities of current IACTs and the future CTA.

Sanchez-Conde, Miguel A.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /IAC, La Laguna /Laguna U., Tenerife; Cannoni, Mirco; /Huelva U.; Zandanel, Fabio; /IAA, Granada; Gomez, Mario E.; /Huelva U.; Prada, Francisco; /IAA, Granada

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

118

From Dark Energy and Dark Matter to Dark Metric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is nowadays clear that General Relativity cannot be the definitive theory of Gravitation due to several shortcomings that come out both from theoretical and experimental viewpoints. At large scales (astrophysical and cosmological) the attempts to match it with the latest observational data lead to invoke Dark Energy and Dark Matter as the bulk components of the cosmic fluid. Since no final evidence, at fundamental level, exists for such ingredients, it is clear that General Relativity presents shortcomings at infrared scales. On the other hand, the attempts to formulate more general theories than Einstein's one give rise to mathematical difficulties that need workarounds that, in turn, generate problems from the interpretative viewpoint. We present here a completely new approach to the mathematical objects in terms of which a theory of Gravitation may be written in a first-order (a' la Palatini) formalism, and introduce the concept of Dark Metric which could completely bypass the introduction of disturbing concepts as Dark Energy and Dark Matter.

S. Capozziello; M. De Laurentis; M. Francaviglia; S. Mercadante

2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

119

A search for particle dark matter using cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors in the one- and two- tower runs of CDMS-II at Soudan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Images of the Bullet Cluster of galaxies in visible light, X-rays, and through gravitational lensing confirm that most of the matter in the universe is not composed of any known form of matter. The combined evidence from the dynamics of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, the cosmic microwave background, big bang nucleosynthesis, and other observations indicates that 80% of the universe's matter is dark, nearly collisionless, and cold. The identify of the dar, matter remains unknown, but weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are a very good candidate. They are a natural part of many supersymmetric extensions to the standard model, and could be produced as a nonrelativistic, thermal relic in the early universe with about the right density to account for the missing mass. The dark matter of a galaxy should exist as a spherical or ellipsoidal cloud, called a 'halo' because it extends well past the edge of the visible galaxy. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) seeks to directly detect interactions between WIMPs in the Milky Way's galactic dark matter halo using crystals of germanium and silicon. Our Z-sensitive ionization and phonon ('ZIP') detectors simultaneously measure both phonons and ionization produced by particle interactions. In order to find very rare, low-energy WIMP interactions, they must identify and reject background events caused by environmental radioactivity, radioactive contaminants on the detector,s and cosmic rays. In particular, sophisticated analysis of the timing of phonon signals is needed to eliminate signals caused by beta decays at the detector surfaces. This thesis presents the firs two dark matter data sets from the deep underground experimental site at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. These are known as 'Run 118', with six detectors (1 kg Ge, 65.2 live days before cuts) and 'Run 119', with twelve detectors (1.5 kg Ge, 74.5 live days before cuts). They have analyzed all data from the two runs together in a single, combined analysis, with sensitivity to lower-energy interactions, careful control of data quality and stability, and further development of techniques for reconstructing event location and rejecting near-surface interactions from beta decays. They also present a revision to the previously published Run 119 analysis, a demonstration of the feasibility of a low-threshold (1 or 2 keV) analysis of Soudan data, and a review of the literature on charge generation and quenching relevant to the ionization signal.

Ogburn, Reuben Walter, IV; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Dark matter, dark energy and gravitational proprieties of antimatter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We suggest that the eventual gravitational repulsion between matter and antimatter may be a key for understanding of the nature of dark matter and dark energy. If there is gravitational repulsion, virtual particle-antiparticle pairs in the vacuum, may be considered as gravitational dipoles. We use a simple toy model to reveal a first indication that the gravitational polarization of such a vacuum, caused by baryonic matter in a Galaxy, may produce the same effect as supposed existence of dark matter. In addition, we argue that cancellation of gravitational charges in virtual particle-antiparticle pairs, may be a basis for a solution of the cosmological constant problem and identification of dark energy with vacuum energy. Hence, it may be that dark matter and dark energy are not new, unknown forms of matter-energy but an effect of complex interaction between quantum vacuum and known baryonic matter.

Dragan Slavkov Hajdukovic

2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Sterile dark matter and reionization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sterile neutrinos with masses in the keV range can be the dark matter, and their emission from a supernova can explain the observed velocities of pulsars. The sterile neutrino decays could produce the x-ray radiation in the early universe, which could have an important effect on the formation of the first stars. X-rays could ionize gas and could catalyze the production of molecular hydrogen during the ``dark ages''. The increased fraction of molecular hydrogen could facilitate the cooling and collapse of the primordial gas clouds in which the first stars were formed.

Alexander Kusenko

2006-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

122

Hierarchy in the Phase Space and Dark Matter Astronomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a theoretical framework for describing the hierarchical structure of the phase space of cold dark matter haloes, due to gravitationally bound substructures. Because it includes the full hierarchy of the cold dark matter initial conditions and is hence complementary to the halo model, the stable clustering hypothesis is applied for the first time here to the small-scale phase space structure. As an application, we show that the particle dark matter annihilation signal could be up to two orders of magnitude larger than that of the smooth halo within the Galactic virial radius. The local boost is inversely proportional to the smooth halo density, and thus is O(1) within the solar radius, which could translate into interesting signatures for dark matter direct detection experiments: The temporal correlation of dark matter detection can change by a factor of 2 in the span of 10 years, while there will be significant correlations in the velocity space of dark matter particles. This can introduce O(1) uncertainty in the direction of local dark matter wind, which was believed to be a benchmark of directional dark matter searches or the annual modulation signal.

Niayesh Afshordi; Roya Mohayaee; Edmund Bertschinger

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

123

Baryonic Dark Matter in Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cosmological nucleosynthesis calculations imply that many of the baryons in the Universe must be dark. We discuss the likelihood that some of these dark baryons may reside in the discs or halos of galaxies. If they were in the form of compact objects, they would then be natural MACHO candidates, in which case they are likely to be the remnants of a first generation of pregalactic or protogalactic Population III stars. Various candidates have been proposed for such remnants - brown dwarfs, red dwarfs, white dwarfs, neutron stars or black holes - and we review the many types of observations (including microlensing searches) which can be used to constrain or exclude them.

B. J. Carr

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Radon-induced surface contaminations in neutrinoless double beta decay and dark matter experiments.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In experiments looking for rare events, like neutrinoless double beta decay (DBD0v) and dark matter search (DM), one of the main issues is to increase (more)

Pattavina, Luca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Design and Construction of Prototype Dark Matter Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lepton Quark Studies (LQS) group is engaged in searching for dark matter using the Dark Matter Time Projection Chamber (DMTPC) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) (Carlsbad, NM). DMTPC is a direction-sensitive dark matter detector designed to measure the recoil direction and energy deposited by fluorine nuclei recoiling from the interaction with incident WIMPs. In the past year, the major areas of progress have been: #15; to publish the #12;first dark matter search results from a surface run of the DMTPC prototype detector, #15; to build and install the 10L prototype in the underground laboratory at WIPP which will house the 1 m{sup 3} detector, and #15; to demonstrate charge and PMT readout of the TPC using prototype detectors, which allow triggering and #1;{Delta}z measurement to be used in the 1 m{sup 3} detector under development.

Peter Fisher

2012-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

126

The Higgs boson, Supersymmetry and Dark Matter: Relations and Perspectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The discovery of a light Higgs boson at the LHC opens a broad program of studies and measurements to understand the role of this particle in connection with New Physics and Cosmology. Supersymmetry is the best motivated and most thoroughly formulated and investigated model of New Physics which predicts a light Higgs boson and can explain dark matter. This paper discusses how the study of the Higgs boson connects with the search for supersymmetry and for dark matter at the LHC and at a future $e^+e^-$ collider and with dedicated underground dark matter experiments.

Alexandre Arbey; Marco Battaglia; Farvah Mahmoudi

2015-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

127

The Higgs boson, Supersymmetry and Dark Matter: Relations and Perspectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The discovery of a light Higgs boson at the LHC opens a broad program of studies and measurements to understand the role of this particle in connection with New Physics and Cosmology. Supersymmetry is the best motivated and most thoroughly formulated and investigated model of New Physics which predicts a light Higgs boson and can explain dark matter. This paper discusses how the study of the Higgs boson connects with the search for supersymmetry and for dark matter at the LHC and at a future $e^+e^-$ collider and with dedicated underground dark matter experiments.

Arbey, Alexandre; Mahmoudi, Farvah

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Wormhole solutions supported by interacting dark matter and dark energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the presence of a nonminimal interaction between dark matter and dark energy may lead to a violation of the null energy condition and to the formation of a configuration with nontrivial topology (a wormhole). In this it is assumed that both dark matter and dark energy satisfy the null energy condition, a violation of which takes place only in the inner high-density regions of the configuration. This is achieved by assuming that, in a high-density environment, a nonminimal coupling function changes its sign in comparison with the case where dark matter and dark energy have relatively low densities which are typical for a cosmological background. For this case, we find regular static, spherically symmetric solutions describing wormholes supported by dark matter nonminimally coupled to dark energy in the form of a quintessence scalar field.

Vladimir Folomeev; Vladimir Dzhunushaliev

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

129

Quantum Haplodynamics, Dark Matter and Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In quantum haplodynamics (QHD) the weak bosons, quarks and leptons are bound states of fundamental constituents, denoted as haplons. The confinement scale of the associated gauge group SU(2)_h is of the order of $\\Lambda_h\\simeq 0.3$ TeV. One scalar state has zero haplon number and is the resonance observed at the LHC. In addition, there exist new bound states of haplons with no counterpart in the SM, having a mass of the order of 0.5 TeV up to a few TeV. In particular, a neutral scalar state with haplon number 4 is stable and can provide the dark matter in the universe. The QHD, QCD and QED couplings can unify at the Planck scale. If this scale changes slowly with cosmic time, all of the fundamental couplings, the masses of the nucleons and of the DM particles, including the cosmological term (or vacuum energy density), will evolve with time. This could explain the dark energy of the universe.

Harald Fritzsch; Joan Sola

2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

130

Gif Lectures on direct detection of Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

These notes cover some of the topics associated with direct detection of dark matter at an introductory level. The general principles of dark matter search are summarized. The current status of some experiments is described, with an emphasis on bolometric and noble liquid techniques. Plots and illustrations associated to these notes may be found on transparencies presented during the lecture, on the web site of Gif school 2009.

Eric Armengaud

2010-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

131

Dark Energy and Dark Matter as Inertial Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A globally rotating model of the universe is postulated. It is shown that dark energy and dark matter are cosmic inertial effects resulting from such a cosmic rotation, corresponding to centrifugal and a combination of centrifugal and the Coriolis forces, respectively. The physics and the cosmological and galactic parameters obtained from the model closely match those attributed to dark energy and dark matter in the standard {\\Lambda}-CDM model.

Serkan Zorba

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

132

Dissipative dark matter explains rotation curves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dissipative dark matter, where dark matter particles interact with a massless (or very light) boson, is studied. Such dark matter can arise in simple hidden sector gauge models, including those featuring an unbroken $U(1)'$ gauge symmetry, leading to a dark photon. Previous work has shown that such models can not only explain the LSS and CMB, but potentially also dark matter phenomena on small scales, such as the inferred cored structure of dark matter halos. In this picture, dark matter halos of disk galaxies not only cool via dissipative interactions but are also heated via ordinary supernovae (facilitated by an assumed photon - dark photon kinetic mixing interaction). This interaction between the dark matter halo and ordinary baryons, a very special feature of these types of models, plays a critical role in governing the physical properties of the dark matter halo. Here, we further study the implications of this type of dissipative dark matter for disk galaxies. Building on earlier work, we develop a simpl...

Foot, R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

EXTRAGALACTIC DARK MATTER AND DIRECT DETECTION EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent astronomical data strongly suggest that a significant part of the dark matter content of the Local Group and Virgo Supercluster is not incorporated into the galaxy halos and forms diffuse components of these galaxy clusters. A portion of the particles from these components may penetrate the Milky Way and make an extragalactic contribution to the total dark matter containment of our Galaxy. We find that the particles of the diffuse component of the Local Group are apt to contribute {approx}12% to the total dark matter density near Earth. The particles of the extragalactic dark matter stand out because of their high speed ({approx}600 km s{sup -1}), i.e., they are much faster than the galactic dark matter. In addition, their speed distribution is very narrow ({approx}20 km s{sup -1}). The particles have an isotropic velocity distribution (perhaps, in contrast to the galactic dark matter). The extragalactic dark matter should provide a significant contribution to the direct detection signal. If the detector is sensitive only to the fast particles (v > 450 km s{sup -1}), then the signal may even dominate. The density of other possible types of the extragalactic dark matter (for instance, of the diffuse component of the Virgo Supercluster) should be relatively small and comparable with the average dark matter density of the universe. However, these particles can generate anomaly high-energy collisions in direct dark matter detectors.

Baushev, A. N., E-mail: baushev@gmail.com [DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, Universitaet Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany)

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

134

Stealth Dark Matter: Dark scalar baryons through the Higgs portal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new model of "Stealth Dark Matter": a composite baryonic scalar of an $SU(N_D)$ strongly-coupled theory with even $N_D \\geq 4$. All mass scales are technically natural, and dark matter stability is automatic without imposing an additional discrete or global symmetry. Constituent fermions transform in vector-like representations of the electroweak group that permit both electroweak-breaking and electroweak-preserving mass terms. This gives a tunable coupling of stealth dark matter to the Higgs boson independent of the dark matter mass itself. We specialize to $SU(4)$, and investigate the constraints on the model from dark meson decay, electroweak precision measurements, basic collider limits, and spin-independent direct detection scattering through Higgs exchange. We exploit our earlier lattice simulations that determined the composite spectrum as well as the effective Higgs coupling of stealth dark matter in order to place bounds from direct detection, excluding constituent fermions with dominant...

Appelquist, Thomas; Buchoff, Michael I; Fleming, George T; Jin, Xiao-Yong; Kiskis, Joe; Kribs, Graham D; Neil, Ethan T; Osborn, James C; Rebbi, Claudio; Rinaldi, Enrico; Schaich, David; Schroeder, Chris; Syritsyn, Sergey; Vranas, Pavlos; Weinberg, Evan; Witzel, Oliver

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

A Search for dark matter in events with one jet and missing transverse energy in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of a search for dark matter production in the monojet signature. We analyze a sample of Tevatron pp collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.7 fb{sup -1} recorded by the CDF II detector. In events with large missing transverse energy and one energetic jet, we find good agreement between the standard model prediction and the observed data. We set 90% confidence level upper limits on the dark matter production rate. The limits are translated into bounds on nucleon-dark matter scattering rates which are competitive with current direct detection bounds on spin-independent interaction below a dark matter candidate mass of 5 GeV/c{sup 2}, and on spin-dependent interactions up to masses of 200 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Composite dark matter from a model with composite Higgs boson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a previous paper \\cite{Khlopov:2007ic}, we showed how the minimal walking technicolor model (WTC) can provide a composite dark matter candidate, by forming bound states between a -2 electrically charged techniparticle and a $^4He^{++}$. We studied the properties of these \\emph{techni-O-helium} $tOHe$ "atoms", which behave as warmer dark matter rather than cold. In this paper we extend our work on several different aspects. We study the possibility of a mixed scenario where both $tOHe$ and bound states between +2 and -2 electrically charged techniparticles coexist in the dark matter density. We argue that these newly proposed bound states solely made of techniparticles, although they behave as Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), due to their large elastic cross section with nuclei, can only account for a small percentage of the dark matter density. Therefore we conclude that within the minimal WTC, composite dark matter should be mostly composed of $tOHe$. Moreover in this paper, we put cosmological bounds in the masses of the techniparticles, if they compose the dark matter density. Finally we propose within this setup, a possible explanation of the discrepancy between the DAMA/NaI and DAMA/LIBRA findings and the negative results of CDMS and other direct dark matter searches that imply nuclear recoil measurement, which should accompany ionization.

Maxim Yu. Khlopov; Chris Kouvaris

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

137

Stealth Dark Matter: Dark scalar baryons through the Higgs portal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new model of "Stealth Dark Matter": a composite baryonic scalar of an $SU(N_D)$ strongly-coupled theory with even $N_D \\geq 4$. All mass scales are technically natural, and dark matter stability is automatic without imposing an additional discrete or global symmetry. Constituent fermions transform in vector-like representations of the electroweak group that permit both electroweak-breaking and electroweak-preserving mass terms. This gives a tunable coupling of stealth dark matter to the Higgs boson independent of the dark matter mass itself. We specialize to $SU(4)$, and investigate the constraints on the model from dark meson decay, electroweak precision measurements, basic collider limits, and spin-independent direct detection scattering through Higgs exchange. We exploit our earlier lattice simulations that determined the composite spectrum as well as the effective Higgs coupling of stealth dark matter in order to place bounds from direct detection, excluding constituent fermions with dominantly electroweak-breaking masses. A lower bound on the dark baryon mass $m_B \\gtrsim 300$ GeV is obtained from the indirect requirement that the lightest dark meson not be observable at LEP II. We briefly survey some intriguing properties of stealth dark matter that are worthy of future study, including: collider studies of dark meson production and decay; indirect detection signals from annihilation; relic abundance estimates for both symmetric and asymmetric mechanisms; and direct detection through electromagnetic polarizability, a detailed study of which will appear in a companion paper.

Thomas Appelquist; Richard C. Brower; Michael I. Buchoff; George T. Fleming; Xiao-Yong Jin; Joe Kiskis; Graham D. Kribs; Ethan T. Neil; James C. Osborn; Claudio Rebbi; Enrico Rinaldi; David Schaich; Chris Schroeder; Sergey Syritsyn; Pavlos Vranas; Evan Weinberg; Oliver Witzel

2015-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

138

The galactic halo in mixed dark matter cosmologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A possible solution to the small scale problems of the cold dark matter (CDM) scenario is that the dark matter consists of two components, a cold and a warm one. We perform a set of high resolution simulations of the Milky Way halo varying the mass of the WDM particle (m{sub WDM}) and the cosmic dark matter mass fraction in the WDM component ( f-bar {sub W}). The scaling ansatz introduced in combined analysis of LHC and astroparticle searches postulates that the relative contribution of each dark matter component is the same locally as on average in the Universe (e.g. f{sub W,s}un = f-bar {sub W}). Here we find however, that the normalised local WDM fraction (f{sub W,s}un / f-bar {sub W}) depends strongly on m{sub WDM} for m{sub WDM} < 1 keV. Using the scaling ansatz can therefore introduce significant errors into the interpretation of dark matter searches. To correct this issue a simple formula that fits the local dark matter densities of each component is provided.

Anderhalden, D.; Diemand, J.; Schneider, A. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zrich, Winterthurerst. 190, 8057 Zrich (Switzerland); Bertone, G. [GRAPPA Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1090 GL Amsterdam (Netherlands); Macci, A.V., E-mail: donninoa@physik.uzh.ch, E-mail: diemand@physik.uzh.ch, E-mail: gf.bertone@gmail.com, E-mail: maccio@mpia.de, E-mail: aurel@physik.uzh.ch [Max-Planck-Insitute for Astronomy, Knigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Noble Travails: Noble Liquid Dark Matter Detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, or water, 0.1x flux per 10 cm Cosmic Ray Muons generate high energy neutrons 50 MeV - 3 GeV which are toughGaitskell Noble Travails: Noble Liquid Dark Matter Detectors Rick Gaitskell Particle Astrophysics://particleastro.brown.edu/ http://gaitskell.brown.edu v1 #12;LUX Dark Matter Collaboration 2007 v01_7mm Dark Matter Theory

Golwala, Sunil

140

Dark Matter in the MSSM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have recently examined a large number of points in the parameter space of the phenomenological MSSM, the 19-dimensional parameter space of the CP-conserving MSSM with Minimal Flavor Violation. We determined whether each of these points satisfied existing experimental and theoretical constraints. This analysis provides insight into general features of the MSSM without reference to a particular SUSY breaking scenario or any other assumptions at the GUT scale. This study opens up new possibilities for SUSY phenomenology both in colliders and in astrophysical experiments. Here we shall discuss the implications of this analysis relevant to the study of dark matter.

Cotta, R.C.; Gainer, J.S.; Hewett, J.L.; Rizzo, T.G.; /SLAC

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Dark Energy vs. Dark Matter: Towards a Unifying Scalar Field?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The standard model of cosmology suggests the existence of two components, "dark matter" and "dark energy", which determine the fate of the Universe. Their nature is still under investigation, and no direct proof of their existences has emerged yet. There exist alternative models which reinterpret the cosmological observations, for example by replacing the dark energy/dark matter hypothesis by the existence of a unique dark component, the dark fluid, which is able to mimic the behaviour of both components. After a quick review of the cosmological constraints on this unifying dark fluid, we will present a model of dark fluid based on a complex scalar field and discuss the problem of the choice of the potential.

A. Arbey

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

142

Shapes of dark matter halos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I present an analysis of the density shapes of dark matter halos in LCDM and LWDM cosmologies. The main results are derived from a statistical sample of galaxy-mass halos drawn from a high resolution LCDM N-body simulation. Halo shapes show significant trends with mass and redshift: low-mass halos are rounder than high mass halos, and, for a fixed mass, halos are rounder at low z. Contrary to previous expectations, which were based on cluster-mass halos and non-COBE normalized simulations, LCDM galaxy-mass halos at z=0 are not strongly flattened, with short to long axis ratios of s = 0.70 +/- 0.17. I go on to study how the shapes of individual halos change when going from a LCDM simulation to a simulation with a warm dark matter power spectrum (LWDM). Four halos were compared, and, on average, the WDM halos are more spherical than their CDM counterparts (s =0.77 compared to s = 0.71). A larger sample of objects will be needed to test whether the trend is significant.

James S. Bullock

2001-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

143

Strangeness, Cosmological Cold Dark Matter and Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is now believed that the universe is composed of a small amount of the normal luminous matter, a substantial amount of matter (Cold Dark Matter: CDM) which is non-luminous and a large amount of smooth energy (Dark Energy: DE). Both CDM and DE seem to require ideas beyond the standard model of particle interactions. In this work, we argue that CDM and DE can arise entirely from the standard principles of strong interaction physics out of the same mechanism.

Sibaji Raha; Shibaji Banerjee; Abhijit Bhattacharyya; Sanjay K. Ghosh; Ernst-Michael Ilgenfritz; Bikash Sinha; Eiichi Takasugi; Hiroshi Toki

2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

144

Search for Dark Matter in Events with a Hadronically Decaying W or Z Boson and Missing Transverse Momentum in pp Collisions at ?s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search is presented for dark matter pair production in association with a W or Z boson in pp collisions representing 20.3??fb[superscript ?1] of integrated luminosity at ?s = 8??TeV using data recorded with the ATLAS ...

Taylor, Frank E.

145

Dark energy and dark matter as curvature effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Astrophysical observations are pointing out huge amounts of dark matter and dark energy needed to explain the observed large scale structures and cosmic accelerating expansion. Up to now, no experimental evidence has been found, at fundamental level, to explain such mysterious components. The problem could be completely reversed considering dark matter and dark energy as shortcomings of General Relativity and claiming for the correct theory of gravity as that derived by matching the largest number of observational data. As a result, accelerating behavior of cosmic fluid and rotation curves of spiral galaxies are reproduced by means of curvature effects.

S. Capozziello; V. F. Cardone; A. Troisi

2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

146

Dark Matter And The Habitability of Planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In many models, dark matter particles can elastically scatter with nuclei in planets, causing those particles to become gravitationally bound. While the energy expected to be released through the subsequent annihilations of dark matter particles in the interior of the Earth is negligibly small (a few megawatts in the most optimistic models), larger planets that reside in regions with higher densities of slow moving dark matter could plausibly capture and annihilate dark matter at a rate high enough to maintain liquid water on their surfaces, even in the absence of additional energy from starlight or other sources. On these rare planets, it may be dark matter rather than light from a host star that makes it possible for life to emerge, evolve, and survive.

Hooper, Dan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Dark Matter And The Habitability of Planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In many models, dark matter particles can elastically scatter with nuclei in planets, causing those particles to become gravitationally bound. While the energy expected to be released through the subsequent annihilations of dark matter particles in the interior of the Earth is negligibly small (a few megawatts in the most optimistic models), larger planets that reside in regions with higher densities of slow moving dark matter could plausibly capture and annihilate dark matter at a rate high enough to maintain liquid water on their surfaces, even in the absence of additional energy from starlight or other sources. On these rare planets, it may be dark matter rather than light from a host star that makes it possible for life to emerge, evolve, and survive.

Dan Hooper; Jason H. Steffen

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

148

Big Bang Synthesis of Nuclear Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the physics of dark matter models featuring composite bound states carrying a large conserved dark "nucleon" number. The properties of sufficiently large dark nuclei may obey simple scaling laws, and we find that this scaling can determine the number distribution of nuclei resulting from Big Bang Dark Nucleosynthesis. For plausible models of asymmetric dark matter, dark nuclei of large nucleon number, e.g. > 10^8, may be synthesised, with the number distribution taking one of two characteristic forms. If small-nucleon-number fusions are sufficiently fast, the distribution of dark nuclei takes on a logarithmically-peaked, universal form, independent of many details of the initial conditions and small-number interactions. In the case of a substantial bottleneck to nucleosynthesis for small dark nuclei, we find the surprising result that even larger nuclei, with size >> 10^8, are often finally synthesised, again with a simple number distribution. We briefly discuss the constraints arising from the novel dark sector energetics, and the extended set of (often parametrically light) dark sector states that can occur in complete models of nuclear dark matter. The physics of the coherent enhancement of direct detection signals, the nature of the accompanying dark-sector form factors, and the possible modifications to astrophysical processes are discussed in detail in a companion paper.

Edward Hardy; Robert Lasenby; John March-Russell; Stephen M. West

2015-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

149

Dark Energy Coupled with Dark Matter in Viscous Fluid Cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate cosmological models with two interacting fluids: dark energy and dark matter in flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe. The interaction between dark energy and dark matter is described in terms of the parameters present in the inhomogeneous equation of state when allowance is made for bulk viscosity, for the Little Rip, the Pseudo Rip, and the bounce universes. We obtain analytic representation for characteristic properties in these cosmological models, in particular the bulk viscosity $\\zeta=\\zeta(H,t)$ as function of Hubble parameter and time. We discuss the corrections of thermodynamical parameters in the equations of state due coupling between the viscous fluid and dark matter. Some common properties of these corrections are elucidated.

I. Brevik; V. V. Obukhov; A. V. Timoshkin

2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

150

Direct Detection Constraints on Dark Photon Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dark matter detectors built primarily to probe elastic scattering of WIMPs on nuclei are also precise probes of light, weakly coupled particles that may be absorbed by the detector material. In this paper, we derive constraints on the minimal model of dark matter comprised of long-lived vector states V (dark photons) in the 0.01-100 keV mass range. The absence of an ionization signal in direct detection experiments such as XENON10 and XENON100 places a very strong constraint on the dark photon mixing angle, down to $O(10^{-15})$, assuming that dark photons comprise the dominant fraction of dark matter. This sensitivity to dark photon dark matter exceeds the indirect bounds derived from stellar energy loss considerations over a significant fraction of the available mass range. We also revisit indirect constraints from $V\\to 3\\gamma$ decay and show that limits from modifications to the cosmological ionization history are comparable to the updated limits from the diffuse gamma-ray flux.

Haipeng An; Maxim Pospelov; Josef Pradler; Adam Ritz

2014-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

151

Unified Field Equations Coupling Four Forces and Theory of Dark Matter and Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unified Field Equations Coupling Four Forces and Theory of Dark Matter and Dark Energy Tian Ma. Electroweak Theory VI. Unified Theory of Dark Energy and Dark Matter VII. Concluding Remarks 2 #12;References: 1. Tian Ma & Shouhong Wang, Gravitational Field Equations and Theory of Dark Matter and Dark Energy

Wang, Shouhong

152

Dark matter candidate in an extended type III seesaw scenario  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The type III seesaw mechanism for neutrino mass generation usually makes use of at least two $Y = 0$, $SU(2)_L$ lepton triplets. We augment such a model with a third triplet and a sterile neutrino, both of which are odd under a conserved $\\Z_2$ symmetry. With all new physics confined to the $\\Z_2$-odd sector, whose low energy manifestation is in some higher-dimensional operators, a fermionic dark matter candidate is found to emerge. We identify the region of the parameter space of the scenario, which is consistent with all constraints from relic density and direct searches, and allows a wide range of masses for the dark matter candidate.

Chaudhuri, Avinanda; Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup; Rakshit, Subhendu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

The Bright Side of Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that it is not possible in the absence of dark matter to construct a four-dimensional metric that explains galactic observations. In particular, by working with an effective potential it is shown that a metric which is constructed to fit flat rotation curves in spiral galaxies leads to the wrong sign for the bending of light i.e. repulsion instead of attraction. Hence, without dark matter the motion of particles on galactic scales cannot be explained in terms of geodesic motion on a four- dimensional metric. This reveals a new bright side to dark matter: it is indispensable if we wish to retain the cherished equivalence principle.

A. Edery

1999-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

154

Unifying dark energy and dark matter with a scalar field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The standard model of cosmology considers the existence of two components of unknown nature, ``dark matter'' and ``dark energy'', which determine the cosmological evolution. Their nature remains unknown, and other models can also be considered. In particular, it may be possible to reinterpret the recent cosmological observations so that the Universe does not contain two fluids of unknown natures, but only one fluid with particular properties. After a brief review of constraints on this unifying ``dark fluid'', we will discuss a specific model of dark fluid based on a complex scalar fluid.

A. Arbey

2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

155

Antigravitation, Dark Energy, Dark Matter - Alternative Solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collisional damping of gravitational waves in the Newtonian matter is investigated. The generalized theory of Landau damping is applied to the gravitational physical systems in the context of the plasma gravitational analogy.

Boris V. Alexeev

2009-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

156

Dark matter monopoles, vectors and photons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a secluded dark sector which is coupled to the Standard Model via a Higgs portal interaction we arrange for the existence of 't Hooft-Polyakov magnetic monopoles and study their implications for cosmology. We point out that a dark sector which can accommodate stable monopoles will also contain massless dark photons gamma' as well as charged massive vector bosons W'. The dark matter in this scenario will be a combination of magnetically and electrically charged species under the unbroken U(1) subgroup of the dark sector. We estimate the cosmological production rate of monopoles and the rate of monopole-anti-monopole annihilation and conclude that monopoles with masses of few hundred TeV or greater, can produce sizeable contributions to the observed dark matter relic density. We scan over the parameter space and compute the relic density for monopoles and vector bosons. Turning to the dark photon radiation, we compute their contribution to the measured density of relativistic particles Neff and also apply observational constraints from the Bullet cluster and other large scale galaxies on long-range interactions for the self-interacting dark matter components made out of monopoles and out of dark vector bosons. At scales relevant for dwarf galaxies we identify regions on the parameter space where self-interacting monopole and vector dark mater components can aid solving the core-cusp and the too-big-to-fail problems.

Valentin V. Khoze; Gunnar Ro

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

157

Exclusion limits on the WIMP-nucleon cross section from the first run of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search in the Soudan Underground Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS-II) employs low-temperature Ge and Si detectors to seek Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) via their elastic scattering interactions with nuclei. Simultaneous measurements of both ionization and phonon energy provide discrimination against interactions of background particles. For recoil energies above 10 keV, events due to background photons are rejected with > 99.99% efficiency. Electromagnetic events very near the detector surface can mimic nuclear recoils because of reduced charge collection, but these surface events are rejected with > 96% efficiency by using additional information from the phonon pulse shape. Efficient use of active and passive shielding, combined with the 2090 m.w.e. overburden at the experimental site in the Soudan mine, makes the background from neutrons negligible for this first exposure. All cuts are determined in a blind manner from in situ calibrations with external radioactive sources without any prior knowledge of the event distribution in the signal region. Resulting efficiencies are known to {approx}10%. A single event with a recoil of 64 keV passes all of the cuts and is consistent with the expected misidentification rate of surface-electron recoils. Under the assumptions for a standard dark matter halo, these data exclude previously unexplored parameter space for both spin-independent and spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon elastic scattering. The resulting limit on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon elastic-scattering cross-section has a minimum of 4 x 10{sup -43} cm{sup 2} at a WIMP mass of 60 GeV c{sup -2}. The minimum of the limit for the spin-dependent WIMP-neutron elastic-scattering cross-section is 2 x 10{sup -37} cm{sup 2} at a WIMP mass of 50 GeV c{sup -2}.

Armel-Funkhouser, M.S.; /UC, Berkeley; Attisha, M.J.; /Case Western Reserve U.; Bailey, C.N.; /Case Western Reserve U.; Baudis, L.; /Florida U.; Bauer, Daniel A.; /Fermilab; Brink, P.L.; /Case Western Reserve U.; Bunker, R.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Cabrera, B.; /Case Western Reserve U.; Caldwell, D.O.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Chang, C.L.; /Case Western Reserve U.; Crisler, M.B.; /Fermilab; Cushman, P.; /Minnesota U.; Daal, M.; /UC, Berkeley; Dixon, R.; /Fermilab; Dragowsky, M.R.; Driscoll, D.D.; /Case Western Reserve U.; Duong, L.; /Minnesota U.; Ferril, R.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Filippini, J.; /UC, Berkeley; Gaitskell, R.J.; /Case Western Reserve U.; Hennings-Yeomans, R.; /Case Western Reserve U. /Fermilab /Case Western Reserve

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Dark Matter in Disc Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent work on the mass distribution in spiral galaxies, using mainly HI observations, is reviewed. The principal problem is still to determine to what extent the dark matter is important in the inner parts of a galaxy, or in other words, how dominant is the self-gravitation of the disc. Studies of the shapes of rotation curves show that in detail there is sufficient individuality in spiral galaxies to prohibit the construction of ``Universal Rotation Curves''. A detailed account is given of the method of Athanassoula et al. (1987), where swing amplifier criteria are applied to set a range in the mass-to-light ratio of the disc. To restrict this range further, other methods might be useful. For a number of bright spirals the rotation curve drops just outside the optical image, but this feature by itself cannot constrain unambiguously the mass models. The use of velocity dispersions seems a promising way, though the observational problems are hard. Within the uncertainties, discs can be close to ``maximum'', even though a range of values cannot be excluded.

A. Bosma

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Coherent neutrino scattering in dark matter detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus and weakly interacting massive particle-nucleus interaction signatures are expected to be quite similar. This paper discusses how a next-generation ton-scale dark matter detector could ...

Anderson, Alexander John

160

Superheavy sterile neutrinos as dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chung, Kolb, and Riotto have proposed nonthermal mechanisms for the production of superheavy dark matter, consisting of particles with masses which may range up to the GUT scale. Shi and Fuller, on the other hand, have proposed much lighter sterile...

Tang, Yongjun

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Non-relativistic effective theory of dark matter direct detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dark matter direct detection searches for signals coming from dark matter scattering against nuclei at a very low recoil energy scale ~ 10 keV. In this paper, a simple non-relativistic effective theory is constructed to describe interactions between dark matter and nuclei without referring to any underlying high energy models. It contains the minimal set of operators that will be tested by direct detection. The effective theory approach highlights the set of distinguishable recoil spectra that could arise from different theoretical models. If dark matter is discovered in the near future in direct detection experiments, a measurement of the shape of the recoil spectrum will provide valuable information on the underlying dynamics. We bound the coefficients of the operators in our non-relativistic effective theory by the null results of current dark matter direct detection experiments. We also discuss the mapping between the non-relativistic effective theory and field theory models or operators, including aspects of the matching of quark and gluon operators to nuclear form factors.

JiJi Fan; Matthew Reece; Lian-Tao Wang

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

162

Non-relativistic effective theory of dark matter direct detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dark matter direct detection searches for signals coming from dark matter scattering against nuclei at a very low recoil energy scale ? 10 keV. In this paper, a simple non-relativistic effective theory is constructed to describe interactions between dark matter and nuclei without referring to any underlying high energy models. It contains the minimal set of operators that will be tested by direct detection. The effective theory approach highlights the set of distinguishable recoil spectra that could arise from different theoretical models. If dark matter is discovered in the near future in direct detection experiments, a measurement of the shape of the recoil spectrum will provide valuable information on the underlying dynamics. We bound the coefficients of the operators in our non-relativistic effective theory by the null results of current dark matter direct detection experiments. We also discuss the mapping between the non-relativistic effective theory and field theory models or operators, including aspects of the matching of quark and gluon operators to nuclear form factors.

Fan, JiJi; Wang, Lian-Tao [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 08540 (United States); Reece, Matthew, E-mail: jijifan@princeton.edu, E-mail: mreece@princeton.edu, E-mail: lianwang@princeton.edu [Princeton Center for Theoretical Science, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 08540 (United States)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

The Unification and Cogeneration of Dark Matter and Baryonic Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In grand unified theories with gauge groups larger than SU(5), the multiplets that contain the known quarks and leptons also contain fermions that are singlets under the Standard Model gauge group. Some of these could be the dark matter of the universe. Grand unified theories can also have accidental U(1) global symmetries (analogous to B-L in minimal SU(5)) that can stabilize dark matter. These ideas are illustrated in an SU(6) model.

S. M. Barr

2011-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

164

The Unification and Cogeneration of Dark Matter and Baryonic Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In grand unified theories with gauge groups larger than SU(5), the multiplets that contain the known quarks and leptons also contain fermions that are singlets under the Standard Model gauge group. Some of these could be the dark matter of the universe. Grand unified theories can also have accidental U(1) global symmetries (analogous to B-L in minimal SU(5)) that can stabilize dark matter. These ideas are illustrated in an SU(6) model.

Barr, S M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Fluid Mechanics Explains Cosmology, Dark Matter, Dark Energy, and Life  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations of the interstellar medium by the Herschel, Planck etc. infrared satellites throw doubt on standard {\\Lambda}CDMHC cosmological processes to form gravitational structures. According to the Hydro-Gravitational-Dynamics (HGD) cosmology of Gibson (1996), and the quasar microlensing observations of Schild (1996), the dark matter of galaxies consists of Proto-Globular-star-Cluster (PGC) clumps of Earth-mass primordial gas planets in metastable equilibrium since PGCs began star production at 0.3 Myr by planet mergers. Dark energy and the accelerating expansion of the universe inferred from SuperNovae Ia are systematic dimming errors produced as frozen gas dark matter planets evaporate to form stars. Collisionless cold dark matter that clumps and hierarchically clusters does not exist. Clumps of PGCs began diffusion from the Milky Way Proto-Galaxy upon freezing at 14 Myr to give the Magellanic Clouds and the faint dwarf galaxies of the 10^22 m diameter baryonic dark matter Galaxy halo. The first stars persist as old globular star clusters (OGCs). Water oceans and the biological big bang occurred at 2-8 Myr. Life inevitably formed and evolved in the cosmological primordial organic soup provided by 10^80 big bang planets and their hot oceans as they gently merged to form larger binary planets and small binary stars.

Carl H. Gibson

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

166

Dark Energy and Dark Matter in Stars Physic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the basic equations and relations for the relativistic static spherically symmetric stars (SSSS) in the model of minimal dilatonic gravity (MDG) which is {\\em locally} equivalent to the f(R) theories of gravity and gives an alternative description of the effects of dark matter and dark energy. The results for the simplest form of the relativistic equation of state (EOS) of neutron matter are represented. Our approach overcomes the well-known difficulties of the physics of SSSS in the f(R) theories of gravity introducing two novel EOS for cosmological energy-pressure densities and dilaton energy-pressure densities, as well as proper boundary conditions.

Plamen Fiziev

2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

167

Dark energy from quantum wave function collapse of dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamical wave function collapse models entail the continuous liberation of a specified rate of energy arising from the interaction of a fluctuating scalar field with the matter wave function. We consider the wave function collapse process for the constituents of dark matter in our universe. Beginning from a particular early era of the universe chosen from physical considerations, the rate of the associated energy liberation is integrated to yield the requisite magnitude of dark energy around the era of galaxy formation. Further, the equation of state for the liberated energy approaches $w \\to -1$ asymptotically, providing a mechanism to generate the present acceleration of the universe.

A. S. Majumdar; D. Home; S. Sinha

2009-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

168

Searching for Dark Sector  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) Sr (2)ScienceScientists InSearchsuperconduct* FindDark Sector

169

Hadronic uncertainties in the elastic scattering of supersymmetric dark matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We review the uncertainties in the spin-independent and spin-dependent elastic scattering cross sections of supersymmetric dark matter particles on protons and neutrons. We propagate the uncertainties in quark masses and hadronic matrix elements that are related to the {pi}-nucleon {sigma} term and the spin content of the nucleon. By far the largest single uncertainty is that in spin-independent scattering induced by our ignorance of the matrix elements linked to the {pi}-nucleon {sigma} term, which affects the ratio of cross sections on proton and neutron targets as well as their absolute values. This uncertainty is already impacting the interpretations of experimental searches for cold dark matter. We plead for an experimental campaign to determine better the {pi}-nucleon {sigma} term. Uncertainties in the spin content of the proton affect significantly, but less strongly, the calculation of rates used in indirect searches.

Ellis, John [TH Division, Physics Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Olive, Keith A.; Savage, Christopher [William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

Astrophysical constraints on millicharged atomic dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some models of inelastic dark matter posit the existence of bound states under some new $U(1)'$ gauge symmetry. If this new dark photon kinetically mixes with the standard model photon, then the constituent particles in these bound states can acquire a fractional electric charge. This electric charge renders a dark-matter medium dispersive. We compute this frequency-dependent index of refraction for such a medium and use the frequency-dependent arrival time of light from astrophysical sources to constrain the properties of dark atoms in the medium. Using optical-wavelength observations from the Crab Pulsar, we find the electric millicharge of dark (electrons) protons to be smaller than the electric charge $e$ for dark atom masses below 100 keV, assuming a dark fine structure constant $\\boldsymbol{\\alpha}=1$. We estimate that future broadband observations of gamma-ray bursts can produce constraints on the millicharge of dark atoms with masses in the keV range that are competitive with existing collider constraints.

Audrey K. Kvam; David C. Latimer

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Extracting Hidden-Photon Dark Matter From an LC-Circuit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We point out that a cold dark matter condensate made of gauge bosons from an extra hidden U(1) sector - dubbed hidden- photons - can create a small, oscillating electric density current. Thus, they could also be searched for in the recently proposed LC-circuit setup conceived for axion cold dark matter search by Sikivie, Sullivan and Tanner. We estimate the sensitivity of this setup for hidden-photon cold dark matter and we find it could cover a sizable, so far unexplored parameter space.

Paola Arias; Ariel Arza; Babette Dbrich; Jorge Gamboa; Fernando Mendez

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

172

Experimental High Energy Physics Research: Direct Detection of Dark Matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The grant supported research on an experimental search for evidence of dark matter interactions with normal matter. The PI carried out the research as a member of the LUX and LZ collaborations. The LUX research team collected a first data set with the LUX experiment, a large liquid xenon detector installed in the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF). The first results were published in Physical Review Letters on March 4, 2014. The journal Nature named the LUX result a scientific highlight of the year for 2013. In addition, the LZ collaboration submitted the full proposal for the Lux Zeplin experiment, which has since been approved by DOE-HEP as a second-generation dark matter experiment. Witherell is the Level 2 manager for the Outer Detector System on the LUX-Zeplin experiment.

Witherell, Michael S.

2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

173

MODELING OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS FOR DARK MATTER HALOS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations show that the underlying rotation curves at intermediate radii in spiral and low-surface-brightness galaxies are nearly universal. Further, in these same galaxies, the product of the central density and the core radius ({rho}{sub 0} r{sub 0}) is constant. An empirically motivated model for dark matter halos that incorporates these observational constraints is presented and shown to be in accord with the observations. A model fit to the observations of the galaxy cluster A611 shows that {rho}{sub 0} r{sub 0} for the dark matter halo in this more massive structure is larger by a factor of {approx}20 over that assumed for the galaxies. The model maintains the successful Navarro-Frenk-White form in the outer regions, although the well-defined differences in the inner regions suggest that modifications to the standard cold dark matter picture are required.

Hartwick, F. D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Asymmetric dark matter and the Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cold dark matter particles with an intrinsic matter-antimatter asymmetry do not annihilate after gravitational capture by the Sun and can affect its interior structure. The rate of capture is exponentially enhanced when such particles have self-interactions of the right order to explain structure formation on galactic scales. A `dark baryon' of mass 5 GeV is a natural candidate and has the required relic abundance if its asymmetry is similar to that of ordinary baryons. We show that such particles can solve the `solar composition problem'. The predicted small decrease in the low energy neutrino fluxes may be measurable by the Borexino and SNO+ experiments.

Mads T. Frandsen; Subir Sarkar

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Understanding the Fundamental Properties of Dark Matter and Dark Energy in Structure Formation and Cosmology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The program was concerned with developing and verifying the validity of observational methods for constraining the properties of dark matter and dark energy in the Universe.

Ellis, Richard S.

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

176

From the Dark Matter Universe to the Dark Energy Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Till the late nineties the accepted cosmological model was that of a Universe that had originated in the Big Bang and was now decelerating under the influence of as yet undetected dark matter, so that it would come to a halt and eventually collapse. In 1997 however, the author had put forward a contra model wherein the Universe was driven by dark energy, essentially the quantum zero point field, and was accelerating with a small cosmological constant. There were other deductions too, all in total agreement with observation. All this got confirmation in 1998 and subsequent observations have reconfirmed the findings.

Burra G. Sidharth

2008-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

177

Gamma-Ray Bursts and Dark Energy - Dark Matter interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) data is used to place constraints on a putative coupling between dark energy and dark matter. Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) constraints from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) first-year results, the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) shift parameter from WMAP seven year results and the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) are also discussed. The prospects for the field are assessed, as more GRB events become available.

T. Barreiro; O. Bertolami; P. Torres

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

178

Fermilab | Science | Particle Physics | Dark matter and dark energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCI Home ItDarkDiscoveries WorldwideDark matter

179

On the capture of dark matter by neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the number of dark matter particles that a neutron star accumulates over its lifetime as it rotates around the center of a galaxy, when the dark matter particle is a self-interacting boson but does not self-annihilate. We take into account dark matter interactions with baryonic matter and the time evolution of the dark matter sphere as it collapses within the neutron star. We show that dark matter self-interactions play an important role in the rapid accumulation of dark matter in the core of the neutron star. We consider the possibility of determining an exclusion region of the parameter space for dark matter mass and dark matter interaction cross sections based on the observation of old neutron stars with strong dark matter self-interactions. We show that for a dark matter density of $~10^3$ GeV/cm$^3$ and dark matter mass $m_\\chi$ less than approximately 10 GeV, there is a potential exclusion region for dark matter interactions with nucleons that is three orders of magnitude more stringent than without self-interactions. The potential exclusion region for dark matter self-interaction cross sections is many orders of magnitude stronger than the current Bullet Cluster limit. For example, for high dark matter density regions, we find that for $m_\\chi\\sim 10$ GeV when the dark matter interaction cross section with the nucleons ranges from $\\sigma_{\\chi n}\\sim 10^{-52}$ cm$^2$ to $10^{-57}$ cm$^2$, the dark matter self-interaction cross section limit is $\\sigma_{\\chi\\chi}ten orders of magnitude stronger than the Bullet Cluster limit.

Tolga Guver; Arif Emre Erkoca; Mary Hall Reno; Ina Sarcevic

2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

180

RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS Dark matter lost and found  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-component condensate.They considered the limited access inherent to samples confined in a diamond anvil cell the gas disks of two spiral galaxies merge. As spirals have dark-matter haloes, their elliptical offspring­Einstein condensate within a ring- shaped magnetic trap (Phys. Rev. Lett. (in the press); preprint at http

Loss, Daniel

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181

Dark Matter and Large Scale Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A review of the study of dark matter and large scale structure of the Universe at Tartu Observatory is given. Tartu astronomers have participated in this development, starting from Ernst "Opik and Grigori Kuzmin, and continuing with the present generation of astronomers. Our goal was to understand better the structure, origin and evolution of the Universe.

J. Einasto

2000-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

182

Task I: Dark Matter Search Experiments with Cryogenic Detectors: CDMS-I and CDMS-II Task II: Experimental Study of Neutrino Properties: EXO and KamLAND  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dark Matter Search - During the period of performance, our group continued the search for dark matter in the form of weakly interacting massive particles or WIMPs. As a key member of the CDMS (Cryogenic Dark Matter Search) collaboration, we completed the CDMS II experiment which led the field in sensitivity for more than five years. We fabricated all detectors, and participated in detector testing and verification. In addition, we participated in the construction and operation of the facility at the Soudan Underground Laboratory and played key roles in the data acquisition and analysis. Towards the end of the performance period, we began operating the SuperCDMS Soudan experiment, which consists of 15 advanced Ge (9 kg) detectors. The advanced detector design called iZIP grew out of our earlier DOE Particle Detector R&D program which demonstrated the rejection of surface electrons to levels where they are no longer the dominant source of background. Our group invented this advanced design and these larger detectors were fabricated on the Stanford campus in collaboration with the SLAC CDMS group and the Santa Clara University group. The sensitivity reach is expected to be up to 5 times better than CDMS II after two years of operation. We will check the new limits on WIMPs set by XENON100, and we expect improved sensitivity for light mass WIMPs beyond that of any other existing experiment. Our group includes the Spokesperson for SuperCDMS and continues to make important contributions to improvements in the detector technology which are enabling the very low trigger thresholds used to explore the low mass WIMP region. We are making detailed measurements of the charge transport and trapping within Ge crystals, measuring the diffusive trapping distance of the quasiparticle excitations within the Al phonon collector fins on the detector surface, and we are contributing to the development of much improved detector Monte Carlos which are essential to guide the detector design and optimize the analysis. Neutrino Physics In the period of performance the neutrino group successfully completed the construction of EXO-200 and commissioned the detector. Science data taking started on Jun 1, 2011. With the discovery of the 2-neutrino double-beta decay in 136-Xe and the first measurement of the 0-neutrino mode resulting in the most stringent limit of Majorana masses, our group continues to be a leading innovator in the field of neutrino physics which is central to DOE-HEP Intensity Frontier program. The phenomenon of neutrino oscillations, in part elucidated by our earlier efforts with the Palo Verde and KamLAND experiments, provides the crucial information that neutrino masses are non-zero and, yet, it contains no information on the value of the neutrino mass scale. In recent times our group has therefore shifted its focus to a high sensitivity 0-neutrino double beta decay program, EXO. The 0-neutrino double beta decay provides the best chance of extending the sensitivity to the neutrino mass scale below 10 meV but, maybe more importantly, it tests the nature of the neutrino wave function, providing the most sensitive probe for Majorana particles and lepton number violation. The EXO program, formulated by our group several years ago, plans to use up to tonnes of the isotope 136-Xe to study the 0-neutrino double beta decay mode. The EXO-200 detector is the first step in this program and it represents the only large US-led and based experiment taking data. The EXO-200 isotope enrichment program broke new grounds for the enterprise of double beta decay. The detector design and material selection program paid off, resulting in a background that is among the very best in the field. The first light" of EXO-200 was very exciting with the discovery -in the first month of data- of the rarest 2-neutrino double beta decay mode ever observed. The lower limit on the 0-neutrino double beta decay half-life, published in Phys. Rev. Lett. and based on the first 120 days of data is the second best but, when translated into a Majorana mass scale, it

Cabrera, Blas [Professor, Stanford University] [Professor, Stanford University; Gratta, Giorgio [Professor, Stanford University] [Professor, Stanford University

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

183

DARK MATTER Tracing the "Cosmic Web" with Diffuse Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 DARK MATTER STARS GAS NEUTRAL HYDROGEN Tracing the "Cosmic Web" with Diffuse Gas Quasar Quasar Absorption Lines Keck/HIRES Quasar Spectrum Observer baryons dark matter potential isotropic UV only on and the radiation field intensity... H I #12;5 GOAL: the primordial dark matter power spectrum

Steidel, Chuck

184

Search for neutrinos from annihilation of captured low-mass dark matter particles in the Sun by Super-Kamiokande  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Super-Kamiokande (SK) can search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) by detecting neutrinos produced from WIMP annihilations occurring inside the Sun. In this analysis, we include neutrino events with interaction vertices in the detector in addition to upward-going muons produced in the surrounding rock. Compared to the previous result, which used the upward-going muons only, the signal acceptances for light (few-GeV/$c^2$ $\\sim$ 200-GeV/$c^2$) WIMPs are significantly increased. We fit 3903 days of SK data to search for the contribution of neutrinos from WIMP annihilation in the Sun. We found no significant excess over expected atmospheric-neutrino background and the result is interpreted in terms of upper limits on WIMP-nucleon elastic scattering cross sections under different assumptions about the annihilation channel. We set the current best limits on the spin-dependent (SD) WIMP-proton cross section for WIMP masses below 200 GeV/$c^2$ (at 10 GeV/$c^2$, 1.49$\\times 10^{-39}$ cm$^2$ for $\\chi\\c...

:,; Abe, K; Haga, Y; Hayato, Y; Iyogi, K; Kameda, J; Kishimoto, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakano, Y; Nakayama, S; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Tomura, T; Wendell, R A; Irvine, T; Kajita, 2 T; Kametani, I; Kaneyuki, 2 K; Lee, K P; Nishimura, Y; Okumura, 2 K; McLachlan, T; Labarga, 2 L; Kearns, E; Raaf, J L; Stone, 4 J L; Sulak, L R; Berkman, 4 S; Tanaka, 5 H A; Tobayama, 5 S; Goldhaber, M; Carminati, G; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Renshaw, A; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Ganezer, K S; Hill, J; Hong, N; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Akiri, T; Himmel, A; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wongjirad, T; Ishizuka, T; Tasaka, S; Jang, J S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Smith, S N; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Suzuki, A T; Takeuchi, Y; Bronner, C; Hirota, S; Huang, K; Ieki, K; Ikeda, M; Kikawa, T; Minamino, A; Nakaya, T; Suzuki, K; Takahashi, S; Fukuda, Y; Itow, Y; Mitsuka, G; Mijakowski, P; Hignight, J; Imber, J; Jung, C K; Yanagisawa, C; Ishino, H; Kibayashi, A; Koshio, Y; Mori, T; Sakuda, M; Yano, T; Kuno, Y; Tacik, R; Kim, S B; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Nishijima, K; Koshiba, M; Totsuka, Y; Yokoyama, M; Martin, J F; de Perio, P; Konaka, A; Wilking, M J; Chen, S; Zhang, Y; Wilkes, R J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Dark Stars: the First Stars in the Universe may be powered by Dark Matter Heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new line of research on Dark Stars is reviewed, which suggests that the first stars to exist in the universe were powered by dark matter heating rather than by fusion. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, which may be there own antipartmers, collect inside the first stars and annihilate to produce a heat source that can power the stars. A new stellar phase results, a Dark Star, powered by dark matter annihilation as long as there is dark matter fuel.

Katherine Freese; Peter Bodenheimer; Paolo Gondolo; Douglas Spolyar

2008-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

186

The Sensitivity of HAWC to High-Mass Dark Matter Annihilations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a wide field-of-view detector sensitive to gamma rays of 100 GeV to a few hundred TeV. Located in central Mexico at 19 degrees North latitude and 4100 m above sea level, HAWC will observe gamma rays and cosmic rays with an array of water Cherenkov detectors. The full HAWC array is scheduled to be operational in Spring 2015. In this paper, we study the HAWC sensitivity to the gamma-ray signatures of high-mass (multi- TeV) dark matter annihilation. The HAWC observatory will be sensitive to diverse searches for dark matter annihilation, including annihilation from extended dark matter sources, the diffuse gamma-ray emission from dark matter annihilation, and gamma-ray emission from non-luminous dark matter subhalos. Here we consider the HAWC sensitivity to a subset of these sources, including dwarf galaxies, the M31 galaxy, the Virgo cluster, and the Galactic center. We simulate the HAWC response to gamma rays from these sources in several well-motivated dark matter annihilation channels. If no gamma-ray excess is observed, we show the limits HAWC can place on the dark matter cross-section from these sources. In particular, in the case of dark matter annihilation into gauge bosons, HAWC will be able to detect a narrow range of dark matter masses to cross-sections below thermal. HAWC should also be sensitive to non-thermal cross-sections for masses up to nearly 1000 TeV. The constraints placed by HAWC on the dark matter cross-section from known sources should be competitive with current limits in the mass range where HAWC has similar sensitivity. HAWC can additionally explore higher dark matter masses than are currently constrained.

A. U. Abeysekara; R. Alfaro; C. Alvarez; J. D. Alvarez; R. Arceo; J. C. Arteaga-Velazquez; H. A. Ayala Solares; A. S. Barber; B. M. Baughman; N. Bautista-Elivar; J. Becerra Gonzalez; E. Belmont; S. Y. BenZvi; D. Berley; M. Bonilla Rosales; J. Braun; R. A. Caballero-Lopez; K. S. Caballero-Mora; A. Carraminana; M. Castillo; U. Cotti; J. Cotzomi; E. de la Fuente; C. De Leon; T. DeYoung; R. Diaz Hernandez; L. Diaz-Cruz; J. C. Diaz-Velez; B. L. Dingus; M. A. DuVernois; R. W. Ellsworth; S. F. E.; D. W. Fiorino; N. Fraija; A. Galindo; F. Garfias; M. M. Gonzalez; J. A. Goodman; V. Grabski; M. Gussert; Z. Hampel-Arias; J. P. Harding; C. M. Hui; P. Huentemeyer; A. Imran; A. Iriarte; P. Karn; D. Kieda; G. J. Kunde; A. Lara; R. J. Lauer; W. H. Lee; D. Lennarz; H. Leon Vargas; E. C. Linares; J. T. Linnemann; M. Longo; R. Luna-Garcia; A. Marinelli; H. Martinez; O. Martinez; J. Martinez-Castro; J. A. J. Matthews; J. McEnery; E. Mendoza Torres; P. Miranda-Romagnoli; E. Moreno; M. Mostafa; L. Nellen; M. Newbold; R. Noriega-Papaqui; T. Oceguera-Becerra; B. Patricelli; R. Pelayo; E. G. Perez-Perez; J. Pretz; C. Riviere; D. Rosa-Gonzalez; J. Ryan; H. Salazar; F. Salesa; A. Sandoval; M. Schneider; S. Silich; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; K. Sparks Woodle; R. W. Springer; I. Taboada; P. A. Toale; K. Tollefson; I. Torres; T. N. Ukwatta; L. Villasenor; T. Weisgarber; S. Westerhoff; I. G. Wisher; J. Wood; G. B. Yodh; P. W. Younk; D. Zaborov; A. Zepeda; H. Zhou; K. N. Abazajian

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

187

First Results from the DarkSide-50 Dark Matter Experiment at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the first results of DarkSide-50, a direct search for dark matter operating in the underground Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) and searching for the rare nuclear recoils possibly induced by weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). The dark matter detector is a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber with a (46.4+-0.7) kg active mass, operated inside a 30 t organic liquid scintillator neutron veto, which is in turn installed at the center of a 1 kt water Cherenkov veto for the residual flux of cosmic rays. We report here the null results of a dark matter search for a (1422+-67) kg d exposure with an atmospheric argon fill. This is the most sensitive dark matter search performed with an argon target, corresponding to a 90% CL upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section of 6.1x10^-44 cm^2 for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV/c^2.

P. Agnes; T. Alexander; A. Alton; K. Arisaka; H. O. Back; B. Baldin; K. Biery; G. Bonfini; M. Bossa; A. Brigatti; J. Brodsky; F. Budano; L. Cadonati; F. Calaprice; N. Canci; A. Candela; H. Cao; M. Cariello; P. Cavalcante; A. Chavarria; A. Chepurnov; A. G. Cocco; L. Crippa; D. D'Angelo; M. D'Incecco; S. Davini; M. De Deo; A. Derbin; A. Devoto; F. Di Eusanio; G. Di Pietro; E. Edkins; A. Empl; A. Fan; G. Fiorillo; K. Fomenko; G. Forster; D. Franco; F. Gabriele; C. Galbiati; A. Goretti; L. Grandi; M. Gromov; M. Y. Guan; Y. Guardincerri; B. Hackett; K. Herner; E. V. Hungerford; Al. Ianni; An. Ianni; C. Jollet; K. Keeter; C. Kendziora; S. Kidner; V. Kobychev; G. Koh; D. Korablev; G. Korga; A. Kurlej; P. X. Li; B. Loer; P. Lombardi; C. Love; L. Ludhova; S. Luitz; Y. Q. Ma; I. Machulin; A. Mandarano; S. Mari; J. Maricic; L. Marini; C. J. Martoff; A. Meregaglia; E. Meroni; P. D. Meyers; R. Milincic; D. Montanari; A. Monte; M. Montuschi; M. E. Monzani; P. Mosteiro; B. Mount; V. Muratova; P. Musico; A. Nelson; S. Odrowski; M. Okounkova; M. Orsini; F. Ortica; L. Pagani; M. Pallavicini; E. Pantic; L. Papp; S. Parmeggiano; R. Parsells; K. Pelczar; N. Pelliccia; S. Perasso; A. Pocar; S. Pordes; D. Pugachev; H. Qian; K. Randle; G. Ranucci; A. Razeto; B. Reinhold; A. Renshaw; A. Romani; B. Rossi; N. Rossi; S. D. Rountree; D. Sablone; P. Saggese; R. Saldanha; W. Sands; S. Sangiorgio; E. Segreto; D. Semenov; E. Shields; M. Skorokhvatov; O. Smirnov; A. Sotnikov; C. Stanford; Y. Suvorov; R. Tartaglia; J. Tatarowicz; G. Testera; A. Tonazzo; E. Unzhakov; R. B. Vogelaar; M. Wada; S. Walker; H. Wang; Y. Wang; A. Watson; S. Westerdale; M. Wojcik; A. Wright; X. Xiang; J. Xu; C. G. Yang; J. Yoo; S. Zavatarelli; A. Zec; C. Zhu; G. Zuzel

2015-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

188

Dark Energy-Dark Matter Interaction from the Abell Cluster A586  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We find that deviation from the virial equilibrium of the Abell Cluster A586 yields evidence of the interaction between dark matter and dark energy. We argue that this interaction might imply a violation of the Equivalence Principle. Our analysis show that evidence is found in the context of two different models of dark energy-dark matter interaction.

Orfeu Bertolami; Francisco Gil Pedro; Morgan Le Delliou

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

Form factors for dark matter capture by the Sun in effective theories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the effective theory of isoscalar and isovector dark matter-nucleon interactions mediated by a heavy spin-1 or spin-0 particle, 8 isotope-dependent nuclear response functions can be generated in the dark matter scattering by nuclei. We compute the 8 nuclear response functions for the 16 most abundant elements in the Sun, i.e. H, $^{3}$He, $^{4}$He, $^{12}$C, $^{14}$N, $^{16}$O, $^{20}$Ne, $^{23}$Na, $^{24}$Mg, $^{27}$Al, $^{28}$Si, $^{32}$S, $^{40}$Ar, $^{40}$Ca, $^{56}$Fe, and $^{59}$Ni, through detailed numerical shell model calculations. We use our response functions to compute the rate of dark matter capture by the Sun for all isoscalar and isovector dark matter-nucleon effective interactions, including several operators previously considered for dark matter direct detection only. We study in detail the dependence of the capture rate on specific dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, and on the different elements in the Sun. We find that a so far neglected momentum dependent dark matter coupling to the nuclear vector charge gives a larger contribution to the capture rate than the constant spin-dependent interaction commonly included in experimental searches. Our investigation lays the foundations for model independent analyses of dark matter induced neutrino signals from the Sun. The nuclear response functions obtained in this study are listed in analytic form in an appendix, ready to be used in other projects.

Riccardo Catena; Bodo Schwabe

2015-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

An Alternative to Particle Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose an alternative to particle dark matter that borrows ingredients of MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) while adding new key components. The first new feature is a dark matter fluid, in the form of a scalar field with small equation of state and sound speed. This component is critical in reproducing the success of cold dark matter for the expansion history and the growth of linear perturbations, but does not cluster significantly on non-linear scales. Instead, the missing mass problem on non-linear scales is addressed by a modification of the gravitational force law. The force law approximates MOND at large and intermediate accelerations, and therefore reproduces the empirical success of MOND at fitting galactic rotation curves. At ultra-low accelerations, the force law reverts to an inverse-square-law, albeit with a larger Newton's constant. This latter regime is important in galaxy clusters and is consistent with their observed isothermal profiles, provided the characteristic acceleration scale of MOND is mildly varying with scale or mass, such that it is ~12 times higher in clusters than in galaxies. We present an explicit relativistic theory in terms of two scalar fields. The first scalar field is governed by a Dirac-Born-Infeld action and behaves as a dark matter fluid on large scales. The second scalar field also has single-derivative interactions and mediates a fifth force that modifies gravity on non-linear scales. Both scalars are coupled to matter via an effective metric that depends locally on the fields. The form of this effective metric implies the equality of the two scalar gravitational potentials, which ensures that lensing and dynamical mass estimates agree. Further work is needed in order to make both the acceleration scale of MOND and the fraction at which gravity reverts to an inverse-square law explicitly dynamical quantities, varying with scale or mass.

Justin Khoury

2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

191

Discrimination of dark matter models in future experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phenomenological aspects of simple dark matter models are studied. We discuss ways to discriminate the dark matter models in future experiments. We find that the measurements of the branching fraction of the Higgs boson into two photons and the electric dipole moment of the electron as well as the direct detection experiments are quite useful in discriminating particle models of dark matter. We also discuss the prospects of finding new particles in dark sector at the LHC/ILC.

Tomohiro Abe; Ryuichiro Kitano; Ryosuke Sato

2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

192

Search for Dark Matter Candidates and Large Extra Dimensions in Events with a Photon and Missing Transverse Momentum in pp Collision Data at ?s=7?TeV with the ATLAS Detector  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Results of a search for new phenomena in events with an energetic photon and large missing transverse momentum in proton-proton collisions at ?s =7??TeV are reported. Data collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6??fb?1 are used. Good agreement is observed between the data and the standard model predictions. The results are translated into exclusion limits on models with large extra spatial dimensions and on pair production of weakly interacting dark matter candidates.

Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; kesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; sman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Atkinson, M.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimares da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, A. K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bittner, B.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Can Cosmic Structure form without Dark Matter?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the prime pieces of evidence for dark matter is the observation of large overdense regions in the universe. Since we know from the cosmic microwave background that the regions that contained the most baryons when the universe was {approx} 400, 000 years old were overdense by only one part in ten thousand, perturbations had to have grown since then by a factor greater than (1 + z{sub *}) {approx_equal} 1180 where z{sub *} is the epoch of recombination. This enhanced growth does not happen in general relativity, so dark matter is needed in the standard theory. We show here that enhanced growth can occur in alternatives to general relativity, in particular in Bekenstein's relativistic version of Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND). The vector field introduced in that theory for a completely different reason plays a key role in generating the instability that produces large cosmic structures today.

Dodelson, Scott; /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Liguori, Michele; /Fermilab /Padua U. /INFN, Padua

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Can Cosmic Structure form without Dark Matter?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the prime pieces of evidence for dark matter is the observation of large overdense regions in the universe. Since we know from the cosmic microwave background that the regions that contained the most baryons when the universe was ~400,000 years old were overdense by only one part in ten thousand, perturbations had to have grown since then by a factor greater than $(1+z_*)\\simeq 1180$ where $z_*$ is the epoch of recombination. This enhanced growth does not happen in general relativity, so dark matter is needed in the standard theory. We show here that enhanced growth can occur in alternatives to general relativity, in particular in Bekenstein's relativistic version of MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND). The vector field introduced in that theory for a completely different reason plays a key role in generating the instability that produces large cosmic structures today.

Scott Dodelson; Michele Liguori

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

195

Quark Nuggets as Baryonic Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cosmic first order phase transition from quarks to hadrons, occurring a few microseconds after the Big Bang, would lead to the formation of quark nuggets which would be stable on a cosmological time scale, if the associated baryon number is larger than a critical value. We examine the possibility that these surviving quark nuggets may not only be viable candidates for cold dark matter but even close the universe.

Jan-e Alam; Sibaji Raha; Bikash Sinha

1997-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

196

Dark Matter Balls Help Supernovae to Explode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As a solution to the well-known problem that the shock wave potentially responsible for the explosion of a supernova actually tends to stall, we propose a new energy source arising from our model for dark matter. Our earlier model proposed that dark matter should consist of cm-large white dwarf-like objects kept together by a skin separating two different sorts of vacua. These dark matter balls or pearls will collect in the middle of any star throughout its lifetime. At some stage during the development of a supernova the balls will begin to take in neutrons and then other surrounding material. By passing into a ball nucleons fall through a potential of order 10 MeV, causing a severe production of heat - of order 10 foe for a solar mass of material eaten by the balls. The temperature in the iron core will thereby be raised, splitting up the iron into smaller nuclei. This provides a mechanism for reviving the shock wave when it arrives and making the supernova explosion really occur. The onset of the heating d...

Froggatt, Colin D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Halo Formation in Warm Dark Matter Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discrepancies have emerged between the predictions of standard cold dark matter (CDM) theory and observations of clustering on sub-galactic scales. Warm dark matter (WDM) is a simple modification of CDM in which the dark matter particles have initial velocities due either to their having decoupled as thermal relics, or having been formed via non-equilibrium decay. We investigate the nonlinear gravitational clustering of WDM with a high resolution N-body code, and identify a number of distinctive observational signatures. Relative to CDM, halo concentrations and core densities are lowered, core radii are increased, and large halos emerge with far fewer low mass satellites. The number of small halos is suppressed, and those present are formed by `top down' fragmentation of caustics, as part of a `cosmic web' connecting massive halos. Few small halos form outside this web. If we identify small halos with dwarf galaxies, their number, spatial distribution, and formation epoch appear in better agreement with the observations for WDM than they are for CDM.

Paul Bode; Jeremiah P. Ostriker; Neil Turok

2001-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

198

SQUID-based Resonant Detection of Axion Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new method for searching for Dark Matter axions is proposed. It is shown that a two-contact SQUID can detect oscillating magnetic perturbations induced by the axions in a strong inhomogeneous magnetic field. A resonant signal is a steplike response in the SQUID current-voltage characteristic at a voltage corresponding to the axion mass with a height depending on the axion energy density near the Earth. The proposed experimental technique appears to be sensitive to the axions with masses $m_a\\lesssim 10^{-4}$ eV, which is well-motivated by current researches both in cosmology and in particle physics.

Vladimir Popov

2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

199

Dark Photon Search at BABAR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presented is the current progress of a search for the signature of a dark photon or new particle using the BaBar data set. We search for the processes e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {gamma}{sub ISR}A{prime},A{prime} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} and e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {gamma}{sub ISR}{gamma}, {gamma} {yields} A{prime},A{prime} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}, where {gamma}{sub ISR} is an initial state radiated photon of energy E{sub {gamma}} >= 1 GeV. Twenty-five sets of Monte Carlo, simulating e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions at an energy of 10.58 GeV, were produced with different values of the A{prime} mass ranging from 100 MeV to 9.5 GeV. The mass resolution is calculated based on Monte Carlo simulations. We implement ROOT's Toolkit for Multivariate Analysis (TMVA), a machine learning tool that allows us to evaluate the signal character of events based on many of discriminating variables. TMVA training is conducted with samples of Monte Carlo as signal and a small portion of Run 6 as background. The multivariate analysis produces additional cuts to separate signal and background. The signal efficiency and sensitivity are calculated. The analysis will move forward to fit the background and scan the residuals for the narrow resonance peak of a new particle.

Greenwood, Ross N; /MIT /SLAC

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

200

Bi-metric Gravity and "Dark Matter"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a bi-metric theory of gravity containing a length scale of galactic size. For distances less than this scale the theory satisfies the standard tests of General Relativity. For distances greater than this scale the theory yields an effective gravitational constant much larger than the locally observed value of Newton's constant. The transition from one regime to the other through the galactic scale can explain the observed rotation curves of galaxies and hence the effects normally attributed to the presence of dark matter. Phenomena on an extragalactic scale such as galactic clusters and the expansion of the universe are controlled by the enhanced gravitational coupling. This provides an explanation of the missing matter normally invoked to account for the observed value of Hubble's constant in relation to observed matter.

I. T. Drummond

2000-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Searching for an invisible dark photon with DarkLight  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DarkLight experiment at Jefferson Lab is designed to search for a new U(1) vector boson A' in the mass range 10-100 MeV through its decay A??e{sup +}e{sup ?}. We will show that DarkLight is also sensitive to an A' decaying to invisible final states, but because of QED backgrounds, such a search is only feasible with photon detection. Surprisingly, pileup can be mitigated with a cut on the sign of the missing invariant mass-squared. We give the DarkLight reach for the invisible search assuming a nominal two-month running time, and compare to constraints from anomalous magnetic moments and rare kaon decays.

Kahn, Yonatan [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

202

Direct and indirect detection of dissipative dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the constraints from direct detection and solar capture on dark matter scenarios with a subdominant dissipative component. This dissipative dark matter component in general has both a symmetric and asymmetric relic abundance. Dissipative dynamics allow this subdominant dark matter component to cool, resulting in its partial or total collapse into a smaller volume inside the halo (e.g., a dark disk) as well as a reduced thermal velocity dispersion compared to that of normal cold dark matter. We first show that these features considerably relax the limits from direct detection experiments on the couplings between standard model (SM) particles and dissipative dark matter. On the other hand, indirect detection of the annihilation of the symmetric dissipative dark matter component inside the Sun sets stringent and robust constraints on the properties of the dissipative dark matter. In particular, IceCube observations force dissipative dark matter particles with mass above 50 GeV to either have a small coupling to the SM or a low local density in the solar system, or to have a nearly asymmetric relic abundance. Possible helioseismology signals associated with purely asymmetric dissipative dark matter are discussed, with no present constraints.

JiJi Fan; Andrey Katz; Jessie Shelton

2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

203

Dark Matter Directionality Revisited with a High Pressure Xenon Gas Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An observation of the anisotropy of dark matter interactions in a direction-sensitive detector would provide decisive evidence for the discovery of galactic dark matter. Directional information would also provide a crucial input to understanding its distribution in the local Universe. Most of the existing directional dark matter detectors utilize particle tracking methods in a low-pressure gas time projection chamber. These low pressure detectors require excessively large volumes in order to be competitive in the search for physics beyond the current limit. In order to avoid these volume limitations, we consider a novel proposal, which exploits a columnar recombination effect in a high-pressure gas time projection chamber. The ratio of scintillation to ionization signals observed in the detector carries the angular information of the particle interactions. In this paper, we investigate the sensitivity of a future directional detector focused on the proposed high-pressure Xenon gas time projection chamber. We study the prospect of detecting an anisotropy in the dark matter velocity distribution. We find that tens of events are needed to exclude an isotropic distribution of dark matter interactions at 95% confidence level in the most optimistic case with head-to-tail information. However, one needs at least 10-20 times more events without head-to-tail information for light dark matter below 50 GeV or one between 200 GeV and 400 GeV. For an intermediate mass range, we find it challenging to observe anisotropy of dark matter distribution.

Gopolang Mohlabeng; Kyoungchul Kong; Jin Li; Adam Para; Jonghee Yoo

2015-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

204

Prospects for detecting Dark Matter with neutrino telescopes in Intermediate Mass Black Holes scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Current strategies of indirect Dark Matter detection with neutrino telescopes are based on the search for high-energy neutrinos from the Solar core or from the center of the Earth. Here, we propose a new strategy based on the detection of neutrinos from Dark Matter annihilations in 'mini-spikes' around Intermediate Mass Black Holes. Neutrino fluxes, in this case, depend on the annihilation cross-section of Dark Matter particles, whereas solar and terrestrial fluxes are sensitive to the scattering cross-section off nucleons, a circumstance that makes the proposed search complementary to the existing ones. We discuss the prospects for detection with upcoming under-water and under-ice experiments such as ANTARES and IceCube, and show that several, up to many, sources could be detected with both experiments. A kilometer scale telescope in the Mediterranean appears to be ideally suited for the proposed search.

Bertone, Gianfranco

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Prospects for detecting Dark Matter with neutrino telescopes in Intermediate Mass Black Holes scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Current strategies of indirect Dark Matter detection with neutrino telescopes are based on the search for high-energy neutrinos from the Solar core or from the center of the Earth. Here, we propose a new strategy based on the detection of neutrinos from Dark Matter annihilations in 'mini-spikes' around Intermediate Mass Black Holes. Neutrino fluxes, in this case, depend on the annihilation cross-section of Dark Matter particles, whereas solar and terrestrial fluxes are sensitive to the scattering cross-section off nucleons, a circumstance that makes the proposed search complementary to the existing ones. We discuss the prospects for detection with upcoming under-water and under-ice experiments such as ANTARES and IceCube, and show that several, up to many, sources could be detected with both experiments. A kilometer scale telescope in the Mediterranean appears to be ideally suited for the proposed search.

Gianfranco Bertone

2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

206

The Structure of Dark Matter Haloes in Dwarf Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent observations indicate that dark matter haloes have flat central density profiles. Cosmological simulations with non-baryonic dark matter predict however self similar haloes with central density cusps. This contradiction has lead to the conclusion that dark matter must be baryonic. Here it is shown that the dark matter haloes of dwarf spiral galaxies represent a one parameter family with self similar density profiles. The observed global halo parameters are coupled with each other through simple scaling relations which can be explained by the standard cold dark matter model if one assumes that all the haloes formed from density fluctuations with the same primordial amplitude. We find that the finite central halo densities correlate with the other global parameters. This result rules out scenarios where the flat halo cores formed subsequently through violent dynamical processes in the baryonic component. These cores instead provide important information on the origin and nature of dark matter in dwarf galaxies.

A. Burkert

1995-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

207

DARK MATTER AND DARK ENERGY AS EFFECTS OF QUANTUM GRAVITY Max I. Fomitchev1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DARK MATTER AND DARK ENERGY AS EFFECTS OF QUANTUM GRAVITY Max I. Fomitchev1 Submitted March 12th of high matter density expected in the early Universe I show that primordial inflation and dark energy (i , 2004 ABSTRACT I present a theory of quantum gravity based on the principle of gravitational energy

Giles, C. Lee

208

Why we need to see the dark matter to understand the dark energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cosmological concordance model contains two separate constituents which interact only gravitationally with themselves and everything else, the dark matter and the dark energy. In the standard dark energy models, the dark matter makes up some 20% of the total energy budget today, while the dark energy is responsible for about 75%. Here we show that these numbers are only robust for specific dark energy models and that in general we cannot measure the abundance of the dark constituents separately without making strong assumptions.

Martin Kunz

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

209

Why we need to see the dark matter to understand the dark energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cosmological concordance model contains two separate constituents which interact only gravitationally with themselves and everything else, the dark matter and the dark energy. In the standard dark energy models, the dark matter makes up some 20% of the total energy budget today, while the dark energy is responsible for about 75%. Here we show that these numbers are only robust for specific dark energy models and that in general we cannot measure the abundance of the dark constituents separately without making strong assumptions.

Kunz, Martin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

From dark matter to neutrinoless double beta decay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Associated with two TeV-scale leptoquark scalars, a dark matter fermion which is the neutral component of an isotriplet can mediate a testable neutrinoless double beta decay at one-loop level. The dark matter fermion with determined mass and spin-independent scattering can be verified by the future dark matter direct detection experiments. We also discuss the implications on neutrino masses and baryon asymmetry.

Pei-Hong Gu

2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

211

Dark Matter Annihilations in the Large Magellanic Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The flat rotation curve obtained for the outer star clusters of the Large Magellanic Cloud is suggestive of an LMC dark matter halo. From the composite HI and star cluster rotation curve, I estimate the parameters of an isothermal dark matter halo added to a `maximum disk.' I then examine the possibility of detecting high energy gamma-rays from non-baryonic dark matter annihilations in the central region of the Large Magellanic Cloud.

P Gondolo

1993-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

212

Constraining Light Dark Matter with Low-Energy e+e- Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the power of low-energy, high-luminosity electron--positron colliders to probe hidden sectors with a mass below ~10 GeV that couple to Standard Model particles through a light mediator. Such sectors provide well-motivated dark matter candidates, and can give rise to distinctive mono-photon signals at B-factories and similar experiments. We use data from an existing mono-photon search by BaBar to place new constraints on this class of models, and give projections for the sensitivity of a similar search at a future B-factory such as Belle II. We find that the sensitivity of such searches are more powerful than searches at other collider or fixed-target facilities for hidden-sector mediators and particles with masses between a few hundred MeV and 10 GeV. Mediators produced on-shell and decaying invisibly to hidden-sector particles such as dark matter can be probed particularly well. Sensitivity to light dark matter produced through an off-shell mediator is more limited, but may be improved with a better control of backgrounds, allowing background estimation and a search for kinematic edges. We compare our results to existing and future direct detection experiments and show that low-energy colliders provide an indispensable and complementary avenue to search for light dark matter. The implementation of a mono-photon trigger at Belle II would provide an unparalleled window into such light hidden sectors.

Rouven Essig; Jeremy Mardon; Michele Papucci; Tomer Volansky; Yi-Ming Zhong

2015-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

213

MSSM Inflaton: SUSY Dark Matter and LHC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this talk we will discuss how inflation can be embedded within a minimal extension of the Standard Model where the inflaton carries the Standard Model charges. There is no need of an ad-hoc scalar field to be introduced in order to explain the temperature anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation, all the ingredients are present within a minimal supersymmetric Standard Model. For the first time inflaton properties can be directly linked to the particle phenomenology, dark matter, and the baryons of the Standard Model.

Mazumdar, A. [Physics Department, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YB (United Kingdom) and Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen University, Blegdamsvej-17, DK-2100 (Denmark)

2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

214

Backgrounds and Projected Limits from Dark Matter Direct Detection Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simple formula is introduced which indicates the amount by which projections of dark matter direct detection experiments are expected to be degraded due to backgrounds.

Scott Dodelson

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

215

asymmetric dark matter: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the baryon asymmetry as a way to address the observed similarity between the baryonic and dark matter energy densities today. Focusing on this framework we calculate the evolution...

216

Neutrinoless double beta decay can constrain neutrino dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine how constraints can be placed on the neutrino component of dark matter by an accurate measurement of neutrinoless double beta ($0\

V. Barger; S. L. Glashow; D. Marfatia; K. Whisnant

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

217

Dark energy - dark matter - and black holes: The music of the universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here we review the recent evidence for dark energy, dark matter and black holes as components of an expanding universe, for the vantage point of a non-expert; we speculate on a specific DM particle.

Peter L. Biermann

2005-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

218

Gravity Resonance Spectroscopy Constrains Dark Energy and Dark Matter Scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on precision resonance spectroscopy measurements of quantum states of ultracold neutrons confined above the surface of a horizontal mirror by the gravity potential of the Earth. Resonant transitions between several of the lowest quantum states are observed for the first time. These measurements demonstrate, that Newton's inverse square law of Gravity is understood at micron distances on an energy scale of~$10^{-14}$~eV. At this level of precision we are able to provide constraints on any possible gravity-like interaction. In particular, a dark energy chameleon field is excluded for values of the coupling constant~$\\beta > 5.8\\times10^8$ at~95% confidence level~(C.L.), and an attractive (repulsive) dark matter axion-like spin-mass coupling is excluded for the coupling strength $g_sg_p > 3.7\\times10^{-16}$~($5.3\\times10^{-16}$)~at a Yukawa length of~$\\lambda = 20$~{\\textmu}m~(95% (C.L.).

T. Jenke; G. Cronenberg; J. Burgdrfer; L. A. Chizhova; P. Geltenbort; A. N. Ivanov; T. Lauer; T. Lins; S. Rotter; H. Saul; U. Schmidt; H. Abele

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

A fluid mechanical explanation of dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Matter in the universe has become ``dark'' or ``missing'' through misconceptions about the fluid mechanics of gravitational structure formation. Gravitational condensation occurs on non-acoustic density nuclei at the largest Schwarz length scale L_{ST}, L_{SV}, L_{SM}, L_{SD} permitted by turbulence, viscous, or magnetic forces, or by the fluid diffusivity. Non-baryonic fluids have diffusivities larger (by factors of trillions or more) than baryonic (ordinary) fluids, and cannot condense to nucleate baryonic galaxy formation as is usually assumed. Baryonic fluids begin to condense in the plasma epoch at about 13,000 years after the big bang to form proto-superclusters, and form proto-galaxies by 300,000 years when the cooling plasma becomes neutral gas. Condensation occurs at small planetary masses to form ``primordial fog particles'' from nearly all of the primordial gas by the new theory, Gibson (1996), supporting the Schild (1996) conclusion from quasar Q0957+651A,B microlensing observations that the mass of the lens galaxy is dominated by ``rogue planets ... likely to be the missing mass''. Non-baryonic dark matter condenses on superclusters at scale L_{SD} to form massive super-halos.

Carl H. Gibson

1999-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

220

Nuclear Double Beta Decay, Fundamental Particle Physics, Hot Dark Matter, And Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear double beta decay, an extremely rare radioactive decay process, is - in one of its variants - one of the most exciting means of research into particle physics beyond the standard model. The large progress in sensitivity of experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay in the last two decades - based largely on the use of large amounts of enriched source material in "active source experiments" - has lead to the observation of the occurrence of this process in nature (on a 6.4 sigma level), with the largest half-life ever observed for a nuclear decay process (2.2 x 10^{25} y). This has fundamental consequences for particle physics - violation of lepton number, Majorana nature of the neutrino. These results are independent of any information on nuclear matrix elements (NME)*. It further leads to sharp restrictions for SUSY theories, sneutrino mass, right-handed W-boson mass, superheavy neutrino masses, compositeness, leptoquarks, violation of Lorentz invariance and equivalence principle in the neutrino sector. The masses of light-neutrinos are found to be degenerate, and to be at least 0.22 +- 0.02 eV. This fixes the contribution of neutrinos as hot dark matter to >=4.7% of the total observed dark matter. The neutrino mass determined might solve also the dark energy puzzle. *(It is briefly discussed how important NME for 0nubb decay really are.)

Hans V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus; Irina V. Krivosheina

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Searching for Low Mass Dark Portal at the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Light dark matter with mass smaller than about 10 GeV is difficult to probe from direct detection experiments. In order to have the correct thermal relic abundance, the mediator of the interaction between dark matter and the Standard Model (SM) should also be relatively light, $\\sim 10^2$ GeV. If such a light mediator couples to charged leptons, it would already be strongly constrained by direct searches at colliders. In this work, we consider the scenario of a leptophobic light $Z'$ vector boson as the mediator, and study the the prospect of searching for it at the 8 TeV Large Hadron Collider (LHC). To improve the reach in the low mass region, we perform a detailed study of the processes that the $Z'$ is produced in association with jet, photon, $W^\\pm$ and $Z^0$. We show that in the region where the mass of $Z'$ is between 80 and 400 GeV, the constraint from associated production can be comparable or even stronger than the known monojet and dijet constraints. Searches in these channels can be complementary to the monojet search, in particular if the $Z'$ couplings to quarks ($g_{Z'}$) and dark matter ($g_D$) are different. For $g_D < g_{Z'}$, we show that there is a larger region of parameter space which has correct thermal relic abundance and a light $Z'$, $M_{Z'} \\sim 100 $ GeV. This region, which cannot be covered by the mono-jet search, can be covered by the resonance searches described in this paper.

Haipeng An; Ran Huo; Lian-Tao Wang

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

222

Analytic study on backreacting holographic superconductors with dark matter sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The variational method for Sturm-Liouville eigenvalue problem was employed to study analytically properties of the holographic superconductor with dark matter sector, in which a coupling between Maxwell field and another U(1)-gauge field was considered. The backreaction of the dark matter sector on gravitational background in question was also examined.

Lukasz Nakonieczny; Marek Rogatko

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

223

Looking for dark matter annihilations in dwarf galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the flux of high energy gamma-rays from annihilation of neutralino dark matter in the centre of the Milky Way and the three nearest dwarf spheroidals (Sagittarius, Draco and Canis Major), using realistic models of the dark matter distribution.

F. Ferrer

2004-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

224

Dark matter at the LHC: EFTs and gauge invariance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective field theory (EFT) formulations of dark matter interactions have proven to be a convenient and popular way to quantify LHC bounds on dark matter. However, some of the non-renormalizable EFT operators considered do not respect the gauge symmetries of the Standard Model. We carefully discuss under what circumstances such operators can arise, and outline potential issues in their interpretation and application.

Bell, Nicole F; Dent, James B; Leane, Rebecca K; Weiler, Thomas J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

The Phenomenology of Gravitino Dark Matter Scenarios in Supergravity Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the phenomenology of gravitino dark matter within supergravity framework. Gravitino can be dark matter if it is the lightest supersymmetric particle, which is stable if R-parity is conserved. There are several distinct scenarios depending on what the next to lightest supersymmetric particle (NLSP) is. We discuss the constraints and summarize the phenomenology of neutralino, stau, stop and sneutrino NLSPs.

Yudi Santoso

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

226

argon dark matter: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

argon dark matter First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 The Argon Dark Matter Experiment HEP...

227

Mixed axion-wino dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A variety of supersymmetric models give rise to a split mass spectrum characterized by very heavy scalars but sub-TeV gauginos, usually with a wino-like LSP. Such models predict a thermally-produced underabundance of wino-like WIMP dark matter so that non-thermal DM production mechanisms are necessary. We examine the case where theories with a wino-like LSP are augmented by a Peccei-Quinn sector including an axion-axino-saxion supermultiplet in either the SUSY KSVZ or SUSY DFSZ models and with/without saxion decays to axions/axinos. We show allowed ranges of PQ breaking scale f_a for various cases which are generated by solving the necessary coupled Boltzmann equations. We also present results for a model with radiatively-driven naturalness but with a wino-like LSP.

Bae, Kyu Jung; Lessa, Andre; Serce, Hasan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Dynamical insight into dark-matter haloes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate, using the spherical Jeans equation, self-gravitating dynamical equilibria satisfying a relation rho/sigma_r^3 propto r^-alpha, which holds for simulated dark-matter haloes over their whole resolved radial range. Considering first the case of velocity isotropy, we find that this problem has only one solution with realistic density profile, which occurs only for a critical value of alpha_crit = 35/18 ~= 1.94, which is consistent with the empirical value of 1.9+/-0.05. We extend our analysis in two ways: first we introduce a parameter epsilon to allow for a more general relation rho/\\sigma_r^epsilon propto r^-alpha; second we consider velocity anisotropy. If we assume beta(r) := 1- sigma_theta^2 / sigma_r^2 to be linearly related to the logarithmic density slope gamma(r) := -dln(rho)/dln(r), which is in agreement with simulations, the problem remains analytically tractable and is equivalent to the simpler isotropic case: there exists only one physical solution, which occurs at a critical alpha value. Remarkably, this value of alpha and the density and velocity-dispersion profiles depend only on epsilon and the value beta_0 := beta(r=0), but not on the slope of the linear beta-gamma relation. For epsilon=3, alpha_crit = 35/18 - 2beta_0/9 and the resulting density profile is fully analytic (as are the velocity dispersion and circular speed) with an inner cusp rho propto r^{-(7+10beta_0)/9} and a very smooth transition to a steeper outer power-law asymptote. These models are in excellent agreement with the density, velocity-dispersion and anisotropy profiles of simulated dark-matter haloes over their full resolved radial range. If epsilon=3 is a universal constant, some scatter in beta_0 ~= 0 may account for some diversity in the density profiles. (ABRIDGED)

Walter Dehnen; Dean McLaughlin

2005-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

229

Future cosmological sensitivity for hot dark matter axions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the potential of a future, large-volume photometric survey to constrain the axion mass $m_a$ in the hot dark matter limit. Future surveys such as Euclid will have significantly more constraining power than current observations for hot dark matter. Nonetheless, the lowest accessible axion masses are limited by the fact that axions lighter than $\\sim 0.15$ eV decouple before the QCD epoch, assumed here to occur at a temperature $T_{\\rm QCD} \\sim 170$ MeV; this leaves an axion population of such low density that its late-time cosmological impact is negligible. For larger axion masses, $m_a \\gtrsim 0.15$ eV, where axions remain in equilibrium until after the QCD phase transition, we find that a Euclid-like survey combined with Planck CMB data can detect $m_a$ at very high significance. Our conclusions are robust against assumptions about prior knowledge of the neutrino mass. Given that the proposed IAXO solar axion search is sensitive to $m_a\\lesssim 0.2$ eV, the axion mass range probed by cosmology is n...

Archidiacono, Maria; Hamann, Jan; Hannestad, Steen; Raffelt, Georg; Wong, Yvonne Y Y

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Results on Dark Matter and beta beta decay modes by DAMA at Gran Sasso  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DAMA is an observatory for rare processes and it is operative deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory of the I.N.F.N. (LNGS). Here some arguments will be presented on the investigation on dark matter particles by annual modulation signature and on some of the realized double beta decay searches.

R. Bernabei

2007-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

231

arXiv:0706.2986v1[astro-ph]20Jun2007 DARK MATTER AND DARK ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

arXiv:0706.2986v1[astro-ph]20Jun2007 DARK MATTER AND DARK ENERGY MARC KAMIONKOWSKI California, and/or the introduction of some negative-pressure "dark energy," again, the nature of which remains Press. kamion@tapir.caltech.edu 1 #12;Dark Matter and Dark Energy 2 eries may help us understand the new

Steidel, Chuck

232

Low mass dark matter and invisible Higgs width in darkon models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Standard Model (SM) plus a real gauge-singlet scalar field dubbed darkon (SM+D) is the simplest model possessing a weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter candidate. In this model, the parameters are constrained from dark matter relic density and direct searches. The fact that interaction between darkon and SM particles is only mediated by a Higgs boson exchange may lead to significant modifications to the Higgs boson properties. If the dark matter mass is smaller than half of the Higgs boson mass, then a Higgs boson can decay into a pair of darkons resulting in a large invisible branching ratio. The Higgs boson will be searched for at the LHC and may well be discovered in the near future. If a Higgs boson with a small invisible decay width will be found, the SM+D model with small dark matter mass will be in trouble. We find that by extending the SM+D to a two Higgs doublet model plus a darkon (THDM+D) it is possible to have a Higgs boson with a small invisible branching ratio and at the same time the dark matter can have a low mass. We also comment on other implications of this model.

Cai Yi; Ren Bo [INPAC, Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); He Xiaogang [INPAC, Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Department of Physics and Center for Theoretical Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

A FLUKA Study of $\\beta$-delayed Neutron Emission for the Ton-size DarkSide Dark Matter Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the published cosmogenic background study for a ton-sized DarkSide dark matter search, only prompt neutron backgrounds coincident with cosmogenic muons or muon induced showers were considered, although observation of the initiating particle(s) was not required. The present paper now reports an initial investigation of the magnitude of cosmogenic background from $\\beta$-delayed neutron emission produced by cosmogenic activity in DarkSide. The study finds a background rate for $\\beta$-delayed neutrons in the fiducial volume of the detector on the order of < 0.1 event/year. However, detailed studies are required to obtain more precise estimates. The result should be compared to a radiogenic background event rate from the PMTs inside the DarkSide liquid scintillator veto of 0.2 events/year.

Empl, Anton

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Neutrino constraints on the dark matter total annihilation cross section  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the indirect detection of dark matter through its annihilation products, the signals depend on the square of the dark matter density, making precise knowledge of the distribution of dark matter in the Universe critical for robust predictions. Many studies have focused on regions where the dark matter density is greatest, e.g., the galactic center, as well as on the cosmic signal arising from all halos in the Universe. We focus on the signal arising from the whole Milky Way halo; this is less sensitive to uncertainties in the dark matter distribution, and especially for flatter profiles, this halo signal is larger than the cosmic signal. We illustrate this by considering a dark matter model in which the principal annihilation products are neutrinos. Since neutrinos are the least detectable standard model particles, a limit on their flux conservatively bounds the dark matter total self-annihilation cross section from above. By using the Milky Way halo signal, we show that previous constraints using the cosmic signal can be improved on by 1-2 orders of magnitude; dedicated experimental analyses should be able to improve both by an additional 1-2 orders of magnitude.

Yueksel, Hasan [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Horiuchi, Shunsaku [Department of Physics, School of Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Beacom, John F. [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Ando, Shin'ichiro [California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 130-33, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Diurnal modulation signal from dissipative hidden sector dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a simple generic dissipative dark matter model: a hidden sector featuring two dark matter particles charged under an unbroken $U(1)'$ interaction. Previous work has shown that such a model has the potential to explain dark matter phenomena on both large and small scales. In this framework, the dark matter halo in spiral galaxies features nontrivial dynamics, with the halo energy loss due to dissipative interactions balanced by a heat source. Ordinary supernovae can potentially supply this heat provided kinetic mixing interaction exists with strength $\\epsilon \\sim 10^{-9}$. This type of kinetically mixed dark matter can be probed in direct detection experiments. Importantly, this self-interacting dark matter can be captured within the Earth and shield a dark matter detector from the halo wind, giving rise to a diurnal modulation effect. We estimate the size of this effect for detectors located in the Southern hemisphere, and find that the modulation is large ($\\gtrsim 10\\%$) for a wide range of parameters.

R. Foot; S. Vagnozzi

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

236

Reducing 68Ge Background in Dark Matter Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental searches for dark matter include experiments with sub-0.5 keV-energy threshold high purity germanium detectors. Experimental efforts, in partnership with the CoGeNT Collaboration operating at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, are focusing on energy threshold reduction via noise abatement, reduction of backgrounds from cosmic ray generated isotopes, and ubiquitous environmental radioactive sources. The most significant cosmic ray produced radionuclide is 68Ge. This paper evaluates reducing this background by freshly mining and processing germanium ore. The most probable outcome is a reduction of the background by a factor of two, and at most a factor of four. A very cost effective alternative is to obtain processed Ge as soon as possible and store it underground for 18 months.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Orrell, John L.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities as Axion Dark Matter Detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A modification of the cavity technique for axion dark matter detection is described in which the cavity is driven with input power instead of being permeated by a static magnetic field. A small fraction of the input power is pumped by the axion field to a receiving mode of frequency $\\omega_1$ when the resonance condition $\\omega_1 = \\omega_0 \\pm m_a$ is satisfied, where $\\omega_0$ is the frequency of the input mode and $m_a$ the axion mass. The relevant form factor is calculated for any pair of input and output modes in a cylindrical cavity. The overall search strategy is discussed and the technical challenges to be overcome by an actual experiment are listed.

P. Sikivie

2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

238

LHC constraints on gauge boson couplings to dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collider searches for energetic particles recoiling against missing transverse energy allow to place strong bounds on the interactions between dark matter (DM) and standard model particles. In this article we update and extend LHC constraints on effective dimension-7 operators involving DM and electroweak gauge bosons. A concise comparison of the sensitivity of the mono-photon, mono-W, mono-Z, mono-W/Z, invisible Higgs-boson decays in the vector boson fusion mode and the mono-jet channel is presented. Depending on the parameter choices, either the mono-photon or the mono-jet data provide the most stringent bounds at the moment. We furthermore explore the potential of improving the current 8 TeV limits at 14 TeV. Future strategies capable of disentangling the effects of the different effective operators involving electroweak gauge bosons are discussed as well.

Crivellin, Andreas; Hibbs, Anthony

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Isospin violating dark matter in Stckelberg portal scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hidden sector scenarios in which dark matter (DM) interacts with the Standard Model matter fields through the exchange of massive Z' bosons are well motivated by certain string theory constructions. In this work, we thoroughly study the phenomenological aspects of such scenarios and find that they present a clear and testable consequence for direct DM searches. We show that such string motivated St\\"uckelberg portals naturally lead to isospin violating interactions of DM particles with nuclei. We find that the relations between the DM coupling to neutrons and protons for both, spin-independent (fn/fp) and spin-dependent (an/ap) interactions, are very flexible depending on the charges of the quarks under the extra U(1) gauge groups. We show that within this construction these ratios are generically different from plus and minus 1 (i.e. different couplings to protons and neutrons) leading to a potentially measurable distinction from other popular portals. Finally, we incorporate bounds from searches for dijet and dilepton resonances at the LHC as well as LUX bounds on the elastic scattering of DM off nucleons to determine the experimentally allowed values of fn/fp and an/ap.

Victor Martin-Lozano; Miguel Peiro; Pablo Soler

2015-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

240

Constraints on particle dark matter from cosmic-ray antiprotons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cosmic-ray antiprotons represent an important channel for dark matter indirect-detection studies. Current measurements of the antiproton flux at the top of the atmosphere and theoretical determinations of the secondary antiproton production in the Galaxy are in good agreement, with no manifest deviation which could point to an exotic contribution in this channel. Therefore, antiprotons can be used as a powerful tool for constraining particle dark matter properties. By using the spectrum of PAMELA data from 50 MV to 180 GV in rigidity, we derive bounds on the dark matter annihilation cross section (or decay rate, for decaying dark matter) for the whole spectrum of dark matter annihilation (decay) channels and under different hypotheses of cosmic-rays transport in the Galaxy and in the heliosphere. For typical models of galactic propagation, the constraints are significantly strong, setting a lower bound on the dark matter mass of a "thermal" relic at about 50-90 GeV for hadronic annihilation channels. These bounds are enhanced to about 150 GeV on the dark matter mass, when large cosmic-rays confinement volumes in the Galaxy are considered, and are reduced to 4-5 GeV for annihilation to light quarks (no bound for heavy-quark production) when the confinement volume is small. Bounds for dark matter lighter than few tens of GeV are due to the low energy part of the PAMELA spectrum, an energy region where solar modulation is relevant: to this aim, we have implemented a detailed solution of the transport equation in the heliosphere, which allowed us not only to extend bounds to light dark matter, but also to determine the uncertainty on the constraints arising from solar modulation modeling. Finally, we estimate the impact of soon-to-come AMS-02 data on the antiproton constraints.

N. Fornengo; L. Maccione; A. Vittino

2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Neutrino masses, leptogenesis, and sterile neutrino dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze a scenario in which the lightest heavy neutrino $N_1$ is a dark matter candidate and the second- heaviest neutrino $N_2$ decays producing a lepton number. If $N_1$ were in thermal equilibrium, its energy density today would be much larger than that of the observed dark matter, so we consider energy injection by the decay of $N_2$. In this paper, we show the parameters of this scenario that give the correct abundances of dark matter and baryonic matter and also induce the observed neutrino masses. This model can explain a possible sterile neutrino dark matter signal of $M_1$=7 keV in the x-ray observation of x-ray multi-mirror mission.

Takanao Tsuyuki

2014-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

242

The Evolution of Galaxies by the Incompatibility between Dark Matter and Baryonic Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, the evolution of galaxies is by the incompatibility between dark matter and baryonic matter. Due to the structural difference, baryonic matter and dark matter are incompatible to each other as oil droplet and water in emulsion. In the interfacial zone between dark matter and baryonic matter, this incompatibility generates the modification of Newtonian dynamics to keep dark matter and baryonic matter apart. The five periods of baryonic structure development in the order of increasing incompatibility are the free baryonic matter, the baryonic droplet, the galaxy, the cluster, and the supercluster periods. The transition to the baryonic droplet generates density perturbation in the CMB. In the galaxy period, the first-generation galaxies include elliptical, normal spiral, barred spiral, irregular, and dwarf spheroidal galaxies. In the cluster period, the second-generation galaxies include modified giant ellipticals, cD, evolved S0, dwarf elliptical, BCD, and tidal dwarf galaxies. The whole observable expanding universe behaves as one unit of emulsion with increasing incompatibility between dark matter and baryonic matter. The properties of dark matter and baryonic matter are based on cosmology derived from the two physical structures: the space structure and the object structure. Baryonic matter can be described by the periodic table of elementary particles.

Ding-Yu Chung

2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

243

Gravity and Anti-gravity of Fermions: the Unification of Dark Matter and Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Massive gravity with second and fourth derivatives is shown to give both attractive and repulsive gravity between fermions. In contrast to the attractive gravity correlated with energy-momentum tensor, the repulsive gravity is proportional to the graviton mass. Therefore, weakly interacting fermions with energy smaller than the graviton mass are both dark matter and dark energy: Their overall gravity is attractive with normal matter but repulsive among themselves. Detailed analyses reveal that this unified dark scenario can properly account for the observed dark matter/energy phenomena: galaxy rotation curves, transition from early cosmic deceleration to recent acceleration; and naturally overcome other dark scenarios' difficulties: the substructure and cuspy core problems, the difference of dark halo distributions in galaxies and clusters, and the cosmic coincidence.

Chen, X S

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Dynamical system analysis for DBI dark energy interacting with dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A dynamical system analysis related to Dirac Born Infeld (DBI) cosmological model has been investigated in this present work. For spatially flat FRW space time, the Einstein field equation for DBI scenario has been used to study the dynamics of DBI dark energy interacting with dark matter. The DBI dark energy model is considered as a scalar field with a nonstandard kinetic energy term. An interaction between the DBI dark energy and dark matter is considered through a phenomenological interaction between DBI scalar field and the dark matter fluid. The field equations are reduced to an autonomous dynamical system by a suitable redefinition of the basic variables. The potential of the DBI scalar field is assumed to be exponential. Finally, critical points are determined, their nature have been analyzed and corresponding cosmological scenario has been discussed.

Nilanjana Mahata; Subenoy Chakraborty

2015-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

245

Dynamical system analysis for DBI dark energy interacting with dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A dynamical system analysis related to Dirac Born Infeld (DBI) cosmological model has been investigated in this present work. For spatially flat FRW space time, the Einstein field equation for DBI scenario has been used to study the dynamics of DBI dark energy interacting with dark matter. The DBI dark energy model is considered as a scalar field with a nonstandard kinetic energy term. An interaction between the DBI dark energy and dark matter is considered through a phenomenological interaction between DBI scalar field and the dark matter fluid. The field equations are reduced to an autonomous dynamical system by a suitable redefinition of the basic variables. The potential of the DBI scalar field is assumed to be exponential. Finally, critical points are determined, their nature have been analyzed and corresponding cosmological scenario has been discussed.

Mahata, Nilanjana

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Collapse Dynamics of a Star of Dark Matter and Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, we study the collapse dynamics of an inhomogeneous spherically symmetric star made of dark matter (DM) and dark energy (DE). The dark matter is taken in the form of a dust cloud while anisotropic fluid is chosen as the candidate for dark energy. It is investigated how dark energy modifies the collapsing process and is examined whether dark energy has any effect on the Cosmic Censorship Conjecture. The collapsing star is assumed to be of finite radius and the space time is divided into three distinct regions $\\Sigma$ and $V^{\\pm}$, where $\\Sigma$ represents the boundary of the star and $V^{-}(V^{+})$ denotes the interior (exterior) of the star. The junction conditions for matching $V^{\\pm}$ over $\\Sigma$ are specified. Role of Dark energy in the formation of apparent horizon is studied and central singularity is analyzed.

Subenoy Chakraborty; Tanwi Bandyopadhyay

2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

247

Radon backgrounds in the DRIFT-II directional dark matter experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low pressure gas Time Projection Chambers being developed for directional Dark Matter searches offer a technology with high particle identification power, combined with poten- tial to produce a definitive detection of galactic Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) Dark Matter. A source of background events in such experiments, able to mimic genuine WIMP in- duced nuclear recoil tracks, arises from potential radon contamination and the recoils that result from associated daughter nuclei, termed Radon Progeny Recoils (RPRs). We present here experi- mental data from a long-term study of this background using the DRIFT-II directional dark matter experiment at the Boulby Underground Laboratory. By detailed examination of event classes in both spatial and time coordinates using 5.5 years of data we show ability to determine the origin of 4 specific background populations and describe development of new technology and mitigation strategies to suppress them.

Daw, E; Gauvreau, J -L; Gold, M; Harmon, L J; Landers, J M; Lee, E R; Loomba, D; Miller, E H; Murphy, A StJ; Paling, S M; Pipe, M; Robinson, M; Sadler, S; Scarff, A; Snowden-Ifft, D P; Spooner, N J C; Walker, D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Dark Matter Constraints on Composite Higgs Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In composite Higgs models the pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone Boson (pNGB) nature of the Higgs field is an interesting alternative for explaning the smallness of the electroweak scale with respect to the beyond the Standard Model scale. In non-minimal models additional pNGB states are present and can be a Dark Matter (DM) candidate, if there is an approximate symmetry suppressing their decay. Here we assume that the low energy effective theory (for scales much below the compositeness scale) corresponds to the Standard Model with a pNGB Higgs doublet and a pNGB DM multiplet. We derive general effective DM Lagrangians for several possible DM representations (under the SM gauge group), including the singlet, doublet and triplet cases. Within this framework we discuss how the DM observables (relic abundance, direct and indirect detection) constrain the dimension-6 operators induced by the strong sector assuming that DM behaves as a Weakly Interacting Particle (WIMP) and that the relic abundance is settled through the free...

Fonseca, Nayara; Lessa, Andre; Lopez-Honorez, Laura

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Light Dark Matter Detection Prospects at Neutrino Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the prospects for the detection of relatively light dark matter through direct annihilation to neutrinos. We specifically focus on the detection possibilities of water Cherenkov and liquid scintillator neutrino detection devices. We find in particular that liquid scintillator detectors may potentially provide excellent detection prospects for dark matter in the 4-10 GeV mass range. These experiments can provide excellent corroborative checks of the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulation signal, but may yield results for low mass dark matter in any case. We identify important tests of the ratio of electron to muon neutrino events (and neutrino versus anti-neutrino events), which discriminate against background atmospheric neutrinos. In addition, the fraction of events which arise from muon neutrinos or anti-neutrinos ($R_{\\mu}$ and $R_{\\bar \\mu}$) can potentially yield information about the branching fractions of hypothetical dark matter annihilations into different neutrino flavors. These results apply to n...

Kumar, Jason; Smith, Stefanie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

axino dark matter: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5times104gev. At higher treh and lower mass, axinos could constitute warm dark matter. In the scenario with axinos as relics, the gravitino problem finds a natural...

251

DMTPC: A dark matter detector with directional sensitivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By correlating nuclear recoil directions with the Earth's direction of motion through the Galaxy, a directional dark matter detector can unambiguously detect Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), even in the presence ...

Battat, James

252

Cosmic-ray electron signatures of dark matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is evidence for an excess in cosmic-ray electrons at about 500 GeV energy, that may be related to dark-matter annihilation. I have calculated the expected electron contributions from a pulsar and from Kaluza-Klein dark matter, based on a realistic treatment of the electron propagation in the Galaxy. Pulsars younger than about 10{sup 5} years naturally cause a narrow peak at a few hundred GeV in the locally observed electron spectrum, similar to that observed. On the other hand, if electron production by dark matter is predominantly occurring in high-mass clumps (> or approx. 10{sup 3}M{sub {center_dot}}), the sharp cutoff in the contribution from Kaluza-Klein particles is sometimes more pronounced, but often smoothed out and indistinguishable from a pulsar source, and therefore the spectral shape of the electron excess is insufficient to discriminate a dark-matter origin from more conventional astrophysical explanations.

Pohl, Martin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Making the Dark Matter Connection Between Particle Physics and Cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be explained within the Standard Model of particle physics. However, models which extend the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry, can explain dark matter. This dissertation investigates the signals of some supersymmetry models in the context of collider...

Krislock, Abram Michael

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

254

What Does The PAMELA Antiproton Spectrum Tell Us About Dark Matter?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of the cosmic ray antiproton spectrum can be used to search for contributions from annihilating dark matter and to constrain the dark matter annihilation cross section. Depending on the assumptions made regarding cosmic ray propagation in the Galaxy, such constraints can be quite stringent. We revisit this topic, utilizing a set of propagation models fit to the cosmic ray boron, carbon, oxygen and beryllium data. We derive upper limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section and find that when the cosmic ray propagation parameters are treated as nuisance parameters (as we argue is appropriate), the resulting limits are significantly less stringent than have been previously reported. We also note (as have several previous groups) that simple GALPROP-like diffusion-reacceleration models predict a spectrum of cosmic ray antiprotons that is in good agreement with PAMELA's observations above ~5 GeV, but that significantly underpredict the flux at lower energies. Although the complexity of modeling cosmic ray propagation at GeV-scale energies makes it difficult to determine the origin of this discrepancy, we consider the possibility that the excess antiprotons are the result of annihilating dark matter. Suggestively, we find that this excess is best fit for a dark matter mass of approximately 35 GeV and annihilation cross section of approximately 1e-26 cm^3/s (to b-bbar), in good agreement with the mass and cross section previously shown to be required to generate the gamma-ray excess observed from the Galactic Center.

Dan Hooper; Tim Linden; Philipp Mertsch

2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

255

The Sensitivity of HAWC to High-Mass Dark Matter Annihilations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a wide field-of-view detector sensitive to gamma rays of 100 GeV to a few hundred TeV. Located in central Mexico at 19 degrees North latitude and 4100 m above sea level, HAWC will observe gamma rays and cosmic rays with an array of water Cherenkov detectors. The full HAWC array is scheduled to be operational in Summer 2014. In this paper, we study the HAWC sensitivity to the gamma-ray signatures of high-mass (multi-TeV) dark matter annihilation. The HAWC observatory will be sensitive to diverse searches for dark matter annihilation, including annihilation from extended dark matter sources, the diffuse gamma-ray emission from dark matter annihilation, and gamma-ray emission from non-luminous dark matter subhalos. Here we consider the HAWC sensitivity to a subset of these sources, including dwarf galaxies, the M31 galaxy, the Virgo cluster, and the Galactic center. We simulate the HAWC response to gamma rays from these sources in several well-motivated dar...

Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; lvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velzquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Gonzalez, J Becerra; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De Len, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Diaz-Cruz, L; D\\'\\iaz-Vlez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; E., S F; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; Gonzlez, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Harding, J P; Hui, C M; Hntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H Len; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-Garcia, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Mart\\'\\inez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; McEnery, J; Torres, E Mendoza; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostaf, M; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Prez-Prez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivire, C; Rosa-Gonzlez, D; Ryan, J; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sandoval, A; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Woodle, K Sparks; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H; Abazajian, K N

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Can dark matter be a Bose-Einstein condensate?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the possibility that the dark matter, which is required to explain the dynamics of the neutral hydrogen clouds at large distances from the galactic center, could be in the form of a Bose-Einstein condensate. To study the condensate we use the non-relativistic Gross-Pitaevskii equation. By introducing the Madelung representation of the wave function, we formulate the dynamics of the system in terms of the continuity equation and of the hydrodynamic Euler equations. Hence dark matter can be described as a non-relativistic, Newtonian Bose-Einstein gravitational condensate gas, whose density and pressure are related by a barotropic equation of state. In the case of a condensate with quartic non-linearity, the equation of state is polytropic with index $n=1$. To test the validity of the model we fit the Newtonian tangential velocity equation of the model with a sample of rotation curves of low surface brightness and dwarf galaxies, respectively. We find a very good agreement between the theoretical rotation curves and the observational data for the low surface brightness galaxies. The deflection of photons passing through the dark matter halos is also analyzed, and the bending angle of light is computed. The bending angle obtained for the Bose-Einstein condensate is larger than that predicted by standard general relativistic and dark matter models. Therefore the study of the light deflection by galaxies and the gravitational lensing could discriminate between the Bose-Einstein condensate dark matter model and other dark matter models.

C. G. Boehmer; T. Harko

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

257

Dark Matter; Modification of f(R) or Wimps Miracle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The identity of dark matter is one of the key outstanding problems in both particle and astrophysics. In this thesis, I review some candidates of dark matter, especially WIMPs (weakly interacting massive particles) which is one of the best candidate so it is called that WIMPs miracle. In addition of this, there are also some theories of modification of gravity, by changing the law of gravity, it could be possible that the dark matter observations are explained. Until the dark matter particle is detected, there is some room for uncertainty. So we should consider every part of the problem and solve it. Dark matter problem is covering a large area so every possibility is important. So f(R) gravity is also reviewed in this thesis and some theories are considered as a possible solution of dark matter problem. Finally we highlight that, even in the case of WIMPs or another particles solution, f(R) gravity is also can be used for this problem. However, last words will be said by experiments.

A. vgn

2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

258

Dark Matter in Split SUSY with Intermediate Higgses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The searches for heavy Higgs bosons and supersymmetric (SUSY) particles at the LHC have left the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) with an unusual spectrum of SUSY particles, namely, all squarks are beyond a few TeV while the Higgs bosons other than the one observed at 125 GeV could be relatively light. In light of this, we study a scenario characterized by two scales: the SUSY breaking scale or the squark-mass scale $(M_S)$ and the heavy Higgs-boson mass scale $(M_A)$. We perform a survey of the MSSM parameter space with $M_S \\lesssim 10^{10}$ GeV and $M_A \\lesssim 10^4$ GeV such that the lightest Higgs boson mass is within the range of the observed Higgs boson as well as satisfying a number of constraints. The set of constraints include the invisible decay width of the $Z$ boson and that of the Higgs boson, the chargino-mass limit, dark matter relic abundance from Planck, the spin-independent cross section of direct detection by LUX, and gamma-ray flux from dwarf spheroidal galaxies and gamma-ray line constraints measured by Fermi LAT. Survived regions of parameter space feature the dark matter with correct relic abundance, which is achieved through either coannihilation with charginos, $A/H$ funnels, or both. We show that future measurements, e.g., XENON1T and LZ, of spin-independent cross sections can further squeeze the parameter space.

Kingman Cheung; Ran Huo; Jae Sik Lee; Yue-Lin Sming Tsai

2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

259

Dark Energy and Search for the Generalized Second Law  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The discovery of accelerated Hubble expansion in the SNIa data and the observed power spectrum of the microwave background radiation provide an ample support for Dark energy and Dark matter. Except for the so far well-known facts that cold dark matter (or simply dark matter) is pressureless, and dark energy has a negative pressure, the nature of these two still remains a complete mystery. The mystery facilitates different consideration. In one hand, dark matter and dark energy are assumed as distinct entities, and other interpretation is that both are different manifestation of a common structure, often referred as quartessence. Chaplygin gas, a perfect fluid also favours the second interpretation. Here, we consider modified chaplygin gas as dark energy candidate. Taking into account the existence of the observer's event horizon in accelerated universe, we find the condition where the generalized second law of gravitational thermodynamics is valid and the positivity of the temperature of the phantom fluid remains intact.

Balendra Kr. Dev Choudhury; Julie Saikia

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

260

Merger Rates of Dark-Matter Haloes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive analytic merger rates for dark-matter haloes within the framework of the Extended Press-Schechter (EPS) formalism. These rates become self-consistent within EPS once we realize that the typical merger in the limit of a small time-step involves more than two progenitors, contrary to the assumption of binary mergers adopted in earlier studies. We present a general method for computing merger rates that span the range of solutions permitted by the EPS conditional mass function, and focus on a specific solution that attempts to match the merger rates in N-body simulations. The corrected EPS merger rates are more accurate than the earlier estimates of Lacey & Cole, by ~20% for major mergers and by up to a factor of ~3 for minor mergers of mass ratio 1:10^4. Based on the revised merger rates, we provide a new algorithm for constructing Monte-Carlo EPS merger trees, that could be useful in Semi-Analytic Modeling. We provide analytic expressions and plot numerical results for several quantities that are very useful in studies of galaxy formation. This includes (a) the rate of mergers of a given mass ratio per given final halo, (b) the fraction of mass added by mergers to a halo, and (c) the rate of mergers per given main progenitor. The creation and destruction rates of haloes serve for a self-consistency check. Our method for computing merger rates can be applied to conditional mass functions beyond EPS, such as those obtained by the ellipsoidal collapse model or extracted from $N$-body simulations.

Eyal Neistein; Avishai Dekel

2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Observable consequences of cold clouds as dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cold, dense clouds of gas have been proposed as baryonic candidates for the dark matter in Galactic haloes, and have also been invoked in the Galactic disc as an explanation for the excess faint sub-mm sources detected by SCUBA. Even if their dust-to-gas ratio is only a small percentage of that in conventional gas clouds, these dense systems would be opaque to visible radiation. This presents the possibility of detecting them by looking for occultations of background stars. We examine the possibility that the data sets of microlensing experiments searching for massive compact halo objects can also be used to search for occultation signatures by cold clouds. We compute the rate and timescale distribution of stellar transits by clouds in the Galactic disc and halo. We find that, for cloud parameters typically advocated by theoretical models, thousands of transit events should already exist within microlensing survey data sets. We examine the seasonal modulation in the rate caused by the Earth's orbital motion and find it provides an excellent probe of whether detected clouds are of disc or halo origin.

E. Kerins; J. Binney; J. Silk

2002-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

262

From Dark Energy to Dark Matter via Non-Minimal Coupling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Toy cosmological models based on non-minimal coupling between gravity and scalar dilaton-like field are presented in the framework of Palatini formalism. They have the following property: preceding to a given cosmological epoch is a dark energy epoch with an accelerated expansion. The next (future) epoch becomes dominated by some kind of dark matter.

A. Borowiec

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

263

Constraining Dark Matter Models from a Combined Analysis of Milky Way Satellites with the Fermi Large Area Telescope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Satellite galaxies of the Milky Way are among the most promising targets for dark matter searches in gamma rays. We present a search for dark matter consisting of weakly interacting massive particles, applying a joint likelihood analysis to 10 satellite galaxies with 24 months of data of the Fermi Large Area Telescope. No dark matter signal is detected. Including the uncertainty in the dark matter distribution, robust upper limits are placed on dark matter annihilation cross sections. The 95% confidence level upper limits range from about 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 5 GeV to about 5 x 10{sup -23} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 1 TeV, depending on the dark matter annihilation final state. For the first time, using gamma rays, we are able to rule out models with the most generic cross section ({approx}3 x 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} for a purely s-wave cross section), without assuming additional boost factors.

Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Albert, A.; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Ohio State U.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Buehler, R.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Burnett, T.H.; /Washington U., Seattle; Buson, S.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /ICE, Bellaterra /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Artep Inc. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /ASDC, Frascati /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /ASDC, Frascati /ASDC, Frascati /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /NASA, Goddard /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /ASDC, Frascati /NASA, Goddard /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Bologna Observ. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /DAPNIA, Saclay /Alabama U., Huntsville; /more authors..

2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

264

Section on prospects for dark matter detection of the white paper on the status and future of ground-based TeV gamma-ray astronomy.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a report on the findings of the dark matter science working group for the white paper on the status and future of TeV gamma-ray astronomy. The white paper was commissioned by the American Physical Society, and the full white paper can be found on astro-ph (arXiv:0810.0444). This detailed section discusses the prospects for dark matter detection with future gamma-ray experiments, and the complementarity of gamma-ray measurements with other indirect, direct or accelerator-based searches. We conclude that any comprehensive search for dark matter should include gamma-ray observations, both to identify the dark matter particle (through the characteristics of the gamma-ray spectrum) and to measure the distribution of dark matter in galactic halos.

Byrum, K.; Horan, D.; Tait, T.; Wanger, R.; Zaharijas, G.; Buckley , J.; Baltz, E. A.; Bertone, G.; Dingus, B.; Fegan, S.; Ferrer, F.; Gondolo, P.; Hall, J.; Hooper, D.; Horan, D.; Koushiappas, S.; Krawczynksi, H.; LeBohec, S.; Pohl, M.; Profumo, S.; Silk , J; Vassilev, V.; Wood , M.; Wakely, S.; High Energy Physics; FNAL; Univ. of St. Louis; Stanford Univ.; Insti. d' Astrophysique; LANL; Univ. of California; Washington Univ.; Univ. of Utah; Brown Univ.; Oxford Univ.; Iowa State Univ.; Univ. of Chicago

2009-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

265

A Terrestrial Search for Dark Contents of the Vacuum, Such as Dark Energy, Using Atom Interferometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the theory and first experimental work on our concept for searching on earth for the presence of dark contents of the vacuum (DCV) using atom interferometry. Specifically, we have in mind any DCV that has not yet been detected on a laboratory scale, but which might manifest itself as dark energy on the cosmological scale. The experimental method uses two atom interferometers to cancel the effect of earth's gravity and diverse noise sources. It depends upon two assumptions: first, that the DCV possesses some space inhomogeneity in density, and second that it exerts a sufficiently strong nongravitational force on matter. The motion of the apparatus through the DCV should then lead to an irregular variation in the detected matter-wave phase shift. We discuss the nature of this signal and note the problem of distinguishing it from instrumental noise. We also discuss the relation of our experiment to what might be learned by studying the noise in gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO. The paper concludes with a projection that a future search of this nature might be carried out using an atom interferometer in an orbiting satellite. The laboratory apparatus is now being constructed.

Adler, Ronald J.; /Stanford U., HEPL /San Francisco State U.; Muller, Holger; /UC, Berkeley; Perl, Martin L.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

266

Dark matter and dark energy production in quantum model of the universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The quantum model of the homogeneous, isotropic, and spatially closed universe predicts an existence of two types of collective quantum states in the universe. The states of one type characterize a gravitational field, the others describe a matter (uniform scalar) field. In the first stage of the evolution of the universe a primordial scalar field evolves slowly into its vacuum-like state. In the second stage the scalar field oscillates about an equilibrium due to the quantum fluctuations. The universe is being filled with matter in the form of elementary quantum excitations of the vibrations of the scalar field. The separate quantum excitations are characterized by non-zero values of their energies (masses). Under the action of gravitational forces mainly these excitations decay into ordinary particles (baryons and leptons) and dark matter. The elementary quantum excitations of the vibrations of the scalar field which have not decayed up to now form dark energy. The numerical estimations lead to realistic values of both the matter density \\Omega_{M} = 0.29 (with the contributions from dark matter, \\Omega_{DM} = 0.25, and optically bright baryons, \\Omega_{stars} = 0.0025) and the dark energy density \\Omega_{X} = 0.71 if one takes that the mean energy ~ 10 GeV is released in decay of dark energy quantum and fixes baryonic component \\Omega_{B} = 0.04 according to observational data. The energy (mass) of dark energy quantum is equal to ~ 17 GeV and the energy > 2 x 10^{10} GeV is needed in order to detect it. Dark matter particle has the mass ~ 6 GeV. The Jeans mass for dark matter which is considered as a gas of such massive particles is equal to M_{J} ~ 10^{5} M_{\\odot}.

V. E. Kuzmichev; V. V. Kuzmichev

2004-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

267

The Unified Equation of State for Dark Matter and Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We assume that dark matter and dark energy satisfy the unified equation of state: $p=B(z)\\rho$, with $p=p_{dE}$, $\\rho=\\rho_{dm}+\\rho_{dE}$, where the pressure of dark matter $p_{dm}=0$ has been taken into account. A special function $B=-\\frac{A}{(1+z)^{\\alpha}}$ is presented, which can well describe the evolution of the universe. In this model, the universe will end up with a Big Rip. By further simple analysis, we know other choices of the function $B$ can also describe the universe but lead to a different doomsday.

Wei Wang; Yuan-xing Gui; Suhong Zhang; Guanghai Guo; Ying Shao

2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

268

The integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in cosmologies with coupled dark matter and dark energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The subject of this paper is the derivation of the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (iSW) effect in cosmologies with coupled dark matter and dark energy fluids. These couplings influence the iSW-effect in three ways: The Hubble function assumes a different scaling, the structure growth rate shows a different time evolution, and in addition, the Poisson equation, which relates the density perturbations to fluctuations in the gravitational potential, is changed, due to the violation of the scaling rho ~ a^{-3} of the matter density rho with scale factor a. Exemplarily, I derive the iSW-spectra for a model in which dark matter decays into dark energy, investigate the influence of the dark matter decay rate and the dark energy equation of state on the iSW-signal, and discuss the analogies for gravitational lensing. Quite generally iSW-measurements should reach similar accuracy in determining the dark energy equation of state parameter and the coupling constant.

Bjoern Malte Schaefer

2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

269

Gamma-ray probes of dark matter substructure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The substructure content of dark matter halos is interesting because it can be affected by complex galaxy physics and dark matter particle physics. However, observing the small scale structure of dark matter is a challenge. The subhalo abundance (mass function, minimum mass) and morphology (density profile, subhalo shape, subsubstructure) contain information about complex astrophysics (halo formation processes) and new exotic fundamental physics (dark matter interactions). Indirect detection of dark matter annihilation radiation (DMAR) in gamma rays may be the most direct method for observing small scale structure. I outline the ways in which gamma rays may probe halo substructure. If substructure is bountiful, it may be responsible for the eventual discovery of DMAR, for instance in galaxy clusters or the diffuse gamma-ray background. Otherwise, the observation of DMAR in places without much substructure, such as the Galactic center, would lead to strict limits on the properties of small scale structure. Properties of the gamma-ray angular power spectrum will also provide information or constraints on Milky Way halo substructure.

Campbell, Sheldon [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics (CCAPP), The Ohio State University, 191 W. Woodruff Ave., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

270

Influence of Dark Matter on Light Propagation in Solar System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigated the influence of dark matter on light propagation in the solar system. We assumed the spherical symmetry of spacetime and derived the approximate solution of the Einstein equation, which consists of the gravitational attractions caused by the central celestial body, i.e. the Sun, and the dark matter surrounding it. We expressed the dark matter density in the solar system in the following simple power-law form, $\\varrho(t, r) = \\rho(t)(\\ell/r)^k$, where $t$ is the coordinate time; $r$, the radius from the central body; $\\ell$, the normalizing factor; $k$, the exponent characterizing $r$-dependence of dark matter density; and $\\rho(t)$, the arbitrary function of time $t$. On the basis of the derived approximate solution, we focused on light propagation and obtained the additional corrections of the gravitational time delay and the relative frequency shift caused by the dark matter. As an application of our results, we considered the secular increase in the astronomical unit reported by Krasinsky and Brumberg (2004) and found that it was difficult to provide an explanation for the observed $d{\\rm AU}/dt = 15 \\pm 4 ~[{\\rm m/century}]$.

Hideyoshi Arakida

2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

271

DARK MATTER AS AN ACTIVE GRAVITATIONAL AGENT IN CLOUD COMPLEXES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the effect that the dark matter background (DMB) has on the gravitational energy content and, in general, on the star formation efficiency (SFE) of a molecular cloud (MC). We first analyze the effect that a dark matter halo, described by the Navarro-Frenk-White density profile, has on the energy budget of a spherical, homogeneous cloud located at different distances from the halo center. We found that MCs located in the innermost regions of a massive galaxy can feel a contraction force greater than their self-gravity due to the incorporation of the potential of the galaxy's dark matter halo. We also calculated analytically the gravitational perturbation that an MC produces over a uniform DMB (uniform at the scales of an MC) and how this perturbation will affect the evolution of the MC itself. The study shows that the star formation in an MC will be considerably enhanced if the cloud is located in a dense and low velocity dark matter environment. We confirm our results by measuring the SFE in numerical simulations of the formation and evolution of MCs within different DMBs. Our study indicates that there are situations where the dark matter's gravitational contribution to the evolution of the MCs should not be neglected.

Suarez-Madrigal, Andres; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier; Colin, Pedro; D'Alessio, Paola, E-mail: a.suarez@crya.unam.mx [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 72-3 (Xangari), Morelia, Michocan, Mexico C.P. 58089 (Mexico)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Detecting dark matter-dark energy coupling with the halo mass function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use high-resolution simulations of large-scale structure formation to analyze the effects of interacting dark matter and dark energy on the evolution of the halo mass function. Using a chi-square likelihood analysis, we find significant differences in the mass function between models of coupled dark matter-dark energy and standard concordance cosmology Lambda-CDM out to redshift z=1.5. We also find a preliminary indication that the Dark Energy Survey should be able to distinguish these models from Lambda-CDM within its mass and redshift contraints. While we can distinguish the effects of these models from Lambda-CDM cosmologies with different fundamental parameters, DES will require independent measurements of sigma-8 to confirm these effects.

P. M. Sutter; P. M. Ricker

2008-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

273

Dark energy interacting with neutrinos and dark matter: a phenomenological theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model for a flat homogeneous and isotropic Universe composed of dark energy, dark matter, neutrinos, radiation and baryons is analyzed. The fields of dark matter and neutrinos are supposed to interact with the dark energy. The dark energy is considered to obey either the van der Waals or the Chaplygin equations of state. The ratio between the pressure and the energy density of the neutrinos varies with the red-shift simulating massive and non-relativistic neutrinos at small red-shifts and non-massive relativistic neutrinos at high red-shifts. The model can reproduce the expected red-shift behaviors of the deceleration parameter and of the density parameters of each constituent.

G. M. Kremer

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

274

Limits in late time conversion of cold dark matter into dark radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structure formation creates high temperature and density regions in the Universe that allow the conversion of matter into more stable states, with a corresponding emission of relativistic matter and radiation. An example of such a mechanism is the supernova event, that releases relativistic neutrinos corresponding to 99% of the binding energy of remnant neutron star. We take this phenomena as a starting point for an assumption that similar processes could occur in the dark sector, where structure formation would generate a late time conversion of cold dark matter into a relativistic form of dark matter. We performed a phenomenological study about the limits of this conversion, where we assumed a transition profile that is a generalized version of the neutrino production in supernovae events. With this assumption, we obtained an interesting modification for the constraint over the cold dark matter density. We show that when comparing with the standard ?CDM cosmology, there is no preference for conversion, although the best fit is within 1? from the standard model best fit. The methodology and the results obtained qualify this conversion hypothesis, from the large scale structure point of view, as a viable and interesting model to be tested in the future with small scale data, and mitigate discrepancies between observations at this scale and the pure cold dark matter model.

Boriero, D.; Holanda, P. C. de; Motta, M., E-mail: danielb@ifi.unicamp.br, E-mail: holanda@ifi.unicamp.br, E-mail: mmota@ifi.unicamp.br [Instituto de Fsica Gleb Wataghin UNICAMP, 13083-859, Campinas SP (Brazil)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Looking for Dark Matter through the Bottom of a Wine Glass!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Looking for Dark Matter through the Bottom of a Wine Glass! (IYA Strange Telescope Series://cfcpwork.uchicago.edu/mailman/listinfo/cafe! #12;Looking for Dark Matter through the Bottom of a Wine Glass! (IYA Strange Telescope Series and energy in the Universe. Dark Matter, an exotic new form of matter that has never been directly detected

Collar, Juan I.

276

From massive gravity to dark matter density II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As previously observed the massless limit of massive gravity leads to a modification of general relativity. Here we study spherically symmetric solutions of the modified field equations which contain normal matter together with a dark energy density. If the dark density profile is assumed to be known, the whole problem is reduced to a linear first order differential equation which can be solved by quadratures.

G. Scharf

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

277

Circumscribing late dark matter decays model-independently  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of theories, spanning a wide range of mass scales, predict dark matter candidates that have lifetimes much longer than the age of the Universe, yet may produce a significant flux of gamma rays in their decays today. We constrain such late-decaying dark matter scenarios model-independently by utilizing gamma-ray line emission limits from the Galactic Center region obtained with the SPI spectrometer on INTEGRAL, and the determination of the isotropic diffuse photon background by SPI, COMPTEL, and EGRET observations. We show that no more than {approx}5% of the unexplained MeV background can be produced by late dark matter decays either in the Galactic halo or cosmological sources.

Yueksel, Hasan; Kistler, Matthew D. [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States) and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Composite Goldstone Dark Matter: Experimental Predictions from the Lattice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study, via first principles lattice simulations, the nonperturbative dynamics of $SU(2)$ gauge theory with two fundamental Dirac flavors. The model can be used simultaneously as a template for composite Goldstone boson dark matter and for breaking the electroweak symmetry dynamically. We compute the form factor, allowing us to estimate the associated electromagnetic charge radius. Interestingly we observe that the form factor obeys vector meson dominance even for the two color theory. We finally compare the model predictions with dark matter direct detection experiments. We find that the composite Goldstone boson dark matter cross sections is constrained by the most stringent direct-detection experiments. Our results are a foundation for quantitative new composite dynamics relevant for model building, and are of interest to current experiments.

Ari Hietanen; Randy Lewis; Claudio Pica; Francesco Sannino

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Right-handed Neutrinos as Superheavy Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose that right-handed neutrinos are very long-lived dark matter. The long lifetime is realized by the separation of the wavefunction of right-handed neutrinos and that of other fermions in an extra dimension. Such long-lived and superheavy dark matter can naturally explain observed ultra high energy cosmic rays above the GZK cutoff (5 * 10^{19} eV) and huge amounts of cold dark matter simultaneously. Furthermore, the exponentially suppressed Yukawa couplings of right-handed neutrinos leads to the high predictablilty on the mass parameter of the neutrinoless double beta decay, as all the models which predict very small neutrino mass of one generation.

Yosuke Uehara

2002-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

280

Isospin-Violating Dark Matter and Neutrinos From the Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the indirect detection of dark matter through neutrino flux from their annihilation in the center of the Sun, in a class of theories where the dark matter-nucleon spin-independent interactions break the isospin symmetry. We point out that, while the direct detection bounds with heavy targets like Xenon are weakened and reconciled with the positive signals in DAMA and CoGeNT experiments, the indirect detection using neutrino telescopes can impose a relatively stronger constraint and brings tension to such explanation, if the annihilation is dominated by heavy quark or $\\tau$-lepton final states. As a consequence, the qualified isospin violating dark matter candidate has to preferably annihilate into light flavors.

Shao-Long Chen; Yue Zhang

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

EFFECT OF DARK MATTER HALO SUBSTRUCTURES ON GALAXY ROTATION CURVES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the effect of halo substructures on galaxy rotation curves is investigated using a simple model of dark matter clustering. A dark matter halo density profile is developed based only on the scale-free nature of clustering that leads to a statistically self-similar distribution of the substructures at the galactic scale. A semi-analytical method is used to derive rotation curves for such a clumpy dark matter density profile. It is found that the halo substructures significantly affect the galaxy velocity field. Based on the fractal geometry of the halo, this self-consistent model predicts a Navarro-Frenk-White-like rotation curve and a scale-free power spectrum of the rotation velocity fluctuations.

Roy, Nirupam, E-mail: nroy@aoc.nrao.ed [NRAO, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

E-Print Network 3.0 - axion hot dark Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with Axions Summary: Lecture April 23, 2009 Outline: From neutrons to axions Axion phenomenology Axion dark matter Thursday... Axion phenomenology Axion dark matter Inflationary...

283

E-Print Network 3.0 - axion cold dark Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with Axions Summary: Lecture April 23, 2009 Outline: From neutrons to axions Axion phenomenology Axion dark matter Thursday... Axion phenomenology Axion dark matter Inflationary...

284

Co-existence of Gravity and Antigravity: The Unification of Dark Matter and Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Massive gravity with second and fourth derivatives is shown to give both attractive and repulsive gravities. In contrast to the attractive gravity correlated with the energy-momentum tensor, the repulsive gravity is related to a fixed mass $m_x$, which equals a spin-dependent factor $f_\\sigma$ times the graviton mass. Therefore, particles with energy below $m_x$ are both dark matter and dark energy: Their overall gravity is attractive with normal matter but repulsive among themselves. Detailed analyses reveal that this unified dark scenario can properly account for the observed dark matter/energy phenomena: galaxy rotation curves, transition from early cosmic deceleration to recent acceleration; and naturally overcome other dark scenarios' difficulties: the substructure and cuspy core problems, the difference of dark halo distributions in galaxies and clusters, and the cosmic coincidence. Very interestingly, Dirac particles have $f_\\sigma=1/\\sqrt 2$, all bosonic matter particles have $f_\\sigma=0$, and the only exceptional boson is the graviton itself, which may have $f_\\sigma>1$.

Xiang-Song Chen

2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

285

Dark matter annihilation and the PAMELA, FERMI, and ATIC anomalies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If dark matter annihilation accounts for the tantalizing excess of cosmic ray electron/positrons, as reported by the PAMELA, ATIC, HESS, and FERMI observatories, then the implied annihilation cross section must be relatively large. This results, in the context of standard cosmological models, in very small relic dark matter abundances that are incompatible with astrophysical observations. We explore possible resolutions to this apparent conflict in terms of nonstandard cosmological scenarios; plausibly allowing for large cross sections, while maintaining relic abundances in accord with current observations.

El Zant, A. A.; Okada, H. [Centre for Theoretical Physics, British University in Egypt, El Sherouk City, Postal No, 11837, Post Office Box 43 (Egypt); Khalil, S. [Centre for Theoretical Physics, British University in Egypt, El Sherouk City, Postal No, 11837, Post Office Box 43 (Egypt); Department of Mathematics, Ain Shams University, Faculty of Science, Cairo, 11566 (Egypt)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

A new test of the light dark matter hypothesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detection of a surprisingly high flux of positron annihilation radiation from the inner galaxy has motivated the proposal that dark matter is made of weakly interacting light particles (possibly as light as the electron). This scenario is extremely hard to test in current high energy physics experiments. Here, however, we demonstrate that the current value of the electron anomalous magnetic moment already has the required precision to unambiguously test the light dark matter hypothesis. If confirmed, the implications for astrophysics are far-reaching.

Celine Boehm; Joseph Silk

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

287

The Hubble Web: The Dark Matter Problem and Cosmic Strings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I propose a reinterpretation of cosmic dark matter in which a rigid network of cosmic strings formed at the end of inflation. The cosmic strings fulfill three functions: At recombination they provide an accretion mechanism for virializing baryonic and warm dark matter into disks. These cosmic strings survive as configurations which thread spiral and elliptical galaxies leading to the observed flatness of rotation curves and the Tully-Fisher relation. We find a relationship between the rotational velocity of the galaxy and the string tension and discuss the testability of this model.

Alexander, Stephon [Departments of Physics and Astronomy, Institute for Gravity and Geometry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

288

The Hubble Web: The Dark Matter Problem and Cosmic Strings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I propose a reinterpretation of cosmic dark matter in which a rigid network of cosmic strings formed at the end of inflation. The cosmic strings fulfill three functions: At recombination they provide an accretion mechanism for virializing baryonic and warm dark matter into disks. These cosmic strings survive as configurations which thread spiral and elliptical galaxies leading to the observed flatness of rotation curves and the Tully-Fisher relation. We find a relationship between the rotational velocity of the galaxy and the string tension and discuss the testability of this model.

Stephon Alexander

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

289

Cosmological Parameters and the case for Cold Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determinations of the main cosmological parameters are reviewed and the implications for cold dark matter discussed. There is no longer an age problem for an $\\Omega_o = 1, \\Lambda = 0$ model and, if anything, there is now an age problem for low $\\Omega_o, \\Lambda > 0$ models. Large scale structure and CMB fluctuation data are best fitted by a mixed dark matter $\\Omega_o$ = 1 universe. Difficulties for this model with cluster evolution, the baryon content of clusters, high z Lyman $\\alpha$ galaxies, and the evidence from Type Ia supernovae favouring low $\\Omega_o, \\Lambda > 0$ models, are discussed critically.

M. Rowan-Robinson

1999-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

290

Red Halos of Galaxies - Reservoirs of Baryonic Dark Matter?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep optical/near-IR surface photometry of galaxies outside the Local Group have revealed faint and very red halos around objects as diverse as disk galaxies and starbursting dwarf galaxies. The colours of these structures are too extreme to be reconciled with stellar populations similar to those seen in the stellar halos of the Milky Way or M31, and alternative explanations like dust reddening, high metallicities or nebular emission are also disfavoured. A stellar population obeying an extremely bottom-heavy initial mass function (IMF), is on the other hand consistent with all available data. Because of its high mass-to-light ratio, such a population would effectively behave as baryonic dark matter and could account for some of the baryons still missing in the low-redshift Universe. Here, we give an overview of current red halo detections, alternative explanations for the origin of the red colours and ongoing searches for red halos around types of galaxies for which this phenomenon has not yet been reported. A number of potential tests of the bottom-heavy IMF hypothesis are also discussed.

E. Zackrisson; N. Bergvall; C. Flynn; G. Ostlin; G. Micheva; B. Caldwell

2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

291

Probing the nature of Dark Matter with the SKA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dark Matter (DM) is a fundamental ingredient of our Universe and of structure formation, and yet its nature is elusive to astrophysical probes. Information on the nature and physical properties of the WIMP (neutralino) DM (the leading candidate for a cosmologically relevant DM) can be obtained by studying the astrophysical signals of their annihilation/decay. Among the various e.m. signals, secondary electrons produced by neutralino annihilation generate synchrotron emission in the magnetized atmosphere of galaxy clusters and galaxies which could be observed as a diffuse radio emission (halo or haze) centered on the DM halo. A deep search for DM radio emission with SKA in local dwarf galaxies, galaxy regions with low star formation and galaxy clusters (with offset DM-baryonic distribution, like e.g. the Bullet cluster) can be very effective in constraining the neutralino mass, composition and annihilation cross-section. For the case of a dwarf galaxy, like e.g. Draco, the constraints on the DM annihilation cr...

Colafrancesco, Sergio; Marchegiani, Paolo; Beck, Geoff; Beck, Rainer; Zechlin, Hannes; Lobanov, Andrei; Horns, Dieter

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Dark Matter vs. Neutrinos: The effect of astrophysical uncertainties and timing information on the neutrino floor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Future multi-tonne Direct Detection experiments will be sensitive to solar neutrino induced nuclear recoils which form an irreducible background to light Dark Matter searches. Indeed for masses around 6 GeV the spectra of neutrinos and Dark Matter are so similar that experiments will run into a neutrino floor, for which sensitivity increases only marginally with exposure past a certain cross section. In this work we show that this floor can be overcome using the different annual modulation expected from solar neutrinos and Dark Matter. Specifically for cross sections below the neutrino floor the DM signal is observable through a phase shift and a smaller amplitude for the time-dependent event rate. This allows the exclusion power to be improved by up to an order of magnitude for large exposures. In addition we demonstrate that the neutrino floor exists over a wider mass range than has been previously shown, since the large uncertainties in the Dark Matter velocity distribution make the signal spectrum harder to distinguish from the neutrino background. However for most velocity distributions the neutrino floor can still be surpassed using timing information, though certain velocity streams may prove problematic.

Jonathan H. Davis

2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

293

Dark Matter vs. Neutrinos: The effect of astrophysical uncertainties and timing information on the neutrino floor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Future multi-tonne Direct Detection experiments will be sensitive to solar neutrino induced nuclear recoils which form an irreducible background to light Dark Matter searches. Indeed for masses around 6 GeV the spectra of neutrinos and Dark Matter are so similar that experiments will run into a neutrino floor, for which sensitivity increases only marginally with exposure past a certain cross section. In this work we show that this floor can be overcome using the different annual modulation expected from solar neutrinos and Dark Matter. Specifically for cross sections below the neutrino floor the DM signal is observable through a phase shift and a smaller amplitude for the time-dependent event rate. This allows the exclusion power to be improved by up to an order of magnitude for large exposures. In addition we demonstrate that the neutrino floor exists over a wider mass range than has been previously shown, since the large uncertainties in the Dark Matter velocity distribution make the signal spectrum harder to distinguish from the neutrino background. However for most velocity distributions the neutrino floor can still be surpassed using timing information, though certain velocity streams may prove problematic.

Jonathan H. Davis

2015-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

294

Dark Matter vs. Neutrinos: The effect of astrophysical uncertainties and timing information on the neutrino floor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Future multi-tonne Direct Detection experiments will be sensitive to solar neutrino induced nuclear recoils which form an irreducible background to light Dark Matter searches. Indeed for masses around 6 GeV the spectra of neutrinos and Dark Matter are so similar that experiments will run into a neutrino floor, for which sensitivity increases only marginally with exposure past a certain cross section. In this work we show that this floor can be overcome using the different annual modulation expected from solar neutrinos and Dark Matter. Specifically for cross sections below the neutrino floor the DM signal is observable through a phase shift and a smaller amplitude for the time-dependent event rate. This allows the exclusion power to be improved by up to an order of magnitude for large exposures. In addition we demonstrate that the neutrino floor exists over a wider mass range than has been previously shown, since the large uncertainties in the Dark Matter velocity distribution make the signal spectrum harder ...

Davis, Jonathan H

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

The case for a directional dark matter detector and the status of current experimental efforts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the case for a dark matter detector with directional sensitivity. This document was developed at the 2009 CYGNUS workshop on directional dark matter detection, and contains contributions from theorists and ...

Battat, James

296

Dark matter and dark energy proposals: maintaining cosmology as a true science?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I consider the relation of explanations for the observed data to testability in the following contexts: observational and experimental detection of dark matter; observational and experimental detection of dark energy or a cosmological constant $\\Lambda$; observational or experimental testing of the multiverse proposal to explain a small non-zero value of $\\Lambda$; and observational testing of the possibility of large scale spatial inhomogeneity with zero $\\Lambda$.

George F. R. Ellis

2008-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

297

Dynamics of a scalar field, with a double exponential potential, interacting with dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the interaction between dark matter and dark energy, with dark energy described by a scalar field having a double exponential effective potential. We discover conditions under which such a scalar field driven solution is a late time attractor. We observe a realistic cosmological evolution which consists of sequential stages of dominance of radiation, matter and dark energy, respectively.

Gupta, Vartika; Mukherjee, Amitabha; Lohiya, Daksh

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Scalar perturbations in cosmological models with dark energy - dark matter interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scalar cosmological perturbations are investigated in the framework of a model with interacting dark energy and dark matter. In addition to these constituents, the inhomogeneous Universe is supposed to be filled with the standard noninteracting constituents corresponding to the conventional $\\Lambda$CDM model. The interaction term is chosen in the form of a linear combination of dark sector energy densities with evolving coefficients. The methods of discrete cosmology are applied, and strong theoretical constraints on the parameters of the model are derived. A brief comparison with observational data is performed.

Eingorn, Maxim

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Conservative constraints on dark matter annihilation into gamma rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using gamma-ray data from observations of the Milky Way, Andromeda (M31), and the cosmic background, we calculate conservative upper limits on the dark matter self-annihilation cross section to monoenergetic gamma rays, <{sigma}{sub A}v>{sub {gamma}}{sub {gamma}}, over a wide range of dark matter masses. (In fact, over most of this range, our results are unchanged if one considers just the branching ratio to gamma rays with energies within a factor of a few of the endpoint at the dark matter mass.) If the final-state branching ratio to gamma rays, Br({gamma}{gamma}), were known, then <{sigma}{sub A}v>{sub {gamma}}{sub {gamma}}/Br({gamma}{gamma}) would define an upper limit on the total cross section; we conservatively assume Br({gamma}{gamma}) > or approx. 10{sup -4}. An upper limit on the total cross section can also be derived by considering the appearance rates of any standard model particles; in practice, this limit is defined by neutrinos, which are the least detectable. For intermediate dark matter masses, gamma-ray-based and neutrino-based upper limits on the total cross section are comparable, while the gamma-ray limit is stronger for small masses and the neutrino limit is stronger for large masses. We comment on how these results depend on the assumptions about astrophysical inputs and annihilation final states, and how GLAST and other gamma-ray experiments can improve upon them.

Mack, Gregory D.; Yueksel, Hasan [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Jacques, Thomas D.; Bell, Nicole F. [School of Physics, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Beacom, John F. [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

The 3D Geometry of Dark Matter Halos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thickness of the neutral hydrogen layer, coupled with the rotation curve, traces the outer dark matter potential. We estimate the amplitude of the flaring in spiral galaxies from a 3D model of the HI gas. Warps in particular are explicitly parametrized in the form of an harmonical density wave. Applying our method to the galaxy NGC 891, the only model that could fit the observations, and in particular the HI at large height above the plane, includes a strong warp with a line of node almost coinciding with the line of sight. This high-Z HI is not observed at the most extreme velocity channels, those corresponding to high rotational velocities. This is accounted for by the model, since orbits in the tilted planes are not circular, but elongated, with their minor axis in the galaxy plane. Their velocity on the major axis (i.e. at their maximal height above the plane) is then 30% less than in the plane. We finally connect the modelled vertical outer gaseous distribution to the dark matter through hydrodynamical and gravitational equations. Under the assumption of isotropy of the gaseous velocity dispersion, we conclude on a very flattened halo geometry for the galaxy NGC 891 ($q \\approx 0.2$), while a vertical velocity dispersion smaller that the radial one would lead to a less flattened Dark Matter Halo ($q \\approx 0.4-0.5$). Both results however suggests that dark matter is dissipative or has been strongly influenced by the gas dynamics.

J. -F. Becquaert; F. Combes

1997-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Scalar dark matter models with significant internal bremsstrahlung  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There has been interest recently on particle physics models that may give rise to sharp gamma ray spectral features from dark matter annihilation. Because dark matter is supposed to be electrically neutral, it is challenging to build weakly interacting massive particle models that may accommodate both a large cross section into gamma rays at, say, the Galactic center, and the right dark matter abundance. In this work, we consider the gamma ray signatures of a class of scalar dark matter models that interact with Standard Model dominantly through heavy vector-like fermions (the vector-like portal). We focus on a real scalar singlet S annihilating into lepton-antilepton pairs. Because this two-body final-state annihilation channel is d-wave suppressed in the chiral limit, ?{sub ff-bar}v?v{sup 4}, we show that virtual internal bremsstrahlung emission of a gamma ray gives a large correction, both today and at the time of freeze-out. For the sake of comparison, we confront this scenario to the familiar case of a Majorana singlet annihilating into light lepton-antilepton pairs, and show that the virtual internal bremsstrahlung signal may be enhanced by a factor of (up to) two orders of magnitude. We discuss the scope and possible generalizations of the model.

Giacchino, Federica; Tytgat, Michel H.G. [Service de Physique Thorique, Universit Libre de Bruxelles, Boulevard du Triomphe, CP225, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Lopez-Honorez, Laura, E-mail: federica.giacchino@ulb.ac.be, E-mail: llopezho@vub.ac.be, E-mail: mtytgat@ulb.ac.be [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel and The International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Light Dark Matter Detection Prospects at Neutrino Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the prospects for the detection of relatively light dark matter through direct annihilation to neutrinos. We specifically focus on the detection possibilities of water Cherenkov and liquid scintillator neutrino detection devices. We find in particular that liquid scintillator detectors may potentially provide excellent detection prospects for dark matter in the 4-10 GeV mass range. These experiments can provide excellent corroborative checks of the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulation signal, but may yield results for low mass dark matter in any case. We identify important tests of the ratio of electron to muon neutrino events (and neutrino versus anti-neutrino events), which discriminate against background atmospheric neutrinos. In addition, the fraction of events which arise from muon neutrinos or anti-neutrinos ($R_{\\mu}$ and $R_{\\bar \\mu}$) can potentially yield information about the branching fractions of hypothetical dark matter annihilations into different neutrino flavors. These results apply to neutrinos from secondary and tertiary decays as well, but will suffer from decreased detectability.

Jason Kumar; John G. Learned; Stefanie Smith

2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

303

Top-Down Fragmentation of a Warm Dark Matter Filament  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the first high-resolution n-body simulations of the fragmentation of dark matter filaments. Such fragmentation occurs in top-down scenarios of structure formation, when the dark matter is warm instead of cold. In a previous paper (Knebe et al. 2002, hereafter Paper I), we showed that WDM differs from the standard Cold Dark Matter (CDM) mainly in the formation history and large-scale distribution of low-mass haloes, which form later and tend to be more clustered in WDM than in CDM universes, tracing more closely the filamentary structures of the cosmic web. Therefore, we focus our computational effort in this paper on one particular filament extracted from a WDM cosmological simulation and compare in detail its evolution to that of the same CDM filament. We find that the mass distribution of the halos forming via fragmentation within the filament is broadly peaked around a Jeans mass of a few 10^9 Msun, corresponding to a gravitational instability of smooth regions with an overdensity contrast around 10 at these redshifts. Our results confirm that WDM filaments fragment and form gravitationally bound haloes in a top-down fashion, whereas CDM filaments are built bottom-up, thus demonstrating the impact of the nature of the dark matter on dwarf galaxy properties.

Alexander Knebe; Julien Devriendt; Brad Gibson; Joseph Silk

2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

304

Dark matter constraints from a cosmic index of refraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dark matter candidates of particle physics invariably possess electromagnetic interactions, if only via quantum fluctuations. Taken en masse, dark matter can thus engender an index of refraction which deviates from its vacuum value. Its presence is signaled through frequency-dependent effects in the propagation and attenuation of light. We discuss theoretical constraints on the expansion of the index of refraction with frequency, the physical interpretation of the terms, and the particular observations needed to isolate its coefficients. This, with the advent of new opportunities to view gamma-ray bursts at cosmological distance scales, gives us a new probe of dark matter and a new possibility for its direct detection. As a first application we use the time delay determined from radio afterglow observations of distant gamma-ray bursts to realize a direct limit on the electric charge-to-mass ratio of dark matter of |{epsilon}|/M<1x10{sup -5} eV{sup -1} at 95% C.L.

Gardner, Susan [Center for Particle Astrophysics and Theoretical Physics Department, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States); Latimer, David C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Dark Matter Constraints from a Cosmic Index of Refraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dark-matter candidates of particle physics invariably possess electromagnetic interactions, if only via quantum fluctuations. Taken en masse, dark matter can thus engender an index of refraction which deviates from its vacuum value. Its presence is signaled through frequency-dependent effects: the real part yields dispersive effects in propagation, and the imaginary part yields such in attenuation. We discuss theoretical constraints on the expansion of the index of refraction with frequency, the physical interpretation of the terms, and the particular observations needed to isolate its coefficients. This, with the advent of new opportunities to view gamma-ray bursts at cosmological distance scales, gives us a new probe of dark matter. As a first application we use the time delay determined from radio afterglow observations of gamma-ray bursts to limit the charge-to-mass ratio of dark matter to |{var_epsilon}|/M < 1.8 x 10{sup -5} eV{sup -1} at 95% CL.

Gardner, Susan; Latimer, David C.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Clustering GCG: a viable option for unified dark matter-dark energy?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the clustering Generalized Chaplygin Gas (GCG) as a possible candidate for dark matter-dark energy unification. The vanishing speed of sound ($c_{s}^2 = 0$) for the GCG fluid can be obtained by incorporating higher derivative operator in the original K-essence Lagrangian. The evolution of the density fluctuations in the GCG+Baryon fluid is studied in the linear regime. The observational constraints on the model are obtained using latest data from SNIa, $H(z)$, BAO and also for the $f\\sigma_{8}$ measurements. The matter power spectra for the allowed parameter values are well behaved without any unphysical features.

Sumit Kumar; Anjan A. Sen

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

307

CONSTRAINTS ON DARK MATTER ANNIHILATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES FROM DIFFUSE RADIO EMISSION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annihilation of dark matter can result in the production of stable Standard Model particles including electrons and positrons that, in the presence of magnetic fields, lose energy via synchrotron radiation, observable as radio emission. Galaxy clusters are excellent targets to search for or to constrain the rate of dark matter annihilation, as they are both massive and dark matter dominated. In this study, we place limits on dark matter annihilation in a sample of nearby clusters using upper limits on the diffuse radio emission, low levels of observed diffuse emission, or detections of radio mini-halos. We find that the strongest limits on the annihilation cross section are better than limits derived from the non-detection of clusters in the gamma-ray band by a factor of {approx}3 or more when the same annihilation channel and substructure model, but different best-case clusters, are compared. The limits on the cross section depend on the assumed amount of substructure, varying by as much as two orders of magnitude for increasingly optimistic substructure models as compared to a smooth Navarro-Frenk-White profile. In our most optimistic case, using the results of the Phoenix Project, we find that the derived limits reach below the thermal relic cross section of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} for dark matter masses as large as 400 GeV, for the b b-bar annihilation channel. We discuss uncertainties due to the limited available data on the magnetic field structure of individual clusters. We also report the discovery of diffuse radio emission from the central 30-40 kpc regions of the groups M49 and NGC 4636.

Storm, Emma; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High St., Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Rudnick, Lawrence [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

308

Long-term study of backgrounds in the DRIFT-II directional dark matter experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-pressure gas Time Projection Chambers being developed for directional dark matter searches offer a technology with strong particle identification capability combined with the potential to produce a definitive detection of Galactic Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) dark matter. A source of events able to mimic genuine WIMP-induced nuclear recoil tracks arises in such experiments from the decay of radon gas inside the vacuum vessel. The recoils that result from associated daughter nuclei are termed Radon Progeny Recoils (RPRs). We present here experimental data from a long-term study using the DRIFT-II directional dark matter experiment at the Boulby Underground Laboratory of the RPRs, and other backgrounds that are revealed by relaxing the normal cuts that are applied to WIMP search data. By detailed examination of event classes in both spatial and time coordinates using 5.5 years of data, we demonstrate the ability to determine the origin of 4 specific background populations and describe development of new technology and mitigation strategies to suppress them.

J. Brack; E. Daw; A. Dorofeev; A. C. Ezeribe; J. R. Fox; J. -L. Gauvreau; M. Gold; L. J. Harmon; J. Harton; R. Lafler; J. M. Landers; R. Lauer; E. R. Lee; D. Loomba; J. A. J. Matthews; E. H. Miller; A. Monte; A. StJ. Murphy; S. M. Paling; N. Phan; M. Pipe; M. Robinson; S. Sadler; A. Scarff; D. P. Snowden-Ifft; N. J. C. Spooner; S. Telfer; D. Walker; L. Yuriev

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

309

Environment Dependence of Dark Matter Halos in Symmetron Modified Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the environment dependence of dark matter halos in the symmetron modified gravity scenario. The symmetron is one of three known mechanisms for screening a fifth-force and thereby recovering General Relativity in dense environments. The effectiveness of the screening depends on both the mass of the object and the environment it lies in. Using high-resolution N-body simulations we find a significant difference, which depends on the halos mass and environment, between the lensing and dynamical masses of dark matter halos similar to the f(R) modified gravity. The symmetron can however yield stronger signatures due to a freedom in the strength of the coupling to matter.

Hans A. Winther; David F. Mota; Baojiu Li

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

310

A Model of Asymmetric Hadronic Dark Matter and Leptogenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper suggests a model to account for the common origins of the asymmetric dark matter (ADM) and matter-antimatter asymmetry. The ADM nature is a stable hadronic particle consisting of a heavy color scalar and a light $u$ quark, which is formed after the QCD phase transition. At the early stage the ADM are in thermal equilibrium through collisions with the nucleons, moreover, they can emit the $\\gamma$ photons with $0.32$ MeV energy. However they are decoupling and become the dark matter at the temperature about $130$ MeV. The mass upper limit of the ADM is predicted as $M_{D}<1207$ GeV. It is feasible and promising to test the model in future experiments.

Yang, Wei-Min

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Neutrino Physics and Dark Matter Physics with Ultra-Low-Energy Germanium Detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status and plans of the TEXONO Collaboration on the development of ultra-low-energy germanium detectors with sub-keV sensitivities are reported. We survey the scientific goals which include the observation of neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering, the studies of neutrino magnetic moments, as well as the searches of WIMP dark matter. In particular, an energy threshold of 220{+-}10 eV at an efficiency of 50% were achieved with a four-channel prototype detectors each of an active mass of 5 g. New limits were set for WIMPs with mass between 3-6 GeV. The prospects of the realization of full-scale experiments are discussed. This detector technique makes the unexplored sub-keV energy window accessible for new neutrino and dark matter experiments.

Shin-Ted, Lin [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China)

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

312

A possible indication of momentum-dependent asymmetric dark matter in the Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Broad disagreement persists between helioseismological observables and predictions of solar models computed with the latest surface abundances. Here we show that most of these problems can be solved by the presence of asymmetric dark matter coupling to nucleons as the square of the momentum $q$ exchanged in the collision. We compute neutrino fluxes, small frequency separations, surface helium abundances, sound speed profiles and convective zone depths for a number of models, showing more than a $6\\sigma$ preference for $q^2$ models over others, and over the Standard Solar Model. The preferred mass (3 GeV) and reference dark matter-nucleon cross-section ($10^{-37}$ cm$^2$ at $q_0 = 40$ MeV) are within the region of parameter space allowed by both direct detection and collider searches.

Aaron C. Vincent; Pat Scott; Aldo Serenelli

2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

313

MIMAC: MIcro-tpc MAtrix of Chambers for dark matter directional detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Directional detection of non-baryonic Dark Matter is a promising search strategy for discriminating WIMP events from neutrons, the ultimate background for dark matter direct detection. This strategy requires both a precise measurement of the energy down to a few keV and 3D reconstruction of tracks down to a few mm. The MIMAC (MIcro-tpc MAtrix of Chambers) collaboration has developed in the last years an original prototype detector based on the direct coupling of large pixelized micromegas with a special developed fast self-triggered electronics showing the feasibility of a new generation of directional detectors. The first bi-chamber prototype has been installed at Modane, underground laboratory in June 2012. The first undergournd background events, the gain stability and calibration are shown. The first spectrum of nuclear recoils showing 3D tracks coming from the radon progeny is presented.

Santos, D; Bouly, J L; Bourrion, O; Fourel, Ch; Guillaudin, O; Lamblin, J; Mayet, F; Muraz, J F; Richer, J P; Riffard, Q; Lebreton, L; Maire, D; Busto, J; Brunner, J; Fouchez, D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Capture and Indirect Detection of Inelastic Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the capture rate for Dark Matter in the Sun for models where the dominant interaction with nuclei is inelastic -- the Dark Matter up-scatters to a nearby dark "partner" state with a small splitting of order a 100 keV. Such models have previously been shown to be compatible with DAMA/LIBRA data, as well as data from all other direct detection experiments. The kinematics of inelastic Dark Matter ensures that the dominant contribution to capture occurs from scattering off of iron. We give a prediction for neutrino rates for current and future neutrino telescopes based on the results from current direct detection experiments. Current bounds from Super--Kamiokande and IceCube-22 significantly constrain these models, assuming annihilations are into two-body Standard Model final states, such as W+W-, t-tbar, b-bbar or tau+tau-. Annihilations into first and second generation quarks and leptons are generally allowed, as are annihilations into new force carriers which decay dominantly into e+e-, mu+mu- and pi+pi-.

Arjun Menon; Rob Morris; Aaron Pierce; Neal Weiner

2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

315

Phenomenology of "dark matter"- from the Everett's quantum cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is widely accepted that the Everett's (or "many-worlds") interpretation of quantum mechanics is the only one which is appropriate for quantum cosmology because no environment may exist for Universe as a whole. We discuss, in the framework of the Everett's interpretation, the (quasi-) classical stage of evolution of the Universe when there coexist "classically incompatible" configurations of matter, or classical alternative realities ("alternatives" for short). In the framework of the Everett's interpretation the semiclassical gravity (where the gravitational field is classical and the non-gravitational fields are quantum) is more natural than theories including quantizing gravitational field. It is shown that the semiclassical (at least on the astrophysical and cosmological scales) Everett-type gravity leads to the observational effect known as the effect of dark matter. Instead of assuming special forms of matter (weakly interacting with the known matter), the role of the dark matter is played in this case by the matter of the usual kind which however belongs to those alternative realities (Everett's worlds) which remain {\\guillemotleft}invisible{\\guillemotright}, i.e. not perceived with the help of non-gravitational fields.

M. B. Mensky

2011-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

316

'Dark Matter' as a Quantum Foam In-Flow Effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The galactic `dark matter' effect is regarded as one of the major problems in fundamental physics. Here it is explained as a self-interaction dynamical effect of space itself, and so is not caused by an unknown form of matter. Because it was based on Kepler's Laws for the motion of the planets in the solar system the Newtonian theory of gravity was too restricted. A reformulation and generalisation of the Newtonian theory of gravity in terms of a velocity in-flow field, representing at a classical level the relative motion of a quantum-foam substructure to space, reveals a key dynamical feature of the phenomenon of gravity, namely the so called `dark matter' effect, which manifests not only in spiral galaxy rotation curves, but also in the borehole g anomaly, globular and galactic black holes, and in ongoing problems in improving the accuracy with which Newton's gravitational constant G is measured. The new theory of gravity involves an additional new dimensionless gravitational constant, and experimental data reveals this to be the fine structure constant. The new theory correctly predicts the globular cluster black hole masses, and that the `frame-dragging' effect is caused by vorticity in the in-flow. The relationship of the new theory of gravity to General Relativity which, like Newtonian gravity, does not have the `dark matter' dynamics, is explained.

Reginald T. Cahill

2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

317

Gravitational Field Equations and Theory of Dark Matter and Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main objective of this article is to derive a new set of gravitational field equations and to establish a new unified theory for dark energy and dark matter. The new gravitational field equations with scalar potential $\\varphi$ are derived using the Einstein-Hilbert functional, and the scalar potential $\\varphi$ is a natural outcome of the divergence-free constraint of the variational elements. Gravitation is now described by the Riemannian metric $g_{ij}$, the scalar potential $\\varphi$ and their interactions, unified by the new gravitational field equations. Associated with the scalar potential $\\varphi$ is the scalar potential energy density $\\frac{c^4}{8\\pi G} \\Phi=\\frac{c^4}{8\\pi G} g^{ij}D_iD_j \\varphi$, which represents a new type of energy caused by the non-uniform distribution of matter in the universe. The negative part of this potential energy density produces attraction, and the positive part produces repelling force. This potential energy density is conserved with mean zero: $\\int_M \\Phi dM=0$. The sum of this new potential energy density $\\frac{c^4}{8\\pi G} \\Phi$ and the coupling energy between the energy-momentum tensor $T_{ij}$ and the scalar potential field $\\varphi$ gives rise to a new unified theory for dark matter and dark energy: The negative part of this sum represents the dark matter, which produces attraction, and the positive part represents the dark energy, which drives the acceleration of expanding galaxies. In addition, the scalar curvature of space-time obeys $R=\\frac{8\\pi G}{c^4} T + \\Phi$. Furthermore, the new field equations resolve a few difficulties encountered by the classical Einstein field equations.

Tian Ma; Shouhong Wang

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

318

THE EXTREME SMALL SCALES: DO SATELLITE GALAXIES TRACE DARK MATTER?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the radial distribution of galaxies within their host dark matter halos as measured in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey by modeling their small-scale clustering. Specifically, we model the Jiang et al. measurements of the galaxy two-point correlation function down to very small projected separations (10 h{sup -1} kpc {<=} r {<=} 400 h{sup -1} kpc), in a wide range of luminosity threshold samples (absolute r-band magnitudes of -18 up to -23). We use a halo occupation distribution framework with free parameters that specify both the number and spatial distribution of galaxies within their host dark matter halos. We assume one galaxy resides in the halo center and additional galaxies are considered satellites that follow a radial density profile similar to the dark matter Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile, except that the concentration and inner slope are allowed to vary. We find that in low luminosity samples (M{sub r} < -19.5 and lower), satellite galaxies have radial profiles that are consistent with NFW. M{sub r} < -20 and brighter satellite galaxies have radial profiles with significantly steeper inner slopes than NFW (we find inner logarithmic slopes ranging from -1.6 to -2.1, as opposed to -1 for NFW). We define a useful metric of concentration, M{sub 1/10}, which is the fraction of satellite galaxies (or mass) that are enclosed within one-tenth of the virial radius of a halo. We find that M{sub 1/10} for low-luminosity satellite galaxies agrees with NFW, whereas for luminous galaxies it is 2.5-4 times higher, demonstrating that these galaxies are substantially more centrally concentrated within their dark matter halos than the dark matter itself. Our results therefore suggest that the processes that govern the spatial distribution of galaxies, once they have merged into larger halos, must be luminosity dependent, such that luminous galaxies become poor tracers of the underlying dark matter.

Watson, Douglas F.; Berlind, Andreas A.; McBride, Cameron K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, 1807 Station B, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Hogg, David W.; Jiang Tao [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

319

Dark matter and dark energy production in quantum model of the universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The quantum model of the homogeneous, isotropic, and spatially closed universe predicts an existence of two types of collective quantum states in the universe. The states of one type characterize a gravitational field, the others describe a matter (uniform scalar) field. In the first stage of the evolution of the universe a primordial scalar field evolves slowly into its vacuum-like state. In the second stage the scalar field oscillates about an equilibrium due to the quantum fluctuations. The universe is being filled with matter in the form of elementary quantum excitations of the vibrations of the scalar field. The separate quantum excitations are characterized by non-zero values of their energies (masses). Under the action of gravitational forces mainly these excitations decay into ordinary particles (baryons and leptons) and dark matter. The elementary quantum excitations of the vibrations of the scalar field which have not decayed up to now form dark energy. The numerical estimations lead to realistic va...

Kuzmichev, V E

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Lowering the threshold in the DAMA dark matter detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We look at two improvements related to the DAMA/LIBRA dark matter detector. We show how using a more optimized binning scheme of the current data can lead to significantly tighter contraints on the compatible regions of the WIMP parameter space. In addition, the PMTs of the detector were upgraded in 2010, allowing the low energy threshold to be lowered from 2 keVee to 1 keVee. We examine the implications for the dark matter interpretion of the DAMA modulation with data in this new energy region. Specifically, we focus on how well the degeneracy between the low mass and high mass regions can be removed by this new data. We find that the lower threshold data should rule out one of the two mass ranges in the spin-independent case at a minimum of the 2.6? level in the worst case scenario.

Kelso, Chris [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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321

Physics Beyond the Standard Model and Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this lecture note, I discuss why many of us are expecting rich physics at the TeV scale, drawing analogies from the history of physics in the last century. Then I review some of the possible candidates of new physics at this energy scale. I also discuss why we believe much of the matter in the universe is not atoms (baryons) or compact astronomical objects, and hence requires physics beyond the standard model. Finally I discuss some of the candidates for the non-baryonic dark matter.

Hitoshi Murayama

2007-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

322

GLAST And Dark Matter Substructure in the Milky Way  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss the possibility of GLAST detecting gamma-rays from the annihilation of neutralino dark matter in the Galactic halo. We have used 'Via Lactea', currently the highest resolution simulation of cold dark matter substructure, to quantify the contribution of subhalos to the annihilation signal. We present a simulated allsky map of the expected gamma-ray counts from dark matter annihilation, assuming standard values of particle mass and cross section. In this case GLAST should be able to detect the Galactic center and several individual subhalos. One of the most exciting discoveries that the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) could make, is the detection of gamma-rays from the annihilation of dark matter (DM). Such a measurement would directly address one of the major physics problems of our time: the nature of the DM particle. Whether or not GLAST will actually detect a DM annihilation signal depends on both unknown particle physics and unknown astrophysics theory. Particle physics uncertainties include the type of particle (axion, neutralino, Kaluza-Klein particle, etc.), its mass, and its interaction cross section. From the astrophysical side it appears that DM is not smoothly distributed throughout the Galaxy halo, but instead exhibits abundant clumpy substructure, in the form of thousands of so-called subhalos. The observability of DM annihilation radiation originating in Galactic DM subhalos depends on their abundance, distribution, and internal properties. Numerical simulations have been used in the past to estimate the annihilation flux from DM substructure, but since the subhalo properties, especially their central density profile, which determines their annihilation luminosity, are very sensitive to numerical resolution, it makes sense to re-examine their contribution with higher resolution simulations.

Kuhlen, Michael; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study; Diemand, Jurg; /UC, Santa Cruz, Astron. Astrophys.; Madau, Piero; /UC, Santa Cruz, Astron. Astrophys. /Garching, Max Planck Inst.

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

323

Generating X-ray lines from annihilating dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose different scenarios where a keV dark matter annihilates to produce a monochromatic signal. The process is generated through the exchange of a light scalar of mass of order 300 keV - 50 MeV coupling to photon through loops or higher dimensional operators. For natural values of the couplings and scales, the model can generate a gamma-ray line which can fit with the recently identified 3.5 keV X-ray line.

Emilian Dudas; Lucien Heurtier; Yann Mambrini

2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

324

Cores and cusps in warm dark matter halos  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The apparent presence of large core radii in Low Surface Brightness galaxies has been claimed as evidence in favor of warm dark matter. Here we show that WDM halos do not have cores that are large fractions of the halo size: typically, r{sub core}/r{sub 200}?<10{sup ?3}. This suggests an astrophysical origin for the large cores observed in these galaxies, as has been argued by other authors.

Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco [IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, E-46071, Valencia (Spain); Dalal, Neal, E-mail: villa@ific.uv.es, E-mail: neal@cita.utoronto.ca [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George St., Toronto, ON, M5S3H8 (Canada)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

E-Print Network 3.0 - antares physics potential Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

physics potential Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: antares physics potential Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 DARK MATTER SEARCHES WITH...

326

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative dark energy Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energy Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alternative dark energy Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 92409 2:12 PMErasing Dark Energy...

327

Cold dark matter cosmology conflicts with fluid mechanics and observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cold dark matter hierarchical clustering (CDMHC) cosmology based on the Jeans 1902 criterion for gravitational instability gives predictions about the early universe contrary to fluid mechanics and observations. Jeans neglected viscosity, diffusivity, and turbulence: factors that determine gravitational structure formation and contradict small structures (CDM halos) forming from non-baryonic dark matter particle candidates. From hydro-gravitational-dynamics (HGD) cosmology, viscous-gravitational fragmentation produced supercluster (10^46 kg), cluster, and galaxy-mass (10^42 kg) clouds in the primordial plasma with the large fossil density turbulence (rho_o ~ 3x10-17 kg m-3) of the first fragmentation at 10^12 s, and a protogalaxy linear and spiral clump morphology reflecting maximum stretching near vortex lines of the plasma turbulence at the 10^13 s plasma-gas transition. Gas protogalaxies fragmented into proto-globular-star-cluster mass (10^36 kg) clumps of protoplanet gas clouds that are now frozen as earth-mass (10^24-^25 kg) Jovian planets of the baryonic dark matter, about 30,000,000 rogue planets per star. Observations contradict the CDMHCC prediction of large explosive Population III first stars at 10^16 s, but support the immediate gentle formation of small Population II first stars at 10^13 s in globular-star-clusters from HGD.

Carl H. Gibson

2006-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

328

Solar neutrino physics: Sensitivity to light dark matter particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrinos are produced in several neutrino nuclear reactions of the proton-proton chain and carbon-nitrogen-oxygen cycle that take place at different radius of the Sun's core. Hence, measurements of solar neutrino fluxes provide a precise determination of the local temperature. The accumulation of non-annihilating light dark matter particles (with masses between 5 GeV and 16 GeV in the Sun produces a change in the local solar structure, namely, a decrease in the central temperature of a few percent. This variation depends on the properties of the dark matter particles, such as the mass of the particle and its spin-independent scattering cross-section on baryon-nuclei, specifically, the scattering with helium, oxygen, and nitrogen among other heavy elements. This temperature effect can be measured in almost all solar neutrino fluxes. In particular, by comparing the neutrino fluxes generated by stellar models with current observations, namely 8B neutrino fluxes, we find that non-annihilating dark matter particles with a mass smaller than 10 GeV and a spin-independent scattering cross-section with heavy baryon-nuclei larger than 3 x 10^{-37} cm^-2 produce a variation in the 8B neutrino fluxes that would be in conflict with current measurements.

Ilidio Lopes; Joseph Silk

2013-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

329

Thermal conduction by dark matter with velocity and momentum-dependent cross-sections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use the formalism of Gould and Raffelt to compute the dimensionless thermal conduction coefficients for scattering of dark matter particles with standard model nucleons via cross-sections that depend on the relative velocity or momentum exchanged between particles. Motivated by models invoked to reconcile various recent results in direct detection, we explicitly compute the conduction coefficients $\\alpha$ and $\\kappa$ for cross-sections that go as $v_{\\rm rel}^2$, $v_{\\rm rel}^4$, $v_{\\rm rel}^{-2}$, $q^2$, $q^4$ and $q^{-2}$, where $v_{\\rm rel}$ is the relative DM-nucleus velocity and $q$ is the momentum transferred in the collision. We find that a $v_{\\rm rel}^{-2}$ dependence can significantly enhance energy transport from the inner solar core to the outer core. The same can true for any $q$-dependent coupling, if the dark matter mass lies within some specific range for each coupling. This effect can complement direct searches for dark matter; combining these results with state-of-the-art Solar simulations should greatly increase sensitivity to certain DM models. It also seems possible that the so-called Solar Abundance Problem could be resolved by enhanced energy transport in the solar core due to such velocity- or momentum-dependent scatterings.

Aaron C. Vincent; Pat Scott

2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

330

Radon in the DRIFT-II directional dark matter TPC: emanation, detection and mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radon gas emanating from materials is of interest in environmental science and also a major concern in rare event non-accelerator particle physics experiments such as dark matter and double beta decay searches, where it is a major source of background. Notable for dark matter experiments is the production of radon progeny recoils (RPRs), the low energy (~100 keV) recoils of radon daughter isotopes, which can mimic the signal expected from WIMP interactions. Presented here are results of measurements of radon emanation from detector materials in the 1 metre cubed DRIFT-II directional dark matter gas time projection chamber experiment. Construction and operation of a radon emanation facility for this work is described, along with an analysis to continuously monitor DRIFT data for the presence of internal 222Rn and 218Po. Applying this analysis to historical DRIFT data, we show how systematic substitution of detector materials for alternatives, selected by this device for low radon emanation, has resulted in a f...

Battat, J B R; Daw, E; Dorofeev, A; Ezeribe, A C; Fox, J R; Gauvreau, J -L; Gold, M; Harmon, L J; Harton, J L; Landers, J M; Lee, E R; Loomba, D; Matthews, J A J; Miller, E H; Monte, A; Murphy, A StJ; Paling, S M; Phan, N; Pipe, M; Robinson, M; Sadler, S W; Scarff, A; Snowden-Ifft, D P; Spooner, N J C; Telfer, S; Walker, D; Warner, D; Yuriev, L

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Radon in the DRIFT-II directional dark matter TPC: emanation, detection and mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radon gas emanating from materials is of interest in environmental science and also a major concern in rare event non-accelerator particle physics experiments such as dark matter and double beta decay searches, where it is a major source of background. Notable for dark matter experiments is the production of radon progeny recoils (RPRs), the low energy (~100 keV) recoils of radon daughter isotopes, which can mimic the signal expected from WIMP interactions. Presented here are results of measurements of radon emanation from detector materials in the 1 metre cubed DRIFT-II directional dark matter gas time projection chamber experiment. Construction and operation of a radon emanation facility for this work is described, along with an analysis to continuously monitor DRIFT data for the presence of internal 222Rn and 218Po. Applying this analysis to historical DRIFT data, we show how systematic substitution of detector materials for alternatives, selected by this device for low radon emanation, has resulted in a factor of ~10 reduction in internal radon rates. Levels are found to be consistent with the sum from separate radon emanation measurements of the internal materials and also with direct measurement using an attached alpha spectrometer. The current DRIFT detector, DRIFT-IId, is found to have sensitivity to 222Rn of 2.5 {\\mu}Bq/l with current analysis efficiency, potentially opening up DRIFT technology as a new tool for sensitive radon assay of materials.

J. B. R. Battat; J. Brack; E. Daw; A. Dorofeev; A. C. Ezeribe; J. R. Fox; J. -L. Gauvreau; M. Gold; L. J. Harmon; J. L. Harton; J. M. Landers; E. R. Lee; D. Loomba; J. A. J. Matthews; E. H. Miller; A. Monte; A. StJ. Murphy; S. M. Paling; N. Phan; M. Pipe; M. Robinson; S. W. Sadler; A. Scarff; D. P. Snowden-Ifft; N. J. C. Spooner; S. Telfer; D. Walker; D. Warner; L. Yuriev

2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

332

Light dark matter from the U(1){sub X} sector in the NMSSM with gauge mediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cosmic ray anomalies observed by PAMELA and Fermi-LAT experiments may be interpreted by heavy (TeV-scale) dark matter annihilation enhanced by Sommerfeld effects mediated by a very light (sub-GeV) U(1){sub X} gauge boson, while the recent direct searches from CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA experiments may indicate a rather light ( ? 7 GeV) dark matter with weak interaction. Motivated by these apparently different scales, we consider a gauge mediated next-to-the minimal supersymmetric standard model (NMSSM) entended with a light U(1){sub X} sector plus a heavy sector ( H-bar {sub h},H{sub h}), which can provide both a light ( ? 7 GeV) and a heavy (TeV-scale) dark matter without introducing any ad hoc new scale. Through the Yukawa coupling between H{sub h} and the messager fields, the U(1){sub X} gauge symmetry is broken around the GeV scale radiatively and a large negative m{sub S}{sup 2} is generated for the NMSSM singlet S. Furthermore, the small kinetic mixing parameter between U(1){sub X} and U(1){sub Y} is predicted to be ? ? 10{sup ?5}?10{sup ?6} after integrating out the messengers. Such a light dark matter, which can have a normal relic density from the late decay of the right-handed sneutrino (assumed to be the ordinary next-to-the lightest supersymmetric particle and thermally produced in the early Universe), can serve a good candidate to explain the recent CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA results.

Kang, Zhaofeng; Li, Tianjun; Liu, Tao; Tong, Chunli; Yang, Jin Min, E-mail: zhfkang@itp.ac.cn, E-mail: tli@itp.ac.cn, E-mail: tliuphy@itp.ac.cn, E-mail: piggy1983@gmail.com, E-mail: jmyang@itp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Frontiers in Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Academia Sinica, Zhongguancun East Road, Beijing 100190 (China)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

A Dark Energy Model interacting with Dark Matter described by an effective EoS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this latter author would like to consider interaction between a dark energy based on Generalized Uncertainty Principle (GUP) and a Dark Matter described by effective EoS: $P = (\\gamma-1)\\rho+p_{0}+\\omega_{H}H+\\omega_{H2}H^{2}+\\omega_{dH}\\dot{H}$ [1]-[3], which could be interpreted as a modification concerning to the some interaction between fluid $P=(\\gamma-1)\\rho$ with different components of the Darkness of the Universe. Two types of interaction, called sign-changeable, $Q=q(3Hb\\rho_{m}+\\beta\\dot{\\rho}_{m})$ [4],[5] and $Q=3Hb\\rho_{m}+\\beta\\dot{\\rho}_{m}$ are considered. EoS parameter of the mixture $\\omega_{tot}$ are investigated. Statefinder diagnostics provided also.

Martiros Khurshudyan

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

Searching a Dark Photon with HADES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a search for the e+e- decay of a hypothetical dark photon, also names U vector boson, in inclusive dielectron spectra measured by HADES in the p (3.5 GeV) + p, Nb reactions, as well as the Ar (1.756 GeV/u) + KCl reaction. An upper limit on the kinetic mixing parameter squared epsilon^{2} at 90% CL has been obtained for the mass range M(U) = 0.02 - 0.55 GeV/c2 and is compared with the present world data set. For masses 0.03 - 0.1 GeV/c^2, the limit has been lowered with respect to previous results, allowing now to exclude a large part of the parameter region favoured by the muon g-2 anomaly. Furthermore, an improved upper limit on the branching ratio of 2.3 * 10^{-6} has been set on the helicity-suppressed direct decay of the eta meson, eta-> e+e-, at 90% CL.

HADES Collaboration; G. Agakishiev; A. Balanda; D. Belver; A. Belyaev; J. C. Berger-Chen; A. Blanco; M. Boehmer; J. L. Boyard; P. Cabanelas; S. Chernenko; A. Dybczak; E. Epple; L. Fabbbietti; O. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; P. Fonte; J. Friese; I. Froehlich; T. Galatyuk; J. A. Garzon; R. Gernhaeuser; K. Goebel; M. Golubeva; D. Gonzalez-Diaz; F. Guber; M. Gumberidze; T. Heinz; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; A. Ierusalimov; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kaempfer; T. Karavicheva; I. Koenig; W. Koenig; B. W. Kolb; G. Kornakov; R. Kotte; A. Krasa; F. Krizek; R. Kruecken; H. Kuc; W. Kuehn; A. Kugler; A. Kurepin; V. Ladygin; R. Lalik; S. Lang; K. Lapidus; A. Lebedev; T. Liu; L. Lopes; M. Lorenz; L. Maier; A. Mangiarotti; J. Markert; V. Metag; B. Michalska; J. Michel; C. Muentz; L. Naumann; Y. C. Pachmayer; M. Palka; Y. Parpottas; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; V. Petousis; J. Pietraszko; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; A. Reshetin; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; P. Salabura; T. Scheib; H. Schuldes; A. Schmah; E. Schwab; J. Siebenson; Yu. G. Sobolev; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; H. Stroebele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; M. Traxler; R. Trebacz; H. Tsertos; T. Vasiliev; V. Wagner; M. Weber; C. Wendisch; J. Wuestenfeld; S. Yurevich; Y. Zanevsky

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Searching a Dark Photon with HADES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a search for the e+e- decay of a hypothetical dark photon, also names U vector boson, in inclusive dielectron spectra measured by HADES in the p (3.5 GeV) + p, Nb reactions, as well as the Ar (1.756 GeV/u) + KCl reaction. An upper limit on the kinetic mixing parameter squared epsilon^{2} at 90% CL has been obtained for the mass range M(U) = 0.02 - 0.55 GeV/c2 and is compared with the present world data set. For masses 0.03 - 0.1 GeV/c^2, the limit has been lowered with respect to previous results, allowing now to exclude a large part of the parameter region favoured by the muon g-2 anomaly. Furthermore, an improved upper limit on the branching ratio of 2.3 * 10^{-6} has been set on the helicity-suppressed direct decay of the eta meson, eta-> e+e-, at 90% CL.

Agakishiev, G; Belver, D; Belyaev, A; Berger-Chen, J C; Blanco, A; Boehmer, M; Boyard, J L; Cabanelas, P; Chernenko, S; Dybczak, A; Epple, E; Fabbbietti, L; Fateev, O; Finocchiaro, P; Fonte, P; Friese, J; Froehlich, I; Galatyuk, T; Garzon, J A; Gernhaeuser, R; Goebel, K; Golubeva, M; Gonzalez-Diaz, D; Guber, F; Gumberidze, M; Heinz, T; Hennino, T; Holzmann, R; Ierusalimov, A; Iori, I; Ivashkin, A; Jurkovic, M; Kaempfer, B; Karavicheva, T; Koenig, I; Koenig, W; Kolb, B W; Kornakov, G; Kotte, R; Krasa, A; Krizek, F; Kruecken, R; Kuc, H; Kuehn, W; Kugler, A; Kurepin, A; Ladygin, V; Lalik, R; Lang, S; Lapidus, K; Lebedev, A; Liu, T; Lopes, L; Lorenz, M; Maier, L; Mangiarotti, A; Markert, J; Metag, V; Michalska, B; Michel, J; Muentz, C; Naumann, L; Pachmayer, Y C; Palka, M; Parpottas, Y; Pechenov, V; Pechenova, O; Petousis, V; Pietraszko, J; Przygoda, W; Ramstein, B; Reshetin, A; Rustamov, A; Sadovsky, A; Salabura, P; Scheib, T; Schuldes, H; Schmah, A; Schwab, E; Siebenson, J; Sobolev, Yu G; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Stroebele, H; Stroth, J; Sturm, C; Tarantola, A; Teilab, K; Tlusty, P; Traxler, M; Trebacz, R; Tsertos, H; Vasiliev, T; Wagner, V; Weber, M; Wendisch, C; Wuestenfeld, J; Yurevich, S; Zanevsky, Y

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

The Future of the Local Large Scale Structure: the roles of Dark Matter and Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the distinct effects of Dark Matter and Dark Energy on the future evolution of nearby large scale structures using constrained N-body simulations. We contrast a model of Cold Dark Matter and a Cosmological Constant (LCDM) with an Open CDM (OCDM) model with the same matter density Omega_m =0.3 and the same Hubble constant h=0.7. Already by the time the scale factor increased by a factor of 6 (29 Gyr from now in LCDM; 78 Gyr from now in OCDM) the comoving position of the Local Group is frozen. Well before that epoch the two most massive members of the Local Group, the Milky Way and Andromeda, will merge. However, as the expansion rates of the scale factor in the two models are different, the Local Group will be receding in physical coordinates from Virgo exponentially in a LCDM model and at a roughly constant velocity in an OCDM model. More generally, in comoving coordinates the future large scale structure will look like a sharpened image of the present structure: the skeleton of the cosmic web will remain the same, but clusters will be more `isolated' and the filaments will become thinner. This implies that the long-term fate of large scale structure as seen in comoving coordinates is determined primarily by the matter density. We conclude that although the LCDM model is accelerating at present due to its Dark Energy component while the OCDM model is non accelerating, their large scale structure in the future will look very similar in comoving coordinates.

Yehuda Hoffman; Ofer Lahav; Gustavo Yepes; Yaniv Dover

2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

337

Gravitational Collapse With Dark Energy And Dark Matter In Ho?ava-Lifshitz Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, the collapsing process of a spherically symmetric star, made of dust cloud, is studied in Ho\\v{r}ava Lifshitz gravity in the background of Chaplygin gas dark energy. Two different classes of Chaplygin gas, namely, New variable modified Chaplygin gas and generalized cosmic Chaplygin gas are considered for the collapse study. Graphs are drawn to characterize the nature and to determine the possible outcome of gravitational collapse. A comparative study is done between the collapsing process in the two different dark energy models. It is found that for open and closed universe, collapse proceeds with an increase in black hole mass, the only constraint being that, relatively smaller values of $\\Lambda$ has to be considered in comparison to $\\lambda$. But in case of flat universe, possibility of the star undergoing a collapse in highly unlikely. Moreover it is seen that the most favourable environment for collapse is achieved when a combination of dark energy and dark matter is considered, both in the presence and absence of interaction. Finally, it is to be seen that, contrary to our expectations, the presence of dark energy does not really hinder the collapsing process in case of Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz gravity.

Prabir Rudra; Ujjal Debnath

2014-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

338

Baryonic Dark Matter: Limits from HST and ISO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent HST and ISO observations provide very severe limits on any compact baryonic contributions to galactic (dark) halos. When combined with Milky Way Galaxy microlensing results, almost the entire plausible range of massive compact baryonic objects is excluded by direct observation. Deep direct imaging at 7mu and 15mu with ISOCAM on the ISO spacecraft directly excludes hydrogen-burning stars of any mass above the hydrogen-burning limit, and of any chemical abundance, from being the predominant explanation of the dark halos of external spiral galaxies. In the Milky Way Galaxy, HST has provided luminosity functions to the hydrogen-burning limit in several globular clusters. The resulting mass functions do not provide any support for dominance by very low-mass stars. This is consistent with field surveys for sub-stellar mass brown dwarfs, which show such objects to be relatively rare. These results are complemented by very deep HST luminosity functions in the Large Magellanic Cloud, providing strong support for the (near)-universality of the stellar mass function. Very recent HST results are available for the nearby dSph galaxy UMi. This galaxy, the most dark-matter dominated object known on kpc scales, has a normal stellar mass function at low masses. The prospects are bright for dark elementary particles.

Gerard Gilmore; IoA Cambridge; UK

1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Diurnal modulation due to self-interacting mirror and hidden sector dark matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mirror and more generic hidden sector dark matter models can simultaneously explain the DAMA, CoGeNT and CRESST-II dark matter signals consistently with the null results of the other experiments. This type of dark matter can be captured by the Earth and shield detectors because it is self-interacting. This effect will lead to a diurnal modulation in dark matter detectors. We estimate the size of this effect for dark matter detectors in various locations. For a detector located in the northern hemisphere, this effect is expected to peak in April and can be detected for optimistic parameter choices. The diurnal variation is expected to be much larger for detectors located in the southern hemisphere. In particular, if the CoGeNT detector were moved to e.g. Sierra Grande, Argentina then a 5? dark matter discovery would be possible in around 30 days of operation.

Foot, R., E-mail: rfoot@unimelb.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale, School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

ROTATION CURVES OF 967 SPIRAL GALAXIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR DARK MATTER.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the rotation curves of 967 spiral galaxies, obtained by deprojecting and folding the raw data published by Mathewson et al. (1992). Of these, 80 meet objective excellence criteria and are suitable for individual detailed mass modelling, while 820 are suitable for statistical studies. A preliminary analysis of theire properties confirms that rotation curves are a universal function of luminosity and that the dark matter fraction in spirals increase with decreasing luminosity. Quantitative considerations on the virial radius of dark halos allow us to make hypotheses about their structure and nature. The deprojected folded curves, the smoothed curves, and various related quantities are available via anonymous ftp at ftp://galileo.sissa.it/users/ftp/pub/psrot

Massimo Persic; Paolo Salucci; Fulvio Stel

1995-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Evidence in Virgo for the Universal Dark Matter Halo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model is constructed for the mass and dynamics of M87 and the Virgo Cluster. Existing surface photometry of the galaxy, mass estimates from X-ray observations of the hot intracluster gas, and the velocity dispersions of early-type Virgo galaxies, all are used to constrain the run of dark matter density over radii to 2 Mpc in the cluster. The ``universal'' halo advocated by Navarro, Frenk, & White provides an excellent description of the combined data, as does a Hernquist profile. These models are favored over isothermal spheres, and their central structure is preferred to density cusps either much stronger or much weaker than r^{-1}. The galaxies and gas in the cluster trace its total mass distribution, the galaxies' velocity ellipsoid is close to isotropic, and the gas temperature follows the virial temperature profile of the dark halo. The virial radius and mass and the intracluster gas fraction of Virgo are evaluated.

Dean E. McLaughlin

1998-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

342

$\\gamma$-Ray Bursts and Dark Matter a joint origin?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A scenario is presented where large quark-gluon plasma (QGP) objects escaping the quark-hadron transition in the early Universe account for the baryonic dark matter as well as act as the sources for gamma-ray bursts. Two basic assumptions are made. Firstly, we assume that a QGP consisting of u,d and s quarks is the absolute ground state of QCD and secondly, that the quark-hadron transition in the early Universe was of first order. Both particle physics and astrophysics constraints are discussed, mainly from an observational point of view.

Enstrm, D; Hansson, J; Nicolaidis, A; Ekelin, S

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Strong Upper Limits on Sterile Neutrino Warm Dark Matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sterile neutrinos are attractive dark matter candidates. Their parameter space of mass and mixing angle has not yet been fully tested despite intensive efforts that exploit their gravitational clustering properties and radiative decays. We use the limits on gamma-ray line emission from the Galactic center region obtained with the SPI spectrometer on the INTEGRAL satellite to set new constraints, which improve on the earlier bounds on mixing by more than 2 orders of magnitude, and thus strongly restrict a wide and interesting range of models.

Yueksel, Hasan [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Beacom, John F. [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Watson, Casey R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Millikin University, Decatur, Illinois 62522 (United States)

2008-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

344

Dark matter in B-L extended MSSM models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze the dark matter problem in the context of the supersymmetric U(1){sub B-L} model. In this model, the lightest neutralino can be the B-L gaugino Z-tilde{sub B-L} or the extra Higgsinos {chi}-tilde{sub 1,2} dominated. We compute the thermal relic abundance of these particles and show that, unlike the lightest neutralino in the MSSM, they can account for the observed relic abundance with no conflict with other phenomenological constraints. The prospects for their direct detection, if they are part of our galactic halo, are also discussed.

Khalil, S. [Centre for Theoretical Physics, British University in Egypt, El Sherouk City, Postal No, 11837, P.O. Box 43 (Egypt); Department of Mathematics, Ain Shams University, Faculty of Science, Cairo, 11566 (Egypt); Okada, H. [Centre for Theoretical Physics, British University in Egypt, El Sherouk City, Postal No, 11837, P.O. Box 43 (Egypt)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

On the sbottom resonance in dark matter scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A resonance in the neutralino-nucleus elastic scattering cross section is usually purported when the neutralino-sbottom mass difference m{sub b-tilde}?m{sub ?} is equal to the bottom quark mass m{sub b} ? 4 GeV. Such a scenario has been discussed as a viable model for light ( ? 10 GeV) neutralino dark matter as explanation of possible DAMA and CoGeNT direct detection signals. Here we give physical and analytical arguments showing that the sbottom resonance may actually not be there. In particular, we show analytically that the one-loop gluon-neutralino scattering amplitude has no pole at m{sub b-tilde} = m{sub ?}+m{sub b}, while by analytic continuation to the regime m{sub b-tilde} < m{sub ?}, it develops a pole at m{sub b-tilde} = m{sub ?}?m{sub b}. In the limit of vanishing gluon momenta, this pole corresponds to the only cut of the neutralino self-energy diagram with a quark and a squark running in the loop, when the decay process ?? Q-tilde +Q becomes kinematically allowed. The pole can be interpreted as the formation of a b-tilde b-bar qqq or b-tilde *bqqq resonant state (where qqq are the nucleon valence quarks), which is however kinematically not accessible if the neutralino is the LSP. Our analysis shows that the common practice of estimating the neutralino-nucleon cross section by introducing an ad-hoc pole at m{sub b-tilde} = m{sub ?}+m{sub b} into the effective four-fermion interaction (also including higher-twist effects) should be discouraged, since it corresponds to adding a spurious pole to the scattering process at the center-of-mass energy (s){sup 1/2} ? m{sub ?} ? m{sub b-tilde}?m{sub b}. Our considerations can be extended from the specific case of supersymmetry to other similar cases in which the dark matter particle scatters off nucleons through the exchange of a b-flavored state almost degenerate in mass with the dark matter particle, such as for instance in theories with extra dimensions and in other mass-degenerate dark matter scenarios recently discussed in the literature.

Gondolo, Paolo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0830 (United States); Scopel, Stefano, E-mail: paolo.gondolo@utah.edu, E-mail: scopel@sogang.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

micrOMEGAs : a tool for dark matter studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

micrOMEGAs is a tool for cold dark matter (DM) studies in generic extensions of the standard model with a R-parity like discrete symmetry that guarantees the stability of the lightest odd particle. The code computes the DM relic density, the elastic scattering cross sections of DM on nuclei relevant for direct detection, and the spectra of positrons, anti-protons and photons originating from DM annihilation including porpagation of charged cosmic rays. The cross sections and decay properties of new particles relevant for collider studies are included as well as constraints from the flavour sector on the parameter space of supersymmetric models.

G. Belanger; F. Boudjema; A. Pukhov; A. Semenov

2010-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

347

Magnetic field in holographic superconductor with dark matter sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on the analytical technique the effect of the static magnetic field on the s-wave holographic superconductor with dark matter sector of U(1)-gauge field type coupled to the Maxwell field has been examined. In the probe limit, we obtained the mean value of the condensation operator. The nature of the condensate in an external magnetic field as well as the behaviour of the critical field close to the transition temperature has been revealed. The obtained upturn of the critical field curves as a function of temperature, both in four and five spacetime dimensions, is a fingerprint of the strong coupling approach.

Nakonieczny, L; Wysokinski, K I

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Tight bonds between sterile neutrinos and dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Despite the astonishing success of standard $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology, there is mounting evidence for a tension with observations at small and intermediate scales. We introduce a simple model where both cold dark matter (DM) and sterile neutrinos are charged under a new $U(1)_X$ gauge interaction. The resulting DM self-interactions resolve the tension with the observed abundances and internal density structures of dwarf galaxies. At the ame time, the sterile neutrinos can account for both the small hot DM component favored by cosmological observations and the neutrino anomalies found in short-baseline experiments.

Torsten Bringmann; Jasper Hasenkamp; Joern Kersten

2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

349

KeV Warm Dark Matter and Composite Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elementary keV sterile Dirac neutrinos can be a natural ingredient of the composite neutrino scenario. For a certain class of composite neutrino theories, these sterile neutrinos naturally have the appropriate mixing angles to be resonantly produced warm dark matter (WDM). Alternatively, we show these sterile neutrinos can be WDM produced by an entropy-diluted thermal freeze-out, with the necessary entropy production arising not from an out-of-equilibrium decay, but rather from the confinement of the composite neutrino sector, provided there is sufficient supercooling.

Dean J Robinson; Yuhsin Tsai

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

350

Orthogonal Technicolor with Isotriplet Dark Matter on the Lattice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the gauge dynamics of an SO(4)-gauge theory with two Dirac Wilson fermions transforming according to the vector representation of the gauge group. We determine the lattice phase diagram by locating the strong coupling bulk phase transition line and the zero PCAC mass line. We present results for the spectrum of the theory. In particular we measure the pseudoscalar, vector and axial meson masses. The data are consistent with a chiral symmetry breaking scenario rather than a conformal one. When used to break the electroweak symmetry dynamically the model leads to a natural dark matter candidate.

Ari Hietanen; Claudio Pica; Francesco Sannino; Ulrik Ishj Sndergaard

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

351

Gamma-Ray Bursts and Dark Matter - a joint origin?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A scenario is presented where large quark-gluon plasma (QGP) objects escaping the quark-hadron transition in the early Universe account for the baryonic dark matter as well as act as the sources for gamma-ray bursts. Two basic assumptions are made. Firstly, we assume that a QGP consisting of u,d and s quarks is the absolute ground state of QCD and secondly, that the quark-hadron transition in the early Universe was of first order. Both particle physics and astrophysics constraints are discussed, mainly from an observational point of view.

Daniel Enstrom

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

352

Dark Matter Halos as Bose-Einstein Condensates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Galactic dark matter is modelled by a scalar field in order to effectively modify Kepler's law without changing standard Newtonian gravity. In particular, a solvable toy model with a self-interaction U(Phi) borrowed from non-topological solitons produces already qualitatively correct rotation curves and scaling relations. Although relativistic effects in the halo are very small, we indicate corrections arising from the general relativistic formulation. Thereby, we can also probe the weak gravitational lensing of our soliton type halo. For cold scalar fields, it corresponds to a gravitationally confined Boson-Einstein condensate, but of galactic dimensions.

Eckehard W. Mielke; Burkhard Fuchs; Franz E. Schunck

2006-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

353

Merging Rate of Dark Matter Halos: Evolution and Dependence on Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the impact of the cosmological environment on the evolution of dark matter halos using a high-resolution simulation within a spatially flat LCDM cosmology.

Stefan Gottloeber; Anatoly Klypin; Andrey V. Kravtsov

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

A Direct Empirical Proof of the Existence of Dark Matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present new weak lensing observations of 1E0657-558 (z = 0.296), a unique cluster merger, that enable a direct detection of dark matter, independent of assumptions regarding the nature of the gravitational force law. Due to the collision of two clusters, the dissipationless stellar component and the fluid-like X-ray emitting plasma are spatially segregated. By using both wide-field ground based images and HST/ACS images of the cluster cores, we create gravitational lensing maps which show that the gravitational potential does not trace the plasma distribution, the dominant baryonic mass component, but rather approximately traces the distribution of galaxies. An 8{sigma} significance spatial offset of the center of the total mass from the center of the baryonic mass peaks cannot be explained with an alteration of the gravitational force law, and thus proves that the majority of the matter in the system is unseen.

Clowe, Douglas; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.; Bradac, Marusa; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; /Florida U.; Markevitch, Maxim; /Harvard-Smithsonian; Randall, Scott W.; Jones, Christine; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Zaritsky, Dennis; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.

2006-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

355

New Constraint on Open Cold-Dark-Matter Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the large-angle cross-correlation between the cosmic-microwave-background (CMB) temperature and the x-ray-background (XRB) intensity expected in an open Universe with cold dark matter (CDM) and a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of adiabatic density perturbations. Results are presented as a function of the nonrelativistic-matter density $\\Omega_0$ (in units of the critical density) and the x-ray bias $b_x$ (evaluated at a redshift $z\\simeq1$ in evolving-bias models) for both an open Universe and a flat cosmological-constant Universe. Recent experimental upper limits to the amplitude of this cross-correlation provide a new constraint to the $\\Omega_0$-$b_x$ parameter space that open-CDM models (and the open-inflation models that produce them) must satisfy.

Ali Kinkhabwala; Marc Kamionkowski

1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

356

First results from a 20-liter prototype dark matter detector with directional sensitivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Astronomical and cosmological evidence suggests that 27% of the energy content of the universe is in the form of non-baryonic matter referred to as "dark matter." Weakly interacting massive particles have long been considered ...

Lopez, Jeremy Paul

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Helioseismology with long range dark matter-baryon interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assuming the existence of a primordial asymmetry in the dark sector, we study how DM-baryon long-range interactions, induced by the kinetic mixing of a new $U(1)$ gauge boson and the photon, affects the evolution of the Sun and in turn the sound speed profile obtained from helioseismology. Thanks to the explicit dependence on the exchanged momenta in the differential cross section (Rutherford-like scattering), we find that dark matter particles with a mass of $\\sim 10\\;{\\rm GeV}$, kinetic mixing parameter of the order of $10^{-9}$ and a mediator with a mass smaller than a few MeV improve the agreement between the best solar model and the helioseismic data without being excluded by direct detection experiments. In particular, the \\LUX\\ detector will soon be able to either constrain or confirm our best fit solar model in the presence of a dark sector with long-range interactions that reconcile helioseismology with thermal neutrino results.

Ildio Lopes; Paolo Panci; Joseph Silk

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

358

Mass Function Gradients and the Need for Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is substantial evidence that the initial mass function (IMF) may be a function of the local star formation conditions. In particular, the IMF is predicted to flatten with increasing local luminosity density, with the formation of massive stars being preferentially enhanced in brighter regions. If IMF gradients are general features of galaxies, several previous astrophysical measurements, such as the surface mass densities of spirals (obtained assuming constant mass to light ratios), were plagued by substantial systematic errors. In this Letter, calculations which account for possible IMF gradients are presented of surface densities of spiral galaxies. Compared to previous estimates, the mass densities corrected for IMF gradients are higher in the outer regions of the disks. For a model based on the Milky Way but with an IMF scaled according to R136, the rotation curve without the traditional dark halo component falls with Galactocentric radius, though slower than it would without IMF gradients. For a second model of the Milky Way in which the IMF gradient is increased by 50%, the rotation curve is approximately flat in the outer disk, with a rotational velocity below ~220 km/s only before the traditional dark halo component is added. These results, if generalizable to other galaxies, not only call into question the assertion that dark matter halos are compatible with the flat rotation curves of spiral galaxies, but also may clarify our understanding of a wide variety of other astrophysical phenomena such as the G-dwarf problem, metallicity gradients, and the Tully-Fisher relation.

Jason A. Taylor

1998-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

359

Can dark matter be a Bose-Einstein condensate?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the possibility that the dark matter, which is required to explain the dynamics of the neutral hydrogen clouds at large distances from the galactic center, could be in the form of a Bose-Einstein condensate. To study the condensate we use the non-relativistic Gross-Pitaevskii equation. By introducing the Madelung representation of the wave function, we formulate the dynamics of the system in terms of the continuity equation and of the hydrodynamic Euler equations. Hence dark matter can be described as a non-relativistic, Newtonian Bose-Einstein gravitational condensate gas, whose density and pressure are related by a barotropic equation of state. In the case of a condensate with quartic non-linearity, the equation of state is polytropic with index $n=1$. To test the validity of the model we fit the Newtonian tangential velocity equation of the model with a sample of rotation curves of low surface brightness and dwarf galaxies, respectively. We find a very good agreement between the theoretical rot...

Boehmer, C G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Decaying Dark Matter and the Deficit of Dwarf Haloes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The hierarchical clustering inherent in Lambda-CDM cosmology seems to produce many of the observed characteristics of large-scale structure. But some glaring problems still remain, including the over-prediction (by a factor 10) of the number of dwarf galaxies within the virialized population of the local group. Several secondary effects have already been proposed to resolve this problem. It is still not clear, however, whether the principal solution rests with astrophysical processes, such as early feedback from supernovae, or possibly with as yet undetermined properties of the dark matter itself. In this paper, we carry out a detailed calculation of the dwarf halo evolution incorporating the effects of a hypothesized dark-matter decay, D -> D'+l, where D is the unstable particle, D' is the more massive daughter particle and l is the other, lighter (or possibly massless) daughter particle. This process preferentially heats the smaller haloes, expanding them during their evolution and reducing their present-day circular velocity. We find that this mechanism can account very well for the factor 4 deficit in the observed number of systems with velocity 10--20 km/s compared to those predicted by the numerical simulations, if dm/m_D' ~ 5-7 x 10^{-5}, where dm is the mass difference between the initial and final states. The corresponding lifetime tau cannot be longer than ~30 Gyr, but may be as short as just a few Gyr.

Majd Abdelqader; Fulvio Melia

2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

THE SPHERICALIZATION OF DARK MATTER HALOS BY GALAXY DISKS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cosmological simulations indicate that cold dark matter (CDM) halos should be triaxial. Validating this theoretical prediction is, however, less than straightforward because the assembly of galaxies is expected to modify halo shapes and to render them more axisymmetric. We use a suite of N-body simulations to quantitatively investigate the effect of the growth of a central disk galaxy on the shape of triaxial dark matter halos. In most circumstances, the halo responds to the presence of the disk by becoming more spherical. The net effect depends weakly on the timescale of the disk assembly but noticeably on the orientation of the disk relative to the halo principal axes, and it is maximal when the disk symmetry axis is aligned with the major axis of the halo. The effect depends most sensitively on the overall gravitational importance of the disk. Our results indicate that exponential disks whose contribution peaks at less than {approx}50% of their circular velocity are unable to noticeably modify the shape of the gravitational potential of their surrounding halos. Many dwarf and low surface brightness galaxies are expected to be in this regime, and therefore their detailed kinematics could be used to probe halo triaxiality, one of the basic predictions of the CDM paradigm. We argue that the complex disk kinematics of the dwarf galaxy NGC 2976 might be the reflection of a triaxial halo. Such signatures of halo triaxiality should be common in galaxies where the luminous component is subdominant.

Kazantzidis, Stelios [Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Abadi, Mario G. [Instituto de Astronomia Teorica y Experimental (IATE), Observatorio Astronomico de Cordoba and CONICET, Laprida 854 X5000BGR Cordoba (Argentina); Navarro, Julio F., E-mail: stelios@mps.ohio-state.ed, E-mail: mario@oac.uncor.ed, E-mail: jfn@uvic.c [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Gravitation, the 'Dark Matter' Effect and the Fine Structure Constant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravitational anomalies such as the mine/borehole g anomaly, the near-flatness of the spiral galaxy rotation-velocity curves, currently interpreted as a `dark matter' effect, the absence of that effect in ordinary elliptical galaxies, and the ongoing problems in accurately determining Newton's gravitational constant G_N are explained by a generalisation of the Newtonian theory of gravity to a fluid-flow formalism with one new dimensionless constant. By analysing the borehole data this constant is shown to be the fine structure constant alpha=1/137. The spiral galaxy `dark matter' effect and the globular cluster `black hole' masses are then correctly predicted. This formalism also explains the cause of the long-standing uncertainties in G_N and leads to the introduction of a fundamental gravitational constant G not = G_N with value G=(6.6526 +/- 0.013)x 10^-11 m^3s^{-2}kg^{-1}. The occurrence of alpha implies that space has a quantum structure, and we have the first evidence of quantum gravity effects.

Reginald T. Cahill

2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

363

The Dark Matter halo of the Milky Way, AD 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We derive the mass model of the Milky Way (MW), crucial for Dark Matter (DM) direct and indirect detection, using recent data and a cored dark matter (DM) halo profile, which is favoured by studies of external galaxies. The method used consists in fitting a spherically symmetric model of the Galaxy with a Burkert DM halo profile to available data: MW terminal velocities in the region inside the solar circle, circular velocity as recently estimated from maser star forming regions at intermediate radii, and velocity dispersions of stellar halo tracers for the outermost Galactic region. The latter are reproduced by integrating the Jeans equation for every modeled mass distribution, and by allowing for different velocity anisotropies for different tracer populations. For comparison we also consider a Navarro-Frenk-White profile. We find that the cored profile is the preferred one, with a shallow central density of ?{sub H} ? 4 10{sup 7}M{sub ?}/kpc{sup 3} and a large core radius R{sub H} ? 10 kpc, as observed in external spirals and in agreement with the mass model underlying the Universal Rotation Curve of spirals. We describe also the derived model uncertainties, which are crucially driven by the poorly constrained velocity dispersion anisotropies of halo tracers. The emerging cored DM distribution has implications for the DM annihilation angular profile, which is much less boosted in the Galactic center direction with respect to the case of the standard ?CDM, NFW profile. Using the derived uncertainties we discuss finally the limitations and prospects to discriminate between cored and cusped DM profile with a possible observed diffuse DM annihilation signal. The present mass model aims to characterize the present-day description of the distribution of matter in our Galaxy, which is needed to frame current crucial issues of Cosmology, Astrophysics and Elementary Particles.

Nesti, Fabrizio [Gran Sasso Science Institute, viale Crispi 7, I-67100 L'Aquila (Italy); Salucci, Paolo, E-mail: nesti@aquila.infn.it, E-mail: salucci@sissa.it [Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati (SISSA/ISAS), Via Bonomea 265, I-34136 Trieste (Italy)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

EMPIRICAL MODELS FOR DARK MATTER HALOS. II. INNER PROFILE SLOPES, DYNAMICAL PROFILES, AND /3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulated dark matter halos better than a Navarro- Frenk-WhiteYlike model with an equal number of parameters]) density profiles of simulated dark matter halos (Navarro et al. 2004). Intriguingly, this function was shown to provide a better fit than thethree-parameter Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW)Ylike model

Terzi, Bal?a

365

Halo-Independent analysis of direct dark matter detection data for any WIMP interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The halo independent comparison of direct dark matter detection data eliminates the need to make any assumption on the uncertain local dark matter distribution and is complementary to the usual data comparison which required assuming a dark halo model for our galaxy. The method, initially proposed for WIMPs with spin-independent contact interactions, has been generalized to any other interaction and applied to recent data on "Light WIMPs".

Graciela B. Gelmini

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

366

Significant effects of second KK particles on LKP dark matter physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We point out that Kaluza-Klein (KK) dark matter physics is drastically affected by second KK particles. In this work various interesting phenomena caused by the second KK modes are discussed. In particular, we reevaluate the annihilation cross section and thermal relic density of the KK dark matter quantitatively in universal extra dimensions, in which all the standard model particles propagate. In these models, the first KK mode of $B$ boson is a viable dark matter candidate by virtue of KK-parity. We demonstrate that the KK dark matter annihilation cross section can be enhanced, compared with the tree level cross section mediated only by first KK particles. The dark matter mass consistent with the WMAP observation is increased.

Mitsuru Kakizaki; Shigeki Matsumoto; Yoshio Sato; Masato Senami

2005-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

367

Cosmology with self-interacting sterile neutrinos and dark matter - A pseudoscalar model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short baseline neutrino oscillation experiments have shown hints of the existence of additional sterile neutrinos in the eV mass range. Such sterile neutrinos are incompatible with cosmology because they suppress structure formation unless they can be prevented from thermalising in the early Universe. Here we present a novel scenario in which both sterile neutrinos and dark matter are coupled to a new, light pseudoscalar. This can prevent thermalisation of sterile neutrinos and make dark matter sufficiently self-interacting to have an impact on galactic dynamics and possibly resolve some of the known problems with the standard cold dark matter scenario. Our model singles out a dimensionless coupling strength for both sterile neutrinos and dark matter in the range $g_s \\sim g_d \\sim 10^{-5}$ and predicts a dark matter particle mass in the MeV range.

Maria Archidiacono; Steen Hannestad; Rasmus Sloth Hansen; Thomas Tram

2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

368

Precision reconstruction of the dark matter-neutrino relative velocity from N-body simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discovering the mass of neutrinos is a principle goal in high energy physics and cosmology. In addition to cosmological measurements based on two-point statistics, the neutrino mass can also be estimated by observations of neutrino wakes resulting from the relative motion between dark matter and neutrinos. Such a detection relies on an accurate reconstruction of the dark matter-neutrino relative velocity which is affected by non-linear structure growth and galaxy bias. We investigate our ability to reconstruct this relative velocity using large N-body simulations where we evolve neutrinos as distinct particles alongside the dark matter. We find that the dark matter velocity power spectrum is overpredicted by linear theory whereas the neutrino velocity power spectrum is underpredicted. The magnitude of the relative velocity observed in the simulations is found to be lower than what is predicted in linear theory. Since neither the dark matter nor the neutrino velocity fields are directly observable from galaxy ...

Inman, Derek; Pen, Ue-Li; Farchi, Alban; Yu, Hao-Ran; Harnois-Deraps, Joachim

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

On the Oscillation of Neutrinos Produced by the Annihilation of Dark Matter inside the Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The annihilation of dark matter particles captured by the Sun can lead to a neutrino flux observable in neutrino detectors. Considering the fact that these dark matter particles are non-relativistic, if a pair of dark matter annihilates to a neutrino pair, the spectrum of neutrinos will be monochromatic. We show that in this case, even after averaging over production point inside the Sun, the oscillatory terms of the oscillation probability do not average to zero. This leads to interesting observable features in the annual variation of the number of muon track events. We show that smearing of the spectrum due to thermal distribution of dark matter inside the Sun is too small to wash out this variation. We point out the possibility of studying the initial flavor composition of neutrinos produced by the annihilation of dark matter particles via measuring the annual variation of the number of muon-track events in neutrino telescopes.

Arman Esmaili; Yasaman Farzan

2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

370

On the minimum dark matter mass testable by neutrinos from the Sun  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss a limitation on extracting bounds on the scattering cross section of dark matter with nucleons, using neutrinos from the Sun. If the dark matter particle is sufficiently light (less than about 4 GeV), the effect of evaporation is not negligible and the capture process goes in equilibrium with the evaporation. In this regime, the flux of solar neutrinos of dark matter origin becomes independent of the scattering cross section and therefore no constraint can be placed on it. We find the minimum values of dark matter masses for which the scattering cross section on nucleons can be probed using neutrinos from the Sun. We also provide simple and accurate fitting functions for all the relevant processes of GeV-scale dark matter in the Sun.

Busoni, Giorgio; Simone, Andrea De; Huang, Wei-Chih, E-mail: giorgio.busoni@sissa.it, E-mail: andrea.desimone@sissa.it, E-mail: wei-chih.huang@sissa.it [SISSA and INFN, Sezione di Trieste, via Bonomea 265, I-34136 Trieste (Italy)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Bounds on self-interacting fermion dark matter from observations of old neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The existence of old neutron stars deeply constrains self-interacting fermion dark matter, which can form star-killing black holes. We quantify this constraint on dark matter-nucleon scattering, considering collapse scenarios that broaden bounds over intermediate masses. We then find the self- and co-annihilation rates necessary to lift these dark matter-nucleon scattering bounds. For Yukawa-coupled dark matter that fits dwarf galaxy halo profiles with a coupling $\\alpha = 10^{-1}-10^{-4}$, a scalar mediator mass $m_\\phi = 1-500$ MeV, and DM mass $m_X = 0.1-10^7$ GeV, we show that fermion dark matter is unconstrained if it self-annihilates at a rate greater than $10^{-40} ~ \\rm{cm^3/s}$ or co-annihilates with baryons at a rate greater than $10^{-50} ~ \\rm{cm^3/s}$.

Joseph Bramante; Keita Fukushima; Jason Kumar; Elan Stopnitzky

2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

372

Accretions of Dark Matter and Dark Energy onto ($n+2$)-dimensional Schwarzschild Black Hole and Morris-Thorne Wormhole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied accretion of the dark matter and dark energy onto of $(n+2)$-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole and Morris-Thorne wormhole. The mass and the rate of change of mass for $(n+2)$-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole and Morris-Thorne wormhole have been found. We have assumed some candidates of dark energy like holographic dark energy, new agegraphic dark energy, quintessence, tachyon, DBI-essence, etc. The black hole mass and the wormhole mass have been calculated in term of redshift when dark matter and above types of dark energies accrete onto them separately. We have shown that the black hole mass increases and wormhole mass decreases for holographic dark energy, new agegraphic dark energy, quintessence, tachyon accretion and the slope of increasing/decreasing of mass sensitively depends on the dimension. But for DBI-essence accretion, the black hole mass first increases and then decreases and the wormhole mass first decreases and then increases and the slope of increasing/decreasing of mass...

Debnath, Ujjal

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Accretions of Dark Matter and Dark Energy onto ($n+2$)-dimensional Schwarzschild Black Hole and Morris-Thorne Wormhole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied accretion of the dark matter and dark energy onto of $(n+2)$-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole and Morris-Thorne wormhole. The mass and the rate of change of mass for $(n+2)$-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole and Morris-Thorne wormhole have been found. We have assumed some candidates of dark energy like holographic dark energy, new agegraphic dark energy, quintessence, tachyon, DBI-essence, etc. The black hole mass and the wormhole mass have been calculated in term of redshift when dark matter and above types of dark energies accrete onto them separately. We have shown that the black hole mass increases and wormhole mass decreases for holographic dark energy, new agegraphic dark energy, quintessence, tachyon accretion and the slope of increasing/decreasing of mass sensitively depends on the dimension. But for DBI-essence accretion, the black hole mass first increases and then decreases and the wormhole mass first decreases and then increases and the slope of increasing/decreasing of mass not sensitively depends on the dimension.

Ujjal Debnath

2015-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

374

Accretions of Dark Matter and Dark Energy onto ($n+2$)-dimensional Schwarzschild Black Hole and Morris-Thorne Wormhole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied accretion of the dark matter and dark energy onto of $(n+2)$-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole and Morris-Thorne wormhole. The mass and the rate of change of mass for $(n+2)$-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole and Morris-Thorne wormhole have been found. We have assumed some candidates of dark energy like holographic dark energy, new agegraphic dark energy, quintessence, tachyon, DBI-essence, etc. The black hole mass and the wormhole mass have been calculated in term of redshift when dark matter and above types of dark energies accrete onto them separately. We have shown that the black hole mass increases and wormhole mass decreases for holographic dark energy, new agegraphic dark energy, quintessence, tachyon accretion and the slope of increasing/decreasing of mass sensitively depends on the dimension. But for DBI-essence accretion, the black hole mass first increases and then decreases and the wormhole mass first decreases and then increases and the slope of increasing/decreasing of mass not sensitively depends on the dimension.

Ujjal Debnath

2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

375

Seeing in the Dark: Searching for Water on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Seeing in the Dark: Searching for Water on the Moon Learning Objectives: · To understand where, which uses ultraviolet light to detect water ice on the surface of the Moon and the LAMP technology used on LRO to detect water on the Moon's surface. Note: students must have learned

Christian, Eric

376

Polytropes: Implications for Molecular Clouds and Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polytropic models are reasonably successful in acounting for the observed features of molecular clouds. Multi-pressure polytropes include the various pressure components that are important in molecular clouds, whereas composite polytropes provide a representation for the core halo structure. Small, very dense (n~10^{11} cm^{-3}) molecular clouds have been proposed as models for both dark matter and for extreme scattering events. Insofar as the equation of state in these clouds can be represented by a single polytropic relation (pressure varies as a power of the density), such models conflict with observation. It is possible to contrive composite polytropes that do not conflict with observation, but whether the thermal properties of the clouds are consistent with such structure remains to be determined.

Christopher F. McKee

2000-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

377

Light Dark Matter in the light of CRESST-II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently the CRESST collaboration has published the long anticipated results of their direct Dark Matter (DM) detection experiment with a CaWO4 target. The number of observed events exceeds known backgrounds at more than 4? significance, and this excess could potentially be due to DM scattering. We confront this interpretation with null results from other direct detection experiments for a number of theoretical models, and find that consistency is achieved in non-minimal models such as inelastic DM and isospin-violating DM. In both cases mild tension with constraints remain. The CRESST data can, however, not be reconciled with the null results and with the positive signals from DAMA and CoGeNT simultaneously in any of the models we study.

Kopp, Joachim; Schwetz, Thomas; Zupan, Jure

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Solar Gamma Rays Powered by Secluded Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Secluded dark matter models, in which WIMPs annihilate first into metastable mediators, can present novel indirect detection signatures in the form of gamma rays and fluxes of charged particles arriving from directions correlated with the centers of large astrophysical bodies within the solar system, such as the Sun and larger planets. This naturally occurs if the mean free path of the mediator is in excess of the solar (or planetary) radius. We show that existing constraints from water Cerenkov detectors already provide a novel probe of the parameter space of these models, complementary to other sources, with significant scope for future improvement from high angular resolution gamma-ray telescopes such as Fermi-LAT. Fluxes of charged particles produced in mediator decays are also capable of contributing a significant solar system component to the spectrum of energetic electrons and positrons, a possibility which can be tested with the directional and timing information of PAMELA and Fermi.

Brian Batell; Maxim Pospelov; Adam Ritz; Yanwen Shang

2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

379

The Amount of Dark Matter in Spiral Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The `maximum' disk hypothesis of galactic disks imbedded in dark matter halos is examined. First, decompositions of the rotation curves of NGC 2613, 3198, 6503, and 7184 are analyzed. For these galaxies the radial velocity dispersions of the stars have been measured. If the parameters of the decompositions are chosen according to the `maximum' disk hypothesis, the Toomre Q stability parameter is sytematically less than one, which is a strong argument against the `maximum' disk hypothesis. Next, density wave theory arguments are used to describe the morphology of the spiral arms of NGC 3223, 157, and 7083. It is shown that the `maximum' disk hypothesis is not consistent with the observed morphologies of the galaxies.

B. Fuchs

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

Light Dark Matter in the light of CRESST-II  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Recently the CRESST collaboration has published the long anticipated results of their direct Dark Matter (DM) detection experiment with a CaWO4 target. The number of observed events exceeds known backgrounds at more than 4? significance, and this excess could potentially be due to DM scattering. We confront this interpretation with null results from other direct detection experiments for a number of theoretical models, and find that consistency is achieved in non-minimal models such as inelastic DM and isospin-violating DM. In both cases mild tension with constraints remain. The CRESST data can, however, not be reconciled with the null results and with the positive signals from DAMA and CoGeNT simultaneously in any of the models we study.

Kopp, Joachim; Schwetz, Thomas; Zupan, Jure

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Spin alignment of dark matter haloes in filaments and walls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MMF technique is used to segment the cosmic web as seen in a cosmological N-body simulation into wall-like and filament-like structures. We find that the spins and shapes of dark matter haloes are significantly correlated with each other and with the orientation of their host structures. The shape orientation is such that the halo minor axes tend to lie perpendicular to the host structure, be it a wall or filament. The orientation of the halo spin vector is mass dependent. Low mass haloes in walls and filaments have a tendency to have their spins oriented within the parent structure, while higher mass haloes in filaments have spins that tend to lie perpendicular to the parent structure.

Miguel A. Aragn-Calvo; Rien van de Weygaert; Bernard J. T. Jones; J. M. Thijs van der Hulst

2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

382

The alignment of dark matter halos with the cosmic web  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the orientation of the axes and angular momentum of dark matter halos with respect to their neighboring voids using high resolution N-body cosmological simulations. We find that the minor axis of halos tends to be aligned along the line joining the halo with the center of the void, and that the major axis is perpendicular to this line. However, we find that the angular momentum of halos does not have any particular orientation. These results may provide information about the mechanisms whereby the large-scale structure of the Universe affects galaxy formation and cast light upon the issue of the orientation of galaxy disks with respect to their host halos.

Santiago G. Patiri; Antonio J. Cuesta; Francisco Prada; Juan Betancort-Rijo; Anatoly Klypin

2006-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

383

E-Print Network 3.0 - attenuate white matter Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

white matter Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: attenuate white matter Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Parametric Transverse Relaxation...

384

Dark matter limits froma 15 kg windowless bubble chamber  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The COUPP collaboration has successfully used bubble chambers, a technology previously applied only to high-energy physics experiments, as direct dark matter detectors. It has produced the world's most stringent spin-dependent WIMP limits, and increasingly competitive spin-independent limits. These limits were achieved by capitalizing on an intrinsic rejection of the gamma background that all other direct detection experiments must address through high-density shielding and empirically-determined data cuts. The history of COUPP, including its earliest prototypes and latest results, is briefly discussed in this thesis. The feasibility of a new, windowless bubble chamber concept simpler and more inexpensive in design is discussed here as well. The dark matter limits achieved with a 15 kg windowless chamber, larger than any previous COUPP chamber (2 kg, 4 kg), are presented. Evidence of the greater radiopurity of synthetic quartz compared to natural is presented using the data from this 15 kg device, the first chamber to be made from synthetic quartz. The effective reconstruction of the three-dimensional positions of bubbles in a highly distorted optical field, with ninety-degree bottom lighting similar to cloud chamber lighting, is demonstrated. Another innovation described in this thesis is the use of the sound produced by bubbles recorded by an array of piezoelectric sensors as the primary means of bubble detection. In other COUPP chambers, cameras have been used as the primary trigger. Previous work on bubble acoustic signature differentiation using piezos is built upon in order to further demonstrate the ability to discriminate between alpha- and neutron-induced events.

Szydagis, Matthew Mark; /Chicago U.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Hidden sector dark matters and elusive Higgs boson(s) at the LHC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider two types of hidden sector dark matters (DM's), with and without QCD-like new strong interaction with confinement properties, and their interplays with the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson. Assuming the hidden sector has only fermions (and gauge bosons in case of strongly interacting hidden sector), we have to introduce a real singlet scalar boson S as a messenger between the SM and the hidden sector dark matters. This singlet scalar will mix with the SM Higgs boson h, and we expect there are two Higgs-like scalar bosons H{sub 1} and H{sub 2}. Imposing all the relevant constraints from collider search bounds on Higgs boson, DM scattering cross section on proton and thermal relic density, we find that one of the two Higgs-like scalar bosons can easily escape the detections at the LHC. Recent results on the Higgs-like new boson with mass around with 125 GeV from the LHC will constrain this class of models, which is left for future study.

Ko, P. [School of Physics, KIAS, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

386

Search for the dark photon and the dark Higgs boson at Belle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dark photon, $A^\\prime$, and the dark Higgs boson, $h^\\prime$, are hypothetical constituents featured in a number of recently proposed Dark Sector Models. Assuming prompt decays of both dark particles, we search for their production in the so-called Higgs-strahlung channel, $e^+e^- \\rightarrow A^\\prime h'$, with $h^\\prime \\rightarrow A^\\prime A^\\prime$. We investigate ten exclusive final-states with $A^\\prime \\rightarrow e^+e^-$, $\\mu^+\\mu^-$, or $\\pi^+\\pi^-$, in the mass ranges $0.1$~GeV/$c^2$~$section, $\\cal B \\times \\sigma_{\\mathrm{Born}}$, on the Born cross section, $\\sigma_{\\mathrm{Born}}$, and on the dark photon coupling to the dark Higgs boson times the kinetic mixing between the Standard Model photon and the dark photon, $\\alpha_D \\times \\epsilon^2$. These limits improve upon and cover wider mass ranges than previous experiments. The limits from the final-states $3(\\pi^+\\pi^-)$ and $2(e^+e^-)X$ are the first placed by any experiment. For $\\alpha_D$ equal to 1/137, $m_{h'}<$ 8 GeV/$c^2$, and $m_{A^\\prime}<$ 1 GeV/$c^2$, we exclude values of the mixing parameter, $\\epsilon$, above $\\sim 8 \\times 10^{-4}$.

The Belle Collaboration

2015-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

Measurement of the Low Energy Nuclear Response in NaI(Tl) Crystals for Use in Dark Matter Direct Detection Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The response of low energy nuclear recoil in NaI(Tl) is investigated in the following experiment. Such detectors have been used recently to search for evidence of dark matter in the form of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Na...

Stiegler, Tyana Michele

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

388

Hints on the nature of dark matter from the properties of Milky Way satellites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nature of dark matter is still unknown and one of the most fundamental scientific mysteries. Although successfully describing large scales, the standard cold dark matter model (CDM) exhibits possible shortcomings on galactic and sub-galactic scales. It is exactly at these highly non-linear scales where strong astrophysical constraints can be set on the nature of the dark matter particle. While observations of the Lyman-? forest probe the matter power spectrum in the mildly non-linear regime, satellite galaxies of the Milky Way provide an excellent laboratory as a test of the underlying cosmology on much smaller scales. Here we present results from a set of high resolution simulations of a Milky Way sized dark matter halo in eight distinct cosmologies: CDM, warm dark matter (WDM) with a particle mass of 2 keV and six different cold plus warm dark matter (C+WDM) models, varying the fraction, f{sub wdm}, and the mass, m{sub wdm}, of the warm component. We used three different observational tests based on Milky Way satellite observations: the total satellite abundance, their radial distribution and their mass profile. We show that the requirement of simultaneously satisfying all three constraints sets very strong limits on the nature of dark matter. This shows the power of a multi-dimensional small scale approach in ruling out models which would be still allowed by large scale observations.

Anderhalden, Donnino; Diemand, Juerg [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zrich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zrich (Switzerland); Schneider, Aurel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton, BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Macci, Andrea V. [Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy, Knigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Bertone, Gianfranco, E-mail: donninoa@physik.uzh.ch, E-mail: aurel.schneider@sussex.ac.uk, E-mail: maccio@mpia.de, E-mail: diemand@physik.uzh.ch, E-mail: gf.bertone@gmail.com [GRAPPA Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1090 GL Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Reducing cosmological small scale structure via a large dark matter-neutrino interaction: constraints and consequences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cold dark matter explains a wide range of data on cosmological scales. However, there has been a steady accumulation of evidence for discrepancies between simulations and observations at scales smaller than galaxy clusters. Solutions to these small scale structure problems may indicate that simulations need to improve how they include feedback from baryonic matter, or may imply that dark matter properties differ from the standard cold, noninteracting scenario. One promising way to affect structure formation on small scales is a relatively strong coupling of dark matter to neutrinos. We construct an experimentally viable, simple, renormalizable, model with new interactions between neutrinos and dark matter. We show that addressing the small scale structure problems requires dark matter with a mass that is tens of MeV, and a present-day density determined by an initial particle-antiparticle asymmetry in the dark sector. Generating a sufficiently large dark matter-neutrino coupling requires a new heavy neutrino with a mass around 100 MeV. The heavy neutrino is mostly sterile but has a substantial $\\tau$ neutrino component, while the three nearly massless neutrinos are partly sterile. We provide the first discussion of how such dark matter-neutrino interactions affect neutrino (especially $\\tau$ neutrino) phenomenology. This model can be tested by future astrophysical, particle physics, and neutrino oscillation data. A feature in the neutrino energy spectrum and flavor content from a future nearby supernova would provide strong evidence of neutrino-dark matter interactions. Promising signatures include anomalous matter effects in neutrino oscillations due to nonstandard interactions and a component of the $\\tau$ neutrino with mass around 100 MeV.

Bridget Bertoni; Seyda Ipek; David McKeen; Ann E. Nelson

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

390

The dark matter self-interaction and its impact on the critical mass for dark matter evaporations inside the sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the capture, annihilation and evaporation of dark matter (DM) inside the Sun. It has been shown that the DM self-interaction can increase the DM number inside the Sun. We demonstrate that this enhancement becomes more significant in the regime of small DM mass, given a fixed DM self-interaction cross section. This leads to the enhancement of neutrino flux from DM annihilation. On the other hand, for DM mass as low as as a few GeVs, not only the DM-nuclei scatterings can cause the DM evaporation, DM self-interaction also provides non-negligible contributions to this effect. Consequently, the critical mass for DM evaporation (typically 3 ~ 4 GeV without the DM self-interaction) can be slightly increased. We discuss the prospect of detecting DM self-interaction in IceCube- PINGU using the annihilation channels $\\chi\\chi\\rightarrow\

Chian-Shu Chen; Fei-Fan Lee; Guey-Lin Lin; Yen-Hsun Lin

2014-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

391

Hypothetical Dark Matter/Axion rockets: What can be said about Dark Matter in terms of space physics propulsion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses dark matter (DM) particle candidates from non-supersymmetry (SUSY) processes and explores how a DM candidate particle in the 100-400 GeV range could be created. Thrust from DM particles is also proposed for Photon rocket and Axion rockets. It would use a magnetic field to convert DM particles to near photonlike particles in a chamber to create thrust from the discharge of the near-photon-like particles. The presence of DM particles would suggest that thrust from the emerging near-photon-like particle would be greater than with conventional photon rockets. This amplifies and improves on an 'axion rocket ramjet' for interstellar travel. It is assumed that the same methodology used in an axion ramjet could be used with DM, with perhaps greater thrust/power conversion efficiencies.

Beckwith, Andrew [APS/Fermi contractor Aurora, Illinois 60502 630-840-2201 (United States)

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

392

A particle dark matter footprint on the first generation of stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dark matter particles with properties identical to dark matter candidates that are hinted at by several international collaborations dedicated to experimental detection of dark matter (DAMA, COGENT, CRESST and CDMS-II, although not, most notably, by LUX), and which also have a dark matter asymmetry identical to the observed baryon asymmetry (Planck and Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe), may produce a significant impact on the evolution of the first generation of low-metallicity stars. The lifetimes of these stars in different phases of stellar evolution are significantly extended, namely, in the pre-main sequence, main sequence, and red giant phases. In particular, intermediate-mass stars in the red giant phase experience significant changes in their luminosity and chemical composition. The annihilations of dark matter particles affect the interior of the star in such a way that the $3\\alpha-$reaction becomes less efficient in the production of carbon and oxygen. This dark matter effect contradicts the excess of carbon and other metals observed today in stars of low mass and low metallicity. Hence, we can impose an upper limit on the dark matter halo density, and therefore on the redshift, at which the first generation of low-metallicity stars formed.

Ilidio Lopes; Joseph Silk

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Form factors for dark matter capture by the Sun in effective theories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the effective theory of isoscalar and isovector dark matter-nucleon interactions mediated by a heavy spin-1 or spin-0 particle, 8 isotope-dependent nuclear response functions can be generated in the dark matter scattering by nuclei. We compute the 8 nuclear response functions for the 16 most abundant elements in the Sun, i.e. H, $^{3}$He, $^{4}$He, $^{12}$C, $^{14}$N, $^{16}$O, $^{20}$Ne, $^{23}$Na, $^{24}$Mg, $^{27}$Al, $^{28}$Si, $^{32}$S, $^{40}$Ar, $^{40}$Ca, $^{56}$Fe, and $^{59}$Ni, through detailed numerical shell model calculations. We use our response functions to compute the rate of dark matter capture by the Sun for all isoscalar and isovector dark matter-nucleon effective interactions, including several operators previously considered for dark matter direct detection only. We study in detail the dependence of the capture rate on specific dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, and on the different elements in the Sun. We find that a so far neglected momentum dependent dark matter coupling to...

Catena, Riccardo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Radiogenic and Muon-Induced Backgrounds in the LUX Dark Matter Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) dark matter experiment aims to detect rare low-energy interactions from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). The radiogenic backgrounds in the LUX detector have been measured and compared with Monte Carlo simulation. Measurements of LUX high-energy data have provided direct constraints on all background sources contributing to the background model. The expected background rate from the background model for the 85.3 day WIMP search run is $(2.6\\pm0.2_{\\textrm{stat}}\\pm0.4_{\\textrm{sys}})\\times10^{-3}$~events~keV$_{ee}^{-1}$~kg$^{-1}$~day$^{-1}$ in a 118~kg fiducial volume. The observed background rate is $(3.6\\pm0.4_{\\textrm{stat}})\\times10^{-3}$~events~keV$_{ee}^{-1}$~kg$^{-1}$~day$^{-1}$, consistent with model projections. The expectation for the radiogenic background in a subsequent one-year run is presented.

Akerib, D S; Bai, X; Bailey, A J; Balajthy, J; Bernard, E; Bernstein, A; Bradley, A; Byram, D; Cahn, S B; Carmona-Benitez, M C; Chan, C; Chapman, J J; Chiller, A A; Chiller, C; Coffey, T; Currie, A; de Viveiros, L; Dobi, A; Dobson, J; Druszkiewicz, E; Edwards, B; Faham, C H; Fiorucci, S; Flores, C; Gaitskell, R J; Gehman, V M; Ghag, C; Gibson, K R; Gilchriese, M G D; Hall, C; Hertel, S A; Horn, M; Huang, D Q; Ihm, M; Jacobsen, R G; Kazkaz, K; Knoche, R; Larsen, N A; Lee, C; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Malling, D C; Mannino, R; McKinsey, D N; Mei, D -M; Mock, J; Moongweluwan, M; Morad, J; Murphy, A St J; Nehrkorn, C; Nelson, H; Neves, F; Ott, R A; Pangilinan, M; Parker, P D; Pease, E K; Pech, K; Phelps, P; Reichhart, L; Shutt, T; Silva, C; Solovov, V N; Sorensen, P; O'Sullivan, K; Sumner, T J; Szydagis, M; Taylor, D; Tennyson, B; Tiedt, D R; Tripathi, M; Uvarov, S; Verbus, J R; Walsh, N; Webb, R; White, J T; Witherell, M S; Wolfs, F L H; Woods, M; Zhang, C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Role of Sterile Neutrino Warm Dark Matter in Rhenium and Tritium Beta Decays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sterile neutrinos with mass in the range of one to a few keV are important as extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics and are serious dark matter (DM) candidates. This DM mass scale (warm DM) is in agreement with both cosmological and galactic observations. We study the role of a keV sterile neutrino through its mixing with a light active neutrino in Rhenium 187 and Tritium beta decays. We pinpoint the energy spectrum of the beta particle, 0 Tritium beta spectra and estimate the size of this perturbation by means of the dimensionless ratio R of the sterile neutrino to the active neutrino contributions. We comment on the possibility of searching for sterile neutrino signatures in two experiments which are currently running at present, MARE and KATRIN, focused on the Rhenium 187 and Tritium beta decays respectively.

H. J. de Vega; O. Moreno; E. Moya de Guerra; M. Ramon Medrano; N. Sanchez

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

396

Does f(R,T) gravity admit a stationary scenario between dark energy and dark matter in its framework?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this note we address the well-known cosmic coincidence problem in the framework of the \\textit{f(R,T)} gravity. In order to achieve this, an interaction between dark energy and dark matter is considered. A constraint equation is obtained which filters the \\textit{f(R,T)} models that produce a stationary scenario between dark energy and dark matter. Due to the absence of a universally accepted interaction term introduced by a fundamental theory, the study is conducted over three different forms of chosen interaction terms. As an illustration three widely known models of \\textit{f(R,T)} gravity are taken into consideration and used in the setup designed to study the problem. The study reveals that, the realization of the coincidence scenario is almost impossible for the popular models of $f(R,T)$ gravity, thus proving to be a major setback for these models.

Rudra, Prabir

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Possible solution of dark matter, the solution of dark energy and Gell-Mann as great theoretician  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This talk discusses the formation of primordial intermediate-mass black holes, in a double-inflationary theory, of sufficient abundance possibly to provide all of the cosmological dark matter. There follows my, hopefully convincing, explanation of the dark energy problem, based on the observation that the visible universe is well approximated by a black hole. Finally, I discuss that Gell-Mann is among the five greatest theoreticians of the twentieth century.

Paul Howard Frampton

2010-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

398

On Einstein - Weyl unified model of dark energy and dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here I give a more detailed account of the part of the conference report that was devoted to reinterpreting the Einstein `unified models of gravity and electromagnetism' (1923) as the unified theory of dark energy (cosmological constant) and dark matter (neutral massive vector particle having only gravitational interactions). After summarizing Einstein's work and related earlier work of Weyl and Eddington, I present an approach to finding spherically symmetric solutions of the simplest variant of the Einstein models that was earlier mentioned in Weyl's work as an example of his generalization of general relativity. The spherically symmetric static solutions and homogeneous cosmological models are considered in some detail. As the theory is not integrable we study approximate solutions. In the static case, we show that there may exist two horizons and derive solutions near horizons. In cosmology, we propose to study the corresponding expansions of possible solutions near the origin and derive these expansions in a simplified model neglecting anisotropy. The structure of the solutions seems to hint at a possibility of an inflation mechanism that does not require adding scalar fields.

A. T. Filippov

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

399

Cogeneration of Dark Matter and Baryons by Non-Standard-Model Sphalerons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sphalerons of a new gauge interaction can convert a primordial asymmetry in B or L into a dark matter asymmetry. From the equilibrium conditions for the sphalerons of both the electroweak and the new interactions, one can compute the ratios of B, L, and X, where X is the dark matter number, thus determining the mass of the dark matter particle fairly precisely. Such a scenario can arise naturally in the context of unification with larger groups. An illustrative model embeddable in $SU(6) \\times SU(2) \\subset E_6$ is described.

Barr, S M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Cogeneration of Dark Matter and Baryons by Non-Standard-Model Sphalerons in Unified Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sphalerons of a new gauge interaction can convert a primordial asymmetry in B or L into a dark matter asymmetry. From the equilibrium conditions for the sphalerons of both the electroweak and the new interactions, one can compute the ratios of B, L, and X, where X is the dark matter number, thus determining the mass of the dark matter particle fairly precisely. Such a scenario can arise naturally in the context of unification with larger groups. An illustrative model embeddable in $SU(6) \\times SU(2) \\subset E_6$ is described as well as an equally simple model based on SU(7).

S. M. Barr; Heng-Yu Chen

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

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401

The Role of Electroweak Corrections for the Dark Matter Relic Abundance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze the validity of the theorems concerning the cancellation of the infrared and collinar divergences in the case of dark matter freeze-out in the early universe. In particular, we compute the electroweak logarithmic corrections of infrared origin to the annihilation cross section of a dark matter particle being the neutral component of a SU(2){sub L} multiplet. The inclusion of processes with final state W can modify significantly the cross sections computed with only virtual W exchange. Our results show that the inclusion of infrared logs is necessary for a precise computation of the dark matter relic abundance.

Ciafaloni, Paolo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universit di Lecce and INFN - Sezione di Lecce, Via per Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Comelli, Denis [INFN - Sezione di Ferrara, Via Saragat 3, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy); Simone, Andrea De [CERN, PH-TH Division, CH-1211, Genve 23 (Switzerland); Morgante, Enrico; Riotto, Antonio [Dpartement de Physique Thorique and Centre for Astroparticle Physics (CAP), 24 quai E. Ansermet, CH-1211 Genve (Switzerland); Urbano, Alfredo, E-mail: paolo.ciafaloni@le.infn.it, E-mail: comelli@fe.infn.it, E-mail: andrea.desimone@sissa.it, E-mail: enrico.morgante@unige.ch, E-mail: antonio.riotto@unige.ch, E-mail: alfredo.urbano@sissa.it [SISSA, Via Bonomea 265, I-34136 Trieste (Italy)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

At the heart of the matter: the origin of bulgeless dwarf galaxies and Dark Matter cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For almost two decades the properties of "dwarf" galaxies have challenged the Cold Dark Matter (CDM) paradigm of galaxy formation. Most observed dwarf galaxies consists of a rotating stellar disc embedded in a massive DM halo with a near constant-density core. Yet, models based on the CDM scenario invariably form galaxies with dense spheroidal stellar "bulges" and steep central DM profiles, as low angular momentum baryons and DM sink to the center of galaxies through accretion and repeated mergers. Processes that decrease the central density of CDM halos have been identified, but have not yet reconciled theory with observations of present day dwarfs. This failure is potentially catastrophic for the CDM model, possibly requiring a different DM particle candidate. This Letter presents new hydrodynamical simulations in a Lambda$CDM framework where analogues of dwarf galaxies, bulgeless and with a shallow central DM profile, are formed. This is achieved by resolving the inhomogeneous interstellar medium, resulting in strong outflows from supernovae explosions which remove low angular momentum gas. This inhibits the formation of bulges and decreases the dark-matter density to less than half within the central kiloparsec. Realistic dwarf galaxies are thus shown to be a natural outcome of galaxy formation in the CDM scenario.

Fabio Governato; Chris Brook; Lucio Mayer; Alyson Brooks; George Rhee; James Wadsley; Patrik Jonsson; Beth Willman; Greg Stinson; Thomas Quinn; Piero Madau

2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

403

Gravitational Lensing Limits on Cold Dark Matter and Its Variants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standard $\\Omega_0=1$ cold dark matter (CDM) needs $0.27 < \\sigma_8 < 0.63$ ($2\\sigma$) to fit the observed number of large separation lenses, and the constraint is nearly independent of $H_0=100h^{-1}\\kms$ Mpc$^{-1}$. This range is strongly inconsistent with the COBE estimate of $\\sigma_8=(2.8\\pm0.2)h$. Tilting the primordial spectrum $\\propto k^n$ from $n=1$ to $0.3 \\ltorder n \\ltorder 0.7$, using an effective Hubble constant of $0.15 \\ltorder \\Gamma=h \\ltorder 0.30$, or reducing the matter density to $0.15 \\ltorder \\Omega_0 h \\ltorder 0.3$ either with no cosmological constant ($\\lambda_0=0$) or in a flat universe with a cosmological constant ($\\Omega_0+\\lambda_0=1$) can bring the lensing estimate of $\\sigma_8$ into agreement with the COBE estimates. The models and values for $\\sigma_8$ consistent with both lensing and COBE match the estimates from the local number density of clusters and correlation functions. The conclusions are insensitive to systematic errors except for the assumption that cluster core radii are singular. If clusters with $\\rho\\propto(r^2+s^2)^{-1}$ have core radii exceeding $s = 15h^{-1}\\sigma_3^2$ kpc for a cluster with velocity dispersion $\\sigma=10^3\\sigma_3 \\kms$ then the estimates are invalid. There is, however, a fine tuning problem in making the cluster core radii large enough to invalidate the estimates of $\\sigma_8$ while producing several lenses that do not have central or ``odd images.'' The estimated completeness of the current samples of lenses larger than $5\\parcs0$ is 20\\%, because neither quasar surveys nor lens surveys are optimized to this class of lenses.

Christopher S. Kochanek

1994-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

404

Constraints on dark matter annihilation from CMB observations before Planck  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We compute the bounds on the dark matter (DM) annihilation cross section using the most recent Cosmic Microwave Background measurements from WMAP9, SPT'11 and ACT'10. We consider DM with mass in the MeVTeV range annihilating 100% into either an e{sup +}e{sup ?} or a ?{sup +}?{sup ?} pair. We consider a realistic energy deposition model, which includes the dependence on the redshift, DM mass and annihilation channel. We exclude the canonical thermal relic abundance cross section ((?v) = 3 10{sup ?26}cm{sup 3}s{sup ?1}) for DM masses below 30 GeV and 15 GeV for the e{sup +}e{sup ?} and ?{sup +}?{sup ?} channels, respectively. A priori, DM annihilating in halos could also modify the reionization history of the Universe at late times. We implement a realistic halo model taken from results of state-of-the-art N-body simulations and consider a mixed reionization mechanism, consisting on reionization from DM as well as from first stars. We find that the constraints on DM annihilation remain unchanged, even when large uncertainties on the halo model parameters are considered.

Lopez-Honorez, Laura [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel and The International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Mena, Olga; Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio; Vincent, Aaron C., E-mail: llopezho@vub.ac.be, E-mail: omena@ific.uv.es, E-mail: sergio.palomares.ruiz@ist.utl.pt, E-mail: vincent@ific.uv.es [Instituto de Fsica Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC-Universitat de Valncia, Apartado de Correos 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Modeling Tidal Streams in evolving dark matter halos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore whether stellar tidal streams can provide information on the secular, cosmological evolution of the Milky Way's gravitational potential and on the presence of subhalos. We carry out long-term (~t_hubble) N-body simulations of disrupting satellite galaxies in a semi-analytic Galaxy potential where the dark matter halo and the subhalos evolve according to a LCDM cosmogony. All simulations are constrained to end up with the same position and velocity at present. Our simulations account for: (i) the secular evolution of the host halo's mass, size and shape, (ii) the presence of subhalos and (iii) dynamical friction. We find that tidal stream particles respond adiabatically to the Galaxy growth so that, at present, the energy and angular momentum distribution is exclusively determined by the present Galaxy potential. In other words, all present-day observables can only constrain the present mass distribution of the Galaxy independent of its past evolution. We also show that, if the full phase-space distribution of a tidal stream is available, we can accurately determine (i) the present Galaxy's shape and (ii) the amount of mass loss from the stream's progenitor, even if this evolution spanned a cosmologically significant epoch.

Jorge Penarrubia; Andrew J. Benson; David Martinez-Delgado; Hans-Walter Rix

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

406

Induced Nested Galactic Bars Inside Assembling Dark Matter Halos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the formation and evolution of nested bar systems in disk galaxies in a cosmological setting by following the development of an isolated dark matter (DM) and baryon density perturbation. The disks form within the assembling triaxial DM halos and the feedback from the stellar evolution is accounted for in terms of supernovae and OB stellar winds. Focusing on a representative model, we show the formation of an oval disk and of a first generation of nested bars with characteristic sub-kpc and a few kpc sizes. The system evolves through successive dynamical couplings and decouplings, forcing the gas inwards and settles in a state of resonant coupling. The inflow rate can support a broad range of activity within the central kpc, from quasar- to Seyfert-types, supplemented by a vigorous star formation as a by-product. The initial bar formation is triggered in response to the tidal torques from the triaxial DM halo, which acts as a finite perturbation. This first generation of bars does not survive for more than 4--5 Gyr: by that time the secondary bar has totally dissolved, while the primary one has very substantially weakened, reduced to a fat oval. This evolution is largely due to chaos introduced by the interaction of the multiple non-axisymmetric components.

Clayton Heller; Isaac Shlosman; Lia Athanassoula

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

407

Designing and testing the neutron source deployment system and calibration plan for a dark matter detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, we designed and tested a calibration and deployment system for the MiniCLEAN dark matter detector. The deployment system uses a computer controlled winch to lower a canister containing a neutron source into ...

Westerdale, Shawn (Shawn S.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Search for the dark photon and the dark Higgs boson at Belle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dark photon, $A^\\prime$, and the dark Higgs boson, $h^\\prime$, are hypothetical constituents featured in a number of recently proposed Dark Sector Models. Assuming prompt decays of both dark particles, we search for their production in the so-called Higgs-strahlung channel, $e^+e^- \\rightarrow A^\\prime h'$, with $h^\\prime \\rightarrow A^\\prime A^\\prime$. We investigate ten exclusive final-states with $A^\\prime \\rightarrow e^+e^-$, $\\mu^+\\mu^-$, or $\\pi^+\\pi^-$, in the mass ranges $0.1$~GeV/$c^2$~$< m_{A^\\prime} < 3.5$~GeV/$c^2$ and $0.2$~GeV/$c^2$~$< m_{h'} < 10.5$~GeV/$c^2$. We also investigate three inclusive final-states, $2(e^+e^-)X$, $2(\\mu^+\\mu^-)X$, and $(e^+e^-)(\\mu^+\\mu^-)X$, where $X$ denotes a dark photon candidate detected via missing mass, in the mass ranges $1.1$~GeV/$c^2$~$< m_{A^\\prime} < 3.5$~GeV/$c^2$ and $2.2$~GeV/$c^2$~$< m_{h'} < 10.5$~GeV/$c^2$. Using the entire $977\\,\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ data set collected by Belle, we observe no significant signal. We obtain ind...

,

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Dark energy and dust matter phases from an exact $f(R)$-cosmology model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that dust matter-dark energy combined phases can be achieved by the exact solution derived from a power law $f(R)$ cosmological model. This example answers the query by which a dust-dominated decelerated phase, before dark-energy accelerated phase, is needed in order to form large scale structures.

S. Capozziello; P. Martin-Moruno; C. Rubano

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

410

Cold Dark Matter, Radiative Neutrino Mass, mu to e gamma, and Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two of the most important and pressing questions in cosmology and particle physics are: (1) What is the nature of cold dark matter? and (2) Will near-future experiments on neutrinoless double beta decay be able to ascertain that the neutrino is a Majorana particle, i.e. its own antiparticle? We show that these two seemingly unrelated issues are intimately connected if neutrinos acquire mass only because of their interactions with dark matter.

Jisuke Kubo; Ernest Ma; Daijiro Suematsu

2006-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

411

Fermi-LAT constraints on dark matter annihilation cross section from observations of the Fornax cluster  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze 2.8-yr data of 1100 GeV photons for clusters of galaxies, collected with the Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi satellite. By analyzing 49 nearby massive clusters located at high Galactic latitudes, we find no excess gamma-ray emission towards directions of the galaxy clusters. Using flux upper limits, we show that the Fornax cluster provides the most stringent constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section. Stacking a large sample of nearby clusters does not help improve the limit for most dark matter models. This suggests that a detailed modeling of the Fornax cluster is important for setting robust limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section based on clusters. We therefore perform the detailed mass modeling and predict the expected dark matter annihilation signals from the Fornax cluster, by taking into account effects of dark matter contraction and substructures. By modeling the mass distribution of baryons (stars and gas) around a central bright elliptical galaxy, NGC 1399, and using a modified contraction model motivated by numerical simulations, we show that the dark matter contraction boosts the annihilation signatures by a factor of 4. For dark matter masses around 10 GeV, the upper limit obtained on the annihilation cross section times relative velocity is (??)?<(23) 10{sup ?25} cm{sup 3} s{sup ?1}, which is within a factor of 10 from the value required to explain the dark matter relic density. This effect is more robust than the annihilation boost due to substructure, and it is more important unless the mass of the smallest subhalos is much smaller than that of the Sun.

Ando, Shin'ichiro [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam, 1090 GL Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nagai, Daisuke, E-mail: s.ando@uva.nl, E-mail: daisuke.nagai@yale.edu [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Density of dark matter in Solar system and perihelion precession of planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct relation is pointed out between the secular perihelion precession of a planet and the density of dark matter at its orbit. It is valid under the only assumption that the density is spherically-symmetric, with the center coinciding with the Sun. This relation, combined with the observational data on perihelion precession of planets, results in upper limits on local values of the dark matter density in the Solar system.

I. B. Khriplovich

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Annihilation vs. decay: constraining dark matter properties from a gamma-ray detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most proposed dark matter candidates are stable and are produced thermally in the early Universe. However, there is also the possibility of unstable (but long-lived) dark matter, produced thermally or otherwise. We propose a strategy to distinguish between dark matter annihilation and/or decay in the case that a clear signal is detected in gamma-ray observations of Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies with gamma-ray experiments. The sole measurement of the energy spectrum of an indirect signal would render the discrimination between these cases impossible. We show that by examining the dependence of the intensity and energy spectrum on the angular distribution of the emission, the origin could be identified as decay, annihilation, or both. In addition, once the type of signal is established, we show how these measurements could help to extract information about the dark matter properties, including mass, annihilation cross section, lifetime, dominant annihilation and decay channels, and the presence of substructure. Although an application of the approach presented here would likely be feasible with current experiments only for very optimistic dark matter scenarios, the improved sensitivity of upcoming experiments could enable this technique to be used to study a wider range of dark matter models.

Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio [Centro de Fsica Terica de Partculas, Instituto Superior Tcnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Siegal-Gaskins, Jennifer M., E-mail: sergio.palomares.ruiz@ist.utl.pt, E-mail: jsg@mps.ohio-state.edu [Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics, The Ohio State University, 191 W. Woodruff Ave., Columbus OH 43210 (United States)

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Dark matter conversion as a source of boost factor for explaining the cosmic ray positron and electron excesses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In interacting multi-component dark matter (DM) models, if the DM components are nearly degenerate in mass and the interactions between them are strong enough, the relatively heavy DM components can be converted into lighter ones at late time after the thermal decoupling. Consequently, the relic density of the lightest DM component can be considerably enhanced at late time. This may contribute to an alternative source of boost factor required to explain the positron and electron excesses reported by the recent DM indirect search experiments such as PAMELA, Fermi-LAT and HESS etc..

Ze-Peng Liu; Yue-Liang Wu; Yu-Feng Zhou

2011-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

415

INTO THE LAIR: GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE SIGNATURES OF DARK MATTER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nature and properties of dark matter (DM) are both outstanding issues in physics. Besides clustering in halos, the universal character of gravity implies that self-gravitating compact DM configurations-predicted by various models-might be spread throughout the universe. Their astrophysical signature can be used to probe fundamental particle physics, or to test alternative descriptions of compact objects in active galactic nuclei. Here, we discuss the most promising dissection tool of such configurations: the inspiral of a compact stellar-size object and consequent gravitational-wave (GW) emission. The inward motion of this ''test probe'' encodes unique information about the nature of the supermassive configuration. When the probe travels through some compact region we show, within a Newtonian approximation, that the quasi-adiabatic inspiral is mainly driven by DM accretion and by dynamical friction, rather than by radiation reaction. When accretion dominates, the frequency and amplitude of the GW signal produced during the latest stages of the inspiral are nearly constant. In the exterior region we study a model in which the inspiral is driven by GW and scalar-wave emission, described at a fully relativistic level. Resonances in the energy flux appear whenever the orbital frequency matches the effective mass of the DM particle, corresponding to the excitation of the central object's quasinormal frequencies. Unexpectedly, these resonances can lead to large dephasing with respect to standard inspiral templates, to such an extent as to prevent detection with matched filtering techniques. We discuss some observational consequences of these effects for GW detection.

Macedo, Caio F. B.; Cardoso, Vitor; Crispino, Luis C. B. [Faculdade de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Para, 66075-110 Belem, Para (Brazil); Pani, Paolo [CENTRA, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa (UTL), Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049 Lisboa (Portugal)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Blind Spots for neutralino Dark Matter in the MSSM with an intermediate m_A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the spin-independent neutralino Dark Matter scattering off heavy nuclei in the MSSM. We identify analytically the blind spots in direct detection for intermediate values of $m_A$. In the region where $\\mu$ and $M_{1,2}$ have opposite signs, there is not only a reduction of the lightest CP-even Higgs coupling to neutralinos, but also a destructive interference between the neutralino scattering through the exchange of the lightest CP-even Higgs and that through the exchange of the heaviest CP-even Higgs. At critical values of $m_A$, the tree-level contribution from the light Higgs exchange cancels the contribution from the heavy Higgs, so the scattering cross section vanishes. We denote these configurations as blind spots, since they provide a generalization of the ones previously discussed in the literature, which occur at very large values of $m_A$. We show that the generalized blind spots may occur in regions of parameter space that are consistent with the obtention of the proper neutralino relic density, and can be tested by non-standard Higgs boson searches and EWino searches at the LHC and future linear colliders.

Peisi Huang; Carlos E. M. Wagner

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

E-Print Network 3.0 - abnormal grey matter Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Sample search results for: abnormal grey matter Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 White Matter Abnormalities in Whole Brain and its Regional Specificity in Chronic...

418

The Cosmic QCD Phase Transition, Quasi-baryonic Dark Matter and Massive Compact Halo Objects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose that the cold dark matter (CDM) is composed entirely of quark matter, arising from a cosmic quark-hadron transition. We denote this phase as "quasibaryonic", distinct from the usual baryons. We show that compact gravitational lenses, with masses around 0.5 (M_{\\odot}), could have evolved out of the quasibaryonic CDM.

Shibaji Banerjee; Abhijit Bhattacharyya; Sanjay K. Ghosh; Sibaji Raha; Bikash Sinha; Hiroshi Toki

2002-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

419

$?_R$ dark matter-philic Higgs for 3.5 keV X-ray signal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We suggest a new model in which a dark matter-philic Higgs is included to discriminate the interaction between dark matter and other particles, to explain the recent observation of the $7~ {\\rm keV}$ X-ray line signal by XMM-Newton observatory. The smallness of the vacuum expectation value of dark matter-philic Higgs can achieve the small mixing angle of the dark matter right-handed neutrino with the ordinary one. We show the range of the symmetry breaking scales as well as the observed dark matter properties are satisfied. In our model, the value of the vacuum expectation value of dark matter-philic Higgs should be about $0.17~ {\\rm GeV}$.

Naoyuki Haba; Hiroyuki Ishida; Ryo Takahashi

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

420

DARK MATTER HALO PROFILES OF MASSIVE CLUSTERS: THEORY VERSUS OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dark-matter-dominated cluster-scale halos act as an important cosmological probe and provide a key testing ground for structure formation theory. Focusing on their mass profiles, we have carried out (gravity-only) simulations of the concordance {Lambda}CDM cosmology, covering a mass range of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} h {sup -1} M{sub Sun} and a redshift range of z = 0-2, while satisfying the associated requirements of resolution and statistical control. When fitting to the Navarro-Frenk-White profile, our concentration-mass (c-M) relation differs in normalization and shape in comparison to previous studies that have limited statistics in the upper end of the mass range. We show that the flattening of the c-M relation with redshift is naturally expressed if c is viewed as a function of the peak height parameter, {nu}. Unlike the c-M relation, the slope of the c-{nu} relation is effectively constant over the redshift range z = 0-2, while the amplitude varies by {approx}30% for massive clusters. This relation is, however, not universal: using a simulation suite covering the allowed wCDM parameter space, we show that the c-{nu} relation varies by about {+-}20% as cosmological parameters are varied. At fixed mass, the c(M) distribution is well fit by a Gaussian with {sigma}{sub c}/(c) {approx_equal} 1/3, independent of the radius at which the concentration is defined, the halo dynamical state, and the underlying cosmology. We compare the {Lambda}CDM predictions with observations of halo concentrations from strong lensing, weak lensing, galaxy kinematics, and X-ray data, finding good agreement for massive clusters (M{sub vir} > 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} h {sup -1} M{sub Sun }), but with some disagreements at lower masses. Because of uncertainty in observational systematics and modeling of baryonic physics, the significance of these discrepancies remains unclear.

Bhattacharya, Suman; Habib, Salman; Heitmann, Katrin [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)] [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Vikhlinin, Alexey [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Planet-bound dark matter and the internal heat of Uranus, Neptune, and hot-Jupiter exoplanets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We suggest that accretion of planet-bound dark matter by the Jovian planets, and by hot-Jupiter exoplanets, could be a significant source of their internal heat. The anomalously low internal heat of Uranus would then be explained if the collision believed to have tilted the axis of Uranus also knocked it free of most of its associated dark matter cloud. Our considerations focus on the efficient capture of non-self-annihilating dark matter, but could also apply to self-annihilating dark matter, provided the capture efficiency is small enough that the earth heat balance constraint is obeyed.

Stephen L. Adler

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

422

Dark matter scaling relations and the assembly epoch of Coma early-type galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Axisymmetric, orbit-based dynamical models are used to derive dark matter scaling relations for Coma early-type galaxies. From faint to bright galaxies halo core-radii and asymptotic circular velocities increase. Compared to spirals of the same brightness, the majority of Coma early-types -- those with old stellar populations -- have similar halo core-radii but more than 2 times larger asymptotic halo velocities. The average dark matter density inside 2 reff decreases with increasing luminosity and is 6.8 times larger than in disk galaxies of the same B-band luminosity. Compared at the same stellar mass, dark matter densities in ellipticals are 13.5 times higher than in spirals. Different baryon concentrations in ellipticals and spirals cannot explain the higher dark matter density in ellipticals. Instead, the assembly redshift (1+z) of Coma early-type halos is likely about two times larger than of comparably bright spirals. Assuming that local spirals typically assemble at a redshift of one, the majority of bright Coma early-type galaxy halos must have formed around z = 2-3. For about half of our Coma galaxies the assembly redshifts match with constraints derived from stellar populations. We find dark matter densities and estimated assembly redshifts of our observed Coma galaxies in reasonable agreement with recent semi-analytic galaxy formation models.

J. Thomas; R. P. Saglia; R. Bender; D. Thomas; K. Gebhardt; J. Magorrian; E. M. Corsini; G. Wegner

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

423

Are Dark Matter and Dark Energy the Residue of the Expansion-Reaction to the Big Bang ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive the phenomenological Milgrom square-law acceleration, describing the apparent behavior of dark matter, as the reaction to the Big Bang from a model based on the Lorentz-Dirac equation of motion traditionally describing radiation reaction in electromagnetism but proven applicable to expansion reaction in cosmology. The model is applied within the Robertson-Walker hypersphere, and suggests that the Hubble expansion exactly cancels the classical reaction imparted to matter following the Big Bang, leaving behind a residue proportional to the square of the acceleration. The model further suggests that the energy density associated with the reaction acceleration is precisely the critical density for flattening the universe thus providing a potential explanation of dark energy as well. A test of this model is proposed.

Harry I. Ringermacher; Lawrence R. Mead

2006-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

424

Semi-empirical catalog of early-type galaxy-halo systems: dark matter density profiles, halo contraction and dark matter annihilation strength  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxy data and halo data from up-to-date N-body simulations within the ?CDM framework we construct a semi-empirical catalog (SEC) of early-type galaxy-halo systems by making a self-consistent bivariate statistical match of stellar mass (M{sub *}) and velocity dispersion (?) with halo virial mass (M{sub vir}) as demonstrated here for the first time. We then assign stellar mass profile and velocity dispersion profile parameters to each system in the SEC using their observed correlations with M{sub *} and ?. Simultaneously, we solve for dark matter density profile of each halo using the spherical Jeans equation. The resulting dark matter density profiles deviate in general from the dissipationless profile of Navarro-Frenk-White or Einasto and their mean inner density slope and concentration vary systematically with M{sub vir}. Statistical tests of the distribution of profiles at fixed M{sub vir} rule out the null hypothesis that it follows the distribution predicted by dissipationless N-body simulations for M{sub vir}?<10{sup 13.5} {sup } {sup 14.5} M{sub s}un. These dark matter profiles imply that dark matter density is, on average, enhanced significantly in the inner region of halos with M{sub vir}?<10{sup 13.5} {sup } {sup 14.5} M{sub s}un supporting halo contraction. The main characteristics of halo contraction are: (1) the mean dark matter density within the effective radius has increased by a factor varying systematically up to ? 34 at M{sub vir} = 10{sup 12} M{sub s}un, and (2) the inner density slope has a mean of (?) ? 1.3 with ?{sub dm}(r)?r{sup ??} and a halo-to-halo rms scatter of rms(?) ? 0.40.5 for 10{sup 12} M{sub s}un?dark matter annihilation.

Chae, Kyu-Hyun [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Sejong University, 98 Gunja-dong Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Kravtsov, Andrey V. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, The University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Frieman, Joshua A. [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Bernardi, Mariangela, E-mail: chae@sejong.ac.kr, E-mail: andrey@oddjob.uchicago.edu, E-mail: frieman@fnal.gov, E-mail: bernardm@physics.upenn.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Production of Sterile Neutrino Dark Matter and the 3.5 keV line  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent observation of an X-ray line at an energy of 3.5 keV mainly from galaxy clusters has initiated a discussion about whether we may have seen a possible dark matter signal. If confirmed, this signal could stem from a decaying sterile neutrino of a mass of 7.1 keV. Such a particle could make up all the dark matter, but it is not clear how it was produced in the early Universe. In this letter we show that it is possible to discriminate between different production mechanisms with present-day astronomical data. The most stringent constraint comes from the Lyman-{\\alpha} forest and seems to disfavor all but one of the main production mechanisms proposed in the literature, which is the production via decay of heavy scalar singlets. Pinning down the production mechanism will help to decide whether the X-ray signal indeed comprises an indirect detection of dark matter.

Alexander Merle; Aurel Schneider

2015-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

426

Modern Cosmological Models with Dark Matter and Their Confrontation with Observational Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New systematic classification of cosmological models of the present Universe is introduced. After making the comparison of these models with all existing observational data three viable models remain: the cold dark matter model with the cosmological constant (which becomes the most reasonable one if the Hubble constant $H_0>60$ km/s/Mpc); the mixed cold-hot dark matter model (models with two and especially three types of neutrinos with equal masses are in a slightly better agreement with observational data than the model with one massive neutrino); the pure cold dark matter model with a step-like initial spectrum of perturbations. The two latter models require $H_0\\leq 60$ km/s/Mpc.

A. A. Starobinsky

1996-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

The effect of dark matter resolution on the collapse of baryons in high redshift numerical simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the impact of dark matter particle resolution on the formation of a baryonic core in high resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations. We test the effect that both particle smoothing and particle splitting have on the hydrodynamic properties of a collapsing halo at high redshift (z > 20). Furthermore, we vary the background field intensity, with energy below the Lyman limit ( 100.0$ be satisfied, where ${M_{\\rm{core}}}$ is the enclosed baryon mass within the core and $M_{\\rm{DM}}$ is the minimum dark matter particle mass. This ratio should provide a very useful starting point for conducting convergence tests before any production run simulations. We find that dark matter particle smoothing is a useful adjunct to already highly resolved simulations.

Regan, John A; Wise, John H

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Constraints on decaying dark matter from Fermi observations of nearby galaxies and clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze the impact of Fermi gamma-ray observations (primarily non-detections) of selected nearby galaxies, including dwarf spheroidals, and of clusters of galaxies on decaying dark matter models. We show that the fact that galaxy clusters do not shine in gamma rays puts the most stringent limits available to-date on the lifetime of dark matter particles for a wide range of particle masses and decay final states. In particular, our results put strong constraints on the possibility of ascribing to decaying dark matter both the increasing positron fraction reported by PAMELA and the high-energy feature in the electron-positron spectrum measured by Fermi. Observations of nearby dwarf galaxies and of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) do not provide as strong limits as those from galaxy clusters, while still improving on previous constraints in some cases.

Dugger, Leanna; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Astronomy and Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA (United States); Jeltema, Tesla E., E-mail: greentee01@gmail.com, E-mail: tesla@ucolick.org, E-mail: profumo@scipp.ucsc.edu [UCO/Lick Observatories, 1156 High St., Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Testing two alternatives theories to dark matter with the Milky Way dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two alternative theories to dark matter are investigated by testing their ability to describe consistently the dynamics of the Milky Way. The first one refers to a modified gravity theory having a running gravitational constant and the second assumes that dark matter halos are constituted by a Bose-Einstein condensation. The parameters of each model as well as those characterizing the stellar subsystems of the Galaxy were estimated by fitting the rotation curve of the Milky Way. Then, using these parameters, the vertical acceleration profile at the solar position was computed and compared with observations. The modified gravity theory overestimates the vertical acceleration derived from stellar kinematics while predictions of the Bose-Einstein condensation halo model are barely consistent with observations. However, a dark matter halo based on a collisionless fluid satisfies our consistency test, being the best model able to describe equally well the rotation curve and the vertical acceleration of the Galaxy.