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1

The Search for Dark Matter  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

More than 25 years ago, PNNL scientists began the first underground measurements searching for dark matter using specialized radiation detector technology. Dark matter is yet to be discovered says Physicist John L. Orrell.

Orrell, John

2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

2

The Search for Dark Matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than 25 years ago, PNNL scientists began the first underground measurements searching for dark matter using specialized radiation detector technology. Dark matter is yet to be discovered says Physicist John L. Orrell.

Orrell, John

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

3

Direct search for dark matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dark matter is hypothetical matter which does not interact with electromagnetic radiation. The existence of dark matter is only inferred from gravitational effects of astrophysical observations to explain the missing mass component of the Universe. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles are currently the most popular candidate to explain the missing mass component. I review the current status of experimental searches of dark matter through direct detection using terrestrial detectors.

Yoo, Jonghee; /Fermilab

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Dark Matter Searches with GLAST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indirect detection of particle dark matter relies upon pair annihilation of Weakly Interaction Massive Particles (WIMPs), which is complementary to the well known techniques of direct detection (WIMP-nucleus scattering) and collider production (WIMP pair production). Pair annihilation of WIMPs results in the production of gamma-rays, neutrinos, and anti-matter. Of the various experiments sensitive to indirect detection of dark matter, the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) may play the most crucial role in the next few years. After launch in late 2007, The GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) will survey the gamma-ray sky in the energy range of 20MeV-300GeV. By eliminating charged particle background above 100 MeV, GLAST may be sensitive to as yet to be observed Milky Way dark matter subhalos, as well as WIMP pair annihilation spectral lines from the Milky Way halo. Discovery of gamma-ray signals from dark matter in the Milky Way would not only demonstrate the particle nature of dark matter; it would also open a new observational window on galactic dark matter substructure. Location of new dark matter sources by GLAST would dramatically alter the experimental landscape; ground based gamma ray telescopes could follow up on the new GLAST sources with precision measurements of the WIMP pair annihilation spectrum.

Lawrence Wai; GLAST LAT Collaboration

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS): The Hunt for Dark Matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deciphering the nature of dark matter has great scientific importance. A leading hypothesis is that dark matter is made of Weakly Interactive Massive Particles (WIMPs), which may result from supersymmetry or additional spatial dimensions. The underground search for elastic scattering of WIMPs on suitable targets (the so-called 'direct detection') is currently led by the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search II (CDMS II) experiment. Its sensitivity is ten times better than any other experiment and we hope to obtain another factor ten in the coming two years. After a brief recall of our recent results, I will describe the complementarity between direct detection experiments, the LHC and the ILC and I will outline the role that SLAC could play in this SuperCDMS program.

Sadoulet, Bernard (UC Berkeley) [UC Berkeley

2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

6

Identifying dark matter interactions in monojet searches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the discrimination of quark-initiated jets from gluon-initiated jets in monojet searches for dark matter using the technique of averaged jet energy profiles. We demonstrate our results in the context of effective field theories of dark matter interactions with quarks and gluons, but our methods apply more generally to a wide class of models. Different effective theories of dark matter and the standard model backgrounds each have a characteristic quark/gluon fraction for the leading jet. When used in conjunction with the traditional cut-and-count monojet search, the jet energy profile can be used to set stronger bounds on contact interactions of dark matter. In the event of a discovery of a monojet excess at the 14 TeV LHC, contact interactions between dark matter with quarks or with gluons can be differentiated at the 95% confidence level. For a given rate at the LHC, signal predictions at direct detection experiments for different dark matter interactions can span five orders of magnitude. The ability to identify these interactions allows us to make a tighter connection between LHC searches and direct detection experiments.

Prateek Agrawal; Vikram Rentala

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

7

Cryogenic Particle Detectors in Search for Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cryogenic Particle Detectors in Search for Dark Matter Panofsky Prize presentation American;Panofsky Prize Talk - Cryogenic Dark Matter Detectors Page Blas Cabrera - Stanford University Original Motivation for broad international program on cryogenic particle detectors was neutrino physics and dark

California at Berkeley, University of

8

Search for pseudoscalar cold dark matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

AH dynamical evidence points to the conclusion that the predominant form of matter in the universe is in a non-luminous form. Furthermore, large scale deviations from uniform Hubble flow, and the recent COBE reports of inhomogeneities in the cosmic microwave background strongly suggest that we live in an exactly closed universe. If this is true, then ordinary baryonic matter could only be a minority component (10% at most) of the missing mass, and that what constitutes the majority of the dark matter must involve new physics. The axion is one of very few well motivated candidates which may comprise the dark matter. Additionally it is a `cold` dark-matter candidate which is preferred by the COBE data. We propose to construct and operate an experiment to search for axions which may constitute the dark matter of our own galaxy. As proposed by Sikivie, dark-matter axions may be detected by their stimulated conversion into monochromatic microwave photons in a tunable high-Q cavity inside a strong magnetic field. Our ability to mount an experiment quickly and take data within one year is due to a confluence of three factors. The first is the availability of a compact high field superconducting magnet and a local industrial partner, Wang NMR, who can make a very thermally efficient and economical cryostat for it. The second is an ongoing joint venture with the Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences to do R&D on metalized precision-formed ceramic microwave cavities for the axion search, and INR has commited to providing all the microwave cavity arrays for this experiment, should this proposal be approved. The third is a commitment of very substantial startup capital monies from MIT for all of the state-of-the-art ultra-low noise microwave electronics, to one of our outstanding young collaborators who is joining their faculty.

van Bibber, K.; Stoeffl, W.; LLNL Collaborators

1992-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

9

The Universe Adventure - The Search for Dark Matter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search for Dark Matter Search for Dark Matter Large Hadron Collider Particle accelerators, such as the newly constructed LHC (Large Hadron Collider) at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, use powerful magnets to accelerate particles to velocities near that of light and collide them into target beams. Physicists analyze the spray of particles created by the collisions which may contain clues about the properties of elusive dark matter particles. Today the search for dark matter is carried out in labs, observatories, and particle accelerators around the world. Scientists hope that the next generation of experiments will finally uncover the identity of dark matter. Alternatives to Dark Matter Some cosmologists are looking for alternative theories that explain these phenomena without relying on unobservable dark matter. Most of these

10

Search for Low-Mass Dark Matter at BABAR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This review briefly describes light dark matter searches performed by the BABAR experiment. Although dark matter candidates have traditionally been associated with heavy particles appearing in extensions of the Standard Model, a lighter component remains a well motivated alternative, and many scenarios of light dark matter have been recently proposed. Thanks to their large luminosities, B factories offer an ideal environment to probe these possibilities, complementing searches from direct detection and satellite experiments.

B. Echenard

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

New Directions in Direct Dark Matter Searches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I present the status of direct dark matter detection with specific attention to the experimental results and their phenomenological interpretation in terms of dark matter interactions. In particular I review a new and more general approach to study signals in this field based on non-relativistic operators which parametrize more efficiently the dark matter-nucleus interactions in terms of a very limited number of relevant degrees of freedom. Then I list the major experimental results, pointing out the main uncertainties that affect the theoretical interpretation of the data. Finally, since the underlying theory that describes both the dark matter and the standard model fields is unknown, I address the uncertainties coming from the nature of the interaction. In particular, the phenomenology of a class of models in which the interaction between dark matter particles and target nuclei is of a long-range type is discussed.

Paolo Panci

2014-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

12

Dark Matter Searches with Representing the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Supernova Remnants · Unidentified Gamma-ray Sources · Gamma-Ray Bursts · Solar Physics · Dark Matter #12)United States · California State University at Sonoma (SSU) · University of California at Santa Cruz - Santa

California at Santa Cruz, University of

13

Direct Search for Low Mass Dark Matter Particles with CCDs  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

A direct dark matter search is performed using fully-depleted high-resistivity CCD detectors. Due to their low electronic readout noise (RMS ~7 eV) these devices operate with a very low detection threshold of 40 eV, making the search for dark matter particles with low masses (~5 GeV) possible. The results of an engineering run performed in a shallow underground site are presented, demonstrating the potential of this technology in the low mass region.

Barreto, J [Rio de Janeiro Federal U.; Cease, H.; Diehl, H.T.; Estrada, J.; Flaugher, B.; Harrison, N.; Jones, J.; Kilminster, B [Fermilab; Molina, J [Asuncion Natl. U.; Smith, J.; Sonnenschein, A [Fermilab

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

A Comprehensive Search for Dark Matter Annihilation in Dwarf Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new formalism designed to discover dark matter annihilation occurring in the Milky Way's dwarf galaxies. The statistical framework extracts all available information in the data by simultaneously combining observations of all the dwarf galaxies and incorporating the impact of particle physics properties, the distribution of dark matter in the dwarfs, and the detector response. The method performs maximally powerful frequentist searches and produces confidence limits on particle physics parameters. Probability distributions of test statistics under various hypotheses are constructed exactly, without relying on large sample approximations. The derived limits have proper coverage by construction and claims of detection are not biased by imperfect background modeling. We implement this formalism using data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope to search for an annihilation signal in the complete sample of Milky Way dwarfs whose dark matter distributions can be reliably determined. We find that the...

Geringer-Sameth, Alex; Walker, Matthew G

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Complementarity of Dark Matter Searches in the pMSSM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As is well known, the search for and eventual identification of dark matter in supersymmetry requires a simultaneous, multi-pronged approach with important roles played by the LHC as well as both direct and indirect dark matter detection experiments. We examine the capabilities of these approaches in the 19-parameter p(henomenological)MSSM which provides a general framework for complementarity studies of neutralino dark matter. We summarize the sensitivity of dark matter searches at the 7, 8 (and eventually 14) TeV LHC, combined with those by \\Fermi, CTA, IceCube/DeepCore, COUPP, LZ and XENON. The strengths and weaknesses of each of these techniques are examined and contrasted and their interdependent roles in covering the model parameter space are discussed in detail. We find that these approaches explore orthogonal territory and that advances in each are necessary to cover the Supersymmetric WIMP parameter space. We also find that different experiments have widely varying sensitivities to the various dark matter annihilation mechanisms, some of which would be completely excluded by null results from these experiments.

Matthew Cahill-Rowley; Randy Cotta; Alex Drlica-Wagner; Stefan Funk; JoAnne Hewett; Ahmed Ismail; Tom Rizzo; Matthew Wood

2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

16

Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Detector Fabrication Process and Recent Improvements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A dedicated facility has been commissioned for Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) detector fabrication at Texas A&M University (TAMU). The fabrication process has been carefully tuned using this facility and its equipment. Production of successfully tested detectors has been demonstrated. Significant improvements in detector performance have been made using new fabrication methods/equipment and tuning of process parameters.

Andrew Jastram; Rusty Harris; Rupak Mahapatra; James Phillips; Mark Platt; Kunj Prasad; Joel Sander; Sriteja Upadhyayula

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Detector Fabrication Process and Recent Improvements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A dedicated facility has been commissioned for Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) detector fabrication at Texas A&M University (TAMU). The fabrication process has been carefully tuned using this facility and its equipment. Production of successfully tested detectors has been demonstrated. Significant improvements in detector performance have been made using new fabrication methods/equipment and tuning of process parameters.

Jastram, Andrew; Mahapatra, Rupak; Phillips, James; Platt, Mark; Prasad, Kunj; Sander, Joel; Upadhyayula, Sriteja

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

A Comprehensive Search for Dark Matter Annihilation in Dwarf Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new formalism designed to discover dark matter annihilation occurring in the Milky Way's dwarf galaxies. The statistical framework extracts all available information in the data by simultaneously combining observations of all the dwarf galaxies and incorporating the impact of particle physics properties, the distribution of dark matter in the dwarfs, and the detector response. The method performs maximally powerful frequentist searches and produces confidence limits on particle physics parameters. Probability distributions of test statistics under various hypotheses are constructed exactly, without relying on large sample approximations. The derived limits have proper coverage by construction and claims of detection are not biased by imperfect background modeling. We implement this formalism using data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope to search for an annihilation signal in the complete sample of Milky Way dwarfs whose dark matter distributions can be reliably determined. We find that the observed data is consistent with background for each of the dwarf galaxies individually as well as in a joint analysis. The strongest constraints are at small dark matter particle masses. Taking the median of the systematic uncertainty in dwarf density profiles, the cross section upper limits are below the pure s-wave weak scale relic abundance value (2.2 x 10^-26 cm^3/s) for dark matter masses below 26 GeV (for annihilation into b quarks), 29 GeV (tau leptons), 35 GeV (up, down, strange, charm quarks and gluons), 6 GeV (electrons/positrons), and 114 GeV (two-photon final state). For dark matter particle masses less than 1 TeV, these represent the strongest limits obtained to date using dwarf galaxies.

Alex Geringer-Sameth; Savvas M. Koushiappas; Matthew G. Walker

2014-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

19

XENON dark matter searches: Results and the future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

XENON100 is a dark matter search experiment looking for elastic WIMP scattering using a 62 kg liquid target. WIMP search data from XENON100 published in 2012 has set the world's strongest limits on WIMP-nucleus spinindependent, elastic scattering. It has also set the strongest limits on WIMP-nucleus spin-dependent scattering considering neutron scattering only, and competitive limits considering proton scattering only. The successor experiment to XENON100, XENON1T, is currently under construction, with commissioning scheduled to begin in 2014. XENON1T's design goal is a 100 fold increase in sensitivity for elastic WIMP searches over XENON100.

Brown, Andrew [Physics Department, Purdue University - 525 Northwestern Ave., West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Collaboration: XENON Collaboration

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

20

Dark Matters  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

One of the greatest mysteries in the cosmos is that it is mostly dark. Astronomers and particle physicists today are seeking to unravel the nature of this mysterious, but pervasive dark matter which has profoundly influenced the formation of structure in the universe. I will describe the complex interplay between galaxy formation and dark matter detectability and review recent attempts to measure particle dark matter by direct and indirect means.

Joseph Silk

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Dark matter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...just how much dark matter in baryons...have lead to the discovery that a large component of the dark mass in groups...the highest-energy photons and the...to that of the discovery of the microwave...experiments assume the dark matter in the...c) Vacuum energy and the cosmological...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

LIPSS Free-Electron Laser Searches for Dark Matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of Dark Matter particle candidates have been hypothesized by physics Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) in the very light (10{sup -6} - 10{sup -3} eV) range. In the past decade several international groups have conducted laboratory experiments designed to either produce such particles or extend the boundaries in parameter space. The LIght Pseudo-scalar and Scalar Search (LIPSS) Collaboration, using the 'Light Shining through a Wall' (LSW) technique, passes the high average power photon beam from Jefferson Lab's Free-Electron Laser through a magnetic field upstream from a mirror and optical beam dump. Light Neutral Bosons (LNBs), generated by coupling of photons with the magnetic field, pass through the mirror ('the Wall') into an identical magnetic field where they revert to detectable photons by the same coupling process. While no evidence of LNBs was evident, new scalar coupling boundaries were established. New constraints were also determined for hypothetical para-photons and for millicharged fermions. We will describe our experimental setup and results for LNBs, para-photons, and milli-charged fermions. Plans for chameleon particle searches are underway.

Afanaciev, Andrei; Beard, Kevin; Biallas, George; Boyce, James R; Minarni, M; Ramdon, R; Robinson, Taylor; Shinn, Michelle D

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search experiment uses low-temperature solid-state detectors to seek Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) and has the world's best exclusion limit on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section. The experiment uses ionization and athermal phonon signals from particle interactions to discriminate between candidate (nuclear recoil) and background (electron recoil) events with extremely high efficiency. The detectors' low energy threshold for electron recoil events allows us to perform the search for relic axions and solar axions which can interact in the detector via the axio-electric coupling $g_{a\\bar{e}e}$ and the Primakoff coupling $g_{a\\gamma\\gamma}$ respectively. We describe the experiment and our most recent results from the Soudan 5-tower data runs which include a world-leading upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section with a minimum of $4.6\\times10^{-44}$ cm$^{2}$ at the 90% confidence level (CL) for a 60 GeV/c$^{2}$ WIMP, the world-leading experimental upper limit on the axio-electric coupling of $1.4\\times10^{-12}$ at the 90% CL for a 2.5 keV/c$^{2}$ axion, and the upper limit on the axion-photon coupling of $2.4\\times10^{-9}$ GeV$^{-1}$ at the 95% CL.

Oleg Kamaev; for the CDMS Collaboration

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

The Fermi Large Area gamma ray Telescope and the current searches for dark matter in space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production [6],[7] [9]. The temptation to claim the discovery of dark matter is strongThe Fermi Large Area gamma ray Telescope and the current searches for dark matter in space Aldo Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has detected the largest amount of gamma rays, in the 20MeV 300GeV energy

Morselli, Aldo

25

The Interplay Between Collider Searches For Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons and Direct Dark Matter Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this article, we explore the interplay between searches for supersymmetric particles and Higgs bosons at hadron colliders (the Tevatron and the LHC) and direct dark matter searches (such as CDMS, ZEPLIN, XENON, EDELWEISS, CRESST, WARP and others). We focus on collider searches for heavy MSSM Higgs bosons (A, H, H{sup {+-}}) and how the prospects for these searches are impacted by direct dark matter limits and vice versa. We find that the prospects of these two experimental programs are highly interrelated. A positive detection of A, H or H{sup {+-}} at the Tevatron would dramatically enhance the prospects for a near future direct discovery of neutralino dark matter. Similarly, a positive direct detection of neutralino dark matter would enhance the prospects of discovering heavy MSSM Higgs bosons at the Tevatron or the LHC. Combining the information obtained from both types of experimental searches will enable us to learn more about the nature of supersymmetry.

Carena, Marcela; Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab; Vallinotto, Alberto; /Fermilab /Chicago U. /Paris, Inst. Astrophys.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Microwave cavity searches for dark-matter axions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent determinations of cosmological parameters point to a flat Universe, whose total energy density is composed of about two-thirds vacuum energy and one-third matter. Ordinary baryonic matter is relegated to a small fraction of the latter, within which the luminous part is an order of magnitude smaller yet. Particle dark matter, i.e., one or more relic particle species from the big bang, is thus strongly suggested as the dominant component of matter in the Universe. The axion, a hypothetical elementary pseudoscalar arising from the Peccei-Quinn solution to the strong-CP problem, is a well-motivated candidate. If the axion exists, it must be extremely light, in the mass range of 10-610-3 eV, and possess extraordinarily feeble couplings to matter and radiation. Nevertheless, as proposed by Sikivie in 1983, the axions two-photon coupling lends itself to a feasible search strategy with currently available technology. In this scheme, axions resonantly convert to single microwave photons by a Primakoff interaction, in a tunable microwave cavity permeated by a strong magnetic field. Present experiments utilizing heterostructure transistor microwave amplifiers have achieved total system noise temperatures of ?3 K and represent the worlds quietest spectral radio receivers. Exclusion regions have already been published well into the band of realistic axion model couplings, within the lowest decade of mass range. Recent breakthroughs in the development of near-quantum-limited superconducting quantum interference device amplifiers should reduce the system noise temperature to ?100 mK or less. Ongoing research into using Rydberg-atom single-quantum detectors as the detector in a microwave cavity experiment could further reduce the effective noise temperature. In parallel with improvements in amplifier technology, promising concepts for higher-frequency cavity resonators are being explored to open up the higher decades in mass range. Definitive experiments to find or exclude the axion may therefore be at hand in the next few years. As the microwave cavity technique measures the total energy of the axion, a positive discovery could well reveal fine structure of the signal due to flows of nonthermalized axions. Manifesting diurnal and sidereal modulation, such detailed features would contain a wealth of information about the history, structure, and dynamics of our Milky Way galaxy.

Richard Bradley; John Clarke; Darin Kinion; Leslie J Rosenberg; Karl van Bibber; Seishi Matsuki; Michael Mck; Pierre Sikivie

2003-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

27

Carbon Nanotubes Potentialities in Directional Dark Matter Searches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new solution to the problem of dark matter directional detection based on large parallel arrays of carbon nanotubes. The phenomenon of ion channeling in single wall nanotubes is simulated to calculate the expected number of recoiling carbon ions, due to the hypothetical scattering with dark matter particles, subsequently being driven along their longitudinal extension. As shown by explicit calculation, the relative orientation of the carbon nanotube array with respect to the direction of motion of the Sun has an appreciable effect on the channeling probability of the struck ion and this provides the required detector anisotropic response.

L. M. Capparelli; G. Cavoto; D. Mazzilli; A. D. Polosa

2014-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

28

A Search for the Dark Matter Annual Modulation in South Pole Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Astrophysical observations and cosmological data have led to the conclusion that nearly one quarter of the Universe consists of dark matter. Under certain assumptions, an observable signature of dark matter is the annual modulation of the rate of dark matter-nucleon interactions taking place in an Earth-bound experiment. To search for this effect, we introduce the concept for a new dark matter experiment using NaI scintillation detectors deployed deep in the South Pole ice. This experiment complements dark matter search efforts in the Northern Hemisphere and will investigate the observed annual modulation in the DAMA/LIBRA and DAMA/NaI experiments. The unique location will permit the study of background effects correlated with seasonal variations and the surrounding environment. This paper describes the experimental concept and explores the sensitivity of a 250 kg NaI experiment at the South Pole.

Cherwinka, J; Cowen, D F; Grant, D; Halzen, F; Heeger, K M; Hsu, L; Karle, A; Kudryavtsev, V A; Maruyama, R; Pettus, W; Robinson, M; Spooner, N J C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Quantifying galactic propagation uncertainty in WIMP dark matter search with AMS01 Z=-1 spectrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for a WIMP dark matter annihilation signal is carried out in the AMS01 negatively charged (Z=-I) particle spectrum, following a set of supersymmetric benchmark scenarios in the mSUGRA framework. The result is ...

Xiao, Sa, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Nuclear spin structure in dark matter search: The finite momentum transfer limit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spin-dependent elastic scattering of weakly interacting massive dark matter particles (WIMP) off nuclei is reviewed. All available, within different nuclear models, structure functions S(q) for finite momentum transfer (q>0) are presented. These functions describe the recoil energy dependence of the differential event rate due to the spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon interactions. This paper, together with the previous paper ``Nuclear spin structure in dark matter search: The zero momentum transfer limit'', completes our review of the nuclear spin structure calculations involved in the problem of direct dark matter search.

V. A. Bednyakov; F. Simkovic

2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

31

WIMP Dark Matter Direct-Detection Searches in Noble Gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cosmological observations and the dynamics of the Milky Way provide ample evidence for an invisible and dominant mass component. This so-called dark matter could be made of new, colour and charge neutral particles, which were non-relativistic when they decoupled from ordinary matter in the early universe. Such weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are predicted to have a non-zero coupling to baryons and could be detected via their collisions with atomic nuclei in ultra-low background, deep underground detectors. Among these, detectors based on liquefied noble gases have demonstrated tremendous discovery potential over the last decade. After briefly introducing the phenomenology of direct dark matter detection, I will review the main properties of liquefied argon and xenon as WIMP targets and discuss sources of background. I will then describe existing and planned argon and xenon detectors that employ the so-called single- and dual-phase detection techniques, addressing their complementarity and science...

Baudis, Laura

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

WIMP Dark Matter Direct-Detection Searches in Noble Gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cosmological observations and the dynamics of the Milky Way provide ample evidence for an invisible and dominant mass component. This so-called dark matter could be made of new, colour and charge neutral particles, which were non-relativistic when they decoupled from ordinary matter in the early universe. Such weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are predicted to have a non-zero coupling to baryons and could be detected via their collisions with atomic nuclei in ultra-low background, deep underground detectors. Among these, detectors based on liquefied noble gases have demonstrated tremendous discovery potential over the last decade. After briefly introducing the phenomenology of direct dark matter detection, I will review the main properties of liquefied argon and xenon as WIMP targets and discuss sources of background. I will then describe existing and planned argon and xenon detectors that employ the so-called single- and dual-phase detection techniques, addressing their complementarity and science reach.

Laura Baudis

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

33

Searching for Dark Matter Annihilation in the Smith High-Velocity Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent observations suggest that some high-velocity clouds may be confined by massive dark matter halos. In particular, the proximity and proposed dark matter content of the Smith Cloud make it a tempting target for the indirect detection of dark matter annihilation. We argue that the Smith Cloud may be a better target than some Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies and use gamma-ray observations from the Fermi Large Area Telescope to search for a dark matter annihilation signal. No significant gamma-ray excess is found coincident with the Smith Cloud, and we set strong limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section assuming a spatially-extended dark matter profile consistent with dynamical modeling of the Smith Cloud. Notably, these limits exclude the canonical thermal relic cross section ($\\sim 3\\times10^{-26}{\\rm cm}^{3}{\\rm s}^{-1}$) for dark matter masses $\\lesssim 30$ GeV annihilating via the $b \\bar b$ or $\\tau^{+}\\tau^{-}$ channels for certain assumptions of the dark matter density profile; however, uncertainties in the dark matter content of the Smith Cloud may significantly weaken these constraints.

Alex Drlica-Wagner; German A. Gomez-Vargas; John W. Hewitt; Tim Linden; Luigi Tibaldo

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

34

Searching for Dark Matter with X-Ray Observations of Local Dwarf Galaxies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A generic feature of weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter models is the emission of photons over a broad energy band resulting from the stable yields of dark matter pair annihilation. Inverse Compton scattering off cosmic microwave background photons of energetic electrons and positrons produced in dark matter annihilation is expected to produce significant diffuse X-ray emission. Dwarf galaxies are ideal targets for this type of dark matter search technique, being nearby, dark matter dominated systems free of any astrophysical diffuse X-ray background. In this paper, we present the first systematic study of X-ray observations of local dwarf galaxies aimed at the search for WIMP dark matter. We outline the optimal energy and angular ranges for current telescopes and analyze the systematic uncertainties connected to electron/positron diffusion. We do not observe any significant X-ray excess, and we translate this null result into limits on the mass and pair annihilation cross section for particle dark matter. Our results indicate that X-ray observations of dwarf galaxies currently constrain dark matter models at the same level as or even more strongly than gamma-ray observations of the same systems, although at the expenses of introducing additional assumptions and related uncertainties in the modeling of diffusion and energy loss processes. The limits we find constrain portions of the supersymmetric parameter space, particularly if the effect of dark matter substructures is included. Finally, we comment on the role of future X-ray satellites (e.g., Constellation-X, XEUS) and on their complementarity with GLAST and other gamma-ray telescopes in the quest for particle dark matter.

T. E. Jeltema; S. Profumo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Searching for dark matter at LHC with Mono-Higgs production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider LHC searches for dark matter in the mono-Higgs channel using the tools of effective field theory. This channel takes unique advantage of the presence of $SU(2)_L$ breaking in those operators to avoid the need for any initial-state radiation, usually necessary to tag the production of invisible particles. We find that sensitivities to parameters describing dark matter interactions with standard model particles are comparable to those from monojet searches for a subset of the usually-considered operators, and we present for the first time bounds from collider searches on operators which couple DM to only the Higgs field or its covariant derivatives.

Alexey A. Petrov; William Shepherd

2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

36

Searching for Smoking Gun Signatures of Decaying Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clear methods to differentiate between decaying and annihilating dark matter (DM) scenarios are still by and large unavailable. In this note, we study the potential astrophysical signatures of a new class of hidden sector decaying DM models, which can address the recent cosmic ray measurements. Such models may produce primary photons and/or neutrinos at large rates, correlated with the leptonic production. The photon and neutrino spectra will then contain sharp features at the TeV scale. We demonstrate the discovery potential for upcoming and future measurements by FERMI, HESS, AGIS and IceCube/DeepCore. We show that these models may be discovered in the near future. Specifically, measurements of diffuse gamma rays by FERMI can detect the start of a hard photon feature. We argue that these hard spectra can be produced by decaying dark matter and be consistent with current constraints, but are difficult to reconcile with models of annihilating DM. Consequently the measurement of a hard spectral feature, in correlation with the current cosmic ray measurements, will strongly favor decaying DM models. Finally we comment on the preliminary results from the Inner Galaxy presented by the FERMI collaboration.

Joshua T. Ruderman; Tomer Volansky

2009-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

37

Dark matter searches in the mono-Z channel at high energy e+e? colliders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We explore the mono-Z signature for dark matter searches at future high energy e+e? colliders. In the context of effective field theory, we consider two kinds of contact operators describing dark matter interactions with electroweak gauge bosons and with electron/positron, respectively. For five benchmark models, we propose kinematic cuts to distinguish signals from backgrounds for both charged leptonic and hadronic decay modes of the Z boson. We also present the experimental sensitivity to cutoff scales of effective operators and compare it with that of the Fermi-LAT indirect search and demonstrate the gains in significance for the several configurations of polarized beams.

Zhao-Huan Yu; Xiao-Jun Bi; Qi-Shu Yan; Peng-Fei Yin

2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

38

The Search for Dark Matter with the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has been scanning the gamma ray sky since it was launched by NASA in June 2008 and has a mission lifetime goal of 10 years. Largely due to our particle physics heritage, one of the main physics topics being studied by the Fermi LAT Collaboration is the search for dark matter via indirect detection. My talk will review the progress of these studies, something on how the LAT detector enables them, and expectations for the future. I will discuss both gamma-ray and (electron + positron) searches for dark matter, and some resulting theoretical implications.

Bloom, Elliott (SLAC) [SLAC

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

39

E-Print Network 3.0 - axion dark matter Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with Axions Summary: Lecture April 23, 2009 Outline: From neutrons to axions Axion phenomenology Axion dark matter Thursday... Axion phenomenology Axion dark matter Inflationary...

40

Search for a dark matter particle in high energy cosmic rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Existing data hints that high energy cosmic ray experiments may offer the most promissing shot at finding a dark matter particle. A search in the PeV mass range is suggested, where the discovery of such a particle might help explain the GZK cutoff violation data.

Yukio Tomozawa

2008-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Big Questions: Dark Matter  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Carl Sagan's oft-quoted statement that there are "billions and billions" of stars in the cosmos gives an idea of just how much "stuff" is in the universe. However scientists now think that in addition to the type of matter with which we are familiar, there is another kind of matter out there. This new kind of matter is called "dark matter" and there seems to be five times as much as ordinary matter. Dark matter interacts only with gravity, thus light simply zips right by it. Scientists are searching through their data, trying to prove that the dark matter idea is real. Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln tells us why we think this seemingly-crazy idea might not be so crazy after all.

Lincoln, Don

2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

42

IceCube, DeepCore, PINGU and the indirect search for supersymmetric dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The discovery of a particle that could be the lightest CP-even Higgs of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) and the lack of evidence so far for supersymmetry at the LHC have many profound implications, including for the phenomenology of supersymmetric dark matter. In this study, we re-evaluate and give an update on the prospects for detecting supersymmetric neutralinos with neutrino telescopes, focussing in particular on the IceCube/DeepCore Telescope as well as on its proposed extension, PINGU. Searches for high-energy neutrinos from the Sun with IceCube probe MSSM neutralino dark matter models with the correct Higgs mass in a significant way. This is especially the case for neutralino dark matter models producing hard neutrino spectra, across a wide range of masses, while PINGU is anticipated to improve the detector sensitivity especially for models in the low neutralino mass range.

Paul Bergeron; Stefano Profumo

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

43

Latest Results of the Edelweiss-II Dark Matter Search Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A search for WIMP dark matter has been undertaken with new-generation germanium heat-and-ionization cryogenic detectors in the EDELWEISS-II experiment. The InterDigit bolometers, with an interleaved electrode design, have proven excellent rejection performance against gamma-ray and surface event backgrounds which are limiting germanium bolometer dark matter searches. One year of continuous operation at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane has been achieved with an array of ten 400 g detectors. Preliminary resultats for WIMP search are presented with an effective exposure of 322 kg.days, which corresponds to a 5x10{sup -8} pb sensitivity to the spin independant WIMP-nucleon cross-section at 90% C.L. for a WIMP mass of 80 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Loaiza, P. [Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane, CEA-CNRS, 1125 route de Bardonneche, 73500 Modane (France)

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

44

dark matter dark energy inflation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

theory dark matter dark energy inflation The National Science Foundation The Kavli Foundation NSF Site Review November 28-29, 2005 #12;dark matter dark energy inflation NSF Site Visit ­ November 28 - 29, 2005The National Science Foundation The Kavli Foundation The Theoretical Web UHE cosmic rays B

Hu, Wayne

45

Searching for dark matter at the LHC with a mono-Z  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate a mono-Z process as a potential dark matter search strategy at the LHC. In this channel a single Z boson recoils against missing transverse momentum, attributed to dark matter particles, ?, which escape the detector. This search strategy is related and complementary to monojet and monophoton searches. For illustrative purposes we consider the process qq???Z in a toy dark matter model, where the Z boson is emitted from either the initial state quarks or from the internal propagator. Among the signatures of this process will be a pair of muons with high pT that reconstruct to the invariant mass the Z, and large amounts of missing transverse energy. Being a purely electroweak signal, QCD and other Standard Model backgrounds are relatively easily removed with modest selection cuts. We compare the signal to Standard Model backgrounds and demonstrate that even for conservative cuts, there exist regions of parameter space where the signal may be clearly visible above background in future LHC data, allowing either new discovery potential or the possibility of supplementing information about the dark sector beyond that available from other observable channels.

Nicole F. Bell; Ahmad J. Galea; James B. Dent; Thomas D. Jacques; Lawrence M. Krauss; Thomas J. Weiler

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

46

Dark Matter Theory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dark Matter Theory Dark Matter Theory Understanding discoveries at the Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic Frontiers Get Expertise Rajan Gupta (505) 667-7664 Email Bruce Carlsten (505)...

47

Search for Dark Matter Annihilations in the Sun with the 79-String IceCube Detector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have performed a search for muon neutrinos from dark matter annihilation in the center of the Sun with the 79-string configuration of the IceCube neutrino telescope. For the first time, the DeepCore subarray is included in the analysis, lowering the energy threshold and extending the search to the austral summer. The 317days of data collected between June 2010 and May 2011 are consistent with the expected background from atmospheric muons and neutrinos. Upper limits are set on the dark matter annihilation rate, with conversions to limits on spin-dependent and spin-independent scattering cross sections of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) on protons, for WIMP masses in the range 205000??GeV/c2. These are the most stringent spin-dependent WIMP-proton cross section limits to date above 35??GeV/c2 for most WIMP models.

M. G. Aartsen et al. (IceCube Collaboration)

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

48

Search for dark matter from the Galactic halo with the IceCube Neutrino Telescope  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Self-annihilating or decaying dark matter in the Galactic halo might produce high energy neutrinos detectable with neutrino telescopes. We have conducted a search for such a signal using 276days of data from the IceCube 22-string configuration detector acquired during 2007 and 2008. The effect of halo model choice in the extracted limit is reduced by performing a search that considers the outer halo region and not the Galactic Center. We constrain any large-scale neutrino anisotropy and are able to set a limit on the dark matter self-annihilation cross section of ??Av??10-22??cm3?s-1 for weakly interacting massive particle masses above 1TeV, assuming a monochromatic neutrino line spectrum.

R. Abbasi et al. (IceCube Collaboration)

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

49

Direct searches for dark matter: Recent?results  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...seen in conventional nuclear and particle physics experiments...cryostat by a cold-vacuum wall. The vacuum wall allows exchanging...searches, likewise for accelerator and satellite based...and Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts...

Leslie J. Rosenberg

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Micromegas micro-TPC for direct Dark Matter search with MIMAC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MIMAC project is a multi-chamber detector for Dark Matter search, aiming at measuring both track and ionization with a matrix of micromegas micro-TPC filled with He3 and CF4. Recent experimental results on the first measurements of the Helium quenching factor at low energy (1 keV recoil) are presented, together with the first simulation of the track reconstruction. Recontruction of track of alpha from Radon impurities is shown as a first proof of concept.

Mayet, F; Grignon, C; Koumeir, C; Santos, D; Colas, P; Giomataris, Yu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search and Background Rejection with Event Position Information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evidence from observational cosmology and astrophysics indicates that about one third of the universe is matter, but that the known baryonic matter only contributes to the universe at 4%. A large fraction of the universe is cold and non-baryonic matter, which has important role in the universe structure formation and its evolution. The leading candidate for the non-baryonic dark matter is Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), which naturally occurs in the supersymmetry theory in particle physics. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is searching for evidence of a WIMP interaction off an atomic nucleus in crystals of Ge and Si by measuring simultaneously the phonon energy and ionization energy of the interaction in the CDMS detectors. The WIMP interaction energy is from a few keV to tens of keV with a rate less than 0.1 events/kg/day. To reach the goal of WIMP detection, the CDMS experiment has been conducted in the Soudan mine with an active muon veto and multistage passive background shields. The CDMS detectors have a low energy threshold and background rejection capabilities based on ionization yield. However, betas from contamination and other radioactive sources produce surface interactions, which have low ionization yield, comparable to that of bulk nuclear interactions. The low-ionization surface electron recoils must be removed in the WIMP search data analysis. An emphasis of this thesis is on developing the method of the surface-interaction rejection using location information of the interactions, phonon energy distributions and phonon timing parameters. The result of the CDMS Soudan run118 92.3 live day WIMP search data analysis is presented, and represents the most sensitive search yet performed.

Wang, Gen-sheng; /Case Western Reserve U.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Future Directions in the Microwave Cavity Search for Dark Matter Axions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The axion is a light pseudoscalar particle which suppresses CP-violating effects in strong interactions and also happens to be an excellent dark matter candidate. Axions constituting the dark matter halo of our galaxy may be detected by their resonant conversion to photons in a microwave cavity permeated by a magnetic field. The current generation of the microwave cavity experiment has demonstrated sensitivity to plausible axion models, and upgrades in progress should achieve the sensitivity required for a definitive search, at least for low mass axions. However, a comprehensive strategy for scanning the entire mass range, from 1-1000 $\\mu$eV, will require significant technological advances to maintain the needed sensitivity at higher frequencies. Such advances could include sub-quantum-limited amplifiers based on squeezed vacuum states, bolometers, and/or superconducting microwave cavities. The Axion Dark Matter eXperiment at High Frequencies (ADMX-HF) represents both a pathfinder for first data in the 20-100 $\\mu$eV range ($\\sim$5-25 GHz), and an innovation test-bed for these concepts.

T. M. Shokair; J. Root; K. A. Van Bibber; B. Brubaker; Y. V. Gurevich; S. B. Cahn; S. K. Lamoreaux; M. A. Anil; K. W. Lehnert; B. K. Mitchell; A. Reed; G. Carosi

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

53

CDEX-1 1 kg point-contact germanium detector for low mass dark matter searches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The CDEX collaboration has been established for direct detection of light dark matter particles, using ultra-low energy threshold point-contact p-type germanium detectors, in China JinPing underground Laboratory (CJPL). The first 1 kg point-contact germanium detector with a sub-keV energy threshold has been tested in a passive shielding system located in CJPL. The outputs from both the point-contact P+ electrode and the outside N+ electrode make it possible to scan the lower energy range of less than 1 keV and at the same time to detect the higher energy range up to 3 MeV. The outputs from both P+ and N+ electrode may also provide a more powerful method for signal discrimination for dark matter experiment. Some key parameters, including energy resolution, dead time, decay times of internal X-rays, and system stability, have been tested and measured. The results show that the 1 kg point-contact germanium detector, together with its shielding system and electronics, can run smoothly with good performances. This detector system will be deployed for dark matter search experiments.

Kang Ke-Jun (???); Yue Qian (??); Wu Yu-Cheng (???); Cheng Jian-Ping (???); Li Yuan-Jing (???); Bai Yang (??); Bi Yong (??); Chang Jian-Ping (???); Chen Nan (??); Chen Ning (??); Chen Qing-Hao (???); Chen Yun-Hua (???); Chuang Yo-Chun (???); Deng Zhi (??); Du Qiang (??); Gong Hui (??); Hao Xi-Qing (???); He Qing-Ju (???); Hu Xin-Hui (???); Huang Han-Xiong (???); Huang Teng-Rui (???); Jiang Hao (??); Li Hau-Bin (???); Li Jian-Min (???); Li Jin (??); Li Jun (??); Li Xia (??); Li Xin-Ying (???); Li Xue-Qian (???); Li Yu-Lan (???); Liao Heng-Yi (???); Lin Fong-Kay (???); Lin Shin-Ted (???); Liu Shu-Kui (???); L Lan-Chun (???); Ma Hao (??); Mao Shao-Ji (???); Qin Jian-Qiang (???); Ren Jie (??); Ren Jing (??); Ruan Xi-Chao (???); Shen Man-Bin (???); Lakhwinder Singh; Manoj Kumar Singh; Arun Kumar Soma; Su Jian (??); Tang Chang-Jian (???); Tseng Chao-Hsiung (???); Wang Ji-Min (???); Wang Li (??); Wang Qing (??); Wong Tsz-King Henry (???); Wu Shi-Yong (???); Wu Wei (??); Wu Yu-Cheng (???); Xing Hao-Yang (???); Xu Yin (??); Xue Tao (??); Yang Li-Tao (???); Yang Song-Wei (???); Yi Nan (??); Yu Chun-Xu (???); Yu Hao (??); Yu Xun-Zhen (???); Zeng Xiong-Hui (???); Zeng Zhi (??); Zhang Lan (??); Zhang Yun-Hua (???); Zhao Ming-Gang (???); Zhao Wei (??); Zhong Su-Ning (???); Zhou Zu-Ying (???); Zhu Jing-Jun (???); Zhu Wei-Bin (???); Zhu Xue-Zhou (???); Zhu Zhong-Hua (???)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Axion Dark Matter searches and New Limits on CPT and Lorentz-Invariance-violating interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the proton and neutron spin contributions for a wide range of nuclei using semi-empirical methods. These values are required for interpretations of searches for exotic nuclear spin-dependent couplings, including those that arise in dark matter detection schemes, which search for axions, WIMPs and topological defects, as well as tests of CPT and Lorentz-invariance violation. We reconsider experiments, which search for evidence of CPT and Lorentz-invariance-violating couplings, using a $^{3}$He/$^{129}$Xe comagnetometer and show that the $^{3}$He/$^{129}$Xe system is in fact particularly sensitive to proton interaction parameters. From existing data, we derive a limit on the CPT and Lorentz-invariance-violating parameter $|\\tilde{b}_{\\perp}^p| nuclear anapole moment data for Cs to obtain new limits on several other CPT and Lorentz-invariance-violating parameters.

Y. V. Stadnik; V. V. Flambaum

2014-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

55

Limits on spin-dependent wimp-nucleon interactions from the cryogenic dark matter search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) is an experiment to detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) based on their interactions with Ge and Si nuclei. We report the results of an analysis of data from the first two runs of CDMS at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in terms of spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon interactions on {sup 73}Ge and {sup 29}Si. These data exclude new regions of spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon interaction parameter space, including regions relevant to spin-dependent interpretations of the annual modulation signal reported by the DAMA/NaI experiment.

Akerib, D.S.; Armel-Funkhouser, M.S.; Attisha, M.J.; Bailey, C.N.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, Daniel A.; Brink, P.L.; Brusov, P.P.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D.O.; Chang, C.L.; Cooley, J.; Crisler, M.B.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; DeJongh, F.; Dixon, R.; Dragowsky, M.R.; Driscoll, D.D.; Duong, L.; /Case Western Reserve U. /UC, Berkeley /Brown U.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

E-Print Network 3.0 - asymmetric dark matter Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

picture Victoria University of Wellington Summary: te Ika a Maui VUW Cosmology: Dark energy, dark matter, and all that... Matt Visser Sunday May 24 2009... -- Te Papa Matt Visser...

57

E-Print Network 3.0 - annihilating dark matter Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;SCIPP... Supernova Remnants Unidentified Gamma-ray Sources Gamma-Ray Bursts Solar Physics Dark Matter 12... ;SCIPP talk Larry Wai SLAC 4 Talk...

58

Particle identification with the AMS-02 RICH detector: search for dark matter with antideuterons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), whose final version AMS-02 is to be installed on the International Space Station (ISS) for at least 3 years, is a detector designed to measure charged cosmic ray spectra with energies up to the TeV region and with high energy photon detection capability up to a few hundred GeV, using state-of-the art particle identification techniques. It is equipped with several subsystems, one of which is a proximity focusing Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector equipped with a dual radiator (aerogel+NaF), a lateral conical mirror and a detection plane made of 680 photomultipliers and light guides, enabling precise measurements of particle electric charge and velocity (Delta beta / beta ~ 10^-3 and 10^-4 for Z=1 and Z=10-20, respectively) at kinetic energies of a few GeV/nucleon. Combining velocity measurements with data on particle rigidity from the AMS-02 Tracker (Delta R / R ~ 2% for R=1-10 GV) it is possible to obtain a reliable measurement for particle mass. One of the main topics of the AMS-02 physics program is the search for indirect signatures of dark matter. Experimental data indicate that dark, non-baryonic matter of unknown composition is much more abundant than baryonic matter, accounting for a large fraction of the energy content of the Universe. Apart from antideuterons produced in cosmic-ray propagation, the annihilation of dark matter will produce additional antideuteron fluxes. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations of AMS-02 have been used to evaluate the detector's performance for mass separation, a key issue for anti-D/anti-p separation. Results of these studies are presented.

Lusa Arruda; Fernando Baro; Rui Pereira

2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

59

SLIM at LHC: LHC search power for a model linking dark matter and neutrino mass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently a model has been proposed that links dark matter and neutrino masses. The dark matter candidate which is dubbed as SLIM has a mass of MeV scale and can show up at low energy experiments. The model als...

Y. Farzan; M. Hashemi

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Simplified Models for Dark Matter and Missing Energy Searches at the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The study of collision events with missing energy as searches for the dark matter (DM) component of the Universe are an essential part of the extensive program looking for new physics at the LHC. Given the unknown nature of DM, the interpretation of such searches should be made broad and inclusive. This report reviews the usage of simplified models in the interpretation of missing energy searches. We begin with a brief discussion of the utility and limitation of the effective field theory approach to this problem. The bulk of the report is then devoted to several different simplified models and their signatures, including s-channel and t-channel processes. A common feature of simplified models for DM is the presence of additional particles that mediate the interactions between the Standard Model and the particle that makes up DM. We consider these in detail and emphasize the importance of their inclusion as final states in any coherent interpretation. We also review some of the experimental progress in the field, new signatures, and other aspects of the searches themselves. We conclude with comments and recommendations regarding the use of simplified models in Run-II of the LHC.

Jalal Abdallah; Adi Ashkenazi; Antonio Boveia; Giorgio Busoni; Andrea De Simone; Caterina Doglioni; Aielet Efrati; Erez Etzion; Johanna Gramling; Thomas Jacques; Tongyan Lin; Enrico Morgante; Michele Papucci; Bjoern Penning; Antonio Walter Riotto; Thomas Rizzo; David Salek; Steven Schramm; Oren Slone; Yotam Soreq; Alessandro Vichi; Tomer Volansky; Itay Yavin; Ning Zhou; Kathryn Zurek

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search at Soudan Underground Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search at Soudan Underground Laboratory for two-tower arrays of detector. Twelve detectors were operated from March 25 to August 8, 2004, or 74.5 detector live days.Within expected background, no statistically significant indication of a WIMP signal was observed. Based on this null observation and combined with our previous results, we exclude a spin-averaged WIMP-nucleon interaction cross section above 1.6 x 10{sup -43} cm{sup 2} for Ge detectors, and 3 x 10{sup -42} cm{sup 2} for Si detectors, for a WIMP mass 60GeV/c{sup 2} with 90%C.L. This result constrains parameter space of minimal supersymmetric standard models (MSSM) and starts to reach the parameter space of a constrained model (CMSSM).

Yoo, Jonghee; /Fermilab

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Development of a Navigator and Imaging Techniques for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project contributes to the detection of flaws in the germanium detectors for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Specifically, after imaging the detector surface with a precise imaging and measuring device, they developed software to stitch the resulting images together, applying any necessary rotations, offsets, and averaging, to produce a smooth image of the whole detector that can be used to detect flaws on the surface of the detector. These images were also tiled appropriately for the Google Maps API to use as a navigation tool, allowing viewers to smoothly zoom and pan across the detector surface. Automated defect identification can now be implemented, increasing the scalability of the germanium detector fabrication.

Wilen, Chris; /Carleton Coll. /KIPAC, Menlo Park

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

63

IceCube search for dark matter annihilation in nearby galaxies and galaxy clusters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present the results of a first search for self-annihilating dark matter in nearby galaxies and galaxy clusters using a sample of high-energy neutrinos acquired in 339.8days of live time during 2009/10 with the IceCube neutrino observatory in its 59-string configuration. The targets of interest include the Virgo and Coma galaxy clusters, the Andromeda galaxy, and several dwarf galaxies. We obtain upper limits on the cross section as a function of the weakly interacting massive particle mass between 300GeV and 100TeV for the annihilation into bb, W+W-, ?+?-, ?+?-, and ??. A limit derived for the Virgo cluster, when assuming a large effect from subhalos, challenges the weakly interacting massive particle interpretation of a recently observed GeV positron excess in cosmic rays.

M. G. Aartsen et al. (IceCube Collaboration)

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

64

Implications of Direct Dark Matter Constraints for Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model Higgs Boson Searches at the Tevatron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Searches for the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) Higgs bosons are among the most promising channels for exploring new physics at the Tevatron. In particular, interesting regions of large $\\tan \\beta$ and small $m_A$ are probed by searches for heavy neutral Higgs bosons, A and H, when they decay to $\\tau^+ \\tau^-$ and $b\\bar{b}$. At the same time, direct searches for dark matter, such as CDMS, attempt to observe neutralino dark matter particles scattering elastically off nuclei. This can occur through t-channel Higgs exchange, which has a large cross section in the case of large $\\tan \\beta$ and small $m_A$. As a result, there is a natural interplay between the heavy, neutral Higgs searches at the Tevatron and the region of parameter space explored by CDMS. We show that if the lightest neutralino makes up the dark matter of our universe, current limits from CDMS strongly constrain the prospects of heavy, neutral MSSM Higgs discovery at the Tevatron (at 3 sigma with 4 fb^-1 per experiment) unless $|\\mu| \\gsim$ 400 GeV. The limits of CDMS projected for 2007 will increase this constraint to $|\\mu| \\gsim$ 800 GeV. On the other hand, if CDMS does observe neutralino dark matter in the near future, it will make the discovery of heavy, neutral MSSM Higgs bosons far more likely at the Tevatron.

Marcela Carena; Dan Hooper; Peter Skands

2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

65

Status of the large-scale dark-matter axion search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If axions constitute the dark matter of our galactic halo they can be detected by their conversion into monochromatic microwave photons in a high-Q microwave cavity permeated by a strong magnetic field. A large-scale experiment is under construction at LLNL to search for halo axions in the mass range 1.3 - 13 {mu}eV, where axions may constitute closure density of the universe. The search builds upon two pilot efforts at BNL and the University of Florida in the late 1980`s, and represents a large improvement in power sensitivity ({approximately}50) both due to the increase in magnetic volume (B{sup 2}V = 14 T{sup 2}m{sup 3}), and anticipated total noise temperature (T{sub n} {approximately}3K). This search will also mark the first use of multiple power-combined cavities to extend the mass range accessible by this technique. Data will be analyzed in two parallel streams. In the first, the resolution of the power spectrum will be sufficient to resolve the expected width of the overall axion line, {approximately}{bigcirc} (1kHz). In the second, the resolution will be {bigcirc}(O.01-1 Hz) to look for extremely narrow substructure reflecting the primordial phase-space of the axions during infall. This experiment will be the first to have the required sensitivity to detect axions, for plausible axion models.

Van Bibber, K.; Hagmann, C.; Stoeffl, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Daw, E.; Rosenberg, L. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Sikivie, P.; Sullivan, N.; Tanner, D. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics; Moltz, D.; Tighe, R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Constraining the Higgs-Dilaton with LHC and Dark Matter Searches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a scenario in which the dilaton, a pseudo-Goldstone boson of the spontaneous breaking of conformal symmetry, provides a portal between dark matter and the visible sector. We consider the low-energy description of the theory in which the dilaton mixes with the Standard Model Higgs boson, thereby predicting a second scalar at or above the weak scale. We derive the collider and dark matter constraints on the corresponding parameter space and find that existing experimental data point towards the decoupling limit in which the CFT scale is well above the electroweak scale. Moreover, the thermal production of dark matter implies its mass is likely above the TeV scale. Upcoming direct detection experiments may allow for the discovery of the dilaton-mediated thermal dark matter while future collider studies will also be sensitive to the available parameter space.

Efrati, Aielet; Nussinov, Shmuel; Soreq, Yotam; Volansky, Tomer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Constraining the Higgs-Dilaton with LHC and Dark Matter Searches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a scenario in which the dilaton, a pseudo-Goldstone boson of the spontaneous breaking of conformal symmetry, provides a portal between dark matter and the visible sector. We consider the low-energy description of the theory in which the dilaton mixes with the Standard Model Higgs boson, thereby predicting a second scalar at or above the weak scale. We derive the collider and dark matter constraints on the corresponding parameter space and find that existing experimental data point towards the decoupling limit in which the CFT scale is well above the electroweak scale. Moreover, the thermal production of dark matter implies its mass is likely above the TeV scale. Upcoming direct detection experiments may allow for the discovery of the dilaton-mediated thermal dark matter while future collider studies will also be sensitive to the available parameter space.

Aielet Efrati; Eric Kuflik; Shmuel Nussinov; Yotam Soreq; Tomer Volansky

2014-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

68

Atomic dark matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose that dark matter is dominantly comprised of atomic bound states. We build a simple model and map the parameter space that results in the early universe formation of hydrogen-like dark atoms. We find that atomic dark matter has interesting implications for cosmology as well as direct detection: Weak-scale dark atoms can accommodate hyperfine splittings of order 100 keV, consistent with the inelastic dark matter interpretation of the DAMA data while naturally evading direct detection bounds. Moreover, protohalo formation can be suppressed below M{sub proto} ? 10{sup 3}10{sup 6}M{sub s}un for weak scale dark matter due to Ion-Radiation and Ion-Atom interactions in the dark sector.

Kaplan, David E.; Krnjaic, Gordan Z.; Rehermann, Keith R.; Wells, Christopher M., E-mail: dkaplan@pha.jhu.edu, E-mail: gordan@pha.jhu.edu, E-mail: keith@pha.jhu.edu, E-mail: cwells13@pha.jhu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States)

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

WIMP Dark Matter Limit-Direct Detection Data and Sensitivity Plots from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search II and the University of California at Santa Barbara  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Expectations for non-baryonic dark matter are founded principally in Big Bang nucleosynthesis calculations, which indicate that the missing mass of the universe is not likely to be baryonic. The supersymmetric standard model (SUSY) offers a promising framework for expectations of particle species which could satisfy the observed properties of dark matter. WIMPs are the most likely SUSY candidate for a dark matter particle. The High Energy Physics Group at University of California, Santa Barbara, is part of the CDMSII Collaboration and have provided the Interactive Plotter for WIMP Dark Matter Limit-Direct Detection Data on their website. They invite other collaborations working on dark matter research to submit datasets and, as a result, have more than 150 data sets now available for use with the plotting tool. The published source of the data is provided with each data set.

70

Comparing the Calibration and Simulation Data of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search, or CDMS, collaboration is preparing a new experiment called SuperCDMS. CDMS uses Germanium detectors to attempt the direct detection of dark matter. To do this, they measure the ionization and heat produced during an event where a WIMP scatters off of germanium crystal lattice. To prepare for the experiment the detectors are calibrated with various radioactive sources. The response of the detectors is also modeled by a Monte Carlo simulation. These simulations include modeling everything from the radiation production to the raw data collected by the detector. The experimental data will be used to validate the results of the detector simulation. This research will look only at the phonons produced during events that occur very close to the detector surface. From the raw data and simulation output three parameters will be determined: the rise time, the decay time, and time to position independence. It was found that the simulation's risetime and time to position independence was generally smaller than that of the data, while the decay time was found to be larger in the simulation than in the data. These differences show that the simulation is not complete. The difference in risetime implies that the phonons are not spread out enough when they reach the detector walls, which would be improved by a look at the Luke phonon and charge transport. The long decay time in the simulation implies that the rate phonons are being absorbed is underestimated. Finally, the small time to position independence in the simulation could be due to a low phonon scattering rate. A simple solution may be to alter the parameters that control the simulation, while still remaining physically sensible, to help match simulation and data.

DiFranzo, Anthony; /Rensselaer Poly. /SLAC

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

71

Dark matter at colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that colliders can impose strong constraints on dark matter. We take an effective field theory approach where dark matter couples to quarks and gluons through high dimensional operators. We discuss limits on interactions of dark matter and hadronic matter from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). For spin-independent scattering, the LHC limits are stronger than those from direct detection experiments for light WIMPs. For spin-dependent scattering, the LHC sets better limits over much of parameter space.

Yu Haibo [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 (United States)

2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

72

Dark Energy and Dark Matter Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We revisit the problems of dark energy and dark matter and several models designed to explain them, in the light of some latest findings.

Burra G. Sidharth

2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

73

In Wino Veritas? Indirect Searches Shed Light on Neutralino Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indirect detection constraints on gamma rays (both continuum and lines) have set strong constraints on wino dark matter. By combining results from Fermi-LAT and HESS, we show that: light nonthermal wino dark matter is strongly excluded; thermal wino dark matter is allowed only if the Milky Way dark matter distribution has a significant (>~0.4 kpc) core; and for plausible NFW and Einasto distributions the entire range of wino masses from 100 GeV up to 3 TeV can be excluded. The case of light, nonthermal wino dark matter is particularly interesting in scenarios with decaying moduli that reheat the universe to a low temperature. Typically such models have been discussed for low reheating temperatures, not far above the BBN bound of a few MeV. We show that constraints on the allowed wino relic density push such models to higher reheating temperatures and hence heavier moduli. Even for a flattened halo model consisting of an NFW profile with constant-density core inside 1 kpc and a density near the sun of 0.3 GeV/...

Fan, JiJi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Aldo Morselli, INFN Roma Tor Vergata ITEP Winter School Moscow 12-19 February 2013! 1! Search for Dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

! Dark Energy 76% CDM Baryons 4%Cold Dark Matter 20% Dark Matter in the era of precision cosmology CDM for Dark matter Aldo Morselli INFN Roma Tor Vergata Moscow February 12-19, 2013 41th ITEP Winter School #12 precision studies of 5 % of our Universe -> Discovery of the Standard Model The LHC is delivering data We

Morselli, Aldo

75

Search for bosonic superweakly interacting massive dark matter particles with the XMASS-I detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bosonic superweakly interacting massive particles (super-WIMPs) are a candidate for warm dark matter. With the absorption of such a boson by a xenon atom these dark matter candidates would deposit an energy equivalent to their rest mass in the detector. This is the first direct detection experiment exploring the vector super-WIMPs in the mass range between 40 and 120 keV. Using 165.9 days of data no significant excess above background was observed in the fiducial mass of 41 kg. The present limit for the vector super-WIMPs excludes the possibility that such particles constitute all of dark matter. The absence of a signal also provides the most stringent direct constraint on the coupling constant of pseudoscalar super-WIMPs to electrons. The unprecedented sensitivity was achieved exploiting the low background at a level $10^{-4}$ kg$^{-1}$keV$_{ee}^{-1}$day$^{-1}$ in the detector.

K. Abe; K. Hieda; K. Hiraide; S. Hirano; Y. Kishimoto; K. Ichimura; K. Kobayashi; S. Moriyama; K. Nakagawa; M. Nakahata; H. Ogawa; N. Oka; H. Sekiya; A. Shinozaki; Y. Suzuki; A. Takeda; O. Takachio; D. Umemoto; M. Yamashita; B. S. Yang; S. Tasaka; J. Liu; K. Martens; K. Hosokawa; K. Miuchi; A. Murata; Y. Onishi; Y. Otsuka; Y. Takeuchi; Y. H. Kim; K. B. Lee; M. K. Lee; J. S. Lee; Y. Fukuda; Y. Itow; K. Masuda; H. Takiya; H. Uchida; N. Y. Kim; Y. D. Kim; F. Kusaba; K. Nishijima; K. Fujii; I. Murayama; S. Nakamura

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

76

Dark matter-motivated searches for exotic fourth-generation mirror quarks in Tevatron and early LHC data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We determine the prospects for finding dark matter at the Tevatron and LHC through the production of exotic fourth-generation mirror quarks T{sup '} that decay through T{sup '{yields}}tX, where X is dark matter. The resulting signal of tt+Ee{sub T} has not previously been considered in searches for fourth-generation quarks, but there are both general and specific dark matter motivations for this signal, and with slight modifications, this analysis applies to any scenario where invisible particles are produced in association with top quarks. Current direct and indirect bounds on such exotic quarks restrict their masses to be between 300 and 600 GeV, and the dark matter's mass may be anywhere below m{sub T}{sup '}. We simulate the signal and main backgrounds with MadGraph/MadEvent-Pythia-PGS4. For the Tevatron, we find that an integrated luminosity of 20 fb{sup -1} will allow 3{sigma} discovery up to m{sub T}{sup '}=400 GeV and 95% exclusion up to m{sub T}{sup '}=455 GeV. For the 10 TeV LHC with 300 pb{sup -1}, the discovery and exclusion sensitivities rise to 490 GeV and 600 GeV. These scenarios are therefore among the most promising for dark matter at colliders. Perhaps most interestingly, we find that dark matter models that can explain results from the DAMA, CDMS, and CoGeNT collaborations can be tested with high statistical significance using data already collected at the Tevatron and have extraordinarily promising implications for early runs of the LHC.

Alwall, Johan [Department of Physics and National Center for Theoretical Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Feng, Jonathan L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Kumar, Jason [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States); Su Shufang [Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Radiopurity of CaWO$_4$ Crystals for Direct Dark Matter Search with CRESST and EURECA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The direct dark matter search experiment CRESST uses scintillating CaWO$_4$ single crystals as targets for possible WIMP scatterings. An intrinsic radioactive contamination of the crystals as low as possible is crucial for the sensitivity of the detectors. In the past CaWO$_4$ crystals operated in CRESST were produced by institutes in Russia and the Ukraine. Since 2011 CaWO$_4$ crystals have also been grown at the crystal laboratory of the Technische Universit\\"at M\\"unchen (TUM) to better meet the requirements of CRESST and of the future tonne-scale multi-material experiment EURECA. The radiopurity of the raw materials and of first TUM-grown crystals was measured by ultra-low background $\\gamma$-spectrometry. Two TUM-grown crystals were also operated as low-temperature detectors at a test setup in the Gran Sasso underground laboratory. These measurements were used to determine the crystals' intrinsic $\\alpha$-activities which were compared to those of crystals produced at other institutes. The total $\\alpha$...

Mnster, A; Angloher, G; Bento, A; Bucci, C; Canonica, L; Erb, A; Feilitzsch, F v; Gorla, P; Gtlein, A; Hauff, D; Jochum, J; Kraus, H; Lanfranchi, J -C; Laubenstein, M; Loebell, J; Ortigoza, Y; Petricca, F; Potzel, W; Prbst, F; Puimedon, J; Reindl, F; Roth, S; Rottler, K; Sailer, C; Schffner, K; Schieck, J; Scholl, S; Schnert, S; Seidel, W; Stodolsky, L; Strandhagen, C; Strauss, R; Tanzke, A; Uffinger, M; Ulrich, A; Usherov, I; Wawoczny, S; Willers, M; Wstrich, M; Zller, A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search: First 5-Tower Data and Improved Understanding of Ionization Collection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) is searching for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with cryogenic particle detectors. These detectors have the ability to discriminate between nuclear recoil candidate and electron recoil background events by collecting both phonon and ionization energy from recoils in the detector crystals. The CDMS-II experiment has completed analysis of the first data runs with 30 semiconductor detectors at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, resulting in a world leading WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section limit for WIMP masses above 44 GeV/c{sup 2}. As CDMS aims to achieve greater WIMP sensitivity, it is necessary to increase the detector mass and discrimination between signal and background events. Incomplete ionization collection results in the largest background in the CDMS detectors as this causes electron recoil background interactions to appear as false candidate events. Two primary causes of incomplete ionization collection are surface and bulk trapping. Recent work has been focused on reducing surface trapping through the modification of fabrication methods for future detectors. Analyzing data taken with test devices has shown that hydrogen passivation of the amorphous silicon blocking layer worsens surface trapping. Additional data has shown that the iron-ion implantation used to lower the critical temperature of the tungsten transition-edge sensors causes a degradation of the ionization collection. Using selective implantation on future detectors may improve ionization collection for events near the phonon side detector surface. Bulk trapping is minimized by neutralizing ionized lattice impurities. Detector investigations at testing facilities and in situ at the experimental site have provided methods to optimize the neutralization process and monitor running conditions to maintain full ionization collection. This work details my contribution to the 5-tower data taking, monitoring, and analysis effort as well as the SuperCDMS detector development with the focus on monitoring and improving ionization collection in the detectors.

Bailey, Catherine N.; /Case Western Reserve U.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Working Group Report: Dark Matter Complementarity (Dark Matter in the Coming Decade: Complementary Paths to Discovery and Beyond)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this Report we discuss the four complementary searches for the identity of dark matter: direct detection experiments that look for dark matter interacting in the lab, indirect detection experiments that connect lab signals to dark matter in our own and other galaxies, collider experiments that elucidate the particle properties of dark matter, and astrophysical probes sensitive to non-gravitational interactions of dark matter. The complementarity among the different dark matter searches is discussed qualitatively and illustrated quantitatively in several theoretical scenarios. Our primary conclusion is that the diversity of possible dark matter candidates requires a balanced program based on all four of those approaches.

Arrenberg, Sebastian; et al.,

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

Dark matter and dark energy: summary and future directions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Brook Workshop, New York, 1979 (ed. P...Dark Matter and Dark Energy in the Universe...Dark Matter and Dark Energy in the Universe...Dark matter and dark energy 2627 Steinhardt...Cargese, 1979. New York: Plenum. Takeda...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

A new approach to searching for dark matter signals in Fermi-LAT gamma rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several cosmic ray experiments have measured excesses in electrons and positrons, relative to standard backgrounds, for energies from ? 10 GeV1 TeV. These excesses could be due to new astrophysical sources, but an explanation in which the electrons and positrons are dark matter annihilation or decay products is also consistent. Fortunately, the Fermi-LAT diffuse gamma ray measurements can further test these models, since the electrons and positrons produce gamma rays in their interactions in the interstellar medium. Although the dark matter gamma ray signal consistent with the local electron and positron measurements should be quite large, as we review, there are substantial uncertainties in the modeling of diffuse backgrounds and, additionally, experimental uncertainties that make it difficult to claim a dark matter discovery. In this paper, we introduce an alternative method for understanding the diffuse gamma ray spectrum in which we take the intensity ratio in each energy bin of two different regions of the sky, thereby canceling common systematic uncertainties. For many spectra, this ratio fits well to a power law with a single break in energy. The two measured exponent indices are a robust discriminant between candidate models, and we demonstrate that dark matter annihilation scenarios can predict index values that require ''extreme'' parameters for background-only explanations.

Chang, Spencer [Physics Department, University of California Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Goodenough, Lisa, E-mail: spchang@ucdavis.edu, E-mail: lcg261@nyu.edu [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Hot and dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, we build new Effective Field Theory tools to describe the propagation of energetic partons in hot and dense media, and we propose two new reactions for dark matter in the early universe. In the first part, ...

D'Eramo, Francesco

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Measurement and modeling of muon-induced neutrons in LSM in application for direct dark matter searches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to a very low event rate expected in direct dark matter search experiments, a good understanding of every background component is crucial. Muon-induced neutrons constitute a prominent background, since neutrons lead to nuclear recoils and thus can mimic a potential dark matter signal. EDELWEISS is a Ge-bolometer experiment searching for WIMP dark matter. It is located in the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane (LSM, France). We have measured muon-induced neutrons by means of a neutron counter based on Gd-loaded liquid scintillator. Studies of muon-induced neutrons are presented and include development of the appropriate MC model based on Geant4 and analysis of a 1000-days measurement campaign in LSM. We find a good agreement between measured rates of muon-induced neutrons and those predicted by the developed model with full event topology. The impact of the neutron background on current EDELWEISS data-taking as well as for next generation experiments such as EURECA is briefly discussed.

Kozlov, Valentin [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institut fr Kernphysik, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)] [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institut fr Kernphysik, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Collaboration: EDELWEISS Collaboration

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

84

Background Rejection in the DMTPC Dark Matter Search Using Charge Signals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Dark Matter Time Projection Chamber (DMTPC) collaboration is developing low-pressure gas TPC detectors for measuring WIMP-nucleon interactions. Optical readout with CCD cameras allows for the detection for the daily modulation in the direction of the dark matter wind, while several charge readout channels allow for the measurement of additional recoil properties. In this article, we show that the addition of the charge readout analysis to the CCD allows us too obtain a statistics-limited 90% C.L. upper limit on the $e^-$ rejection factor of $5.6\\times10^{-6}$ for recoils with energies between 40 and 200 keV$_{\\mathrm{ee}}$. In addition, requiring coincidence between charge signals and light in the CCD reduces CCD-specific backgrounds by more than two orders of magnitude.

J. P. Lopez; S. Ahlen; J. Battat; T. Caldwell; M. Chernicoff; C. Deaconu; D. Dujmic; A. Dushkin; W. Fedus; P. Fisher; F. Golub; S. Henderson; A. Inglis; A. Kaboth; G. Kohse; L. Kirsch; R. Lanza; A. Lee; J. Monroe; H. Ouyang; T. Sahin; G. Sciolla; N. Skvorodnev; H. Tomita; H. Wellenstein; I. Wolfe; R. Yamamoto; H. Yegoryan

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Can Dark Matter Decay in Dark Energy?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the interaction between Dark Energy and Dark Matter from a thermodynamical perspective. By assuming they have different temperatures, we study the possibility of occurring a decay from Dark Matter into Dark Energy, characterized by a negative parameter $Q$. We find that, if at least one of the fluids has non vanishing chemical potential, for instance $\\mu_x0$, the decay is possible, where $\\mu_x$ and $\\mu_{dm}$ are the chemical potentials of Dark Energy and Dark Matter, respectively. Using recent cosmological data, we find that, for a fairly simple interaction, the Dark Matter decay is favored with a probability of $\\sim 93%$ over the Dark Energy decay. This result comes from a likelihood analysis where only background evolution has been considered.

S. H. Pereira; J. F. Jesus

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

86

First measurement of the Head-Tail directional nuclear recoil signature at energies relevant to WIMP dark matter searches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present first evidence for the so-called Head-Tail asymmetry signature of neutron-induced nuclear recoil tracks at energies down to 1.5 keV/amu using the 1m^3 DRIFT-IIc dark matter detector. This regime is appropriate for recoils induced by Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMPs) but one where the differential ionization is poorly understood. We show that the distribution of recoil energies and directions induced here by Cf-252 neutrons matches well that expected from massive WIMPs. The results open a powerful new means of searching for a galactic signature from WIMPs.

S. Burgos; E. Daw; J. Forbes; C. Ghag; M. Gold; C. Hagemann; V. A. Kudryavtsev; T. B. Lawson; D. Loomba; P. Majewski; D. Muna; A. StJ. Murphy; G. G. Nicklin; S. M. Paling; A. Petkov; S. J. S. Plank; M. Robinson; N. Sanghi; D. P. Snowden-Ifft; N. J. C. Spooner; J. Turk; E. Tziaferi

2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

87

Antihelium from Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cosmic-ray anti-nuclei provide a promising discovery channel for the indirect detection of particle dark matter. Hadron showers produced by the pair-annihilation or decay of Galactic dark matter generate anti-nucleons which can in turn form light anti-nuclei. Previous studies have only focused on the spectrum and flux of low energy antideuterons which, although very rarely, are occasionally also produced by cosmic-ray spallation. Heavier elements ($A\\geq3$) have instead entirely negligible astrophysical background and a primary yield from dark matter which could be detectable by future experiments. Using a Monte Carlo event generator and an event-by-event phase space analysis, we compute, for the first time, the production spectrum of \\antihe and \\antiT for dark matter annihilating or decaying to $b\\bar{b}$ and ${W^+}{W^-}$ final states. We then employ a semi-analytic model of interstellar and heliospheric propagation to calculate the \\antihe flux as well as to provide tools to relate the anti-helium spectrum...

Carlson, Eric; Linden, Tim; Profumo, Stefano; Ibarra, Alejandro; Wild, Sebastian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Antihelium from dark matter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cosmic-ray antinuclei provide a promising discovery channel for the indirect detection of particle dark matter. Hadron showers produced by the pair annihilation or decay of Galactic dark matter generate antinucleons which can in turn form light antinuclei. Previous studies have only focused on the spectrum and flux of low energy antideuterons which, although very rarely, are occasionally also produced by cosmic-ray spallation. Heavier elements (A?3) have instead entirely negligible astrophysical background and a primary yield from dark matter which could be detectable by future experiments. Using a MonteCarlo event generator and an event-by-event phase space analysis, we compute, for the first time, the production spectrum of He3 and H3 for dark matter annihilating or decaying to bb and W+W? final states. We then employ a semianalytic model of interstellar and heliospheric propagation to calculate the He3 flux as well as to provide tools to relate the antihelium spectrum corresponding to an arbitrary antideuteron spectrum. Finally, we discuss prospects for current and future experiments, including GAPS and AMS-02.

Eric Carlson; Adam Coogan; Tim Linden; Stefano Profumo; Alejandro Ibarra; Sebastian Wild

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

89

Dark matter, not magnetism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Astronomical Society. Provided by the NASA Astrophysics Data System 1 March 1993 research-article Letters Dark matter, not magnetism Massimo Persic 1 2 Paolo Salucci 1 1 Notice that most optical rotation curves, coming from the gas-emitted H alpha line......

Massimo Persic; Paolo Salucci

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Dark Matter Gravitational Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We argue that the conjectured dark mater in the Universe may be endowed with a new kind of gravitational charge that couples to a short range gravitational interaction mediated by a massive vector field. A model is constructed that assimilates this concept into ideas of current inflationary cosmology. The model is also consistent with the observed behaviour of galactic rotation curves according to Newtonian dynamics. The essential idea is that stars composed of ordinary (as opposed to dark matter) experience Newtonian forces due to the presence of an all pervading background of massive gravitationally charged cold dark matter. The novel gravitational interactions are predicted to have a significant influence on pre-inflationary cosmology. The precise details depend on the nature of a gravitational Proca interaction and the description of matter. A gravitational Proca field configuration that gives rise to attractive forces between dark matter charges of like polarity exhibits homogeneous isotropic eternal cosmologies that are free of cosmological curvature singularities thus eliminating the horizon problem associated with the standard big-bang scenario. Such solutions do however admit dense hot pre-inflationary epochs each with a characteristic scale factor that may be correlated with the dark matter density in the current era of expansion. The model is based on a theory in which a modification of Einsteinian gravity at very short distances can be expressed in terms of the gradient of the Einstein metric and the torsion of a non-Riemannian connection on the bundle of linear frames over spacetime. Indeed we demonstrate that the genesis of the model resides in a remarkable simplification that occurs when one analyses the variational equations associated with a broad class of non-Riemannian actions.

R. W. Tucker; C. Wang

1996-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

91

Constraining Dark Matter and Dark Energy Models using Astrophysical Surveys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of current dark energy astrophysical surveys. Although manyMatter and Dark Energy Models using Astrophysical Surveys byMatter and Dark Energy Models using Astrophysical Surveys A

Cieplak, Agnieszka M.

92

A fussy revisitation of antiprotons as a tool for Dark Matter searches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Antiprotons are regarded as a powerful probe for Dark Matter (DM) indirect detection and indeed current data from PAMELA have been shown to lead to stringent constraints. However, in order to exploit their constraining/discovery power properly and especially in anticipation of the exquisite accuracy of upcoming data from AMS, great attention must be put into effects (linked to their propagation in the Galaxy) which may be perceived as subleasing but actually prove to be quite relevant. We revisit the computation of the astrophysical background and of the DM antiproton fluxes fully including the effects of: diffusive reacceleration, energy losses including tertiary component and solar modulation (in a force field approximation). We show that their inclusion can somewhat modify the current bounds, even at large DM masses, and that a wrong interpretation of the data may arise if they are not taken into account. The numerical results for the astrophysical background are provided in terms of fit functions; the results for Dark Matter are incorporated in the new release of the PPPC4DMID.

Mathieu Boudaud; Marco Cirelli; Galle Giesen; Pierre Salati

2015-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

93

A fussy revisitation of antiprotons as a tool for Dark Matter searches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Antiprotons are regarded as a powerful probe for Dark Matter (DM) indirect detection and indeed current data from PAMELA have been shown to lead to stringent constraints. However, in order to exploit their constraining/discovery power properly and especially in anticipation of the exquisite accuracy of upcoming data from AMS, great attention must be put into effects (linked to their propagation in the Galaxy) which may be perceived as subleasing but actually prove to be quite relevant. We revisit the computation of the astrophysical background and of the DM antiproton fluxes fully including the effects of: diffusive reacceleration, energy losses including tertiary component and solar modulation (in a force field approximation). We show that their inclusion can somewhat modify the current bounds, even at large DM masses, and that a wrong interpretation of the data may arise if they are not taken into account. The numerical results for the astrophysical background are provided in terms of fit functions; the results for Dark Matter are incorporated in the new release of the PPPC4DMID.

Mathieu Boudaud; Marco Cirelli; Galle Giesen; Pierre Salati

2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

94

Dissecting the Gamma-Ray Background in Search of Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several classes of astrophysical sources contribute to the approximately isotropic gamma-ray background measured by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. In this paper, we use Fermi's catalog of gamma-ray sources (along with corresponding source catalogs at infrared and radio wavelengths) to build and constrain a model for the contributions to the extragalactic gamma-ray background from astrophysical sources, including radio galaxies, star-forming galaxies, and blazars. We then combine our model with Fermi's measurement of the gamma-ray background to derive constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section, including contributions from both extragalactic and galactic halos and subhalos. The resulting constraints are competitive with the strongest current constraints from the Galactic Center and dwarf spheroidal galaxies. As Fermi continues to measure the gamma-ray emission from a greater number of astrophysical sources, it will become possible to more tightly constrain the astrophysical contributions to the extragalactic gamma-ray background. We project that with 10 years of data, Fermi's measurement of this background combined with the improved constraints on the astrophysical source contributions will yield a sensitivity to dark matter annihilations that exceeds the strongest current constraints by a factor of ~ 5 - 10.

Ilias Cholis; Dan Hooper; Samuel D. McDermott

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

95

The CDEX-1 1 kg Point-Contact Germanium Detector for Low Mass Dark Matter Searches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CDEX Collaboration has been established for direct detection of light dark matter particles, using ultra-low energy threshold p-type point-contact germanium detectors, in China JinPing underground Laboratory (CJPL). The first 1 kg point-contact germanium detector with a sub-keV energy threshold has been tested in a passive shielding system located in CJPL. The outputs from both the point-contact p+ electrode and the outside n+ electrode make it possible to scan the lower energy range of less than 1 keV and at the same time to detect the higher energy range up to 3 MeV. The outputs from both p+ and n+ electrode may also provide a more powerful method for signal discrimination for dark matter experiment. Some key parameters, including energy resolution, dead time, decay times of internal X-rays, and system stability, have been tested and measured. The results show that the 1 kg point-contact germanium detector, together with its shielding system and electronics, can run smoothly with good performances. This...

Kang, Ke-Jun; Wu, Yu-Cheng; Cheng, Jian-Ping; Li, Yuan-Jing; Bai, Yang; Bi, Yong; Chang, Jian-Ping; Chen, Nan; Chen, Ning; Chen, Qing-Hao; Chen, Yun-Hua; Chuang, You-Chun; Dend, Zhi; Du, Qiang; Gong, Hui; Hao, Xi-Qing; He, Qing-Ju; Hu, Xin-Hui; Huang, Han-Xiong; Huang, Teng-Rui; Jiang, Hao; Li, Hau-Bin; Li, Jian-Min; Li, Jin; Li, Jun; Li, Xia; Li, Xin-Ying; Li, Xue-Qian; Li, Yu-Lan; Liao, Heng-Ye; Lin, Fong-Kay; Lin, Shin-Ted; Liu, Shu-Kui; Lv, Lan-Chun; Ma, Hao; Mao, Shao-Ji; Qin, Jian-Qiang; Ren, Jie; Ren, Jing; Ruan, Xi-Chao; Shen, Man-Bin; Singh, Lakhwinder; Singh, Manoj Kumar; Soma, Arun Kumar; Su, Jian; Tang, Chang-Jian; Tseng, Chao-Hsiung; Wang, Ji-Min; Wang, Li; Wang, Qing; Wong, Tsz-King Henry; Wu, Shi-Yong; Wu, Wei; Wu, Yu-Cheng; Xing, Hao-Yang; Xu, Yin; Xue, Tao; Yang, Li-Tao; Yang, Song-Wei; Yi, Nan; Yu, Chun-Xu; Yu, Hao; Yu, Xun-Zhen; Zeng, Xiong-Hui; Zeng, Zhi; Zhang, Lan; Zhang, Yun-Hua; Zhao, Ming-Gang; Zhao, Wei; Zhong, Su-Ning; Zhou, Zu-Ying; Zhu, Jing-Jun; Zhu, Wei-Bin; Zhu, Xue-Zhou; Zhu, Zhong-Hua

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Dark matter studies entrain nuclear physics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We review theoretically well-motivated dark-matter candidates, and pathways to their discovery, in the light of recent results from collider physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. Taken in aggregate, these encourage broader thinking in regards to possible dark-matter candidates dark-matter need not be made of WIMPs, i.e., elementary particles with weak-scale masses and interactions. Facilities dedicated to nuclear physics are well-poised to investigate certain non-WIMP models. In parallel to this, developments in observational cosmology permit probes of the relativistic energy density at early epochs and thus provide new ways to constrain dark-matter models, provided nuclear physics inputs are sufficiently well-known. The emerging confluence of accelerator, astrophysical, and cosmological constraints permit searches for dark-matter candidates in a greater range of masses and interaction strengths than heretofore possible.

Susan Gardner; George M. Fuller

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Fermilab | Science | Particle Physics | Dark matter and dark...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dark matter and dark energy photo Visible matter makes up just 4 percent of the contents of the universe; the remaining 96 percent is made of dark matter and dark energy....

98

Tunguska Dark Matter Ball  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is suggested that the Tunguska event in June 1908 cm-large was due to a cm-large ball of a condensate of bound states of 6 top and 6 anti-top quarks containing highly compressed ordinary matter. Such balls are supposed to make up the dark matter as we earlier proposed. The expected rate of impact of this kind of dark matter ball with the earth seems to crudely match a time scale of 200 years between the impacts. The main explosion of the Tunguska event is explained in our picture as material coming out from deep within the earth, where it has been heated and compressed by the ball penetrating to a depth of several thousand km. Thus the effect has some similarity with volcanic activity as suggested by Kundt. We discuss the possible identification of kimberlite pipes with earlier Tunguska-like events. A discussion of how the dark matter balls may have formed in the early universe is also given.

C. D. Froggatt; H. B. Nielsen

2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

99

Tunguska Dark Matter Ball  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is suggested that the Tunguska event in June 1908 cm-large was due to a cm-large ball of a condensate of bound states of 6 top and 6 anti-top quarks containing highly compressed ordinary matter. Such balls are supposed to make up the dark matter as we earlier proposed. The expected rate of impact of this kind of dark matter ball with the earth seems to crudely match a time scale of 200 years between the impacts. The main explosion of the Tunguska event is explained in our picture as material coming out from deep within the earth, where it has been heated and compressed by the ball penetrating to a depth of several thousand km. Thus the effect has some similarity with volcanic activity as suggested by Kundt. We discuss the possible identification of kimberlite pipes with earlier Tunguska-like events. A discussion of how the dark matter balls may have formed in the early universe is also given.

Froggatt, C D

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Early search for supersymmetric dark matter models at the LHC without missing energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate early discovery signals for supersymmetry at the Large Hadron Collider without using information about missing transverse energy. Instead we use cuts on the number of jets and isolated leptons (electrons and/or muons). We work with minimal supersymmetric extensions of the standard model, and focus on phenomenological models that give a relic density of dark matter compatible with the WMAP measurements. An important model property for early discovery is the presence of light sleptons, and we find that for an integrated luminosity of only 200--300 pb$^{-1}$ at a center-of-mass energy of 10 TeV models with gluino masses up to $\\sim 700$ GeV can be tested.

Joakim Edsjo; Erik Lundstrom; Sara Rydbeck; Jorgen Sjolin

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

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101

Global interpretation of direct Dark Matter searches after CDMS-II results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We perform a global fit to data from Dark Matter (DM) direct detection experiments, including the recent CDMS-II results. We discuss possible interpretations of the DAMA annual modulation signal in terms of spin-independent and spin-dependent DM-nucleus interactions, both for elastic and inelastic scattering. We find that for the spin-dependent inelastic scattering off protons a good fit to all data is obtained. We present a simple toy model realizing such a scenario. In all the remaining cases the DAMA allowed regions are disfavored by other experiments or suffer from severe fine tuning of DM parameters with respect to the galactic escape velocity. Finally, we also entertain the possibility that the two events observed in CDMS-II are an actual signal of elastic DM scattering, and we compare the resulting CDMS-II allowed regions to the exclusion limits from other experiments.

Kopp, Joachim; Schwetz, Thomas; Zupan, Jure

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

The first cryogenic dark matter experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental search for dark matter particle candidates using cryogenic detectors requires a low radioactive background environment. The authors discuss the status of a cryogenic dark matter experiment to be performed in the Stanford Underground Facility. The detectors will be cooled in a specially designed cryostat connected to a modified side access Oxford 400 dilution refrigerator. Details of the cryostat design and its operating performance are presented. The effectiveness of the multi-level shield surrounding the cryostat, as well as the background levels expected to be achieved in the pilot experiment are discussed. Finally, the limits which can be set on dark matter candidates with such an experiment are discussed.

Barnes, P.D.; Aubourg, E.; Akerib, D.S.; Cummings, A.; Lange, A.E.; Margulies, S.; Sadoulet, B.; Shutt, T.; Stockwell, W.; White, S.; Young, B.A. (Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)); Da Silva, A. (Univ. of British Columbia, BC (Canada)); Bauer, D.; Borden, D.; Caldwell, D.O.; Gray, M.; Hale, D.; Lu, A.; Witherell, M.; Yellin, S. (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)); Cabrera, B.; Chugg, B.; Dougherty, B.L.; Irwin, K.D.; Penn, M.J. (Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States)); Emes, J.; Smith, A.; Smith, G.; Taylor, J.; Wolgast, C.; Haller, E.E. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Pritychenko, B.V.; Pomansky, A.A. (Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation)); Ross, R.R. (Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States) Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Search for Dark Matter with Liquid Argon and Pulse Shape Discrimination: Results from DEAP-1 and Status of DEAP-3600  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the last decade, Direct Dark Matter searches has become a very active research program, spawning dozens of projects world wide and leading to contradictory results. It is on this stage that the Dark matter Experiment with liquid Argon and Pulse shape discrimination (DEAP) is about to enter. With a 3600~kg liquid argon target and a 1000~kg fiducial mass, it is designed to run background free during 3 years, reaching an unprecedented sensitivity of 10$^{-46}$~cm$^2$ for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV. In order to achieve this impressive feat, the collaboration followed a two-pronged approach: a careful selection of every material entering the construction of the detector in order to suppress the backgrounds, and optimum use of the pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique to separate the nuclear recoils from the electronic recoils. Using the experience acquired ffrom the 7~kg-prototype DEAP-1, a 3600~kg detector is being completed at SNOLAB (Sudbury, CANADA) and is expected to start taking data in mid-2014.

Gorel, P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Current trends in non-accelerator particle physics: 1, Neutrino mass and oscillation. 2, High energy neutrino astrophysics. 3, Detection of dark matter. 4, Search for strange quark matter. 5, Magnetic monopole searches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of papers reflecting current trends in non-accelerator particle physics, corresponding to talks that its author was invited to present at the Workshop on Tibet Cosmic Ray Experiment and Related Physics Topics held in Beijing, China, April 4--13, 1995. The papers are entitled `Neutrino Mass and Oscillation`, `High Energy Neutrino Astrophysics`, `Detection of Dark Matter`, `Search for Strange Quark Matter`, and `Magnetic Monopole Searches`. The report is introduced by a survey of the field and a brief description of each of the author`s papers.

He, Yudong [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Dark energy and dark matter with SNAP  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating opens up new frontiers for our understanding of cosmology and particle physics. The nature of the dark energy responsible is intimately tied to the high energy theory and gravitation. Measuring the properties of the accelerating universe and studying both the dark energy and the dark matter of the Universe using supernovae and weak gravitational lensing is the primary aim of the Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP). SNAP can discover and follow thousands of Type Ia supernovae at redshifts z = 0.3 ? 1.7. The resulting magnitude-redshift relation can determine the cosmological and dark energy parameters with high precision: the dark energy equation of state w to 0.05 and its time variation w? = dwdz to 0.15. Wide area weak gravitational lensing studies will map the distribution of dark matter in the universe.

Eric V. Linder

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Dark matter search in a Beam-Dump eXperiment (BDX) at Jefferson Lab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MeV-GeV dark matter (DM) is theoretically well motivated but remarkably unexplored. This Letter of Intent presents the MeV-GeV DM discovery potential for a 1 m$^3$ segmented plastic scintillator detector placed downstream of the beam-dump at one of the high intensity JLab experimental Halls, receiving up to 10$^{22}$ electrons-on-target (EOT) in a one-year period. This experiment (Beam-Dump eXperiment or BDX) is sensitive to DM-nucleon elastic scattering at the level of a thousand counts per year, with very low threshold recoil energies ($\\sim$1 MeV), and limited only by reducible cosmogenic backgrounds. Sensitivity to DM-electron elastic scattering and/or inelastic DM would be below 10 counts per year after requiring all electromagnetic showers in the detector to exceed a few-hundred MeV, which dramatically reduces or altogether eliminates all backgrounds. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations are in progress to finalize the detector design and experimental set up. An existing 0.036 m$^3$ prototype based on the s...

Battaglieri, M; De Vita, R; Izaguirre, E; Krnjaic, G; Smith, E; Stepanyan, S; Bersani, A; Fanchini, E; Fegan, S; Musico, P; Osipenko, M; Ripani, M; Santopinto, E; Taiuti, M; Schuster, P; Toro, N; Dalton, M; Freyberger, A; Girod, F -X; Kubarovsky, V; Ungaro, M; De Cataldo, G; De Leo, R; Di Bari, D; Lagamba, L; Nappi, E; Perrino, R; Carpinelli, M; Sipala, V; Aiello, S; Bellini, V; De Napoli, M; Giusa, A; Mammoliti, F; Leonora, E; Noto, F; Randazzo, N; Russo, G; Sperduto, M; Sutera, C; Ventura, C; Barion, L; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Lenisa, P; Movsisyan, A; Spizzo, F; Turisini, M; De Persio, F; Cisbani, E; Fanelli, C; Garibaldi, F; Meddi, F; Urciuoli, G M; Pereira, S Anefalos; De Sanctis, E; Hasch, D; Lucherini, V; Mirazita, M; Montgomery, R; Pisano, S; Simi, G; D'Angelo, A; Lanza, L Colaneri L; Rizzo, A; Schaerf, C; Zonta, I; Calvo, D; Filippi, A; Holtrop, M; Peremuzyan, R; Glazier, D; Ireland, D; McKinnon, B; Afanasev, D Sokhan A; Briscoe, B; Kalantarians, N; Fassi, L El; Weinstein, L; Beltrame, P; Murphy, A; Watts, D; Zana, L; Hicks, K

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Dark matter search in a Beam-Dump eXperiment (BDX) at Jefferson Lab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MeV-GeV dark matter (DM) is theoretically well motivated but remarkably unexplored. This Letter of Intent presents the MeV-GeV DM discovery potential for a 1 m$^3$ segmented plastic scintillator detector placed downstream of the beam-dump at one of the high intensity JLab experimental Halls, receiving up to 10$^{22}$ electrons-on-target (EOT) in a one-year period. This experiment (Beam-Dump eXperiment or BDX) is sensitive to DM-nucleon elastic scattering at the level of a thousand counts per year, with very low threshold recoil energies ($\\sim$1 MeV), and limited only by reducible cosmogenic backgrounds. Sensitivity to DM-electron elastic scattering and/or inelastic DM would be below 10 counts per year after requiring all electromagnetic showers in the detector to exceed a few-hundred MeV, which dramatically reduces or altogether eliminates all backgrounds. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations are in progress to finalize the detector design and experimental set up. An existing 0.036 m$^3$ prototype based on the same technology will be used to validate simulations with background rate estimates, driving the necessary R$\\&$D towards an optimized detector. The final detector design and experimental set up will be presented in a full proposal to be submitted to the next JLab PAC. A fully realized experiment would be sensitive to large regions of DM parameter space, exceeding the discovery potential of existing and planned experiments by two orders of magnitude in the MeV-GeV DM mass range.

BDX Collaboration; M. Battaglieri; A. Celentano; R. De Vita; E. Izaguirre; G. Krnjaic; E. Smith; S. Stepanyan; A. Bersani; E. Fanchini; S. Fegan; P. Musico; M. Osipenko; M. Ripani; E. Santopinto; M. Taiuti; P. Schuster; N. Toro; M. Dalton; A. Freyberger; F. -X. Girod; V. Kubarovsky; M. Ungaro; G. De Cataldo; R. De Leo; D. Di Bari; L. Lagamba; E. Nappi; R. Perrino; M. Carpinelli; V. Sipala; S. Aiello; V. Bellini; M. De Napoli; A. Giusa; F. Mammoliti; E. Leonora; F. Noto; N. Randazzo; G. Russo; M. Sperduto; C. Sutera; C. Ventura; L. Barion; G. Ciullo; M. Contalbrigo; P. Lenisa; A. Movsisyan; F. Spizzo; M. Turisini; F. De Persio; E. Cisbani; C. Fanelli; F. Garibaldi; F. Meddi; G. M. Urciuoli; S. Anefalos Pereira; E. De Sanctis; D. Hasch; V. Lucherini; M. Mirazita; R. Montgomery; S. Pisano; G. Simi; A. D'Angelo; L. Colaneri L. Lanza; A. Rizzo; C. Schaerf; I. Zonta; D. Calvo; A. Filippi; M. Holtrop; R. Peremuzyan; D. Glazier; D. Ireland; B. McKinnon; D. Sokhan A. Afanasev; B. Briscoe; N. Kalantarians; L. El Fassi; L. Weinstein; P. Beltrame; A. Murphy; D. Watts; L. Zana; K. Hicks

2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

108

Light Higgses and Dark Matter at Bottom and Charm Factories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neither Dark Matter nor scalar particles in the Higgs sector are ruled out at energies accessible to bottom and charm factories. In Dark Matter searches, the error on the mass of Dark Matter is $\\sim 4$ GeV in the best LHC studies. For light Dark Matter this could represent a 100% (or more) error. In Higgs searches, the presence of a light singlet Higgs can make the LHC Higgs search difficult, if not impossible. If Dark Matter or a Higgs scalar is light, it will {\\it require} a low-energy machine to precisely determine the couplings. We review the models, modes of discovery and rate expectations for these new particle searches at bottom and charm factories. We also discuss the options for new runs at bottom and charm factories relevant for these searches.

Bob McElrath

2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

109

Direct constraints on diffusion models from cosmic-ray positron data: Excluding the minimal model for dark matter searches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Galactic cosmic-ray (CR) transport parameters are usually constrained by the boron-to-carbon ratio. This procedure is generically plagued with degeneracies between the diffusion coefficient and the vertical extent of the Galactic magnetic halo. The latter is of paramount importance for indirect dark matter (DM) searches because it fixes the amount of DM annihilation or decay that contributes to the local antimatter CR flux. These degeneracies could be broken by using secondary radioactive species, but the current data still have large error bars, and this method is extremely sensitive to the very local interstellar medium properties. Here, we propose to use the low-energy CR positrons in the GeV range as another direct constraint on diffusion models. We show that the PAMELA data disfavor small diffusion halo (L?3??kpc) and large diffusion slope models and exclude the minimal configuration [Maurin etal. Astrophys. J. 555, 585 (2001); Donato etal. Phys. Rev. D 69, 063501 (2004)] widely used in the literature to bracket the uncertainties in the DM signal predictions. This is complementary to indirect constraints (diffuse radio and gamma-ray emissions) and has a strong impact on DM searches. Indeed, this makes the antiproton constraints more robust while enhancing the discovery/exclusion potential of current and future experiments, like AMS-02 and GAPS, especially in the antiproton and antideuteron channels.

Julien Lavalle; David Maurin; Antje Putze

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Multiyear search for dark matter annihilations in the Sun with the AMANDA-II and IceCube detectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A search for an excess of muon neutrinos from dark matter annihilations in the Sun has been performed with the AMANDA-II neutrino telescope using data collected in 812 days of live time between 2001 and 2006 and 149 days of live time collected with the AMANDA-II and the 40-string configuration of IceCube during 2008 and early 2009. No excess over the expected atmospheric neutrino background has been observed. We combine these results with the previously published IceCube limits obtained with data taken during 2007 to obtain a total live time of 1065 days. We provide an upper limit at 90% confidence level on the annihilation rate of captured neutralinos in the Sun, as well as the corresponding muon flux limit at the Earth, both as functions of the neutralino mass in the range 505000GeV. We also derive a limit on the neutralino-proton spin-dependent and spin-independent cross section. The limits presented here improve the previous results obtained by the collaboration between a factor of 2 and 5, as well as extending the neutralino masses probed down to 50GeV. The spin-dependent cross section limits are the most stringent so far for neutralino masses above 200GeV, and well below direct search results in the mass range from 50GeV to 5TeV.

R. Abbasi et al. (IceCube Collaboration)

2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

111

Direct constraints on diffusion models from cosmic-ray positron data: Excluding the Minimal model for dark matter searches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Galactic Cosmic-ray (CR) transport parameters are usually constrained by the boron-to-carbon ratio. This procedure is generically plagued with degeneracies between the diffusion coefficient and the vertical extent of the Galactic magnetic halo. The latter is of paramount importance for indirect dark matter (DM) searches, because it fixes the amount of DM annihilation or decay that contributes to the local antimatter CR flux. These degeneracies could be broken by using secondary radioactive species, but the current data still have large error bars, and this method is extremely sensitive to the very local interstellar medium (ISM) properties. Here, we propose to use the low-energy CR positrons in the GeV range as another direct constraint on diffusion models. We show that the PAMELA data disfavor small diffusion halo ($L\\lesssim 3$ kpc) and large diffusion slope models, and exclude the minimal ({\\em min}) configuration (Maurin et al. 2001, Donato et al. 2004) widely used in the literature to bracket the uncertainties in the DM signal predictions. This is complementary to indirect constraints (diffuse radio and gamma-ray emissions) and has strong impact on DM searches. Indeed this makes the antiproton constraints more robust while enhancing the discovery/exclusion potential of current and future experiments, like AMS-02 and GAPS, especially in the antiproton and antideuteron channels.

Julien Lavalle; David Maurin; Antje Putze

2015-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

112

Secluded WIMP Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a generic mechanism via which thermal relic WIMP dark matter may be decoupled from the Standard Model, namely through a combination of WIMP annihilation to metastable mediators with subsequent delayed decay to Standard Model states. We illustrate this with explicit examples of WIMPs connected to the Standard Model by metastable bosons or fermions. In all models, provided the WIMP mass is greater than that of the mediator, it can be secluded from the Standard Model with an extremely small elastic scattering cross-section on nuclei and rate for direct collider production. In contrast, indirect signatures from WIMP annihilation are consistent with a weak scale cross-section and provide potentially observable \\gamma-ray signals. We also point out that \\gamma-ray constraints and flavor physics impose severe restrictions on MeV-scale variants of secluded models, and identify limited classes that pass all the observational constraints.

Maxim Pospelov; Adam Ritz; Mikhail B. Voloshin

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

113

Experiment Profile: DAMIC NAME: Dark Matter In CCDs, or DAMIC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DAMIC DAMIC NAME: Dark Matter In CCDs, or DAMIC ThE ORIGIN OF ThE NAME: DAMIC searches for dark matter using Charge Coupled Devices. These digital chips register light that gets converted into a digital value a computer can store. WHAT WILL THIS TELL? Everything you see, visible matter, makes up 4 percent of the universe. Dark matter and dark energy make up the rest of the universe. Physicists understand that dark matter acts as an invisible source of gravity, but little more. DAMIC seeks to pinpoint what particles make up dark matter, which will help explain how the universe came to exist. Without the added gravitational attraction of dark matter, stars and galaxies would have never formed. The expansion of the universe after the Big Bang would have dispersed visible

114

Search for Axionic Dark Matter D.B. Tanner, for the ADMX collaboration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of 100­200 mK. Our understanding of the energy and matter composition of the universe has undergone into microwave photons when the resonant frequency of the cavity equals the mass of the axion. An ultra

Tanner, David B.

115

Dark matter and the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An abundance of astrophysical evidence indicates that the bulk of matter in the universe is made up of massive, electrically neutral particles that form the dark matter (DM). While the density of DM has been precisely measured, the identity of the DM particle (or particles) is a complete mystery. In fact, within the laws of physics as we know them (the Standard Model, or SM), none of the particles have the right properties to make up DM. Remarkably, many new physics extensions of the SM -- designed to address theoretical issues with the electroweak symmetry breaking sector -- require the introduction of new particles, some of which are excellent DM candidates. As the LHC era begins, there are high hopes that DM particles, along with their associated new matter states, will be produced in pp collisions. We discuss how LHC experiments, along with other DM searches, may serve to determine the identity of DM particles and elucidate the associated physics. Most of our discussion centers around theories with weak-scale supersymmetry, and allows for several different DM candidate particles.

Howard Baer; Xerxes Tata

2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

116

Double-Disk Dark Matter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Based on observational tests of large scale structure and constraints on halo structure, dark matter is generally taken to be cold and essentially collisionless. On the other hand, given the large number of particles and forces in the visible world, a more complex dark sector could be a reasonable or even likely possibility. This hypothesis leads to testable consequences, perhaps portending the discovery of a rich hidden world neighboring our own. We consider a scenario that readily satisfies current bounds that we call Partially Interacting Dark Matter (PIDM). This scenario contains self-interacting dark matter, but it is not the dominant component. Even if PIDM contains only a fraction of the net dark matter density, comparable to the baryonic fraction, the subdominant components interactions can lead to interesting and potentially observable consequences. Our primary focus will be the special case of Double-Disk Dark Matter (DDDM), in which self-interactions allow the dark matter to lose enough energy to lead to dynamics similar to those in the baryonic sector. We explore a simple model in which DDDM can cool efficiently and form a disk within galaxies, and we evaluate some of the possible observational signatures. The most prominent signal of such a scenario could be an enhanced indirect detection signature with a distinctive spatial distribution. Even though subdominant, the enhanced density at the center of the galaxy and possibly throughout the plane of the galaxy (depending on precise alignment) can lead to large boost factors, and could even explain a signature as large as the 130 GeV Fermi line. Such scenarios also predict additional dark radiation degrees of freedom that could soon be detectable and would influence the interpretation of future data, such as that from Planck and from the Gaia satellite. We consider this to be the first step toward exploring a rich array of new possibilities for dark matter dynamics.

JiJi Fan; Andrey Katz; Lisa Randall; Matthew Reece

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

A DEEP SEARCH FOR EXTENDED RADIO CONTINUUM EMISSION FROM DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR PARTICLE DARK MATTER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present deep radio observations of four nearby dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, designed to detect extended synchrotron emission resulting from weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter annihilations in their halos. Models by Colafrancesco et al. (CPU07) predict the existence of angularly large, smoothly distributed radio halos in such systems, which stem from electron and positron annihilation products spiraling in a turbulent magnetic field. We map a total of 40.5 deg{sup 2} around the Draco, Ursa Major II, Coma Berenices, and Willman 1 dSphs with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) at 1.4 GHz to detect this annihilation signature, greatly reducing discrete-source confusion using the NVSS catalog. We achieve a sensitivity of {sigma}{sub sub} {approx}< 7 mJy beam{sup -1} in our discrete source-subtracted maps, implying that the NVSS is highly effective at removing background sources from GBT maps. For Draco we obtained approximately concurrent Very Large Array observations to quantify the variability of the discrete source background, and find it to have a negligible effect on our results. We construct radial surface brightness profiles from each of the subtracted maps, and jackknife the data to quantify the significance of the features therein. At the {approx}10' resolution of our observations, foregrounds contribute a standard deviation of 1.8 mJy beam{sup -1} {<=} {sigma}{sub ast} {<=} 5.7 mJy beam{sup -1} to our high-latitude maps, with the emission in Draco and Coma dominated by foregrounds. On the other hand, we find no significant emission in the Ursa Major II and Willman 1 fields, and explore the implications of non-detections in these fields for particle dark matter using the fiducial models of CPU07. For a WIMP mass M{sub {chi}} = 100 GeV annihilating into b b-bar final states and B = 1 {mu}G, upper limits on the annihilation cross-section for Ursa Major II and Willman I are log (({sigma}v){sub {chi}}, cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}) {approx}< -25 for the preferred set of charged particle propagation parameters adopted by CPU07; this is comparable to that inferred at {gamma}-ray energies from the two-year Fermi Large Area Telescope data. We discuss three avenues for improving the constraints on ({sigma}v){sub {chi}} presented here, and conclude that deep radio observations of dSphs are highly complementary to indirect WIMP searches at higher energies.

Spekkens, Kristine [Department of Physics, Royal Military College of Canada, P.O. Box 17000, Station Forces, Kingston, Ontario K7K 7B4 (Canada); Mason, Brian S. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Aguirre, James E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Nhan, Bang, E-mail: kristine.spekkens@rmc.ca [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 391 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

118

Lorentz-violating dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LORENTZ-VIOLATING DARK MATTER A Dissertation by ANTONIO R. MONDRAGON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2007 Major Subject...: Physics LORENTZ-VIOLATING DARK MATTER A Dissertation by ANTONIO R. MONDRAGON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair...

Mondragon, Antonio Richard

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

VDM: a model for vector dark matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We construct a model based on a new U(1){sub X} gauge symmetry and a discrete Z{sub 2} symmetry under which the new gauge boson is odd. The model contains new complex scalars which carry U(1){sub X} charge but are singlets of the Standard Model. The U(1){sub X} symmetry is spontaneously broken but the Z{sub 2} symmetry is maintained, making the new gauge boson a dark matter candidate. In the minimal version there is only one complex scalar field but by extending the number of scalars to two, the model will enjoy rich phenomenology which comes in various phases. In one phase, CP is spontaneously broken. In the other phase, an accidental Z{sub 2} symmetry appears which makes one of the scalars stable and therefore a dark matter candidate along with the vector boson. We discuss the discovery potential of the model by colliders as well as the direct dark matter searches.

Farzan, Yasaman; RezaeiAkbarieh, Amin, E-mail: yasaman@theory.ipm.ac.ir, E-mail: am_rezaei@physics.sharif.ir [School of physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Weak Lensing: Dark Matter, Dark Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The light rays from distant galaxies are deflected by massive structures along the line of sight, causing the galaxy images to be distorted. Measurements of these distortions, known as weak lensing, provide a way of measuring the distribution of dark matter as well as the spatial geometry of the universe. I will describe the ideas underlying this approach to cosmology. With planned large imaging surveys, weak lensing is a powerful probe of dark energy. I will discuss the observational challenges ahead and recent progress in developing multiple, complementary approaches to lensing measurements.

Jain, Bhuvnesh (University of Pennsylvania) [University of Pennsylvania

2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Inert scalar dark matter in an extra dimension inspired model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we analyze a dark matter model inspired by theories with extra dimensions. The dark matter candidate corresponds to the first Kaluza-Klein mode of a real scalar added to the Standard Model. The tower of new particles enriches the calculation of the relic abundance. For large mass splitting, the model converges to the predictions of the inert singlet dark matter model. For nearly degenerate mass spectrum, coannihilations increase the cross-sections used for direct and indirect dark matter searches. Moreover, the Kaluza-Klein zero mode can mix with the SM higgs and further constraints can be applied.

R. A. Lineros; F. A. Pereira dos Santos

2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

122

Missing energy signatures of dark matter at the LHC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We use ATLAS and CMS searches in the monojet + missing energy and monophoton + missing energy final state to set limits on the couplings of dark matter to quarks and gluons. Working in an effective field theory framework we compare several existing monojet analyses and find that searches with high pT cuts are more sensitive to dark matter. We constrain the suppression scale of the effective dark matterstandard model interactions and convert these limits into bounds on the cross sections relevant to direct and indirect detection. We find that, for certain types of operators, in particular, spin-independent dark mattergluon couplings and spin-dependent dark matterquark couplings, LHC constraints from the monojet channel are competitive with, or superior to, limits from direct searches up to dark matter masses of order 1TeV. Comparing to indirect searches, we exclude, at 90%C.L., dark matter annihilating to quarks with the annihilation cross section of a thermal relic for masses below ?1570??GeV, depending on the Lorentz structure of the effective couplings. Monophoton limits are somewhat weaker than monojet bounds but still provide an important cross check in the case of a discovery in monojets. We also discuss the possibility that dark matterstandard model interactions at LHC energies cannot be described by effective operators, in which case we find that constraints can become either significantly stronger, or considerably weaker, depending on the mass and width of the intermediate particle. Further, we discuss the special case of dark matter coupling to the Higgs boson, and we show that searches for invisible Higgs decays would provide superior sensitivity, particularly for a light Higgs mass and light dark matter.

Patrick J. Fox; Roni Harnik; Joachim Kopp; Yuhsin Tsai

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

123

Missing Energy Signatures of Dark Matter at the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use ATLAS and CMS searches in the mono-jet + missing energy and mono-photon + missing energy final state to set limits on the couplings of dark matter to quarks and gluons. Working in an effective field theory framework we compare several existing mono-jet analyses and find that searches with high p_T cuts are more sensitive to dark matter. We constrain the suppression scale of the effective dark matter-Standard Model interactions, and convert these limits into bounds on the cross sections relevant to direct and indirect detection. We find that, for certain types of operators, in particular spin-independent dark matter-gluon couplings and spin-dependent dark matter-quark couplings, LHC constraints from the mono-jet channel are competitive with, or superior to, limits from direct searches up to dark matter masses of order 1 TeV. Comparing to indirect searches, we exclude, at 90% C.L., dark matter annihilating to quarks with the annihilation cross section of a thermal relic for masses below ~ 15-70 GeV, depending on the Lorentz structure of the effective couplings. Mono-photon limits are somewhat weaker than mono-jet bounds, but still provide an important cross check in the case of a discovery in mono-jets. We also discuss the possibility that dark matter--Standard Model interactions at LHC energies cannot be described by effective operators, in which case we find that constraints can become either significantly stronger, or considerably weaker, depending on the mass and width of the intermediate particle. We also discuss the special case of dark matter coupling to the Higgs boson, and we show that searches for invisible Higgs decays would provide superior sensitivity, particularly for a light Higgs mass and light dark matter.

Patrick J. Fox; Roni Harnik; Joachim Kopp; Yuhsin Tsai

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

124

Search for muon signal from dark matter annihilations in the Sun with the Baksan Underground Scintillator Telescope for 24.12 years  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a new dataset analysis of the neutrino experiment at the Baksan Underground Scintillator Telescope with muon energy threshold about 1 GeV for the longest exposure time toward the Sun. In search for a signal from self-annihilations of dark matter particles in the center of the Sun we use an updated sample of upward through-going muons for 24.12 years of live time. No observable excess has been found in measured muons relative to expected background from neutrinos of atmospheric origin. We present an improved data analysis procedure and describe it in detail. We set the 90% C.L. new upper limits on expected neutrino and muon fluxes from dark matter annihilations in the Sun, on the corresponding annihilation rates and cross sections of their elastic scattering off proton.

Boliev, M.M. [Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences, Baksan Neutrino Observatory, Kabardino-Balkariya 400900 (Russian Federation); Demidov, S.V.; Mikheyev, S.P.; Suvorova, O.V., E-mail: boliev2005@yandex.ru, E-mail: demidov@ms2.inr.ac.ru, E-mail: mikheyev@pcbai10.inr.ruhep.ru, E-mail: suvorova@cpc.inr.ac.ru [Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences, prospect 60-th October 7A, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Cold dark matter heats up  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the principal discoveries in modern cosmology is that standard model particles (including baryons, leptons and photons) together comprise only 5% of the mass-energy budget of the Universe. The remaining 95% consists of dark energy and dark matter (DM). Consequently our picture of the universe is known as {\\Lambda}CDM, with {\\Lambda} denoting dark energy and CDM cold dark matter. {\\Lambda}CDM is being challenged by its apparent inability to explain the low density of DM measured at the centre of cosmological systems, ranging from faint dwarf galaxies to massive clusters containing tens of galaxies the size of the Milky Way. But before making conclusions one should carefully include the effect of gas and stars, which were historically seen as merely a passive component during the assembly of galaxies. We now understand that these can in fact significantly alter the DM component, through a coupling based on rapid gravitational potential fluctuations.

Pontzen, Andrew

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Dark energy and dark matter from cosmological observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present status of our knowledge about the dark matter and dark energy is reviewed. Bounds on the content of cold and hot dark matter from cosmological observations are discussed in some detail. I also review current bounds on the physical properties of dark energy, mainly its equation of state and effective speed of sound.

Steen Hannestad

2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

127

A search for particle dark matter using cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors in the one- and two- tower runs of CDMS-II at Soudan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Images of the Bullet Cluster of galaxies in visible light, X-rays, and through gravitational lensing confirm that most of the matter in the universe is not composed of any known form of matter. The combined evidence from the dynamics of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, the cosmic microwave background, big bang nucleosynthesis, and other observations indicates that 80% of the universe's matter is dark, nearly collisionless, and cold. The identify of the dar, matter remains unknown, but weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are a very good candidate. They are a natural part of many supersymmetric extensions to the standard model, and could be produced as a nonrelativistic, thermal relic in the early universe with about the right density to account for the missing mass. The dark matter of a galaxy should exist as a spherical or ellipsoidal cloud, called a 'halo' because it extends well past the edge of the visible galaxy. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) seeks to directly detect interactions between WIMPs in the Milky Way's galactic dark matter halo using crystals of germanium and silicon. Our Z-sensitive ionization and phonon ('ZIP') detectors simultaneously measure both phonons and ionization produced by particle interactions. In order to find very rare, low-energy WIMP interactions, they must identify and reject background events caused by environmental radioactivity, radioactive contaminants on the detector,s and cosmic rays. In particular, sophisticated analysis of the timing of phonon signals is needed to eliminate signals caused by beta decays at the detector surfaces. This thesis presents the firs two dark matter data sets from the deep underground experimental site at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. These are known as 'Run 118', with six detectors (1 kg Ge, 65.2 live days before cuts) and 'Run 119', with twelve detectors (1.5 kg Ge, 74.5 live days before cuts). They have analyzed all data from the two runs together in a single, combined analysis, with sensitivity to lower-energy interactions, careful control of data quality and stability, and further development of techniques for reconstructing event location and rejecting near-surface interactions from beta decays. They also present a revision to the previously published Run 119 analysis, a demonstration of the feasibility of a low-threshold (1 or 2 keV) analysis of Soudan data, and a review of the literature on charge generation and quenching relevant to the ionization signal.

Ogburn, Reuben Walter, IV; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

MiniCLEAN Dark Matter Experiment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MiniCLEAN MiniCLEAN Dark Matter Experiment Investigating the field of high energy physics through experiments that strengthen our fundamental understanding of matter, energy,...

129

Nonthermal dark matter in mirage mediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In mirage-mediation models there exists a modulus field whose mass is O(1000) TeV and its late decay may significantly change the standard thermal relic scenario of the dark matter. We study nonthermal production of the dark matter directly from the modulus decay, and find that for some parameter regions nonthermally produced neutralinos can become the dark matter.

Nagai, Minoru; Nakayama, Kazunori [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8582 (Japan)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Vacuum energy as dark matter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the vacuum energy of massive quantum fields in an expanding universe. We define a conserved renormalized energy-momentum tensor by means of a comoving cutoff regularization. Using exact solutions for de Sitter space-time, we show that in a certain range of mass and renormalization scales there is a contribution to the vacuum energy density that scales as nonrelativistic matter and that such a contribution becomes dominant at late times. By means of the WKB approximation, we find that these results can be extended to arbitrary Robertson-Walker geometries. We study the range of parameters in which the vacuum energy density would be compatible with current limits on dark matter abundance. Finally, by calculating the vacuum energy in a perturbed Robertson-Walker background, we obtain the speed of sound of density perturbations and show that the vacuum energy density contrast can grow on sub-Hubble scales as in standard cold dark matter scenarios.

F.?D. Albareti; J.?A.?R. Cembranos; A.?L. Maroto

2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

131

Dark Energy - Dark Matter Unification: Generalized Chaplygin Gas Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the main features of the generalized Chaplygin gas (GCG) proposal for unification of dark energy and dark matter and discuss how it admits an unique decomposition into dark energy and dark matter components once phantom-like dark energy is excluded. In the context of this approach we consider structure formation and show that unphysical oscillations or blow-up in the matter power spectrum are not present. Moreover, we demonstrate that the dominance of dark energy occurs about the time when energy density fluctuations start evolving away from the linear regime.

Orfeu Bertolami

2005-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

132

Sterile dark matter and reionization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sterile neutrinos with masses in the keV range can be the dark matter, and their emission from a supernova can explain the observed velocities of pulsars. The sterile neutrino decays could produce the x-ray radiation in the early universe, which could have an important effect on the formation of the first stars. X-rays could ionize gas and could catalyze the production of molecular hydrogen during the ``dark ages''. The increased fraction of molecular hydrogen could facilitate the cooling and collapse of the primordial gas clouds in which the first stars were formed.

Alexander Kusenko

2006-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

133

LHC Bounds on Interactions of Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive limits on the interactions of dark matter with quarks from ATLAS null searches for jets + missing energy based on ~1 fb^-1 of integrated luminosity, using a model-insensitive effective theory framework. We find that the new limits from the LHC significantly extend limits previously derived from CDF data at the Tevatron. Translated into the parameter space of direct searches, these limits are particularly effective for ~GeV mass WIMPs. Our limits indicate tension with isospin violating models satisfying minimal flavor violation which attempt to reconcile the purported CoGeNT excess with Xenon-100, indicating that either a light mediator or nontrivial flavor structure for the dark sector is necessary for a viable reconciliation of CoGeNT with Xenon.

Arvind Rajaraman; William Shepherd; Tim M. P. Tait; Alexander M. Wijangco

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

134

LHC bounds on interactions of dark matter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We derive limits on the interactions of dark matter with quarks from ATLAS null searches for jets+missing energy based on ?1??fb-1 of integrated luminosity, using a model-insensitive effective theory framework. We find that the new limits from the LHC significantly extend limits previously derived from CDF data at the Tevatron. Translated into the parameter space of direct searches, these limits are particularly effective for ???GeV mass weakly interacting massive particles. Our limits indicate tension with isospin-violating models satisfying minimal flavor violation which attempt to reconcile the purported CoGeNT excess with Xenon-100, indicating that either a light mediator or nontrivial flavor structure for the dark sector is necessary for a viable reconciliation of CoGeNT with Xenon.

Arvind Rajaraman; William Shepherd; Tim M. P. Tait; Alexander M. Wijangco

2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

135

2 Apr 2009 "Shedding Light on Dark Matter", LHC Status and SUSY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Apr 2009 "Shedding Light on Dark Matter", U MD 1 LHC Status and SUSY Search Preparations Sarah Light on Dark Matter", U MD 2 · Can look for the ambient dark matter all around us using nuclear recoils,659 m. Injector: SPS Injected beam energy: 450 GeV (protons) Nominal beam energy in physics: 7 Te

Maryland at College Park, University of

136

Quantum Haplodynamics, Dark Matter and Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In quantum haplodynamics (QHD) the weak bosons, quarks and leptons are bound states of fundamental constituents, denoted as haplons. The confinement scale of the associated gauge group SU(2)_h is of the order of $\\Lambda_h\\simeq 0.3$ TeV. One scalar state has zero haplon number and is the resonance observed at the LHC. In addition, there exist new bound states of haplons with no counterpart in the SM, having a mass of the order of 0.5 TeV up to a few TeV. In particular, a neutral scalar state with haplon number 4 is stable and can provide the dark matter in the universe. The QHD, QCD and QED couplings can unify at the Planck scale. If this scale changes slowly with cosmic time, all of the fundamental couplings, the masses of the nucleons and of the DM particles, including the cosmological term (or vacuum energy density), will evolve with time. This could explain the dark energy of the universe.

Harald Fritzsch; Joan Sola

2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

137

Dissipative hidden sector dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simple way of explaining dark matter without modifying known Standard Model physics is to require the existence of a hidden sector, which interacts with the visible one predominantly via gravity. We consider a hidden sector containing two stable particles charged under an unbroken $U(1)^{'}$ gauge symmetry, hence featuring dissipative interactions. The massless gauge field associated with this symmetry can interact via kinetic mixing with the ordinary photon. In fact, such an interaction of strength $\\epsilon \\sim 10^{-9}$ appears to be necessary in order to explain galactic structure. We calculate the effect of this new physics on Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and its contribution to the relativistic energy density at Hydrogen recombination. Subsequently we examine the process of dark recombination, during which neutral dark states are formed, which is important for large-scale structure formation. We then analyze the phenomenology of our model in the context of galactic structure, and find that it can reproduc...

Foot, R

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Hierarchy in the Phase Space and Dark Matter Astronomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a theoretical framework for describing the hierarchical structure of the phase space of cold dark matter haloes, due to gravitationally bound substructures. Because it includes the full hierarchy of the cold dark matter initial conditions and is hence complementary to the halo model, the stable clustering hypothesis is applied for the first time here to the small-scale phase space structure. As an application, we show that the particle dark matter annihilation signal could be up to two orders of magnitude larger than that of the smooth halo within the Galactic virial radius. The local boost is inversely proportional to the smooth halo density, and thus is O(1) within the solar radius, which could translate into interesting signatures for dark matter direct detection experiments: The temporal correlation of dark matter detection can change by a factor of 2 in the span of 10 years, while there will be significant correlations in the velocity space of dark matter particles. This can introduce O(1) uncertainty in the direction of local dark matter wind, which was believed to be a benchmark of directional dark matter searches or the annual modulation signal.

Niayesh Afshordi; Roya Mohayaee; Edmund Bertschinger

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

139

A Search for dark matter in events with one jet and missing transverse energy in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of a search for dark matter production in the monojet signature. We analyze a sample of Tevatron pp collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.7 fb{sup -1} recorded by the CDF II detector. In events with large missing transverse energy and one energetic jet, we find good agreement between the standard model prediction and the observed data. We set 90% confidence level upper limits on the dark matter production rate. The limits are translated into bounds on nucleon-dark matter scattering rates which are competitive with current direct detection bounds on spin-independent interaction below a dark matter candidate mass of 5 GeV/c{sup 2}, and on spin-dependent interactions up to masses of 200 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Design and Construction of Prototype Dark Matter Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lepton Quark Studies (LQS) group is engaged in searching for dark matter using the Dark Matter Time Projection Chamber (DMTPC) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) (Carlsbad, NM). DMTPC is a direction-sensitive dark matter detector designed to measure the recoil direction and energy deposited by fluorine nuclei recoiling from the interaction with incident WIMPs. In the past year, the major areas of progress have been: #15; to publish the #12;first dark matter search results from a surface run of the DMTPC prototype detector, #15; to build and install the 10L prototype in the underground laboratory at WIPP which will house the 1 m{sup 3} detector, and #15; to demonstrate charge and PMT readout of the TPC using prototype detectors, which allow triggering and #1;{Delta}z measurement to be used in the 1 m{sup 3} detector under development.

Peter Fisher

2012-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

An Overview of Dark Matter Experiments at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dark Matter research at Jefferson Lab started in 2006 with the LIght Pseudoscalar and Scalar Search (LIPSS) collaboration to check the validity of results reported by the PVLAS collaboration. In the intervening years interest in dark matter laboratory experiments has grown at Jefferson Lab. Current research underway or in planning stages probe various mass regions covering 14 orders of magnitude: from 10{sup -6} eV to 100 MeV. This presentation will be an overview of our dark matter efforts, three of which focus on the hypothesized A' gauge boson.

James Boyce

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Gif Lectures on direct detection of Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

These notes cover some of the topics associated with direct detection of dark matter at an introductory level. The general principles of dark matter search are summarized. The current status of some experiments is described, with an emphasis on bolometric and noble liquid techniques. Plots and illustrations associated to these notes may be found on transparencies presented during the lecture, on the web site of Gif school 2009.

Eric Armengaud

2010-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

143

The Maximum Patch Method for Directional Dark Matter Detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Present and planned dark matter detection experiments search for WIMP-induced nuclear recoils in poorly known background conditions. In this environment, the maximum gap statistical method provides a way of setting more sensitive cross section upper limits by incorporating known signal information. We give a recipe for the numerical calculation of upper limits for planned directional dark matter detection experiments, that will measure both recoil energy and angle, based on the gaps between events in two-dimensional phase space.

Shawn Henderson; Jocelyn Monroe; Peter Fisher

2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

144

Maximum patch method for directional dark matter detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Present and planned dark matter detection experiments search for WIMP-induced nuclear recoils in poorly known background conditions. In this environment, the maximum gap statistical method provides a way of setting more sensitive cross section upper limits by incorporating known signal information. We give a recipe for the numerical calculation of upper limits for planned directional dark matter detection experiments, that will measure both recoil energy and angle, based on the gaps between events in two-dimensional phase space.

Henderson, Shawn; Monroe, Jocelyn; Fisher, Peter [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Laboratory for Nuclear Science, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Limits on electrophilic Dark Matter from LHC Monojets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Searches for WIMP Dark Matter particle at the LHC are considered from the point of view of the existence of a Dark Matter particle which couples primarily through the heavy gauge boson Z, as suggested by recent tentative evidence for a 130 GeV gamma line in the FermiLAT data. We compare three models in which the WIMP is a neutrino-like particle and consider the limits on such particle and interactions from LHC.

K. G. Savvidy

2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

146

The Cosmology of Composite Inelastic Dark Matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Composite dark matter is a natural setting for implementing inelastic dark matter - the O(100 keV) mass splitting arises from spin-spin interactions of constituent fermions. In models where the constituents are charged under an axial U(1) gauge symmetry that also couples to the Standard Model quarks, dark matter scatters inelastically off Standard Model nuclei and can explain the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulation signal. This article describes the early Universe cosmology of a minimal implementation of a composite inelastic dark matter model where the dark matter is a meson composed of a light and a heavy quark. The synthesis of the constituent quarks into dark hadrons results in several qualitatively different configurations of the resulting dark matter composition depending on the relative mass scales in the system.

Spier Moreira Alves, Daniele; Behbahani, Siavosh R.; /SLAC /Stanford U., ITP; Schuster, Philip; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

147

Axion dark matter detection with cold molecules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current techniques cannot detect axion dark matter over much of its parameter space, particularly in the theoretically well-motivated region where the axion decay constant fa lies near the grand unified theory (GUT) and Planck scales. We suggest a novel experimental method to search for QCD axion dark matter in this region. The axion field oscillates at a frequency equal to its mass when it is a component of dark matter. These oscillations induce time varying CP-odd nuclear moments, such as electric dipole and Schiff moments. The coupling between internal atomic fields and these nuclear moments gives rise to time varying shifts to atomic energy levels. These effects can be enhanced by using elements with large Schiff moments such as the light Actinides, and states with large spontaneous parity violation, such as molecules in a background electric field. The energy level shift in such a molecule can be ?10-24??eV or larger. While challenging, this energy shift may be observable in a molecular clock configuration with technology presently under development. The detectability of this energy shift is enhanced by the fact that it is a time varying shift whose oscillation frequency is set by fundamental physics, and is therefore independent of the details of the experiment. This signal is most easily observed in the sub-MHz range, allowing detection when fa is ?1016??GeV, and possibly as low as 1015??GeV. A discovery in such an experiment would not only reveal the nature of dark matter and confirm the axion as the solution to the strong CP problem, it would also provide a glimpse of physics at the highest energy scales, far beyond what can be directly probed in the laboratory.

Peter W. Graham and Surjeet Rajendran

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Nonthermal dark matter in mirage mediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In mirage-mediation models there exists a modulus field whose mass is O(1000) TeV and its late-decay may significantly change the standard thermal relic scenario of the dark matter. We study nonthermal production of the dark matter directly from the modulus decay, and find that for some parameter regions non-thermally produced neutralinos can become the dark matter.

Minoru Nagai; Kazunori Nakayama

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

149

Anapole dark matter at the LHC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The anapole moment is the only allowed electromagnetic moment for Majorana fermions. Fermionic dark matter acquiring an anapole can have a standard thermal history and be consistent with current direct detection experiments. In this paper, we calculate the collider monojet signatures of anapole dark matter and show that the current LHC results exclude anapole dark matter with mass less than 100GeV, for an anapole coupling that leads to the correct thermal relic abundance.

Yu Gao; Chiu Man Ho; Robert J. Scherrer

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

150

What are the neutrino masses. Dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The arguments connecting detections of a reason of difficulties of a solution of a problem of a cold dark matter are adduced.

V. P. Efrosinin

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

151

Can we discover dual-component thermal WIMP dark matter?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We address the question of whether the upcoming generation of dark matter search experiments and colliders will be able to discover if the dark matter in the Universe has two components of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). We outline a model-independent approach, and we study the specific cases of (1) direct detection with low-background 1 ton noble-gas detectors and (2) a 0.5 TeV center of mass energy electron-positron linear collider. We also analyze the case of indirect detection via two gamma-ray lines, which would provide a verification of such a discovery, although multiple gamma-ray lines can in principle originate from the annihilation of a single dark matter particle. For each search ''channel'', we outline a few assumptions to relate the very small set of parameters we consider (defining the masses of the two WIMPs and their relative abundance in the overall dark matter density) with the relevant detection rates. We then draw general conclusions on which corners of a generic dual-component dark matter scenario can be explored with current and next generation experiments. We find that in all channels the ideal setup is one where the relative mass splitting between the two WIMP species is of order 1, and where the two dark matter components contribute in a ratio close to 1:1 to the overall dark matter content of the Universe. Interestingly, in the case of direct detection, future experiments might detect multiple states even if only ? 10% of the energy-density of dark matter in the Universe is in the subdominant species.

Profumo, Stefano; Ubaldi, Lorenzo [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz CA 95064 (United States); Sigurdson, Kris, E-mail: profumo@scipp.ucsc.edu, E-mail: krs@physics.ubc.ca, E-mail: ubaldi@physics.ucsc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

LHC Bounds on UV-Complete Models of Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the sensitivity of searches for dark matter in the jets and missing energy channel in the case where the particle mediating interactions between hadronic matter and DM is collider accessible. We consider all tree level UV completions of interactions between fermion DM and quarks which contribute to direct detection, and derive bounds which apply to elastic or inelastic scattering dark matter explanations of direct detection signals. We find that studies based on effective operators give robust bounds when the mediator is heavy enough to resonantly produce the final state in question.

Jessica Goodman; William Shepherd

2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

153

Big Bang Synthesis of Nuclear Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the physics of dark matter models featuring composite bound states carrying a large conserved dark "nucleon" number. The properties of sufficiently large dark nuclei may obey simple scaling laws, and we find that this scaling can determine the number distribution of nuclei resulting from Big Bang Dark Nucleosynthesis. For plausible models of asymmetric dark matter, dark nuclei of large nucleon number, e.g. > 10^8, may be synthesised, with the number distribution taking one of two characteristic forms. If small-nucleon-number fusions are sufficiently fast, the distribution of dark nuclei takes on a logarithmically-peaked, universal form, independent of many details of the initial conditions and small-number interactions. In the case of a substantial bottleneck to nucleosynthesis for small dark nuclei, we find the surprising result that even larger nuclei, with size >> 10^8, are often finally synthesised, again with a simple number distribution. We briefly discuss the constraints arising from the...

Hardy, Edward; March-Russell, John; West, Stephen M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Can dark matter be mostly massless particles?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss an overlooked factor in dark matter studies. Namely, if massless particles are captured into a local structure and stop free streaming in the universe, they no longer lose energy by cosmological red-shift, and no longer smear out density fluctuations beyond their ``confinement'' scale. If this occurred at the stage when radiation dominated over baryonic matter in energy density, then these captured massless particles would comprise the major part of dark matter in today's universe, leaving no room for other dark matter scenarios. The most probable such particles are gravitons with non-linear self-interaction.

Xiang-Song Chen

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

155

Gamma-ray bursts and dark energydark matter interaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......on a putative coupling between dark energy and dark matter. Type Ia supernovae constraints from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) first-year results...general|cosmological parameters|dark energy|dark matter| 1 INTRODUCTION......

T. Barreiro; O. Bertolami; P. Torres

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

CMB constraints on light dark matter candidates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unveiling the nature of cosmic dark matter is an urgent issue in cosmology. Here we make use of a strategy based on the search for the imprints left on the CMB temperature and polarization spectra by the energy deposition due to annihilations of the most promising dark matter candidate, a stable WIMP of mass 1-20 GeV. A major improvement with respect to previous similar studies is a detailed treatment of the annihilation cascade and its energy deposition in the cosmic gas. This is vital as this quantity is degenerate with the annihilation cross-section . The strongest constraints are obtained from Monte Carlo Markov Chains analysis of the combined WMAP7 and SPT datasets up to lmax = 3100. If annihilation occurs via the e+e- channel, a light WIMP can be excluded at 2-{\\sigma} c.l. as a viable DM candidate in the above mass range. However, if annihilation occurs via {\\mu}+{\\mu}- or {\\tau}+{\\tau}- channels instead we find that WIMPs with mass > 5 GeV might represent a viable cosmological DM candidate. We compare...

Evoli, Carmelo; Ferrara, Andrea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Direct Detection Constraints on Dark Photon Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dark matter detectors built primarily to probe elastic scattering of WIMPs on nuclei are also precise probes of light, weakly coupled particles that may be absorbed by the detector material. In this paper, we derive constraints on the minimal model of dark matter comprised of long-lived vector states V (dark photons) in the 0.01-100 keV mass range. The absence of an ionization signal in direct detection experiments such as XENON10 and XENON100 places a very strong constraint on the dark photon mixing angle, down to $O(10^{-15})$, assuming that dark photons comprise the dominant fraction of dark matter. This sensitivity to dark photon dark matter exceeds the indirect bounds derived from stellar energy loss considerations over a significant fraction of the available mass range. We also revisit indirect constraints from $V\\to 3\\gamma$ decay and show that limits from modifications to the cosmological ionization history are comparable to the updated limits from the diffuse gamma-ray flux.

Haipeng An; Maxim Pospelov; Josef Pradler; Adam Ritz

2014-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

158

Smoothly evolving supercritical-string dark energy relaxes supersymmetric-dark-matter constraints  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show that Supercritical-String-Cosmology (SSC) off-equilibrium and time-dependent-dilaton effects lead to a smoothly evolving dark energy for the last 10 billion years in concordance with all presently available astrophysical data. Such effects dilute by a factor O ( 10 ) the supersymmetric dark matter density (neutralinos), relaxing severe WMAP 1, 3 constraints on the SUSY parameter space. Thus, LHC anticipated searches/discoveries may discriminate between conventional and supercritical-string cosmology.

A.B. Lahanas; N.E. Mavromatos; D.V. Nanopoulos

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Neutrinos, Dark Matter and Nuclear Detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solutions to problems in nuclear non-proliferation and counter-terrorism may be found at the forefront of modern physics. Neutrino oscillation experiments, dark matter searches, and high energy astrophysics, are based on technology advances that have may also have application to nuclear detection. The detection problems share many characteristics, including energy scales, time structures, particle-type, and, of course, the combination of high backgrounds and low signal levels. This convergence of basic and applied physics is realized in non-proliferation and homeland security projects at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Examples described here include reactor anti-neutrino monitoring, dual-phase noble liquid TPC development, gamma-ray telescopes, and nuclear resonance fluorescence.

Goldstein, W H; Bernstein, A; Craig, W W; Johnson, M

2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

160

Antigravitation, Dark Energy, Dark Matter - Alternative Solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collisional damping of gravitational waves in the Newtonian matter is investigated. The generalized theory of Landau damping is applied to the gravitational physical systems in the context of the plasma gravitational analogy.

Boris V. Alexeev

2009-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Unifying dark energy and dark matter with a scalar field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The standard model of cosmology considers the existence of two components of unknown nature, ``dark matter'' and ``dark energy'', which determine the cosmological evolution. Their nature remains unknown, and other models can also be considered. In particular, it may be possible to reinterpret the recent cosmological observations so that the Universe does not contain two fluids of unknown natures, but only one fluid with particular properties. After a brief review of constraints on this unifying ``dark fluid'', we will discuss a specific model of dark fluid based on a complex scalar fluid.

A. Arbey

2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

162

Dark matter candidate in an extended type III seesaw scenario  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The type III seesaw mechanism for neutrino mass generation usually makes use of at least two $Y = 0$, $SU(2)_L$ lepton triplets. We augment such a model with a third triplet and a sterile neutrino, both of which are odd under a conserved $\\Z_2$ symmetry. With all new physics confined to the $\\Z_2$-odd sector, whose low energy manifestation is in some higher-dimensional operators, a fermionic dark matter candidate is found to emerge. We identify the region of the parameter space of the scenario, which is consistent with all constraints from relic density and direct searches, and allows a wide range of masses for the dark matter candidate.

Chaudhuri, Avinanda; Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup; Rakshit, Subhendu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Disentangling Dark Matter Dynamics with Directional Detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inelastic dark matter reconciles the DAMA anomaly with other null direct detection experiments and points to a non-minimal structure in the dark matter sector. In addition to the dominant inelastic interaction, dark matter scattering may have a subdominant elastic component. If these elastic interactions are suppressed at low momentum transfer, they will have similar nuclear recoil spectra to inelastic scattering events. While upcoming direct detection experiments will see strong signals from such models, they may not be able to unambiguously determine the presence of the subdominant elastic scattering from the recoil spectra alone. We show that directional detection experiments can separate elastic and inelastic scattering events and discover the underlying dynamics of dark matter models.

Lisanti, Mariangela; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

164

What is the Evidence for Dark Matter?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Newtonian mechanics indicates that galaxies and galaxy clusters are much more massive than we would have guessed from their luminosities, with the discrepancy being generally attributed to dark matter halos. An alternative hypothesis is that accelerations in very weak gravitational fields are larger than predicted by Newton's laws, and there is no need for dark matter. Even though we do not currently have a satisfactory theory associated with this rival hypothesis, we can ask whether any observational tests could rule it out or prefer it over the dark matter hypothesis. Current evidence suggests that neither hypothesis enjoys a decisive advantage over the other. If dark matter turns out to be the correct interpretation however, then theories of galaxy formation face some quite severe fine-tuning problems.

J A Sellwood

2004-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

165

Muon Fluxes From Dark Matter Annihilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the muon flux from annihilation of the dark matter in the core of the Sun, in the core of the Earth and from cosmic diffuse neutrinos produced in dark matter annihilation in the halos. We consider model-independent direct neutrino production and secondary neutrino production from the decay of taus produced in the annihilation of dark matter. We illustrate how muon energy distribution from dark matter annihilation has a very different shape than muon flux from atmospheric neutrinos. We consider both the upward muon flux, when muons are created in the rock below the detector, and the contained flux when muons are created in the (ice) detector. We contrast our results to the ones previously obtained in the literature, illustrating the importance of properly treating muon propagation and energy loss. We comment on neutrino flavor dependence and their detection.

Arif Emre Erkoca; Mary Hall Reno; Ina Sarcevic

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

166

Limits on spin-independent wimp-nucleon interactions from the two-tower run of the cryogenic dark matter search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report new results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. Two towers, each consisting of six detectors, were operated for 74.5 live days, giving spectrum-weighted exposures of 34 kg-d for germanium and 12 kg-d for silicon targets after cuts, averaged over recoil energies 10-100 keV for a WIMP mass of 60GeV/c{sup 2}. A blind analysis was conducted, incorporating improved techniques for rejecting surface events. No WIMP signal exceeding expected backgrounds was observed. When combined with our previous results from Soudan, the 90% C.L. upper limit on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section is 1.6 x 10{sup -43} cm{sup 2} from Ge, and 3 x 10{sup -42} cm{sup 2} from Si, for a WIMP mass of 60GeV/c{sup 2}. The combined limit from Ge (Si) is a factor of 2.5 (10) lower than our previous results, and constrains predictions of supersymmetric models.

Akerib, D.S.; Attisha, M.J.; Bailey, C.N.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, Daniel A.; Brink, P.L.; Brusov, P.P.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D.O.; Chang, C.L.; Cooley, J.; Crisler, M.B.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Dixon, R.; Dragowsky, M.R.; Driscoll, D.D.; Duong, L.; Ferril, R.; Filippini, J.; /Brown U. /Case Western Reserve U. /Fermilab /LBL, Berkeley

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Superheavy sterile neutrinos as dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Chair of Committee) Ronald A. Bryan (Member) S ephen A. Fulling (Member) Thomas Adair, III (Head of Department) May 2000 Major Subject: Physics ABSTRACT Superheavy Sterile Neutrinos as Dark Matter. (May 2000) Yongjun Tang, B. S. , Jilin... this research. Thanks also go to Dr. Ronald A. Bryan and Dr. Stephen A. Fulling for being my committee members. vu TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER Page I INTRODUCTION . II DARK MATTER MODELS III NEUTRINO OSCILLATION . A. Neutrino Oscillation in Vacuum B...

Tang, Yongjun

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

168

Dark Matter Density in Disk Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I show that the predicted densities of the inner dark matter halos in LCDM models of structure formation appear to be higher than estimates from real galaxies and constraints from dynamical friction on bars. This inconsistency would not be a problem for the LCDM model if physical processes that are omitted in the collisionless collapse simulations were able to reduce the dark matter density in the inner halos. I review the mechanisms proposed to achieve the needed density reduction.

J. A. Sellwood

2008-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

169

On The Origin of Light Dark Matter Species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TeV-mass dark matter charged under a new GeV-scale gauge force can explain electronic cosmic-ray anomalies. We propose that the CoGeNT and DAMA direct detection experiments are observing scattering of light stable states 'GeV-Matter' that are charged under this force and constitute a small fraction of the dark matter halo. Dark higgsinos in a supersymmetric dark sector are natural candidates for GeV-Matter that scatter off protons with a universal cross-section of 5 x 10{sup -38} cm{sup 2} and can naturally be split by 10-30 keV so that their dominant interaction with protons is down-scattering. As an example, down-scattering of an O(5) GeV dark higgsino can simultaneously explain the spectra observed by both CoGeNT and DAMA. The event rates in these experiments correspond to a GeV-Matter abundance of 0.2-1% of the halo mass density. This abundance can arise directly from thermal freeze-out at weak coupling, or from the late decay of an unstable TeV-scale WIMP. Our proposal can be tested by searches for exotics in the BaBar and Belle datasets.

Essig, Rouven; Kaplan, Jared; Schuster, Philip; /SLAC; Toro, Natalia; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2010-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

170

Dark matter identification with gamma rays from dwarf galaxies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If the positron fraction and combined electron-positron flux excesses recently observed by PAMELA, Fermi and HESS are due to dark matter annihilation into lepton-rich final states, the accompanying final state radiation (FSR) photons may be detected by ground-based atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (ACTs). Satellite dwarf galaxies in the vicinity of the Milky Way are particularly promising targets for this search. We find that current and near-future ACTs have an excellent potential for discovering the FSR photons from dwarfs, although a discovery cannot be guaranteed due to large uncertainties in the fluxes resulting from lack of precise knowledge of dark matter distribution within the dwarfs. We also investigate the possibility of discriminating between different dark matter models based on the measured FSR photon spectrum. For typical parameters, we find that the ACTs can reliably distinguish models predicting dark matter annihilation into two-lepton final states from those favoring four-lepton final states (as in, for example, ''axion portal'' models). In addition, we find that the dark matter particle mass can also be determined from the FSR spectrum.

Perelstein, Maxim; Shakya, Bibhushan, E-mail: mp325@cornell.edu, E-mail: bs475@cornell.edu [Institute for High Energy Phenomenology, Newman Laboratory of Elementary Particle Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Non-relativistic effective theory of dark matter direct detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dark matter direct detection searches for signals coming from dark matter scattering against nuclei at a very low recoil energy scale ~ 10 keV. In this paper, a simple non-relativistic effective theory is constructed to describe interactions between dark matter and nuclei without referring to any underlying high energy models. It contains the minimal set of operators that will be tested by direct detection. The effective theory approach highlights the set of distinguishable recoil spectra that could arise from different theoretical models. If dark matter is discovered in the near future in direct detection experiments, a measurement of the shape of the recoil spectrum will provide valuable information on the underlying dynamics. We bound the coefficients of the operators in our non-relativistic effective theory by the null results of current dark matter direct detection experiments. We also discuss the mapping between the non-relativistic effective theory and field theory models or operators, including aspects of the matching of quark and gluon operators to nuclear form factors.

JiJi Fan; Matthew Reece; Lian-Tao Wang

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

172

Non-relativistic effective theory of dark matter direct detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dark matter direct detection searches for signals coming from dark matter scattering against nuclei at a very low recoil energy scale ? 10 keV. In this paper, a simple non-relativistic effective theory is constructed to describe interactions between dark matter and nuclei without referring to any underlying high energy models. It contains the minimal set of operators that will be tested by direct detection. The effective theory approach highlights the set of distinguishable recoil spectra that could arise from different theoretical models. If dark matter is discovered in the near future in direct detection experiments, a measurement of the shape of the recoil spectrum will provide valuable information on the underlying dynamics. We bound the coefficients of the operators in our non-relativistic effective theory by the null results of current dark matter direct detection experiments. We also discuss the mapping between the non-relativistic effective theory and field theory models or operators, including aspects of the matching of quark and gluon operators to nuclear form factors.

Fan, JiJi; Wang, Lian-Tao [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 08540 (United States); Reece, Matthew, E-mail: jijifan@princeton.edu, E-mail: mreece@princeton.edu, E-mail: lianwang@princeton.edu [Princeton Center for Theoretical Science, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 08540 (United States)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Development and Performance of Detectors for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment with an Increased Sensitivity Based on a Maximum Likelihood Analysis of Beta Contamination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) uses cryogenically-cooled detectors made of germanium and silicon in an attempt to detect dark matter in the form of Weakly-Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). The expected interaction rate of these particles is on the order of 1/kg/day, far below the 200/kg/day expected rate of background interactions after passive shielding and an active cosmic ray muon veto. Our detectors are instrumented to make a simultaneous measurement of both the ionization energy and thermal energy deposited by the interaction of a particle with the crystal substrate. A comparison of these two quantities allows for the rejection of a background of electromagnetically-interacting particles at a level of better than 99.9%. The dominant remaining background at a depth of {approx} 11 m below the surface comes from fast neutrons produced by cosmic ray muons interacting in the rock surrounding the experiment. Contamination of our detectors by a beta emitter can add an unknown source of unrejected background. In the energy range of interest for a WIMP study, electrons will have a short penetration depth and preferentially interact near the surface. Some of the ionization signal can be lost to the charge contacts there and a decreased ionization signal relative to the thermal signal will cause a background event which interacts at the surface to be misidentified as a signal event. We can use information about the shape of the thermal signal pulse to discriminate against these surface events. Using a subset of our calibration set which contains a large fraction of electron events, we can characterize the expected behavior of surface events and construct a cut to remove them from our candidate signal events. This thesis describes the development of the 6 detectors (4 x 250 g Ge and 2 x 100 g Si) used in the 2001-2002 CDMS data run at the Stanford Underground Facility with a total of 119 livedays of data. The preliminary results presented are based on the first use of a beta-eliminating cut based on a maximum-likelihood characterization described above.

Driscoll, Donald D.; /Case Western Reserve U.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Thermodynamics of dark energy interacting with dark matter and radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics, in the cosmological scenario where dark energy interacts with both dark matter and radiation. Calculating separately the entropy variation for each fluid component and for the apparent horizon itself, we show that the generalized second law is always and generally valid, independently of the specific interaction form, of the fluids equation-of-state parameters and of the background geometry.

Jamil, Mubasher [Center for Advanced Mathematics and Physics, National University of Sciences and Technology, Rawalpindi, 46000 (Pakistan); Saridakis, Emmanuel N. [Department of Physics, University of Athens, GR-15771 Athens (Greece); Setare, M. R. [Department of Science, Payame Noor University, Bijar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

NASA?s Dark Matter & Dark Energy Programs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We present an overview of selected high value scientific results and prospects for future advances from NASA?s Dark missions, i.e., those covering dark matter (DM) and dark energy (DE). This includes current missions HST, Chandra, Swift, GALEX, Suzaku, Fermi, and future missions JWST and WFIRST. These missions and earlier ones, such as WMAP, have brought about a revolution in our understanding of the fundamental properties of the universe its age, rate of expansion, deceleration history, and composition (i.e., relative mix of luminous matter, dark matter, and dark energy). The next chapters in this story will be written by JWST and WFIRST. JWST was the highest priority of the 2000 Decadal Survey. It will observe in the near and medium infrared, and revolutionize our understanding of the high redshift universe. WFIRST is the highest ranked large space mission of the 2010 Decadal Survey. It is a NASA observatory designed to perform wide-field imaging and slitless spectroscopic surveys of the NIR sky (0.7 2.5?). WFIRST will: (i) measure the expansion history of the universe, and thereby constrain dark energy, (ii) find Earth-like planets around other stars using microlensing, and (iii) perform surveys that are ?100 times more sensitive than current NIR surveys.

N. Gehrels; J.K. Cannizzo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Limits on a muon flux from Kaluza-Klein dark matter annihilations in the Sun from the IceCube 22-string detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Limits on a muon flux from Kaluza-Klein dark matterAPS/123-QED Limits on a muon ?ux from Kaluza-Klein dark23, 2009) A search for muon neutrinos from Kaluza-Klein dark

Abbasi, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Astrophysical constraints on millicharged atomic dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some models of inelastic dark matter posit the existence of bound states under some new $U(1)'$ gauge symmetry. If this new dark photon kinetically mixes with the standard model photon, then the constituent particles in these bound states can acquire a fractional electric charge. This electric charge renders a dark-matter medium dispersive. We compute this frequency-dependent index of refraction for such a medium and use the frequency-dependent arrival time of light from astrophysical sources to constrain the properties of dark atoms in the medium. Using optical-wavelength observations from the Crab Pulsar, we find the electric millicharge of dark (electrons) protons to be smaller than the electric charge $e$ for dark atom masses below 100 keV, assuming a dark fine structure constant $\\boldsymbol{\\alpha}=1$. We estimate that future broadband observations of gamma-ray bursts can produce constraints on the millicharge of dark atoms with masses in the keV range that are competitive with existing collider constra...

Kvam, Audrey K

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Astrophysical constraints on millicharged atomic dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some models of inelastic dark matter posit the existence of bound states under some new $U(1)'$ gauge symmetry. If this new dark photon kinetically mixes with the standard model photon, then the constituent particles in these bound states can acquire a fractional electric charge. This electric charge renders a dark-matter medium dispersive. We compute this frequency-dependent index of refraction for such a medium and use the frequency-dependent arrival time of light from astrophysical sources to constrain the properties of dark atoms in the medium. Using optical-wavelength observations from the Crab Pulsar, we find the electric millicharge of dark (electrons) protons to be smaller than the electric charge $e$ for dark atom masses below 100 keV, assuming a dark fine structure constant $\\boldsymbol{\\alpha}=1$. We estimate that future broadband observations of gamma-ray bursts can produce constraints on the millicharge of dark atoms with masses in the keV range that are competitive with existing collider constraints.

Audrey K. Kvam; David C. Latimer

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Hadronic uncertainties in the elastic scattering of supersymmetric dark matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We review the uncertainties in the spin-independent and spin-dependent elastic scattering cross sections of supersymmetric dark matter particles on protons and neutrons. We propagate the uncertainties in quark masses and hadronic matrix elements that are related to the {pi}-nucleon {sigma} term and the spin content of the nucleon. By far the largest single uncertainty is that in spin-independent scattering induced by our ignorance of the matrix elements linked to the {pi}-nucleon {sigma} term, which affects the ratio of cross sections on proton and neutron targets as well as their absolute values. This uncertainty is already impacting the interpretations of experimental searches for cold dark matter. We plead for an experimental campaign to determine better the {pi}-nucleon {sigma} term. Uncertainties in the spin content of the proton affect significantly, but less strongly, the calculation of rates used in indirect searches.

Ellis, John [TH Division, Physics Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Olive, Keith A.; Savage, Christopher [William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment, results from the 2004 campaign and status of the current update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CDMS II experiment uses Z-dependent Ionization Phonon (ZIP) detectors made of Germanium and Silicon to identify nuclear recoils from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with near complete event-by-event rejection of various radioactive backgrounds. In 2004 CDMS II operated 6 Ge ZIPs and 6 Si ZIPs. The 74.5 live days of operation gave after cuts 34 kg*d exposure for the Ge ZIPs and 15 kg*d exposure for Si ZIPs. All criteria for identifying a signal from nuclear recoil due to WIMPs were developed blind with respect to the WIMP search data. The new 90% C.L. upper limit on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section is 1.6e-43 cm2 from Si, for a WIMP mass of 60 GeV/c2. The experiment has recently upgraded to 19 Ge ZIPs totaling 4.8 kg, and 11 Si ZIPs totaling 1.9 kg. The goal is to increase sensitivity with running in 2006 and 2007 by one order of magnitude.

Samuel Leclercq

2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Stable Higgs Bosons as Cold Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a class of the gauge-Higgs unification models the 4D neutral Higgs boson, which is a part of the extra-dimensional component of the gauge fields, becomes absolutely stable as a consequence of the gauge invariance and dynamically generated new parity, serving as a promising candidate for cold dark matter (CDM). We show that the observed relic abundance of cold dark matter is obtained in the SO(5) x U(1) model in the warped space with the Higgs mass around 70 GeV. The Higgs-nucleon scattering cross section is found to be close to the current CDMS II and XENON10 bounds in the direct detection of dark matter.

Yutaka Hosotani; Pyungwon Ko; Minoru Tanaka

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

182

Electroweak fragmentation functions for dark matter annihilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electroweak corrections can play a crucial role in dark matter annihilation. The emission of gauge bosons, in particular, leads to a secondary flux consisting of all Standard Model particles, and may be described by electroweak fragmentation functions. To assess the quality of the fragmentation function approximation to electroweak radiation in dark matter annihilation, we have calculated the flux of secondary particles from gauge-boson emission in models with Majorana fermion and vector dark matter, respectively. For both models, we have compared cross sections and energy spectra of positrons and antiprotons after propagation through the galactic halo in the fragmentation function approximation and in the full calculation. Fragmentation functions fail to describe the particle fluxes in the case of Majorana fermion annihilation into light fermions: the helicity suppression of the lowest-order cross section in such models cannot be lifted by the leading logarithmic contributions included in the fragmentation f...

Cavasonza, Leila Ali; Pellen, Mathieu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

MODELING OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS FOR DARK MATTER HALOS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations show that the underlying rotation curves at intermediate radii in spiral and low-surface-brightness galaxies are nearly universal. Further, in these same galaxies, the product of the central density and the core radius ({rho}{sub 0} r{sub 0}) is constant. An empirically motivated model for dark matter halos that incorporates these observational constraints is presented and shown to be in accord with the observations. A model fit to the observations of the galaxy cluster A611 shows that {rho}{sub 0} r{sub 0} for the dark matter halo in this more massive structure is larger by a factor of {approx}20 over that assumed for the galaxies. The model maintains the successful Navarro-Frenk-White form in the outer regions, although the well-defined differences in the inner regions suggest that modifications to the standard cold dark matter picture are required.

Hartwick, F. D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Asymmetric dark matter and the Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cold dark matter particles with an intrinsic matter-antimatter asymmetry do not annihilate after gravitational capture by the Sun and can affect its interior structure. The rate of capture is exponentially enhanced when such particles have self-interactions of the right order to explain structure formation on galactic scales. A `dark baryon' of mass 5 GeV is a natural candidate and has the required relic abundance if its asymmetry is similar to that of ordinary baryons. We show that such particles can solve the `solar composition problem'. The predicted small decrease in the low energy neutrino fluxes may be measurable by the Borexino and SNO+ experiments.

Mads T. Frandsen; Subir Sarkar

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Scalar dark matter in spiral galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An exact, axially symmetric solution to the Einstein-Klein-Gordon field equations is employed to model the dark matter in spiral galaxies. The extended rotation curves from a previous analysis are used to fit the model and a very good agreement is found. It is argued that, although our model possesses three parameters to be fitted, it is better than the non-relativistic alternatives in the sense that it is not of a phenomenological nature, since the dark matter would consist entirely of a scalar field.

F. S. Guzman; T. Matos; H. Villegas-Brena

1998-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

186

Experimental High Energy Physics Research: Direct Detection of Dark Matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The grant supported research on an experimental search for evidence of dark matter interactions with normal matter. The PI carried out the research as a member of the LUX and LZ collaborations. The LUX research team collected a first data set with the LUX experiment, a large liquid xenon detector installed in the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF). The first results were published in Physical Review Letters on March 4, 2014. The journal Nature named the LUX result a scientific highlight of the year for 2013. In addition, the LZ collaboration submitted the full proposal for the Lux Zeplin experiment, which has since been approved by DOE-HEP as a second-generation dark matter experiment. Witherell is the Level 2 manager for the Outer Detector System on the LUX-Zeplin experiment.

Witherell, Michael S.

2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

187

Dark energy and dark matter from Bose-Einstein condensate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose that gravitons with a very small mass (but consistent with experiments) may form a Bose-Einstein condensate, with its macroscopic wave function spanning the universe and producing a quantum potential. The latter's contribution to the cosmological constant accounts for the observed dark energy content and the accelerated expansion of our universe. Further, the density of the Bose-Einstein condensed gravitons in the lowest zero momentum state accounts for its cold dark matter content. In the far future this condensate is all that remains of our universe.

Das, Saurya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Dark energy and dark matter from Bose-Einstein condensate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose that gravitons with a very small mass (but consistent with experiments) may form a Bose-Einstein condensate, with its macroscopic wave function spanning the universe and producing a quantum potential. The latter's contribution to the cosmological constant accounts for the observed dark energy content and the accelerated expansion of our universe. Further, the density of the Bose-Einstein condensed gravitons in the lowest zero momentum state accounts for its cold dark matter content. In the far future this condensate is all that remains of our universe.

Saurya Das; Rajat K. Bhaduri

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

189

Gamma rays from top-mediated dark matter annihilations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lines in the energy spectrum of gamma rays are a fascinating experimental signal, which are often considered ''smoking gun'' evidence of dark matter annihilation. The current generation of gamma ray observatories are currently closing in on parameter space of great interest in the context of dark matter which is a thermal relic. We consider theories in which the dark matter's primary connection to the Standard Model is via the top quark, realizing strong gamma ray lines consistent with a thermal relic through the forbidden channel mechanism proposed in the Higgs in Space Model. We consider realistic UV-completions of the Higgs in Space and related theories, and show that a rich structure of observable gamma ray lines is consistent with a thermal relic as well as constraints from dark matter searches and the LHC. Particular attention is paid to the one loop contributions to the continuum gamma rays, which can easily swamp the line signals in some cases, and have been largely overlooked in previous literature.

Jackson, C.B. [University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Servant, Graldine [CERN Physics Department, Theory Division, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Shaughnessy, Gabe [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Tait, Tim M.P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Taoso, Marco, E-mail: geraldine.servant@cern.ch, E-mail: chris@uta.edu, E-mail: gshau@hep.wisc.edu, E-mail: ttait@uci.edu, E-mail: marco.taoso@cea.fr [Institut de Physique Thorique, CEA/Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cdex (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

On the capture of dark matter by neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the number of dark matter particles that a neutron star accumulates over its lifetime as it rotates around the center of a galaxy, when the dark matter particle is a self-interacting boson but does not self-annihilate. We take into account dark matter interactions with baryonic matter and the time evolution of the dark matter sphere as it collapses within the neutron star. We show that dark matter self-interactions play an important role in the rapid accumulation of dark matter in the core of the neutron star. We consider the possibility of determining an exclusion region of the parameter space for dark matter mass and dark matter interaction cross sections based on the observation of old neutron stars with strong dark matter self-interactions. We show that for a dark matter density of $~10^3$ GeV/cm$^3$ and dark matter mass $m_\\chi$ less than approximately 10 GeV, there is a potential exclusion region for dark matter interactions with nucleons that is three orders of magnitude more stringent than without self-interactions. The potential exclusion region for dark matter self-interaction cross sections is many orders of magnitude stronger than the current Bullet Cluster limit. For example, for high dark matter density regions, we find that for $m_\\chi\\sim 10$ GeV when the dark matter interaction cross section with the nucleons ranges from $\\sigma_{\\chi n}\\sim 10^{-52}$ cm$^2$ to $10^{-57}$ cm$^2$, the dark matter self-interaction cross section limit is $\\sigma_{\\chi\\chi}ten orders of magnitude stronger than the Bullet Cluster limit.

Tolga Guver; Arif Emre Erkoca; Mary Hall Reno; Ina Sarcevic

2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

191

Evolution of the Dark Matter Distribution at the Galactic Center  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Annihilation radiation from neutralino dark matter at the Galactic center (GC) would be greatly enhanced if the dark matter were strongly clustered around the supermassive black hole (SBH). The existence of a dark matter spike is made plausible by the observed, steeply rising stellar density near the GC SBH. Here the time-dependent equations describing gravitational interaction of the dark matter with the stars are solved. Scattering of dark matter particles by stars would substantially lower the dark matter density near the GC SBH over 10Gyr, due both to kinetic heating and to capture of dark matter particles by the SBH. This evolution implies a decrease by several orders of magnitude in the observable flux of annihilation products compared with models that associate a steep, dark matter spike with the SBH.

David Merritt

2004-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

192

Dark Photon Search at BABAR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presented is the current progress of a search for the signature of a dark photon or new particle using the BaBar data set. We search for the processes e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {gamma}{sub ISR}A{prime},A{prime} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} and e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {gamma}{sub ISR}{gamma}, {gamma} {yields} A{prime},A{prime} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}, where {gamma}{sub ISR} is an initial state radiated photon of energy E{sub {gamma}} >= 1 GeV. Twenty-five sets of Monte Carlo, simulating e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions at an energy of 10.58 GeV, were produced with different values of the A{prime} mass ranging from 100 MeV to 9.5 GeV. The mass resolution is calculated based on Monte Carlo simulations. We implement ROOT's Toolkit for Multivariate Analysis (TMVA), a machine learning tool that allows us to evaluate the signal character of events based on many of discriminating variables. TMVA training is conducted with samples of Monte Carlo as signal and a small portion of Run 6 as background. The multivariate analysis produces additional cuts to separate signal and background. The signal efficiency and sensitivity are calculated. The analysis will move forward to fit the background and scan the residuals for the narrow resonance peak of a new particle.

Greenwood, Ross N; /MIT /SLAC

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

193

RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS Dark matter lost and found  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-component condensate.They considered the limited access inherent to samples confined in a diamond anvil cell the gas disks of two spiral galaxies merge. As spirals have dark-matter haloes, their elliptical offspring­Einstein condensate within a ring- shaped magnetic trap (Phys. Rev. Lett. (in the press); preprint at http

Loss, Daniel

194

Constraints on Resonant Dark Matter Annihilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by PAMELA and FERMI satellites. In this thesis, we analyze a class of models which allow for dark matter to annihilate through an s-channel resonance. Our analysis takes into account constraints from thermal relic abundance and the recent measurements...

Backovic, Mihailo

2011-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

195

Dark matter interacts with variable vacuum energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate a spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) scenario with two interacting components, dark matter and variable vacuum energy (VVE) densities, plus two decoupled components, one is a baryon term while the other behaves as a radiation component. We consider a linear interaction in the derivative dark component density. We apply the $\\chi^2$ method to the observational Hubble data for constraining the cosmological parameters and analyze the amount of dark energy in the radiation era for the model. It turns out that our model fulfills the severe bound of $\\Omega_{x}(z\\simeq 1100)survey, the future constraints achievable by Euclid and CMBPol experiments, reported for the behavior of the dark energy at early times, and fulfills the stringent bound $\\Omega_{x}(z\\simeq 10^{10})<0.04$ at $2\\sigma$ level in the big-bang nucleosynthesis epoch. We a...

G, Ivn E Snchez

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

SU(5) Grand Unified Model and Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A dark matter model which is called w-matter or mirror dark matter is concretely constructed based on (f-SU(5))X(w-SU(5)) symmetry. There is no Higgs field and all masses originate from interactions in the present model. W-matter is dark matter relatively to f-matter and vice versa. In high-energy processes or when temperature is very high, visible matter and dark matter can transform from one into another. In such process energy seems to be non-conservational, because dark matter cannot be detected. In low-energy processes or when temperature is low, there is only gravitation interaction of dark matter for visible matter.

Shi-Hao Chen

2009-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

197

Constraints on dissipative unified dark matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modern cosmology suggests that the Universe contains two dark components dark matter and dark energy both unkown in laboratory physics and both lacking direct evidence. Alternatively, a unified dark sector, described by a single fluid, has been proposed. Dissipation is a common phenomenon in nature and it thus seems natural to consider models dominated by a viscous dark fluid. We focus on the study of bulk viscosity, as isotropy and homogeneity at large scales implies the suppression of shear viscosity, heat flow and diffusion. The generic ansatz ???{sup ?} for the coefficient of bulk viscosity (? denotes the mass/energy density), which for ? = ?1/2 mimics the ?CDM background evolution, offers excellent fits to supernova and H(z) data. We show that viscous dark fluids suffer from large contributions to the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect (generalising a previous study by Li and Barrow) and a suppression of structure growth at small-scales (as seen from a generalized Meszaros equation). Based on recent observations, we conclude that viscous dark fluid models (with ???{sup ?} and neglecting baryons) are strongly challenged.

Velten, Hermano [Universidade Federal do Esprito Santo, Av. Fernando Ferrari, Goiabeiras, Vitria (Brazil); Schwarz, Dominik J., E-mail: velten@physik.uni-bielefeld.de, E-mail: dschwarz@physik.uni-bielefeld.de [Fakultt fr Physik, Universitt Bielefeld, Postfach 100131, 33501 Bielefeld (Germany)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

DARK MATTER Tracing the "Cosmic Web" with Diffuse Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 DARK MATTER STARS GAS NEUTRAL HYDROGEN Tracing the "Cosmic Web" with Diffuse Gas Quasar Quasar Absorption Lines Keck/HIRES Quasar Spectrum Observer baryons dark matter potential isotropic UV only on and the radiation field intensity... H I #12;5 GOAL: the primordial dark matter power spectrum

Steidel, Chuck

199

Search for Dark Matter Candidates and Large Extra Dimensions in Events with a Photon and Missing Transverse Momentum in pp Collision Data at ?s=7?TeV with the ATLAS Detector  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Results of a search for new phenomena in events with an energetic photon and large missing transverse momentum in proton-proton collisions at ?s =7??TeV are reported. Data collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6??fb?1 are used. Good agreement is observed between the data and the standard model predictions. The results are translated into exclusion limits on models with large extra spatial dimensions and on pair production of weakly interacting dark matter candidates.

Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; kesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; sman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Atkinson, M.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimares da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, A. K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bittner, B.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Dark Stars: the First Stars in the Universe may be powered by Dark Matter Heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new line of research on Dark Stars is reviewed, which suggests that the first stars to exist in the universe were powered by dark matter heating rather than by fusion. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, which may be there own antipartmers, collect inside the first stars and annihilate to produce a heat source that can power the stars. A new stellar phase results, a Dark Star, powered by dark matter annihilation as long as there is dark matter fuel.

Katherine Freese; Peter Bodenheimer; Paolo Gondolo; Douglas Spolyar

2008-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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201

Searching for an invisible dark photon with DarkLight  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The DarkLight experiment at Jefferson Lab is designed to search for a new U(1) vector boson A' in the mass range 10-100 MeV through its decay A??e + e ?. We will show that DarkLight is also sensitive to an A' decaying to invisible final states but because of QED backgrounds such a search is only feasible with photon detection. Surprisingly pileup can be mitigated with a cut on the sign of the missing invariant mass-squared. We give the DarkLight reach for the invisible search assuming a nominal two-month running time and compare to constraints from anomalous magnetic moments and rare kaon decays.

Yonatan Kahn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Gravitational lensing: a unique probe of dark matter and dark energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...gravitating matter (dark and visible...in subsequent surveys (e.g. Astier...presence of an energy density with...The moniker dark energy was invented...Digital Sky Survey commissioning...the hunt for dark matter and dark energy in the UniverseNew...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

An Alternative to Particle Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose an alternative to particle dark matter that borrows ingredients of MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) while adding new key components. The first new feature is a dark matter fluid, in the form of a scalar field with small equation of state and sound speed. This component is critical in reproducing the success of cold dark matter for the expansion history and the growth of linear perturbations, but does not cluster significantly on non-linear scales. Instead, the missing mass problem on non-linear scales is addressed by a modification of the gravitational force law. The force law approximates MOND at large and intermediate accelerations, and therefore reproduces the empirical success of MOND at fitting galactic rotation curves. At ultra-low accelerations, the force law reverts to an inverse-square-law, albeit with a larger Newton's constant. This latter regime is important in galaxy clusters and is consistent with their observed isothermal profiles, provided the characteristic acceleration scale of MOND is mildly varying with scale or mass, such that it is ~12 times higher in clusters than in galaxies. We present an explicit relativistic theory in terms of two scalar fields. The first scalar field is governed by a Dirac-Born-Infeld action and behaves as a dark matter fluid on large scales. The second scalar field also has single-derivative interactions and mediates a fifth force that modifies gravity on non-linear scales. Both scalars are coupled to matter via an effective metric that depends locally on the fields. The form of this effective metric implies the equality of the two scalar gravitational potentials, which ensures that lensing and dynamical mass estimates agree. Further work is needed in order to make both the acceleration scale of MOND and the fraction at which gravity reverts to an inverse-square law explicitly dynamical quantities, varying with scale or mass.

Justin Khoury

2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

204

The Sensitivity of HAWC to High-Mass Dark Matter Annihilations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a wide field-of-view detector sensitive to gamma rays of 100 GeV to a few hundred TeV. Located in central Mexico at 19 degrees North latitude and 4100 m above sea level, HAWC will observe gamma rays and cosmic rays with an array of water Cherenkov detectors. The full HAWC array is scheduled to be operational in Spring 2015. In this paper, we study the HAWC sensitivity to the gamma-ray signatures of high-mass (multi- TeV) dark matter annihilation. The HAWC observatory will be sensitive to diverse searches for dark matter annihilation, including annihilation from extended dark matter sources, the diffuse gamma-ray emission from dark matter annihilation, and gamma-ray emission from non-luminous dark matter subhalos. Here we consider the HAWC sensitivity to a subset of these sources, including dwarf galaxies, the M31 galaxy, the Virgo cluster, and the Galactic center. We simulate the HAWC response to gamma rays from these sources in several well-motivated dark matter annihilation channels. If no gamma-ray excess is observed, we show the limits HAWC can place on the dark matter cross-section from these sources. In particular, in the case of dark matter annihilation into gauge bosons, HAWC will be able to detect a narrow range of dark matter masses to cross-sections below thermal. HAWC should also be sensitive to non-thermal cross-sections for masses up to nearly 1000 TeV. The constraints placed by HAWC on the dark matter cross-section from known sources should be competitive with current limits in the mass range where HAWC has similar sensitivity. HAWC can additionally explore higher dark matter masses than are currently constrained.

A. U. Abeysekara; R. Alfaro; C. Alvarez; J. D. Alvarez; R. Arceo; J. C. Arteaga-Velazquez; H. A. Ayala Solares; A. S. Barber; B. M. Baughman; N. Bautista-Elivar; J. Becerra Gonzalez; E. Belmont; S. Y. BenZvi; D. Berley; M. Bonilla Rosales; J. Braun; R. A. Caballero-Lopez; K. S. Caballero-Mora; A. Carraminana; M. Castillo; U. Cotti; J. Cotzomi; E. de la Fuente; C. De Leon; T. DeYoung; R. Diaz Hernandez; L. Diaz-Cruz; J. C. Diaz-Velez; B. L. Dingus; M. A. DuVernois; R. W. Ellsworth; S. F. E.; D. W. Fiorino; N. Fraija; A. Galindo; F. Garfias; M. M. Gonzalez; J. A. Goodman; V. Grabski; M. Gussert; Z. Hampel-Arias; J. P. Harding; C. M. Hui; P. Huentemeyer; A. Imran; A. Iriarte; P. Karn; D. Kieda; G. J. Kunde; A. Lara; R. J. Lauer; W. H. Lee; D. Lennarz; H. Leon Vargas; E. C. Linares; J. T. Linnemann; M. Longo; R. Luna-Garcia; A. Marinelli; H. Martinez; O. Martinez; J. Martinez-Castro; J. A. J. Matthews; J. McEnery; E. Mendoza Torres; P. Miranda-Romagnoli; E. Moreno; M. Mostafa; L. Nellen; M. Newbold; R. Noriega-Papaqui; T. Oceguera-Becerra; B. Patricelli; R. Pelayo; E. G. Perez-Perez; J. Pretz; C. Riviere; D. Rosa-Gonzalez; J. Ryan; H. Salazar; F. Salesa; A. Sandoval; M. Schneider; S. Silich; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; K. Sparks Woodle; R. W. Springer; I. Taboada; P. A. Toale; K. Tollefson; I. Torres; T. N. Ukwatta; L. Villasenor; T. Weisgarber; S. Westerhoff; I. G. Wisher; J. Wood; G. B. Yodh; P. W. Younk; D. Zaborov; A. Zepeda; H. Zhou; K. N. Abazajian

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

205

Gravitational lensing: a unique probe of dark matter and dark energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...fine-scale distribution of dark matter will require exquisite...puzzle of resolving the dark matter question were...astronomers, consider the discovery from two studies of distant...gravitating matter (dark and visible), but actually...implies the presence of an energy density with a negative...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Form factors for dark matter capture by the Sun in effective theories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the effective theory of isoscalar and isovector dark matter-nucleon interactions mediated by a heavy spin-1 or spin-0 particle, 8 isotope-dependent nuclear response functions can be generated in the dark matter scattering by nuclei. We compute the 8 nuclear response functions for the 16 most abundant elements in the Sun, i.e. H, $^{3}$He, $^{4}$He, $^{12}$C, $^{14}$N, $^{16}$O, $^{20}$Ne, $^{23}$Na, $^{24}$Mg, $^{27}$Al, $^{28}$Si, $^{32}$S, $^{40}$Ar, $^{40}$Ca, $^{56}$Fe, and $^{59}$Ni, through detailed numerical shell model calculations. We use our response functions to compute the rate of dark matter capture by the Sun for all isoscalar and isovector dark matter-nucleon effective interactions, including several operators previously considered for dark matter direct detection only. We study in detail the dependence of the capture rate on specific dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, and on the different elements in the Sun. We find that a so far neglected momentum dependent dark matter coupling to the nuclear vector charge gives a larger contribution to the capture rate than the constant spin-dependent interaction commonly included in experimental searches. Our investigation lays the foundations for model independent analyses of dark matter induced neutrino signals from the Sun. The nuclear response functions obtained in this study are listed in analytic form in an appendix, ready to be used in other projects.

Riccardo Catena; Bodo Schwabe

2015-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Can Cosmic Structure form without Dark Matter?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the prime pieces of evidence for dark matter is the observation of large overdense regions in the universe. Since we know from the cosmic microwave background that the regions that contained the most baryons when the universe was {approx} 400, 000 years old were overdense by only one part in ten thousand, perturbations had to have grown since then by a factor greater than (1 + z{sub *}) {approx_equal} 1180 where z{sub *} is the epoch of recombination. This enhanced growth does not happen in general relativity, so dark matter is needed in the standard theory. We show here that enhanced growth can occur in alternatives to general relativity, in particular in Bekenstein's relativistic version of Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND). The vector field introduced in that theory for a completely different reason plays a key role in generating the instability that produces large cosmic structures today.

Dodelson, Scott; /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Liguori, Michele; /Fermilab /Padua U. /INFN, Padua

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Can Cosmic Structure form without Dark Matter?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the prime pieces of evidence for dark matter is the observation of large overdense regions in the universe. Since we know from the cosmic microwave background that the regions that contained the most baryons when the universe was ~400,000 years old were overdense by only one part in ten thousand, perturbations had to have grown since then by a factor greater than $(1+z_*)\\simeq 1180$ where $z_*$ is the epoch of recombination. This enhanced growth does not happen in general relativity, so dark matter is needed in the standard theory. We show here that enhanced growth can occur in alternatives to general relativity, in particular in Bekenstein's relativistic version of MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND). The vector field introduced in that theory for a completely different reason plays a key role in generating the instability that produces large cosmic structures today.

Scott Dodelson; Michele Liguori

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

209

Directional detection of dark matter streams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Directional detection of weakly interacting massive particles, in which the energies and directions of the recoiling nuclei are measured, currently presents the only prospect for probing the local velocity distribution of Galactic dark matter. We investigate the extent to which future directional detectors would be capable of probing dark matter substructure in the form of streams. We analyze the signal expected from a Sagittarius-like stream and also explore the full parameter space of stream speed, direction, dispersion and density. Using a combination of nonparametric directional statistics, a profile likelihood ratio test and Bayesian parameter inference we find that within acceptable exposure times [O(10)??kg?yr for cross sections just below the current exclusion limits] future directional detectors will be sensitive to a wide range of stream velocities and densities. We also examine and discuss the importance of the energy window of the detector.

Ciaran A.?J. OHare and Anne M. Green

2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

210

Newtonian Collapse of Scalar Field Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this letter, we develop a Newtonian approach to the collapse of galaxy fluctuations of scalar field dark matter under initial conditions inferred from simple assumptions. The full relativistic system, the so called Einstein-Klein-Gordon, is reduced to the Schr\\"odinger-Newton one in the weak field limit. The scaling symmetries of the SN equations are exploited to track the non-linear collapse of single scalar matter fluctuations. The results can be applied to both real and complex scalar fields.

F. Siddhartha Guzman; L. Arturo Urena-Lopez

2003-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

211

Low-background underground facilities for the direct detection of dark matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the report of a working group formed to discuss the requirements of an underground facility for experiments trying to detect directly dark matter particles. There is a brief discussion of the general properties of underground facilities, focusing on the levels of muon induced backgrounds that are tolerable. Then the authors review the scientific motivation of the search for dark matter particles, and the existing experimental limits. There is a short description of the shielding necessary to reach the desired background levels. Finally, they report the results of their preliminary study of muon induced backgrounds in dark matter experiments, and the implications for the required depth of the facilities for such experiments.

Barnes, P.D. Jr. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Caldwell, D. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); DaSilva, A. [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Berkeley, CA (United States)] [and others

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

Coherent neutrino scattering in dark matter detectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus and weakly interacting massive particle-nucleus interaction signatures are expected to be quite similar. This paper discusses how a next-generation ton-scale dark matter detector could discover neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering, a precisely-predicted standard model process. A high-intensity pion- and muon- decay-at-rest neutrino source recently proposed for oscillation physics at underground laboratories would provide the neutrinos for these measurements. In this paper, we calculate raw rates for various target materials commonly used in dark matter detectors and show that discovery of this interaction is possible with a 2??tonyear GEODM exposure in an optimistic energy threshold and efficiency scenario. We also study the effects of the neutrino source on weakly interacting massive particle sensitivity and discuss the modulated neutrino signal as a sensitivity/consistency check between different dark matter experiments at the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. Furthermore, we consider the possibility of coherent neutrino physics with a GEODM module placed within tens of meters of the neutrino source.

A. J. Anderson; J. M. Conrad; E. Figueroa-Feliciano; K. Scholberg; J. Spitz

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Tensor Detection Severely Constrains Axion Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent detection of tensor modes by BICEP2 has non-trivial implications for axion dark matter implied by combining the tensor detection with isocurvature constraints from Planck. In this paper the measurement is taken as fact, and its implications considered, though further experimental verification is required. In the simplest inflation models $r=0.2$ implies $H_I=1.1\\times 10^{14}\\text{ GeV}$. If the axion decay constant $f_a>H_I$ then isocurvature constraints effectively rule out the QCD axion as dark matter for $m_a \\lesssim 0.06\\mu$ eV, contributing only a fraction $\\Omega_a/\\Omega_d\\lesssim 10^{-11}(f_a/10^{16}\\text{ GeV})^{5/6}$ (where $\\Omega_i$ is the fraction of the critical density), with misalignment angle $\\theta_i\\lesssim 3.1 \\times 10^{-8}(f_a/10^{16}\\text{ GeV})^{-1/6}$ . Implications of this fine tuning are discussed. Constraints on axion-like particles, as a function of their mass and dark matter fraction are also considered. For heavy axions with $m_a\\gtrsim 10^{-22}\\text{ eV}$ we find ...

Marsh, David J E; Hlozek, Renee; Ferreira, Pedro G

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Draft 04/05/09 A new high-background-rejection dark matter Ge cryogenic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Draft 04/05/09 A new high-background-rejection dark matter Ge cryogenic detector The EDELWEISS of a cryogenic germanium detector for dark matter search is presented, taking advantage of the coplanar grid in the EURECA project of a one-ton cryogenic detector mass. PACS numbers: 07.57.Kp; 07.85.Nc; 72.20.Jv; 95.35.+d

Boyer, Edmond

215

DOE Science Showcase - Dark Matter and Dark Energy | OSTI, US Dept of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Dark Matter and Dark Energy Dark Matter and Dark Energy The nature of dark energy or invisible energy is one of the universe's most compelling mysteries and its resolution is likely to completely change our understanding of matter, space, and time. For more information, see In the OSTI Collections: Dark Matter and Dark Energy, by Dr. William Watson, Physicist, OSTI staff. Gravitational lensing, or the warping of light around massive objects is one sign of dark energy Image Credit: NASA/Andy Fruchter/ERO team Dark energy research information: Temperature and Density Conditions for Nucleogenesis by Fusion Processes in Stars, William Fowler, DOE R&D Accomplishments Saul Perlmutter, Distant Supernovae, Dark Energy, and the Accelerating Expansion of the Universe, DOE R&D Accomplishments

216

Three-dimensional track reconstruction for directional Dark Matter detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Directional detection of Dark Matter is a promising search strategy. However, to perform such detection, a given set of parameters has to be retrieved from the recoiling tracks: direction, sense and position in the detector volume. In order to optimize the track reconstruction and to fully exploit the data of forthcoming directional detectors, we present a likelihood method dedicated to 3D track reconstruction. This new analysis method is applied to the MIMAC detector. It requires a full simulation of track measurements in order to compare real tracks to simulated ones. We conclude that a good spatial resolution can be achieved, i.e. sub-mm in the anode plane and cm along the drift axis. This opens the possibility to perform a fiducialization of directional detectors. The angular resolution is shown to range between 20 to 80, depending on the recoil energy, which is however enough to achieve a high significance discovery of Dark Matter. On the contrary, we show that sense recognition capability of directional detectors depends strongly on the recoil energy and the drift distance, with small efficiency values (50%70%). We suggest not to consider this information either for exclusion or discovery of Dark Matter for recoils below 100 keV and then to focus on axial directional data.

Billard, J.; Mayet, F.; Santos, D., E-mail: billard@lpsc.in2p3.fr, E-mail: mayet@lpsc.in2p3.fr, E-mail: santos@lpsc.in2p3.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universit Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut Nationale Polytechnique de Grenoble, 53 rue des Martyrs, Grenoble (France)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Weak lensing and dark energy: The impact of dark energy on nonlinear dark matter clustering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine the influence of percent-level dark energy corrections to the nonlinear matter power spectrum on constraints of the dark energy equation of state from future weak lensing probes. We explicitly show that a poor approximation (off by > or approx.10%) to the nonlinear corrections causes a > or approx. 1{sigma} bias on the determination of the dark energy equation of state. Future weak lensing surveys must therefore incorporate dark energy modifications to the nonlinear matter power spectrum accurate to the percent-level, to avoid introducing significant bias in their measurements. For the WMAP5 cosmology, the more accurate power spectrum is more sensitive to dark energy properties, resulting in a factor of 2 improvement in dark energy equation of state constraints. We explore the complementary constraints on dark energy from future weak lensing and supernova surveys. A space-based, Joint Dark Energy Mission-like survey measures the equation of state in five independent redshift bins to {approx}10%, while this improves to {approx}5% for a wide-field ground-based survey like the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. These constraints are contingent upon our ability to control weak lensing systematic uncertainties to the sub-percent level.

Joudaki, Shahab; Cooray, Asantha; Holz, Daniel E. [Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

Weak lensing and dark energy: The impact of dark energy on nonlinear dark matter clustering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examine the influence of percent-level dark energy corrections to the nonlinear matter power spectrum on constraints of the dark energy equation of state from future weak lensing probes. We explicitly show that a poor approximation (off by ?10%) to the nonlinear corrections causes a ?1? bias on the determination of the dark energy equation of state. Future weak lensing surveys must therefore incorporate dark energy modifications to the nonlinear matter power spectrum accurate to the percent-level, to avoid introducing significant bias in their measurements. For the WMAP5 cosmology, the more accurate power spectrum is more sensitive to dark energy properties, resulting in a factor of 2 improvement in dark energy equation of state constraints. We explore the complementary constraints on dark energy from future weak lensing and supernova surveys. A space-based, Joint Dark Energy Mission-like survey measures the equation of state in five independent redshift bins to ?10%, while this improves to ?5% for a wide-field ground-based survey like the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. These constraints are contingent upon our ability to control weak lensing systematic uncertainties to the sub-percent level.

Shahab Joudaki; Asantha Cooray; Daniel E. Holz

2009-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

219

Bi-metric Gravity and "Dark Matter"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a bi-metric theory of gravity containing a length scale of galactic size. For distances less than this scale the theory satisfies the standard tests of General Relativity. For distances greater than this scale the theory yields an effective gravitational constant much larger than the locally observed value of Newton's constant. The transition from one regime to the other through the galactic scale can explain the observed rotation curves of galaxies and hence the effects normally attributed to the presence of dark matter. Phenomena on an extragalactic scale such as galactic clusters and the expansion of the universe are controlled by the enhanced gravitational coupling. This provides an explanation of the missing matter normally invoked to account for the observed value of Hubble's constant in relation to observed matter.

I. T. Drummond

2000-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

220

The Sensitivity of HAWC to High-Mass Dark Matter Annihilations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a wide field-of-view detector sensitive to gamma rays of 100 GeV to a few hundred TeV. Located in central Mexico at 19 degrees North latitude and 4100 m above sea level, HAWC will observe gamma rays and cosmic rays with an array of water Cherenkov detectors. The full HAWC array is scheduled to be operational in Summer 2014. In this paper, we study the HAWC sensitivity to the gamma-ray signatures of high-mass (multi-TeV) dark matter annihilation. The HAWC observatory will be sensitive to diverse searches for dark matter annihilation, including annihilation from extended dark matter sources, the diffuse gamma-ray emission from dark matter annihilation, and gamma-ray emission from non-luminous dark matter subhalos. Here we consider the HAWC sensitivity to a subset of these sources, including dwarf galaxies, the M31 galaxy, the Virgo cluster, and the Galactic center. We simulate the HAWC response to gamma rays from these sources in several well-motivated dark matter annihilation channels. If no gamma-ray excess is observed, we show the limits HAWC can place on the dark matter cross-section from these sources. In particular, in the case of dark matter annihilation into gauge bosons, HAWC will be able to detect a narrow range of dark matter masses to cross-sections below thermal. HAWC should also be sensitive to non-thermal cross-sections for masses up to nearly 1000 TeV. The constraints placed by HAWC on the dark matter cross-section from known sources should be competitive with current limits.

A. U. Abeysekara; R. Alfaro; C. Alvarez; J. D. lvarez; R. Arceo; J. C. Arteaga-Velzquez; H. A. Ayala Solares; A. S. Barber; B. M. Baughman; N. Bautista-Elivar; J. Becerra Gonzalez; E. Belmont; S. Y. BenZvi; D. Berley; M. Bonilla Rosales; J. Braun; R. A. Caballero-Lopez; K. S. Caballero-Mora; A. Carramiana; M. Castillo; U. Cotti; J. Cotzomi; E. de la Fuente; C. De Len; T. DeYoung; R. Diaz Hernandez; L. Diaz-Cruz; J. C. D\\'\\iaz-Vlez; B. L. Dingus; M. A. DuVernois; R. W. Ellsworth; S. F. E.; D. W. Fiorino; N. Fraija; A. Galindo; F. Garfias; M. M. Gonzlez; J. A. Goodman; V. Grabski; M. Gussert; Z. Hampel-Arias; J. P. Harding; C. M. Hui; P. Hntemeyer; A. Imran; A. Iriarte; P. Karn; D. Kieda; G. J. Kunde; A. Lara; R. J. Lauer; W. H. Lee; D. Lennarz; H. Len Vargas; E. C. Linares; J. T. Linnemann; M. Longo; R. Luna-Garcia; A. Marinelli; H. Martinez; O. Martinez; J. Mart\\'\\inez-Castro; J. A. J. Matthews; J. McEnery; E. Mendoza Torres; P. Miranda-Romagnoli; E. Moreno; M. Mostaf; L. Nellen; M. Newbold; R. Noriega-Papaqui; T. Oceguera-Becerra; B. Patricelli; R. Pelayo; E. G. Prez-Prez; J. Pretz; C. Rivire; D. Rosa-Gonzlez; J. Ryan; H. Salazar; F. Salesa; A. Sandoval; M. Schneider; S. Silich; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; K. Sparks Woodle; R. W. Springer; I. Taboada; P. A. Toale; K. Tollefson; I. Torres; T. N. Ukwatta; L. Villaseor; T. Weisgarber; S. Westerhoff; I. G. Wisher; J. Wood; G. B. Yodh; P. W. Younk; D. Zaborov; A. Zepeda; H. Zhou; K. N. Abazajian

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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221

SUSY and Dark Matter Constraints from the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ability of the LHC to make statements about the dark matter problem is considered, with a specific focus on supersymmetry. After reviewing the current strategies for supersymmetry searches at the LHC (in both CMS and ATLAS), some key ATLAS studies are used to demonstrate how one could establish that SUSY exists before going on to measure the relic density of a neutralino WIMP candidate. Finally, the general prospects for success at the LHC are investigated by looking at different points in the MSSM parameter space.

Martin J. White

2006-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

222

Dark matter interacts with variable vacuum energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate a spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) scenario with two interacting components, dark matter and variable vacuum energy (VVE) densities, plus two decoupled components, one is a baryon term while the other behaves as a radiation component. We consider a linear interaction in the derivative dark component density. We apply the $\\chi^2$ method to the observational Hubble data for constraining the cosmological parameters and analyze the amount of dark energy in the radiation era for the model. It turns out that our model fulfills the severe bound of $\\Omega_{x}(z\\simeq 1100)measurements from Planck survey, the future constraints achievable by Euclid and CMBPol experiments, reported for the behavior of the dark energy at early times, and fulfills the stringent bound $\\Omega_{x}(z\\simeq 10^{10})<0.04$ at $2\\sigma$ level in the big-bang nucleosynthesis epoch. We also examine the cosmic age problem at high redshift associated with the old quasar APM 08279+5255 and estimate the age of the universe today.

Ivn E. Snchez G

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

223

Direct and indirect detection of dissipative dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the constraints from direct detection and solar capture on dark matter scenarios with a subdominant dissipative component. This dissipative dark matter component in general has both a symmetric and asymmetric relic abundance. Dissipative dynamics allow this subdominant dark matter component to cool, resulting in its partial or total collapse into a smaller volume inside the halo (e.g., a dark disk) as well as a reduced thermal velocity dispersion compared to that of normal cold dark matter. We first show that these features considerably relax the limits from direct detection experiments on the couplings between standard model (SM) particles and dissipative dark matter. On the other hand, indirect detection of the annihilation of the symmetric dissipative dark matter component inside the Sun sets stringent and robust constraints on the properties of the dissipative dark matter. In particular, IceCube observations force dissipative dark matter particles with mass above 50 GeV to either have a small coupling to the SM or a low local density in the solar system, or to have a nearly asymmetric relic abundance. Possible helioseismology signals associated with purely asymmetric dissipative dark matter are discussed, with no present constraints.

JiJi Fan; Andrey Katz; Jessie Shelton

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

224

A Cosmological Model without Singularity and Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

According to the cosmological model without singularity, there are s-matter and v-matter which are symmetric and have oppose gravitational masses. In V-breaking s-matter is similar to dark energy to cause expansion of the universe with an acceleration now, and v-matter is composed of v-F-matter and v-W-matter which are symmetric and have the same gravitational masses and forms the world. The ratio of s-matter to v-matter is changeable. Based on the cosmological model, we confirm that big bang nucleosynthesis is not spoiled by that the average energy density of W-matter (mirror matter) is equal to that of F-matter (ordinary matter). According to the present model, there are three sorts of dark matter which are v-W-baryon matter (4/27), unknown v-F-matter (9.5/27) and v-W-matter (9.5/27). Given v-F-baryon matter (4/27) and v-W-baryon matter can cluster and respectively form the visible galaxies and dark galaxies. Unknown v-F-matter and v-W-matter cannot cluster to form any celestial body, loosely distribute in space, are equivalent to cold dark matter, and their compositions are unknown. The number in a bracket is the ratio of the density of a sort of matter to total density of v-matter. The decisive predict is that there are dark celestial bodies and dark galaxies. The energy of F-matter can transform into the energy of W-matter by such a process in which the reaction energy is high enough.

Shi-Hao Chen

2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

225

Dark-matter admixed white dwarfs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the equilibrium structures of white dwarfs with dark matter cores formed by non-self-annihilating dark matter (DM) particles with masses ranging from 1GeV to 100GeV, which are assumed to form an ideal degenerate Fermi gas inside the stars. For DM particles of mass 10GeV and 100GeV, we find that stable stellar models exist only if the mass of the DM core inside the star is less than O(10-3)M? and O(10-6)M?, respectively. The global properties of these stars, and in particular the corresponding Chandrasekhar mass limits, are essentially the same as those of traditional white dwarf models without DM. Nevertheless, in the 10GeV case, the gravitational attraction of the DM core is strong enough to squeeze the normal matter in the core region to densities above neutron drip, far above those in traditional white dwarfs. For DM with a particle mass of 1GeV, the DM core inside the star can be as massive as ?0.1M? and affects the global structure of the star significantly. In this case, the radius of a stellar model with DM can be about two times smaller than that of a traditional white dwarf. Furthermore, the Chandrasekhar mass limit can also be decreased by as much as 40%. Our results may have implications on the extent to which type Ia supernovae can be regarded as standard candlesa key assumption in the discovery of dark energy.

S.-C. Leung; M.-C. Chu; L.-M. Lin; K.-W. Wong

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

226

Sensitivity of the IceCube neutrino detector to dark matter annihilating in dwarf galaxies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we compare the relative sensitivities of gamma-ray and neutrino observations to the dark matter annihilation cross section in leptophilic models such as have been designed to explain PAMELA data. We investigate whether the high energy neutrino telescope IceCube will be competitive with current and upcoming searches by gamma-ray telescopes, such as the Atmospheric erenkov Telescopes (H.E.S.S., VERITAS, and MAGIC), or the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, in detecting or constraining dark matter particles annihilating in dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We find that after 10 years of observation of the most promising nearby dwarfs, IceCube will have sensitivity comparable to the current sensitivity of gamma-ray telescopes only for very heavy (mX?7??TeV) or relatively light (mX?200??GeV) dark matter particles which annihilate primarily to ?+?-. If dark matter particles annihilate primarily to ?+?-, IceCube will have superior sensitivity only for dark matter particle masses below the 200GeV threshold of current Atmospheric erenkov Telescopes. If dark matter annihilations proceed directly to neutrino-antineutrino pairs a substantial fraction of the time, IceCube will be competitive with gamma-ray telescopes for a much wider range of dark matter masses.

Pearl Sandick; Douglas Spolyar; Matthew Buckley; Katherine Freese; Dan Hooper

2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

227

Self-interacting dark matter and the Higgs boson  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Self-interacting dark matter has been suggested in order to overcome the difficulties of the cold dark matter model on galactic scales. We argue that a scalar gauge singlet coupled to the Higgs boson, which could lead to an invisibly decaying Higgs boson, is an interesting candidate for this self-interacting dark matter particle. We also present estimates on the abundance of these particles today as well as the consequences to non-Newtonian forces.

M. C. Bento; O. Bertolami; R. Rosenfeld; L. Teodoro

2000-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

228

MSSM Inflaton: SUSY Dark Matter and LHC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this talk we will discuss how inflation can be embedded within a minimal extension of the Standard Model where the inflaton carries the Standard Model charges. There is no need of an ad-hoc scalar field to be introduced in order to explain the temperature anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation, all the ingredients are present within a minimal supersymmetric Standard Model. For the first time inflaton properties can be directly linked to the particle phenomenology, dark matter, and the baryons of the Standard Model.

Mazumdar, A. [Physics Department, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YB (United Kingdom) and Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen University, Blegdamsvej-17, DK-2100 (Denmark)

2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

229

Scalar Dark Matter and Cold Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a medium composed of scalar particles with non-zero mass, the range of Van-der-Waals-type scalar mediated interactions among nucleons becomes infinite when the medium makes a transition to a Bose-Einstein condensed phase. We explore this phenomenon in an astrophysical context. Namely, we study the effect of a scalar dark matter background on the equilibrium of degenerate stars.In particular we focus on white dwarfs and the changes induced in their masses and in their radii.

J. A. Grifols

2005-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

230

Scalar Field Dark Matter and Galaxy Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a general description of the scalar field dark matter (SFDM) hypothesis in the cosmological context. The scenario of structure formation under such a hypothesis is based on Jeans instabilities of fluctuations of the scalar field. It is shown that it is possible to form stable long lived objects consisting of a wide range of typical galactic masses around $10^{12}M_{\\odot}$ once the parameters of the effective theory are fixed with the cosmological constraints. The energy density at the origin of such an object is smooth as it should.

Miguel Alcubierre; F. Siddhartha Guzman; Tonatiuh Matos; Dario Nunez; L. Arturo Urena-Lopez; Petra Wiederhold

2002-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

231

Recent Developments in Supersymmetric and Hidden Sector Dark Matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New results which correlate SUSY dark matter with LHC signals are presented, and a brief review of recent developments in supersymmetric and hidden sector dark matter is given. It is shown that the direct detection of dark matter is very sensitive to the hierarchical SUSY sparticle spectrum and the spectrum is very useful in distinguishing models. It is shown that the prospects of the discovery of neutralino dark matter are very bright on the 'Chargino Wall' due to a copious number of model points on the Wall, where the NLSP is the Chargino, and the spin independent neutralino-proton cross section is maintained at high values in the 10{sup -44} cm{sup 2} range for neutralino masses up to {approx}850 GeV. It is also shown that the direct detection of dark matter along with lepton plus jet signatures and missing energy provide dual, and often complementary, probes of supersymmetry. Finally, we discuss an out of the box possibility for dark matter, which includes dark matter from the hidden sector, which could either consist of extra weakly interacting dark matter (a Stino XWIMP), or milli-charged dark matter arising from the Stueckelberg extensions of the MSSM or the SM.

Feldman, Daniel; Liu Zuowei [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Nath, Pran [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); TH Division, PH Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

2008-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

232

Recent Developments in Supersymmetric and Hidden Sector Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New results which correlate SUSY dark matter with LHC signals are presented, and a brief review of recent developments in supersymmetric and hidden sector dark matter is given. It is shown that the direct detection of dark matter is very sensitive to the hierarchical SUSY sparticle spectrum and the spectrum is very useful in distinguishing models. It is shown that the prospects of the discovery of neutralino dark matter are very bright on the "Chargino Wall" due to a copious number of model points on the Wall, where the NLSP is the Chargino, and the spin independent neutralino-proton cross section is maintained at high values in the $10^{-44}$cm$^{2}$ range for neutralino masses up to $\\sim 850$ GeV . It is also shown that the direct detection of dark matter along with lepton plus jet signatures and missing energy provide dual, and often complementary, probes of supersymmetry. Finally, we discuss an out of the box possibility for dark matter, which includes dark matter from the hidden sector, which could either consist of extra weakly interacting dark matter (a Stino XWIMP), or milli-charged dark matter arising from the Stueckelberg extensions of the MSSM or the SM.

Daniel Feldman; Zuowei Liu; Pran Nath

2008-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

233

Direct/indirect detection signatures of nonthermally produced dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study direct and indirect detection possibilities of neutralino dark matter produced non-thermally by e.g. the decay of long-lived particles, as is easily implemented in the case of anomaly or mirage mediation models. In this scenario, large self-annihilation cross sections are required to account for the present dark matter abundance, and it leads to significant enhancement of the gamma-ray signature from the Galactic Center and the positron flux from the dark matter annihilation. It is found that GLAST and PAMELA will find the signal or give tight constraints on such nonthermal production scenarios of neutralino dark matter.

Minoru Nagai; Kazunori Nakayama

2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

234

Direct/indirect detection signatures of nonthermally produced dark matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study direct and indirect detection possibilities of neutralino dark matter produced nonthermally by, e.g., the decay of long-lived particles, as is easily implemented in the case of anomaly or mirage-mediation models. In this scenario, large self-annihilation cross sections are required to account for the present dark matter abundance, and it leads to significant enhancement of the gamma-ray signature from the galactic center and the positron flux from the dark matter annihilation. It is found that GLAST and PAMELA will find the signal or give tight constraints on such nonthermal production scenarios of neutralino dark matter.

Nagai, Minoru [Theory Group, KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Nakayama, Kazunori [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Backgrounds and Projected Limits from Dark Matter Direct Detection Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simple formula is introduced which indicates the amount by which projections of dark matter direct detection experiments are expected to be degraded due to backgrounds.

Scott Dodelson

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

236

Neutrinoless double beta decay can constrain neutrino dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine how constraints can be placed on the neutrino component of dark matter by an accurate measurement of neutrinoless double beta ($0\

V. Barger; S. L. Glashow; D. Marfatia; K. Whisnant

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

237

Dark Matter and a Definite Non-Definite | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Dark Matter and a Definite Non-Definite Dark Matter and a Definite Non-Definite Dark Matter and a Definite Non-Definite April 17, 2013 - 4:22pm Addthis The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment is a particle detector which was lofted to the International Space Station onboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour about two years ago. | Image courtesy of NASA. The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment is a particle detector which was lofted to the International Space Station onboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour about two years ago. | Image courtesy of NASA. Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science LEARN MORE Several national labs are involved with the search for dark matter including Berkeley Lab, Fermilab and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. When is a definite non-definite worth noting? Perhaps when there's

238

Matter sourced anisotropic stress for dark energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Usually a dark energy as a perfect fluid is characterized by the ratio of pressure to energy density (w=p/?) and the ratio of their perturbations in its rest frame (cs2=?p/??). However, a dark energy would have other characteristics beyond its equation of state and the effective speed of sound. Here the extra property is the anisotropic stress sourced by matter as a simple extension to the perfect fluid model. At the background level, this anisotropic stress is zero with respect to the cosmological principle, but not at the first-order perturbation. We tested the viability of the existence of this kind of anisotropic stress by using the currently available cosmic observations through the geometrical and dynamical measurements. Using the Markov-chain MonteCarlo method, we found that the upper bounds on the anisotropic stress which enters into the summation of the Newtonian potentials should be of the order O(10?3)?m. We did not find any strong evidence for the existence of this matter-sourced anisotropic stress, even in the 1? region.

Baorong Chang; Jianbo Lu; Lixin Xu

2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

239

Effects of the interaction between dark energy and dark matter on cosmological parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the effects of possible phenomenological interactions between dark energy and dark matter on cosmological parameters and their efficiency in solving the coincidence problem. We work with two simple parameterizations of the dynamical dark energy equation of state and the constant dark energy equation of state. Using observational data coming from the new 182 Gold type Ia supernova samples, the shift parameter of the Cosmic Microwave Background given by the three-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe observations, and the baryon acoustic oscillation measurement from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we perform a statistical joint analysis of different forms of phenomenological interactions between dark energy and dark matter.

Jian-Hua He; Bin Wang

2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

240

Effects of the interaction between dark energy and dark matter on cosmological parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine the effects of possible phenomenological interactions between dark energy and dark matter on cosmological parameters and their efficiency in solving the coincidence problem. We work with two simple parameterizations of the dynamical dark energy equation of state and the constant dark energy equation of state. Using observational data coming from the new 182 Gold type Ia supernova samples, the shift parameter of the Cosmic Microwave Background given by the three-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe observations and the baryon acoustic oscillation measurement from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we perform a statistical joint analysis of different forms of phenomenological interaction between dark energy and dark matter.

He, Jian-Hua; Wang, Bin, E-mail: 062019010@fudan.edu.cn, E-mail: wangb@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)] [Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The Phenomenology of Gravitino Dark Matter Scenarios in Supergravity Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the phenomenology of gravitino dark matter within supergravity framework. Gravitino can be dark matter if it is the lightest supersymmetric particle, which is stable if R-parity is conserved. There are several distinct scenarios depending on what the next to lightest supersymmetric particle (NLSP) is. We discuss the constraints and summarize the phenomenology of neutralino, stau, stop and sneutrino NLSPs.

Yudi Santoso

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

242

"Jordan's Scalar Stars" and Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here we are starting the study of the field equations of relativistic scalar tensor theories in the spherically symmetric gravitational field. In the present article we shall consider as an example only the simplest Jordan-Brans-Dicke (JBD) one. To illustrate the property of the spherically symmetric JBD configuration we exhibit a new representation of the well-known four dimensional solutions. In this model, a suitable segment of Brans solution is chosen for the interior of the object while the outer region consists of a Schwarzschild vacuum. We have constructed "Jordan's scalar stars" model consisting of three parts: a homogeneous inner core with linear equation of state; an envelope of Brans spacetime matching the core and the exterior Schwarzschild spacetime. We have also showed that this toy model can explain the intergalactic effects without the dark matter hypothesis.

S. M. Kozyrev

2008-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

243

Antiproton Limits on Decaying Gravitino Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on constraints on the lifetime of decaying gravitino dark matter in models with bilinear R-parity violation derived from observations of cosmic-ray antiprotons with the PAMELA experiment. Performing a scan over a viable set of cosmic-ray propagation parameters we find lower limits ranging from $8\\times 10^{28}$s to $6\\times 10^{28}$s for gravitino masses from roughly 100 GeV to 10 TeV. Comparing these limits to constraints derived from gamma-ray and neutrino observations we conclude that the presented antiproton limits are currently the strongest and most robust limits on the gravitino lifetime in the considered mass range. These constraints correspond to upper limits on the size of the bilinear R-parity breaking parameter in the range of $10^{-8}$ to $8\\times 10^{-13}$.

Grefe, Michael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Stability of BEC galactic dark matter halos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we show that spherically symmetric BEC dark matter halos, with the $\\sin r/r$ density profile, that accurately fit galactic rotation curves and represent a potential solution to the cusp-core problem are unstable. We do this by introducing back the density profiles into the fully time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii-Poisson system of equations. Using numerical methods to track the evolution of the system, we found that these galactic halos lose mass at an approximate rate of half of its mass in a time scale of dozens of Myr. We consider this time scale is enough as to consider these halos are unstable and unlikely to be formed. We provide some arguments to show that this behavior is general and discuss some other drawbacks of the model that restrict its viability.

F. S. Guzman; F. D. Lora-Clavijo; J. J. Gonzalez-Aviles; F. J. Rivera-Paleo

2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

245

Dark matter and dark energy accretion on to intermediate-mass black holes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Dark matter and dark energy accretion on to intermediate-mass...1428 Buenos Aires, Argentina 2 Consejo Nacional de...AAJ, Buenos Aires, Argentina 3 Instituto Argentino...de Buenos Aires, Argentina In this work we investigate...the so-called dark energy on to an intermediate-mass......

C. Pepe; L. J. Pellizza; G. E. Romero

2012-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

246

Future cosmological sensitivity for hot dark matter axions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the potential of a future, large-volume photometric survey to constrain the axion mass $m_a$ in the hot dark matter limit. Future surveys such as Euclid will have significantly more constraining power than current observations for hot dark matter. Nonetheless, the lowest accessible axion masses are limited by the fact that axions lighter than $\\sim 0.15$ eV decouple before the QCD epoch, assumed here to occur at a temperature $T_{\\rm QCD} \\sim 170$ MeV; this leaves an axion population of such low density that its late-time cosmological impact is negligible. For larger axion masses, $m_a \\gtrsim 0.15$ eV, where axions remain in equilibrium until after the QCD phase transition, we find that a Euclid-like survey combined with Planck CMB data can detect $m_a$ at very high significance. Our conclusions are robust against assumptions about prior knowledge of the neutrino mass. Given that the proposed IAXO solar axion search is sensitive to $m_a\\lesssim 0.2$ eV, the axion mass range probed by cosmology is n...

Archidiacono, Maria; Hamann, Jan; Hannestad, Steen; Raffelt, Georg; Wong, Yvonne Y Y

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Neutrino constraints on the dark matter total annihilation cross section  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the indirect detection of dark matter through its annihilation products, the signals depend on the square of the dark matter density, making precise knowledge of the distribution of dark matter in the Universe critical for robust predictions. Many studies have focused on regions where the dark matter density is greatest, e.g., the galactic center, as well as on the cosmic signal arising from all halos in the Universe. We focus on the signal arising from the whole Milky Way halo; this is less sensitive to uncertainties in the dark matter distribution, and especially for flatter profiles, this halo signal is larger than the cosmic signal. We illustrate this by considering a dark matter model in which the principal annihilation products are neutrinos. Since neutrinos are the least detectable standard model particles, a limit on their flux conservatively bounds the dark matter total self-annihilation cross section from above. By using the Milky Way halo signal, we show that previous constraints using the cosmic signal can be improved on by 1-2 orders of magnitude; dedicated experimental analyses should be able to improve both by an additional 1-2 orders of magnitude.

Yueksel, Hasan [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Horiuchi, Shunsaku [Department of Physics, School of Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Beacom, John F. [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Ando, Shin'ichiro [California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 130-33, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Cosmic Coincidence and Asymmetric Dark Matter in a Stueckelberg Extension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the possibility of cogenesis generating the ratio of baryon asymmetry to dark matter in a Stueckelberg U(1) extension of the standard model and of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. For the U(1) we choose $L_{\\mu}-L_{\\tau}$ which is anomaly free and can be gauged. The dark matter candidate arising from this extension is a singlet of the standard model gauge group but is charged under $L_{\\mu}-L_{\\tau}$. Solutions to the Boltzmann equations for relics in the presence of asymmetric dark matter are discussed. It is shown that the ratio of the baryon asymmetry to dark matter consistent with the current WMAP data, i.e., the cosmic coincidence, can be successfully explained in this model with the depletion of the symmetric component of dark matter from resonant annihilation via the Stueckelberg gauge boson. For the extended MSSM model it is shown that one has a two component dark matter picture with asymmetric dark matter being the dominant component and the neutralino being the subdominant compo...

Feng, Wan-Zhe; Peim, Gregory

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Diurnal modulation signal from dissipative hidden sector dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a simple generic dissipative dark matter model: a hidden sector featuring two dark matter particles charged under an unbroken $U(1)'$ interaction. Previous work has shown that such a model has the potential to explain dark matter phenomena on both large and small scales. In this framework, the dark matter halo in spiral galaxies features nontrivial dynamics, with the halo energy loss due to dissipative interactions balanced by a heat source. Ordinary supernovae can potentially supply this heat provided kinetic mixing interaction exists with strength $\\epsilon \\sim 10^{-9}$. This type of kinetically mixed dark matter can be probed in direct detection experiments. Importantly, this self-interacting dark matter can be captured within the Earth and shield a dark matter detector from the halo wind, giving rise to a diurnal modulation effect. We estimate the size of this effect for detectors located in the Southern hemisphere, and find that the modulation is large ($\\gtrsim 10\\%$) for a wide range of pa...

Foot, R

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

E-Print Network 3.0 - acceleration dark energy Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

dark energy Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: acceleration dark energy Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The big picture Victoria...

251

Dark Energy and Search for the Generalized Second Law  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The discovery of accelerated Hubble expansion in the SNIa data and the observed power spectrum of the microwave background radiation provide an ample support for Dark energy and Dark matter. Except for the so far well-known facts that cold dark matter (or simply dark matter) is pressureless, and dark energy has a negative pressure, the nature of these two still remains a complete mystery. The mystery facilitates different consideration. In one hand, dark matter and dark energy are assumed as distinct entities, and other interpretation is that both are different manifestation of a common structure, often referred as quartessence. Chaplygin gas, a perfect fluid also favours the second interpretation. Here, we consider modified chaplygin gas as dark energy candidate. Taking into account the existence of the observer's event horizon in accelerated universe, we find the condition where the generalized second law of gravitational thermodynamics is valid and the positivity of the temperature of the phantom fluid remains intact.

Balendra Kr. Dev Choudhury; Julie Saikia

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

252

Constraints on particle dark matter from cosmic-ray antiprotons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cosmic-ray antiprotons represent an important channel for dark matter indirect-detection studies. Current measurements of the antiproton flux at the top of the atmosphere and theoretical determinations of the secondary antiproton production in the Galaxy are in good agreement, with no manifest deviation which could point to an exotic contribution in this channel. Therefore, antiprotons can be used as a powerful tool for constraining particle dark matter properties. By using the spectrum of PAMELA data from 50 MV to 180 GV in rigidity, we derive bounds on the dark matter annihilation cross section (or decay rate, for decaying dark matter) for the whole spectrum of dark matter annihilation (decay) channels and under different hypotheses of cosmic-rays transport in the Galaxy and in the heliosphere. For typical models of galactic propagation, the constraints are significantly strong, setting a lower bound on the dark matter mass of a "thermal" relic at about 50 -- 90 GeV for hadronic annihilation channels. These bounds are enhanced to about 150 GeV on the dark matter mass, when large cosmic-rays confinement volumes in the Galaxy are considered, and are reduced to 4-5 GeV for annihilation to light quarks (no bound for heavy-quark production) when the confinement volume is small. Bounds for dark matter lighter than few tens of GeV are due to the low energy part of the PAMELA spectrum, an energy region where solar modulation is relevant: to this aim, we have implemented a detailed solution of the transport equation in the heliosphere, which allowed us not only to extend bounds to light dark matter, but also to determine the uncertainty on the constraints arising from solar modulation modeling. Finally, we estimate the impact of soon-to-come AMS-02 data on the antiproton constraints.

N. Fornengo; L. Maccione; A. Vittino

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

253

Constraints on particle dark matter from cosmic-ray antiprotons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cosmic-ray antiprotons represent an important channel for dark matter indirect-detection studies. Current measurements of the antiproton flux at the top of the atmosphere and theoretical determinations of the secondary antiproton production in the Galaxy are in good agreement, with no manifest deviation which could point to an exotic contribution in this channel. Therefore, antiprotons can be used as a powerful tool for constraining particle dark matter properties. By using the spectrum of PAMELA data from 50 MV to 180 GV in rigidity, we derive bounds on the dark matter annihilation cross section (or decay rate, for decaying dark matter) for the whole spectrum of dark matter annihilation (decay) channels and under different hypotheses of cosmic-rays transport in the Galaxy and in the heliosphere. For typical models of galactic propagation, the constraints are significantly strong, setting a lower bound on the dark matter mass of a "thermal" relic at about 50-90 GeV for hadronic annihilation channels. These bounds are enhanced to about 150 GeV on the dark matter mass, when large cosmic-rays confinement volumes in the Galaxy are considered, and are reduced to 4-5 GeV for annihilation to light quarks (no bound for heavy-quark production) when the confinement volume is small. Bounds for dark matter lighter than few tens of GeV are due to the low energy part of the PAMELA spectrum, an energy region where solar modulation is relevant: to this aim, we have implemented a detailed solution of the transport equation in the heliosphere, which allowed us not only to extend bounds to light dark matter, but also to determine the uncertainty on the constraints arising from solar modulation modeling. Finally, we estimate the impact of soon-to-come AMS-02 data on the antiproton constraints.

N. Fornengo; L. Maccione; A. Vittino

2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

254

Neutrino masses, leptogenesis, and sterile neutrino dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze a scenario in which the lightest heavy neutrino $N_1$ is a dark matter candidate and the second- heaviest neutrino $N_2$ decays producing a lepton number. If $N_1$ were in thermal equilibrium, its energy density today would be much larger than that of the observed dark matter, so we consider energy injection by the decay of $N_2$. In this paper, we show the parameters of this scenario that give the correct abundances of dark matter and baryonic matter and also induce the observed neutrino masses. This model can explain a possible sterile neutrino dark matter signal of $M_1$=7 keV in the x-ray observation of x-ray multi-mirror mission.

Takanao Tsuyuki

2014-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

255

LHC constraints on gauge boson couplings to dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collider searches for energetic particles recoiling against missing transverse energy allow to place strong bounds on the interactions between dark matter (DM) and standard model particles. In this article we update and extend LHC constraints on effective dimension-7 operators involving DM and electroweak gauge bosons. A concise comparison of the sensitivity of the mono-photon, mono-W, mono-Z, mono-W/Z, invisible Higgs-boson decays in the vector boson fusion mode and the mono-jet channel is presented. Depending on the parameter choices, either the mono-photon or the mono-jet data provide the most stringent bounds at the moment. We furthermore explore the potential of improving the current 8 TeV limits at 14 TeV. Future strategies capable of disentangling the effects of the different effective operators involving electroweak gauge bosons are discussed as well.

Crivellin, Andreas; Hibbs, Anthony

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Dynamical system analysis for DBI dark energy interacting with dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A dynamical system analysis related to Dirac Born Infeld (DBI) cosmological model has been investigated in this present work. For spatially flat FRW space time, the Einstein field equation for DBI scenario has been used to study the dynamics of DBI dark energy interacting with dark matter. The DBI dark energy model is considered as a scalar field with a nonstandard kinetic energy term. An interaction between the DBI dark energy and dark matter is considered through a phenomenological interaction between DBI scalar field and the dark matter fluid. The field equations are reduced to an autonomous dynamical system by a suitable redefinition of the basic variables. The potential of the DBI scalar field is assumed to be exponential. Finally, critical points are determined, their nature have been analyzed and corresponding cosmological scenario has been discussed.

Mahata, Nilanjana

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Closing the window on strongly interacting dark matter with IceCube  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We use the recent results on dark matter searches of the 22-string IceCube detector to probe the remaining allowed window for strongly interacting dark matter in the mass range 104

Ivone F. M. Albuquerque and Carlos Prez de los Heros

2010-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

258

Tensor Detection Severely Constrains Axion Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent detection of B-modes by BICEP2 has non-trivial implications for axion dark matter implied by combining the tensor interpretation with isocurvature constraints from Planck. In this paper the measurement is taken as fact, and its implications considered, though further experimental verification is required. In the simplest inflation models $r=0.2$ implies $H_I=1.1\\times 10^{14}\\text{ GeV}$. If the axion decay constant $f_a1$ accounts for theoretical uncertainty). If $f_a>H_I/2\\pi$ then vacuum fluctuations of the axion field place conflicting demands on axion DM: isocurvature constraints require a DM abundance which is too small to be reached when the back reaction of fluctuations is included. High $f_a$ QCD axions are thus ruled out. Constraints on axion-like particles, as a function of their mass and DM fraction, are also considered. For heavy axions with $m_a\\gtrsim 10^{-22}\\text{ eV}$ we find $\\Omega_a/\\Omega_d\\lesssim 10^{-3}$, with stronger constraints on heavier axions. Lighter axions, however, are allowed and (inflationary) model-independent constraints from the CMB temperature power spectrum and large scale structure are stronger than those implied by tensor modes.

David J. E. Marsh; Daniel Grin; Renee Hlozek; Pedro G. Ferreira

2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

259

Dark Matter Constraints on Composite Higgs Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In composite Higgs models the pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone Boson (pNGB) nature of the Higgs field is an interesting alternative for explaning the smallness of the electroweak scale with respect to the beyond the Standard Model scale. In non-minimal models additional pNGB states are present and can be a Dark Matter (DM) candidate, if there is an approximate symmetry suppressing their decay. Here we assume that the low energy effective theory (for scales much below the compositeness scale) corresponds to the Standard Model with a pNGB Higgs doublet and a pNGB DM multiplet. We derive general effective DM Lagrangians for several possible DM representations (under the SM gauge group), including the singlet, doublet and triplet cases. Within this framework we discuss how the DM observables (relic abundance, direct and indirect detection) constrain the dimension-6 operators induced by the strong sector assuming that DM behaves as a Weakly Interacting Particle (WIMP) and that the relic abundance is settled through the free...

Fonseca, Nayara; Lessa, Andre; Lopez-Honorez, Laura

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

MSSM inflation, dark matter, and the LHC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inflation can occur near a point of inflection in the potential of flat directions of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). In this paper we elaborate on the complementarity between the bounds from cosmic microwave background measurements, dark matter, and particle physics phenomenology in determining the underlying parameters of MSSM inflation by specializing to the minimal supergravity scenario. We show that the future measurements from the Large Hadron Collider in tandem with all these constraints will significantly restrict the allowed parameter space. We also suggest a new perspective on the fine tuning issue of MSSM inflation. With quantum corrections taken into account, the necessary condition between the soft supersymmetry breaking parameters in the inflaton potential can be satisfied at scales of interest without a fine tuning of their boundary values at a high scale. The requirement that this happens at the inflection point determines a dimensionless coupling, which is associated with a nonrenormalizable interaction term in the Lagrangian and has no bearing for phenomenology, to very high accuracy.

Rouzbeh Allahverdi; Bhaskar Dutta; Yudi Santoso

2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Direct Detection of Sub-GeV Dark Matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Direct detection strategies are proposed for dark matter particles with MeV to GeV mass. In this largely unexplored mass range, dark matter scattering with electrons can cause single-electron ionization signals, which are detectable with current technology. Ultraviolet photons, individual ions, and heat are interesting alternative signals. Focusing on ionization, we calculate the expected dark matter scattering rates and estimate the sensitivity of possible experiments. Backgrounds that may be relevant are discussed. Theoretically interesting models can be probed with existing technologies, and may even be within reach using ongoing direct detection experiments. Significant improvements in sensitivity should be possible with dedicated experiments, opening up a window to new regions in dark matter parameter space.

Essig, Rouven; Mardon, Jeremy; Volansky, Tomer

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

262

Constraints on dark matter annihilation from AMS-02 results  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We use recently released data on the positron-to-electron ratio in cosmic rays from the AMS-02 experiment to constrain dark matter annihilation in the MilkyWay. Due to the yet unexplained positron excess, limits are generally weaker than those obtained using other probes, especially gamma rays. This also means that explaining the positron excess in terms of dark matter annihilation is difficult. Only if very conservative assumptions on the dark matter distribution in the Galactic center region are adopted, it may be possible to accommodate dark matter annihilating to leptons with a cross section above 10-24??cm3/sec?. We comment on several theoretical mechanisms to explain such large annihilation cross sections.

Joachim Kopp

2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

263

New Analysis of SUSY Dark Matter Scenarios at ILC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applying realistic veto efficiencies for the low angle electromagnetic calorimeter located in the very forward direction of the future international linear collider, we revisited the Standard Model background contributions studied previously in stau analyses with supersymmetrical dark matter scenarios.

Zhiqing Zhang

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

Dark Matter Constraints from a Cosmic Index of Refraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dark-matter candidates of particle physics invariably possess electromagnetic interactions, if only via quantum fluctuations. Taken en masse, dark matter can thus engender an index of refraction which deviates from its vacuum value. Its presence is signaled through frequency-dependent effects: the real part yields dispersive effects in propagation, and the imaginary part yields such in attenuation. We discuss theoretical constraints on the expansion of the index of refraction with frequency, the physical interpretation of the terms, and the particular observations needed to isolate its coefficients. This, with the advent of new opportunities to view gamma-ray bursts at cosmological distance scales, gives us a new probe of dark matter. As a first application we use the time delay determined from radio afterglow observations of gamma-ray bursts to limit the charge-to-mass ratio of dark matter to |\\epsilon/M|< 1.8 x 10^{-5}/eV at 95% CL.

Gardner, S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Neutrinos from dark matter annihilations at the galactic center  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We discuss the prospects for detection of high energy neutrinos from dark matter (DM) annihilation at the galactic center (GC). Despite the large uncertainties associated with our poor knowledge of the distribution of dark matter in the innermost regions of the Galaxy, we determine an upper limit on the neutrino flux by requiring that the associated gamma-ray emission does not exceed the observed flux. We conclude that a neutrino flux from the GC will not be observable by Antares if dark matter is made of neutralinos with mass smaller than 650GeV, while for heavier neutralinos, corresponding to models that will soon be probed by HESS (high energy stereoscopic system), the upper limit on the neutrino flux is barely above the Antares sensitivity. The detection of a larger flux would either require an alternative explanation, in terms of astrophysical processes, or the adoption of other dark matter candidates, disfavouring the case for neutralinos.

Gianfranco Bertone; Emmanuel Nezri; Jean Orloff; Joseph Silk

2004-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

266

Cosmic-ray electron signatures of dark matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is evidence for an excess in cosmic-ray electrons at about 500 GeV energy, that may be related to dark-matter annihilation. I have calculated the expected electron contributions from a pulsar and from Kaluza-Klein dark matter, based on a realistic treatment of the electron propagation in the Galaxy. Pulsars younger than about 10{sup 5} years naturally cause a narrow peak at a few hundred GeV in the locally observed electron spectrum, similar to that observed. On the other hand, if electron production by dark matter is predominantly occurring in high-mass clumps (> or approx. 10{sup 3}M{sub {center_dot}}), the sharp cutoff in the contribution from Kaluza-Klein particles is sometimes more pronounced, but often smoothed out and indistinguishable from a pulsar source, and therefore the spectral shape of the electron excess is insufficient to discriminate a dark-matter origin from more conventional astrophysical explanations.

Pohl, Martin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Constraining warm dark matter with cosmic shear power spectra  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate potential constraints from cosmic shear on the dark matter particle mass, assuming all dark matter is made up of light thermal relic particles. Given the theoretical uncertainties involved in making cosmological predictions in such warm dark matter scenarios we use analytical fits to linear warm dark matter power spectra and compare (i) the halo model using a mass function evaluated from these linear power spectra and (ii) an analytical fit to the non-linear evolution of the linear power spectra. We optimistically ignore the competing effect of baryons for this work. We find approach (ii) to be conservative compared to approach (i). We evaluate cosmological constraints using these methods, marginalising over four other cosmological parameters. Using the more conservative method we find that a Euclid-like weak lensing survey together with constraints from the Planck cosmic microwave background mission primary anisotropies could achieve a lower limit on the particle mass of 2.5 keV.

Markovic, Katarina; Weller, Jochen [University Observatory Munich, Ludwig-Maximilian University, Scheinerstr. 1, 81679 Munich (Germany); Bridle, Sarah [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Slosar, Ane, E-mail: markovic@usm.lmu.de, E-mail: sarah.bridle@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: anze@bnl.gov, E-mail: jochen.weller@usm.lmu.de [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Building 510A, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Making the Dark Matter Connection Between Particle Physics and Cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recently been determined very accurately by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) [1] to be 23% dark matter and 73% Dark Energy. This leaves only 4% of the content of the energy density of the universe which can be explained by the SM...

Krislock, Abram Michael

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

269

In the OSTI Collections: Dark Matter and Dark Energy | OSTI, US Dept of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Dark Matter and Dark Energy Dark Matter and Dark Energy Recent observations of the universe, combined with Einstein's theory of general relativity, indicate that most of the universe consists of entities very different from the matter and energy long familiar to us. These previously unknown entities are beginning to be explored on several fronts, many through Department of Energy sponsorship. Albert Einstein's theory of relativity describes space and time as observer-dependent aspects of a single absolute entity (spacetime). According to the theory, just as a two-dimensional surface can be curved, four-dimensional spacetime is also curved, with the curvature at different places and times being partly determined by how matter (or equivalently, energy) is distributed within it. Where curvature is lacking, matter will

270

Can dark matter be a Bose-Einstein condensate?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the possibility that the dark matter, which is required to explain the dynamics of the neutral hydrogen clouds at large distances from the galactic center, could be in the form of a Bose-Einstein condensate. To study the condensate we use the non-relativistic Gross-Pitaevskii equation. By introducing the Madelung representation of the wave function, we formulate the dynamics of the system in terms of the continuity equation and of the hydrodynamic Euler equations. Hence dark matter can be described as a non-relativistic, Newtonian Bose-Einstein gravitational condensate gas, whose density and pressure are related by a barotropic equation of state. In the case of a condensate with quartic non-linearity, the equation of state is polytropic with index $n=1$. To test the validity of the model we fit the Newtonian tangential velocity equation of the model with a sample of rotation curves of low surface brightness and dwarf galaxies, respectively. We find a very good agreement between the theoretical rotation curves and the observational data for the low surface brightness galaxies. The deflection of photons passing through the dark matter halos is also analyzed, and the bending angle of light is computed. The bending angle obtained for the Bose-Einstein condensate is larger than that predicted by standard general relativistic and dark matter models. Therefore the study of the light deflection by galaxies and the gravitational lensing could discriminate between the Bose-Einstein condensate dark matter model and other dark matter models.

C. G. Boehmer; T. Harko

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

271

A Terrestrial Search for Dark Contents of the Vacuum, Such as Dark Energy, Using Atom Interferometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the theory and first experimental work on our concept for searching on earth for the presence of dark contents of the vacuum (DCV) using atom interferometry. Specifically, we have in mind any DCV that has not yet been detected on a laboratory scale, but which might manifest itself as dark energy on the cosmological scale. The experimental method uses two atom interferometers to cancel the effect of earth's gravity and diverse noise sources. It depends upon two assumptions: first, that the DCV possesses some space inhomogeneity in density, and second that it exerts a sufficiently strong nongravitational force on matter. The motion of the apparatus through the DCV should then lead to an irregular variation in the detected matter-wave phase shift. We discuss the nature of this signal and note the problem of distinguishing it from instrumental noise. We also discuss the relation of our experiment to what might be learned by studying the noise in gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO. The paper concludes with a projection that a future search of this nature might be carried out using an atom interferometer in an orbiting satellite. The laboratory apparatus is now being constructed.

Adler, Ronald J.; /Stanford U., HEPL /San Francisco State U.; Muller, Holger; /UC, Berkeley; Perl, Martin L.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

272

A Laboratory Search for Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The discovery of the accelerating universe indicates strongly the presence of a scalar field which is not only expected to solve today's version of the cosmological constant problem, or the fine-tuning and the coincidence problems, but also provides a way to understand dark energy. It has also been shown that Jordan's scalar-tensor theory is now going to be re-discovered in the new lights. In this letter we suggest a way to search for the extremely light scalar field by means of a laboratory experiment on the low-energy photon-photon interactions with the quasi-parallel incident beams.

Yasunori Fujii; Kensuke Homma

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

273

Dark Matter in Minimal Universal Extra Dimensions with a Stable Vacuum and the "Right" Higgs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent discovery of a Higgs boson with mass of about 125 GeV, along with its striking similarity to the prediction from the Standard Model, informs and constrains many models of new physics. The Higgs mass exhausts one out of three input parameters of the minimal, five-dimensional version of universal extra dimension models, the other two parameters being the Kaluza-Klein (KK) scale and the cut-off scale of the theory. The presence of KK fermions with large coupling to the Higgs implies a short-lived electro-weak vacuum, unless the cut-off scale is at most a few times higher than the KK mass scale, providing an additional tight constraint to the theory parameter space. Here, we focus on the lightest KK particle as a dark matter candidate, and investigate the regions of parameter space where such particle has a thermal relic density in accord with the cosmological dark matter density. We find the paradoxical result that, for low enough cutoff scales consistent with vacuum stability, larger than previously thought KK mass scales become preferred to explain the dark matter abundance in the universe. We explain this phenomenon by pinpointing the additional particles which, at such low cutoffs, become close enough in mass to the dark matter candidate to coannihilate with it. We make predictions for both collider and direct dark matter searches that might soon close in on all viable theory parameter space.

Jonathan M. Cornell; Stefano Profumo; William Shepherd

2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

274

Dynamical 3-Space: Alternative Explanation of the `Dark Matter Ring'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NASA has claimed the discovery of a `Ring of Dark Matter' in the galaxy cluster CL 0024+17, see Jee M.J. et al. arXiv:0705.2171, based upon gravitational lensing data. Here we show that the lensing can be given an alternative explanation that does not involve `dark matter'. This explanation comes from the new dynamics of 3-space. This dynamics involves two constant G and alpha - the fine structure constant. This dynamics has explained the bore hole anomaly, spiral galaxy flat rotation speeds, the masses of black holes in spherical galaxies, gravitational light bending and lensing, all without invoking `dark matter', and also the supernova redshift data without the need for `dark energy'.

Reginald T Cahill

2007-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

275

E-Print Network 3.0 - axion hot dark Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with Axions Summary: Lecture April 23, 2009 Outline: From neutrons to axions Axion phenomenology Axion dark matter Thursday... Axion phenomenology Axion dark matter Inflationary...

276

E-Print Network 3.0 - axion cold dark Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with Axions Summary: Lecture April 23, 2009 Outline: From neutrons to axions Axion phenomenology Axion dark matter Thursday... Axion phenomenology Axion dark matter Inflationary...

277

Implications of the Little Higgs Dark Matter and T-odd Fermions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the phenomenology of dark matter in the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity after the discovery of Higgs boson. We analyze the relic abundance of dark matter, focusing on the effects of coannihilaitons with T-odd fermions. After determining the parameter space that predicts the correct relic abundance measured by WMAP and Planck collaborations, we evaluate the elastic scattering cross section between dark matter and nucleon. In comparison with experimental results, we find that the lower mass of dark matter is constrained mildly by LUX 2013 while the future XENON experiment has potential to explore most of the parameter space for both T-odd lepton and T-odd quark coannihilation scenarios. We also study the collider signatures of T-odd fermion pair production at the LHC. Even though the production cross sections are large, it turns out very challenging to search for these T-odd fermions directly at the collider because the visible charged leptons or jets are very soft. Furthermore, we show that, with an extra hard jet radiated out from the initial state, the T-odd quark pair production can contribute significantly to mono-jet plus missing energy search at the LHC.

Chuan-Ren Chen; Ming-Che Lee; Ho-Chin Tsai

2014-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

278

Dark matter and dark energy production in quantum model of the universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The quantum model of the homogeneous, isotropic, and spatially closed universe predicts an existence of two types of collective quantum states in the universe. The states of one type characterize a gravitational field, the others describe a matter (uniform scalar) field. In the first stage of the evolution of the universe a primordial scalar field evolves slowly into its vacuum-like state. In the second stage the scalar field oscillates about an equilibrium due to the quantum fluctuations. The universe is being filled with matter in the form of elementary quantum excitations of the vibrations of the scalar field. The separate quantum excitations are characterized by non-zero values of their energies (masses). Under the action of gravitational forces mainly these excitations decay into ordinary particles (baryons and leptons) and dark matter. The elementary quantum excitations of the vibrations of the scalar field which have not decayed up to now form dark energy. The numerical estimations lead to realistic values of both the matter density \\Omega_{M} = 0.29 (with the contributions from dark matter, \\Omega_{DM} = 0.25, and optically bright baryons, \\Omega_{stars} = 0.0025) and the dark energy density \\Omega_{X} = 0.71 if one takes that the mean energy ~ 10 GeV is released in decay of dark energy quantum and fixes baryonic component \\Omega_{B} = 0.04 according to observational data. The energy (mass) of dark energy quantum is equal to ~ 17 GeV and the energy > 2 x 10^{10} GeV is needed in order to detect it. Dark matter particle has the mass ~ 6 GeV. The Jeans mass for dark matter which is considered as a gas of such massive particles is equal to M_{J} ~ 10^{5} M_{\\odot}.

V. E. Kuzmichev; V. V. Kuzmichev

2004-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

279

Looking for Dark Matter through the Bottom of a Wine Glass!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and detect the imprint of dark energy on the web of dark matter that winds across the cosmos. Café Email listLooking for Dark Matter through the Bottom of a Wine Glass! (IYA Strange Telescope Series://cfcpwork.uchicago.edu/mailman/listinfo/cafe! #12;Looking for Dark Matter through the Bottom of a Wine Glass! (IYA Strange Telescope Series

Collar, Juan I.

280

Influence of Dark Matter on Light Propagation in Solar System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigated the influence of dark matter on light propagation in the solar system. We assumed the spherical symmetry of spacetime and derived the approximate solution of the Einstein equation, which consists of the gravitational attractions caused by the central celestial body, i.e. the Sun, and the dark matter surrounding it. We expressed the dark matter density in the solar system in the following simple power-law form, $\\varrho(t, r) = \\rho(t)(\\ell/r)^k$, where $t$ is the coordinate time; $r$, the radius from the central body; $\\ell$, the normalizing factor; $k$, the exponent characterizing $r$-dependence of dark matter density; and $\\rho(t)$, the arbitrary function of time $t$. On the basis of the derived approximate solution, we focused on light propagation and obtained the additional corrections of the gravitational time delay and the relative frequency shift caused by the dark matter. As an application of our results, we considered the secular increase in the astronomical unit reported by Krasinsky and Brumberg (2004) and found that it was difficult to provide an explanation for the observed $d{\\rm AU}/dt = 15 \\pm 4 ~[{\\rm m/century}]$.

Hideyoshi Arakida

2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

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281

Invisible Quarkonium Decays as a Sensitive Probe of Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine in a model-independent manner the measurements that can be performed at B-factories with sensitivity to dark matter. If a singlet scalar, pseudo-scalar, or vector is present and mediates the Standard Model - dark matter interaction, it can mediate invisible decays of quarkonium states such as the $\\Upsilon$, $J/\\Psi$, and $\\eta$. Such scenarios have arisen in the context of supersymmetry, extended Higgs sectors, solutions the supersymmetric $\\mu$ problem, and extra U(1) gauge groups from grand unified theories and string theory. Existing B-factories running at the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ can produce lower $\\Upsilon$ resonances by emitting an Initial State Radiation (ISR) photon. Using a combination of ISR and radiative decays, the initial state of an invisibly decaying quarkonium resonance can be tagged, giving sensitivity to the spin and CP-nature of the particle that mediates standard model-dark matter interactions. These measurements can discover or place strong constraints on dark matter scenarios where the dark matter is approximately lighter than the $b$-quark. For the decay chains $\\Upsilon(nS) \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\Upsilon(1S)$ (n=2,3) we analyze the dominant backgrounds and determine that with $400 fb^{-1}$ collected at the $\\Upsilon(4S)$, the B-factories can limit $BR(\\Upsilon(1S) \\to invisible) \\lsim 0.1%$.

Bob McElrath

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Neutrinos at IceCube from heavy decaying dark matter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A monochromatic line in the cosmic neutrino spectrum would be a smoking gun signature of dark matter. It is intriguing that the IceCube experiment has recently reported two PeV neutrino events with energies that may be equal up to experimental uncertainties, and which have a probability of being a background fluctuation estimated to be less than a percent. Here we explore prospects for these events to be the first indication of a monochromatic line signal from dark matter. While measurable annihilation signatures would seem to be impossible at such energies, we discuss the dark matter quantum numbers, effective operators, and lifetimes which could lead to an appropriate signal from dark matter decays. We will show that the set of possible decay operators is rather constrained and will focus on the following viable candidates which could explain the IceCube events: R-parity violating gravitinos, hidden sector gauge bosons, and singlet fermions in an extra dimension. In essentially all cases we find that a PeV neutrino line signal from dark matter would be accompanied by a potentially observable continuum spectrum of neutrinos rising towards lower energies.

Brian Feldstein; Alexander Kusenko; Shigeki Matsumoto; Tsutomu T. Yanagida

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

283

DARK MATTER AS AN ACTIVE GRAVITATIONAL AGENT IN CLOUD COMPLEXES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the effect that the dark matter background (DMB) has on the gravitational energy content and, in general, on the star formation efficiency (SFE) of a molecular cloud (MC). We first analyze the effect that a dark matter halo, described by the Navarro-Frenk-White density profile, has on the energy budget of a spherical, homogeneous cloud located at different distances from the halo center. We found that MCs located in the innermost regions of a massive galaxy can feel a contraction force greater than their self-gravity due to the incorporation of the potential of the galaxy's dark matter halo. We also calculated analytically the gravitational perturbation that an MC produces over a uniform DMB (uniform at the scales of an MC) and how this perturbation will affect the evolution of the MC itself. The study shows that the star formation in an MC will be considerably enhanced if the cloud is located in a dense and low velocity dark matter environment. We confirm our results by measuring the SFE in numerical simulations of the formation and evolution of MCs within different DMBs. Our study indicates that there are situations where the dark matter's gravitational contribution to the evolution of the MCs should not be neglected.

Suarez-Madrigal, Andres; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier; Colin, Pedro; D'Alessio, Paola, E-mail: a.suarez@crya.unam.mx [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 72-3 (Xangari), Morelia, Michocan, Mexico C.P. 58089 (Mexico)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Constraining Dark Matter Models from a Combined Analysis of Milky Way Satellites with the Fermi Large Area Telescope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Satellite galaxies of the Milky Way are among the most promising targets for dark matter searches in gamma rays. We present a search for dark matter consisting of weakly interacting massive particles, applying a joint likelihood analysis to 10 satellite galaxies with 24 months of data of the Fermi Large Area Telescope. No dark matter signal is detected. Including the uncertainty in the dark matter distribution, robust upper limits are placed on dark matter annihilation cross sections. The 95% confidence level upper limits range from about 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 5 GeV to about 5 x 10{sup -23} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 1 TeV, depending on the dark matter annihilation final state. For the first time, using gamma rays, we are able to rule out models with the most generic cross section ({approx}3 x 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} for a purely s-wave cross section), without assuming additional boost factors.

Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Albert, A.; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Ohio State U.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Buehler, R.; /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC; Burnett, T.H.; /Washington U., Seattle; Buson, S.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /ICE, Bellaterra /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Artep Inc. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /ASDC, Frascati /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /ASDC, Frascati /ASDC, Frascati /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /NASA, Goddard /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /ASDC, Frascati /NASA, Goddard /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Bologna Observ. /Stanford U., HEPL /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /DAPNIA, Saclay /Alabama U., Huntsville; /more authors..

2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

285

Dark energy, dark matter and fermion families in the two measures theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A field theory is proposed where the regular fermionic matter and the dark fermionic matter are different states of the same "primordial" fermion fields. In regime of the fermion densities typical for normal particle physics, each of the primordial fermions splits into three generations identified with regular fermions. In a simple model, this fermion families birth effect is accompanied with the right lepton numbers conservation laws. It is possible to fit the muon to electron mass ratio without fine tuning of the Yukawa coupling constants. When fermion energy density becomes comparable with dark energy density, the theory allows new type of states - Cosmo-Low Energy Physics (CLEP) states. Neutrinos in CLEP state can be both a good candidate for dark matter and responsible for a new type of dark energy. In the latter case the total energy density of the universe is less than it would be in the universe free of fermionic matter at all. The (quintessence) scalar field is coupled to dark matter but its coupling to regular fermionic matter appears to be extremely suppressed.

E. I. Guendelman; A. B. Kaganovich

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

286

Boldly Illuminating Biology's "Dark Matter"  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

14, 2013 14, 2013 Boldly Illuminating Biology's "Dark Matter" Is space really the final frontier, or are the greatest mysteries closer to home? In cosmology, dark matter is said to account for the majority of mass in the universe, however its presence is inferred by indirect effects rather than detected through telescopes. The biological equivalent is "microbial dark matter," that pervasive yet practically invisible infrastructure of life on the planet, which can have profound influences on the most significant environmental processes from plant growth and health, to nutrient cycles in terrestrial and marine environments, the global carbon cycle, and possibly even climate processes. By employing next generation DNA sequencing of genomes isolated from single cells, great

287

Mono-Higgs Detection of Dark Matter at the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by the recent discovery of the Higgs boson, we investigate the possibility that a missing energy plus Higgs final state is the dominant signal channel for dark matter at the LHC. We consider examples of higher-dimension operators where a Higgs and dark matter pair are produced through an off-shell Z or photon, finding potential sensitivity at the LHC to cutoff scales of around a few hundred GeV. We generalize this production mechanism to a simplified model by introducing a Z' as well as a second Higgs doublet, where the pseudoscalar couples to dark matter. Resonant production of the Z' which decays to a Higgs plus invisible particles gives rise to a potential mono-Higgs signal. This may be observable at the 14 TeV LHC at low tan beta and when the Z' mass is roughly in the range 600 GeV to 1.3 TeV.

Berlin, Asher; Wang, Lian-Tao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Mono-Higgs Detection of Dark Matter at the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by the recent discovery of the Higgs boson, we investigate the possibility that a missing energy plus Higgs final state is the dominant signal channel for dark matter at the LHC. We consider examples of higher-dimension operators where a Higgs and dark matter pair are produced through an off-shell Z or photon, finding potential sensitivity at the LHC to cutoff scales of around a few hundred GeV. We generalize this production mechanism to a simplified model by introducing a Z' as well as a second Higgs doublet, where the pseudoscalar couples to dark matter. Resonant production of the Z' which decays to a Higgs plus invisible particles gives rise to a potential mono-Higgs signal. This may be observable at the 14 TeV LHC at low tan beta and when the Z' mass is roughly in the range 600 GeV to 1.3 TeV.

Asher Berlin; Tongyan Lin; Lian-Tao Wang

2014-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

289

Circumscribing late dark matter decays model-independently  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of theories, spanning a wide range of mass scales, predict dark matter candidates that have lifetimes much longer than the age of the Universe, yet may produce a significant flux of gamma rays in their decays today. We constrain such late-decaying dark matter scenarios model-independently by utilizing gamma-ray line emission limits from the Galactic Center region obtained with the SPI spectrometer on INTEGRAL, and the determination of the isotropic diffuse photon background by SPI, COMPTEL, and EGRET observations. We show that no more than {approx}5% of the unexplained MeV background can be produced by late dark matter decays either in the Galactic halo or cosmological sources.

Yueksel, Hasan; Kistler, Matthew D. [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States) and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

Isospin-Violating Dark Matter and Neutrinos From the Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the indirect detection of dark matter through neutrino flux from their annihilation in the center of the Sun, in a class of theories where the dark matter-nucleon spin-independent interactions break the isospin symmetry. We point out that, while the direct detection bounds with heavy targets like Xenon are weakened and reconciled with the positive signals in DAMA and CoGeNT experiments, the indirect detection using neutrino telescopes can impose a relatively stronger constraint and brings tension to such explanation, if the annihilation is dominated by heavy quark or $\\tau$-lepton final states. As a consequence, the qualified isospin violating dark matter candidate has to preferably annihilate into light flavors.

Shao-Long Chen; Yue Zhang

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

291

Modified holographic Ricci dark energy coupled to interacting relativistic and non-relativistic dark matter in the nonflat universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The modified holographic Ricci dark energy coupled to interacting relativistic and non-relativistic dark matter is considered in the nonflat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe. Through examining the deceleration parameter, one can find that the transition time of the Universe from decelerating to accelerating phase in the interacting holographic Ricci dark energy model is close to that in the $\\Lambda$ cold dark matter model. The evolution of modified holographic Ricci dark energy's state parameter and the evolution of dark matter and dark energy's densities shows that the dark energy holds the dominant position from the near past to the future. By studying the statefinder diagnostic and the evolution of the total pressure, one can find that this model could explain the Universe's transition from the radiation to accelerating expansion stage through the dust stage. According to the $Om$ diagnostic, it is easy to find that when the interaction is weak and the proportion of relativistic dark matter in total da...

Li, En-Kun; Geng, Jin-Ling

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Dark energy and matter evolution from lensing tomography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reconstructed from lensing tomography, the evolution of the dark matter density field in the well-understood linear regime can provide model-independent constraints on the growth function of structure and the evolution of the dark energy density. We examine this potential in the context that high-redshift cosmology has in the future been fixed by cosmic microwave background measurements. We construct sharp tests for the existence of multiple dark matter components or a dark energy component that is not a cosmological constant. These functional constraints can be transformed into physically motivated model parameters. From the growth function, the fraction of the dark matter in a smooth component, such as a light neutrino, may be constrained to a statistical precision of ?(f)?0.0006fsky-1/2 by a survey covering a fraction of sky fsky with a redshift resolution ?z=0.1. For the dark energy, a parametrization in terms of the present energy density ?DE, equation of state w, and its redshift derivative w?, the constraints correspond to ?(w)=0.009fsky-1/2 and a degenerate combination of the other two parameters. For a fixed ?DE, ?(w?)=0.046fsky-1/2.

Wayne Hu

2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

293

Dark matter and dark energy: summary and future directions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to tell us whether ultra-high-energy y http://www.auger.org...sensitivities to ultra- high-energy cosmic rays. 3. Calculate it...have a good idea of the matter and energy content of the Universe, and some prospects...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Co-existence of Gravity and Antigravity: The Unification of Dark Matter and Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Massive gravity with second and fourth derivatives is shown to give both attractive and repulsive gravities. In contrast to the attractive gravity correlated with the energy-momentum tensor, the repulsive gravity is related to a fixed mass $m_x$, which equals a spin-dependent factor $f_\\sigma$ times the graviton mass. Therefore, particles with energy below $m_x$ are both dark matter and dark energy: Their overall gravity is attractive with normal matter but repulsive among themselves. Detailed analyses reveal that this unified dark scenario can properly account for the observed dark matter/energy phenomena: galaxy rotation curves, transition from early cosmic deceleration to recent acceleration; and naturally overcome other dark scenarios' difficulties: the substructure and cuspy core problems, the difference of dark halo distributions in galaxies and clusters, and the cosmic coincidence. Very interestingly, Dirac particles have $f_\\sigma=1/\\sqrt 2$, all bosonic matter particles have $f_\\sigma=0$, and the only exceptional boson is the graviton itself, which may have $f_\\sigma>1$.

Xiang-Song Chen

2005-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

295

The Hubble Web: The Dark Matter Problem and Cosmic Strings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I propose a reinterpretation of cosmic dark matter in which a rigid network of cosmic strings formed at the end of inflation. The cosmic strings fulfill three functions: At recombination they provide an accretion mechanism for virializing baryonic and warm dark matter into disks. These cosmic strings survive as configurations which thread spiral and elliptical galaxies leading to the observed flatness of rotation curves and the Tully-Fisher relation. We find a relationship between the rotational velocity of the galaxy and the string tension and discuss the testability of this model.

Alexander, Stephon [Departments of Physics and Astronomy, Institute for Gravity and Geometry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

296

Standard model Higgs boson-inflaton and dark matter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The standard model Higgs boson can serve as the inflaton field of slow roll inflationary models provided it exhibits a large nonminimal coupling with the gravitational scalar curvature. The Higgs boson self interactions and its couplings with a standard model singlet scalar serving as the source of dark matter are then subject to cosmological constraints. These bounds, which can be more stringent than those arising from vacuum stability and perturbative triviality alone, still allow values for the Higgs boson mass which should be accessible at the LHC. As the Higgs boson coupling to the dark matter strengthens, lower values of the Higgs boson mass consistent with the cosmological data are allowed.

T. E. Clark; Boyang Liu; S. T. Love; T. ter Veldhuis

2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

297

The First Billion Years of a Warm Dark Matter Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results of cosmological N-body hydrodynamic chemistry simulations of primordial structure growth and evolution in a scenario with warm dark matter (WDM) having a mass of 3keV and compare with a model consisting of standard cold dark matter (CDM). We focus on the high-redshift universe ($z>6$), where the structure formation process should better reflect the primordial (linear) differences in terms of matter power spectrum. We find that early epochs are exceptional probes of the dark-matter nature. Non-linear CDM and WDM power spectra differ by up to 2 dex at early times and show spreads of factor of a few persisting in the whole first Gyr. Primordial WDM objects with masses $\\lesssim 10^8\\,\\rm M_\\odot$ are less abundant by $\\gtrsim 1\\,\\rm dex$, both in terms of dark matter and of baryon content. Runaway molecular cooling in primordial WDM mini-haloes results severely inhibited due to the damping of power at large $k$ modes. As a consequence, the cosmic (population III and II-I) star formation activi...

Maio, Umberto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

GUT and supersymmetry at the LHC and in dark matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional SO(10) models involve more than one scale for a complete breaking of the GUT symmetry requiring further assumptions on the VEVs of the Higgs fields that enter in the breaking to achieve viable models. Recent works where the breaking can be accomplished at one scale are discussed. These include models with just a pair of 144+144 of Higgs fields. Further extensions of this idea utilizing 560+560 of Higgs representations allow both the breaking at one scale, as well as accomplish a natural doublet-triplet splitting via the missing partner mechanism. More generally, we discuss the connection of high scale models to low energy physics in the context of supergravity grand unification. Here we discuss a natural solution to the little hierarchy problem and also discuss the implications of the LHC data for supersymmetry. It is shown that the LHC data implies that most of the parameter space of supergravity models consistent with the data lie on the Hyperbolic Branch of radiative breaking of the electroweak symmetry and more specifically on the Focal Surface of the Hyperbolic Branch. A discussion is also given of the implications of recent LHC data on the Higgs boson mass for the discovery of supersymmetry and for the search for dark matter.

Nath, Pran [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

299

Red Halos of Galaxies - Reservoirs of Baryonic Dark Matter?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep optical/near-IR surface photometry of galaxies outside the Local Group have revealed faint and very red halos around objects as diverse as disk galaxies and starbursting dwarf galaxies. The colours of these structures are too extreme to be reconciled with stellar populations similar to those seen in the stellar halos of the Milky Way or M31, and alternative explanations like dust reddening, high metallicities or nebular emission are also disfavoured. A stellar population obeying an extremely bottom-heavy initial mass function (IMF), is on the other hand consistent with all available data. Because of its high mass-to-light ratio, such a population would effectively behave as baryonic dark matter and could account for some of the baryons still missing in the low-redshift Universe. Here, we give an overview of current red halo detections, alternative explanations for the origin of the red colours and ongoing searches for red halos around types of galaxies for which this phenomenon has not yet been reported. A number of potential tests of the bottom-heavy IMF hypothesis are also discussed.

E. Zackrisson; N. Bergvall; C. Flynn; G. Ostlin; G. Micheva; B. Caldwell

2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

300

Dark Matter vs. Neutrinos: The effect of astrophysical uncertainties and timing information on the neutrino floor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Future multi-tonne Direct Detection experiments will be sensitive to solar neutrino induced nuclear recoils which form an irreducible background to light Dark Matter searches. Indeed for masses around 6 GeV the spectra of neutrinos and Dark Matter are so similar that experiments will run into a neutrino floor, for which sensitivity increases only marginally with exposure past a certain cross section. In this work we show that this floor can be overcome using the different annual modulation expected from solar neutrinos and Dark Matter. Specifically for cross sections below the neutrino floor the DM signal is observable through a phase shift and a smaller amplitude for the time-dependent event rate. This allows the exclusion power to be improved by up to an order of magnitude for large exposures. In addition we demonstrate that the neutrino floor exists over a wider mass range than has been previously shown, since the large uncertainties in the Dark Matter velocity distribution make the signal spectrum harder to distinguish from the neutrino background. However for most velocity distributions the neutrino floor can still be surpassed using timing information, though certain velocity streams may prove problematic.

Jonathan H. Davis

2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Nonabelian dark matter models for 3.5 keV X-rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A recent analysis of XXM-Newton data reveals the possible presence of an X-ray line at approximately 3.55 keV, which is not readily explained by known atomic transitions. Numerous models of eV-scale decaying dark matter have been proposed to explain this signal. Here we explore models of multicomponent nonabelian dark matter with typical mass ~ 1-10 GeV (higher values being allowed in some models) and eV-scale splittings that arise naturally from the breaking of the nonabelian gauge symmetry. Kinetic mixing between the photon and the hidden sector gauge bosons can occur through a dimension-5 or 6 operator. Radiative decays of the excited states proceed through transition magnetic moments that appear at one loop. The decaying excited states can either be primordial or else produced by upscattering of the lighter dark matter states. These models are significantly constrained by direct dark matter searches or cosmic microwave background distortions, and are potentially testable in fixed target experiments that s...

Cline, James M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

The case for a directional dark matter detector and the status of current experimental efforts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the case for a dark matter detector with directional sensitivity. This document was developed at the 2009 CYGNUS workshop on directional dark matter detection, and contains contributions from theorists and ...

Battat, James

303

Top-Down Fragmentation of a Warm Dark Matter Filament  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the first high-resolution n-body simulations of the fragmentation of dark matter filaments. Such fragmentation occurs in top-down scenarios of structure formation, when the dark matter is warm instead of cold. In a previous paper (Knebe et al. 2002, hereafter Paper I), we showed that WDM differs from the standard Cold Dark Matter (CDM) mainly in the formation history and large-scale distribution of low-mass haloes, which form later and tend to be more clustered in WDM than in CDM universes, tracing more closely the filamentary structures of the cosmic web. Therefore, we focus our computational effort in this paper on one particular filament extracted from a WDM cosmological simulation and compare in detail its evolution to that of the same CDM filament. We find that the mass distribution of the halos forming via fragmentation within the filament is broadly peaked around a Jeans mass of a few 10^9 Msun, corresponding to a gravitational instability of smooth regions with an overdensity contrast around 10 at these redshifts. Our results confirm that WDM filaments fragment and form gravitationally bound haloes in a top-down fashion, whereas CDM filaments are built bottom-up, thus demonstrating the impact of the nature of the dark matter on dwarf galaxy properties.

Alexander Knebe; Julien Devriendt; Brad Gibson; Joseph Silk

2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

304

ccsd00003303, Dark Matter Direct Detection using Cryogenic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ccsd­00003303, version 1 ­ 17 Nov 2004 Dark Matter Direct Detection using Cryogenic Detectors cryogenic experiments currently provide the best sensitivity, by nearly one order of magnitude, to WIMP of cryogenic exper- iments promises two orders of magnitude increase in sensitivity over the next few years

305

Conservative constraints on dark matter annihilation into gamma rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using gamma-ray data from observations of the Milky Way, Andromeda (M31), and the cosmic background, we calculate conservative upper limits on the dark matter self-annihilation cross section to monoenergetic gamma rays, <{sigma}{sub A}v>{sub {gamma}}{sub {gamma}}, over a wide range of dark matter masses. (In fact, over most of this range, our results are unchanged if one considers just the branching ratio to gamma rays with energies within a factor of a few of the endpoint at the dark matter mass.) If the final-state branching ratio to gamma rays, Br({gamma}{gamma}), were known, then <{sigma}{sub A}v>{sub {gamma}}{sub {gamma}}/Br({gamma}{gamma}) would define an upper limit on the total cross section; we conservatively assume Br({gamma}{gamma}) > or approx. 10{sup -4}. An upper limit on the total cross section can also be derived by considering the appearance rates of any standard model particles; in practice, this limit is defined by neutrinos, which are the least detectable. For intermediate dark matter masses, gamma-ray-based and neutrino-based upper limits on the total cross section are comparable, while the gamma-ray limit is stronger for small masses and the neutrino limit is stronger for large masses. We comment on how these results depend on the assumptions about astrophysical inputs and annihilation final states, and how GLAST and other gamma-ray experiments can improve upon them.

Mack, Gregory D.; Yueksel, Hasan [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Jacques, Thomas D.; Bell, Nicole F. [School of Physics, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Beacom, John F. [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

Warmth Elevating the Depths: Shallower Voids with Warm Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Warm dark matter (WDM) has been proposed as an alternative to cold dark matter (CDM), to resolve issues such as the apparent lack of satellites around the Milky Way. Even if WDM is not the answer to observational issues, it is essential to constrain the nature of the dark matter. The effect of WDM on haloes has been extensively studied, but the small-scale initial smoothing in WDM also affects the present-day cosmic web and voids. It suppresses the cosmic "sub-web" inside voids, and the formation of both void haloes and subvoids. In N-body simulations run with different assumed WDM masses, we identify voids with the zobov algorithm, and cosmic-web components with the origami algorithm. As dark-matter warmth increases, the initial-conditions smoothing increases, and the number of voids and subvoids is suppressed. Also, void density profiles change, their shapes become flatter inside the void radius, while edges of the voids remain unchanged. Also, filaments and walls become cleaner, as the sub-structures in be...

Yang, Lin F; Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A; Silk, Joseph

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Measuring the mass of dark matter at the LHC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many methods have been developed for measuring the mass of invisible particles that only use kinematic information available at hadron colliders. Because a particle is identified by its mass, these methods are critical when distinguishing between dark matter and fake dark matter, where a neutrino or other massless states can mimic a dark-matter signal. However, the uncertainty associated with measuring the mass of an invisible particle could be so large that it is indistinguishable from a neutrino. MonteCarlo is used to estimate lower bounds on how heavy an invisible particle must be in order for it to be distinguishable from a massless one at 95%CL, which we estimate to be O(10??GeV). This result, to a good approximation, is independent of the way the massive final-state particle is produced. If there is a light dark-matter particle with mass O(10??GeV), its presence will be difficult to unambiguously identify at the LHC, using kinematic information alone.

Andrew C. Kobach

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

308

Solar neutrinos and dark matter: cosmions, CHAMPs or DAEMONS?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......they are possibly truly elementary particles, whose fusion...energetics, these DArk Electric Matter Objects with...atom, say, owing to electric focusing of (light...2qimy!2/Tpp to the resistance met by the moving DAEMON...charged (to Z ~ 10) elementary black holes (EBHs......

E. M. Drobyshevski

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Dynamics of a scalar field, with a double exponential potential, interacting with dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the interaction between dark matter and dark energy, with dark energy described by a scalar field having a double exponential effective potential. We discover conditions under which such a scalar field driven solution is a late time attractor. We observe a realistic cosmological evolution which consists of sequential stages of dominance of radiation, matter and dark energy, respectively.

Gupta, Vartika; Mukherjee, Amitabha; Lohiya, Daksh

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Clustering GCG: a viable option for unified dark matter-dark energy?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the clustering Generalized Chaplygin Gas (GCG) as a possible candidate for dark matter-dark energy unification. The vanishing speed of sound ($c_{s}^2 = 0$) for the GCG fluid can be obtained by incorporating higher derivative operator in the original K-essence Lagrangian. The evolution of the density fluctuations in the GCG+Baryon fluid is studied in the linear regime. The observational constraints on the model are obtained using latest data from SNIa, $H(z)$, BAO and also for the $f\\sigma_{8}$ measurements. The matter power spectra for the allowed parameter values are well behaved without any unphysical features.

Sumit Kumar; Anjan A. Sen

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

311

The Milky Way's dark matter distribution and consequences for axion detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Signals for both direct and indirect dark matter detection depend on the phase-space distribution of dark matter. The possibility of structures with high physical density, known as caustics, has provided an opportunity to increase the discovery potential of the Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX). I discuss the formation of dark matter caustics and consequences of the caustic ring model for ADMX.

Duffy, Leanne D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Searching a Dark Photon with HADES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a search for the e+e- decay of a hypothetical dark photon, also names U vector boson, in inclusive dielectron spectra measured by HADES in the p (3.5 GeV) + p, Nb reactions, as well as the Ar (1.756 GeV/u) + KCl reaction. An upper limit on the kinetic mixing parameter squared epsilon^{2} at 90% CL has been obtained for the mass range M(U) = 0.02 - 0.55 GeV/c2 and is compared with the present world data set. For masses 0.03 - 0.1 GeV/c^2, the limit has been lowered with respect to previous results, allowing now to exclude a large part of the parameter region favoured by the muon g-2 anomaly. Furthermore, an improved upper limit on the branching ratio of 2.3 * 10^{-6} has been set on the helicity-suppressed direct decay of the eta meson, eta-> e+e-, at 90% CL.

HADES Collaboration; G. Agakishiev; A. Balanda; D. Belver; A. Belyaev; J. C. Berger-Chen; A. Blanco; M. Boehmer; J. L. Boyard; P. Cabanelas; S. Chernenko; A. Dybczak; E. Epple; L. Fabbbietti; O. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; P. Fonte; J. Friese; I. Froehlich; T. Galatyuk; J. A. Garzon; R. Gernhaeuser; K. Goebel; M. Golubeva; D. Gonzalez-Diaz; F. Guber; M. Gumberidze; T. Heinz; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; A. Ierusalimov; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kaempfer; T. Karavicheva; I. Koenig; W. Koenig; B. W. Kolb; G. Kornakov; R. Kotte; A. Krasa; F. Krizek; R. Kruecken; H. Kuc; W. Kuehn; A. Kugler; A. Kurepin; V. Ladygin; R. Lalik; S. Lang; K. Lapidus; A. Lebedev; T. Liu; L. Lopes; M. Lorenz; L. Maier; A. Mangiarotti; J. Markert; V. Metag; B. Michalska; J. Michel; C. Muentz; L. Naumann; Y. C. Pachmayer; M. Palka; Y. Parpottas; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; V. Petousis; J. Pietraszko; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; A. Reshetin; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; P. Salabura; T. Scheib; H. Schuldes; A. Schmah; E. Schwab; J. Siebenson; Yu. G. Sobolev; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; H. Stroebele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; M. Traxler; R. Trebacz; H. Tsertos; T. Vasiliev; V. Wagner; M. Weber; C. Wendisch; J. Wuestenfeld; S. Yurevich; Y. Zanevsky

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Searching a Dark Photon with HADES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a search for the e+e- decay of a hypothetical dark photon, also names U vector boson, in inclusive dielectron spectra measured by HADES in the p (3.5 GeV) + p, Nb reactions, as well as the Ar (1.756 GeV/u) + KCl reaction. An upper limit on the kinetic mixing parameter squared epsilon^{2} at 90% CL has been obtained for the mass range M(U) = 0.02 - 0.55 GeV/c2 and is compared with the present world data set. For masses 0.03 - 0.1 GeV/c^2, the limit has been lowered with respect to previous results, allowing now to exclude a large part of the parameter region favoured by the muon g-2 anomaly. Furthermore, an improved upper limit on the branching ratio of 2.3 * 10^{-6} has been set on the helicity-suppressed direct decay of the eta meson, eta-> e+e-, at 90% CL.

Agakishiev, G; Belver, D; Belyaev, A; Berger-Chen, J C; Blanco, A; Boehmer, M; Boyard, J L; Cabanelas, P; Chernenko, S; Dybczak, A; Epple, E; Fabbbietti, L; Fateev, O; Finocchiaro, P; Fonte, P; Friese, J; Froehlich, I; Galatyuk, T; Garzon, J A; Gernhaeuser, R; Goebel, K; Golubeva, M; Gonzalez-Diaz, D; Guber, F; Gumberidze, M; Heinz, T; Hennino, T; Holzmann, R; Ierusalimov, A; Iori, I; Ivashkin, A; Jurkovic, M; Kaempfer, B; Karavicheva, T; Koenig, I; Koenig, W; Kolb, B W; Kornakov, G; Kotte, R; Krasa, A; Krizek, F; Kruecken, R; Kuc, H; Kuehn, W; Kugler, A; Kurepin, A; Ladygin, V; Lalik, R; Lang, S; Lapidus, K; Lebedev, A; Liu, T; Lopes, L; Lorenz, M; Maier, L; Mangiarotti, A; Markert, J; Metag, V; Michalska, B; Michel, J; Muentz, C; Naumann, L; Pachmayer, Y C; Palka, M; Parpottas, Y; Pechenov, V; Pechenova, O; Petousis, V; Pietraszko, J; Przygoda, W; Ramstein, B; Reshetin, A; Rustamov, A; Sadovsky, A; Salabura, P; Scheib, T; Schuldes, H; Schmah, A; Schwab, E; Siebenson, J; Sobolev, Yu G; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Stroebele, H; Stroth, J; Sturm, C; Tarantola, A; Teilab, K; Tlusty, P; Traxler, M; Trebacz, R; Tsertos, H; Vasiliev, T; Wagner, V; Weber, M; Wendisch, C; Wuestenfeld, J; Yurevich, S; Zanevsky, Y

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

CONSTRAINTS ON DARK MATTER ANNIHILATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES FROM DIFFUSE RADIO EMISSION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annihilation of dark matter can result in the production of stable Standard Model particles including electrons and positrons that, in the presence of magnetic fields, lose energy via synchrotron radiation, observable as radio emission. Galaxy clusters are excellent targets to search for or to constrain the rate of dark matter annihilation, as they are both massive and dark matter dominated. In this study, we place limits on dark matter annihilation in a sample of nearby clusters using upper limits on the diffuse radio emission, low levels of observed diffuse emission, or detections of radio mini-halos. We find that the strongest limits on the annihilation cross section are better than limits derived from the non-detection of clusters in the gamma-ray band by a factor of {approx}3 or more when the same annihilation channel and substructure model, but different best-case clusters, are compared. The limits on the cross section depend on the assumed amount of substructure, varying by as much as two orders of magnitude for increasingly optimistic substructure models as compared to a smooth Navarro-Frenk-White profile. In our most optimistic case, using the results of the Phoenix Project, we find that the derived limits reach below the thermal relic cross section of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} for dark matter masses as large as 400 GeV, for the b b-bar annihilation channel. We discuss uncertainties due to the limited available data on the magnetic field structure of individual clusters. We also report the discovery of diffuse radio emission from the central 30-40 kpc regions of the groups M49 and NGC 4636.

Storm, Emma; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High St., Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Rudnick, Lawrence [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

315

Small Scale Clustering of Late Forming Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform a study of the non-linear clustering of matter in the Late Forming Dark Matter (LFDM) scenario in which dark matter results from the transition of non-minimally coupled scalar field from radiation to collisionless matter. A distinct feature of this model is the presence of a damped oscillatory cut-off in the linear matter power spectrum at small scales. We use a suite of high-resolution N-body simulations to study the imprints of LFDM on the non-linear matter power spectrum, the halo mass function and the halo density profiles. The model satisfies high-redshift matter power spectrum constraints from Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest measurements. We find suppressed abundance of low mass halos ($\\sim 10^{9}-10^{10}$ h$^{-1}$ M$_\\odot$) at all redshifts compared to a vanilla $\\Lambda$CDM model. Furthermore, in this mass range we find significant deviations with respect to predictions from the Sheth-Tormen mass function. Halos with mass $M\\gtrsim 10^{11}$ h$^{-1}$ M$_\\odot$ show minor departures of the density pr...

Agarwal, Shankar; Das, Subinoy; Rasera, Yann

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

From gamma ray line signals of dark matter to the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the relationship between astrophysical gamma-ray signals and LHC signatures for a class of phenomenologically successful secluded dark matter models, motivated by recent evidence for a ~130 GeV gamma-ray line. We consider in detail scenarios in which interactions between the dark sector and the standard model are mediated by a vev-less scalar field \\phi, transforming as an N-plet (N > 3) under SU(2)_L. Since some of the component fields of \\phi carry large electric charges, loop induced dark matter annihilation to \\gamma \\gamma and \\gamma Z can be enhanced without the need for non-perturbatively large couplings, and without overproduction of continuum gamma-rays from other final states. We discuss prospects for other experimental tests, including dark matter-nucleon scattering and production of \\phi at the LHC, where future searches for anomalous charged tracks may be sensitive. The first LHC hints could come from the Higgs sector, where loop corrections involving \\phi lead to significantly modified h to \\gamma \\gamma and h to \\gamma Z branching ratios.

Joachim Kopp; Ethan T. Neil; Reinard Primulando; Jure Zupan

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

317

Capture and Indirect Detection of Inelastic Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the capture rate for Dark Matter in the Sun for models where the dominant interaction with nuclei is inelastic -- the Dark Matter up-scatters to a nearby dark "partner" state with a small splitting of order a 100 keV. Such models have previously been shown to be compatible with DAMA/LIBRA data, as well as data from all other direct detection experiments. The kinematics of inelastic Dark Matter ensures that the dominant contribution to capture occurs from scattering off of iron. We give a prediction for neutrino rates for current and future neutrino telescopes based on the results from current direct detection experiments. Current bounds from Super--Kamiokande and IceCube-22 significantly constrain these models, assuming annihilations are into two-body Standard Model final states, such as W+W-, t-tbar, b-bbar or tau+tau-. Annihilations into first and second generation quarks and leptons are generally allowed, as are annihilations into new force carriers which decay dominantly into e+e-, mu+mu- and pi+pi-.

Arjun Menon; Rob Morris; Aaron Pierce; Neal Weiner

2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

318

Neutrino Physics and Dark Matter Physics with Ultra-Low-Energy Germanium Detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status and plans of the TEXONO Collaboration on the development of ultra-low-energy germanium detectors with sub-keV sensitivities are reported. We survey the scientific goals which include the observation of neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering, the studies of neutrino magnetic moments, as well as the searches of WIMP dark matter. In particular, an energy threshold of 220{+-}10 eV at an efficiency of 50% were achieved with a four-channel prototype detectors each of an active mass of 5 g. New limits were set for WIMPs with mass between 3-6 GeV. The prospects of the realization of full-scale experiments are discussed. This detector technique makes the unexplored sub-keV energy window accessible for new neutrino and dark matter experiments.

Shin-Ted, Lin [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China)

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

319

A possible indication of momentum-dependent asymmetric dark matter in the Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Broad disagreement persists between helioseismological observables and predictions of solar models computed with the latest surface abundances. Here we show that most of these problems can be solved by the presence of asymmetric dark matter coupling to nucleons as the square of the momentum $q$ exchanged in the collision. We compute neutrino fluxes, small frequency separations, surface helium abundances, sound speed profiles and convective zone depths for a number of models, showing more than a $6\\sigma$ preference for $q^2$ models over others, and over the Standard Solar Model. The preferred mass (3 GeV) and reference dark matter-nucleon cross-section ($10^{-37}$ cm$^2$ at $q_0 = 40$ MeV) are within the region of parameter space allowed by both direct detection and collider searches.

Aaron C. Vincent; Pat Scott; Aldo Serenelli

2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

320

The CHASE laboratory search for chameleon dark energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A scalar field is a favorite candidate for the particle responsible for dark energy. However, few theoretical means exist that can simultaneously explain the observed acceleration of the Universe and evade tests of gravity. The chameleon mechanism, whereby the properties of a particle depend upon the local environment, is one possible avenue. We present the results of the Chameleon Afterglow Search (CHASE) experiment, a laboratory probe for chameleon dark energy. CHASE marks a significant improvement other searches for chameleons both in terms of its sensitivity to the photon/chameleon coupling as well as its sensitivity to the classes of chameleon dark energy models and standard power-law models. Since chameleon dark energy is virtually indistinguishable from a cosmological constant, CHASE tests dark energy models in a manner not accessible to astronomical surveys.

Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Theory, phenomenology, and prospects for detection of supersymmetric dark matter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One of the great attractions of minimal superunified supersymmetric models is the prediction of a massive, stable, weakly interacting particle [the lightest supersymmetric partner (LSP)] which can have the right relic abundance to be a cold dark matter candidate. In this paper we investigate the identity, mass, and properties of the LSP after requiring gauge coupling unification, proper electroweak symmetry breaking, and numerous phenomenological constraints. We then discuss the prospects for detecting the LSP. The experiments which we investigate are (1) space annihilations into positrons, antiprotons, and ? rays, (2) large underground arrays to detect upward-going muons arising from LSP capture and annihilation in the sun and earth, (3) elastic collisions on matter in a table top apparatus, and (4) production of LSPs or decays into LSPs at high energy colliders. Our conclusions are that space annihilation experiments and large underground detectors are of limited help in initially detecting the LSP although perhaps they could provide confirmation of a signal seen in other experiments, while table top detectors have considerable discovery potential. Colliders such as the CERN LEP II, an upgraded Fermilab, and the CERN LHC might be the best dark matter detectors of all. This paper improves on most previous analyses in the literature by (a) only considering parameters not already excluded by several physics constraints listed above, (b) presenting results that are independent of (usually untenable) parameter choices, (c) comparing opportunities to study the same cold dark matter, and (d) including minor technical improvements.

E. Diehl; G. L. Kane; Chris Kolda; James D. Wells

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

'Dark Matter' as a Quantum Foam In-Flow Effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The galactic `dark matter' effect is regarded as one of the major problems in fundamental physics. Here it is explained as a self-interaction dynamical effect of space itself, and so is not caused by an unknown form of matter. Because it was based on Kepler's Laws for the motion of the planets in the solar system the Newtonian theory of gravity was too restricted. A reformulation and generalisation of the Newtonian theory of gravity in terms of a velocity in-flow field, representing at a classical level the relative motion of a quantum-foam substructure to space, reveals a key dynamical feature of the phenomenon of gravity, namely the so called `dark matter' effect, which manifests not only in spiral galaxy rotation curves, but also in the borehole g anomaly, globular and galactic black holes, and in ongoing problems in improving the accuracy with which Newton's gravitational constant G is measured. The new theory of gravity involves an additional new dimensionless gravitational constant, and experimental data reveals this to be the fine structure constant. The new theory correctly predicts the globular cluster black hole masses, and that the `frame-dragging' effect is caused by vorticity in the in-flow. The relationship of the new theory of gravity to General Relativity which, like Newtonian gravity, does not have the `dark matter' dynamics, is explained.

Reginald T. Cahill

2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

323

Phenomenology of "dark matter"- from the Everett's quantum cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is widely accepted that the Everett's (or "many-worlds") interpretation of quantum mechanics is the only one which is appropriate for quantum cosmology because no environment may exist for Universe as a whole. We discuss, in the framework of the Everett's interpretation, the (quasi-) classical stage of evolution of the Universe when there coexist "classically incompatible" configurations of matter, or classical alternative realities ("alternatives" for short). In the framework of the Everett's interpretation the semiclassical gravity (where the gravitational field is classical and the non-gravitational fields are quantum) is more natural than theories including quantizing gravitational field. It is shown that the semiclassical (at least on the astrophysical and cosmological scales) Everett-type gravity leads to the observational effect known as the effect of dark matter. Instead of assuming special forms of matter (weakly interacting with the known matter), the role of the dark matter is played in this case by the matter of the usual kind which however belongs to those alternative realities (Everett's worlds) which remain {\\guillemotleft}invisible{\\guillemotright}, i.e. not perceived with the help of non-gravitational fields.

M. B. Mensky

2011-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

324

THE EXTREME SMALL SCALES: DO SATELLITE GALAXIES TRACE DARK MATTER?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the radial distribution of galaxies within their host dark matter halos as measured in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey by modeling their small-scale clustering. Specifically, we model the Jiang et al. measurements of the galaxy two-point correlation function down to very small projected separations (10 h{sup -1} kpc {<=} r {<=} 400 h{sup -1} kpc), in a wide range of luminosity threshold samples (absolute r-band magnitudes of -18 up to -23). We use a halo occupation distribution framework with free parameters that specify both the number and spatial distribution of galaxies within their host dark matter halos. We assume one galaxy resides in the halo center and additional galaxies are considered satellites that follow a radial density profile similar to the dark matter Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile, except that the concentration and inner slope are allowed to vary. We find that in low luminosity samples (M{sub r} < -19.5 and lower), satellite galaxies have radial profiles that are consistent with NFW. M{sub r} < -20 and brighter satellite galaxies have radial profiles with significantly steeper inner slopes than NFW (we find inner logarithmic slopes ranging from -1.6 to -2.1, as opposed to -1 for NFW). We define a useful metric of concentration, M{sub 1/10}, which is the fraction of satellite galaxies (or mass) that are enclosed within one-tenth of the virial radius of a halo. We find that M{sub 1/10} for low-luminosity satellite galaxies agrees with NFW, whereas for luminous galaxies it is 2.5-4 times higher, demonstrating that these galaxies are substantially more centrally concentrated within their dark matter halos than the dark matter itself. Our results therefore suggest that the processes that govern the spatial distribution of galaxies, once they have merged into larger halos, must be luminosity dependent, such that luminous galaxies become poor tracers of the underlying dark matter.

Watson, Douglas F.; Berlind, Andreas A.; McBride, Cameron K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, 1807 Station B, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Hogg, David W.; Jiang Tao [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

325

Environmentally Selected WIMP Dark Matter with High-Scale Supersymmetry Breaking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the possibility that both the weak scale and the thermal relic dark matter abundance are environmentally selected in a multiverse. An underlying supersymmetric theory containing the states of the MSSM and singlets, with supersymmetry and R symmetry broken at unified scales, has just two realistic low energy effective theories. One theory, (SM + \\tilde{w}), is the Standard Model augmented only by the wino, having a mass near 3 TeV, and has a Higgs boson mass in the range of (127 - 142) GeV. The other theory, (SM + \\tilde{h}/\\tilde{s}), has Higgsinos and a singlino added to the Standard Model. The Higgs boson mass depends on the single new Yukawa coupling of the theory, y, and is near 141 GeV for small y but grows to be as large as 210 GeV as this new coupling approaches strong coupling at high energies. Much of the parameter space of this theory will be probed by direct detection searches for dark matter that push two orders of magnitude below the present bounds; furthermore, the dark matter mass and cross section on nucleons are correlated with the Higgs boson mass. The indirect detection signal of monochromatic photons from the galactic center is computed, and the range of parameters that may be accessible to LHC searches for trilepton events is explored. Taking a broader view, allowing the possibility of R symmetry protection to the TeV scale or axion dark matter, we find four more theories: (SM + axion), two versions of Split Supersymmetry, and the E-MSSM, where a little supersymmetric hierarchy is predicted. The special Higgs mass value of (141 \\pm 2) GeV appears in symmetry limits of three of the six theories, (SM + axion), (SM + \\tilde{w}) and (SM + \\tilde{h}/\\tilde{s}), motivating a comparison of other signals of these three theories.

Gilly Elor; Hock-Seng Goh; Lawrence J. Hall; Piyush Kumar; Yasunori Nomura

2009-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

326

Dark matter and dark energy production in quantum model of the universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The quantum model of the homogeneous, isotropic, and spatially closed universe predicts an existence of two types of collective quantum states in the universe. The states of one type characterize a gravitational field, the others describe a matter (uniform scalar) field. In the first stage of the evolution of the universe a primordial scalar field evolves slowly into its vacuum-like state. In the second stage the scalar field oscillates about an equilibrium due to the quantum fluctuations. The universe is being filled with matter in the form of elementary quantum excitations of the vibrations of the scalar field. The separate quantum excitations are characterized by non-zero values of their energies (masses). Under the action of gravitational forces mainly these excitations decay into ordinary particles (baryons and leptons) and dark matter. The elementary quantum excitations of the vibrations of the scalar field which have not decayed up to now form dark energy. The numerical estimations lead to realistic va...

Kuzmichev, V E

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Bulk Viscosity, Decaying Dark Matter, and the Cosmic Acceleration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss a cosmology in which cold dark-matter particles decay into relativistic particles. We argue that such decays could lead naturally to a bulk viscosity in the cosmic fluid. For decay lifetimes comparable to the present hubble age, this bulk viscosity enters the cosmic energy equation as an effective negative pressure. We investigate whether this negative pressure is of sufficient magnitude to account fo the observed cosmic acceleration. We show that a single decaying species in a flat, dark-matter dominated cosmology without a cosmological constant cannot reproduce the observed magnitude-redshift relation from Type Ia supernovae. However, a delayed bulk viscosity, possibly due to a cascade of decaying particles may be able to account for a significant fraction of the apparent cosmic acceleration. Possible candidate nonrelativistic particles for this scenario include sterile neutrinos or gauge-mediated decaying supersymmetric particles.

James R. Wilson; Grant J. Mathews; George M. Fuller

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

328

Gamma Rays from Kaluza-Klein Dark Matter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A TeV gamma-ray signal from the direction of the Galactic center (GC) has been detected by the HESS experiment. Here, we investigate whether Kaluza-Klein (KK) dark matter annihilations near the GC can be the explanation. Including the contributions from internal bremsstrahlung as well as subsequent decays of quarks and ?leptons, we find a very flat gamma-ray spectrum which drops abruptly at the dark matter particle mass. For a KK mass of about 1TeV, this gives a good fit to the HESS data below 1TeV. A similar model, with gauge coupling roughly 3times as large and a particle mass of about 10TeV, would give both the correct relic density and a photon spectrum that fits the complete range of data.

Lars Bergstrm; Torsten Bringmann; Martin Eriksson; Michael Gustafsson

2005-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

329

Physics Beyond the Standard Model and Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this lecture note, I discuss why many of us are expecting rich physics at the TeV scale, drawing analogies from the history of physics in the last century. Then I review some of the possible candidates of new physics at this energy scale. I also discuss why we believe much of the matter in the universe is not atoms (baryons) or compact astronomical objects, and hence requires physics beyond the standard model. Finally I discuss some of the candidates for the non-baryonic dark matter.

Hitoshi Murayama

2007-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

330

GLAST And Dark Matter Substructure in the Milky Way  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss the possibility of GLAST detecting gamma-rays from the annihilation of neutralino dark matter in the Galactic halo. We have used 'Via Lactea', currently the highest resolution simulation of cold dark matter substructure, to quantify the contribution of subhalos to the annihilation signal. We present a simulated allsky map of the expected gamma-ray counts from dark matter annihilation, assuming standard values of particle mass and cross section. In this case GLAST should be able to detect the Galactic center and several individual subhalos. One of the most exciting discoveries that the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) could make, is the detection of gamma-rays from the annihilation of dark matter (DM). Such a measurement would directly address one of the major physics problems of our time: the nature of the DM particle. Whether or not GLAST will actually detect a DM annihilation signal depends on both unknown particle physics and unknown astrophysics theory. Particle physics uncertainties include the type of particle (axion, neutralino, Kaluza-Klein particle, etc.), its mass, and its interaction cross section. From the astrophysical side it appears that DM is not smoothly distributed throughout the Galaxy halo, but instead exhibits abundant clumpy substructure, in the form of thousands of so-called subhalos. The observability of DM annihilation radiation originating in Galactic DM subhalos depends on their abundance, distribution, and internal properties. Numerical simulations have been used in the past to estimate the annihilation flux from DM substructure, but since the subhalo properties, especially their central density profile, which determines their annihilation luminosity, are very sensitive to numerical resolution, it makes sense to re-examine their contribution with higher resolution simulations.

Kuhlen, Michael; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study; Diemand, Jurg; /UC, Santa Cruz, Astron. Astrophys.; Madau, Piero; /UC, Santa Cruz, Astron. Astrophys. /Garching, Max Planck Inst.

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

331

Review of Dark Matter Direct Detection Using Cryogenic Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The direct detection of the Universe's Dark Matter is one of the key questions in particle astrophysics. Cryogenic based detectors offer advantages in low radioactive backgrounds, target mass, sensitivity to the small energy depositions and rejection of possible background sources. I will summarize the main experimental approaches, including both cryogenic crystal and liquid targets and the options pursued for their signal readout. Recent advances from around the world and prospects for future proposed experiments will be discussed.

Brink, P.L.; /SLAC

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

332

The Distribution of Dark Matter in a Ringed Galaxy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Outer rings are located at the greatest distance from the galaxy center of any feature resonant with a bar. Because of their large scale, their morphology is sensitive to the distribution of the dark matter in the galaxy. We introduce here how study of these rings can constrain the mass-to-light ratio of the bar, and so the percentage of dark matter in the center of these galaxies. We compare periodic orbits integrated in the ringed galaxy NGC 6782 near the outer Lindblad resonance to the shape of the outer ring. The non-axisymmetric component of the potential resulting from the bar is derived from a near-infrared image of the galaxy. The axisymmetric component is derived assuming a flat rotation curve. We find that the pinched non-self-intersecting periodic orbits are more elongated for higher bar mass-to-light ratios and faster bars. The inferred mass-to-light ratio of the bar depends on the assumed inclination of the galaxy. With an assumed galaxy inclination of i=41 degrees, for the orbits to be consistent with the observed ring morphology the mass-to-light ratio of the bar must be high, greater than 70% of a maximal disk value. For i=45 degrees, the mass-to-light ratio of the bar is $75\\pm 15%$ of the maximal disk value. Since the velocity field of these rings can be used to constrain the galaxy inclination as well as which periodic orbit is represented in the ring, further study will yield tighter constraints on the mass-to-light ratio of the bar. If a near maximal disk value for the bar is required, then either there would be little dark matter within the bar, or the dark matter contained in the disk of the galaxy would be non-axisymmetric and would rotate with the bar.

A. C. Quillen; J. A. Frogel

1996-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

333

From Strings Theory to the Dark Matter in Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Starting from the effective action of the low energy limit of superstrings theory, I find an exact solution of the field equations which geodesics behavie exactly as the trajectories of stars arround of a spiral galaxy. Here dark matter is of dilatonic origin. It is remarkable that the energy density of this space-time is the same as the used by astronomers to model galaxy stability. Some remarks about a universe dominated by dilatons are pointed out.

Tonatiuh Matos

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

334

Generating X-ray lines from annihilating dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose different scenarios where a keV dark matter annihilates to produce a monochromatic signal. The process is generated through the exchange of a light scalar of mass of order 300 keV - 50 MeV coupling to photon through loops or higher dimensional operators. For natural values of the couplings and scales, the model can generate a gamma-ray line which can fit with the recently identified 3.5 keV X-ray line.

Emilian Dudas; Lucien Heurtier; Yann Mambrini

2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

335

Dark matter from cosmic defects on galactic scales?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss the possible dynamical role of extended cosmic defects on galactic scales, specifically focusing on the possibility that they may provide the dark matter suggested by the classical problem of galactic rotation curves. We emphasize that the more standard defects (such as Goto-Nambu strings) are unsuitable for this task but show that more general models (such as transonic wiggly strings) could in principle have a better chance. In any case, we show that observational data severely restricts any such scenarios.

Guerreiro, N.; Carvalho, J. P. M. de [Centro de Astrofisica da Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Departamento de Matematica Aplicada da, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007, Porto (Portugal); Avelino, P. P. [Centro de Fisica do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Departamento de Fisica da Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Martins, C. J. A. P. [Centro de Astrofisica da Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

THE CENTRAL DARK MATTER DISTRIBUTION OF NGC 2976  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the mass distribution in the late-type dwarf galaxy NGC 2976 through stellar kinematics obtained with the Visible Integral Field Replicable Unit Spectrograph Prototype and anisotropic Jeans models as a test of cosmological simulations and baryonic processes that putatively alter small-scale structure. Previous measurements of the H{alpha} emission-line kinematics have determined that the dark matter halo of NGC 2976 is most consistent with a cored density profile. We find that the stellar kinematics are best fit with a cuspy halo. Cored dark matter halo fits are only consistent with the stellar kinematics if the stellar mass-to-light ratio is significantly larger than that derived from stellar population synthesis, while the best-fitting cuspy model has no such conflict. The inferred mass distribution from a harmonic decomposition of the gaseous kinematics is inconsistent with that of the stellar kinematics. This difference is likely due to the gas disk not meeting the assumptions that underlie the analysis such as no pressure support, a constant kinematic axis, and planar orbits. By relaxing some of these assumptions, in particular the form of the kinematic axis with radius, the gas-derived solution can be made consistent with the stellar kinematic models. A strong kinematic twist in the gas of NGC 2976's center suggests caution, and we advance the mass model based on the stellar kinematics as more reliable. The analysis of this first galaxy shows promising evidence that dark matter halos in late-type dwarfs may in fact be more consistent with cuspy dark matter distributions than earlier work has claimed.

Adams, Joshua J.; Gebhardt, Karl; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Murphy, Jeremy D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Fabricius, Maximilian H. [Max-Planck Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85741 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Hill, Gary J. [Texas Cosmology Center, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Van den Bosch, Remco C. E. [McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1402, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Van de Ven, Glenn [Max-Planck Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

337

Cores and cusps in warm dark matter halos  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The apparent presence of large core radii in Low Surface Brightness galaxies has been claimed as evidence in favor of warm dark matter. Here we show that WDM halos do not have cores that are large fractions of the halo size: typically, r{sub core}/r{sub 200}?<10{sup ?3}. This suggests an astrophysical origin for the large cores observed in these galaxies, as has been argued by other authors.

Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco [IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, E-46071, Valencia (Spain); Dalal, Neal, E-mail: villa@ific.uv.es, E-mail: neal@cita.utoronto.ca [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George St., Toronto, ON, M5S3H8 (Canada)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Solar neutrino physics: Sensitivity to light dark matter particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrinos are produced in several neutrino nuclear reactions of the proton-proton chain and carbon-nitrogen-oxygen cycle that take place at different radius of the Sun's core. Hence, measurements of solar neutrino fluxes provide a precise determination of the local temperature. The accumulation of non-annihilating light dark matter particles (with masses between 5 GeV and 16 GeV in the Sun produces a change in the local solar structure, namely, a decrease in the central temperature of a few percent. This variation depends on the properties of the dark matter particles, such as the mass of the particle and its spin-independent scattering cross-section on baryon-nuclei, specifically, the scattering with helium, oxygen, and nitrogen among other heavy elements. This temperature effect can be measured in almost all solar neutrino fluxes. In particular, by comparing the neutrino fluxes generated by stellar models with current observations, namely 8B neutrino fluxes, we find that non-annihilating dark matter particles with a mass smaller than 10 GeV and a spin-independent scattering cross-section with heavy baryon-nuclei larger than 3 x 10^{-37} cm^-2 produce a variation in the 8B neutrino fluxes that would be in conflict with current measurements.

Ilidio Lopes; Joseph Silk

2013-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

339

Isospin-violating dark matter at the LHC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider a toy model of dark matter with a gauge singlet Dirac fermion that has contact interactions to quarks that differ for right-handed up and down quarks. This is motivated by the isospin-violating dark matter scenario that was proposed to reconcile reported hints of direct dark matter detection with bounds from nonobservation of the signal in other experiments. We discuss how the effects of isospin violation in these couplings can be observed at the LHC. By studying events with large missing transverse momentum (ET), we show that the ratio of monophoton and monojet events is sensitive to the ratio of the absolute values of the couplings to the up and down quarks, while a dedicated study of dijet plus ET events can reveal their relative sign. We also consider how our results are modified if, instead of a contact interaction, a particle that mediates the interaction is introduced. Our methods have broad applicability to new physics that involves unequal couplings to up and down quarks.

Kaoru Hagiwara; Danny Marfatia; Toshifumi Yamada

2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

340

Dark matter at DeepCore and IceCube  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the augmentation of IceCube by DeepCore, the prospect for detecting dark matter annihilation in the Sun is much improved. To complement this experimental development, we provide a thorough template analysis of the particle physics issues that are necessary to precisely interpret the data. Our study is about nitty-gritty and is intended as a framework for detailed work on a variety of dark matter candidates. To accurately predict the source neutrino spectrum, we account for spin-correlations of the final state particles and the helicity-dependence of their decays, and absorption effects at production. We fully treat the propagation of neutrinos through the Sun, including neutrino oscillations, energy losses and tau regeneration. We simulate the survival probability of muons produced in the Earth by using the Muon MonteCarlo program, reproduce the published IceCube effective area, and update the parameters in the differential equation that approximates muon energy losses. To evaluate the zenith-angle dependent atmospheric background event rate, we track the Sun and determine the time it spends at each zenith-angle. Throughout, we employ neutralino dark matter as our example.

V. Barger; Y. Gao; D. Marfatia

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The Impact of Cold Dark Matter Variants on the Halos of the First Stars and Galaxies: Angular Momentum and Vortex Creation in BEC Dark Matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If cold dark matter elementary particles form a Bose-Einstein condensate, their superfluidity may distinguish them from other forms of cold dark matter, including the creation of quantum vortices. We have shown that such vortices are favored in strongly-coupled condensates. Vortex creation causes central densities to drop, thus affecting the dynamics of the gaseous baryonic component and subsequently star formation.

Rindler-Daller, Tanja [Department of Astronomy and Texas Cosmology Center, University of Texas at Austin (United States); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Cologne (Germany); Shapiro, Paul R. [Department of Astronomy and Texas Cosmology Center, University of Texas at Austin (United States)

2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

342

Thermal conduction by dark matter with velocity and momentum-dependent cross-sections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use the formalism of Gould and Raffelt to compute the dimensionless thermal conduction coefficients for scattering of dark matter particles with standard model nucleons via cross-sections that depend on the relative velocity or momentum exchanged between particles. Motivated by models invoked to reconcile various recent results in direct detection, we explicitly compute the conduction coefficients $\\alpha$ and $\\kappa$ for cross-sections that go as $v_{\\rm rel}^2$, $v_{\\rm rel}^4$, $v_{\\rm rel}^{-2}$, $q^2$, $q^4$ and $q^{-2}$, where $v_{\\rm rel}$ is the relative DM-nucleus velocity and $q$ is the momentum transferred in the collision. We find that a $v_{\\rm rel}^{-2}$ dependence can significantly enhance energy transport from the inner solar core to the outer core. The same can true for any $q$-dependent coupling, if the dark matter mass lies within some specific range for each coupling. This effect can complement direct searches for dark matter; combining these results with state-of-the-art Solar simulations should greatly increase sensitivity to certain DM models. It also seems possible that the so-called Solar Abundance Problem could be resolved by enhanced energy transport in the solar core due to such velocity- or momentum-dependent scatterings.

Aaron C. Vincent; Pat Scott

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

343

Light dark matter from the U(1){sub X} sector in the NMSSM with gauge mediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cosmic ray anomalies observed by PAMELA and Fermi-LAT experiments may be interpreted by heavy (TeV-scale) dark matter annihilation enhanced by Sommerfeld effects mediated by a very light (sub-GeV) U(1){sub X} gauge boson, while the recent direct searches from CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA experiments may indicate a rather light ( ? 7 GeV) dark matter with weak interaction. Motivated by these apparently different scales, we consider a gauge mediated next-to-the minimal supersymmetric standard model (NMSSM) entended with a light U(1){sub X} sector plus a heavy sector ( H-bar {sub h},H{sub h}), which can provide both a light ( ? 7 GeV) and a heavy (TeV-scale) dark matter without introducing any ad hoc new scale. Through the Yukawa coupling between H{sub h} and the messager fields, the U(1){sub X} gauge symmetry is broken around the GeV scale radiatively and a large negative m{sub S}{sup 2} is generated for the NMSSM singlet S. Furthermore, the small kinetic mixing parameter between U(1){sub X} and U(1){sub Y} is predicted to be ? ? 10{sup ?5}?10{sup ?6} after integrating out the messengers. Such a light dark matter, which can have a normal relic density from the late decay of the right-handed sneutrino (assumed to be the ordinary next-to-the lightest supersymmetric particle and thermally produced in the early Universe), can serve a good candidate to explain the recent CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA results.

Kang, Zhaofeng; Li, Tianjun; Liu, Tao; Tong, Chunli; Yang, Jin Min, E-mail: zhfkang@itp.ac.cn, E-mail: tli@itp.ac.cn, E-mail: tliuphy@itp.ac.cn, E-mail: piggy1983@gmail.com, E-mail: jmyang@itp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Frontiers in Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Academia Sinica, Zhongguancun East Road, Beijing 100190 (China)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

A new high-background-rejection dark matter Ge cryogenic detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new design of a cryogenic germanium detector for dark matter search is presented, taking advantage of the coplanar grid technique of event localisation for improved background discrimination. Experiments performed with prototype devices in the EDELWEISS II setup at the Modane underground facility demonstrate the remarkably high efficiency of these devices for the rejection of low-energy $\\beta$, approaching 10$^5$ . This opens the road to investigate the range beyond 10$^{-8}$ pb in the WIMP-nucleon collision cross-sections, as proposed in the EURECA project of a one-ton cryogenic detector mass.

Broniatowski, A; Armengaud, E; Berg, L; Benot, A; Besida, O; Blumer, J; Chantelauze, A; Chapellier, M; Chardin, G; Charlieux, F; Collin, S; Crauste, O; De Jsus, M; Di Stefano, P; Dolgorouki, Y; Domange, J; Dumoulin, L; Eitel, K; Gascon, J; Gerbier, G; Gros, M; Hannawald, M; Herv, S; Juillard, A; Kluck, H; Kozlov, V; Lemrani, R; Lubashevskiy, A; Marrache, C; Marnieros, S; Navick, X -F; Nones, C; Olivieri, E; Pari, P; Paul, B; Rozov, S; Sanglard, V; Scorza, S; Semikh, S; Verdier, M -A; Vagneron, L; Yakushev, E

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

The Future of the Local Large Scale Structure: the roles of Dark Matter and Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the distinct effects of Dark Matter and Dark Energy on the future evolution of nearby large scale structures using constrained N-body simulations. We contrast a model of Cold Dark Matter and a Cosmological Constant (LCDM) with an Open CDM (OCDM) model with the same matter density Omega_m =0.3 and the same Hubble constant h=0.7. Already by the time the scale factor increased by a factor of 6 (29 Gyr from now in LCDM; 78 Gyr from now in OCDM) the comoving position of the Local Group is frozen. Well before that epoch the two most massive members of the Local Group, the Milky Way and Andromeda, will merge. However, as the expansion rates of the scale factor in the two models are different, the Local Group will be receding in physical coordinates from Virgo exponentially in a LCDM model and at a roughly constant velocity in an OCDM model. More generally, in comoving coordinates the future large scale structure will look like a sharpened image of the present structure: the skeleton of the cosmic web will remain the same, but clusters will be more `isolated' and the filaments will become thinner. This implies that the long-term fate of large scale structure as seen in comoving coordinates is determined primarily by the matter density. We conclude that although the LCDM model is accelerating at present due to its Dark Energy component while the OCDM model is non accelerating, their large scale structure in the future will look very similar in comoving coordinates.

Yehuda Hoffman; Ofer Lahav; Gustavo Yepes; Yaniv Dover

2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

346

ROTATION CURVES OF 967 SPIRAL GALAXIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR DARK MATTER.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the rotation curves of 967 spiral galaxies, obtained by deprojecting and folding the raw data published by Mathewson et al. (1992). Of these, 80 meet objective excellence criteria and are suitable for individual detailed mass modelling, while 820 are suitable for statistical studies. A preliminary analysis of theire properties confirms that rotation curves are a universal function of luminosity and that the dark matter fraction in spirals increase with decreasing luminosity. Quantitative considerations on the virial radius of dark halos allow us to make hypotheses about their structure and nature. The deprojected folded curves, the smoothed curves, and various related quantities are available via anonymous ftp at ftp://galileo.sissa.it/users/ftp/pub/psrot

Massimo Persic; Paolo Salucci; Fulvio Stel

1995-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

347

Diurnal modulation due to self-interacting mirror and hidden sector dark matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mirror and more generic hidden sector dark matter models can simultaneously explain the DAMA, CoGeNT and CRESST-II dark matter signals consistently with the null results of the other experiments. This type of dark matter can be captured by the Earth and shield detectors because it is self-interacting. This effect will lead to a diurnal modulation in dark matter detectors. We estimate the size of this effect for dark matter detectors in various locations. For a detector located in the northern hemisphere, this effect is expected to peak in April and can be detected for optimistic parameter choices. The diurnal variation is expected to be much larger for detectors located in the southern hemisphere. In particular, if the CoGeNT detector were moved to e.g. Sierra Grande, Argentina then a 5? dark matter discovery would be possible in around 30 days of operation.

Foot, R., E-mail: rfoot@unimelb.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale, School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Parity Dependence in Strong Lens Systems as a Probe of Dark Matter Substructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The amount of mass in small, dark matter clumps within galaxies (substructure) is an important test of cold dark matter. One approach to measuring the substructure mass fraction is to analyze the fluxes of images that have been strongly lensed by a galaxy. Flux ratios between images that are anomalous with respect to smooth (no substructure) models have previously suggested that there is a greater amount of substructure than found in dark matter simulations. One measure of anomalous flux ratios is parity dependence -- that the fluxes of different images of a source are perturbed differently. In this paper, we discuss parity dependence as a probe of dark matter substructure. We find that reproducing the observed parity dependence requires a significant alignment between concentrated dark matter clumps and images. The results may imply a larger fraction of mass in substructures than suggested by some dark matter simulations and that the observed parity dependence is unlikely to be reproduced by luminous satellites of lens galaxies.

Jacqueline Chen

2008-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

349

Self-interacting dark matter from an SU(3)_L \\otimes U(1)_N electroweak model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently has been showed that models which consider self-interacting particles as dark matter candidates can be able to account all the discrepancies between N-body simulations and astronomical observations of the galactic structure. In the present work we show that the 3-3-1-electroweak model can provide a realistic candidate to this kind of dark matter. This dark matter particle is not arbitrarily imposed and no new symmetry is need for to stabilize it.

Douglas Fregolente; Mauro D. Tonasse

2002-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

350

Neutral and Millicharged Dark Matter Decay into Gamma-Ray Lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A gamma-ray line observation would be a strong hint towards the detection of dark matter. The possibility that a decay of the dark matter particle is responsible for the emission of a line is investigated, for both a neutral and a millicharged dark matter. We focus here on a comparison of these two scenarios, based on an effective field theory description and relying on cosmic ray continuum constraints.

Tiziana Scarna

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Gamma-Ray Bursts and Dark Matter - a joint origin?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A scenario is presented where large quark-gluon plasma (QGP) objects escaping the quark-hadron transition in the early Universe account for the baryonic dark matter as well as act as the sources for gamma-ray bursts. Two basic assumptions are made. Firstly, we assume that a QGP consisting of u,d and s quarks is the absolute ground state of QCD and secondly, that the quark-hadron transition in the early Universe was of first order. Both particle physics and astrophysics constraints are discussed, mainly from an observational point of view.

Daniel Enstrom

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

352

Discovering dark matter through flavor violation at the LHC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show that the discovery channel for dark matter (DM) production at colliders can be through flavor violating interactions resulting in a novel signature of a single top and large missing transverse energy. We discuss several examples where the production of DM is dominated by flavor violating couplings: minimal flavor violating models with a large bottom Yukawa, models with horizontal symmetries, and DM in nontrivial flavor group representations. Discovery at the 7TeV LHC with a few fb-1 may already be possible.

Jernej F. Kamenik and Jure Zupan

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

353

Tight bonds between sterile neutrinos and dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Despite the astonishing success of standard $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology, there is mounting evidence for a tension with observations at small and intermediate scales. We introduce a simple model where both cold dark matter (DM) and sterile neutrinos are charged under a new $U(1)_X$ gauge interaction. The resulting DM self-interactions resolve the tension with the observed abundances and internal density structures of dwarf galaxies. At the ame time, the sterile neutrinos can account for both the small hot DM component favored by cosmological observations and the neutrino anomalies found in short-baseline experiments.

Torsten Bringmann; Jasper Hasenkamp; Joern Kersten

2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

354

On the sbottom resonance in dark matter scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A resonance in the neutralino-nucleus elastic scattering cross section is usually purported when the neutralino-sbottom mass difference m{sub b-tilde}?m{sub ?} is equal to the bottom quark mass m{sub b} ? 4 GeV. Such a scenario has been discussed as a viable model for light ( ? 10 GeV) neutralino dark matter as explanation of possible DAMA and CoGeNT direct detection signals. Here we give physical and analytical arguments showing that the sbottom resonance may actually not be there. In particular, we show analytically that the one-loop gluon-neutralino scattering amplitude has no pole at m{sub b-tilde} = m{sub ?}+m{sub b}, while by analytic continuation to the regime m{sub b-tilde} < m{sub ?}, it develops a pole at m{sub b-tilde} = m{sub ?}?m{sub b}. In the limit of vanishing gluon momenta, this pole corresponds to the only cut of the neutralino self-energy diagram with a quark and a squark running in the loop, when the decay process ?? Q-tilde +Q becomes kinematically allowed. The pole can be interpreted as the formation of a b-tilde b-bar qqq or b-tilde *bqqq resonant state (where qqq are the nucleon valence quarks), which is however kinematically not accessible if the neutralino is the LSP. Our analysis shows that the common practice of estimating the neutralino-nucleon cross section by introducing an ad-hoc pole at m{sub b-tilde} = m{sub ?}+m{sub b} into the effective four-fermion interaction (also including higher-twist effects) should be discouraged, since it corresponds to adding a spurious pole to the scattering process at the center-of-mass energy (s){sup 1/2} ? m{sub ?} ? m{sub b-tilde}?m{sub b}. Our considerations can be extended from the specific case of supersymmetry to other similar cases in which the dark matter particle scatters off nucleons through the exchange of a b-flavored state almost degenerate in mass with the dark matter particle, such as for instance in theories with extra dimensions and in other mass-degenerate dark matter scenarios recently discussed in the literature.

Gondolo, Paolo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0830 (United States); Scopel, Stefano, E-mail: paolo.gondolo@utah.edu, E-mail: scopel@sogang.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Is a Simple Collisionless Relic Dark Matter Particle Ruled Out?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The central densities of dark matter (DM) halos are much lower than predicted in cold DM models of structure formation. Confirmation that they have cores with a finite central density would allow us to rule out many popular types of collisionless particle as candidates for DM. Any model that leads to cusped halos (such as cold DM) is already facing serious difficulties on small scales and hot DM models have been excluded. Here I show that fermionic warm DM is inconsistent with the wide range of phase space densities in the DM halos of well-observed nearby galaxies.

J. A. Sellwood

2000-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

356

$\\gamma$-Ray Bursts and Dark Matter a joint origin?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A scenario is presented where large quark-gluon plasma (QGP) objects escaping the quark-hadron transition in the early Universe account for the baryonic dark matter as well as act as the sources for gamma-ray bursts. Two basic assumptions are made. Firstly, we assume that a QGP consisting of u,d and s quarks is the absolute ground state of QCD and secondly, that the quark-hadron transition in the early Universe was of first order. Both particle physics and astrophysics constraints are discussed, mainly from an observational point of view.

Enstrm, D; Hansson, J; Nicolaidis, A; Ekelin, S

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Strong Upper Limits on Sterile Neutrino Warm Dark Matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sterile neutrinos are attractive dark matter candidates. Their parameter space of mass and mixing angle has not yet been fully tested despite intensive efforts that exploit their gravitational clustering properties and radiative decays. We use the limits on gamma-ray line emission from the Galactic center region obtained with the SPI spectrometer on the INTEGRAL satellite to set new constraints, which improve on the earlier bounds on mixing by more than 2 orders of magnitude, and thus strongly restrict a wide and interesting range of models.

Yueksel, Hasan [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Beacom, John F. [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Watson, Casey R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Millikin University, Decatur, Illinois 62522 (United States)

2008-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

358

Tau Portal Dark Matter models at the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by the Galactic Center gamma-ray excess in the Fermi-LAT data, we study the signatures of a class of tau portal dark matter (DM) models where DM particles preferentially couple to tau leptons at the LHC. We consider the constraints from the DM direct detection and investigate the sensitivity of the LHC to di-tau plus missing energy signatures. We find that the LHC with a high luminosity of 3000 fb$^{-1}$ can test the tau portal DM models with fermionic mediators in the mass range of $120\\sim450$ GeV.

Zhao-Huan Yu; Xiao-Jun Bi; Qi-Shu Yan; Peng-Fei Yin

2014-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

359

Constraints on the dark matter particle mass from the number of Milky Way satellites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have conducted N-body simulations of the growth of Milky Way-sized halos in cold and warm dark matter cosmologies. The number of dark matter satellites in our simulated Milky Ways decreases with decreasing mass of the dark matter particle. Assuming that the number of dark matter satellites exceeds or equals the number of observed satellites of the Milky Way, we derive lower limits on the dark matter particle mass. We find with 95% confidence m{sub s}>13.3 keV for a sterile neutrino produced by the Dodelson and Widrow mechanism, m{sub s}>8.9 keV for the Shi and Fuller mechanism, m{sub s}>3.0 keV for the Higgs decay mechanism, and m{sub WDM}>2.3 keV for a thermal dark matter particle. The recent discovery of many new dark matter dominated satellites of the Milky Way in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey allows us to set lower limits comparable to constraints from the complementary methods of Lyman-{alpha} forest modeling and x-ray observations of the unresolved cosmic x-ray background and of dark matter halos from dwarf galaxy to cluster scales. Future surveys like LSST, DES, PanSTARRS, and SkyMapper have the potential to discover many more satellites and further improve constraints on the dark matter particle mass.

Polisensky, Emil [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20745 (United States); Ricotti, Massimo [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20745 (United States)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

360

A Direct Empirical Proof of the Existence of Dark Matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present new weak lensing observations of 1E0657-558 (z = 0.296), a unique cluster merger, that enable a direct detection of dark matter, independent of assumptions regarding the nature of the gravitational force law. Due to the collision of two clusters, the dissipationless stellar component and the fluid-like X-ray emitting plasma are spatially segregated. By using both wide-field ground based images and HST/ACS images of the cluster cores, we create gravitational lensing maps which show that the gravitational potential does not trace the plasma distribution, the dominant baryonic mass component, but rather approximately traces the distribution of galaxies. An 8{sigma} significance spatial offset of the center of the total mass from the center of the baryonic mass peaks cannot be explained with an alteration of the gravitational force law, and thus proves that the majority of the matter in the system is unseen.

Clowe, Douglas; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.; Bradac, Marusa; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; /Florida U.; Markevitch, Maxim; /Harvard-Smithsonian; Randall, Scott W.; Jones, Christine; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Zaritsky, Dennis; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.

2006-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

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361

New Constraint on Open Cold-Dark-Matter Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the large-angle cross-correlation between the cosmic-microwave-background (CMB) temperature and the x-ray-background (XRB) intensity expected in an open Universe with cold dark matter (CDM) and a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of adiabatic density perturbations. Results are presented as a function of the nonrelativistic-matter density $\\Omega_0$ (in units of the critical density) and the x-ray bias $b_x$ (evaluated at a redshift $z\\simeq1$ in evolving-bias models) for both an open Universe and a flat cosmological-constant Universe. Recent experimental upper limits to the amplitude of this cross-correlation provide a new constraint to the $\\Omega_0$-$b_x$ parameter space that open-CDM models (and the open-inflation models that produce them) must satisfy.

Ali Kinkhabwala; Marc Kamionkowski

1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

362

Two dark matter components in dark matter extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model and the high energy positron spectrum in PAMELA/HEAT data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a dark matter extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model to give the recent trend of the high energy positron spectrum of the PAMELA/HEAT experiments. If the trend is caused indeed by dark matter, the minimal supersymmetric standard model needs to be extended. Here, we minimally extend the minimal supersymmetric standard model with one more dark matter component N together with a heavy lepton E and introduce the coupling e{sub R}E{sub R}{sup c}N{sub R}. This coupling naturally appears in the flipped SU(5) grand unification models. We also present the needed parameter ranges of these additional particles.

Huh, Ji-Haeng; Kim, Jihn E.; Kyae, Bumseok [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Theoretical Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

Helioseismology with long range dark matter-baryon interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assuming the existence of a primordial asymmetry in the dark sector, we study how DM-baryon long-range interactions, induced by the kinetic mixing of a new $U(1)$ gauge boson and the photon, affects the evolution of the Sun and in turn the sound speed profile obtained from helioseismology. Thanks to the explicit dependence on the exchanged momenta in the differential cross section (Rutherford-like scattering), we find that dark matter particles with a mass of $\\sim 10\\;{\\rm GeV}$, kinetic mixing parameter of the order of $10^{-9}$ and a mediator with a mass smaller than a few MeV improve the agreement between the best solar model and the helioseismic data without being excluded by direct detection experiments. In particular, the \\LUX\\ detector will soon be able to either constrain or confirm our best fit solar model in the presence of a dark sector with long-range interactions that reconcile helioseismology with thermal neutrino results.

Ildio Lopes; Paolo Panci; Joseph Silk

2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

364

Search for the dark photon and the dark Higgs boson at Belle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dark photon, $A^\\prime$, and the dark Higgs boson, $h^\\prime$, are hypothetical constituents featured in a number of recently proposed Dark Sector Models. Assuming prompt decays of both dark particles, we search for their production in the so-called Higgs-strahlung channel, $e^+e^- \\rightarrow A^\\prime h'$, with $h^\\prime \\rightarrow A^\\prime A^\\prime$. We investigate ten exclusive final-states with $A^\\prime \\rightarrow e^+e^-$, $\\mu^+\\mu^-$, or $\\pi^+\\pi^-$, in the mass ranges $0.1$~GeV/$c^2$~$section, $\\cal B \\times \\sigma_{\\mathrm{Born}}$, on the Born cross section, $\\sigma_{\\mathrm{Born}}$, and on the dark photon coupling to the dark Higgs boson times the kinetic mixing between the Standard Model photon and the dark photon, $\\alpha_D \\times \\epsilon^2$. These limits improve upon and cover wider mass ranges than previous experiments. The limits from the final-states $3(\\pi^+\\pi^-)$ and $2(e^+e^-)X$ are the first placed by any experiment. For $\\alpha_D$ equal to 1/137, $m_{h'}<$ 8 GeV/$c^2$, and $m_{A^\\prime}<$ 1 GeV/$c^2$, we exclude values of the mixing parameter, $\\epsilon$, above $\\sim 8 \\times 10^{-4}$.

The Belle Collaboration

2015-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

365

Assessing the discovery potential of directional detection of dark matter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is a worldwide effort toward the development of a large time projection chamber devoted to directional dark matter detection. All current projects are being designed to fulfill a unique goal: identifying weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) as such by taking advantage of the expected direction dependence of WIMP-induced events toward the constellation Cygnus. However, such proof of discovery requires a careful statistical data treatment. In this paper, the discovery potential of forthcoming directional detectors is addressed by using a frequentist approach based on the profile likelihood ratio test statistic. This allows us to estimate the expected significance of a dark matter detection taking into account astrophysical and experimental uncertainties. We show that the energy threshold and the background contamination are key experimental issues for directional detection, while angular resolution and sense recognition efficiency only mildly affect the sensitivity and the energy resolution is unimportant. This way, we found that a 30kg.year CF4 directional experiment could reach a 3? sensitivity at 90%C.L. down to 10-5??pb and 3.10-4??pb for the WIMP-proton axial cross section in the most optimistic and pessimistic detector performance case, respectively.

J. Billard; F. Mayet; D. Santos

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

366

Gravitation, the 'Dark Matter' Effect and the Fine Structure Constant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravitational anomalies such as the mine/borehole g anomaly, the near-flatness of the spiral galaxy rotation-velocity curves, currently interpreted as a `dark matter' effect, the absence of that effect in ordinary elliptical galaxies, and the ongoing problems in accurately determining Newton's gravitational constant G_N are explained by a generalisation of the Newtonian theory of gravity to a fluid-flow formalism with one new dimensionless constant. By analysing the borehole data this constant is shown to be the fine structure constant alpha=1/137. The spiral galaxy `dark matter' effect and the globular cluster `black hole' masses are then correctly predicted. This formalism also explains the cause of the long-standing uncertainties in G_N and leads to the introduction of a fundamental gravitational constant G not = G_N with value G=(6.6526 +/- 0.013)x 10^-11 m^3s^{-2}kg^{-1}. The occurrence of alpha implies that space has a quantum structure, and we have the first evidence of quantum gravity effects.

Reginald T. Cahill

2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

367

Can dark matter be a Bose-Einstein condensate?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the possibility that the dark matter, which is required to explain the dynamics of the neutral hydrogen clouds at large distances from the galactic center, could be in the form of a Bose-Einstein condensate. To study the condensate we use the non-relativistic Gross-Pitaevskii equation. By introducing the Madelung representation of the wave function, we formulate the dynamics of the system in terms of the continuity equation and of the hydrodynamic Euler equations. Hence dark matter can be described as a non-relativistic, Newtonian Bose-Einstein gravitational condensate gas, whose density and pressure are related by a barotropic equation of state. In the case of a condensate with quartic non-linearity, the equation of state is polytropic with index $n=1$. To test the validity of the model we fit the Newtonian tangential velocity equation of the model with a sample of rotation curves of low surface brightness and dwarf galaxies, respectively. We find a very good agreement between the theoretical rot...

Boehmer, C G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Decaying Dark Matter and the Deficit of Dwarf Haloes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The hierarchical clustering inherent in Lambda-CDM cosmology seems to produce many of the observed characteristics of large-scale structure. But some glaring problems still remain, including the over-prediction (by a factor 10) of the number of dwarf galaxies within the virialized population of the local group. Several secondary effects have already been proposed to resolve this problem. It is still not clear, however, whether the principal solution rests with astrophysical processes, such as early feedback from supernovae, or possibly with as yet undetermined properties of the dark matter itself. In this paper, we carry out a detailed calculation of the dwarf halo evolution incorporating the effects of a hypothesized dark-matter decay, D -> D'+l, where D is the unstable particle, D' is the more massive daughter particle and l is the other, lighter (or possibly massless) daughter particle. This process preferentially heats the smaller haloes, expanding them during their evolution and reducing their present-day circular velocity. We find that this mechanism can account very well for the factor 4 deficit in the observed number of systems with velocity 10--20 km/s compared to those predicted by the numerical simulations, if dm/m_D' ~ 5-7 x 10^{-5}, where dm is the mass difference between the initial and final states. The corresponding lifetime tau cannot be longer than ~30 Gyr, but may be as short as just a few Gyr.

Majd Abdelqader; Fulvio Melia

2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

369

Mixed sneutrinos, dark matter, and the CERN LHC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the phenomenology of supersymmetric models in which gauge-singlet scalars mix with the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) sneutrinos through weak-scale A terms. After reviewing the constraints on mixed-sneutrino dark matter from measurements of ?CDM and from direct-detection experiments, we explore mixed-sneutrino signatures relevant to the LHC. For a mixed-sneutrino lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) and a right-handed slepton next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle (NLSP), decays of the lightest neturalino can produce opposite-sign, same-flavor (OSSF) dileptons with an invariant-mass distribution shifted away from the kinematic end point. This signature is possible for parameters that lead to a cosmologically viable mixed-sneutrino LSP. We also consider signatures that require larger mixing angles than preferred for mixed-sneutrino dark matter, but which are possible regardless of whether a mixed-sneutrino is the LSP. In some parameter regions, the charginos and neutralinos produced in cascades all decay dominantly to the lighter sneutrinos, leading to a kinematic edge in the jet-lepton invariant-mass distribution from the decay chain q??-q??*lq, without an OSSF dilepton signature. We explore the possibility of using mass-estimation methods to distinguish this mixed-sneutrino jet-lepton signature from an MSSM one. Finally, we consider signatures associated with Higgs-lepton or Z-lepton production in cascades involving the heavier sneutrinos.

Zachary Thomas; David Tucker-Smith; Neal Weiner

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

370

Axion cold dark matter: status after Planck and BICEP2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the axion dark matter scenario (ADM), in which axions account for all of the dark matter in the Universe, in light of the most recent cosmological data. In particular, we use the Planck temperature data, complemented by WMAP E-polarization measurements, as well as the recent BICEP2 observations of B-modes. Baryon Acoustic Oscillation data, including those from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, are also considered in the numerical analyses. We find that, in the minimal ADM scenario, the full dataset implies that the axion mass m_a = 82.2 pm 1.1 {\\mu}eV (corresponding to the Peccei-Quinn symmetry being broken at a scale f_a = (7.54 pm 0.10)*10^10 GeV), or m_a = 76.6 pm 2.6 {\\mu}eV (f_a = (8.08 pm 0.27)*10^10 GeV) when we allow for a non- standard effective number of relativistic species Neff . We also find a 2{\\sigma} preference for Neff > 3.046. The limit on the sum of neutrino masses is Sum m_{\

E. Di Valentino; E. Giusarma; M. Lattanzi; A. Melchiorri; O. Mena

2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

371

Thermal detector model for cryogenic composite detectors for the dark matter experiments CRESST and EURECA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CRESST (Cryogenic Rare Event Search with Superconducting Thermometers) and the EURECA (European Underground Rare Event Calorimeter Array) experiments are direct dark matter search experiments where cryogenic detectors are used to detect spin-independent, coherent WIMP (Weakly Interacting Massive Particle)-nucleon scattering events by means of the recoil energy. The cryogenic detectors use a massive single crystal as absorber which is equipped with a TES (transition edge sensor) for signal read-out. They are operated at mK-temperatures. In order to enable a mass production of these detectors, as needed for the EURECA experiment, a so-called composite detector design (CDD) that allows decoupling of the TES fabrication from the optimization procedure of the absorber single-crystal was developed and studied. To further investigate, understand and optimize the performance of composite detectors a detailed thermal detector model which takes into account the CDD has been developed.

S. Roth; C. Ciemniak; C. Coppi; F. v. Feilitzsch; A. Guetlein; C. Isaila; J. -C. Lanfranchi; S. Pfister; W. Potzel; W. Westphal

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

372

First results from a 20-liter prototype dark matter detector with directional sensitivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Astronomical and cosmological evidence suggests that 27% of the energy content of the universe is in the form of non-baryonic matter referred to as "dark matter." Weakly interacting massive particles have long been considered ...

Lopez, Jeremy Paul

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Imprints of nonthermal Wino dark matter on small-scale structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study how warm the Wino dark matter is when it is nonthermally produced by the decays of the gravitino in the early Universe. We clarify the energy distribution of the Wino at the decay of the gravitino and the energy loss process after their production. By solving the Boltzmann equation, we show that a sizable fraction of the Wino dark matter can be warm for the Wino mass mw?100500??GeV. The warmness of the Wino dark matter leaves imprints on the matter power spectra and may provide further insights on the origin of dark matter via the future 21cm line survey. Our calculations can be applied to other nonthermal Wino production scenarios such as the Wino dark matter produced by the decay of the moduli fields.

Masahiro Ibe; Ayuki Kamada; Shigeki Matsumoto

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

374

The Dark Matter halo of the Milky Way, AD 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We derive the mass model of the Milky Way (MW), crucial for Dark Matter (DM) direct and indirect detection, using recent data and a cored dark matter (DM) halo profile, which is favoured by studies of external galaxies. The method used consists in fitting a spherically symmetric model of the Galaxy with a Burkert DM halo profile to available data: MW terminal velocities in the region inside the solar circle, circular velocity as recently estimated from maser star forming regions at intermediate radii, and velocity dispersions of stellar halo tracers for the outermost Galactic region. The latter are reproduced by integrating the Jeans equation for every modeled mass distribution, and by allowing for different velocity anisotropies for different tracer populations. For comparison we also consider a Navarro-Frenk-White profile. We find that the cored profile is the preferred one, with a shallow central density of ?{sub H} ? 4 10{sup 7}M{sub ?}/kpc{sup 3} and a large core radius R{sub H} ? 10 kpc, as observed in external spirals and in agreement with the mass model underlying the Universal Rotation Curve of spirals. We describe also the derived model uncertainties, which are crucially driven by the poorly constrained velocity dispersion anisotropies of halo tracers. The emerging cored DM distribution has implications for the DM annihilation angular profile, which is much less boosted in the Galactic center direction with respect to the case of the standard ?CDM, NFW profile. Using the derived uncertainties we discuss finally the limitations and prospects to discriminate between cored and cusped DM profile with a possible observed diffuse DM annihilation signal. The present mass model aims to characterize the present-day description of the distribution of matter in our Galaxy, which is needed to frame current crucial issues of Cosmology, Astrophysics and Elementary Particles.

Nesti, Fabrizio [Gran Sasso Science Institute, viale Crispi 7, I-67100 L'Aquila (Italy); Salucci, Paolo, E-mail: nesti@aquila.infn.it, E-mail: salucci@sissa.it [Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati (SISSA/ISAS), Via Bonomea 265, I-34136 Trieste (Italy)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

E-Print Network 3.0 - asymmetric nuclear matter Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nuclear matter Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: asymmetric nuclear matter Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Los Alamos National Laboratory...

376

E-Print Network 3.0 - attenuate white matter Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

white matter Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: attenuate white matter Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Parametric Transverse Relaxation...

377

PROSPECTS FOR A DARK MATTER ANNIHILATION SIGNAL TOWARD THE SAGITTARIUS DWARF GALAXY WITH GROUND-BASED CHERENKOV TELESCOPES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dwarf galaxies are widely believed to be among the best targets for indirect dark matter searches using high-energy gamma rays and indeed gamma-ray emission from these objects has long been a subject of detailed study for ground-based atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. Here, we update current exclusion limits obtained on the closest dwarf, the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy, in light of recent realistic dark matter halo models. The constraints on the velocity-weighted annihilation cross-section of the dark matter particle are of a few 10{sup -23} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} in the TeV energy range for a 50 hr exposure. The limits are extrapolated to the sensitivities of future Cherenkov Telescope Arrays. For 200 hr of observation time, the sensitivity at the 95% confidence level reaches 10{sup -25} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}. Possible astrophysical backgrounds from gamma-ray sources dissembled in the Sagittarius dwarf are studied. It is shown that with long enough observation times, gamma-ray background from millisecond pulsars in a globular cluster contained within the Sagittarius dwarf may limit the sensitivity to dark matter annihilations.

Viana, A.; Medina, M. C.; Brun, P.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Kosack, K.; Moulin, E.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Peyaud, B. [IRFU/DSM, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, Cedex (France); Penarrubia, J. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

378

Prospects for detecting dark matter with neutrino telescopes in light of recent results from direct detection experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Direct detection dark matter experiments, lead by the CDMS collaboration, have placed increasingly stronger constraints on the cross sections for elastic scattering of WIMPs on nucleons. These results impact the prospects for the indirect detection of dark matter using neutrino telescopes. With this in mind, we revisit the prospects for detecting neutrinos produced by the annihilation of WIMPs in the Sun. We find that the latest bounds do not seriously limit the models most accessible to next generation kilometer-scale neutrino telescopes such as IceCube. This is largely due to the fact that models with significant spin-dependent couplings to protons are the least constrained and, at the same time, the most promising because of the efficient capture of WIMPs in the Sun. We identify models where dark matter particles are beyond the reach of any planned direct detection experiments while within reach of neutrino telescopes. In summary, we find that, even when contemplating recent direct detection results, neutrino telescopes still have the opportunity to play an important as well as complementary role in the search for particle dark matter.

Halzen, Francis; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

EMPIRICAL MODELS FOR DARK MATTER HALOS. II. INNER PROFILE SLOPES, DYNAMICAL PROFILES, AND /3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulated dark matter halos better than a Navarro- Frenk-WhiteYlike model with an equal number of parameters]) density profiles of simulated dark matter halos (Navarro et al. 2004). Intriguingly, this function was shown to provide a better fit than thethree-parameter Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW)Ylike model

Terzi, Bal?a

380

Halo-Independent analysis of direct dark matter detection data for any WIMP interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The halo independent comparison of direct dark matter detection data eliminates the need to make any assumption on the uncertain local dark matter distribution and is complementary to the usual data comparison which required assuming a dark halo model for our galaxy. The method, initially proposed for WIMPs with spin-independent contact interactions, has been generalized to any other interaction and applied to recent data on "Light WIMPs".

Graciela B. Gelmini

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Accretions of Dark Matter and Dark Energy onto ($n+2$)-dimensional Schwarzschild Black Hole and Morris-Thorne Wormhole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied accretion of the dark matter and dark energy onto of $(n+2)$-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole and Morris-Thorne wormhole. The mass and the rate of change of mass for $(n+2)$-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole and Morris-Thorne wormhole have been found. We have assumed some candidates of dark energy like holographic dark energy, new agegraphic dark energy, quintessence, tachyon, DBI-essence, etc. The black hole mass and the wormhole mass have been calculated in term of redshift when dark matter and above types of dark energies accrete onto them separately. We have shown that the black hole mass increases and wormhole mass decreases for holographic dark energy, new agegraphic dark energy, quintessence, tachyon accretion and the slope of increasing/decreasing of mass sensitively depends on the dimension. But for DBI-essence accretion, the black hole mass first increases and then decreases and the wormhole mass first decreases and then increases and the slope of increasing/decreasing of mass not sensitively depends on the dimension.

Ujjal Debnath

2015-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

382

Energy from the Center of the Milky Way May Be the Remnant of Dark Matter |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Energy from Energy from the Center of the Milky Way May Be the Remnant of Dark Matter News Featured Articles 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 11.17.10 Energy from the Center of the Milky Way May Be the Remnant of Dark Matter Dark matter particles continue to hide, but they release energy when they collide: evidence shows that gamma rays from the center of our galaxy may come from dark matter collisions. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page From the center of the Milky Way, dark matter particles may be sending signals of their existence. Astrophysicists analyzing data from the center

383

Affleck-Dine Baryogenesis and Dark Matter Production after High-scale Inflation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The discovery of the primordial B-mode polarisation by the BICEP2 experiment indicates inflation with a relatively high energy scale. Taking this indication into account, we propose consistent scenarios to account for the observed baryon and dark matter densities in gravity and gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking models. The baryon asymmetry is explained by the Afflck-Dine mechanism, which requires relatively low reheating temperature to avoid a sizable baryonic isocurvature perturbation. The low reheating temperature then requires non-thermal production of dark matter to account for the correct relic density of dark matter. Our scenarios can account for the observations of baryon and dark matter density in gravity and gauge mediation and predict some parameters, including the mass of dark matter.

Harigaya, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Mukaida, Kyohei; Yamada, Masaki

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Affleck-Dine baryogenesis and dark matter production after high-scale inflation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The discovery of the primordial B-mode polarization by the BICEP2 experiment indicates inflation with a relatively high energy scale. Taking this indication into account, we propose consistent scenarios to account for the observed baryon and dark matter densities in gravity- and gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking models. The baryon asymmetry is explained by the Afflck-Dine mechanism, which requires relatively low reheating temperature to avoid a sizable baryonic isocurvature perturbation. The low reheating temperature then requires nonthermal production of dark matter to account for the correct relic density of dark matter. Our scenarios can account for the observations of baryon and dark matter density in gravity and gauge mediation and predict some parameters, including the mass of dark matter.

Keisuke Harigaya; Ayuki Kamada; Masahiro Kawasaki; Kyohei Mukaida; Masaki Yamada

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

385

Cosmology with self-interacting sterile neutrinos and dark matter - A pseudoscalar model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short baseline neutrino oscillation experiments have shown hints of the existence of additional sterile neutrinos in the eV mass range. Such sterile neutrinos are incompatible with cosmology because they suppress structure formation unless they can be prevented from thermalising in the early Universe. Here we present a novel scenario in which both sterile neutrinos and dark matter are coupled to a new, light pseudoscalar. This can prevent thermalisation of sterile neutrinos and make dark matter sufficiently self-interacting to have an impact on galactic dynamics and possibly resolve some of the known problems with the standard cold dark matter scenario. Our model singles out a dimensionless coupling strength for both sterile neutrinos and dark matter in the range $g_s \\sim g_d \\sim 10^{-5}$ and predicts a dark matter particle mass in the MeV range.

Maria Archidiacono; Steen Hannestad; Rasmus Sloth Hansen; Thomas Tram

2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

386

Non-perturbative Effect on Thermal Relic Abundance of Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We point out that thermal relic abundance of the dark matter is strongly altered by a non-perturbative effect called the Sommerfeld enhancement, when constituent particles of the dark matter are non-singlet under the SU(2)_L gauge interaction and much heavier than the weak gauge bosons. Typical candidates for such dark matter particles are the heavy wino- and higgsino-like neutralinos. We investigate the non-perturbative effect on the relic abundance of dark matter for the wino-like neutralino as an example. We show that its thermal abundance is reduced by 50% compared to the perturbative result. The wino-like neutralino mass consistent with the observed dark matter abundance turns out to be 2.7 TeV < m < 3.0 TeV.

Junji Hisano; Shigeki Matsumoto; Minoru Nagai; Osamu Saito; Masato Senami

2006-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

387

Indirect Dark Matter Detection Limits from the Ultra-Faint Milky Way Satellite Segue 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use new kinematic data from the ultra-faint Milky Way satellite Segue 1 to model its dark matter distribution and derive upper limits on the dark matter annihilation cross-section. Using gamma-ray ux upper limits from the Fermi satellite and MAGIC, we determine cross-section exclusion regions for dark matter annihilation into a variety of different particles including charged leptons. We show that these exclusion regions are beginning to probe the regions of interest for a dark matter interpretation of the electron and positron uxes from PAMELA, Fermi, and HESS, and that future observations of Segue 1 have strong prospects for testing such an interpretation. We additionally discuss prospects for detecting annihilation with neutrinos using the IceCube detector, finding that in an optimistic scenario a few neutrino events may be detected. Finally we use the kinematic data to model the Segue 1 dark matter velocity dispersion and constrain Sommerfeld enhanced models.

Essig, Rouven; /SLAC; Sehgal, Neelima; Strigari, Louis E.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Geha, Marla; /Yale U.; Simon, Joshua D.; /Carnegie Inst. Observ.

2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

388

On the Oscillation of Neutrinos Produced by the Annihilation of Dark Matter inside the Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The annihilation of dark matter particles captured by the Sun can lead to a neutrino flux observable in neutrino detectors. Considering the fact that these dark matter particles are non-relativistic, if a pair of dark matter annihilates to a neutrino pair, the spectrum of neutrinos will be monochromatic. We show that in this case, even after averaging over production point inside the Sun, the oscillatory terms of the oscillation probability do not average to zero. This leads to interesting observable features in the annual variation of the number of muon track events. We show that smearing of the spectrum due to thermal distribution of dark matter inside the Sun is too small to wash out this variation. We point out the possibility of studying the initial flavor composition of neutrinos produced by the annihilation of dark matter particles via measuring the annual variation of the number of muon-track events in neutrino telescopes.

Arman Esmaili; Yasaman Farzan

2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

389

On the minimum dark matter mass testable by neutrinos from the Sun  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss a limitation on extracting bounds on the scattering cross section of dark matter with nucleons, using neutrinos from the Sun. If the dark matter particle is sufficiently light (less than about 4 GeV), the effect of evaporation is not negligible and the capture process goes in equilibrium with the evaporation. In this regime, the flux of solar neutrinos of dark matter origin becomes independent of the scattering cross section and therefore no constraint can be placed on it. We find the minimum values of dark matter masses for which the scattering cross section on nucleons can be probed using neutrinos from the Sun. We also provide simple and accurate fitting functions for all the relevant processes of GeV-scale dark matter in the Sun.

Busoni, Giorgio; Simone, Andrea De; Huang, Wei-Chih, E-mail: giorgio.busoni@sissa.it, E-mail: andrea.desimone@sissa.it, E-mail: wei-chih.huang@sissa.it [SISSA and INFN, Sezione di Trieste, via Bonomea 265, I-34136 Trieste (Italy)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Spin alignment of dark matter haloes in filaments and walls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MMF technique is used to segment the cosmic web as seen in a cosmological N-body simulation into wall-like and filament-like structures. We find that the spins and shapes of dark matter haloes are significantly correlated with each other and with the orientation of their host structures. The shape orientation is such that the halo minor axes tend to lie perpendicular to the host structure, be it a wall or filament. The orientation of the halo spin vector is mass dependent. Low mass haloes in walls and filaments have a tendency to have their spins oriented within the parent structure, while higher mass haloes in filaments have spins that tend to lie perpendicular to the parent structure.

Miguel A. Aragn-Calvo; Rien van de Weygaert; Bernard J. T. Jones; J. M. Thijs van der Hulst

2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

391

Light Dark Matter in the light of CRESST-II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently the CRESST collaboration has published the long anticipated results of their direct Dark Matter (DM) detection experiment with a CaWO4 target. The number of observed events exceeds known backgrounds at more than 4? significance, and this excess could potentially be due to DM scattering. We confront this interpretation with null results from other direct detection experiments for a number of theoretical models, and find that consistency is achieved in non-minimal models such as inelastic DM and isospin-violating DM. In both cases mild tension with constraints remain. The CRESST data can, however, not be reconciled with the null results and with the positive signals from DAMA and CoGeNT simultaneously in any of the models we study.

Kopp, Joachim; Schwetz, Thomas; Zupan, Jure

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Rotation curves of rotating galactic BEC dark matter halos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the dynamics of rotating Bose Condensate galactic dark matter halos, made of an ultralight spinless boson. We restrict to the case of adding axisymmetric rigid rotation to initially spherically symmetric structures and show there are three regimes: i) small angular momentum, that basically retains the drawbacks of spherically symmetric halos related to compactness and failure at explaining galactic RCs, ii) an intermediate range of values of angular momentum that allow the existence of long-lived structures with acceptable RC profiles, and iii) high angular momentum, in which the structure is dispersed away by rotation. We also present in detail the new code used to solve the Gross-Pitaevskii Poisson system of equations in three dimensions.

F. S. Guzman; F. D. Lora-Clavijo; J. J. Gonzalez-Aviles; F. J. Rivera-Paleo

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Light Dark Matter in the light of CRESST-II  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Recently the CRESST collaboration has published the long anticipated results of their direct Dark Matter (DM) detection experiment with a CaWO4 target. The number of observed events exceeds known backgrounds at more than 4? significance, and this excess could potentially be due to DM scattering. We confront this interpretation with null results from other direct detection experiments for a number of theoretical models, and find that consistency is achieved in non-minimal models such as inelastic DM and isospin-violating DM. In both cases mild tension with constraints remain. The CRESST data can, however, not be reconciled with the null results and with the positive signals from DAMA and CoGeNT simultaneously in any of the models we study.

Kopp, Joachim; Schwetz, Thomas; Zupan, Jure

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Solar gamma rays powered by secluded dark matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Secluded dark matter models, in which weakly interacting massive particles annihilate first into metastable mediators, can present novel indirect detection signatures in the form of gamma rays and fluxes of charged particles arriving from directions correlated with the centers of large astrophysical bodies within the Solar System, such as the Sun and larger planets. This naturally occurs if the mean free path of the mediator is in excess of the solar (or planetary) radius. We show that existing constraints from water Cerenkov detectors already provide a novel probe of the parameter space of these models, complementary to other sources, with significant scope for future improvement from high angular resolution gamma-ray telescopes such as Fermi-LAT. Fluxes of charged particles produced in mediator decays are also capable of contributing a significant solar system component to the spectrum of energetic electrons and positrons, a possibility which can be tested with the directional and timing information of PAMELA and Fermi.

Batell, Brian; Shang Yanwen [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario, N2J 2W9 (Canada); Pospelov, Maxim [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario, N2J 2W9 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, V8P 1A1 (Canada); Ritz, Adam [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, V8P 1A1 (Canada)

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Relaxing Isocurvature Bounds on String Axion Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If inflation scale is high, light scalars acquire large quantum fluctuations during inflation.If sufficiently long-lived, they will give rise to CDM isocurvature perturbations, which are highly constrained by the Planck data. Focusing on string axions as such light scalars, we show that thermal inflation can provide a sufficiently large entropy production to dilute the CDM isocurvature perturbations. Importantly, efficient dilution is possible for the string axions, because effectively no secondary coherent oscillations are induced at the end of thermal inflation, in contrast to the moduli fields. We also study the viability of the axion dark matter with mass of about 7 keV as the origin of the 3.5 keV X-ray line excess, in the presence of large entropy production.

Kawasaki, Masahiro; Takahashi, Fuminobu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Search for the dark photon and the dark Higgs boson at Belle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dark photon, $A^\\prime$, and the dark Higgs boson, $h^\\prime$, are hypothetical constituents featured in a number of recently proposed Dark Sector Models. Assuming prompt decays of both dark particles, we search for their production in the so-called Higgs-strahlung channel, $e^+e^- \\rightarrow A^\\prime h'$, with $h^\\prime \\rightarrow A^\\prime A^\\prime$. We investigate ten exclusive final-states with $A^\\prime \\rightarrow e^+e^-$, $\\mu^+\\mu^-$, or $\\pi^+\\pi^-$, in the mass ranges $0.1$~GeV/$c^2$~$< m_{A^\\prime} < 3.5$~GeV/$c^2$ and $0.2$~GeV/$c^2$~$< m_{h'} < 10.5$~GeV/$c^2$. We also investigate three inclusive final-states, $2(e^+e^-)X$, $2(\\mu^+\\mu^-)X$, and $(e^+e^-)(\\mu^+\\mu^-)X$, where $X$ denotes a dark photon candidate detected via missing mass, in the mass ranges $1.1$~GeV/$c^2$~$< m_{A^\\prime} < 3.5$~GeV/$c^2$ and $2.2$~GeV/$c^2$~$< m_{h'} < 10.5$~GeV/$c^2$. Using the entire $977\\,\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ data set collected by Belle, we observe no significant signal. We obtain ind...

,

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

The dark matter self-interaction and its impact on the critical mass for dark matter evaporations inside the sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the capture, annihilation and evaporation of dark matter (DM) inside the Sun. It has been shown that the DM self-interaction can increase the DM number inside the Sun. We demonstrate that this enhancement becomes more significant in the regime of small DM mass, given a fixed DM self-interaction cross section. This leads to the enhancement of neutrino flux from DM annihilation. On the other hand, for DM mass as low as as a few GeVs, not only the DM-nuclei scatterings can cause the DM evaporation, DM self-interaction also provides non-negligible contributions to this effect. Consequently, the critical mass for DM evaporation (typically 3 ~ 4 GeV without the DM self-interaction) can be slightly increased. We discuss the prospect of detecting DM self-interaction in IceCube- PINGU using the annihilation channels $\\chi\\chi\\rightarrow\

Chian-Shu Chen; Fei-Fan Lee; Guey-Lin Lin; Yen-Hsun Lin

2014-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

398

E-Print Network 3.0 - annular detector dark-field Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: annular detector dark-field Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Electron tomography of Pt nanocatalyst particles and their carbon support Summary: -angle annular dark...

399

Measurement of the Low Energy Nuclear Response in NaI(Tl) Crystals for Use in Dark Matter Direct Detection Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The response of low energy nuclear recoil in NaI(Tl) is investigated in the following experiment. Such detectors have been used recently to search for evidence of dark matter in the form of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Na...

Stiegler, Tyana Michele

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

400

Form factors for dark matter capture by the Sun in effective theories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the effective theory of isoscalar and isovector dark matter-nucleon interactions mediated by a heavy spin-1 or spin-0 particle, 8 isotope-dependent nuclear response functions can be generated in the dark matter scattering by nuclei. We compute the 8 nuclear response functions for the 16 most abundant elements in the Sun, i.e. H, $^{3}$He, $^{4}$He, $^{12}$C, $^{14}$N, $^{16}$O, $^{20}$Ne, $^{23}$Na, $^{24}$Mg, $^{27}$Al, $^{28}$Si, $^{32}$S, $^{40}$Ar, $^{40}$Ca, $^{56}$Fe, and $^{59}$Ni, through detailed numerical shell model calculations. We use our response functions to compute the rate of dark matter capture by the Sun for all isoscalar and isovector dark matter-nucleon effective interactions, including several operators previously considered for dark matter direct detection only. We study in detail the dependence of the capture rate on specific dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, and on the different elements in the Sun. We find that a so far neglected momentum dependent dark matter coupling to...

Catena, Riccardo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dark matter search" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Constraints on enhanced dark matter annihilation from IceCube results  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Excesses on positron and electron fluxesmeasured by ATIC and the PAMELA and Fermi-LAT telescopescan be explained by dark matter annihilation in the Galaxy, however, it requires large boosts on the dark matter annihilation rate. There are many possible enhancement mechanisms such as the Sommerfeld effect or the existence of dark matter clumps in our halo. If enhancements on the dark matter annihilation cross section are taking place, the dark matter annihilation in the core of the Earth will be enhanced. Here we use recent results from the IceCube 40-string configuration to probe generic enhancement scenarios. We present results as a function of the dark matter-proton interaction cross section, ??p weighted by the branching fraction into neutrinos f?? as a function of a generic boost factor BF, which parametrizes the expected enhancement of the annihilation rate. We find that dark matter models that require annihilation enhancements of O(100) or more and that annihilate significantly into neutrinos are excluded as an explanation for these excesses. We also determine the boost range that can be probed by the full IceCube telescope.

Ivone F. M. Albuquerque; Leandro J. Beraldo e Silva; Carlos Prez de los Heros

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

402

Rotation Curve with MOND and Dark Matter Halo profile for ESO138-G014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is devoted to solve the galactic rotation problem for ESO138-G014 galaxy based on two theories: dark matter and Modified Newtonian Dynamics. Here we did the rotation curve analysis with two possible choices for the dark matter density profile, namely Burkert and Navarro, Frenk and White profiles. The analysis shows the dark matter distribution favored to Burkert profile (cored dark matter). The standard hypothesis for most spiral galaxies are known to be embedded in dark matter haloes has now been overshadowed by Modified Newtonian Dynamics, known as MOND, the leading alternative of dark matter. MOND addresses the problem of a new fundamental constant $a_0$, called the acceleration constant, at which acceleration scale of Newton second law fails to hold. In this respect, we investigate this issue by testing the rotation curve within the MOND framework with the observations to obtain the reliable disk mass, $M_D$. We investigate whether ESO138-G014 is compatible with MOND or dark matter is still favorable for the galactic rotation problem.

Norsiah Hashim; Mariafelicia De Laurentis; Zamri Zainal Abidin; Paolo Salucci

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Dark Energy and Equation of State Oscillations with Collisional Matter Fluid in Exponential Modified Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study some aspects of cosmological evolution in a universe described by a viable curvature corrected exponential $F(R)$ gravity model, in the presence of matter fluids consisting of collisional matter and radiation. Particularly, we express the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker equations of motion in terms of parameters that are appropriate for describing the dark energy oscillations and compare the dark energy density and the dark energy equation of state parameter corresponding to collisional and non-collisional matter. In addition to these, and owing to the fact that the cosmological evolution of collisional and non-collisional matter universes, when quantified in terms of the Hubble parameter and the effective equation of states parameters, is very much alike, we further scrutinize the cosmological evolution study by extending the analysis to the study of matter perturbations in the matter domination era. We quantify this analysis in terms of the growth factor of matter perturbations, in which case the result...

Oikonomou, V K; Park, Miok

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Shedding Light on Dark Matter and Dark Energy | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fig. 2: Time evolution of structure formation. A zoom-in to an approximately 70-Mpc-wide region is shown. The frames depict the structure at different redshifts or temporal epochs. Comparison to the overall box size of 9.14 Gpc in linear dimension shows the impressive dynamic range achievable on the BG/Q. Fig. 2: Time evolution of structure formation. A zoom-in to an approximately 70-Mpc-wide region is shown. The frames depict the structure at different redshifts or temporal epochs. Comparison to the overall box size of 9.14 Gpc in linear dimension shows the impressive dynamic range achievable on the BG/Q. Fig. 2: Time evolution of structure formation. A zoom-in to an approximately 70-Mpc-wide region is shown. The frames depict the structure at different redshifts or temporal epochs. Comparison to the overall box size of 9.14 Gpc in linear dimension shows the impressive dynamic range achievable on the BG/Q. Shedding Light on Dark Matter and Dark Energy By Gail Pieper * March 6, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint Cosmology is currently in one of its most scientifically exciting phases.

405

On Einstein - Weyl unified model of dark energy and dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here I give a more detailed account of the part of the conference report that was devoted to reinterpreting the Einstein `unified models of gravity and electromagnetism' (1923) as the unified theory of dark energy (cosmological constant) and dark matter (neutral massive vector particle having only gravitational interactions). After summarizing Einstein's work and related earlier work of Weyl and Eddington, I present an approach to finding spherically symmetric solutions of the simplest variant of the Einstein models that was earlier mentioned in Weyl's work as an example of his generalization of general relativity. The spherically symmetric static solutions and homogeneous cosmological models are considered in some detail. As the theory is not integrable we study approximate solutions. In the static case, we show that there may exist two horizons and derive solutions near horizons. In cosmology, we propose to study the corresponding expansions of possible solutions near the origin and derive these expansions in a simplified model neglecting anisotropy. The structure of the solutions seems to hint at a possibility of an inflation mechanism that does not require adding scalar fields.

A. T. Filippov

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

406

The ArDM - a ton-scale liquid argon experiment for direct Dark Matter Detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ArDM is a ton-scale double phase detector for the direct search of the Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMPs) as Dark Matter candidates. The detector is based on a liquid Argon (LAr) target. The present goal is to assemble, fully characterize the detector on the surface and then operate it at an underground facility. The scintillation light and ionization charge produced by recoiling nuclei in WIMP-Ar collision can be measured independently. The discrimination of the WIMP induced nuclear recoils from the electron/gamma background is done using the pulse discrimination technique and the ratio between the produced light and charge. The experiment and the last results from the detector commissioning are presented.

Otyugova, Polina [Physik-Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

407

Effective Theories of Gamma-ray Lines from Dark Matter Annihilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore theories of dark matter in which dark matter annihilations produce mono-energetic gamma rays ("lines") in the context of effective field theory, which captures the physics for cases in which the particles mediating the interaction are somewhat heavier than the dark matter particle itself. Building on earlier work, we explore the generic signature resulting from SU(2)xU(1) gauge invariance that two (or more) lines are generically expected, and determine the expected relative intensities, including the possibility of interference between operators.

Arvind Rajaraman; Tim M. P. Tait; Alexander M. Wijangco

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

408

At the heart of the matter: the origin of bulgeless dwarf galaxies and Dark Matter cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For almost two decades the properties of "dwarf" galaxies have challenged the Cold Dark Matter (CDM) paradigm of galaxy formation. Most observed dwarf galaxies consists of a rotating stellar disc embedded in a massive DM halo with a near constant-density core. Yet, models based on the CDM scenario invariably form galaxies with dense spheroidal stellar "bulges" and steep central DM profiles, as low angular momentum baryons and DM sink to the center of galaxies through accretion and repeated mergers. Processes that decrease the central density of CDM halos have been identified, but have not yet reconciled theory with observations of present day dwarfs. This failure is potentially catastrophic for the CDM model, possibly requiring a different DM particle candidate. This Letter presents new hydrodynamical simulations in a Lambda$CDM framework where analogues of dwarf galaxies, bulgeless and with a shallow central DM profile, are formed. This is achieved by resolving the inhomogeneous interstellar medium, resulting in strong outflows from supernovae explosions which remove low angular momentum gas. This inhibits the formation of bulges and decreases the dark-matter density to less than half within the central kiloparsec. Realistic dwarf galaxies are thus shown to be a natural outcome of galaxy formation in the CDM scenario.

Fabio Governato; Chris Brook; Lucio Mayer; Alyson Brooks; George Rhee; James Wadsley; Patrik Jonsson; Beth Willman; Greg Stinson; Thomas Quinn; Piero Madau

2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

409

Multiwavelength signals of dark matter annihilations at the Galactic center  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We perform a systematic study of the multiwavelength signal induced by weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) annihilations at the Galactic Center (GC). Referring to a generic WIMP dark matter (DM) scenario and depending on astrophysical inputs, we discuss spectral and angular features and sketch correlations among signals in the different energy bands. None of the components which have been associated to the GC source Sgr A*, nor the diffuse emission components from the GC region, have spectral or angular features typical of a DM source. Still, data sets at all energy bands, namely, the radio, near-infrared, x-ray and gamma-ray bands, contribute to place significant constraints on the WIMP parameter space. In general, the gamma-ray energy range is not the one with the largest signal to background ratio. In the case of large magnetic fields close to the GC, x-ray data give the tightest bounds. The emission in the radio band, which is less model dependent, is very constraining as well. The recent detection by HESS of a GC gamma-ray source, and of a diffuse gamma-ray component, limits the possibility of a DM discovery with the next generation of gamma-ray telescopes, like GLAST and CTA. We find that most of the region in the parameter space accessible to these instruments is actually already excluded at other wavelengths. On the other hand, there may be still an open window to improve constraints with wide-field radio observations.

Marco Regis and Piero Ullio

2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

410

Investigation of possible dark matter direct detection in electron accelerators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate a possibility of neutralino dark matter (DM) direct detection in the future electron accelerators. That is counting of high pT electron recoil events by neutralinos in halo. If selectron and neutralino masses would be precisely measured in future collider experiments, the beam energy could be tuned so that the scatterings are dominated by on-pole selectron exchange. When selectron and neutralino mass difference is smaller than O(10)GeV, the elastic cross section exceeds over micro barn. Discovery of the high pT electron events would be a firm prove of the neutralino DM component in halo. In the experiment, the electron beam energy must be tuned within O(10)MeV and the electron beam with high currents of O(100)A is required for the detectors of the total length of a few hundred meters so that the sufficient event rate is obtained. The dependence of the event rate on the DM velocity distribution in halo is also discussed. This method might be applicable to other DM candidates.

Junji Hisano; Minoru Nagai; Mihoko M. Nojiri; Masato Senami

2006-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

411

Imprint of multicomponent dark matter on AMS-02  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The multicomponent decaying dark matter (DM) scenario is investigated to explain the possible excesses in the positron fraction by PAMELA and recently confirmed by AMS-02, and in the total e++e? flux observed by Fermi-LAT. By performing the ?2 fits, we find that two DM components are already enough to give a reasonable fit of both AMS-02 and Fermi-LAT data. The best-fitted results show that the heavier DM component with its mass of 1.5TeV dominantly decays through the ? channel, while the lighter one of 100GeV decays mainly through the ? channel. As a by-product, the fine structure around 100GeV observed by AMS-02 and Fermi-LAT can be naturally explained by the dropping due to the lighter DM component. With the obtained model parameters by the fitting, we calculate the diffuse ?-ray emission spectrum in this two-component DM scenario, and find that it is consistent with the data measured by Fermi-LAT. We also construct a microscopic particle DM model to naturally realize the two-component DM scenario, and point out an interesting neutrino signal which will possibly be measured in the near future by IceCube.

Chao-Qiang Geng; Da Huang; Lu-Hsing Tsai

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

412

Modeling Angular-Momentum History in Dark-Matter Halos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We model the acquisition of spin by dark-matter halos in semi-analytic merger trees. We explore two different algorithms; one in which halo spin is acquired from the orbital angular momentum of merging satellites, and another in which halo spin is gained via tidal torquing on shells of material while still in the linear regime. We find that both scenarios produce the characteristic spin distribution of halos found in N-body simulations, namely, a log-normal distribution with mean ~0.04 and standard deviation ~0.5 in the log. A perfect match requires fine-tuning of two free parameters. Both algorithms also reproduce the general insensitivity of the spin distribution to halo mass, redshift and cosmology seen in N-body simulations. The spin distribution can be made strictly constant by physically motivated scalings of the free parameters. In addition, both schemes predict that halos which have had recent major mergers have systematically larger spin values. These algorithms can be implemented within semi-analytic models of galaxy formation based on merger trees. They yield detailed predictions of galaxy properties that strongly depend on angular momentum (such as size and surface brightness) as a function of merger history and environment.

Ariyeh H. Maller; Avishai Dekel; Rachel S. Somerville

2001-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

413

Investigation of possible dark matter direct detection in electron accelerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate a possibility of neutralino dark matter (DM) direct detection in the future electron accelerators. That is counting of high p{sub T} electron recoil events by neutralinos in halo. If selectron and neutralino masses would be precisely measured in future collider experiments, the beam energy could be tuned so that the scatterings are dominated by on-pole selectron exchange. When selectron and neutralino mass difference is smaller than O(10) GeV, the elastic cross section exceeds over micro barn. Discovery of the high p{sub T} electron events would be a firm prove of the neutralino DM component in halo. In the experiment, the electron beam energy must be tuned within O(10) MeV and the electron beam with high currents of O(100)A is required for the detectors of the total length of a few hundred meters so that the sufficient event rate is obtained. The dependence of the event rate on the DM velocity distribution in halo is also discussed. This method might be applicable to other DM candidates.

Hisano, Junji; Nagai, Minoru; Senami, Masato [ICRR, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8582 (Japan); Nojiri, Mihoko M. [YITP, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Investigation of Possible Dark Matter Direct Detection in Electron Accelerators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate a possibility of neutralino dark matter (DM) direct detection in the future electron accelerators. That is counting of high p_T electron recoil events by neutralinos in halo. If selectron and neutralino masses would be precisely measured in future collider experiments, the beam energy could be tuned so that the scatterings are dominated by on-pole selectron exchange. When selectron and neutralino mass difference is smaller than O(10) GeV, the elastic cross section exceeds over micro barn. Discovery of the high p_T electron events would be a firm prove of the neutralino DM component in halo. In the experiment, the electron beam energy must be tuned within O(10) MeV and the electron beam with high currents of O(100)A is required for the detectors of the total length of a few hundred meters so that the sufficient event rate is obtained. The dependence of the event rate on the DM velocity distribution in halo is also discussed. This method might be applicable to other DM candidates.

Junji Hisano; Minoru Nagai; Mihoko M. Nojiri; Masato Senami

2005-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

415

The Energy Cascade from Warm Dark Matter Decays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use a set of Monte Carlo simulations to follow the cascade produced by a primary electron of energy E_in in the intergalactic medium. We choose E_in=3-10 keV as expected from the decay of one of the most popular Warm Dark Matter (WDM) candidates, sterile neutrinos. Our simulation takes into account processes previously neglected such as free-free interactions with ions and recombinations and uses the best available cross sections for collisional ionizations and excitations with H and He and for electron-electron collisions. We precisely derive the fraction of the primary electron energy that heats the gas, ionizes atoms and produces line and continuum photons as a function of the ionization fraction. Handy fitting formulae for all the above energy depositions are provided. By keeping track of the individual photons we can distinguish between photons in the Ly-alpha resonance and those with energy E gas. This separation is important because a Ly-alpha background can heat or cool the gas depending on the nature of the photons, and can have effects on the 21 cm radiation emitted by neutral H, which will probably become detectable at z > 6 in the near future by the next generation radio interferometers.

M. Valds; A. Ferrara

2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

416

CONFRONTING COLD DARK MATTER PREDICTIONS WITH OBSERVED GALAXY ROTATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rich statistics of galaxy rotations as captured by the velocity function (VF) provide invaluable constraints on galactic baryon physics and the nature of dark matter (DM). However, the comparison of observed galaxy rotations against cosmological models is prone to subtle caveats that can easily lead to misinterpretations. Our analysis reveals full statistical consistency between {approx}5000 galaxy rotations, observed in line-of-sight projection, and predictions based on the standard cosmological model ({Lambda}CDM) at the mass-resolution of the Millennium simulation (H I line-based circular velocities above {approx}50 km s{sup -1}). Explicitly, the H I linewidths in the H I Parkes All Sky Survey (HIPASS) are found to be consistent with those in S{sup 3}-SAX, a post-processed semi-analytic model for the Millennium simulation. Previously found anomalies in the VF can be plausibly attributed to (1) the mass-limit of the Millennium simulation, (2) confused sources in HIPASS, (3) inaccurate inclination measurements for optically faint sources, and (4) the non-detectability of gas-poor early-type galaxies. These issues can be bypassed by comparing observations and models using linewidth source counts rather than VFs. We investigate if and how well such source counts can constrain the temperature of DM.

Obreschkow, Danail; Meyer, Martin; Power, Chris; Staveley-Smith, Lister [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), M468, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)] [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), M468, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Ma, Xiangcheng [The University of Sciences and Technology of China, Centre for Astrophysics, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)] [The University of Sciences and Technology of China, Centre for Astrophysics, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zwaan, Martin [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching b. Muenchen (Germany)] [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching b. Muenchen (Germany); Drinkwater, Michael J. [School of Mathematics and Physics, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)] [School of Mathematics and Physics, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Induced Nested Galactic Bars Inside Assembling Dark Matter Halos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the formation and evolution of nested bar systems in disk galaxies in a cosmological setting by following the development of an isolated dark matter (DM) and baryon density perturbation. The disks form within the assembling triaxial DM halos and the feedback from the stellar evolution is accounted for in terms of supernovae and OB stellar winds. Focusing on a representative model, we show the formation of an oval disk and of a first generation of nested bars with characteristic sub-kpc and a few kpc sizes. The system evolves through successive dynamical couplings and decouplings, forcing the gas inwards and settles in a state of resonant coupling. The inflow rate can support a broad range of activity within the central kpc, from quasar- to Seyfert-types, supplemented by a vigorous star formation as a by-product. The initial bar formation is triggered in response to the tidal torques from the triaxial DM halo, which acts as a finite perturbation. This first generation of bars does not survive for more than 4--5 Gyr: by that time the secondary bar has totally dissolved, while the primary one has very substantially weakened, reduced to a fat oval. This evolution is largely due to chaos introduced by the interaction of the multiple non-axisymmetric components.

Clayton Heller; Isaac Shlosman; Lia Athanassoula

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

418

High Energy Electron Signals from Dark Matter Annihilation in the Sun  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss two mechanisms by which high energy electrons resulting from dark matter annihilations in or near the Sun can arrive at the Earth. Specifically, electrons can escape the sun if DM annihilates into long-lived states, or if dark matter scatters inelastically, which would leave a halo of dark matter outside of the sun. Such a localized source of electrons may affect the spectra observed by experiments with narrower fields of view oriented towards the sun, such as ATIC, differently from those with larger fields of view such as Fermi. We suggest a simple test of these possibilities with existing Fermi data that is more sensitive than limits from final state radiation. If observed, such a signal will constitute an unequivocal signature of dark matter.

Schuster, Philip; /SLAC; Toro, Natalia; /Stanford U., ITP; Weiner, Neal; Yavin, Itay; /New York U., CCPP

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

419

Neutrino mass, sneutrino dark matter and signals of lepton flavor violation in the MRSSM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the phenomenology of mixed-sneutrino dark matter in the Minimal R-symmetric Supersymmetric Standard Model (MRSSM). Mixed sneutrinos fit naturally within the MRSSM, as the smallness (or absence) of neutri...

Abhishek Kumar; David Tucker-Smith; Neal Weiner

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Implication of neutrino backgrounds on the reach of next generation dark matter direct detection experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As direct dark matter experiments continue to increase in size, they will become sensitive to neutrinos from astrophysical sources. For experiments that do not have directional sensitivity, coherent neutrino scattering ...

Strigari, L.

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421

Designing and testing the neutron source deployment system and calibration plan for a dark matter detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, we designed and tested a calibration and deployment system for the MiniCLEAN dark matter detector. The deployment system uses a computer controlled winch to lower a canister containing a neutron source into ...

Westerdale, Shawn (Shawn S.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Positron and gamma-ray signatures of dark matter annihilation and big-bang nucleosynthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The positron excess observed by the PAMELA experiment may come from dark matter annihilation, if the annihilation cross section is large enough. We show that the dark matter annihilation scenarios to explain the positron excess may also be compatible with the discrepancy of the cosmic lithium abundances between theory and observations. The winolike neutralino in the supersymmetric standard model is a good example for it. This scenario may be confirmed by Fermi satellite experiments.

Hisano, Junji; Kawasaki, Masahiro [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8582 (Japan); Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8568 (Japan); Kohri, Kazunori [Physics Department, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Nakayama, Kazunori [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8582 (Japan)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Cluster number counts dependence on dark energy inhomogeneities and coupling to dark matter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......future galaxy cluster surveys would constrain cosmological...parameters like the amount of dark energy today or the equation...the recently proposed Dark Energy Survey (DES) (Annis et al...clearly not our case. 2 Dark Energy Survey: http://cosmology......

M. Manera; D. F. Mota

2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

424

INTO THE LAIR: GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE SIGNATURES OF DARK MATTER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nature and properties of dark matter (DM) are both outstanding issues in physics. Besides clustering in halos, the universal character of gravity implies that self-gravitating compact DM configurations-predicted by various models-might be spread throughout the universe. Their astrophysical signature can be used to probe fundamental particle physics, or to test alternative descriptions of compact objects in active galactic nuclei. Here, we discuss the most promising dissection tool of such configurations: the inspiral of a compact stellar-size object and consequent gravitational-wave (GW) emission. The inward motion of this ''test probe'' encodes unique information about the nature of the supermassive configuration. When the probe travels through some compact region we show, within a Newtonian approximation, that the quasi-adiabatic inspiral is mainly driven by DM accretion and by dynamical friction, rather than by radiation reaction. When accretion dominates, the frequency and amplitude of the GW signal produced during the latest stages of the inspiral are nearly constant. In the exterior region we study a model in which the inspiral is driven by GW and scalar-wave emission, described at a fully relativistic level. Resonances in the energy flux appear whenever the orbital frequency matches the effective mass of the DM particle, corresponding to the excitation of the central object's quasinormal frequencies. Unexpectedly, these resonances can lead to large dephasing with respect to standard inspiral templates, to such an extent as to prevent detection with matched filtering techniques. We discuss some observational consequences of these effects for GW detection.

Macedo, Caio F. B.; Cardoso, Vitor; Crispino, Luis C. B. [Faculdade de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Para, 66075-110 Belem, Para (Brazil); Pani, Paolo [CENTRA, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa (UTL), Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049 Lisboa (Portugal)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Environmental Dependence of Cold Dark Matter Halo Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use a high-resolution $N$-body simulation to study how the formation of cold dark matter (CDM) halos is affected by their environments, and how such environmental effects produce the age-dependence of halo clustering observed in recent $N$-body simulations. We estimate, for each halo selected at redshift $z=0$, an `initial' mass $M_{\\rm i}$ defined to be the mass enclosed by the largest sphere which contains the initial barycenter of the halo particles and within which the mean linear density is equal to the critical value for spherical collapse at $z=0$. For halos of a given final mass, $M_{\\rm h}$, the ratio $M_{\\rm i}/M_{\\rm h}$ has large scatter, and the scatter is larger for halos of lower final masses. Halos that form earlier on average have larger $M_{\\rm i}/M_{\\rm h}$, and so correspond to higher peaks in the initial density field than their final masses imply. Old halos are more strongly clustered than younger ones of the same mass because their initial masses are larger. The age-dependence of clustering for low-mass halos is entirely due to the difference in the initial/final mass ratio. Low-mass old halos are almost always located in the vicinity of big structures, and their old ages are largely due to the fact that their mass accretions are suppressed by the hot environments produced by the tidal fields of the larger structure. The age-dependence of clustering is weaker for more massive halos because the heating by large-scale tidal fields is less important.

H. Y. Wang; H. J. Mo; Y. P. Jing

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z