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Sample records for darghouth samantha weaver

  1. Samantha Gross

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Samantha Gross is the Director for International Climate and Clean Energy at the Office of International Affairs in the U.S. Department of Energy. She directs U.S. activities under the Clean Energy...

  2. NREL: Energy Analysis - Samantha Bench Reese

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Samantha Bench Reese Photo of Samantha Bench Reese Samantha Bench Reese is a member of the Technology Systems and Sustainability Analysis Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Technologies Analyst and Engineer On staff since April, 2015 Phone number: 303-275-3062 E-mail: Samantha.Reese@nrel.gov Areas of expertise System engineering and fundamentals Manufacturing cost models and cost reduction roadmaps Primary research interests Wide-bandgap Semiconductors Advanced manufacturing Supply

  3. Andrew Weaver

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Andrew Weaver Andrew Weaver WeaverA.jpg Andrew R. Weaver HPC Technician Operations Technology Group arweaver@lbl.gov Phone: (510) 486-6821 Fax: (510) 486-4316 1 Cyclotron Road Mail Stop 943-256 Berkeley, CA 94720 Biographical Sketch Last edited: 2013-04-22 13:00:24

  4. William Weaver

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    William W. Weaver is a Nuclear Facilities and Tritium Risk Specialist in the Office of Chief Nuclear Safety, experienced with operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities and tritium...

  5. Photovoltaic System Pricing Trends: Historical, Recent, and Near-Term Projections (Presentation), Sunshot, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gov/sunshot energy.gov/sunshot Photovoltaic System Pricing Trends Historical, Recent, and Near-Term Projections 2014 Edition David Feldman 1 , Galen Barbose 2 , Robert Margolis 1 , Ted James 1 , Samantha Weaver 2 , Naïm Darghouth 2 , Ran Fu 1 , Carolyn Davidson 1 , Sam Booth 1 , and Ryan Wiser 2 September 22, 2014 1 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 2 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory NREL/PR-6A20-62558 energy.gov/sunshot Contents * Introduction and Summary * Historical and Recent

  6. Kendra Letchworth Weaver > Graduate Student - Arias Group > Researchers,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Postdocs & Graduates > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell Kendra Letchworth Weaver Graduate Student - Arias Group kll67

  7. Memorandum for Tritium Focus Group Members from Bill Weaver | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Memorandum for Tritium Focus Group Members from Bill Weaver Memorandum for Tritium Focus Group Members from Bill Weaver Official Position of the Tritium Focus Group on Hazard Category 2 and 3 Threshold Values for Tritium. PDF icon Memorandum from Bill Weaver More Documents & Publications Draft STD-1027 Supplemental Directive (Alternate Hazard Categorization) Methodology DOE-HDBK-1129-99 DOE-HDBK-1129-2007

  8. M.; Weaver, J.N.; Wiedemann, H. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Stanford

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the 2 MeV microwave gun for the SSRL 150 MeV linac Borland, M.; Weaver, J.N.; Wiedemann, H. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Green, M.C.; Nelson,...

  9. Kendra Letchworth-Weaver | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kelly Yaker About Us Kelly Yaker - National Renewable Energy Laboratory Kelly Yaker is a Web project manager at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), one of the U.S. Department of Energy's 17 national laboratories, where she manages Web content for both the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and NREL's Wind and Water Power Technologies Office. Most Recent Eagles are Making Wind Turbines Safer for Birds March 16

    Ken T. Venuto About Us Ken T. Venuto - Director, Office

  10. Memo from Bill Weaver.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Meeting Minutes and Transcripts | Department of Energy Committee, September 29-30, 2015 - Meeting Minutes and Transcripts Meeting of the Electricity Advisory Committee, September 29-30, 2015 - Meeting Minutes and Transcripts Meeting minutes and transcripts for the September 29-30, 2015 meeting of the Electric Advisory Committee. PDF icon EAC Meeting Minutes September 29, 2015 PDF icon EAC Meeting Minutes September 30, 2015 PDF icon EAC Meeting Transcript September 29, 2015 PDF icon EAC

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems: Sensitivities to Changes ... Bill Savings From Residential Photovoltaic Systems Darghouth, Naim ; Barbose, ...

  12. Letchworth-Weaver awarded 2015 Argonne National Lab Fellowship...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Aneesur Rahman Fellowship in computational physics. Rahman is known as the father of molecular dynamics, a discipline of physics that utilizes computers to simulate...

  13. ADR Lunchtime Program: THE MEMODRAMA OF CONFLICT- FROM PASSIVE VICTIM TO ACTIVE HERO

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Guest Speaker: Dr. Samantha Hardy – Professor, Conflict Coach, and Founder of REAL Conflict Coaching System

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Filter by Author Mills, Andrew (31) Wiser, Ryan (25) Barbose, Galen (18) Bolinger, Mark (8) Porter, Kevin (8) Mills, Andrew D. (7) Darghouth, Naim (6) Buckley, Michael (5) Golove, ...

  15. Thomas A. Weaver, 1985 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    National Security: For his exceptional contributions to national security in the physics, design and leadership of x-ray laser experiments, which include work in atomic physics, ...

  16. Sustaining the natural and economical resources of the Lac Courte Oreilles, Leslie Isham; Jason Weaver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isham, Leslie; Weaver, Jason

    2013-09-30

    The Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, located in northwest Wisconsin has developed a project, entitled Sustaining the Natural and Economic Resources of the LCO Ojibwe. This technical report is a summary of the project.

  17. Letchworth-Weaver awarded 2015 Argonne National Lab Fellowship > EMC2 News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Let's Try That Again: Selling the Teapot Dome Oil Field Let's Try That Again: Selling the Teapot Dome Oil Field January 30, 2015 - 11:28am Addthis A solitary oil pump at the Teapot Dome Oilfield in Wyoming. | Department of Energy photo. A solitary oil pump at the Teapot Dome Oilfield in Wyoming. | Department of Energy photo. Allison Lantero Allison Lantero Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs In 1922, President Warren Harding's Interior Secretary Albert Fall found

  18. 2013 | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Selectivity in Amorphous Porous Molecular Solids Abstract Image Shan Jiang, Kim E. Jelfs, Daniel Holden, Tom Hasell, Samantha Y. Chong, Maciej Haranczyk, Abbie Trewin, and Andrew...

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Gas Selectivity in Amorphous...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamics Simulations of Gas Selectivity in Amorphous Porous Molecular Solids Previous Next List Shan Jiang, Kim E. Jelfs, Daniel Holden, Tom Hasell, Samantha Y. Chong, Maciej...

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Darghouth, Naim" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All Book/Monograph Conference/Event Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report Thesis/Dissertation Subject: Identifier Numbers: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium,

  1. 2012 Solid-State Lighting R&D Workshop Presentations and Materials...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Saving Phosphorescent Luminaires Mike Weaver, Universal Display Corporation Solution-Processed, Small-Molecule OLED Luminaire for Interior Illumination Ian Parker, DuPont ...

  2. Pdc- The Worldwide Leader in Hydrogen Refueling Station Compression

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation by Matther Weaver of Pdc Machines Inc. was given at the was given at the DOE Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Workshop in March 2013.

  3. Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals and Host-Galaxy Properties...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tao, C.; Thomas, R. C.; Weaver, B. A. 79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS distance scale, supernovae: general distance scale, supernovae: general Kim et al. (2013) K13 introduced a...

  4. Calhoun County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alabama Glencoe, Alabama Hobson City, Alabama Jacksonville, Alabama Ohatchee, Alabama Oxford, Alabama Piedmont, Alabama Saks, Alabama Southside, Alabama Weaver, Alabama West...

  5. Projections of Future Climate Change (Book) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Milly, C. ; Mitchell, J. F. ; Nozawa, T. ; Paeth, H. ; Raisanen, J. ; Sausen, R. ; Smith, Steven J. ; Stocker, T. ; Timmermann, A. ; Ulbrich, U. ; Weaver, A. ; Wegner, J. ; ...

  6. CX-008205: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energize Missouri HUG Weaver CX(s) Applied: B5.19 Date: 03/23/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  7. Grain orientation dependence of phase transformation in the shape memory

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    alloy Nickel-Titanium (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Grain orientation dependence of phase transformation in the shape memory alloy Nickel-Titanium This content will become publicly available on May 20, 2017 « Prev Next » Title: Grain orientation dependence of phase transformation in the shape memory alloy Nickel-Titanium Authors: Kimiecik, Michael ; Wayne Jones, J. ; Daly, Samantha Publication Date: 2015-08-01 OSTI Identifier: 1251238 Grant/Contract Number: SC0003996 Type: Publisher's

  8. Grain orientation dependence of phase transformation in the shape memory

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    alloy Nickel-Titanium (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Grain orientation dependence of phase transformation in the shape memory alloy Nickel-Titanium Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on May 20, 2017 Title: Grain orientation dependence of phase transformation in the shape memory alloy Nickel-Titanium Authors: Kimiecik, Michael ; Wayne Jones, J. ; Daly, Samantha Publication Date: 2015-08-01 OSTI Identifier: 1251238 Grant/Contract Number:

  9. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    R Smadja G Tao C Thomas R C Weaver B A ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS distance scale supernovae general distance scale supernovae general Kim et al K13 introduced a new methodology...

  10. Microsoft Word - DIBS Final Paper.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Vision, hype, and reality for delivering computing as the 5th utility FGCS 25, 2009. 5 R. Chaiken, B. Jenkins, P.-A. Larson, B. Ramsey, D. Shakib, S. Weaver, and J. Zhou. ...

  11. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Performance of the MeV microwave gun for the SSRL MeV linac Borland M Weaver J N Wiedemann H Stanford Univ CA USA Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab Green M C Nelson L V Varian...

  12. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Performance of the 2 MeV microwave gun for the SSRL 150 MeV linac","Borland, M.; Weaver, J.N.; Wiedemann, H. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Green,...

  13. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Links Between Mesoscale Dynamics and Cloud Water in High-Resolution March 2000 RAMS Simulations Weaver, C.P.(a), Gordon, N.D.(b), Norris, J.R.(b), and Klein, S.A.(d), Rutgers ...

  14. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) Simulations of March 2000 IOP Frontal Clouds Weaver, C.P.(a), Gordon, N.D.(b), Norris, J.R.(c), and Klein, S.A.(d), Rutgers University ...

  15. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Towards Parameterization of Frontal Mesoscale Circulations and Cloudiness in GCMs Based on ARM Observations Norris, J.R.(a), Weaver, C.P.(b), Gordon, N.D.(c), and Klein, S.A.(d), ...

  16. Asia West LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    West LLC Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Asia West LLC Name: Asia West LLC Address: One East Weaver Street Place: Greenwich, Connecticut Zip: 06831 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT...

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rotenberg, E. (2) Schuler, B (2) Woodruff, D.P. (2) Fernandez, V. (1) Hasselblatt, M. (1) ... J.J. ; Hasselblatt, M. ; Horn, K. ; Fernandez, V. ; Schaff, O. ; Weaver, J.H. ; ...

  18. Structure determination of (*3x*3)R30{sup o} boron phase on the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    No abstract prepared. Authors: Baumgartel, P. ; Paggel, J.J. ; Hasselblatt, M. ; Horn, K. ; Fernandez, V. ; Schaff, O. ; Weaver, J.H. ; Bradshaw, A.M. ; Woodruff, D.P. ; Rotenberg, ...

  19. Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Presentations June 2014...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tuesday, June 17, 2014 Panel - Distributed Energy Storage (DES) - Wanda Reder, S&C, moderator Willem Fadrhonc, STEM Tom Weaver, AEP Melicia Charles, CPUC Tom Bialek, SDG&E Panel - ...

  20. Energy Jobs: Utility Line Worker | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Utility Line Worker Energy Jobs: Utility Line Worker November 19, 2014 - 10:07am Addthis Line workers get hands-on experience with an electrical pole as part of their training. | Photo courtesy of David Weaver. Line workers get hands-on experience with an electrical pole as part of their training. | Photo courtesy of David Weaver. Allison Lantero Allison Lantero Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Check out our Infographic on Understanding the Grid. Send

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search SciTech Connect Search Results Page 1 of 1 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "Daly, Samantha Hayes" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Next » Everything1 Electronic Full Text1 Citations0 Multimedia0 Datasets0 Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject engineering small scale characterization (1) materials science (1) phase transformation (1) scanning electron

  2. Benchmark of numerical tools simulating beam propagation and secondary particles in ITER NBI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sartori, E. Veltri, P.; Serianni, G.; Dlougach, E.; Hemsworth, R.; Singh, M.

    2015-04-08

    Injection of high energy beams of neutral particles is a method for plasma heating in fusion devices. The ITER injector, and its prototype MITICA (Megavolt ITER Injector and Concept Advancement), are large extrapolations from existing devices: therefore numerical modeling is needed to set thermo-mechanical requirements for all beam-facing components. As the power and charge deposition originates from several sources (primary beam, co-accelerated electrons, and secondary production by beam-gas, beam-surface, and electron-surface interaction), the beam propagation along the beam line is simulated by comprehensive 3D models. This paper presents a comparative study between two codes: BTR has been used for several years in the design of the ITER HNB/DNB components; SAMANTHA code was independently developed and includes additional phenomena, such as secondary particles generated by collision of beam particles with the background gas. The code comparison is valuable in the perspective of the upcoming experimental operations, in order to prepare a reliable numerical support to the interpretation of experimental measurements in the beam test facilities. The power density map calculated on the Electrostatic Residual Ion Dump (ERID) is the chosen benchmark, as it depends on the electric and magnetic fields as well as on the evolution of the beam species via interaction with the gas. Finally the paper shows additional results provided by SAMANTHA, like the secondary electrons produced by volume processes accelerated by the ERID fringe-field towards the Cryopumps.

  3. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stochastic Techniques to the ARM Cloud- Radiation Parameterization Problem D. Vernon, J. Secora, M. Foster, J. F. Brodie, and C. Weaver Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey New Brunswick, New Jersey F. Veron University of Delaware Newark, Delaware Introduction Stochastic shortwave radiative transfer through cloud fields has been shown to be a promising approach for modeling cloud-radiation interactions when the cloud field has a horizontal fraction between 0.2 and 0.8. The improvement of

  4. US DOE Refinery Water Study 01-19-16 PublicE_docx

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Potential Vulnerability of US Petroleum Refineries to Increasing Water Temperature and/or Reduced Water Availability Executive Summary of Final Report Prepared for US Department of Energy January 2016 For Jacobs Consultancy Laura E. Weaver Rob Henderson John Blieszner January 2016 Potential Vulnerability of US Petroleum Refineries to Increasing Water Temperature and/or Reduced Water Availability Prepared For US Department of Energy 525 West Monroe Chicago, Illinois 60661 Phone: +312.655.9207

  5. Contacts | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Computing Contacts ASC Program Managers - Headquarters Acting Director, Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional Research and Development, NA-114 Douglas Wade Robert Weaver Erich Rummel Emily Simpson Anita McGhee Adam Boyd - Physics and Engineering Models, Integrated Codes, and Verification and Validation Program Manager Thuc Hoang - Computational Systems and Software Environment Program Manager Alexis Blanc - Facility Operations and User Support Program Manager Lucille

  6. Boise State University | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Boise State University Boise State University Top left: Mike Sansorm, Calvin Brown, Cody McConkey, Luke Weaver. Top right: Cameron Allen, Scott Roskens, Mitchell Petronek, Davis Gumbo. Bottom Left: Jerad Deitrick, Brandon Lee, Nael Naser, Luke Ganschow. Bottom middle: Grant Stephens, Michael Shoaee, Brian Cardwell, Rory O'Leary. Bottom right: Brian Dambi, Stephan Stuats, Adrian Reyes, Haitian Xu, Firaj Almasyabi. Photo from Boise State University. Top left: Mike Sansorm, Calvin Brown, Cody

  7. Structure determination of (*3x*3)R30{sup o} boron phase on the Si(111)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    surface using photoelectron diffraction (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Structure determination of (*3x*3)R30{sup o} boron phase on the Si(111) surface using photoelectron diffraction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure determination of (*3x*3)R30{sup o} boron phase on the Si(111) surface using photoelectron diffraction No abstract prepared. Authors: Baumgartel, P. ; Paggel, J.J. ; Hasselblatt, M. ; Horn, K. ; Fernandez, V. ; Schaff, O. ; Weaver, J.H. ; Bradshaw, A.M. ;

  8. F E

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    F E ," POST RmDIAL ACTION SURVEY PROPERTY OF MODERN LANDFILL, INC. FORMRR LOOW SITE LEWISTON. NEW YORK Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy J.D. Berger Project Staff R.D. C&dra C.P. Riemke P.W. Frame C.F. Weaver W.O. Eelton L.A. Young Prepared by Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower 'Sducation. Research. and Training Division Oak Ridge Associated Uuiverbities Oak Ridge. Tennessee 37830 FINAL REPORT January 1982 This report is b,ased on wbrk performed under contract

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search SciTech Connect Search Results Page 1 of 1 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "Weaver, Samuel P" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Next » Everything3 Electronic Full Text2 Citations1 Multimedia0 Datasets0 Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject concentrating solar power (2) geothermal energy geothermal (1) geothermal power generation (1) heat recovery (1) heat

  10. Prepared

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Prepared for Division of Remedial Action Projects U.S. Department of Energy COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OFF-SITE PROPERTYM NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE LEWISTON, NEW YORK B.P. ROCCO Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division FINAL REPORT May 1983 B.P. Rocco FINAL REPORT Prepared for A.M. pitt T.J. Sowell C.F. Weaver T.S. Yoo Project Staff Prepared by J.D. Berger R.D. Condra R.C. Gosslee J.A. Mattina

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - Tritium Design Practice.ppt

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    LET'S COMPARE TRITIUM DESIGN PRACTICES ACROSS THE DOE COMPLEX X Steve Xiao 2 GENERAL REFERENCES DOE-HDBK-1129-2008, "DOE Handbook Tritium Handling and Safe Storage", 2008 William W Weaver et al, DOE/EH-0417, Technical Notice Issue No 94-01, "Guidelines for Valves in Tritium Service", 1994 F Mannone, Springer, Editor, "Safety in Tritium Handling Technology", Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1993 International Atomic Energy Agency, "Safe Handling of Tritium: Review of

  12. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-38)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-01-14

    BPA proposes to purchase the conservation easements on the Sanders (307 acres) and Seabaugh (449 acres) parcels of the Weaver Slough to ensure that current fisheries and natural resource values remain protected, and that no development or human encroachment would occur on these parcels, in perpetuity. No planned construction or improvements are currently proposed and the project does not involve fee title land acquisition. Protection will sustain quality aquatic habitats, water quality, and fish and wildlife habitat. Wetlands protected by this easement are priority wetlands in the basin, according to the Flathead Lakers Critical Lands Study. A ''Grant of Agricultural Conservation Easement'' has been prepared for both the Sanders parcel (Nov. 21, 2003) and Seabaugh parcel (December 4, 2003) which provide the parameters, rights and responsibilities, prohibitions, contingencies, and other provisions for the granting these properties for the above purpose and intent. In addition, a Memorandum of Agreement (among the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks; Flathead Land Trust; and BPA) has also been established to protect and conserve the Sanders and Seabaugh parcels.

  13. Reactor Testing and Qualification: Prioritized High-level Criticality Testing Needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Bragg-Sitton; J. Bess; J. Werner; G. Harms; S. Bailey

    2011-09-01

    Researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) were tasked with reviewing possible criticality testing needs to support development of the fission surface power system reactor design. Reactor physics testing can provide significant information to aid in development of technologies associated with small, fast spectrum reactors that could be applied for non-terrestrial power systems, leading to eventual system qualification. Several studies have been conducted in recent years to assess the data and analyses required to design and build a space fission power system with high confidence that the system will perform as designed [Marcille, 2004a, 2004b; Weaver, 2007; Parry et al., 2008]. This report will provide a summary of previous critical tests and physics measurements that are potentially applicable to the current reactor design (both those that have been benchmarked and those not yet benchmarked), summarize recent studies of potential nuclear testing needs for space reactor development and their applicability to the current baseline fission surface power (FSP) system design, and provide an overview of a suite of tests (separate effects, sub-critical or critical) that could fill in the information database to improve the accuracy of physics modeling efforts as the FSP design is refined. Some recommendations for tasks that could be completed in the near term are also included. Specific recommendations on critical test configurations will be reserved until after the sensitivity analyses being conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are completed (due August 2011).

  14. FUEL INTERCHANGEABILITY FOR LEAN PREMIXED COMBUSTION IN GAS TURBINE ENGINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Ferguson; Geo. A. Richard; Doug Straub

    2008-06-13

    In response to environmental concerns of NOx emissions, gas turbine manufacturers have developed engines that operate under lean, pre-mixed fuel and air conditions. While this has proven to reduce NOx emissions by lowering peak flame temperatures, it is not without its limitations as engines utilizing this technology are more susceptible to combustion dynamics. Although dependent on a number of mechanisms, changes in fuel composition can alter the dynamic response of a given combustion system. This is of particular interest as increases in demand of domestic natural gas have fueled efforts to utilize alternatives such as coal derived syngas, imported liquefied natural gas and hydrogen or hydrogen augmented fuels. However, prior to changing the fuel supply end-users need to understand how their system will respond. A variety of historical parameters have been utilized to determine fuel interchangeability such as Wobbe and Weaver Indices, however these parameters were never optimized for todays engines operating under lean pre-mixed combustion. This paper provides a discussion of currently available parameters to describe fuel interchangeability. Through the analysis of the dynamic response of a lab-scale Rijke tube combustor operating on various fuel blends, it is shown that commonly used indices are inadequate for describing combustion specific phenomena.

  15. Simulations of Clouds and Sensitivity Study by Weather Research and Forecast Model for Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Case 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, J.; Zhang, M.

    2005-03-18

    One of the large errors in general circulation models (GCMs) cloud simulations is from the mid-latitude, synoptic-scale frontal cloud systems. Now, with the availability of the cloud observations from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) 2000 cloud Intensive Operational Period (IOP) and other observational datasets, the community is able to document the model biases in comparison with the observations and make progress in development of better cloud schemes in models. Xie et al. (2004) documented the errors in midlatitude frontal cloud simulations for ARM Case 4 by single-column models (SCMs) and cloud resolving models (CRMs). According to them, the errors in the model simulated cloud field might be caused by following reasons: (1) lacking of sub-grid scale variability; (2) lacking of organized mesoscale cyclonic advection of hydrometeors behind a moving cyclone which may play important role to generate the clouds there. Mesoscale model, however, can be used to better under stand these controls on the subgrid variability of clouds. Few studies have focused on applying mesoscale models to the forecasting of cloud properties. Weaver et al. (2004) used a mesoscale model RAMS to study the frontal clouds for ARM Case 4 and documented the dynamical controls on the sub-GCM-grid-scale cloud variability.

  16. Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Circulation: Diagnosis of Mechanisms and Biases Using Data Assimilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric T. DeWeaver

    2010-01-19

    This is the final report for DOE grant DE-FG02-07ER64434 to Eric DeWeaver at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The overall goal of work performed under this grant is to enhance understanding of simulations of present-day climate and greenhouse gas-induced climate change. Enhanced understanding is desirable 1) as a prerequisite for improving simulations; 2) for assessing the credibility of model simulations and their usefulness as tools for decision support; and 3) as a means to identify robust behaviors which commonly occur over a wide range of models, and may yield insights regarding the dominant physical mechanisms which determine mean climate and produce climate change. A furthe objective is to investigate the use of data assimilation as a means for examining and correcting model biases. Our primary focus is on the Arctic, but the scope of the work was expanded to include the global climate system to the extent that research targets of opportunity present themselves. Research performed under the grant falls into five main research areas: 1) a study of data assimilation using an ensemble filter with the atmospheric circulation model of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, in which both conventional observations and observations of the refraction of radio waves from GPS satellites were used to constrain the atmospheric state of the model; 2) research on the likely future status of polar bears, in which climate model simluations were used to assess the effectiveness of climate change mitigation efforts in preserving the habitat of polar bears, now considered a threatened species under global warming; 3) as assessment of the credibility of Arctic sea ice thickness simulations from climate models; 4) An examination of the persistence and reemergence of Northern Hemisphere sea ice area anomalies in climate model simulations and in observations; 5) An examination of the roles played by changes in net radiation and surface relative humidity in determine the response of the hydrological cycle to global warming.

  17. Information and meaning revisiting Shannon's theory of communication and extending it to address todays technical problems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Travis LaDell

    2009-12-01

    This paper has three goals. The first is to review Shannon's theory of information and the subsequent advances leading to today's statistics-based text analysis algorithms, showing that the semantics of the text is neglected. The second goal is to propose an extension of Shannon's original model that can take into account semantics, where the 'semantics' of a message is understood in terms of the intended or actual changes on the recipient of a message. The third goal is to propose several lines of research that naturally fall out of the proposed model. Each computational approach to solving some problem rests on an underlying model or set of models that describe how key phenomena in the real world are represented and how they are manipulated. These models are both liberating and constraining. They are liberating in that they suggest a path of development for new tools and algorithms. They are constraining in that they intentionally ignore other potential paths of development. Modern statistical-based text analysis algorithms have a specific intellectual history and set of underlying models rooted in Shannon's theory of communication. For Shannon, language is treated as a stochastic generator of symbol sequences. Shannon himself, subsequently Weaver, and at least one of his predecessors are all explicit in their decision to exclude semantics from their models. This rejection of semantics as 'irrelevant to the engineering problem' is elegant and combined with developments particularly by Salton and subsequently by Latent Semantic Analysis, has led to a whole collection of powerful algorithms and an industry for data mining technologies. However, the kinds of problems currently facing us go beyond what can be accounted for by this stochastic model. Today's problems increasingly focus on the semantics of specific pieces of information. And although progress is being made with the old models, it seems natural to develop or extend information theory to account for semantics. By developing such theory, we can improve the quality of the next generation analytical tools. Far from being a mere intellectual curiosity, a new theory can provide the means for us to take into account information that has been to date ignored by the algorithms and technologies we develop. This paper will begin with an examination of Shannon's theory of communication, discussing the contributions and the limitations of the theory and how that theory gets expanded into today's statistical text analysis algorithms. Next, we will expand Shannon's model. We'll suggest a transactional definition of semantics that focuses on the intended and actual change that messages are intended to have on the recipient. Finally, we will examine implications of the model for algorithm development.

  18. Discovering the desirable alleles contributing to the lignocellulosic biomass traits in saccharum germplasm collections for energy cane improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, James; Comstock, Jack C.

    2015-11-25

    Phenotyping Methods: The accessions (which includes 21 taxa and 1,177 accessions) in the World Collection of Sugarcane and Related Grasses (WCSRG) was evaluated for the following traits: arenchyma, internode length and diameter, pubescence, pith, Brix, stalk number and fiber. A core of 300 accessions that included each species in the World Collection was selected by using the Maximization Strategy in MStrat software. Results: The core had a higher diversity rating than random selections of 300 accessions. The Shannon–Weaver Diversity Index scores of the core and whole collection were similar indicating that the majority of the diversity was captured by the core collection. The ranges and medians between the core and WCSRG were similar; only two of the trait medians were not significant at P = 0.05 using the non-parametric Wilcoxon method and the coincidence rate (CR % = 96.2) was high (>80) indicating that extreme values were retained. Thus, the phenotypic diversity of these traits in the WCSRG was well represented by the core collection. Associations Methods: Genotypic and phenotypic data were collected for 1002 accessions of the WCSRG including 209 SSR markers. Association analysis was performed using both General Linear (GLM) and Maximum Likelihood (MLM) models. Different core collections with 300 accessions each were selected based on genotypic, phenotypic and combined data based on the Maximization Strategy in MStrat software. Results: A major portion of the genotyping involving SNPs is being conducted by Dr. Jianping Wang of the University of Florida under the DOE award DE-FG 02-11ER 65214 and the genotypic and phenotypic associations will be reported separately next year. In the current, study forty one and seventeen markers were found to be associated with traits using the GLM and MLM methods respectively including associations with arenchyma, internode length and diameter, pubescence, pith, and Sugar Cane Yellow Leaf Virus. The data indicates that each of the cores and the World Collection are similar to each other genotypically and phenotypically, but the core that was selected using only genotypic data was significantly different phenotypically. This indicates that there is not enough association between the genotypic and phenotypic diversity as to select using only genotypic diversity and get the full phenotypic diversity. Core Collection: Creation and Phenotyping Methods: To evaluate this germplasm for breeding purposes, a representative diversity panel selected from the WCSRG of approximately 300 accessions was planted at Canal Point, FL in three replications. These accessions were measured for stalk height and stalk number multiple times throughout the growing season and Brix and fresh biomass during harvest in 2013 and, stalk height, stalk number, stalk diameter, internode length, Brix and fresh and dry biomass was determined in the ratoon crop harvest in 2014. Results: In correlations of multiple measurements, there were higher correlations for early measurements of stalk number and stalk height with harvest traits like Brix and fresh weight. Hybrids had higher fresh mass and Brix while Saccharum spontaneum had higher stalk number and dry mass. The heritability of hybrid mass traits was lower in the ratoon crop. According to the principal component analysis, the diversity panel was divided into two groups. One group had accessions with high stalk number and high dry biomass like S. spontaneum and the other groups contained accessions with higher Brix and fresh biomass like S. officinarum. Mass traits correlated with each other as expected but hybrids had lower correlations between fresh and dry mass. Stalk number and the mass traits correlated with each other except in S. spontaneum and hybrids in the first ratoon. There were 110 accessions not significantly different in Brix from the commercial sugarcane checks including 10 S. spontaneum accessions. There were 27 dry and 6 fresh mass accessions significantly higher than the commercial sugarcane checks. Core Collection: Fiber analysis Methods: A biomass sample was taken from each accession then shredded and dried. Fiber analysis was then performed on each sample. The acetyl groups, acid insoluble lignin, acid soluble lignin, arabinan, glucan, holocellulose, total lignin, structural ash, and xylan were quantified on a % fiber basis and nonstructural ash on a % total basis. Results: There were significant, but not large differences between species for holocellulose, lignin, acetyl, acid soluble lignin, nonstructural ash, and glucan. For each trait, S. spontaneum had significantly more holocellulose, glucan, lignin, and nonstructural ash and less acetyl and acid soluble lignin than the other species. In all populations, glucan and was positively correlated with holocellulose were positively correlated and glucan and and holocellulose were negatively correlated with lignin. In hybrids, internode length correlated positively with holocellulose and nonstructural ash and negatively with lignin. The heritability estimates for each of the fiber component traits is low indicating that environment is an important factor in fiber composition. Principal component analysis indicated that a large amount of diversity exists within each of the species.

  19. GRASSLAND BIRD DISTRIBUTION AND RAPTOR FLIGHT PATTERNS IN THE COMPETITIVE RENEWABLE ENERGY ZONES OF THE TEXAS PANHANDLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansen, Erik

    2013-08-10

    The consistent wind resource in the Great Plains of North America has encouraged the development of wind energy facilities across this region. In the Texas Panhandle, a high quality wind resource is only one factor that has led to the expansion of wind energy development. Other factors include federal tax incentives and the availability of subsidies. Moreover, the State Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS), mandating production of 10,000 mega-watts of renewable energy in the state by 2025, has contributed to an amicable regulatory and permitting environment (State Energy Conservation Office 2010). Considering the current rate of development, the RPS will be met in coming years (American Wind Energy Association 2011) and the rate of development is likely to continue. To meet increased energy demands in the face of a chronically constrained transmission grid, Texas has developed a comprehensive plan that organizes and prioritizes new transmission systems in high quality wind resource areas called Competitive Renewable Energy Zones (CREZ). The CREZ plan provides developers a solution to transmission constraints and unlocks large areas of undeveloped wind resource areas. In the northern Texas panhandle, there are two CREZs that are classified Class 3 wind (Class 5 is the highest) and range from 862,725 to 1,772,328 ha in size (Public Utility Commission of Texas 2008). Grassland bird populations have declined more than any other bird group in North America (Peterjohn and Sauer 1999, Sauer et al. 2004). Loss of grassland habitat from agricultural development has been the greatest contributor to the decline of grassland bird populations, but development of non-renewable (i.e., oil, coal, and gas) and renewable energy (i.e., wind, solar, biomass, and geothermal) sources have contributed to the decline as well (Pimentel et al. 2002, Maybe and Paul 2007). The effects of wind energy development on declining grassland bird populations has become an area of extensive research, as we attempt to understand and minimize potential impacts of a growing energy sector on declining bird populations. Based on data from post-construction fatality surveys, two grassland bird groups have been the specific focus of research, passerines (songbird guild) and raptors (birds of prey). The effects of wind energy development on these two groups of birds, both of conservation concern, have been examined over the last decade. The primary focus of this research has been on mortality resulting from collision with wind turbines (Kuvlesky et al. 2007). Most studies just quantify post-construction fatality levels (e.g., Erickson et al. 2002) while very few studies provide a comparison of bird populations prior to development through a Before-After-Control-Impact (BACI) study design. Before-After-Control-Impact studies provide powerful evidence of avian/wind energy relationships (Anderson et al. 1999). Despite repeated urgency on conducting these types of studies (Anderson et al. 1999, Madders and Whitfield 2006, Kuvelsky et al. 2007), few have been conducted in North America. Although several European researchers (Larsson 1994, de Lucas et al. 2007) have used BACI designs to examine whether wind facilities modified raptor behavior, there is a scarcity of BACI data relating to North America grassland ecosystems that examine avian-wind energy relationships. There are less than a handful of studies in the entire United States, let alone the southern short grass prairie ecosystem, that incorporate preconstruction data to form the baseline for post-construction impact estimates (Johnson et al. 2000, Erickson et al. 2002). Although declines in grassland bird populations are well-documented (Peterjohn and Sauer 1999, Sauer et al. 2004), the causal mechanisms affecting the decline of grassland birds with increasing wind energy development in the southern short grass prairie are not well-understood (Kuvlesky et al. 2007, Maybe and Paul 2007). Several factors may potentially affect the bird population when wind turbines are constructed in areas with high bird densities (de Lucas et al. 2007). Habitat fragmentation, noise from turbines, physical movement of turbine blades, and increased vehicle traffic have been suggested as causes of decreased density of nesting grassland birds in Minnesota (Leddy et al. 1999), Oklahoma (O’Connell and Piorkowski 2006), and South Dakota (Shaffer and Johnson 2008). Similarly, constructing turbines in areas where bird flight patterns place them at similar heights of turbine blades increases the potential for bird collisions (Johnson et al. 2000, Hoover 2002). Raptor fatalities have been associated with topographic features such as ridges, saddles and rims where birds use updrafts from prevailing winds (Erickson et al. 2000, Johnson et al. 2000, Barrios and Rodriquez 2004, Hoover and Morrison 2005). Thus, wind energy development can result in indirect (e.g., habitat avoidance, decreased nest success) and direct (e.g., collision fatalities) impacts to bird populations (Anderson et al. 1999). Directly quantifying the level of potential impacts (e.g., estimated fatalities/mega-watthour) from wind energy development is beyond the scope of this study. Instead, I aim to quantify density, occupancy and flight behavior for the two bird groups mentioned earlier: obligate grassland songbirds and raptors, respectively, predict where impacts may occur, and provide management recommendations to minimize potential impacts. The United States Department of Energy (DOE), through the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Allocation, contracted Texas Tech University to investigate grassland bird patterns of occurrence in the anticipated CREZ in support of DOE’s 20% Wind Energy by 2030 initiative. In cooperation with Iberdrola Renewables, Inc., studies initiated by Wulff (2010) at Texas Tech University were continued at an area proposed for wind energy development and a separate reference site unassociated with wind energy development. I focused on four primary objectives and this thesis is accordingly organized in four separate chapters that address grassland bird density, grassland bird occupancy, raptor flight patterns, and finally I summarize species diversity and composition. The following chapters use formatting from the Journal of Wildlife Management guidelines (Block et al. 2011) with modifications as required by the Texas Tech University Graduate School. 1) I estimate pre-construction bird density patterns using methods that adjust for imperfect detection. I used a distance sampling protocol that effectively accounts for incomplete detection in the field where birds are present but not detected (Buckland et al. 2001). I improved density estimates with hierarchical distance sampling models, a modeling technique that effectively incorporates the detection process with environmental covariates that further influence bird density (Royle et al. 2004, Royle and Dorazio 2008). Covariates included road density and current oil and gas infrastructure to determine the relationship between existing energy development and bird density patterns. Further, I used remote sensing techniques and vegetation field data to investigate how landcover characteristics influenced bird density patterns. I focused species-specific analyses on obligate grassland birds with >70 detections per season namely grasshopper sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum) and horned lark (Eremophila alpestris). Chapter II focuses on hierarchical models that model and describe relationships between grassland bird density and anthropogenic and landscape features. 2) A large number of bird detections (>70) are needed to estimate density using distance sampling and collection of such quantity are often not feasible, particularly for cryptic species or species that naturally occur at low densities (Buckland et al. 2001). Occupancy models operate with far fewer data and are often used as a surrogate for bird abundance when there are fewer detections (MacKenzie and Nichols 2004). I used occupancy models that allow for the possibility of imperfect detection and species abundance to improve estimates of occurrence probability (Royal 2004). I focused species-specific analyses on grassland birds with few detections: Cassin’s sparrow (Peucaea cassinii), eastern meadowlark (Sturnella magna), and upland sandpiper (Bartramia longicauda). Chapter III uses a multi-season dynamic site occupancy model that incorporates bird abundance to better estimate occurrence probability. 3) When I considered the topographic relief of the study sites, the proposed design of the wind facility and its location within the central U.S. migratory corridor, I expanded the study to investigate raptor abundance and flight behavior (Hoover 2002, Miller 2008). I developed a new survey technique that improved the accuracy of raptor flight height estimates and compared seasonal counts and flight heights at the plateau rim and areas further inland. I used counts and flight behaviors to calculate species-specific collision risk indices for raptors based on topographic features. I focused species-specific analyses on raptors with the highest counts: American kestrel (Falco sparverius), northern harrier (Circus cyaneus), red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), Swainson’s hawk (Buteo swainsoni), and turkey vulture (Cathartes aura). Chapter IV describes patterns of seasonal raptor abundance and flight behavior and how topography modulates collision risk with proposed wind energy turbines. 4) Finally, for completeness, in Chapter V I summarize morning point count data for all species and provide estimates of relative composition and species diversity with the Shannon-Wiener Diversity Index (Shannon and Weaver 1949).